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Sample records for 3-fold symmetry axis

  1. Kerr geodesics following the axis of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariel, J.; Santos, N. O.; Wang, Anzhong

    2016-05-01

    We present here the general expressions for the acceleration of massive test particles along the symmetry axis of the Kerr metric, and then study the main properties of this acceleration in different regions of the spacetime. In particular, we show that there exists a region near the black hole in which the gravitational field is repulsive. We provide possible physical interpretations about the role of this effect in terms of the different conserved parameters. The studies of these geodesics are important not only to understand better the structure of the Kerr spacetime but also to its use as a possible mechanism for the production of extragalactic jets. Our results are obtained with the help of expressing the geodesics of the Kerr spacetime in terms of the Weyl coordinates.

  2. Central configurations of four bodies with an axis of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Érdi, Bálint; Czirják, Zalán

    2016-05-01

    A complete solution is given for a symmetric case of the problem of the planar central configurations of four bodies, when two bodies are on an axis of symmetry, and the other two bodies have equal masses and are situated symmetrically with respect to the axis of symmetry. The positions of the bodies on the axis of symmetry are described by angle coordinates with respect to the outside bodies. The solution is such, that giving the angle coordinates, the masses for which the given configuration is a central configuration, can be computed from simple analytical expressions of the angles. The central configurations can be described as one-parameter families, and these are discussed in detail in one convex and two concave cases. The derived formulae represent exact analytical solutions of the four-body problem.

  3. Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, H. G.

    2000-04-01

    An exploratory computational study of the reflection of an inward-facing conical shock wave from its axis of symmetry is presented. This is related to more complex practical situations in both steady and unsteady flows. The absence of a length scale in the problem studied makes features grow linearly with time. The ensuing flow is related to the Guderley singularity in a cylindrical imploding shock. The problem is explored by making a large number of computations of the Euler equations. Distinct reflection configurations are identified, and the regions of parameter space in which they occur are delineated.

  4. A new robust gradient-based method for detection of symmetry axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Wan, Qinqi; Hu, Yongli

    2015-12-01

    Symmetry axis extraction is an important part of the image feature detection. So far, various classical symmetry axes extraction algorithms have been proposed, such as the minimum-inertia-axis-based method, the SIFT-based method. If the input image is blurry, or it's difficult to extract feature points or corner points from input images, however, the above algorithms are difficult to obtain satisfied results. This paper presents a gradient-based method that can robustly extract symmetry axis from visual pattern. The key points of our methods are gradient calculation, symmetric weight calculation, and Hough Transform. Our method was evaluated on several datasets, including both blurred and smooth-edged cases. Experimental results demonstrated that our method achieves a more robust performance than previous methods.

  5. Estimation of the anisotropy parameters of transversely isotropic shales with a tilted symmetry axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadri, Dariush; Sarout, Joël.; Bóna, Andrej; Dewhurst, David

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports a new approach for the estimation of Thomsen anisotropy parameters and symmetry axis orientation from ultrasonic P-wave traveltime measurements on transversely isotropic shale samples of arbitrary geometry. This approach can be used for core samples cut in any direction with respect to the bedding plane, because no a priori assumption regarding the symmetry axis orientation is made. This orientation is rather part of the solution of the inverse problem together with the anisotropy parameters themselves. Very fast simulated reannealing is used to search for the best possible estimate of the model parameters. The methodology is applied to spherical and cylindrical anisotropic shale samples.

  6. Axis extraction method of symmetry object under unilateral illumination condition in optical measurement images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shao-wen; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Guo, Peng-yu; Wang, Kun-peng

    2013-08-01

    Measuring the three-dimension (3D) orientation parameters of the axis symmetry objects, such as missile and rocket, plays an important role of optimization design and malfunction analysis of the targets in shooting range experimentations. If the target is clear-cut, there are already many ways to extract the axis precisely, and get the three-dimension orientation parameters by triangulation method. But in practical experimentations, we sometimes face the problem that the target is illuminated by intense sunlight, which with the background of sky will cause the imprecision of axis extraction and the increasing of measurement error. To solve the problem, this paper presents an accurate method to extract the target's axis. The method build a point set, and try to put all the target's points into it by using the priori-knowledge, such as the symmetry target's characteristic under unilateral illumination condition, then calculate the regional minimum inertia axis of the set's points and get the target's axis. Experimental results show that this method is efficient and robust to noise, which can meet the requirement of unilaterally illuminated target 3D pose interpretation in shooting range.

  7. Co-Spin With Symmetry Axis Stabilization, and De-Spin for Asteroid Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Haijun; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Consideration is given to attitude control associated with capturing a free-flying asteroid using an axisymmetric spacecraft. Asymptotically stable controllers are designed to align the spacecraft axis of symmetry with a line of descent that is fixed in the asteroid, and to eliminate all relative angular velocity before capture takes place. An analytical expression is presented for the torque required to maintain alignment of the axes of symmetry of the spacecraft and an axisymmetric asteroid. After the asteroid is securely captured, the angular velocity of the rigid composite body relative to an inertial frame is arrested; we present a controller that is asymptotically stable and stays within specified thrust limits.

  8. Neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in the vicinity of the magnetic axis in tokamaks with broken symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Lee, H.; Seol, J.; Aydemir, A. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in the low collisionality regime is extended to the vicinity of the magnetic axis in tokamaks with broken symmetry. The toroidal viscosity is induced by particles drifting off the perturbed magnetic surface under the influence of the symmetry breaking magnetic field. In the region away from the magnetic axis, the drift orbit dynamics is governed by the bounce averaged drift kinetic equation in the low collisionality regimes. In the vicinity of the magnetic axis, it is the drift kinetic equation, averaged over the trapped particle orbits, i.e., potato orbits, that governs the drift dynamics. The orbit averaged drift kinetic equation is derived when collision frequency is low enough for trapped particles to complete their potato trajectories. The resultant equation is solved in the 1 /ν regime to obtain transport fluxes and, thus, toroidal plasma viscosity through flux-force relation. Here, ν is the collision frequency. The viscosity does not vanish on the magnetic axis, and has the same scalings as that in the region away from magnetic axis, except that the fraction of bananas is replaced by the fraction of potatoes. It also has a weak radial dependence. Modeling of plasma flow velocity V for the case where the magnetic surfaces are broken is also discussed.

  9. Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry: shock dynamics and relation to the Guderley singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, H. G.; Schwendeman, D. W.

    2001-07-01

    Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry is studied using Whitham's theory of geometrical shock dynamics, and the results are compared with previous numerical simulations of the phenomenon by Hornung (2000). The shock shapes (for strong and weak shocks), and the location of the shock-shock (for strong shocks), are in good agreement with the numerical results, though the detail of the shock reflection structure is, of course, not resolved by shock dynamics. A guess at a mathematical form of the shock shape based on an analogy with the Guderley singularity in cylindrical shock implosion, in the form of a generalized hyperbola, fits the shock shape very well. The smooth variation of the exponent in this equation with initial shock angle from the Guderley value at zero to 0.5 at 90° supports the analogy. Finally, steady-flow shock reflection from a symmetry axis is related to the self-similar flow.

  10. Human Rhinovirus Subviral A Particle Binds to Lipid Membranes over a Twofold Axis of Icosahedral Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Minor group human rhinoviruses bind low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors for endocytosis. Once they are inside endosomes, the acidic pH triggers their dissociation from the receptors and conversion into hydrophobic subviral A particles; these attach to the membrane and transfer their single-strand, positive-sense RNA genome into the cytosol. Here, we allowed human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) A particles, produced in vitro by incubation at pH 5.4, to attach to liposomes; cryo-electron microscopy 3-dimensional single-particle image reconstruction revealed that they bind to the membrane around a 2-fold icosahedral symmetry axis. PMID:23946453

  11. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1991-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  12. Relation between perception of vertical axis rotation and vestibulo-ocular reflex symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1992-01-01

    Subjects seated in a vertical axis rotation chair controlled their rotational velocity by adjusting a potentiometer. Their goal was to null out pseudorandom rotational perturbations in order to remain perceptually stationary. Most subjects showed a slow linear drift of velocity (a constant acceleration) to one side when they were deprived of an earth-fixed visual reference. The amplitude and direction of this drift can be considered a measure of a static bias in the subject's perception of rotation. The presence of a perceptual bias is consistent with a small, constant imbalance of vestibular function which could be of either central or peripheral origin. Deviations from perfect vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) symmetry are also assumed to be related to imbalances in either peripheral or central vestibular function. Researchers looked for correlations between perceptual bias and various measures of vestibular reflex symmetry that might suggest a common source for both reflective and perceptual imbalances. No correlations were found. Measurement errors could not account for these results since repeated tests on the same subjects of both perceptual bias and VOR symmetry were well correlated.

  13. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions-a route to multi-axis mixing.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Solis, Kyle J

    2016-01-28

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry-breaking rational fields-consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type-rational triads-consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude of the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. These orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes. PMID:26549438

  14. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude of the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.

  15. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude ofmore » the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.« less

  16. Broken particle-hole symmetry at atomically flat a-axis YBa2Cu3O7-delta interfaces.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Bruce A; Ramazashvili, Revaz; Kos, Simon; Eckstein, James N

    2004-09-01

    We have studied quasiparticle tunneling into atomically flat a-axis films of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) and DyBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) through epitaxial CaTiO3 barriers. The junction heterostructures were grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy and were carefully optimized using in situ monitoring techniques, resulting in unprecedented crystalline perfection of the superconductor-insulator interface. Below T(c), the tunneling conductance shows the evolution of a large unexpected asymmetrical feature near zero-bias. This is evidence that superconducting YBCO crystals, atomically truncated along the lobe direction with a titanate layer, have intrinsically broken particle-hole symmetry over macroscopically large areas. PMID:15447441

  17. Early time implosion symmetry from two-axis shock-timing measurements on indirect drive NIF experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D. Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Munro, D. H.; Barker, D. A.; Baker, K. L.; Döppner, T.; Hash, N. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; LaFortune, K.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Widmayer, C.; Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E.; Boehly, T.

    2014-09-15

    An innovative technique has been developed and used to measure the shock propagation speed along two orthogonal axes in an inertial confinement fusion indirect drive implosion target. This development builds on an existing target and diagnostic platform for measuring the shock propagation along a single axis. A 0.4 mm square aluminum mirror is installed in the ablator capsule which adds a second orthogonal view of the x-ray-driven shock speeds. The new technique adds capability for symmetry control along two directions of the shocks launched in the ablator by the laser-generated hohlraum x-ray flux. Laser power adjustments in four different azimuthal cones based on the results of this measurement can reduce time-dependent symmetry swings during the implosion. Analysis of a large data set provides experimental sensitivities of the shock parameters to the overall laser delivery and in some cases shows the effects of laser asymmetries on the pole and equator shock measurements.

  18. Breaking axi-symmetry in stenotic flow lowers the critical transition Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsson, J.; Tammisola, O.; Juniper, M. P.

    2015-10-01

    Flow through a sinuous stenosis with varying degrees of non-axisymmetric shape variations and at Reynolds number ranging from 250 to 750 is investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and global linear stability analysis. At low Reynolds numbers (Re < 390), the flow is always steady and symmetric for an axisymmetric geometry. Two steady state solutions are obtained when the Reynolds number is increased: a symmetric steady state and an eccentric, non-axisymmetric steady state. Either one can be obtained in the DNS depending on the initial condition. A linear global stability analysis around the symmetric and non-axisymmetric steady state reveals that both flows are linearly stable for the same Reynolds number, showing that the first bifurcation from symmetry to antisymmetry is subcritical. When the Reynolds number is increased further, the symmetric state becomes linearly unstable to an eigenmode, which drives the flow towards the non-axisymmetric state. The symmetric state remains steady up to Re = 713, while the non-axisymmetric state displays regimes of periodic oscillations for Re ≥ 417 and intermittency for Re ≳ 525. Further, an offset of the stenosis throat is introduced through the eccentricity parameter E. When eccentricity is increased from zero to only 0.3% of the pipe diameter, the bifurcation Reynolds number decreases by more than 50%, showing that it is highly sensitive to non-axisymmetric shape variations. Based on the resulting bifurcation map and its dependency on E, we resolve the discrepancies between previous experimental and computational studies. We also present excellent agreement between our numerical results and previous experimental results.

  19. Proof of the gamma conjecture for Fano 3-folds of Picard rank 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golyshev, V. V.; Zagier, D.

    2016-02-01

    We verify the (first) gamma conjecture, which relates the gamma class of a Fano variety to the asymptotics at infinity of the Frobenius solutions of its associated quantum differential equation, for all 17 of the deformation classes of Fano 3-folds of rank 1. This involves computing the corresponding limits (`Frobenius limits') for the Picard-Fuchs differential equations of Apéry type associated by mirror symmetry with the Fano families, and is achieved using two methods, one combinatorial and the other using the modular properties of the differential equations. The gamma conjecture for Fano 3-folds always contains a rational multiple of the number \\zeta(3). We present numerical evidence suggesting that higher Frobenius limits of Apéry-like differential equations may be related to multiple zeta values.

  20. Dynamical Diffraction and X-Ray Standing Waves from Atomic Planes Normal to a Twofold Symmetry Axis of the Quasicrystal AlPdMn

    SciTech Connect

    Jach, T.; Zhang, Y.; Colella, R.; de Boissieu, M.; Boudard, M.; Goldman, A.I.; Lograsso, T.A.; Delaney, D.W.; Kycia, S.

    1999-04-01

    We have observed dynamical diffraction in the 0240{ovr 2}4 and 0460{ovr 4}6 reflections of the icosahedral quasicrystal AlPdMn in the back-reflection geometry ({theta}{sub B}=90{degree} ). The x-ray fluorescence from the Al and Pd atoms exhibits strong standing wave behavior, similar to that observed in crystalline materials. The data indicate a long-range order of each species of atoms, with the coherent positions attributable to distributions of the Al and Pd, which we compare to a centrosymmetric model. We observe deviations from the model which imply small departures from inversion symmetry along the twofold symmetry axis and from the expected coherent fractions for Al. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Alteration of intersubunit acid–base pair interactions at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry of Cucumber mosaic virus disrupts aphid vector transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Bricault, Christine A.; Perry, Keith L.

    2013-06-05

    In the atomic model of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), six amino acid residues form stabilizing salt bridges between subunits of the asymmetric unit at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry. To evaluate the effects of these positions on virion stability and aphid vector transmissibility, six charged amino acid residues were individually mutated to alanine. All of the six engineered viruses were viable and exhibited near wild type levels of virion stability in the presence of urea. Aphid vector transmissibility was nearly or completely eliminated in the case of four of the mutants; two mutants demonstrated intermediate aphid transmissibility. For the majority of the engineered mutants, second-site mutations were observed following aphid transmission and/or mechanical passaging, and one restored transmission rates to that of the wild type. CMV capsids tolerate disruption of acid–base pairing interactions at the quasi-threefold axis of symmetry, but these interactions are essential for maintaining aphid vector transmissibility. - Highlights: ► Amino acids between structural subunits of Cucumber mosaic virus affect vector transmission. ► Mutant structural stability was retained, while aphid vector transmissibility was disrupted. ► Spontaneous, second-site mutations restored aphid vector transmissibility.

  2. Open Gromov-Witten Invariants of Toric Calabi-Yau 3-Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bohan; Liu, Chiu-Chu Melissa

    2013-10-01

    We present a proof of the mirror conjecture of Aganagic and Vafa (Mirror Symmetry, D-Branes and Counting Holomorphic Discs. http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0012041v1, 2000) and Aganagic et al. (Z Naturforsch A 57(1-2):128, 2002) on disk enumeration in toric Calabi-Yau 3-folds for all smooth semi-projective toric Calabi-Yau 3-folds. We consider both inner and outer branes, at arbitrary framing. In particular, we recover previous results on the conjecture for (i) an inner brane at zero framing in (Graber-Zaslow, Contemp Math 310:107-121, 2002), (ii) an outer brane at arbitrary framing in the resolved conifold (Zhou, Open string invariants and mirror curve of the resolved conifold. http://arxiv.org/abs/1001.0447v1 [math.AG], 2010), and (iii) an outer brane at zero framing in (Brini, Open topological strings and integrable hierarchies: Remodeling the A-model. http://arxiv.org/abs/1102.0281 [hep-th], 2011).

  3. Development of the β-BaB2O4 crystal growth technique in the heat field of three-fold axis symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, A. E.; Bekker, T. B.; Vlezko, V. A.; Kokh, K. A.

    2011-03-01

    In our earlier works we have shown the efficiency of β-BaB2O4 crystal growth in the heat field of three-fold axis symmetry. In order to involve the whole body of the high temperature solution in the convective motion it is very important to achieve vertical temperature distribution with the ‘hot points' at the lower part of the growth crucible. At the same time to prevent crystal overgrowth and contact with the crucible wall, the temperature of the latter at the high temperature solution surface must be higher than the crystallization temperature. In order to accomplish such temperature distribution two-zone heating furnace with three heating sectors in each zone has been developed. Load commutator executes power distribution on heating sectors during the growth run. We suppose that developed heating furnace and the system of thermoregulation allow one to achieve stable thermo-gravitational convection in the whole body of high temperature solution, thus substantially delaying the onset of constitutional undercooling.

  4. General Relativistic Effect on the Energy Deposition Rate for Neutrino Pair Annihilation above the Equatorial Plane Along the Symmetry Axis Near a Rotating Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Ritam; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Raha, Sibaji

    2013-02-01

    The estimate of the energy deposition rate (EDR) for neutrino pair annihilation has been carried out. The EDR for the neutrinos coming from the equatorial plane of a rotating neutron star is calculated along the rotation axis using the Cook-Shapiro-Teukolsky metric. The neutrino trajectories and hence the neutrinos emitted from the disk are affected by the redshift due to disk rotation and gravitation. The EDR is very sensitive to the value of the temperature and its variation along the disk. The rotation of the star has a negative effect on the EDR; it decreases with increase in rotational velocity.

  5. Comparison of Crystal Field Dependent and Independent Methods to Analyse Lanthanide Induced NMR Shifts in Axially Symmetric Complexes. Part II: Systems with a C4 Symmetry Axis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shanrong; Sherry, A. Dean

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the LIS data for several series of Ln3+ complexes of C4 symmetry in terms of structural changes, crystal-field effects and/or variation of hyperfine constants along the lanthanide series was undertaken using a combination of the two-nuclei and three-nuclei techniques together with the classical onenucleus technique. Isostructurality of whole series of complexes, with changes of the Fi, and B02 parameters, was clearly defined for the complexes of L by the combination of the two first methods. Small changes, involving the three Fi, Gi and B02 parameters, are observed for the series of complexes of L-L4, using the three data plotting methods. Some of the plots according to the two- and three-nuclei methods are accidentally linear, without necessarily implying isostructurality of the complexes, as they involve parameters, which may be insensitive to any small structural changes occurring in these systems. These parameter variations could result from a magnification, by the present graphical analysis, of the breaks expected from the gradual structural changes along the series due to the lanthanide contraction. The α and β parameters of the three-nuclei method are not diagnostic of the type of structures the complexes have in solution, due to their very indirect dependence on the geometric factors. PMID:18365039

  6. Stability of two-fold screw axis structures for cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffraction crystallography indicates that most forms of crystalline cellulose have two-fold screw axis symmetry. Even if exact symmetry is absent, the degree of pseudo symmetry is very high. On the other hand, this symmetry leads to short contacts between H4 and H1' across the glycosidic linkage....

  7. Computation of Open Gromov-Witten Invariants for Toric Calabi-Yau 3-Folds by Topological Recursion, a Proof of the BKMP Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eynard, B.; Orantin, N.

    2015-07-01

    The BKMP conjecture (2006-2008) proposed a new method to compute closed and open Gromov-Witten invariants for every toric Calabi-Yau 3-folds, through a topological recursion based on mirror symmetry. So far, this conjecture has been verified to low genus for several toric CY3folds, and proved to all genus only for . In this article we prove the general case. Our proof is based on the fact that both sides of the conjecture can be naturally written in terms of combinatorial sums of weighted graphs: on the A-model side this is the localization formula, and on the B-model side the graphs encode the recursive algorithm of the topological recursion. One can slightly reorganize the set of graphs obtained in the B-side, so that it coincides with the one obtained by localization in the A-model. Then it suffices to compare the weights of vertices and edges of graphs on each side, which is done in two steps: the weights coincide in the large radius limit, due to the fact that the toric graph is the tropical limit of the mirror curve. Then the derivatives with respect to Kähler radius coincide due to the special geometry property implied by the topological recursion.

  8. Institutionalizing the academic health department within the context of the 3-fold academic mission.

    PubMed

    Livingood, William C; Goldhagen, Jeffrey; Bryant, Thomas; Harmon, Robert G; Wood, David L

    2014-01-01

    A mature model of an academic health department (AHD) that has been institutionalized over 2 decades is described within the context of the 3-fold traditional mission of academics (teaching, research, and service/practice). This adaptive model for AHDs, based on mutual benefits that can be viewed through the lenses of both the academic health center mission and the public health functions and services, has important implications for AHD sustainability. Continued collaboration in any academic-public health partnership will depend in part on the commitments of the changing leadership. However, institutionalizing support for the academic mission enables this collaboration to transcend changing leadership styles and priorities. The collaboration of Duval County Health Department and University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville is an example of a model of AHD that has endured major changes in leadership within both the academic center and the Duval County Health Department. PMID:24667196

  9. Preparation and characterization of a 3-fold redundant human PAC library

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.; Chen, C.; Frengen, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recently, we have developed new procedures for the cloning of large DNA fragments using a bacteriophage P1-derived vector, pCYPAC1. In view of the large sizes (up to 400 kb clones have been observed) and the single copy mode of maintenance, we have designated our clones as {open_quotes}PACs{close_quotes} for {open_quotes}P1-derived artificial chromosomes{close_quotes}. Our subsequent efforts have focused on the construction of a large human PAC library from MboI digested human DNA (from white blood cells). About 120,000 PAC clones have been picked into 312 microtiter dishes of 384 wells. Preliminary characterization has revealed that the insert containing clones have average inserts of 110-120 kb and that the library has approximately 27% empty clones (vector without insert). Based on the average insert size and the total number of recombinant clones, we estimate that the library has 3-fold genome redundancy. This estimate is consistent with results obtained by screening of the library: 18 STS markers detect 52 corresponding clones and 6 unique probes find 20 positives. The library is expanded to a final size of 6- to 8-fold genome redundancy and is also being characterized with by fluorescent in situ hybridization and chromosome-walking procedures. Copies of the arrayed library are being distributed.

  10. Symmetry matters.

    PubMed

    Moubayidin, Laila; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-09-01

    985 I. 985 II. 986 III. 987 IV. 988 V. 989 989 References 989 SUMMARY: The development of multicellular organisms depends on correct establishment of symmetry both at the whole-body scale and within individual tissues and organs. Setting up planes of symmetry must rely on communication between cells that are located at a distance from each other within the organism, presumably via mobile morphogenic signals. Although symmetry in nature has fascinated scientists for centuries, it is only now that molecular data to unravel mechanisms of symmetry establishment are beginning to emerge. As an example we describe the genetic and hormonal interactions leading to an unusual bilateral-to-radial symmetry transition of an organ in order to promote reproduction. PMID:26086581

  11. Three-fold diffraction symmetry in epitaxial graphene and the SiC substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D A; Zhou, S Y; El Gabaly, F; Schmid, A K; McCarty, K F; Lanzara, A

    2009-12-10

    The crystallographic symmetries and spatial distribution of stacking domains in graphene films on 6H-SiC(0001) have been studied by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and dark field imaging in a low energy electron microscope (LEEM). We find that the graphene diffraction spots from 2 and 3 atomic layers of graphene have 3-fold symmetry consistent with AB (Bernal or rhombohedral) stacking of the layers. On the contrary, graphene diffraction spots from the buffer layer and monolayer graphene have apparent 6-fold symmetry, although the 3-fold nature of the satellite spots indicates a more complex periodicity in the graphene sheets.

  12. A 3-fold "butterfly valve" in command of the encapsulation's kinetic stability. Molecular baskets at work.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Yu; Bao, Xiaoguang; Yan, Zhiqing; Maslak, Veselin; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2008-11-12

    Molecular basket 1, composed of a semirigid tris-norbornadiene framework and three revolving pyridine-based gates at the rim, has been built to "dynamically" enclose space and as such regulate molecular encapsulation. The gates were shown to fold via intramolecular hydrogen bonding and thereby form a C3nu symmetrical receptor: the 1H NMR resonance for the amide N-H protons of the pyridine gates appeared downfield (delta= 10.98 ppm), and the N-H vibrational stretch (IR) was observed at 3176 cm(-1). Accordingly, density functional theory (DFT, B3LYP) investigations revealed for the closed conformers of 1 to be energetically the most stable and dominant. The gearing of the pyridine "gates", about their axis, led to the interconversion of two dynamic enantiomers 1A and 1B comprising the clockwise and counterclockwise seam of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopic measurements and line-shape simulations suggested that the energy barrier of 10.0 kcal/mol (DeltaG++(A/B), 298 K) is required for the 1A/B interconversion, when CCl4 occupies the cavity of 1. Likewise, the activation free energy for CCl4 departing the basket was found to be 13.1 kcal/mol (DeltaG++, 298 K), whereas the thermodynamic stability of 1:CCl4 complex was -2.7 kcal/mol (DeltaGdegrees, 298 K). In view of that, CCl4 (but also (CH3)3CBr) was proposed to escape from, and a molecule of solvent to enter, the basket when the gates rotate about their axis: the exit of CCl4 requires the activation energy of 12.7 kcal/mol (DeltaG++(A/B) + DeltaGdegrees), similar to the experimentally found 13.1 kcal/mol (DeltaG++). PMID:18937455

  13. Exploring Metric Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zwart, P.H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R.W.; Adams, P.D.

    2006-07-31

    Relatively minor perturbations to a crystal structure can in some cases result in apparently large changes in symmetry. Changes in space group or even lattice can be induced by heavy metal or halide soaking (Dauter et al, 2001), flash freezing (Skrzypczak-Jankun et al, 1996), and Se-Met substitution (Poulsen et al, 2001). Relations between various space groups and lattices can provide insight in the underlying structural causes for the symmetry or lattice transformations. Furthermore, these relations can be useful in understanding twinning and how to efficiently solve two different but related crystal structures. Although (pseudo) symmetric properties of a certain combination of unit cell parameters and a space group are immediately obvious (such as a pseudo four-fold axis if a is approximately equal to b in an orthorhombic space group), other relations (e.g. Lehtio, et al, 2005) that are less obvious might be crucial to the understanding and detection of certain idiosyncrasies of experimental data. We have developed a set of tools that allows straightforward exploration of possible metric symmetry relations given unit cell parameters and a space group. The new iotbx.explore{_}metric{_}symmetry command produces an overview of the various relations between several possible point groups for a given lattice. Methods for finding relations between a pair of unit cells are also available. The tools described in this newsletter are part of the CCTBX libraries, which are included in the latest (versions July 2006 and up) PHENIX and CCI Apps distributions.

  14. Direct computation of the degree 4 Gopakumar-Vafa invariant on a Calabi-Yau 3-fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2012-05-01

    In this work we compute the topological Euler characteristic of the moduli space of stable sheaves of Hilbert polynomial 4n+1 on P2 to be 192, using tools of algebraic geometry. This Euler characteristic is equal up to sign to the degree 4 BPS (Gopakumar-Vafa) invariant of local P2, a (noncompact) Calabi-Yau 3-fold. This is a new result verifying an instance of conjecture motivated by physics.

  15. Inherited Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attanucci, Frank J.; Losse, John

    2008-01-01

    In a first calculus course, it is not unusual for students to encounter the theorems which state: If f is an even (odd) differentiable function, then its derivative is odd (even). In our paper, we prove some theorems which show how the symmetry of a continuous function f with respect to (i) the vertical line: x = a or (ii) with respect to the…

  16. Electrical-Discharge Machining With Additional Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malinzak, Roger M.; Booth, Gary N.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electrical-discharge-machining (EDM) apparatus uses moveable vertical wire as electrode. Wire positionable horizontally along one axis as it slides vertically past workpiece. Workpiece indexed in rotation about horizontal axis. Because of symmetry of parts, process used to make two such parts at a time by defining boundary between them. Advantages: cost of material reduced, imparts less residual stress to workpiece, and less time spent machining each part when parts produced in such symmetrical pairs.

  17. Symmetry, winding number, and topological charge of vortex solitons in discrete-symmetry media

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-March, Miguel-Angel; Zacares, Mario; Sahu, Sarira; Ceballos-Herrera, Daniel E.

    2009-05-15

    We determine the functional behavior near the discrete rotational symmetry axis of discrete vortices of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. We show that these solutions present a central phase singularity whose charge is restricted by symmetry arguments. Consequently, we demonstrate that the existence of high-charged discrete vortices is related to the presence of other off-axis phase singularities, whose positions and charges are also restricted by symmetry arguments. To illustrate our theoretical results, we offer two numerical examples of high-charged discrete vortices in photonic crystal fibers showing hexagonal discrete rotational invariance.

  18. Broken Symmetry

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not ?renormalizable?. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged ?vector? particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of ?massless? modes

  19. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Raedler, K.H. ); Ness, N.F. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus, only the dipole and quadrupole contributoins are considered. The magnetic fields are analyzed by decomposing them into those parts which have simple symmetry properties with respect to the rotation axis and the equatorial plane. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of Earth and Jupiter. Compared to Earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis, by now rather well known, but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets. The implications of these results for dynamo models are discussed. With a vgiew to Cowling's theorem the symmetry of the fields is investigated with respect to not only the rotation axis but also to other axes intersecting the plaentary center. Surprisingly, the high degree of asymmetry of the Uranian field that is observed with respect to the rotation axis reduces considerably to being compare to that for Earth or Jupiter when the appropriate axis is employed.

  20. 3D surface configuration modulates 2D symmetry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Sio, Lok-Teng

    2015-02-01

    We investigated whether three-dimensional (3D) information in a scene can affect symmetry detection. The stimuli were random dot patterns with 15% dot density. We measured the coherence threshold, or the proportion of dots that were the mirror reflection of the other dots in the other half of the image about a central vertical axis, at 75% accuracy with a 2AFC paradigm under various 3D configurations produced by the disparity between the left and right eye images. The results showed that symmetry detection was difficult when the corresponding dots across the symmetry axis were on different frontoparallel or inclined planes. However, this effect was not due to a difference in distance, as the observers could detect symmetry on a slanted surface, where the depth of the two sides of the symmetric axis was different. The threshold was reduced for a hinge configuration where the join of two slanted surfaces coincided with the axis of symmetry. Our result suggests that the detection of two-dimensional (2D) symmetry patterns is subject to the 3D configuration of the scene; and that coplanarity across the symmetry axis and consistency between the 2D pattern and 3D structure are important factors for symmetry detection. PMID:25536469

  1. Spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without vertical axis of rotation

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis; Christenson, Todd; Aaronson, Gene

    2009-06-09

    The symmetry properties of a magnetic levitation arrangement are exploited to produce spin-stabilized magnetic levitation without aligning the rotational axis of the rotor with the direction of the force of gravity. The rotation of the rotor stabilizes perturbations directed parallel to the rotational axis.

  2. The cyanobacterial cytochrome b6f subunit PetP adopts an SH3 fold in solution.

    PubMed

    Veit, Sebastian; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Rögner, Matthias; Rexroth, Sascha; Stoll, Raphael; Ikegami, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    PetP is a peripheral subunit of the cytochrome b(6)f complex (b(6)f) present in both, cyanobacteria and red algae. It is bound to the cytoplasmic surface of this membrane protein complex where it greatly affects the efficiency of the linear photosynthetic electron flow although it is not directly involved in the electron transfer reactions. Despite the crystal structures of the b(6)f core complex, structural information for the transient regulatory b(6)f subunits is still missing. Here we present the first structure of PetP at atomic resolution as determined by solution NMR. The protein adopts an SH3 fold, which is a common protein motif in eukaryotes but comparatively rare in prokaryotes. The structure of PetP enabled the identification of the potential interaction site for b(6)f binding by conservation mapping. The interaction surface is mainly formed by two large loop regions and one short 310 helix which also exhibit an increased flexibility as indicated by heteronuclear steady-state {(1)H}-(15)N NOE and random coil index parameters. The properties of this potential b(6)f binding site greatly differ from the canonical peptide binding site which is highly conserved in eukaryotic SH3 domains. Interestingly, three other proteins of the photosynthetic electron transport chain share this SH3 fold with PetP: NdhS of the photosynthetic NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH-1), PsaE of the photosystem 1 and subunit α of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase have, similar to PetP, a great impact on the photosynthetic electron transport. Finally, a model is presented to illustrate how SH3 domains modulate the photosynthetic electron transport processes in cyanobacteria. PMID:27033306

  3. The near-symmetry of proteins.

    PubMed

    Bonjack-Shterengartz, Maayan; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    The majority of protein oligomers form clusters which are nearly symmetric. Understanding of that imperfection, its origins, and perhaps also its advantages requires the conversion of the currently used vague qualitative descriptive language of the near-symmetry into an accurate quantitative measure that will allow to answer questions such as: "What is the degree of symmetry deviation of the protein?," "how do these deviations compare within a family of proteins?," and so on. We developed quantitative methods to answer this type of questions, which are capable of analyzing the whole protein, its backbone or selected portions of it, down to comparison of symmetry-related specific amino-acids, and which are capable of visualizing the various levels of symmetry deviations in the form of symmetry maps. We have applied these methods on an extensive list of homomers and heteromers and found that apparently all proteins never reach perfect symmetry. Strikingly, even homomeric protein clusters are never ideally symmetric. We also found that the main burden of symmetry distortion is on the amino-acids near the symmetry axis; that it is mainly the more hydrophilic amino-acids that take place in symmetry-distortive interactions; and more. The remarkable ability of heteromers to preserve near-symmetry, despite the different sequences, was also shown and analyzed. The comprehensive literature on the suggested advantages symmetric oligomerizations raises a yet-unsolved key question: If symmetry is so advantageous, why do proteins stop shy of perfect symmetry? Some tentative answers to be tested in further studies are suggested in a concluding outlook. PMID:25354765

  4. Some symmetries in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.

    1981-09-01

    Internal and space-time symmetries are discussed in this group of lectures. The first of the lectures deals with an internal symmetry, or rather two related symmetries called charge independence and charge symmetry. The next two discuss space-time symmetries which also hold approximately, but are broken only by the weak forces; that is, these symmetries hold for both the hadronic and electromagnetic forces. (GHT)

  5. The role of color and attention-to-color in mirror-symmetry perception.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiu, Elena; Kingdom, Frederick A A; Remkes, Aaron; Li, Hyung-Chul O; Rainville, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The role of color in the visual perception of mirror-symmetry is controversial. Some reports support the existence of color-selective mirror-symmetry channels, others that mirror-symmetry perception is merely sensitive to color-correlations across the symmetry axis. Here we test between the two ideas. Stimuli consisted of colored Gaussian-blobs arranged either mirror-symmetrically or quasi-randomly. We used four arrangements: (1) 'segregated' - symmetric blobs were of one color, random blobs of the other color(s); (2) 'random-segregated' - as above but with the symmetric color randomly selected on each trial; (3) 'non-segregated' - symmetric blobs were of all colors in equal proportions, as were the random blobs; (4) 'anti-symmetric' - symmetric blobs were of opposite-color across the symmetry axis. We found: (a) near-chance levels for the anti-symmetric condition, suggesting that symmetry perception is sensitive to color-correlations across the symmetry axis; (b) similar performance for random-segregated and non-segregated conditions, giving no support to the idea that mirror-symmetry is color selective; (c) highest performance for the color-segregated condition, but only when the observer knew beforehand the symmetry color, suggesting that symmetry detection benefits from color-based attention. We conclude that mirror-symmetry detection mechanisms, while sensitive to color-correlations across the symmetry axis and subject to the benefits of attention-to-color, are not color selective. PMID:27404804

  6. Inclusive charged particle distribution in nearly 3-fold symmetric 3-jet events at E/sub cm/ = 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, A.

    1986-04-01

    Results of inclusive charged particle distribution for gluon jets using nearly 3-fold symmetric 3-jet events taken at center of mass energies of 29 GeV in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are presented. The charged particle spectrum for these jets is observed to be softer than that of quark jets with the same jet energy.

  7. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  8. Robust adaptive spin-axis stabilization of a symmetric spacecraft using two bounded torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Haichao; Vukovich, George

    2015-12-01

    The spin-axis stabilization of an axisymmetric spacecraft by two control torques perpendicular to the symmetry axis is addressed. Two control laws are designed to align the symmetry axis along a desired inertial direction despite the revolution around the symmetry axis. The first controller takes a saturated proportional-derivative form and can stabilize the spin-axis to the desired direction with a priori bounded torques in the absence of modeling uncertainties. In order to achieve better robustness, an adaptive controller is then designed to account for the inertia uncertainties and disturbances, in addition to actuator saturation. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the advantageous features of the proposed algorithm compared with conventional spin-axis stabilization methods.

  9. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2003-12-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  10. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  11. Geometric intrinsic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A. Szulerecka, A.; Pedrak, A.

    2013-08-15

    The problem of geometric symmetries in the intrinsic frame of a many-body system (nucleus) is considered. An importance of symmetrization group notion is discussed. Ageneral structure of the intrinsic symmetry group structure is determined.

  12. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  13. Symmetry in halo displays and symmetry in halo-making crystals.

    PubMed

    Können, Gunther P

    2003-01-20

    The relation between the symmetry in halo displays and crystal symmetry is investigated for halo displays that are generated by ensembles of crystals. It is found that, regardless of the symmetry of the constituent crystals, such displays are always left-right (L-R) symmetric if the crystals are formed from the surrounding vapor. L-R symmetry of a halo display implies here that the cross sections for formation of a halo arc on the left-hand side of the solar vertical and its right-hand side mirror image are equal. This property leaves room for two types of halo display only: a full symmetric one (mmm-symmetric), and a partial symmetric one (mm2-symmetric) in which halo constituents lack their counterparts on the other side of the parhelic circle. A partial symmetric display can occur only for point halos. Its occurrence implies that a number of symmetry elements are not present in the shape of the halo-making crystals. These elements are a center of inversion, any rotatory-inversion axis that is parallel to the crystal spin axis P, a mirror plane perpendicular to the P axis, and a twofold rotation axis perpendicular to the P axis. A simple conceptual method is presented to reconstruct possible shapes of the halo-generating crystals from the halos in the display. The method is illustrated in two examples. Halos that may occur on the Saturnian satellite Titan are discussed. The possibilities for the Huygens probe to detect these halos during its descent through the Titan clouds in 2005 are detailed. PMID:12570252

  14. Neutrinos and flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2015-07-15

    We discuss the recent progress of flavor models with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry in the lepton sector focusing on the θ{sub 13} and CP violating phase. In both direct approach and indirect approach of the flavor symmetry, the non-vanishing θ{sub 13} is predictable. The flavor symmetry with the generalised CP symmetry can also predicts the CP violating phase. We show the phenomenological analyses of neutrino mixing for the typical flavor models.

  15. Polynomial Graphs and Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehle, Geoff; Kobayashi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Most quadratic functions are not even, but every parabola has symmetry with respect to some vertical line. Similarly, every cubic has rotational symmetry with respect to some point, though most cubics are not odd. We show that every polynomial has at most one point of symmetry and give conditions under which the polynomial has rotational or…

  16. Chiral symmetry and chiral-symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    These lectures concern the dynamics of fermions in strong interaction with gauge fields. Systems of fermions coupled by gauge forces have a very rich structure of global symmetries, which are called chiral symmetries. These lectures will focus on the realization of chiral symmetries and the causes and consequences of thier spontaneous breaking. A brief introduction to the basic formalism and concepts of chiral symmetry breaking is given, then some explicit calculations of chiral symmetry breaking in gauge theories are given, treating first parity-invariant and then chiral models. These calculations are meant to be illustrative rather than accurate; they make use of unjustified mathematical approximations which serve to make the physics more clear. Some formal constraints on chiral symmetry breaking are discussed which illuminate and extend the results of our more explicit analysis. Finally, a brief review of the phenomenological theory of chiral symmetry breaking is presented, and some applications of this theory to problems in weak-interaction physics are discussed. (WHK)

  17. On the photometric axis of the zodiacal light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misconi, N. Y.

    1977-01-01

    A model of the zodiacal cloud is used to predict the position of the photometric axis (the locus of points of maximum brightness) of the zodiacal light at any elongation angle from the sun for any time of the year for various symmetry planes: the orbital planes of Venus, Mars, and Jupiter, the invariable plane, and the solar equatorial plane. Using a scattering function which combines isotropic scattering and Fresnel reflection, the geocentric distance of the dust that contributes most of the brightness at each elongation angle is determined by computing the brightness contribution along the line of sight. A comparison of the predicted and observed positions shows that at elongation angles of 15 to 60 deg, the axis of symmetry appears to be close to the orbital plane of Venus. At angles of less than 10 deg, it is difficult to distinguish among the proposed planes of symmetry. Observations of the photometric axis at angles of 60 to 180 deg are scarce and do not permit precise determination of the axis of symmetry in that region.

  18. Cellulose and the twofold screw axis: Modeling and experimental arguments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystallography indicates that molecules in crystalline cellulose either have 2-fold screw-axis (21) symmetry or closely approximate it, leading to short distances between H4 and H1' across the glycosidic linkage. Therefore, modeling studies of cellobiose often show elevated energies for 21 structur...

  19. The Symmetries of QCD

    ScienceCinema

    Sekhar Chivukula

    2010-01-08

    The symmetries of a quantum field theory can be realized in a variety of ways. Symmetries can be realized explicitly, approximately, through spontaneous symmetry breaking or, via an anomaly, quantum effects can dynamically eliminate a symmetry of the theory that was present at the classical level.  Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the modern theory of the strong interactions, exemplify each of these possibilities. The interplay of these effects determine the spectrum of particles that we observe and, ultimately, account for 99% of the mass of ordinary matter. 

  20. Is symmetry informative?

    PubMed

    Gray, J E; Vogt, A

    1997-01-01

    Is symmetry informative? The answer is both yes and no. We examine what information and symmetry are and how they are related. Our approach is primarily mathematical, not because mathematics provides the final word, but because it provides an insightful and relatively precise starting point. Information theory treats transformations that messages undergo from source to destination. Symmetries are information that leave some property of interest unchanged. In this respect the studies of information and symmetry can both be regarded as a Quest for the identity transformation. PMID:9224554

  1. Symmetry and Symmetry Breaking in Planetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Russell, C. T.; Aurnou, J. M.; Soderlund, K. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Six out of eight solar system planets currently possess global-scale intrinsic magnetic fields. Different symmetry and symmetry breaking with respect to the spin-axis and the equatorial plane of the host planet can be found for different planetary magnetic fields. With respect to the spin-axis, the magnetic fields of Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn are dominated by the axisymmetric part while the magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune show no such alignment. Moreover, non-axisymmetric components have not been determined unambiguously for the magnetic fields of Mercury and Saturn. With respect to the equatorial plane, the magnetic fields of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn show small but non-negligible asymmetry while the magnetic field of Mercury shows a significant asymmetry. The magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune likely possess similar strength in the two hemispheres divided by the equatorial plane, but this needs to be confirmed with future measurements. Here we present our interpretation of the magnetic fields of Mercury and Saturn, both of which are often referred to as anomalous dipolar dynamos. For Mercury, we will show that volumetrically distributed buoyancy sources in its liquid iron core can naturally lead to equatorial symmetry breaking in the dynamo generated magnetic field as observed by MESSENGER. We will also show that the size of the solid inner core inside Mercury is likely smaller than 1000 km and could be detected indirectly with high-spatial-resolution magnetic field measurements near Mercury's north pole. In addition, we will show that degree-2 longitudinal variations observed in the magnetic equator positions of Mercury could have an internal origin. For Saturn's magnetic field, although its extreme axisymmetry could in principle be explained by a stably-stratified electrically-conducting layer on top of the dynamo region, more features such as equator-to-pole field contrasts cannot be explained by this same mechanism simultaneously. Towards

  2. Symmetries in Lagrangian Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrario, Carlo; Passerini, Arianna

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of Noether's theorem, a distinction between Lagrangian and dynamical symmetries is made, in order to clarify some aspects neglected by textbooks. An intuitive setting of the concept of invariance of differential equations is presented. The analysis is completed by deriving the symmetry properties in the motion of a charged…

  3. Symmetries of Spectral Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, A.

    Deriving abelian KdV and NLS hierarchies, we describe non-abelian symmetries and "pre-Lax" elementary approach to Lax pairs. Discrete symmetries of spectral problems are considered in Sect. 4.2. Here we prove Darboux classical theorem and discuss a modern theory of dressing chains.

  4. Symmetry and Interculturality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2009-01-01

    Symmetry is one of the fundamental concepts in Geometry. It is a Mathematical concept, which can be very well connected with Art and Ethnography. The aim of the article is to show how to link the geometrical concept symmetry with interculturality. For this mosaics from different countries are used.

  5. Symmetry Effects in Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Andrew Chi-Chih

    2008-12-01

    The concept of symmetry has played a key role in the development of modern physics. For example, using symmetry, C.N. Yang and other physicists have greatly advanced our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics. Meanwhile, computer scientists have been pondering why some computational problems seem intractable, while others are easy. Just as in physics, the laws of computation sometimes can only be inferred indirectly by considerations of general principles such as symmetry. The symmetry properties of a function can indeed have a profound effect on how fast the function can be computed. In this talk, we present several elegant and surprising discoveries along this line, made by computer scientists using symmetry as their primary tool. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  6. The determination of the direction of the optic axis of uniaxial crystalline materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, J. A.; Schock, H. J.; Regan, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    The birefringence of crystalline substances in general, and of sapphire in particular, is described. A test is described whose purpose is to determine the direction of the optic axis of a cylindrically machined single crystal of sapphire. This test was performed on the NASA Lewis sapphire cylinder and it was found that the optic axis made an angle of 18 deg with the axis of symmetry of the cylinder.

  7. Aspects of emergent symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Pedro R. S.

    2016-03-01

    These are intended to be review notes on emergent symmetries, i.e. symmetries which manifest themselves in specific sectors of energy in many systems. The emphasis is on the physical aspects rather than computation methods. We include some background material and go through more recent problems in field theory, statistical mechanics and condensed matter. These problems illustrate how some important symmetries, such as Lorentz invariance and supersymmetry, usually believed to be fundamental, can arise naturally in low-energy regimes of systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The aim is to discuss how these examples could help us to face other complex and fundamental problems.

  8. Sequential flavor symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, Thorsten; Jung, Martin; Mannel, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    The gauge sector of the standard model exhibits a flavor symmetry that allows for independent unitary transformations of the fermion multiplets. In the standard model the flavor symmetry is broken by the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs boson, and the resulting fermion masses and mixing angles show a pronounced hierarchy. In this work we connect the observed hierarchy to a sequence of intermediate effective theories, where the flavor symmetries are broken in a stepwise fashion by vacuum expectation values of suitably constructed spurion fields. We identify the possible scenarios in the quark sector and discuss some implications of this approach.

  9. The role of color and attention-to-color in mirror-symmetry perception

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, Elena; Kingdom, Frederick A. A.; Remkes, Aaron; Li, Hyung-Chul O.; Rainville, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The role of color in the visual perception of mirror-symmetry is controversial. Some reports support the existence of color-selective mirror-symmetry channels, others that mirror-symmetry perception is merely sensitive to color-correlations across the symmetry axis. Here we test between the two ideas. Stimuli consisted of colored Gaussian-blobs arranged either mirror-symmetrically or quasi-randomly. We used four arrangements: (1) ‘segregated’ – symmetric blobs were of one color, random blobs of the other color(s); (2) ‘random-segregated’ – as above but with the symmetric color randomly selected on each trial; (3) ‘non-segregated’ – symmetric blobs were of all colors in equal proportions, as were the random blobs; (4) ‘anti-symmetric’ – symmetric blobs were of opposite-color across the symmetry axis. We found: (a) near-chance levels for the anti-symmetric condition, suggesting that symmetry perception is sensitive to color-correlations across the symmetry axis; (b) similar performance for random-segregated and non-segregated conditions, giving no support to the idea that mirror-symmetry is color selective; (c) highest performance for the color-segregated condition, but only when the observer knew beforehand the symmetry color, suggesting that symmetry detection benefits from color-based attention. We conclude that mirror-symmetry detection mechanisms, while sensitive to color-correlations across the symmetry axis and subject to the benefits of attention-to-color, are not color selective. PMID:27404804

  10. Multiple axis reticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barns, Chris E.; Gunter, William D.

    1990-09-01

    A reticle permits the alignment of three orthogonal axes (X, Y and Z) that intersect at a common target point. Thin, straight filaments are supported on a frame. The filaments are each contained in a different orthogonal plane (S sub xy, S sub xz, and S sub yz) and each filament intersects two of the three orthogonal axes. The filaments, as viewed along the frame axis, give the appearance of a triangle with a V extending from each triangle vertex. When axial alignment is achieved, the filament portions adjacent to a triangle vertex are seen (along the axis of interest) as a right-angle cross, whereas these filament portions are seen to intersect at an oblique angle when axial misalignment occurs. The reticle is open in the region near the target point leaving ample space for alignment aids such as a pentaprism or a cube mirror.

  11. Molecular symmetry with quaternions.

    PubMed

    Fritzer, H P

    2001-09-01

    A new and relatively simple version of the quaternion calculus is offered which is especially suitable for applications in molecular symmetry and structure. After introducing the real quaternion algebra and its classical matrix representation in the group SO(4) the relations with vectors in 3-space and the connection with the rotation group SO(3) through automorphism properties of the algebra are discussed. The correlation of the unit quaternions with both the Cayley-Klein and the Euler parameters through the group SU(2) is presented. Besides rotations the extension of quaternions to other important symmetry operations, reflections and the spatial inversion, is given. Finally, the power of the quaternion calculus for molecular symmetry problems is revealed by treating some examples applied to icosahedral symmetry. PMID:11666072

  12. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  13. Dynamical spacetime symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin C.; Wheeler, James T.

    2016-04-01

    According to the Coleman-Mandula theorem, any gauge theory of gravity combined with an internal symmetry based on a Lie group must take the form of a direct product in order to be consistent with basic assumptions of quantum field theory. However, we show that an alternative gauging of a simple group can lead dynamically to a spacetime with compact internal symmetry. The biconformal gauging of the conformal symmetry of n-dimensional Euclidean space doubles the dimension to give a symplectic manifold. Examining one of the Lagrangian submanifolds in the flat case, we find that in addition to the expected S O (n ) connection and curvature, the solder form necessarily becomes Lorentzian. General coordinate invariance gives rise to an S O (n -1 ,1 ) connection on the spacetime. The principal fiber bundle character of the original S O (n ) guarantees that the two symmetries enter as a direct product, in agreement with the Coleman-Mandula theorem.

  14. Dynamical symmetries for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model (FDSM). The analytical symmetry limits of the model are then applied to the calculation of physical quantities such as ground-state masses and B(E{sub 2}) values in heavy nuclei. These comparisons with data provide strong support for a new principle of collective motion, the Dynamical Pauli Effect, and suggest that dynamical symmetries which properly account for the pauli principle are much more persistent in nuclear structure than the corresponding boson symmetries. Finally, we present an assessment of criticisms which have been voiced concerning the FDSM, and a discussion of new phenomena and exotic spectroscopy'' which may be suggested by the model. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Another Broken Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Resistance destroys symmetry. In this note, a graphical exploration serves as a guide to a rigorous elementary proof of a specific asymmetry in the trajectory of a point projectile in a medium offering linear resistance.

  16. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaños, Octavio

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this course is to study the evolution of the symmetry concept and establish its influence in the knowledge of the fundamental laws of nature. Physicist have been using the symmetry concept in two ways: to solve problems and to search for new understanding of the world around us. In quantum physics symmetry plays a key role in gaining an understanding of the physical laws governing the behavior of matter and field systems. It provides, generally, a shortcut based on geometry for discovering the secrets of the Universe. Because it is believed that the laws of physics are invariant under discrete and continuous transformation operations of the space and time, there are continuous symmetries, for example, energy and momentum together with discrete ones corresponding to charge, parity and time reversal operations.

  17. Mechanochemical Symmetry Breaking in Hydra Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Mercker, Moritz; Köthe, Alexandra; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis comprises the self-organized creation of various patterns and shapes. Although detailed underlying mechanisms are still elusive in many cases, an increasing amount of experimental data suggests that chemical morphogen and mechanical processes are strongly coupled. Here, we develop and test a minimal model of the axis-defining step (i.e., symmetry breaking) in aggregates of the Hydra polyp. Based on previous findings, we combine osmotically driven shape oscillations with tissue mechanics and morphogen dynamics. We show that the model incorporating a simple feedback loop between morphogen patterning and tissue stretch reproduces a wide range of experimental data. Finally, we compare different hypothetical morphogen patterning mechanisms (Turing, tissue-curvature, and self-organized criticality). Our results suggest the experimental investigation of bigger (i.e., multiple head) aggregates as a key step for a deeper understanding of mechanochemical symmetry breaking in Hydra. PMID:25954896

  18. Mechanochemical symmetry breaking in Hydra aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mercker, Moritz; Köthe, Alexandra; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Tissue morphogenesis comprises the self-organized creation of various patterns and shapes. Although detailed underlying mechanisms are still elusive in many cases, an increasing amount of experimental data suggests that chemical morphogen and mechanical processes are strongly coupled. Here, we develop and test a minimal model of the axis-defining step (i.e., symmetry breaking) in aggregates of the Hydra polyp. Based on previous findings, we combine osmotically driven shape oscillations with tissue mechanics and morphogen dynamics. We show that the model incorporating a simple feedback loop between morphogen patterning and tissue stretch reproduces a wide range of experimental data. Finally, we compare different hypothetical morphogen patterning mechanisms (Turing, tissue-curvature, and self-organized criticality). Our results suggest the experimental investigation of bigger (i.e., multiple head) aggregates as a key step for a deeper understanding of mechanochemical symmetry breaking in Hydra. PMID:25954896

  19. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raedler, Karl-Heinz; Ness, Norman F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus only the dipole and quadrupole contributions are considered. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of earth and Jupiter. Compared to earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets.

  20. Symmetry constraints on generalizations of Bjorken flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2010-10-15

    I explain a generalization of Bjorken flow where the medium has finite transverse size and expands both radially and along the beam axis. If one assumes that the equations of viscous hydrodynamics can be used, with p={epsilon}/3 and zero bulk viscosity, then the flow I describe can be developed into an exact solution of the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations. The local four-velocity in the flow is entirely determined by the assumption of symmetry under a subgroup of the conformal group.

  1. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  2. Single Axis Piezoceramic Gimbal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication, testing, and analysis of a single axis piezoceramic gimbal. The fabrication process consist of pre-stressing a piezoceramic wafer using a high-temperature thermoplastic polyimide and a metal foil. The differential thermal expansion between the ceramic and metal induces a curvature. The pre-stressed, curved piezoceramic is mounted on a support mechanism and a mirror is attached to the piezoceramic. A plot of gimbal angle versus applied voltage to the piezoceramic is presented. A finite element analysis of the piezoceramic gimbal is described. The predicted gimbal angle versus applied voltage is compared to experimental results.

  3. Single Axis Piezoceramic Gimbal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett; Taleghani, Barmac

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication, testing, and analysis of a single axis piezoceramic gimbal. The fabrication process consists of pre-stressing a piezoceramic wafer using a high-temperature thermoplastic polyimide and a metal foil. The differential thermal expansion between the ceramic and metal induces a curvature. The pre-stressed, curved piezoceramic is mounted on a support mechanism and a mirror is attached to the piezoceramic. A plot of gimbal angle versus applied voltage to the piezoceramic is presented. A finite element analysis of the piezoceramic gimbal is described. The predicted gimbal angle versus applied voltage is compared to experimental results.

  4. Emergent Rotational Symmetries in Disordered Magnetic Domain Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Run; Seu, Keoki A.; Parks, Daniel; Kan, Jimmy J.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Stephen D.

    2011-12-01

    Uniaxial systems often form labyrinthine domains that exhibit short-range order but are macroscopically isotropic and would not be expected to exhibit precise symmetries. However, their underlying frustration results in a multitude of metastable configurations of comparable energy, and driving such a system externally might lead to pattern formation. We find that soft x-ray speckle diffraction patterns of the labyrinthine domains in CoPd/IrMn heterostructures reveal a diverse array of hidden rotational symmetries about the magnetization axis, thereby suggesting an unusual form of emergent order in an otherwise disordered system. These symmetries depend on applied magnetic field, magnetization history, and scattering wave vector. Maps of rotational symmetry exhibit intriguing structures that can be controlled by manipulating the applied magnetic field in concert with the exchange bias condition.

  5. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang–Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang–Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross–Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang–Mills theory in four dimensions.

  6. Semimajor Axis Estimation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Alfriend, Kyle T.; Breger, Louis; Mitchell, Megan

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends previous analysis on the impact of sensing noise for the navigation and control aspects of formation flying spacecraft. We analyze the use of Carrier-phase Differential GPS (CDGPS) in relative navigation filters, with a particular focus on the filter correlation coefficient. This work was motivated by previous publications which suggested that a "good" navigation filter would have a strong correlation (i.e., coefficient near -1) to reduce the semimajor axis (SMA) error, and therefore, the overall fuel use. However, practical experience with CDGPS-based filters has shown this strong correlation seldom occurs (typical correlations approx. -0.1), even when the estimation accuracies are very good. We derive an analytic estimate of the filter correlation coefficient and demonstrate that, for the process and sensor noises levels expected with CDGPS, the expected value will be very low. It is also demonstrated that this correlation can be improved by increasing the time step of the discrete Kalman filter, but since the balance condition is not satisfied, the SMA error also increases. These observations are verified with several linear simulations. The combination of these simulations and analysis provide new insights on the crucial role of the process noise in determining the semimajor axis knowledge.

  7. Quantification of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi-Nan; Dong, Guo-Hui; Zhou, Duan-Lu; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2016-04-01

    Symmetry is conventionally described in a polarized manner that the system is either completely symmetric or completely asymmetric. Using group theoretical approach to overcome this dichotomous problem, we introduce the degree of symmetry (DoS) as a non-negative continuous number ranging from zero to unity. DoS is defined through an average of the fidelity deviations of Hamiltonian or quantum state over its transformation group G, and thus is computable by making use of the completeness relations of the irreducible representations of G. The monotonicity of DoS can effectively probe the extended group for accidental degeneracy while its multi-valued natures characterize some (spontaneous) symmetry breaking. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11421063, 11534002, 11475254 and the National 973 Program under Grant Nos. 2014CB921403, 2012CB922104, and 2014CB921202

  8. Electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, requiring the existence of a new symmetry-breaking force and associated particles, which need not however be Higgs bosons. The first lecture reviews the essential elements of the Higgs mechanism, which suffice to establish low energy theorems for the scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z gauge bosons. An upper bound on the scale of the symmetry-breaking physics then follows from the low energy theorems and partial wave unitarity. The second lecture reviews particular models, with and without Higgs bosons, paying special attention to how the general features discussed in lecture 1 are realized in each model. The third lecture focuses on the experimental signals of strong WW scattering that can be observed at the SSC above 1 TeV in the WW subenergy, which will allow direct measurement of the strength of the symmetry-breaking force. 52 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Essays on symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Jenann Tareq

    1997-04-01

    Structures of many different sorts arise in physics, e.g., the concrete structures of material bodies, the structure exemplified by the spatiotemporal configuration of a set of bodies, the structures of more abstract objects like states, state-spaces, laws, and so on. To each structure of any of these types there corresponds a set of transformations which map it onto itself. These are its symmetries. Increasingly ubiquitous in theoretical discussions in physics, the notion of symmetry is also at the root of some time-worn philosophical debates. This dissertation consists of a set of essays on topics drawn from places where the two fields overlap. The first essay is an informal introduction to the mathematical study of symmetry. The second essay defends a famous principle of Pierre Curie which states that the symmetries of a cause are always symmetries of its effect. The third essay takes up the case of reflection in space in the context of a controversy stemming from one of Kant's early arguments for the substantivality of space. The fourth essay is a discussion of the general conditions under which an asymmetry in a phenomenon suggests an asymmetry in the laws which govern it. The case of reflection in time-specifically, the theoretical strategy used in statistical mechanics to subsume the time-asymmetric phenomena of Thermodynamics under the time-symmetric classical dynamical laws-is used to illustrate the general points. The philosophical heart of the thesis lies in its fifth essay. Here a somewhat novel way of conceiving scientific theorizing is articulated, one suggested by the abstract mathematical perspective of symmetry.

  10. Bilateral symmetry across Aphrodite Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Head, J. W.; Campbell, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    There are three main highland areas on Venus: Beta Regio, Ishtar Terra and Aphrodite Terra. The latter is least known and the least mapped, yet existing analyses of Aphrodite Terra based on available Pioneer-Venus orbiter data suggest that it may be the site of extensive rifting. Some of the highest resolution (30 km) PV data (SAR) included most of the western half of Aphrodite Terra. Recent analysis of the SAR data together with Arecibo range-doppler topographic profiling (10 X 100 km horizontal and 10 m vertical resolution) across parts of Aphrodite, further characterized the nature of possible tectonic processes in the equatorial highlands. The existence of distinct topographic and radar morphologic linear discontinuities across the nearly east-west strike of Aphrodite Terra is indicated. Another prominent set of linear features is distinctly parallel to and orthogonal to the ground tracks of the PV spacecraft and are not included because of the possibility that they are artifacts. Study of the northwest trending cross-strike discontinuities (CSD's) and the nature of topographic and morphologic features along their strike suggest the presence of bilateral topographic and morphologic symmetry about the long axis of Aphrodite Terra.

  11. PT -symmetry Wave Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Carl T.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Prosen, Tomaz

    2010-03-01

    We study a new class of chaotic systems with dynamical localization, where gain/loss processes break the hermiticity, while allowing for parity-time PT symmetry. For a value γPT of the gain/loss parameter the spectrum undergoes a spontaneous phase transition from real (exact phase) to complex values (broken phase). We develop a one parameter scaling theory for γPT, and show that chaos assists the exact PT-phase. Our results will have applications to the design of optical elements with PT-symmetry.

  12. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  13. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar ϕ invariant under the internal galileon symmetryϕ→ϕ+b{sub μ}x{sup μ} have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon’s quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  14. Atkin-Lehner symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory

    The vanishing of the one-loop string cosmological constant in nontrivial non supersymmetric backgrounds can be understood by viewing the path integral as an inner product of orthogonal wave functions. For special backgrounds the string theory has an extra symmetry, expressed as a transformation on moduli space. When left- and right-moving wave functions transform in different representations of this symmetry the cosmological constant must vanish. Specific examples of the mechanism are given at one loop for theories in two and four dimensions. Various suggestions are made for the higher loop extension of this idea.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, L. H.

    2005-11-01

    One of the most fruitful and enduring advances in theoretical physics during the last half century has been the development of the role played by symmetries. One needs only to consider SU(3) and the classification of elementary particles, the Yang Mills enlargement of Maxwell's electrodynamics to the symmetry group SU(2), and indeed the tremendous activity surrounding the discovery of parity violation in the weak interactions in the late 1950s. This last example is one of a broken symmetry, though the symmetry in question is a discrete one. It was clear to Gell-Mann, who first clarified the role of SU(3) in particle physics, that this symmetry was not exact. If it had been, it would have been much easier to discover; for example, the proton, neutron, Σ, Λ and Ξ particles would all have had the same mass. For many years the SU(3) symmetry breaking was assigned a mathematical form, but the importance of this formulation fell away when the quark model began to be taken seriously; the reason the SU(3) symmetry was not exact was simply that the (three, in those days) quarks had different masses. At the same time, and in a different context, symmetry breaking of a different type was being investigated. This went by the name of `spontaneous symmetry breaking' and its characteristic was that the ground state of a given system was not invariant under the symmetry transformation, though the interactions (the Hamiltonian, in effect) was. A classic example is ferromagnetism. In a ferromagnet the atomic spins are aligned in one direction only—this is the ground state of the system. It is clearly not invariant under a rotation, for that would change the ground state into a (similar but) different one, with the spins aligned in a different direction; this is the phenomenon of a degenerate vacuum. The contribution of the spin interaction, s1.s2, to the Hamiltonian, however, is actually invariant under rotations. As Coleman remarked, a little man living in a ferromagnet would

  16. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  17. Horror Vacui Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson used with children in the third grade to help them learn about symmetry, as well as encouraging them to draw larger than usual. Explains that students learn about the belief called "Horror Vacui" of the Northwest American Indian tribes and create their interpretation of this belief. (CMK)

  18. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-08

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented.

  19. Active fluctuation symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Salazar, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with the understanding of fluctuation symmetries for entropy production, similar ideas applied to the time-symmetric fluctuation sector have been less explored. Here we give detailed derivations of time-symmetric fluctuation symmetries in boundary-driven particle systems such as the open Kawasaki lattice gas and the zero-range model. As a measure of time-symmetric dynamical activity over time T we count the difference (Nℓ - Nr)/T between the number of particle jumps in or out at the left edge and those at the right edge of the system. We show that this quantity satisfies a fluctuation symmetry from which we derive a new Green-Kubo-type relation. It will follow then that the system is more active at the edge connected to the particle reservoir with the largest chemical potential. We also apply these exact relations derived for stochastic particle models to a deterministic case, the spinning Lorentz gas, where the symmetry relation for the activity is checked numerically.

  20. Falling for Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGehe, Carol

    1991-01-01

    Presents math activities, problems, and games for teaching elementary students to recognize the world's natural symmetry and understand the mathematical qualities it represents; suggests activities with construction paper, blocks, and calculators. Instructions for using the calculator to create palindromes are included. (SM)

  1. Dual axis operation of a micromachined rate gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Juneau, T.; Pisano, A.P.; Smith, J.

    1997-04-01

    Since micromachining technology has raised the prospect of fabricating high performance sensors without the associated high cost and large size, many researchers have investigated micromachined rate gyroscopes. The vast majority of research has focused on single input axis rate gyroscopes, but this paper presents work on a dual input axis micromachined rate gyroscope. The key to successful simultaneous dual axis operation is the quad symmetry of the circular oscillating rotor design. Untuned gyroscopes with mismatched modes yielded random walk as low as 10{degrees}/{radical}hour with cross sensitivity ranging from 6% to 16%. Mode frequency matching via electrostatic tuning allowed performance better than 2{degrees}/{radical}hour, but at the expense of excessive cross sensitivity.

  2. Gauging without initial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Alexei; Strobl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The gauge principle is at the heart of a good part of fundamental physics: Starting with a group G of so-called rigid symmetries of a functional defined over space-time Σ, the original functional is extended appropriately by additional Lie(G) -valued 1-form gauge fields so as to lift the symmetry to Maps(Σ , G) . Physically relevant quantities are then to be obtained as the quotient of the solutions to the Euler-Lagrange equations by these gauge symmetries. In this article we show that one can construct a gauge theory for a standard sigma model in arbitrary space-time dimensions where the target metric is not invariant with respect to any rigid symmetry group, but satisfies a much weaker condition: It is sufficient to find a collection of vector fields va on the target M satisfying the extended Killing equationv a(i ; j) = 0 for some connection acting on the index a. For regular foliations this is equivalent to requiring the conormal bundle to the leaves with its induced metric to be invariant under leaf-preserving diffeomorphisms of M, which in turn generalizes Riemannian submersions to which the notion reduces for smooth leaf spaces M / ∼. The resulting gauge theory has the usual quotient effect with respect to the original ungauged theory: in this way, much more general orbits can be factored out than usually considered. In some cases these are orbits that do not correspond to an initial symmetry, but still can be generated by a finite-dimensional Lie group G. Then the presented gauging procedure leads to an ordinary gauge theory with Lie algebra valued 1-form gauge fields, but showing an unconventional transformation law. In general, however, one finds that the notion of an ordinary structural Lie group is too restrictive and should be replaced by the much more general notion of a structural Lie groupoid.

  3. Mechanogenetic coupling of Hydra symmetry breaking and driven Turing instability model.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Jordi; Rüdiger, Sten; Pullarkat, Pramod; Ott, Albrecht

    2009-02-18

    The freshwater polyp Hydra can regenerate from tissue fragments or random cell aggregates. We show that the axis-defining step ("symmetry breaking") of regeneration requires mechanical inflation-collapse oscillations of the initial cell ball. We present experimental evidence that axis definition is retarded if these oscillations are slowed down mechanically. When biochemical signaling related to axis formation is perturbed, the oscillation phase is extended and axis formation is retarded as well. We suggest that mechanical oscillations play a triggering role in axis definition. We extend earlier reaction-diffusion models for Hydra regrowth by coupling morphogen transport to mechanical stress caused by the oscillations. The modified reaction-diffusion model reproduces well two important experimental observations: 1), the existence of an optimum size for regeneration, and 2), the dependence of the symmetry breaking time on the properties of the mechanical oscillations. PMID:19217880

  4. Mechanogenetic Coupling of Hydra Symmetry Breaking and Driven Turing Instability Model

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Jordi; Rüdiger, Sten; Pullarkat, Pramod; Ott, Albrecht

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater polyp Hydra can regenerate from tissue fragments or random cell aggregates. We show that the axis-defining step (“symmetry breaking”) of regeneration requires mechanical inflation-collapse oscillations of the initial cell ball. We present experimental evidence that axis definition is retarded if these oscillations are slowed down mechanically. When biochemical signaling related to axis formation is perturbed, the oscillation phase is extended and axis formation is retarded as well. We suggest that mechanical oscillations play a triggering role in axis definition. We extend earlier reaction-diffusion models for Hydra regrowth by coupling morphogen transport to mechanical stress caused by the oscillations. The modified reaction-diffusion model reproduces well two important experimental observations: 1), the existence of an optimum size for regeneration, and 2), the dependence of the symmetry breaking time on the properties of the mechanical oscillations. PMID:19217880

  5. Gravity from Lorentz Symmetry Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Potting, Robertus

    2006-06-19

    In general relativity, the masslessness of gravitons can be traced to symmetry under diffeomorphisms. In this talk, we consider another possibility, whereby the masslessness arises from spontaneous violation of Lorentz symmetry.

  6. Limits of custodial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Di Chiara, Stefano; Foadi, Roshan

    2009-11-01

    We introduce a toy model implementing the proposal of using a custodial symmetry to protect the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling from large corrections. This 'doublet-extended standard model' adds a weak doublet of fermions (including a heavy partner of the top quark) to the particle content of the standard model in order to implement an O(4)xU(1){sub X}{approx}SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xP{sub LR}xU(1){sub X} symmetry in the top-quark mass generating sector. This symmetry is softly broken to the gauged SU(2){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} electroweak symmetry by a Dirac mass M for the new doublet; adjusting the value of M allows us to explore the range of possibilities between the O(4)-symmetric (M{yields}0) and standard-model-like (M{yields}{infinity}) limits. In this simple model, we find that the experimental limits on the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling favor smaller M while the presence of a potentially sizable negative contribution to {alpha}T strongly favors large M. Comparison with precision electroweak data shows that the heavy partner of the top quark must be heavier than about 3.4 TeV, making it difficult to search for at LHC. This result demonstrates that electroweak data strongly limit the amount by which the custodial symmetry of the top-quark mass generating sector can be enhanced relative to the standard model. Using an effective field theory calculation, we illustrate how the leading contributions to {alpha}T, {alpha}S, and the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling in this model arise from an effective operator coupling right-handed top quarks to the Z boson, and how the effects on these observables are correlated. We contrast this toy model with extradimensional models in which the extended custodial symmetry is invoked to control the size of additional contributions to {alpha}T and the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling, while leaving the standard model contributions essentially unchanged.

  7. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  8. Reflections on Symmetry and Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrotsy, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The concept of symmetry is fundamental to mathematics. Arguments and proofs based on symmetry are often aesthetically pleasing because they are subtle and succinct and non-standard. This article uses notions of symmetry to approach the solutions to a broad range of mathematical problems. It responds to Krutetskii's criteria for mathematical…

  9. PSEUDOSPIN SYMMETRY IN NUCLEI, SPIN SYMMETRY IN HADRONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. PAGE; T. GOLDMAN; J. GINOCCHIO

    2000-08-01

    Ginocchio argued that chiral symmetry breaking in QCD is responsible for the relativistic pseudospin symmetry in the Dirac equation, explaining the observed approximate pseudospin symmetry in sizable nuclei. On a much smaller scale, it is known that spin-orbit splittings in hadrons are small. Specifically, new experimental data from CLEO indicate small splittings in D-mesons. For heavy-light mesons we identify a cousin of pseudospin symmetry that suppresses these splittings in the Dirac equation, known as spin symmetry. We suggest an experimental test of the implications of spin symmetry for wave functions in electron-positron annihilation. We investigate how QCD can give rise to two different dynamical symmetries on nuclear and hadronic scales.

  10. A broken symmetry ontology: Quantum mechanics as a broken symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Buschmann, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The author proposes a new broken symmetry ontology to be used to analyze the quantum domain. This ontology is motivated and grounded in a critical epistemological analysis, and an analysis of the basic role of symmetry in physics. Concurrently, he is led to consider nonheterogeneous systems, whose logical state space contains equivalence relations not associated with the causal relation. This allows him to find a generalized principle of symmetry and a generalized symmetry-conservation formalisms. In particular, he clarifies the role of Noether's theorem in field theory. He shows how a broken symmetry ontology already operates in a description of the weak interactions. Finally, by showing how a broken symmetry ontology operates in the quantum domain, he accounts for the interpretational problem and the essential incompleteness of quantum mechanics. He proposes that the broken symmetry underlying this ontological domain is broken dilation invariance.

  11. Chiral symmetry and pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-07-01

    Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, mesons and baryons are illustrated in the language of the Dirac theory. Various forces acting between quarks inside baryons are discussed. I explain why the naive quark models typically overestimate pentaquark masses by some 500 MeV and why in the fully relativistic approach to baryons pentaquarks turn out to be light. I discuss briefly why it can be easier to produce pentaquarks at low than at high energies.

  12. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  13. Diamond Machining of an Off-Axis Biconic Aspherical Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Preuss, Werner; Sohn, Alex; MacKenty, John

    2009-01-01

    Two diamond-machining methods have been developed as part of an effort to design and fabricate an off-axis, biconic ellipsoidal, concave aluminum mirror for an infrared spectrometer at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. Beyond this initial application, the methods can be expected to enable satisfaction of requirements for future instrument mirrors having increasingly complex (including asymmetrical), precise shapes that, heretofore, could not readily be fabricated by diamond machining or, in some cases, could not be fabricated at all. In the initial application, the mirror is prescribed, in terms of Cartesian coordinates x and y, by aperture dimensions of 94 by 76 mm, placements of -2 mm off axis in x and 227 mm off axis in y, an x radius of curvature of 377 mm, a y radius of curvature of 407 mm, an x conic constant of 0.078, and a y conic constant of 0.127. The aspect ratio of the mirror blank is about 6. One common, "diamond machining" process uses single-point diamond turning (SPDT). However, it is impossible to generate the required off-axis, biconic ellipsoidal shape by conventional SPDT because (1) rotational symmetry is an essential element of conventional SPDT and (2) the present off-axis biconic mirror shape lacks rotational symmetry. Following conventional practice, it would be necessary to make this mirror from a glass blank by computer-controlled polishing, which costs more than diamond machining and yields a mirror that is more difficult to mount to a metal bench. One of the two present diamond machining methods involves the use of an SPDT machine equipped with a fast tool servo (FTS). The SPDT machine is programmed to follow the rotationally symmetric asphere that best fits the desired off-axis, biconic ellipsoidal surface. The FTS is actuated in synchronism with the rotation of the SPDT machine to generate the difference between the desired surface and the best-fit rotationally symmetric asphere. In order to minimize the required stroke of the FTS

  14. PT symmetry in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Demetrios

    2015-03-01

    Interest in complex Hamiltonians has been rekindled after the realization that a wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can have entirely real spectra as long as they simultaneously respect parity and time reversal operators. In non-relativistic quantum mechanics, governed by the Schrödinger equation, a necessary but not sufficient condition for PT symmetry to hold is that the complex potential should involve real and imaginary parts which are even and odd functions of position respectively. As recently indicated, optics provides a fertile ground to observe and utilize notions of PT symmetry. In optics, the refractive index and gain/loss profiles play the role of the real and imaginary parts of the aforementioned complex potentials. As it has been demonstrated in several studies, PT-symmetric optical structures can exhibit peculiar properties that are otherwise unattainable in traditional Hermitian (conservative) optical settings. Among them, is the possibility for breaking this symmetry through an abrupt phase transition, band merging effects and unidirectional invisibility. Here we review recent developments in the field of -symmetric optics.

  15. Two types of bilateral symmetry in the Metazoa: chordate and bilaterian.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, R P

    1991-01-01

    The chordate sagittal plane is perpendicular to the sagittal plane primitive for the bilaterally symmetrical metazoans (Bilateria). The earliest metazoans, when symmetrical at all, were probably radial in symmetry. The axis of symmetry was vertical and the mouth, when present, opened either upward or downward. The Bilateria evolved from the primitive metazoan condition by acquiring bilateral symmetry, mesoderm, a brain at the anterior end and protonephridia. Perhaps in the stem lineage of the Bilateria a hydroid-like or medusoid-like ancestor fell over on one side onto a substrate (pleurothetism). If so, the anteroposterior axis of Bilateria would be homologous with the vertical axis of radial symmetry in coelenterates. The bilaterian plane of symmetry arose to include the anteroposterior axis. The Deuterostomia (the Hemichordata, Echinodermata and Chordata) evolved within the Bilateria by producing the mouth as a secondary perforation. Within the deuterostomes the echinoderms and chordates constitute a monophyletic group named Dexiothetica. Hemichordates retain the primitive bilaterian sagittal plane. The Dexiothetica derive from an ancestor like the present-day hemichordate Cephalodiscus which had lain down on the primitive right side (dexiothetism) and acquired a calcite skeleton. The echinoderms evolved from this ancestor by losing the ancestral locomotory tail and gill slit, becoming static, moving the mouth to the centre of the new upper surface and developing radial pentameral symmetry. The chordates evolved from the same ancestor by developing a notochord in the tail, losing the water vascular system, evolving a filter-feeding pharynx and developing a new vertical plane of bilateral symmetry perpendicular to the old bilaterian plane. Evidence derived from certain bizarre Palaeozoic marine fossils (calcichordates) gives a detailed history of the early evolution of echinoderms and chordates and shows how the new bilateral symmetry was gradually acquired in

  16. Hierarchically Flower-like N-Doped Porous Carbon Materials Derived from an Explosive 3-Fold Interpenetrating Diamondoid Copper Metal-Organic Framework for a Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuo-Xi; Zou, Kang-Yu; Zhang, Xue; Han, Tong; Yang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    A peculiar copper metal-organic framework (Cu-MOF) was synthesized by a self-assembly method, which presents a 3-fold interpenetrating diamondoid net based on the square-planar Cu(II) node. Although it exhibits a high degree of interpenetration, the Cu-MOF still exhibits a one-dimensional channel, which provides a template for constructing porous materials through the "precursor" strategy. Furthermore, the explosive ClO4(-) ion, which resided in the channel, could induce the quick decomposition of organic ingredients and release a huge amount of gas, which is beneficial for the porosity of postsynthetic materials. Significantly, we first utilize this explosive MOF to prepare a series of Cu@C composites through the calcination-thermolysis method at different temperatures, which contain copper particles exhibiting various shapes and combinations with the carbon substrate. Considering the hole-forming effect of copper particles, Cu@C composites were etched by HCl to afford a sequence of hierarchically flower-like N-doped porous carbon materials (NPCs), which retain the original morphology of the Cu-MOF. Interestingly, NPC-900, originating from the calcination of the Cu-MOF at 900 °C, exhibits a more regular flower-like morphology, the largest specific surface area, abundant porosities, and multiple nitrogen functionalities. The remarkable specific capacitances are 138 F g(-1) at 5 mV s(-1) and 149 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) for the NPC-900 electrode in a 6 M potassium hydroxide aqueous solution. Moreover, the retention of capacitance remains 86.8% (125 F g(-1)) at 1 A g(-1) over 2000 cycles, which displays good chemical stability. These findings suggest that NPC-900 can be applied as a suitable electrode for a supercapacitor. PMID:27304095

  17. Classification of stable Dirac and Weyl semimetals with reflection and rotational symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zihao; Hua, Meng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac and Weyl semimetals are novel states of quantum matter. We classify stable 3D Dirac and Weyl semimetals with reflection and rotational symmetry in the presence of time reversal symmetry and spin-orbit coupling, which belong to seventeen different point groups. They have two classes of reflection symmetry, with the mirror plane parallel and perpendicular to rotation axis. In both cases two types of Dirac points, existing through accidental band crossing (ABC) or at a time reversal invariant momentum (TBC), are determined by four different reflection symmetries. We classify those two types of Dirac points with a combination of different reflection and rotational symmetries. We further classify Dirac and Weyl line nodes to show in which types of mirror plane they can exist. Finally we discuss that Weyl line nodes and Dirac points can exist at the same time taking C4 v symmetry as an example.

  18. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  19. The A/P axis in echinoderm ontogeny and evolution: evidence from fossils and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K. J.; Arenas-Mena, C.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    Even though echinoderms are members of the Bilateria, the location of their anterior/posterior axis has remained enigmatic. Here we propose a novel solution to the problem employing three lines of evidence: the expression of a posterior class Hox gene in the coeloms of the nascent adult body plan within the larva; the anatomy of certain early fossil echinoderms; and finally the relation between endoskeletal plate morphology and the associated coelomic tissues. All three lines of evidence converge on the same answer, namely that the location of the adult mouth is anterior, and the anterior/posterior axis runs from the mouth through the adult coelomic compartments. This axis then orients the animal such that there is but a single plane of symmetry dividing the animal into left and right halves. We tentatively hypothesize that this plane of symmetry is positioned along the dorsal/ventral axis. These axis identifications lead to the conclusion that the five ambulacra are not primary body axes, but instead are outgrowths from the central anterior/posterior axis. These identifications also shed insight into several other evolutionary mysteries of various echinoderm clades such as the independent evolution of bilateral symmetry in irregular echinoids, but do not elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the adult coelomic architecture.

  20. Low-temperature magnetic phase transitions in the multiferroic Nd0.9Dy0.1Fe3(BO3)4. Part 1. Transitions induced by magnetic fields directed along the trigonal symmetry axis. Spontaneous transitions with temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagina, G. A.; Zhekov, K. R.; Bilych, I. V.; Kolodyazhnaya, M. P.; Zvyagin, A. A.; Bludov, A. N.; Pashchenko, V. A.; Gudim, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    The elastic and magnetic characteristics of single-crystal Nd0.9Dy0.1Fe3(BO3)4 are studied at low temperatures in zero magnetic field and in external fields H||C3. The temperature dependences of the acoustic mode velocities and the magnetic susceptibility manifest a transition of the magnetic subsystem into a magnetically ordered state and two successive, spontaneous spin-reorientation phase transitions. The possibility of a spontaneous transition into an incommensurate (spiral) magnetic phase in the crystal is discussed. It is shown that an external magnetic field directed along the trigonal axis of the crystal induces a sequence of spin-reorientation phase transitions. An H-T phase diagram (H||C3) is constructed for this compound.

  1. Suppression of Speckles at High Adaptive Correction Using Speckle Symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.

    2006-01-01

    Focal-plane speckles set important sensitivity limits on ground- or space-based imagers and coronagraphs that may be used to search for faint companions, perhaps ultimately including exoplanets, around stars. As speckles vary with atmospheric fluctuations or with drifting beamtrain aberrations, they contribute speckle noise proportional to their full amplitude. Schemes to suppress speckles are thus of great interest. At high adaptive correction, speckles organize into species, represented by algebraic terms in the expansion of the phase exponential, that have distinct spatial symmetry, even or odd, under spatial inversion. Filtering speckle patterns by symmetry may eliminate a disproportionate fraction of the speckle noise while blocking (only) half of the image signal from the off-axis companion being sought. The fraction of speckle power and hence of speckle noise in each term will vary with degree of correction, and so also will the net symmetry in the speckle pattern.

  2. Thermal symmetry in isoscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, C. R.; Lopez, J. A.; Dorso, C. O.

    2007-02-12

    It is determined that isoscaling data, if produced by two isotopic reactions under similar thermodynamic conditions, should satisfy a simple numerical relationship. This, which helps to explore the symmetry of thermodynamic conditions of isotopic reactions, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations of 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+48Ca, and 52Ca+52Ca, at beam energies from 35 MeV / A to 85 MeV / A, and as a function of time. Strong deviations from the rule are detected in the beginning of the collision, with an excellent convergence at long times for some energies. A comparison with experimental data and other calculations is also included.

  3. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  4. Applications of chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    The author discusses several topics in the applications of chiral symmetry at nonzero temperature. First, where does the rho go? The answer: up. The restoration of chiral symmetry at a temperature T{sub {chi}} implies that the {rho} and a{sub 1} vector mesons are degenerate in mass. In a gauged linear sigma model the {rho} mass increases with temperature, m{sub {rho}}(T{sub {chi}}) > m{sub {rho}}(0). The author conjectures that at T{sub {chi}} the thermal {rho} - a{sub 1}, peak is relatively high, at about {approximately}1 GeV, with a width approximately that at zero temperature (up to standard kinematic factors). The {omega} meson also increases in mass, nearly degenerate with the {rho}, but its width grows dramatically with temperature, increasing to at least {approximately}100 MeV by T{sub {chi}}. The author also stresses how utterly remarkable the principle of vector meson dominance is, when viewed from the modern perspective of the renormalization group. Secondly, he discusses the possible appearance of disoriented chiral condensates from {open_quotes}quenched{close_quotes} heavy ion collisions. It appears difficult to obtain large domains of disoriented chiral condensates in the standard two flavor model. This leads to the last topic, which is the phase diagram for QCD with three flavors, and its proximity to the chiral critical point. QCD may be very near this chiral critical point, and one might thereby generated large domains of disoriented chiral condensates.

  5. Micromachined dual input axis rate gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Thor Nelson

    The need for inexpensive yet reliable angular rate sensors in fields ranging from automotive to consumer electronics has motivated prolific micromachined rate gyroscope research. The vast majority of research has focused on single input axis rate gyroscopes based upon either translational resonance, such as tuning forks, or structural mode resonance, such as vibrating rings. However, this work presents a novel, contrasting approach based on angular resonance of a rotating rigid rotor suspended by torsional springs. The inherent symmetry of the circular design allows angular rate measurement about two axes simultaneously, hence the name micromachined dual-axis rate gyroscope. The underlying theory of operation, mechanical structure design optimization, electrical interface circuitry, and signal processing are described in detail. Several operational versions were fabricated using two different fully integrated surface micromachining processes as proof of concept. The heart of the dual-axis rate gyroscope is a ˜2 mum thick polysilicon disk or rotor suspended above the substrate by a four beam suspension. When this rotor in driven into angular oscillation about the axis perpendicular to the substrate, a rotation rate about the two axes parallel to the substrate invokes an out of plane rotor tilting motion due to Coriolis acceleration. This tilting motion is capacitively measured and on board integrated signal processing provides two output voltages proportional to angular rate input about the two axes parallel to the substrate. The design process begins with the derivation of gyroscopic dynamics. The equations suggest that tuning sense mode frequencies to the drive oscillation frequency can vastly increase mechanical sensitivity. Hence the supporting four beam suspension is designed such that electrostatic tuning can match modes despite process variations. The electrostatic tuning range is limited only by rotor collapse to the substrate when tuning-voltage induced

  6. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  7. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  8. Symmetry of Magnetically Ordered Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, Ron

    1998-03-01

    The notion of magnetic symmetry is reexamined in light of the recent observation of long-range magnetic order in icosahedral quasicrystals [Charrier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4637 (1997)]. The relation between the symmetry of a magnetically ordered (periodic or quasiperiodic) crystal, given in terms of a ``spin space group,'' and its neutron diffraction diagram is established. In doing so, an outline of a symmetry classification scheme for magnetically ordered quasiperiodic crystals, is provided. Predictions are given for the expected diffraction patterns of magnetically ordered icosahedral crystals, provided their symmetry is well described by icosahedral spin space groups.

  9. Spontaneous Planar Chiral Symmetry Breaking in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidjojo, Jeremy; Lubensky, David

    Recent progress in animal development has highlighted the central role played by planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelial tissue morphogenesis. Through PCP, cells have the ability to collectively polarize in the plane of the epithelium by localizing morphogenetic proteins along a certain axis. This allows direction-dependent modulation of tissue mechanical properties that can translate into the formation of complex, non-rotationally invariant shapes. Recent experimental observations[1] show that cells, in addition to being planar-polarized, can also spontaneously develop planar chirality, perhaps in the effort of making yet more complex shapes that are reflection non-invariant. In this talk we will present our work in characterizing general mechanisms that can lead to spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in cells. We decompose interfacial concentration of polarity proteins in a hexagonal cell packing into irreducible representations. We find that in the case of polar concentration distributions, a chiral state can only be reached from a secondary instability after the cells are polarized. However in the case of nematic distributions, we show that a finite-amplitude (subcritical, or ``first-order'') nematic transition can send the system from disorder directly to a chiral state. In addition, we find that perturbing the system by stretching the hexagonal packing enables direct (supercritical, or ``second-order'') chiral transition in the nematic case. Finally, we do a Landau expansion to study competition between stretch-induced chirality and the tendency towards a non-chiral state in packings that have retained the full 6-fold symmetry.

  10. Pion scattering poles and chiral symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Fraile, D.; Nicola, A. Gomez; Herruzo, E. T.

    2007-10-15

    Using unitarized chiral perturbation theory methods, we perform a detailed analysis of the {pi}{pi} scattering poles f{sub 0}(600) and {rho}(770) behavior when medium effects such as temperature or density drive the system towards chiral symmetry restoration. In the analysis of real poles below threshold, we show that it is crucial to extend properly the unitarized amplitudes so that they match the perturbative Adler zeros. Our results do not show threshold enhancement effects at finite temperature in the f{sub 0}(600) channel, which remains as a pole of broad nature. We also implement T=0 finite-density effects related to chiral symmetry restoration, by varying the pole position with the pion decay constant. Although this approach takes into account only a limited class of contributions, we reproduce the expected finite-density restoration behavior, which drives the poles towards the real axis, producing threshold enhancement and {pi}{pi} bound states. We compare our results with several model approaches and discuss the experimental consequences, both in relativistic heavy ion collisions and in {pi}{yields}{pi}{pi} and {gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} reactions in nuclei.

  11. Breaking the symmetry of SN1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Kristy; Reynolds, Stephen

    2002-04-01

    SN1006 has proved to be the critical supernova remnant in the study of high-energy, nonthermal processes. It provided the first undisputed source of synchrotron X-rays and has led to the discovery of less dominate nonthermal X-ray emission in other SNRs. The full ASCA dataset (70 ks) provides coverage as yet unmatched by XMM or Chandra. Analysis of the integrated spectrum of SN1006 (Dyer et al. 2001) demonstrated that the spectra was well described by the SRESC synchrotron model with a small thermal component -- with important implications for elemental abundances. Models for SN1006 have been build around the striking cylindrical symmetry about the NW-SE axis. In these models the morphology is explained by limb brightening due to expansion into an upstream magnetic field. Now however, close spectral analysis of regions across the remnant indicate that SN1006 is NOT symmetric as previously thought. I will demonstrate that SRESC submodels place severe limits on nonthermal emission in non-limb regions -- breaking the symmetry and forcing the observer into a unique orientation with respect to the remnant and discuss the impact of this result.

  12. Teaching Molecular Symmetry of Dihedral Point Groups by Drawing Useful 2D Projections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Lan; Sun, Hongwei; Lai, Chengming

    2015-01-01

    There are two main difficulties in studying molecular symmetry of dihedral point groups. One is locating the C[subscript 2] axes perpendicular to the C[subscript n] axis, while the other is finding the s[subscript]d planes which pass through the C[subscript n] axis and bisect the angles formed by adjacent C[subscript 2] axes. In this paper, a…

  13. NIF symmetry capsule modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Pino, J. E.; Rowley, D. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Tipton, R. E.

    2013-10-01

    NIF CH ablator symmetry capsules are filled with hydrogen or helium gas. SymCaps have more moderate convergence ratios ~ 15 as opposed to ~ 35 for ignition capsules with DT ice layers, and better agreement has been achieved between simulations and experimental data. We will present modeling of capsules with CD layers and tritium fill, for which we are able to match the dependence of DT yield on recession distance of the CD layer from the gas. We can also match the performance of CH capsules with D3 He fill. The simulations include surface roughness, drive asymmetry, a mock-up of modulation introduced by the tent holding the capsule, and an empirical prescription for ablator-gas atomic mix. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Symmetry in the Car Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a lesson on rotational symmetry which she developed for her students. The aim of the lesson was "to identify objects with rotational symmetry in the staff car park" and the success criteria were "pictures or sketches of at least six objects with different orders of rotation". After finding examples of…

  15. Crystallographic and Spectroscopic Symmetry Notations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Compares Schoenflies and Hermann-Mauguin notations of symmetry. Although the former (used by spectroscopists) and latter (used by crystallographers) both describe the same symmetry, there are distinct differences in the manner of description which may lead to confusion in correlating the two notations. (Author/JN)

  16. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  17. Generalized Atkin-Lehner symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.

    1990-09-01

    Atkin-Lehner symmetry was proposed several years ago as a mechanism for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant in nonsupersymmetric superstring models, but for models formulated in four-dimensional spacetime this symmetry cannot be realized. We therefore investigate various means of retaining the general Atkin-Lehner idea without having strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry. We first explicitly construct non-Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions which not only lead to vanishing cosmological constants but which also avoid a recent proof that Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions cannot arise from physically viable string models in greater than two dimensions. We then develop a systematic generalization of Atkin-Lehner symmetry, basing our considerations on the use of non-Hermitian operators as well as on a general class of possible congruence subgroups of the full modular group. We find that whereas in many instances our resulting symmetries reduce to either strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry or symmetries closely related to it, in other cases we obtain symmetries of a fundamentally new character. Our results therefore suggest possible new avenues for retaining the general Atkin-Lehner ``selection rule'' approach for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant.

  18. Generalized Atkin-Lehner symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, K.R. )

    1990-09-15

    Atkin-Lehner symmetry was proposed several years ago as a mechanism for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant in nonsupersymmetric superstring models, but for models formulated in four-dimensional spacetime this symmetry cannot be realized. We therefore investigate various means of retaining the general Atkin-Lehner idea without having strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry. We first explicitly construct non-Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions which not only lead to vanishing cosmological constants but which also avoid a recent proof that Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions cannot arise from physically viable string models in greater than two dimensions. We then develop a systematic generalization of Atkin-Lehner symmetry, basing our considerations on the use of non-Hermitian operators as well as on a general class of possible congruence subgroups of the full modular group. We find that whereas in many instances our resulting symmetries reduce to either strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry or symmetries closely related to it, in other cases we obtain symmetries of a fundamentally new character. Our results therefore suggest possible new avenues for retaining the general Atkin-Lehner selection rule'' approach for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant.

  19. Three axis attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A three-axis attitude control system for an orbiting body comprised of a motor driven flywheel supported by a torque producing active magnetic bearing is described. Free rotation of the flywheel is provided about its central axis and together with limited angular torsional deflections of the flywheel about two orthogonal axes which are perpendicular to the central axis. The motor comprises an electronically commutated DC motor, while the magnetic bearing comprises a radially servoed permanent magnet biased magnetic bearing capable of producing cross-axis torques on the flywheel. Three body attitude sensors for pitch, yaw and roll generate respective command signals along three mutually orthogonal axes (x, y, z) which are coupled to circuit means for energizing a set of control coils for producing torques about two of the axes (x and y) and speed control of the flywheel about the third (z) axis. An energy recovery system, which is operative during motor deceleration, is also included which permits the use of a high-speed motor to perform effectively as a reactive wheel suspended in the magnetic bearing.

  20. Ultraviolet completion without symmetry restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endlich, Solomon; Nicolis, Alberto; Penco, Riccardo

    2014-03-01

    We show that it is not possible to UV complete certain low-energy effective theories with spontaneously broken spacetime symmetries by embedding them into linear sigma models, that is, by adding "radial" modes and restoring the broken symmetries. When such a UV completion is not possible, one can still raise the cutoff up to arbitrarily higher energies by adding fields that transform nonlinearly under the broken symmetries, that is, new Goldstone bosons. However, this (partial) UV completion does not necessarily restore any of the broken symmetries. We illustrate this point by considering a concrete example in which a combination of spacetime and internal symmetries is broken down to a diagonal subgroup. Along the way, we clarify a recently proposed interpretation of inverse Higgs constraints as gauge-fixing conditions.

  1. Asymptotic symmetries from finite boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Marolf, Donald

    2016-01-01

    It is natural to regulate an infinite-sized system by imposing a boundary condition at finite distance, placing the system in a 'box.' This breaks symmetries, though the breaking is small when the box is large. One should thus be able to obtain the asymptotic symmetries of the infinite system by studying regulated systems. We provide concrete examples in the context of Einstein-Hilbert gravity (with negative or zero cosmological constant) by showing in 4 or more dimensions how the anti-de Sitter and Poincaré asymptotic symmetries can be extracted from gravity in a spherical box with Dirichlet boundary conditions. In 2 + 1 dimensions we obtain the full double-Virasoro algebra of asymptotic symmetries for AdS3 and, correspondingly, the full Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra for asymptotically flat space. In higher dimensions, a related approach may continue to be useful for constructing a good asymptotically flat phase space with BMS asymptotic symmetries.

  2. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  3. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  4. Off-axis photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Ryan; Applegate, Brian E.

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We have developed a novel photoacoustic microscope design, which substantially simplifies construction by enabling the use of unmodified commercial optics and ultrasonic transducers. Moreover, the simple design may be readily incorporated into a standard light microscope, thus providing a familiar imaging platform for clinical researchers. A proof-of-concept Off-Axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 μm and a modest axial resolution of 410 μm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. We have derived the appropriate equations to describe the relevant design parameters and verified the equations via measurements made on our prototype Off-Axis PAM system. A consequence of the simple design is a reduction in axial resolution compared to coaxial designs. The reduction is inversely proportional to the cosine of the angle between excitation and detection and equal to 15% and 41% for angles of 30º and 45º, respectively. While resolution is negatively affected by off-axis detection, the ability to measure weak signals at depth is enhanced. Off-axis detection has an inherent dark-field quality; chromophores excited outside the numerical aperture of the ultrasonic detector will not be detected. The physical geometry of Off-Axis PAM enables the placement of the ultrasonic transducer at the minimum distance from the sample with no obstructions between the sample and transducer. This may prove to be an additional advantage of Off-Axis PAM over designs that incorporate long working distance ultrasonic transducers and/or require the propagation of the acoustic wave through the laser excitation optics to achieve co-axial detection.

  5. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  6. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  7. Anomalous discrete symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. )

    1992-12-01

    We examine an interesting scenario to solve the domain-wall problem recently suggested by Preskill, Trivedi, Wilczek, and Wise. The effective potential is calculated in the presence of the QCD axial anomaly. It is shown that some discrete symmetries such as {ital CP} and {ital Z}{sub 2} can be anomalous due to a so-called {ital K} term induced by instantons. We point out that the {ital Z}{sub 2} domain-wall problem in the two-doublet standard model can be resolved by two types of solutions: the {ital CP}-conserving one and the {ital CP}-breaking one. In the first case, there exist two {ital Z}{sub 2}-related local minima whose energy splitting is provided by the instanton effect. In the second case, there is only one unique vacuum so that the domain walls do not form at all. The consequences of this new source of {ital CP} violation are discussed and shown to be well within the experimental limits in weak interactions.

  8. Enhanced stability of skyrmions in magnets with broken mirror symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, James; Banerjee, Sumilan; Randeria, Mohit

    Most previous work on skyrmion phases in chiral magnets with Dzyaloshinkii Moriya interactions (DMI) focuses on the case of broken bulk inversion symmetry. The skyrmion crystal is then stable only in a limited range of parameter space with easy-axis anisotropy. In this talk I will describe the effects of including broken mirror or surface inversion symmetry which leads to a Rashba DMI, in addition to the Dresselhaus DMI arising from broken bulk inversion. I will show that increasing Rashba DMI leads to a progressively larger domain of stability for skyrmions, especially in the easy-plane anisotropy regime. In the latter regime the topological charge density shows an unusual internal structure, and isolated skyrmions cannot be embedded in a ferromagnetic background. Thus the homotopy group π2 (S2) method of classifying skyrmions fails. I will discuss a Chern number classification of these non-trivial skyrmions using maps from the 2-torus (the unit cell for skyrmion crystals) to the 2-sphere in spin space. Finally, I will discuss the elliptic cone phase, a new state that emerges for easy-axis anisotropy and broken mirror symmetry. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Grant No. DGE-1343012 (JR), by an NSF Grant DMR-1410364 (MR), and by the CEM, an NSF MRSEC, under Grant DMR-1420451.

  9. Three axis velocity probe system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Smith, Jr., Nelson S.; Utt, Carroll E.

    1992-01-01

    A three-axis velocity probe system for determining three-axis positional velocities of small particles in fluidized bed systems and similar applications. This system has a sensor head containing four closely-spaced sensing electrodes of small wires that have flat ends to establish a two axis plane, e.g. a X-Y plane. Two of the sensing electrodes are positioned along one of the axes and the other two are along the second axis. These four sensing electrodes are surrounded by a guard electrode, and the outer surface is a ground electrode and support member for the sensing head. The electrodes are excited by, for example, sinusoidal voltage having a peak-to-peak voltage of up to 500 volts at a frequency of 2 MHz. Capacitive currents flowing between the four sensing electrodes and the ground electrode are influenced by the presence and position of a particle passing the sensing head. Any changes in these currents due to the particle are amplified and synchronously detected to produce positional signal values that are converted to digital form. Using these digital forms and two values of time permit generation of values of the three components of the particle vector and thus the total velocity vector.

  10. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  11. Spectral theorem and partial symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A.; Gozdz, M.

    2012-10-15

    A novel method of the decompositon of a quantum system's Hamiltonian is presented. In this approach the criterion of the decomposition is determined by the symmetries possessed by the sub-Hamiltonians. This procedure is rather generic and independent of the actual global symmetry, or the lack of it, of the full Hamilton operator. A detailed investigation of the time evolution of the various sub-Hamiltonians, therefore the change in time of the symmetry of the physical object, is presented for the case of a vibrator-plus-rotor model. Analytical results are illustrated by direct numerical calculations.

  12. Hidden symmetries and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2009-10-01

    The paper contains a brief review of recent results on hidden symmetries in higher dimensional black hole spacetimes. We show how the existence of a principal CKY tensor (that is a closed conformal Killing-Yano 2-form) allows one to generate a `tower' of Killing-Yano and Killing tensors responsible for hidden symmetries. These symmetries imply complete integrability of geodesic equations and the complete separation of variables in the Hamilton-Jacobi, Klein-Gordon, Dirac and gravitational perturbation equations in the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS metrics. Equations of the parallel transport of frames along geodesics in these spacetimes are also integrable.

  13. The Relationship between the Perception of Axes of Symmetry and Spatial Memory during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortmann, Margaret R.; Schutte, Anne R.

    2010-01-01

    Early in development, there is a transition in spatial working memory (SWM). When remembering a location in a homogeneous space (e.g., in a sandbox), young children are biased toward the midline symmetry axis of the space. Over development, a transition occurs that leads to older children being biased away from midline. The dynamic field theory…

  14. Combining Flavour and CP Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio

    2013-07-01

    I shortly review the impact of the most recent neutrino oscillation data on our attempts to construct a realistic model for neutrino masses and mixing angles. Models based on anarchy and its variants remain an open possibility, reinforced by the latest experimental findings. Many models based on discrete symmetries no longer work in their simplest realizations. I illustrate several proposals that can rescue discrete symmetries. In particular I discuss the possibility of combining discrete flavour symmetries and CP, and I describe a recently proposed symmetry breaking pattern that allows to predict all mixing parameters, angles and phases, in terms of a single real unknown. I analyze several explicit examples of this construction, providing new realistic mixing patterns.

  15. A symmetry of massless fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Keller, J.

    1996-09-01

    It is proved that there exists an additional intrinsic symmetry in the left-handed and right-handed fermions (and other fields). The corresponding group of transformations is induced by the Poincar{acute e} translations in the space{endash}time manifold. This symmetry predicts an additional intrinsic energy-momentum for fermions. Considering this symmetry as local leads to introduction of a gauge field and of a nonintegrable phase angle, the corresponding Berry-type phase depends on the topology of the Riemannian space{endash}time manifold as determined by the vierbein. This additional symmetry provides us with the possibility of considering the fermions as gauge fields on the nonvector bundle. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Symmetries from the solution manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Víctor; Guerrero, Julio; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco F.; Cossío, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    We face a revision of the role of symmetries of a physical system aiming at characterizing the corresponding Solution Manifold (SM) by means of Noether invariants as a preliminary step towards a proper, non-canonical, quantization. To this end, "point symmetries" of the Lagrangian are generally not enough, and we must resort to the more general concept of contact symmetries. They are defined in terms of the Poincaré-Cartan form, which allows us, in turn, to find the symplectic structure on the SM, through some sort of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) transformation. These basic symmetries are realized as Hamiltonian vector fields, associated with (coordinate) functions on the SM, lifted back to the Evolution Manifold through the inverse of this HJ mapping, that constitutes an inverse of the Noether Theorem. The specific examples of a particle moving on S3, at the mechanical level, and nonlinear SU(2)-sigma model in field theory are sketched.

  17. Trace formula for broken symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Creagh, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    We derive a trace formula for systems that exhibit an approximate continuous symmetry. It interpolates between the sum over continuous families of periodic orbits that holds in the case of exact continuous symmetry, and the discrete sum over isolated orbits that holds when the symmetry is completely broken. It is based on a simple perturbation expansion of the classical dynamics, centered around the case of exact symmetry, and gives an approximation to the usual Gutzwiller formula when the perturbation is large. We illustrate the computation with some 2-dimensional examples: the deformation of the circular billiard into an ellipse, and anisotropic and anharmonic perturbations of a harmonic oscillator. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  18. Momentum dependence of symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Daniel D.; Youngs, Michael; Chajecki, Zbigniew; Lynch, William; Tsang, Betty; Zhang, Yingxun; Famiano, Michael; Ghosh, Tilak; Giacherio, B.; Kilburn, Micha; Lee, Jenny; Lu, Fei; Russotto, Paulo; Sanetullaev, Alisher; Showalter, Rachel; Verde, Giuseppe; Winkelbauer, Jack

    2014-09-01

    One of the main uncertainties in the Equation of State of neutron-rich nuclear matter concerns the density and momentum dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Some constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities have been recently obtained. However questions remain, especially concerning the momentum dependence of the symmetry mean-field potential that can make the neutron and proton effective masses different. We probe the momentum dependence of this isovector mean-field potential by comparing the energy spectra of neutrons and protons emitted in 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn +124Sn collisions at incident energies of E/A = 50 and 120 MeV. We achieve an experimental precision that can discriminate between transport model predictions for the n/p double ratio for different momentum dependencies of the symmetry mean-field potential. One of the main uncertainties in the Equation of State of neutron-rich nuclear matter concerns the density and momentum dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Some constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities have been recently obtained. However questions remain, especially concerning the momentum dependence of the symmetry mean-field potential that can make the neutron and proton effective masses different. We probe the momentum dependence of this isovector mean-field potential by comparing the energy spectra of neutrons and protons emitted in 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn collisions at incident energies of E/A = 50 and 120 MeV. We achieve an experimental precision that can discriminate between transport model predictions for the n/p double ratio for different momentum dependencies of the symmetry mean-field potential. PHY-1102511.

  19. Symmetry and quaternionic integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, G.; Rodríguez, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Given a hyperkahler manifold M, the hyperkahler structure defines a triple of symplectic structures on M; with these, a triple of Hamiltonians defines a so-called hyperHamiltonian dynamical system on M. These systems are integrable when can be mapped to a system of quaternionic oscillators. We discuss the symmetry of integrable hyperHamiltonian systems, i.e. quaternionic oscillators, and conversely how these symmetries characterize, at least in the Euclidean case, integrable hyperHamiltonian systems.

  20. Dynamical symmetries in nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years the concept of dynamical symmetries in nuclei has witnessed a renaissance of interest and activity. Much of this work has been developed in the context of the Interacting Boson Approximation (or IBA) model. The appearance and properties of dynamical symmetries in nuclei will be reviewed, with emphasis on their characteristic signatures and on the role of the proton-neutron interaction in their formation, systematics and evolution. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  1. Broken Symmetries and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Phase space symmetries inherent in the statistical theory of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are known to be broken dynamically to produce large-scale coherent magnetic structure. Here, results of a numerical study of decaying MHD turbulence are presented that show large-scale coherent structure also arises and persists in the presence of dissipation. Dynamically broken symmetries in MHD turbulence may thus play a fundamental role in the dynamo process.

  2. Anomalies and Discrete Chiral Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    2009-09-07

    The quantum anomaly that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.

  3. Stress and the reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Toufexis, D; Rivarola, M A; Lara, H; Viau, V

    2014-09-01

    There exists a reciprocal relationship between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes, wherein the activation of one affects the function of the other and vice versa. For example, both testosterone and oestrogen modulate the response of the HPA axis, whereas activation of the stress axis, especially activation that is repeating or chronic, has an inhibitory effect upon oestrogen and testosterone secretion. Alterations in maternal care can produce significant effects on both HPG and HPA physiology, as well as behaviour in the offspring at adulthood. For example, changes in reproductive behaviour induced by altered maternal care may alter the expression of sex hormone receptors such as oestrogen receptor (ER)α that govern sexual behaviour, and may be particularly important in determining the sexual strategies utilised by females. Stress in adulthood continues to mediate HPG activity in females through activation of a sympathetic neural pathway originating in the hypothalamus and releasing norepinephrine into the ovary, which produces a noncyclic anovulatory ovary that develops cysts. In the opposite direction, sex differences and sex steroid hormones regulate the HPA axis. For example, although serotonin (5-HT) has a stimulatory effect on the HPA axis in humans and rodents that is mediated by the 5-HT1A receptor, only male rodents respond to 5-HT1A antagonism to show increased corticosterone responses to stress. Furthermore, oestrogen appears to decrease 5-HT1A receptor function at presynaptic sites, yet increases 5-HT1A receptor expression at postsynaptic sites. These mechanisms could explain the heightened stress HPA axis responses in females compared to males. Studies on female rhesus macaques show that chronic stress in socially subordinate female monkeys produces a distinct behavioural phenotype that is largely unaffected by oestrogen, a hyporesponsive HPA axis that is hypersensitive to the modulating effects

  4. Stress and the Reproductive Axis

    PubMed Central

    Toufexis, Donna; Rivarola, Maria Angelica; Lara, Hernan; Viau, Victor

    2014-01-01

    There exists a reciprocal relationship between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes wherein the activation of one affects the function of the other and vice versa. For instance, both testosterone and oestrogen modulate the response of the HPA axis, while activation of the stress axis, especially activation that is repeating or chronic, has an inhibitory effect upon oestrogen and testosterone secretion. Alterations in maternal care can produce significant effects on both HPG and HPA physiology and behaviour in the offspring at adulthood. For example, changes in reproductive behaviour induced by altered maternal care may alter the expression of sex hormone receptors like ERα that govern sexual behaviour, and may be particularly important in determining the sexual strategies utilized by females. Stress in adulthood continues to mediate HPG activity in females through activation of a sympathetic neural pathway originating in the hypothalamus and releasing norepinephrine (NE) into the ovary, which produces a non-cyclic anovulatory ovary that develops cysts. In the opposite direction, sex differences and sex steroid hormones regulate the HPA axis. For example, although serotonin (5-HT) has a stimulatory effect on the HPA axis in humans and rodents that is mediated by the 5-HT1A receptor, only male rodents respond to 5-HT1A antagonism to show increased corticosterone responses to stress. Furthermore, oestrogen appears to decrease 5-HT1A receptor function at presynaptic sites, yet increase 5-HT1A receptor expression at postsynaptic sites. These mechanisms could explain heightened stress HPA axis responses in females compared to males. Studies on female rhesus macaques show that chronic stress in socially subordinate female monkeys produces a distinct behavioral phenotype that is largely unaffected by oestrogen, a hypo-responsive HPA axis that is hypersensitive to the modulating effects of oestrogen, and changes in 5-HT

  5. Trends in flower symmetry evolution revealed through phylogenetic and developmental genetic advances

    PubMed Central

    Hileman, Lena C.

    2014-01-01

    A striking aspect of flowering plant (angiosperm) diversity is variation in flower symmetry. From an ancestral form of radial symmetry (polysymmetry, actinomorphy), multiple evolutionary transitions have contributed to instances of non-radial forms, including bilateral symmetry (monosymmetry, zygomorphy) and asymmetry. Advances in flowering plant molecular phylogenetic research and studies of character evolution as well as detailed flower developmental genetic studies in a few model species (e.g. Antirrhinum majus, snapdragon) have provided a foundation for deep insights into flower symmetry evolution. From phylogenetic studies, we have a better understanding of where during flowering plant diversification transitions from radial to bilateral flower symmetry (and back to radial symmetry) have occurred. From developmental studies, we know that a genetic programme largely dependent on the functional action of the CYCLOIDEA gene is necessary for differentiation along the snapdragon dorsoventral flower axis. Bringing these two lines of inquiry together has provided surprising insights into both the parallel recruitment of a CYC-dependent developmental programme during independent transitions to bilateral flower symmetry, and the modifications to this programme in transitions back to radial flower symmetry, during flowering plant evolution. PMID:24958922

  6. Frequency analysis of the non-principal-axis rotation of uniaxial space debris in circular orbit subjected to gravity-gradient torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hou-Yuan; Zhao, Chang-Yin; Zhang, Ming-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-principal-axis rotational motion of uniaxial space debris can be decomposed into periodic motions associated with two frequencies: the polhode frequency of the space debris rotating around the symmetry axis, and the tumbling frequency of the symmetry axis rotating around the angular momentum. To determine from optical measurements the rotational motion of upper rocket stages in circular orbits subjected to gravity-gradient torque, the evolutions of these two frequencies need to be analyzed. Taking into account only the long-term changes in the long-period variables, the differential equations of the non-principal axis rotational motion of the uniaxial space debris are averaged and reduced, from which the evolutions of the polhode and tumbling frequencies are then obtained analytically. The theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations of the diffuse reflection model. The frequencies in the variation of the reflected light intensity in the simulation are analyzed using the frequency map analysis (FMA) method. Errors of these results are found to be less than 1%. Based on the theoretical expressions, the rotational state of the uniaxial space debris can be estimated in the simulation without any prior information except the orbital parameters. A series of state variables are estimated, including the ratio of the moments of inertia about the transverse axis and the symmetry axis, the instantaneous rotation velocity, the orientation of the angular momentum, and the precession cone of the symmetry axis.

  7. Linearly polarized light with axial symmetry generated by liquid-crystal polarization converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalder, M.; Schadt, M.

    1996-12-01

    Novel liquid-crystal devices are described that generate linearly polarized light with axial symmetry; the beam propagation axis is the symmetry axis. Such light fields can be characterized by a polarization order number P . For example, P=1 fields represent radially or azimuthally polarized light. The reorientation of the polarization orientation in these polarization converters is due to the twisted nematic effect and the effect of lambda /2 wave plates. A single polarization converter can generate fields of orders 1 and 2. It is shown that one can in principle generate fields of any integral order P by cascading such elements. Devices that generate P=1 fields are achromatic and can be used as polarization axis finders or as versatile tools for studying birefringent or polarizing materials.

  8. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis.

    PubMed

    Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M; Chiamolera, Maria I; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C; Wondisford, Fredic E

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis determines the set point of thyroid hormone (TH) production. Hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulates the synthesis and secretion of pituitary thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH), which acts at the thyroid to stimulate all steps of TH biosynthesis and secretion. The THs thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) control the secretion of TRH and TSH by negative feedback to maintain physiological levels of the main hormones of the HPT axis. Reduction of circulating TH levels due to primary thyroid failure results in increased TRH and TSH production, whereas the opposite occurs when circulating THs are in excess. Other neural, humoral, and local factors modulate the HPT axis and, in specific situations, determine alterations in the physiological function of the axis. The roles of THs are vital to nervous system development, linear growth, energetic metabolism, and thermogenesis. THs also regulate the hepatic metabolism of nutrients, fluid balance and the cardiovascular system. In cells, TH actions are mediated mainly by nuclear TH receptors (210), which modify gene expression. T3 is the preferred ligand of THR, whereas T4, the serum concentration of which is 100-fold higher than that of T3, undergoes extra-thyroidal conversion to T3. This conversion is catalyzed by 5'-deiodinases (D1 and D2), which are TH-activating enzymes. T4 can also be inactivated by conversion to reverse T3, which has very low affinity for THR, by 5-deiodinase (D3). The regulation of deiodinases, particularly D2, and TH transporters at the cell membrane control T3 availability, which is fundamental for TH action. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1387-1428, 2016. PMID:27347897

  9. Symmetry in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among polarimetric backscattering coefficients are derived from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. For both reciprocal and non-reciprocal media, symmetry encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered. The derived properties are general and valid to all scattering mechanisms, including volume and surface scatterings and their interactions, in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is also discussed. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is then defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented. Experimental evidences of the symmetry relationships are shown and their use in polarimetric remote sensing is illustrated. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mt. Shasta area (California) and mixed forest near Presque Isle (Maine) exhibit characteristics of the centrical symmetry at C-band. For sea ice in the Beaufort Sea, multi-year sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e(sub 0), calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. First-year sea ice has e much smaller than e(sub 0) due to the preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering Sea, it is

  10. Noise regulation and symmetry breaking during vertebrate body elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emonet, Thierry; Das, Dipjyoti; Holley, Scott A.

    Elongation of the vertebrate body axis is driven by collective cell migration and cell proliferation at the posteriorly advancing embryonic tailbud. Within the Zebrafish tailbud an ordered stream of cells symmetrically bifurcates to form the left and right halves of the presomitic mesoderm. Maintaining bilateral symmetry during this process is critical to avoid catastrophic spine deformation. Using direct comparison between experimental data and a simple model of cell migration we identified the dynamic regulation of the noise in the direction of motion of individual cells as a critical factor in maintaining symmetric cell flow. Genetic perturbations that reduced noise led to body axis deformation whereas an increase in noise led to retarded elongation as predicted by our model.

  11. Parity-time symmetry broken by point-group symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Francisco M. Garcia, Javier

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a parity-time (PT) symmetric Hamiltonian with complex eigenvalues. It is based on the dimensionless Schrödinger equation for a particle in a square box with the PT-symmetric potential V(x, y) = iaxy. Perturbation theory clearly shows that some of the eigenvalues are complex for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point-group symmetry proves useful to guess if some of the eigenvalues may already be complex for all values of the coupling constant. We confirm those conclusions by means of an accurate numerical calculation based on the diagonalization method. On the other hand, the Schrödinger equation with the potential V(x, y) = iaxy{sup 2} exhibits real eigenvalues for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point group symmetry suggests that PT-symmetry may be broken in the former case and unbroken in the latter one.

  12. Physical symmetry and lattice symmetry in the lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.; Chen, S.; Jin, S.; Martinez, D.

    1997-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is regarded as a specific finite difference discretization for the kinetic equation of the discrete velocity distribution function. We argue that for finite sets of discrete velocity models, such as LBM, the physical symmetry is necessary for obtaining the correct macroscopic Navier-Stokes equations. In contrast, the lattice symmetry and the Lagrangian nature of the scheme, which is often used in the lattice gas automaton method and the existing lattice Boltzmann methods and directly associated with the property of particle dynamics, is not necessary for recovering the correct macroscopic dynamics. By relaxing the lattice symmetry constraint and introducing other numerical discretization, one can also obtain correct hydrodynamics. In addition, numerical simulations for applications, such as nonuniform meshes and thermohydrodynamics can be easily carried out and numerical stability can be ensured by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewey condition and using the semi-implicit collision scheme. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Signature of magnetization dynamics in spin-transfer-driven nanopillars with tilted easy axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Lin, Weiwei; Mangin, Stéphane; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen

    2013-01-01

    Special spin-transfer-driven magnetic behaviors can take place in a spin valve nanopillar with perpendicular anisotropy due to reduced symmetry of easy axis. Micromagnetic simulation demonstrates a dip in the average magnetization curve, which corresponds to the experimentally observed undulation of dc resistance. The dip is a signature of spin-transfer-driven reversable magnetic process with slightly tilted easy axis in the free layer. This featured magnetization dynamics includes non-uniform magnetization precession and multi-mode propagating spin waves, which are attributed to the competition among tilted magnetic anisotropy, magnetic field, and spin transfer torque.

  14. Pseudodielectric Functions of Uniaxial Materials in Certain Symmetry Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Baba, Justin S

    2006-01-01

    The pseudodielectric function is often used to represent ellipsometric data and corresponds to the actual dielectric functions of materials when there is no surface overlayer and the material is isotropic. If a uniaxial material is oriented such that the optic axis is in the plane of incidence or is perpendicular to the plane of incidence, then the cross-polarization terms are zero and appropriate pseudodielectric functions can be determined from the ellipsometry data. We calculate the pseudodielectric functions for uniaxial crystals in three primary symmetry directions: (1) the optic axis is perpendicular to the plane of incidence, (2) the optic axis is in the plane of the sample surface and parallel to the plane of incidence, and (3) the optic axis is in the plane of the sample surface and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. These results are expanded in terms of the difference in the ordinary and extraordinary dielectric functions and compared with the approximation ofAspnes [J. Opt. Soc. Am.70, 1275 (1980)]. Comparisons are made with experimental results on oriented crystals of rutile (TiO2), and a simple procedure is presented to determine the complex dielectric function from standard ellipsometry techniques.

  15. Symmetry in finite phase plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, J.

    2010-03-01

    The known symmetries in one-dimensional systems are inversion and translations. These symmetries persist in finite phase plane, but a novel symmetry arises in view of the discrete nature of the coordinate xi and the momentum pi : xi and pi can undergo permutations. Thus, if xi assumes M discrete values, i = 0, 1,2,..., M - 1, a permutation will change the order of the set x0,x1,..., xM-1 into a new ordered set. Such a symmetry element does not exist for a continuous x-coordinate in an infinite phase plane. Thus, in a finite phase plane, translations can be replaced by permutations. This is also true for the inversion operator. The new permutation symmetry has been used for the construction of conjugate representations and for the splitting of the M-dimensional vector space into independent subspaces. This splitting is exhaustive in the sense that if M = iMi with Mi being prime numbers, the M-dimensional space splits into M1,M2,...Mn-dimensional independent subspaces. It is shown that following this splitting one can design new potentials with appropriate constants of motion. A related problem is the Weyl-Heisenberg group in the M-dimensional space which turns into a direct product of its subgroups in the Mi-dimensional subspaces. As an example we consider the case of M = 8.

  16. On the symmetries of integrability

    SciTech Connect

    Bellon, M.; Maillard, J.M.; Viallet, C. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper the authors show that the Yang-Baxter equations for two-dimensional models admit as a group of symmetry the infinite discrete group A{sub 2}{sup (1)}. The existence of this symmetry explains the presence of a spectral parameter in the solutions of the equations. The authors show that similarly, for three-dimensional vertex models and the associated tetrahedron equations, there also exists an infinite discrete group of symmetry. Although generalizing naturally the previous one, it is a much bigger hyperbolic Coxeter group. The authors indicate how this symmetry can help to resolve the Yang-Baxter equations and their higher-dimensional generalizations and initiate the study of three-dimensional vertex models. These symmetries are naturally represented as birational projective transformations. They may preserve non-trivial algebraic varieties, and lead to proper parametrizations of the models, be they integrable or not. The authors mention the relation existing between spin models and the Bose-Messner algebras of algebraic combinatorics. The authors' results also yield the generalization of the condition q{sup n} = 1 so often mentioned in the theory of quantum groups, when no q parameter is available.

  17. Symmetry Guide to Ferroaxial Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, J.; Privratska, J.; Ondrejkovic, P.; Janovec, V.

    2016-04-01

    The 212 species of the structural phase transitions with a macroscopic symmetry breaking are inspected with respect to the occurrence of the ferroaxial order parameter, the electric toroidal moment. In total, 124 ferroaxial species are found, some of them being also fully ferroelectric (62) or fully ferroelastic ones (61). This ensures a possibility of electrical or mechanical switching of ferroaxial domains. Moreover, there are 12 ferroaxial species that are neither ferroelectric nor ferroelastic. For each species, we have also explicitly worked out a canonical form for a set of representative equilibrium property tensors of polar and axial nature in both high-symmetry and low-symmetry phases. This information was gathered into the set of 212 mutually different symbolic matrices, expressing graphically the presence of nonzero independent tensorial components and the symmetry-imposed links between them, for both phases simultaneously. Symmetry analysis reveals the ferroaxiality in several currently debated materials, such as VO2 , LuFe2 O4 , and URu2 Si2 .

  18. Symmetry breaking in molecular ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Peng-Fei; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Zhong-Xia; Ye, Qiong; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2016-07-11

    Ferroelectrics are inseparable from symmetry breaking. Accompanying the paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition, the paraelectric phase adopting one of the 32 crystallographic point groups is broken into subgroups belonging to one of the 10 ferroelectric point groups, i.e. C1, C2, C1h, C2v, C4, C4v, C3, C3v, C6 and C6v. The symmetry breaking is captured by the order parameter known as spontaneous polarization, whose switching under an external electric field results in a typical ferroelectric hysteresis loop. In addition, the responses of spontaneous polarization to other external excitations are related to a number of physical effects such as second-harmonic generation, piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity and dielectric properties. Based on these, this review summarizes recent developments in molecular ferroelectrics since 2011 and focuses on the relationship between symmetry breaking and ferroelectricity, offering ideas for exploring high-performance molecular ferroelectrics. PMID:27051889

  19. CKM matrix and flavor symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeshi; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Ishimori, Hajime; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Ogasahara, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Following the way proposed recently by Hernandez and Smirnov, we seek possible residual symmetries in the quark sector with a focus on the von Dyck groups. We begin with two extreme cases in which both θ13 and θ23 or only θ13 are set to zero. Then, cases where all the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa parameters are allowed to take nonzero values are explored. The Z7 symmetry is favorable to realize only the Cabibbo angle. On the other hand, larger groups are necessary in order to be consistent with all the mixing parameters. Possibilities of embedding the obtained residual symmetries into the Δ(6N2) series are also briefly discussed.

  20. Symmetries in geometrical optics: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, M.; Mui, P. H.

    1995-12-01

    A study of light and charged-particle optical systems with inversion, reflection, rotation, translation, and/or glide symmetries is presented. The constraints imposed by the various symmetries on the first-order properties of a lens are investigated. In particular, the mathematical structures of the deflection vectors and the transfer matrices are described for various symmetrical systems. In the course of studying the translation and the glide symmetries, a simple technique for characterizing a general system of N identical components in series (or cascade) is also developed, based on the linear algebra theory of factoring matrices into Jordan canonical forms. Applications of these results are presented in a follow-up paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 12, XXXX (1995)]. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  1. Heisenberg symmetry and hypermultiplet manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Derendinger, Jean-Pierre; Marios Petropoulos, P.; Siampos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    We study the emergence of Heisenberg (Bianchi II) algebra in hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces. This is motivated by the rôle these spaces with this symmetry play in N = 2 hypermultiplet scalar manifolds. We show how to construct related pairs of hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces under general symmetry assumptions, the former being a zooming-in limit of the latter at vanishing scalar curvature. We further apply this method for the two hyper-Kähler spaces with Heisenberg algebra, which is reduced to U (1) × U (1) at the quaternionic level. We also show that no quaternionic spaces exist with a strict Heisenberg symmetry - as opposed to Heisenberg ⋉ U (1). We finally discuss the realization of the latter by gauging appropriate Sp (2 , 4) generators in N = 2 conformal supergravity.

  2. Characteristics of light transfer in the connected conical waveguides with the same symmetry axis.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, Shant; Abrahamyan, Tigran; Babajanyan, Arsen; Nerkararyan, Khachatur

    2016-05-10

    The propagation of the light trough dielectric-metal-dielectric conical waveguide is described by the coupling modes between internal and external waveguides. The energy pumping from internal to the external waveguide has a resonant behavior and is very sensitive to the variations of the system parameters. The simplified model of this process realization is the light flash at the end of the conical metal covered tip of the optical fiber that crosses the liquid-air interface. Here, as an external waveguide serves the liquid meniscus formed at the tip of the optical fiber. In this condition, the shift of liquid surface by 50 nm toward the tip end brings significant changes in the transferred radiation power. Ability to register nanometric displacements (nanovibrations) of the liquid surface opens up new ways to create sensitive sensors for different purposes. PMID:27168303

  3. Unparticles and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2008-11-23

    We investigate a scalar potential inspired by the unparticle sector for the electroweak symmetry breaking. The scalar potential contains the interaction between the standard model fields and unparticle sector. It is described by the non-integral power of fields that originates from the nontrivial scaling dimension of the unparticle operator. It is found that the electroweak symmetry is broken at tree level when the interaction is turned on. The scale invariance of unparticle sector is also broken simultaneously, resulting in a physical Higgs and a new lighter scalar particle.

  4. The Broken Symmetry of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Ruth E.

    2011-11-29

    This paper seeks to clarify features of time asymmetry in terms of symmetry breaking. It is observed that, in general, a contingent situation or event requires the breaking of an underlying symmetry. The distinction between the universal anisotropy of temporal processes and the irreversibility of certain physical processes is clarified. It is also proposed that the Transactional Interpretation of quantum mechanics offers an effective way to explain general thermodynamic asymmetry in terms of the time asymmetry of radiation, where prior such efforts have fallen short.

  5. Symmetry analysis of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of B-calculus [V. García-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] a universal map for deterministic cellular automata (CAs) has been derived. The latter is shown here to be invariant upon certain transformations (global complementation, reflection and shift). When constructing CA rules in terms of rules of lower range a new symmetry, “invariance under construction” is uncovered. Modular arithmetic is also reformulated within B-calculus and a new symmetry of certain totalistic CA rules, which calculate the Pascal simplices modulo an integer number p, is then also uncovered.

  6. Iterates of maps with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chossat, Pascal; Golubitsky, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Fixed-point bifurcation, period doubling, and Hopf bifurcation (HB) for iterates of equivariant mappings are investigated analytically, with a focus on HB in the presence of symmetry. An algebraic formulation for the hypotheses of the theorem of Ruelle (1973) is derived, and the case of standing waves in a system of ordinary differential equations with O(2) symmetry is considered in detail. In this case, it is shown that HB can lead directly to motion on an invariant 3-torus, with an unexpected third frequency due to drift of standing waves along the torus.

  7. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  8. Centration axis in refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh; McAlinden, Colm

    2015-01-01

    The human eye is an asymmetric optical system and the real cornea is not a rotationally symmetrical volume. Each optical element in the eye has its own optical and neural axes. Defining the optimum center for laser ablation is difficult with many available approaches. We explain the various centration approaches (based on these reference axes) in refractive surgery and review their clinical outcomes. The line-of-sight (LOS) (the line joining the entrance pupil center with the fixation point) is often the recommended reference axis for representing wavefront aberrations of the whole eye (derived from the definition of chief ray in geometrical optics); however pupil centration can be unstable and change with the pupil size. The corneal vertex (CV) represents a stable preferable morphologic reference which is the best approximate for alignment to the visual axis. However, the corneal light reflex can be considered as non-constant, but dependent on the direction of gaze of the eye with respect to the light source. A compromise between the pupil and CV centered ablations is seen in the form of an asymmetric offset where the manifest refraction is referenced to the CV while the higher order aberrations are referenced to the pupil center. There is a need for a flexible choice of centration in excimer laser systems to design customized and non-customized treatments optimally. PMID:26605360

  9. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  10. ScaphoLunate Axis Method.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jeffrey; Zlotolow, Dan A; Lee, Steve K

    2016-03-01

    Background Treating chronic scapholunate ligament injuries without the presence of arthritis remains an unsolved clinical problem facing wrist surgeons. This article highlights a technique for reconstructing the scapholunate ligament using novel fixation, the ScaphoLunate Axis Method (SLAM). Materials and Methods In a preliminary review of the early experience of this technique, 13 patients were evaluated following scapholunate ligament reconstruction utilizing the SLAM technique. Description of Techinque The scapholunate interval is reconstructed utilizing a palmaris longus autograft passed between the scaphoid and lunate along the axis of rotation in the sagittal plane. It is secured in the lunate using a graft anchor and in the scaphoid utilizing an interference screw. The remaining graft is passed dorsally to reconstruct the dorsal scapholunate ligament. Results At an average follow-up of 11 months, the mean postoperative scapholunate gap was 2.1 mm. The mean postoperative scapholunate angle was 59 degrees. The mean postoperative wrist flexion and extension was 45 and 56 degrees, respectively. The mean grip strength was 24.9 kg, or 62% of the contralateral side. The mean pain score (VAS) was 1.7. There was 1 failure with recurrence of the pathologic scapholunate gap and the onset of pain. Conclusion While chronic scapholunate ligament instability remains an unsolved problem facing wrist surgeons, newer techniques are directed toward restoring the normal relationships of the scaphoid and lunate in both the coronal and sagittal planes. The SLAM technique has demonstrated promise in preliminary clinical studies. PMID:26855838

  11. Graphene Symmetry Amplified by Designed Peptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Mustata, Gina-Mirela; Kim, Yong Ho; Zhang, Jian; DeGrado, William F; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-06-01

    We present a strategy for designed self-assembly of peptides into two-dimensional monolayer crystals on the surface of graphene and graphite. As predicted by computation, designed peptides assemble on the surface of graphene to form very long, parallel, in-register β-sheets, which we call β-tapes. Peptides extend perpendicularly to the long axis of each β-tape, defining its width, with hydrogen bonds running along the axis. Tapes align on the surface to create highly regular microdomains containing 4-nm pitch striations. Moreover, in agreement with calculations, the atomic structure of the underlying graphene dictates the arrangement of the β-tapes, as they orient along one of six directions defined by graphene's sixfold symmetry. A cationic-assembled peptide surface is shown here to strongly adhere to DNA, preferentially orienting the double helix along β-tape axes. This orientational preference is well anticipated from calculations, given the underlying peptide layer structure. These studies illustrate how designed peptides can amplify the Ångstrom-level atomic symmetry of a surface onto the micrometer scale, further imparting long-range directional order onto the next level of assembly. The remarkably stable nature of these assemblies under various environmental conditions suggests applications in enzymelike catalysis, biological interfaces for cellular recognition, and two-dimensional platforms for studying DNA-peptide interactions. PMID:27276268

  12. Spin symmetry in the antinucleon spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shan-Gui; Meng, Jie; Ring, P

    2003-12-31

    We discuss spin and pseudospin symmetry in the spectrum of single nucleons and single antinucleons in a nucleus. As an example we use relativistic mean field theory to investigate single antinucleon spectra. We find a very well developed spin symmetry in single antineutron and single antiproton spectra. The dominant components of the wave functions of the spin doublet are almost identical. This spin symmetry in antiparticle spectra and the pseudospin symmetry in particle spectra have the same origin. However, it turns out that the spin symmetry in antinucleon spectra is much better developed than the pseudospin symmetry in normal nuclear single particle spectra. PMID:14754045

  13. Charge symmetry at the partonic level

    SciTech Connect

    Londergan, J. T.; Peng, J. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-07-01

    This review article discusses the experimental and theoretical status of partonic charge symmetry. It is shown how the partonic content of various structure functions gets redefined when the assumption of charge symmetry is relaxed. We review various theoretical and phenomenological models for charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. We summarize the current experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation in parton distributions. A series of experiments are presented, which might reveal partonic charge symmetry violation, or alternatively might lower the current upper limits on parton charge symmetry violation.

  14. Superdeformations and fermion dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Cheng-Li . Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN )

    1990-01-01

    In this talk, I will present a link between nuclear collective motions and their underlying fermion dynamical symmetries. In particular, I will focus on the microscopic understanding of deformations. It is shown that the SU{sub 3} of the one major shell fermion dynamical symmetry model (FDSM) is responsible for the physics of low and high spins in normal deformation. For the recently observed phenomena of superdeformation, the physics of the problem dictates a generalization to a supershell structure (SFDSM), which also has an SU{sub 3} fermion dynamical symmetry. Many recently discovered feature of superdeformation are found to be inherent in such an SU{sub 3} symmetry. In both cases the dynamical Pauli effect plays a vital role. A particularly noteworthy discovery from this model is that the superdeformed ground band is not the usual unaligned band but the D-pair aligned (DPA) band, which sharply crosses the excited bands. The existence of such DPA band is a key point to understand many properties of superdeformation. Our studies also poses new experimental challenge. This is particularly interesting since there are now plans to build new and exciting {gamma}-ray detecting systems, like the GAMMASPHERE, which could provide answers to some of these challenges. 34 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. The Symmetry of Natural Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laurie M.

    This document is a monograph intended for advanced undergraduate students, or beginning graduate students, who have some knowledge of modern physics as well as classical physics, including the elementary quantum mechanical treatment of the hydrogen atom and angular momentum. The first chapter introduces symmetry and relates it to the mathematical…

  16. Paper Models Illustrating Virus Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Instructions are given for constructing two models, one to illustrate the general principles of symmetry in T=1, T=3, and T=4 viruses, and the other to illustrate the disposition of protein subunits in the T=3 plant viruses and the picornaviruses. (Author/CW)

  17. Entanglement renormalization and gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Vidal, G.

    2011-03-15

    A lattice gauge theory is described by a redundantly large vector space that is subject to local constraints and can be regarded as the low-energy limit of an extended lattice model with a local symmetry. We propose a numerical coarse-graining scheme to produce low-energy, effective descriptions of lattice models with a local symmetry such that the local symmetry is exactly preserved during coarse-graining. Our approach results in a variational ansatz for the ground state(s) and low-energy excitations of such models and, by extension, of lattice gauge theories. This ansatz incorporates the local symmetry in its structure and exploits it to obtain a significant reduction of computational costs. We test the approach in the context of a Z{sub 2} lattice gauge theory formulated as the low-energy theory of a specific regime of the toric code with a magnetic field, for lattices with up to 16x16 sites (16{sup 2}x2=512 spins) on a torus. We reproduce the well-known ground-state phase diagram of the model, consisting of a deconfined and spin-polarized phases separated by a continuous quantum phase transition, and obtain accurate estimates of energy gaps, ground-state fidelities, Wilson loops, and several other quantities.

  18. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  19. Turning Students into Symmetry Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilders, Richard; VanOyen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Exploring mathematical symmetry is one way of increasing students' understanding of art. By asking students to search designs and become pattern detectives, teachers can potentially increase their appreciation of art while reinforcing their perception of the use of math in their day-to-day lives. This article shows teachers how they can interest…

  20. From symmetries to number theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tempesta, P.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the finite-operator calculus provides a simple formalism useful for constructing symmetry-preserving discretizations of quantum-mechanical integrable models. A related algebraic approach can also be used to define a class of Appell polynomials and of L series.

  1. Circular codes, symmetries and transformations.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Giannerini, Simone; Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Circular codes, putative remnants of primeval comma-free codes, have gained considerable attention in the last years. In fact they represent a second kind of genetic code potentially involved in detecting and maintaining the normal reading frame in protein coding sequences. The discovering of an universal code across species suggested many theoretical and experimental questions. However, there is a key aspect that relates circular codes to symmetries and transformations that remains to a large extent unexplored. In this article we aim at addressing the issue by studying the symmetries and transformations that connect different circular codes. The main result is that the class of 216 C3 maximal self-complementary codes can be partitioned into 27 equivalence classes defined by a particular set of transformations. We show that such transformations can be put in a group theoretic framework with an intuitive geometric interpretation. More general mathematical results about symmetry transformations which are valid for any kind of circular codes are also presented. Our results pave the way to the study of the biological consequences of the mathematical structure behind circular codes and contribute to shed light on the evolutionary steps that led to the observed symmetries of present codes. PMID:25008961

  2. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  3. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  4. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Face Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2015-06-01

    The major objective of this article was to report quantitatively the degree of human face symmetry for reported images taken from the Internet. From the original image of a certain person that appears in the center of each triplet, 2 symmetric combinations were constructed that are based on the left part of the image and its mirror image (left-left) and on the right part of the image and its mirror image (right-right). By applying a computer software that enables to determine length, surface area, and perimeter of any geometric shape, the following measurements were obtained for each triplet: face perimeter and area; distance between the pupils; mouth length; its perimeter and area; nose length and face length, usually below the ears; as well as the area and perimeter of the pupils. Then, for each of the above measurements, the value C, which characterizes the degree of symmetry of the real image with respect to the combinations right-right and left-left, was calculated. C appears on the right-hand side below each image. A high value of C indicates a low symmetry, and as the value is decreasing, the symmetry is increasing. The magnitude on the left relates to the pupils and compares the difference between the area and perimeter of the 2 pupils. The major conclusion arrived at here is that the human face is asymmetric to some degree; the degree of asymmetry is reported quantitatively under each portrait. PMID:26080172

  6. Off-Axis Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality, used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We demonstrate a novel PAM design that markedly simplifies the implementation by separating the optical illumination from the acoustic detection path. This modification enables the use of high-quality commercial optics and transducers, and may be readily adapted to commercial light microscopes. The designed PAM system is only sensitive to signals generated in the overlap of the illumination and detection solid angles, providing the additional benefit of quasi-dark-field detection. An off-axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 μm and a modest axial resolution of 410 μm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. The axial resolution is readily scaled down to tens of micrometers within the same design, by utilizing commercially available high-frequency acoustic transducers. PMID:20176531

  7. Off-axis photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Ryan L; Applegate, Brian E

    2010-08-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality, used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We demonstrate a novel PAM design that markedly simplifies the implementation by separating the optical illumination from the acoustic detection path. This modification enables the use of high-quality commercial optics and transducers, and may be readily adapted to commercial light microscopes. The designed PAM system is only sensitive to signals generated in the overlap of the illumination and detection solid angles, providing the additional benefit of quasi-dark-field detection. An off-axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 microm and a modest axial resolution of 410 microm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. The axial resolution is readily scaled down to tens of micrometers within the same design, by utilizing commercially available high-frequency acoustic transducers. PMID:20176531

  8. The Axis of Evil revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Kate; Magueijo, João

    2007-06-01

    In light of the three-year data release from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, we re-examine the evidence for the `Axis of Evil' (AoE). We discover that previous statistics are not robust with respect to the data sets available and different treatments of the Galactic plane. We identify the cause of the instability and implement an alternative `model selection' approach. A comparison to Gaussian isotropic simulations finds the features significant at the 94-98 per cent level, depending on the particular AoE model. The Bayesian evidence finds lower significance, ranging from `substantial' at Δ(lnE) ~ 1.4 to no evidence for the most general AoE model.

  9. Origin of Spontaneous Broken Mirror Symmetry of Vortex Lattices in Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroki M.; Ishikawa, Masaki; Hirano, Tomoya; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2011-11-01

    Combining the microscopic Eilenberger theory with the first-principles band calculation, we investigate the stable flux line lattice (FLL) for a field applied to the fourfold axis, i.e., H\\parallel [001] in cubic Nb. The observed FLL transformation along Hc2 is almost perfectly explained without using adjustable parameter, including the tilted square, scalene triangle with broken mirror symmetry, and isosceles triangle lattices upon increasing T. We construct a minimum Fermi surface model to understand such morphologies, particularly the stability of the scalene triangle lattice attributed to the lack of mirror symmetry about the Fermi velocity maximum direction in k-space.

  10. Macroscopic manifestations of broken inversion symmetry in noncentrosymmetric superconductors with applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Masatosi; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2007-03-01

    We numerically investigate paramagnetic properties in noncentrosymmetric superconductors under applied magnetic fields, based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory including the Pauli paramagnetic effect and the Rashba interaction. When an applied field is perpendicular to the polar axis, the paramagnetic effect breaks centrosymmetry in the Meissner state and cylindrical symmetry in the vortices, as macroscopic manifestations of broken inversion symmetry in the spatial structures of the screening current and the penetrating field. The paramagnetic supercurrent exists even at the vortex center by their asymmetric properties, therefore the flux flow is spontaneously induced without applying external currents.

  11. Symmetry in the problem of wave modes of thin viscous liquid layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Dmitriy; Vozhakov, Ivan; Markovich, Dmitriy; Tsvelodub, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    The equations in conservative form for nonlinear waves modeling on a liquid film flowing down a vertical plane have been investigated. It has been found that in the computational domain extended along the transverse axis the equations with boundary conditions are invariant under parity transformation. It is numerically shown that for moderate Reynolds numbers the steady-state travelling solutions of the equations have the detected symmetry. It is demonstrated that using this symmetry for the numerical solution of the problem by Galerkin methods significantly increases the efficiency of calculations.

  12. Reflection symmetry detection using locally affine invariant edge correspondence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaozhong; Tang, Zesheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Reflection symmetry detection receives increasing attentions in recent years. The state-of-the-art algorithms mainly use the matching of intensity-based features (such as the SIFT) within a single image to find symmetry axes. This paper proposes a novel approach by establishing the correspondence of locally affine invariant edge-based features, which are superior to the intensity based in the aspects that it is insensitive to illumination variations, and applicable to textureless objects. The locally affine invariance is achieved by simple linear algebra for efficient and robust computations, making the algorithm suitable for detections under object distortions like perspective projection. Commonly used edge detectors and a voting process are, respectively, used before and after the edge description and matching steps to form a complete reflection detection pipeline. Experiments are performed using synthetic and real-world images with both multiple and single reflection symmetry axis. The test results are compared with existing algorithms to validate the proposed method. PMID:25608306

  13. Symmetry breaking and singularity structure in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commeford, K. A.; Garcia-March, M. A.; Ferrando, A.; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2012-08-01

    We determine the trajectories of vortex singularities that arise after a single vortex is broken by a discretely symmetric impulse in the context of Bose-Einstein condensates in a harmonic trap. The dynamics of these singularities are analyzed to determine the form of the imprinted motion. We find that the symmetry-breaking process introduces two effective forces: a repulsive harmonic force that causes the daughter trajectories to be ejected from the parent singularity and a Magnus force that introduces a torque about the axis of symmetry. For the analytical noninteracting case we find that the parent singularity is reconstructed from the daughter singularities after one period of the trapping frequency. The interactions between singularities in the weakly interacting system do not allow the parent vortex to be reconstructed. Analytic trajectories were compared to the actual minima of the wave function, showing less than 0.5% error for an impulse strength of v=0.00005. We show that these solutions are valid within the impulse regime for various impulse strengths using numerical integration of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We also show that the actual duration of the symmetry-breaking potential does not significantly change the dynamics of the system as long as the strength is below v=0.0005.

  14. Analyses of surgically induced astigmatism and axis deviation in microcoaxial phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Özyol, Erhan; Özyol, Pelin

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) and axis deviation after coaxial microincision superotemporal clear corneal phacoemulsification incision in eyes with differently located steep axis. This prospective, comparative study included four groups of 45 eyes with age-related cataracts; each group underwent 2.2-mm superotemporal clear corneal incision (CCI) cataract surgery. The four groups of patients were divided by location of the steep axis. Groups were matched according to symmetry of the steep axis for both right and left eyes as follows--0°-45° of steep axis for right eyes, and 136°-180° for left eyes (group 1); 46°-90° for right eyes and 91°-135° for left eyes (group 2); 91°-135° for right eyes and 46°-90° for left eyes (group 3); and 136°-180° for right eyes and 0°-45° for left eyes (group 4). Outcome measures included changes in mean total astigmatism, SIA, and axis deviation. Astigmatism was measured by manual keratometry readings before surgery and week 1, week 4, week 8, and week 12 postoperatively. SIA was calculated by the vector analysis (Holladay-Cravy-Koch method). The magnitude of mean total astigmatism was lowest in group 3 and highest in group 1 at week 12. SIA was 0.39 diopters (D), 0.22 D, 0.17 D, and 0.28 D in group 1, group 2, group 3, and group 4, respectively. The change in astigmatic axis deviation was highest in group 3 (23.6 ± 16.6) (P < 0.05). Axis deviation and SIA were stable after week 4. Planning of CCI on or near the steep axis can help decrease corneal astigmatism. PMID:24081915

  15. PT Symmetry, Conformal Symmetry, and the Metrication of Electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2016-05-01

    We present some interesting connections between PT symmetry and conformal symmetry. We use them to develop a metricated theory of electromagnetism in which the electromagnetic field is present in the geometric connection. However, unlike Weyl who first advanced this possibility, we do not take the connection to be real but to instead be PT symmetric, with it being iA_{μ } rather than A_{μ } itself that then appears in the connection. With this modification the standard minimal coupling of electromagnetism to fermions is obtained. Through the use of torsion we obtain a metricated theory of electromagnetism that treats its electric and magnetic sectors symmetrically, with a conformal invariant theory of gravity being found to emerge. An extension to the non-Abelian case is provided.

  16. What symmetries can do for you

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, M. C.

    2015-04-01

    Several applications of Lie symmetries and its generalisation are presented: from turning butterflies into tornados, to its applications in epidemics, population dynamics, and ultimately converting classical problems into the quantum realm. Applications of nonclassical symmetries are also illustrated.

  17. Universal Formulation For Symmetries In Computed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    Universal formulation for high-order symmetries in boundary conditions on flows devised. Eliminates need for special procedures to incorporate symmetries and corresponding boundary conditions into computer codes solving Navier-Stokes and Euler equations of flow.

  18. Symmetry breaking Hopf bifurcations in equations with O(2) symmetry with application to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation

    SciTech Connect

    Amdjadi, F.; Aston, P.J.; Plechac, P.

    1997-02-01

    In problems with O(2) symmetry, the Jacobian matrix at nontrivial steady state solutions with D{sub n} symmetry always has a zero eigenvalue due to the group orbit of solutions. We consider bifurcations which occur when complex eigenvalues also cross the imaginary axis and develop a numerical method which involves the addition of a new variable, namely the velocity of solutions drifting around the group orbit, and another equation, which has the form of a phase condition for isolating one solution on the group orbit. The bifurcating branch has a particular type of spatio-temporal symmetry which can be broken in a further bifurcation which gives rise to modulated travelling wave solutions which drift around the group orbit. Multiple Hopf bifurcations are also considered. The methods derived are applied to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation and we give results at two different bifurcations, one of which is a multiple Hopf bifurcation. Our results give insight into the numerical results of Hyman, Nicolaenko, and Zaleski. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Yet another symmetry breaking to be discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, M.

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of spontaneous symmetry breaking in particle physics was the greatest contribution in Nambu's achievements. There is another class of symmetries that exist in low-energy nature, yet is doomed to be broken at high energy, due to a lack of protection of the gauge symmetry. I shall review our approach to searching for this class of symmetry breaking, the lepton number violation linked to the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe.

  20. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E

    2003-06-02

    Partial dynamical symmetry (PDS) extends and complements the concepts of exact and dynamical symmetry. It allows one to remove undesired constraints from an algebraic theory, while preserving some of the useful aspects of a dynamical symmetry, and to study the effects of symmetry breaking in a controlled manner. An example of a PDS in an interacting fermion system is presented. The associated PDS Hamiltonians are closely related with a realistic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction and provide new insights into this important interaction.

  1. Symmetry Breaking for Black-Scholes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan-Liu; Zhang, Shun-Li; Qu, Chang-Zheng

    2007-06-01

    Black-Scholes equation is used to model stock option pricing. In this paper, optimal systems with one to four parameters of Lie point symmetries for Black-Scholes equation and its extension are obtained. Their symmetry breaking interaction associated with the optimal systems is also studied. As a result, symmetry reductions and corresponding solutions for the resulting equations are obtained.

  2. Superalgebra and fermion-boson symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Hironari

    2010-01-01

    Fermions and bosons are quite different kinds of particles, but it is possible to unify them in a supermultiplet, by introducing a new mathematical scheme called superalgebra. In this article we discuss the development of the concept of symmetry, starting from the rotational symmetry and finally arriving at this fermion-boson (FB) symmetry. PMID:20228617

  3. Applications of Symmetry to Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leikin, Roza; Berman, Abraham; Zaslavsky, Orit

    2000-01-01

    Symmetry is an important mathematical concept that plays an extremely important role as a problem solving technique. Presents examples of problems from several branches of mathematics that can be solved using different types of symmetry. Discusses teachers' attitudes and beliefs regarding the use of symmetry in the solutions of these problems.…

  4. CP symmetry in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Brenda; Bahabad, Alon; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a model of a dual-core optical waveguide with opposite signs of the group-velocity dispersion in the two cores, and a phase-velocity mismatch between them. The coupler is embedded into an active host medium, which provides for the linear coupling of a gain-loss type between the two cores. The same system can be derived, without phenomenological assumptions, by considering the three-wave propagation in a medium with the quadratic nonlinearity, provided that the depletion of the second-harmonic pump is negligible. This linear system offers an optical realization of the charge-parity symmetry, while the addition of the intracore cubic nonlinearity breaks the symmetry. By means of direct simulations and analytical approximations, it is demonstrated that the linear system generates expanding Gaussian states, while the nonlinear one gives rise to broad oscillating solitons, as well as a general family of stable stationary gap solitons.

  5. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  6. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  7. Tensionless strings from worldsheet symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Chakrabortty, Shankhadeep; Parekh, Pulastya

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the construction of the tensionless limit of closed bosonic string theory in the covariant formulation in the light of Galilean conformal symmetry that rises as the residual gauge symmetry on the tensionless worldsheet. We relate the analysis of the fundamentally tensionless theory to the tensionless limit that is viewed as a contraction of worldsheet coordinates. Analysis of the quantum regime uncovers interesting physics. The degrees of freedom that appear in the tensionless string are fundamentally different from the usual string states. Through a Bogoliubov transformation on the worldsheet, we link the tensionless vacuum to the usual tensile vacuum. As an application, we show that our analysis can be used to understand physics of strings at very high temperatures and propose that these new degrees of freedom are naturally connected with the long-string picture of the Hagedorn phase of free string theory. We also show that tensionless closed strings behave like open strings.

  8. New charge for BMS symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesavan, Aruna; Ashtekar, Abhay

    2016-03-01

    Conservation laws of asymptotic symmetries are essential to quantify the amount of energy-momentum and angular momentum carried away by gravitational radiation from isolated systems. The asymptotic symmetry group of asymptotically flat spacetimes at null infinity is the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group. While the flux associated to an arbitrary BMS vector field was provided by Ashtekar and Streubel (1981) using symplectic methods, the tensorial expression of a corresponding two-dimensional charge integral linear in an arbitrary BMS vector field has not been available in the literature. We fill this gap by providing such a charge. I will discuss its properties and relation to Geroch's supermomentum and the charge of Dray and Streubel (1984).

  9. Chiral symmetry in rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2015-08-01

    The triaxial rotating system at critical angular momentum I ≥Iband exhibits two enatiomeric (the left- and right-handed) forms. These enatiomers are related to each other through dynamical chiral symmetry. The chiral symmetry in rotating system is defined by an operator χ ˆ =Rˆy (π) T ˆ, which involves the product of two distinct symmetries, namely, continuous and discrete. Therefore, new guidelines are required for testing its commutation with the system Hamiltonian. One of the primary objectives of this study is to lay down these guidelines. Further, the possible impact of chiral symmetry on the geometrical arrangement of angular momentum vectors and investigation of observables unique to nuclear chiral-twins is carried out. In our model, the angular momentum components (J1, J2, J3) occupy three mutually perpendicular axes of triaxial shape and represent a non-planar configuration. At certain threshold energy, the equation of motion in angular momentum develops a second order phase transition and as a result two distinct frames (i.e., the left- and right-handed) are formed. These left- and right-handed states correspond to a double well system and are related to each other through chiral operator. At this critical angular momentum, the centrifugal and Coriolis interactions lower the barrier in the double well system. The tunneling through the double well starts, which subsequently lifts the degeneracy among the rotational states. A detailed analysis of the behavior of rotational energies, spin-staggering, and the electromagnetic transition probabilities of the resulting twin-rotational bands is presented. The ensuing model results exhibit similarities with many observed features of the chiral-twins. An advantage of our formalism is that it is quite simple and it allows us to pinpoint the understanding of physical phenomenon which lead to chiral-twins in rotating systems.

  10. Symmetry and Stochastic Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre F.; Hornos, José E. M.

    2007-09-01

    Lorentz-like noncompact Lie symmetry SO(2,1) is found in a spin-boson stochastic model for gene expression. The invariant of the algebra characterizes the switch decay to equilibrium. The azimuthal eigenvalue describes the affinity between the regulatory protein and the gene operator site. Raising and lowering operators are constructed and their actions increase or decrease the affinity parameter. The classification of the noise regime of the gene arises from the group theoretical numbers.

  11. Symmetry analysis of talus bone

    PubMed Central

    Islam, K.; Dobbe, A.; Komeili, A.; Duke, K.; El-Rich, M.; Dhillon, S.; Adeeb, S.; Jomha, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The main object of this study was to use a geometric morphometric approach to quantify the left-right symmetry of talus bones. Methods Analysis was carried out using CT scan images of 11 pairs of intact tali. Two important geometric parameters, volume and surface area, were quantified for left and right talus bones. The geometric shape variations between the right and left talus bones were also measured using deviation analysis. Furthermore, location of asymmetry in the geometric shapes were identified. Results Numerical results showed that talus bones are bilaterally symmetrical in nature, and the difference between the surface area of the left and right talus bones was less than 7.5%. Similarly, the difference in the volume of both bones was less than 7.5%. Results of the three-dimensional (3D) deviation analyses demonstrated the mean deviation between left and right talus bones were in the range of -0.74 mm to 0.62 mm. It was observed that in eight of 11 subjects, the deviation in symmetry occurred in regions that are clinically less important during talus surgery. Conclusions We conclude that left and right talus bones of intact human ankle joints show a strong degree of symmetry. The results of this study may have significance with respect to talus surgery, and in investigating traumatic talus injury where the geometric shape of the contralateral talus can be used as control. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:139–45. PMID:24802391

  12. Dark matter and global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-09-01

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. Assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O (1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime.

  13. Painlevé property, symmetries and symmetry reductions of the coupled Burgers system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zeng-Ju; Chen, Li-Li; Lou, Sen-Yue

    2005-08-01

    The Painlevé property, inverse recursion operator, infinite number of symmetries and Lie symmetry reductions of the coupled Burgers equation are given explicitly. Three sets of infinitely many symmetries of the considered model are obtained by acting the recursion operator and the inverse recursion operator on the trivial symmetries such as the identity transformation, the space translation and the scaling transformation respectively. These symmetries constitute an infinite dimensional Lie algebra while its finite dimensional Lie point symmetry subalgebra is used to find possible symmetry reductions and then the group invariant solutions.

  14. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Described are electrical means for determining the focal axis of an offset reflector antenna whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture. Even and odd sensing functions are employed in the focal region, leading to both amplitude and phase criteria for resolving a focal axis generally inclined with respect to the system axis. The analytical aspects of the problem are discussed, and an example related to a 4-meter Large-Antenna Multiple-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) is included. The technique is useful for focal axis determination in mathematical simulations and in the physical world.

  15. Principles of the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis

    PubMed Central

    Bertsch, Thomas; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Rios-Barrera, Daniel; Pearce, Christy F.; Hüfner, Michael; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Clapp, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The hormonal family of vasoinhibins, which derive from the anterior pituitary hormone prolactin, are known for their inhibiting effects on blood vessel growth, vasopermeability, and vasodilation. As pleiotropic hormones, vasoinhibins act in multiple target organs and tissues. The generation, secretion, and regulation of vasoinhibins are embedded into the organizational principle of an axis, which integrates the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the target tissue microenvironment. This axis is designated as the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis. Disturbances of the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis are associated with the pathogenesis of retinal and cardiac diseases and with diseases occurring during pregnancy. New phylogenetical, physiological, and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26310939

  16. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  17. A numerical method of tracing a vortical axis along local topological axis line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    A new numerical method is presented to trace or identify a vortical axis in flow, which is based on Galilean invariant flow topology. We focus on the local flow topology specified by the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor, and extract the axis component from its flow trajectory. Eigen-vortical-axis line is defined from the eigenvector of the real eigenvalue of the velocity gradient tensor where the tensor has the conjugate complex eigenvalues. This numerical method integrates the eigen-vortical-axis line and traces a vortical axis in terms of the invariant flow topology, which enables to investigate the feature of the topology-based vortical axis.

  18. Angle between principal axis triples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Walter; Tape, Carl

    2012-09-01

    The principal axis angle ξ0, or Kagan angle, is a measure of the difference between the orientations of two seismic moment tensors. It is the smallest angle needed to rotate the principal axes of one moment tensor to the corresponding principal axes of the other. This paper is a conceptual review of the main features of ξ0. We give a concise formula for calculating ξ0, but our main goal is to illustrate the behaviour of ξ0 geometrically. When the first of two moment tensors is fixed, the angle ξ0 between them becomes a function on the unit ball. The level surfaces of ξ0 can then be depicted in the unit ball, and they give insights into ξ0 that are not obvious from calculations alone. We also include a derivation of the known probability density inline image of ξ0. The density inline image is proportional to the area of a certain surface inline image. The easily seen variation of inline image with t then explains the rather peculiar shape of inline image. Because the curve inline image is highly non-uniform, its shape needs to be considered when analysing distributions of empirical ξ0 values. We recall an example of Willemann which shows that ξ0 may not always be the most appropriate measure of separation for moment tensor orientations, and we offer an alternative measure.

  19. Lie group symmetries and Riemann function of Klein-Gordon-Fock equation with central symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, Bogdan A.

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper Lie symmetry group method is applied to find new exact invariant solutions for Klein-Gordon-Fock equation with central symmetry. The found invariant solutions are important for testing finite-difference computational schemes of various boundary value problems of Klein-Gordon-Fock equation with central symmetry. The classical admitted symmetries of the equation are found. The infinitesimal symmetries of the equation are used to find the Riemann function constructively.

  20. Polyhedra with noncrystallographic symmetry as the orbits of crystallographic point symmetry groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsetsina, T. I.; Chuprunov, E. V.

    2015-11-01

    Polyhedra with noncrystallographic symmetry are analyzed as the orbits of crystallographic point symmetry groups on a set of smooth or structured ("hatched") planes. Polyhedra with symmetrically equivalent faces, obtained using crystallographic point groups but having noncrystallographic symmetry, and polyhedra, the symmetry group T of which is crystallographic but can be implemented only on the assumption of a noncrystallographic character of the internal structure of polyhedron, are studied. The results of the analysis for all 32 point symmetry groups are listed in table.

  1. Symmetry, Statistics and Structure in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we examine homogeneous MHD turbulence in terms of truncated Fourier series. The ideal MHD equations and the associated statistical theory of absolute equilibrium ensembles are symmetric under P, C and T. However, the presence of invariant helicities, which are pseudoscalars under P and C, dynamically breaks this symmetry. This occurs because the surface of constant energy in phase space has disjoint parts, called components: while ensemble averages are taken over all components, a dynamical phase trajectory is confined to only one component. As the Birkhoff-Khinchin theorem tells us, ideal MHD turbulence is thus non-ergodic. This non-ergodicity manifests itself in low-wave number Fourier modes that have large mean values (while absolute ensemble theory predicts mean values of zero). Therefore, we have coherent structure in ideal MHD turbulence. The level of non-ergodicity and amount of energy contained in the associated coherent structure depends on the values of the helicities, as well as on the presence, or not, of a mean magnetic field and/or overall rotation. In addition to the well known cross and magnetic helicities, we also present a new invariant, which we call the parallel helicity, since it occurs when mean field and rotation axis are aligned. The question of applicability of these results to real (i.e., dissipative) MHD turbulence is also examined. Several long-time numerical simulations on a 64(exp 3) grid are given as examples. It is seen that coherent structure begins to form before decay dominates over nonlinearity. The connection of these results with inverse spectral cascades, selective decay, and magnetic dynamos is also discussed.

  2. Enhanced Facial Symmetry Assessment in Orthodontists

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tate H.; Clark, Kait; Mitroff, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing facial symmetry is an evolutionarily important process, which suggests that individual differences in this ability should exist. As existing data are inconclusive, the current study explored whether a group trained in facial symmetry assessment, orthodontists, possessed enhanced abilities. Symmetry assessment was measured using face and non-face stimuli among orthodontic residents and two control groups: university participants with no symmetry training and airport security luggage screeners, a group previously shown to possess expert visual search skills unrelated to facial symmetry. Orthodontic residents were more accurate at assessing symmetry in both upright and inverted faces compared to both control groups, but not for non-face stimuli. These differences are not likely due to motivational biases or a speed-accuracy tradeoff—orthodontic residents were slower than the university participants but not the security screeners. Understanding such individual differences in facial symmetry assessment may inform the perception of facial attractiveness. PMID:24319342

  3. Symmetry measures of the electron density.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David; Alemany, Pere; Alvarez, Santiago

    2010-10-01

    In this communication we define electronic symmetry operation and symmetry group measures, eSOM and eSGM, respectively, develop the basic algorithms to obtain them, and give some examples of the possible applications of these new computational tools. These new symmetry measures based on the electron density have been tested in an analysis of (a) the inversion symmetry for heteronuclear diatomic molecules, for the eclipsed and staggered conformations of ethane and tetrafluoroethane, and for a series of octahedral sulfur halides; (b) the reflection symmetry of three different conformers of tetrafluoroethene; and (c) the loss of C(6) symmetry along the B(2u) distortion mode of benzene and an analysis of rotational symmetry for different six-member ring heterocycles. PMID:20652983

  4. Symmetries in nuclei: New methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, Mark A.

    2011-04-01

    When a symmetry is a ``good'' symmetry of the nuclear system, as in the dynamical symmetries of the shell model and interacting boson model, this symmetry can directly give the spectroscopic properties of the nucleus, without the need for involved calculations. However, even if a symmetry is strongly broken, it nonetheless provides a calculational tool, classifying the basis states used in a full computational treatment of the many-body problem and greatly simplifying the underlying computational machinery. The symmetry then serves as the foundation for a physically meaningful truncation scheme for the calculation. This talk will provide an introduction to new applications of symmetry approaches to the nuclear problem, including the required mathematical developments. Supported by the US DOE under grant DE-FG02-95ER-40934 and by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement under a Cottrell Scholar Award.

  5. Indication of Probe-Axis Angle by Extracting Wall Motion of Heart to Assist in Obtaining Long- and Short-Axis Views on Echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Matsuura, H.; Takahashi, R.

    We have developed an algorithm to find standard cross sections of the heart from successive echograms. We first divided an echogram into small spatial regions to detect the typical motion of the mitral valve by analyzing the brightness variation and correlation coefficient among the regions. Furthermore, combining this technique with the optical flow method, we elucidated the region velocity of the left ventricle after centering the valve on echogram. By analyzing symmetry among specified regions, we distinguished the short-axis view of heart from the others.

  6. Concentrating solar cookers with eccentric axis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiping; Sha Yong Ling; Hou Shugin; Liu Zude

    1992-12-31

    This paper describes the design, development and use of a concentrating solar cooker with eccentric axis in China. For the same power, the older circular parabolic cookers are large in volume and less convenient to operate than the cooker with eccentric axis. Calculations are presented for the design of the cooker and for obtaining an accurate test of its efficiency.

  7. The axis of evil - a polarization perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommert, M.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2010-04-01

    We search for an unusual alignment of the preferred axes of the quadrupole and octopole, the so-called axis of evil, in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. We use the part of the polarization map which is uncorrelated with the temperature map as a statistically independent probe of the axis of evil, which helps to assess whether the latter has a cosmological origin or if it is a mere chance fluctuation in the temperature. Note, though, that for certain models creating a preferred axis in the temperature map, we would not expect to see the axis in the uncorrelated polarization map. We find that the axis of the quadrupole of the uncorrelated polarization map roughly aligns with the axis of evil within our measurement precision, whereas the axis of the octopole does not. However, with our measurement uncertainty, the probability of such a scenario to happen by chance in an isotropic universe is of the order of 50 per cent. We also find that the so-called cold spot present in the CMB temperature map is even colder in the part of the temperature map which is uncorrelated with the polarization, although there is still a large uncertainty in the latter. Therefore, our analysis of the axis of evil and a future analysis of the cold spot in the uncorrelated temperature data will strongly benefit from the polarization data expected from the Planck satellite.

  8. Focal axis resolver for offset reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the focal axis of an asymmetrical antenna such as an offset paraboloid reflector whose physical rim is not coincident with the boundary of the electrical aperture but whose focal point is known is provided. A transmitting feed horn array consisting of at least two feed horn elements is positioned asymmetrically on either side of an estimated focal axis which is generally inclined with respect to the boresight axis of the antenna. The feed horn array is aligned with the estimated focal axis so that the phase centers (CP sub 1, CP sub 2) of the two feed horn elements are located on a common line running through the focal point (F) orthogonally with respect to the estimated focal axis.

  9. The effect of vertical and horizontal symmetry on memory for tactile patterns in late blind individuals.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Vecchi, Tomaso; Fantino, Micaela; Herbert, Andrew M; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2013-02-01

    Visual stimuli that exhibit vertical symmetry are easier to remember than stimuli symmetric along other axes, an advantage that extends to the haptic modality as well. Critically, the vertical symmetry memory advantage has not been found in early blind individuals, despite their overall superior memory, as compared with sighted individuals, and the presence of an overall advantage for identifying symmetric over asymmetric patterns. The absence of the vertical axis memory advantage in the early blind may depend on their total lack of visual experience or on the effect of prolonged visual deprivation. To disentangle this issue, in this study, we measured the ability of late blind individuals to remember tactile spatial patterns that were either vertically or horizontally symmetric or asymmetric. Late blind participants showed better memory performance for symmetric patterns. An additional advantage for the vertical axis of symmetry over the horizontal one was reported, but only for patterns presented in the frontal plane. In the horizontal plane, no difference was observed between vertical and horizontal symmetric patterns, due to the latter being recalled particularly well. These results are discussed in terms of the influence of the spatial reference frame adopted during exploration. Overall, our data suggest that prior visual experience is sufficient to drive the vertical symmetry memory advantage, at least when an external reference frame based on geocentric cues (i.e., gravity) is adopted. PMID:23150215

  10. Killing symmetries as Hamiltonian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The existence of a Killing symmetry in a gauge theory is equivalent to the addition of extra Hamiltonian constraints in its phase space formulation, which imply restrictions both on the Dirac observables (the gauge invariant physical degrees of freedom) and on the gauge freedom. When there is a time-like Killing vector field only pure gauge electromagnetic fields survive in Maxwell theory in Minkowski space-time, while in ADM canonical gravity in asymptotically Minkowskian space-times only inertial effects without gravitational waves survive.

  11. Hidden symmetries in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Peter K.; Corwin, Eric I.

    2016-07-01

    There are deep, but hidden, geometric structures within jammed systems, associated with hidden symmetries. These can be revealed by repeated transformations under which these structures lead to fixed points. These geometric structures can be found in the Voronoi tesselation of space defined by the packing. In this paper we examine two iterative processes: maximum inscribed sphere (MIS) inversion and a real-space coarsening scheme. Under repeated iterations of the MIS inversion process we find invariant systems in which every particle is equal to the maximum inscribed sphere within its Voronoi cell. Using a real-space coarsening scheme we reveal behavior in geometric order parameters which is length-scale invariant.

  12. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, T. W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012.

  13. Unified framework of topological phases with symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yuxiang; Hung, Ling-Yan; Wan, Yidun

    2014-12-01

    In topological phases in 2 +1 dimensions, anyons fall into representations of quantum group symmetries. As proposed in our work [Hung and Wan, Int. J. Mod. Phys. B 28, 1450172 (2014), 10.1142/S0217979214501720], the physics of a symmetry enriched phase can be extracted by the mathematics of (hidden) quantum group symmetry breaking of a "parent phase." This offers a unified framework and classification of the symmetry enriched (topological) phases, including symmetry protected trivial phases as well. In this paper, we extend our investigation to the case where the "parent" phases are non-Abelian topological phases. We show explicitly how one can obtain the topological data and symmetry transformations of the symmetry enriched phases from that of the "parent" non-Abelian phase. Two examples are computed: (1) the Ising×Ising¯ phase breaks into the Z2 toric code with Z2 global symmetry; (2) the SU (2) 8 phase breaks into the chiral Fibonacci × Fibonacci phase with a Z2 symmetry, a first non-Abelian example of symmetry enriched topological phase beyond the gauge-theory construction.

  14. Identification of kinematic errors of five-axis machine tool trunnion axis from finished test piece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Fu, Jianzhong; Chen, Zichen

    2014-09-01

    Compared with the traditional non-cutting measurement, machining tests can more accurately reflect the kinematic errors of five-axis machine tools in the actual machining process for the users. However, measurement and calculation of the machining tests in the literature are quite difficult and time-consuming. A new method of the machining tests for the trunnion axis of five-axis machine tool is proposed. Firstly, a simple mathematical model of the cradle-type five-axis machine tool was established by optimizing the coordinate system settings based on robot kinematics. Then, the machining tests based on error-sensitive directions were proposed to identify the kinematic errors of the trunnion axis of cradle-type five-axis machine tool. By adopting the error-sensitive vectors in the matrix calculation, the functional relationship equations between the machining errors of the test piece in the error-sensitive directions and the kinematic errors of C-axis and A-axis of five-axis machine tool rotary table was established based on the model of the kinematic errors. According to our previous work, the kinematic errors of C-axis can be treated as the known quantities, and the kinematic errors of A-axis can be obtained from the equations. This method was tested in Mikron UCP600 vertical machining center. The machining errors in the error-sensitive directions can be obtained by CMM inspection from the finished test piece to identify the kinematic errors of five-axis machine tool trunnion axis. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method can reduce the complexity, cost, and the time consumed substantially, and has a wider applicability. This paper proposes a new method of the machining tests for the trunnion axis of five-axis machine tool.

  15. Spinor Structure and Internal Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    Spinor structure and internal symmetries are considered within one theoretical framework based on the generalized spin and abstract Hilbert space. Complex momentum is understood as a generating kernel of the underlying spinor structure. It is shown that tensor products of biquaternion algebras are associated with the each irreducible representation of the Lorentz group. Space-time discrete symmetries P, T and their combination PT are generated by the fundamental automorphisms of this algebraic background (Clifford algebras). Charge conjugation C is presented by a pseudoautomorphism of the complex Clifford algebra. This description of the operation C allows one to distinguish charged and neutral particles including particle-antiparticle interchange and truly neutral particles. Spin and charge multiplets, based on the interlocking representations of the Lorentz group, are introduced. A central point of the work is a correspondence between Wigner definition of elementary particle as an irreducible representation of the Poincaré group and SU(3)-description (quark scheme) of the particle as a vector of the supermultiplet (irreducible representation of SU(3)). This correspondence is realized on the ground of a spin-charge Hilbert space. Basic hadron supermultiplets of SU(3)-theory (baryon octet and two meson octets) are studied in this framework. It is shown that quark phenomenologies are naturally incorporated into presented scheme. The relationship between mass and spin is established. The introduced spin-mass formula and its combination with Gell-Mann-Okubo mass formula allows one to take a new look at the problem of mass spectrum of elementary particles.

  16. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-10-15

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  17. Duality symmetries in string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Carmen A.

    1999-10-25

    The search for a unified theory of quantum gravity and gauge interactions leads naturally to string theory. This field of research has received a revival of interest after the discovery of duality symmetries in recent years. We present a self contained account of some non-perturbative aspects of string theory which have been recently understood. The spectrum and interactions of the five consistent superstring theories in ten dimensions are recollected and the fundamental principles underlying this initial stage in the construction of the theory are briefly reviewed. We next discuss some evidences that these apparently different superstrings are just different aspects of one unique theory. The key to this development is given by the non-perturbative duality symmetries which have modified and improved our understanding of string dynamics in many ways. In particular, by relating the fundamental objects of one theory to solitons of another theory, they have unraveled the presence of extended objects in the theory which stand on an equal footing with strings. We introduce these higher dimensional objects, named D-branes, and discuss applications of D-brane physics.

  18. Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson,S.

    2008-10-02

    The Standard Model (SM) is the backbone of elementary particle physics-not only does it provide a consistent framework for studying the interactions of quark and leptons, but it also gives predictions which have been extensively tested experimentally. In these notes, I review the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, discuss the calculation of electroweak radiative corrections to observables, and summarize the status of SM Higgs boson searches. Despite the impressive experimental successes, however, the electroweak theory is not completely satisfactory and the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking is untested. I will discuss the logic behind the oft-repeated statement: 'There must be new physics at the TeV scale'. These lectures reflect my strongly held belief that upcoming results from the LHC will fundamentally change our understanding of electroweak symmetry breaking. In these lectures, I review the status of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, with an emphasis on the importance of radiative corrections and searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. A discussion of the special role of the TeV energy scale in electroweak physics is included.

  19. Where to Go: Breaking the Symmetry in Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration in the “correct” direction is pivotal for many biological processes. Although most work is devoted to its molecular mechanisms, the cell’s preference for one direction over others, thus overcoming intrinsic random motility, epitomizes a profound principle that underlies all complex systems: the choice of one axis, in structure or motion, from a uniform or symmetric set of options. Explaining directional motility by an external chemo-attractant gradient does not solve but only shifts the problem of causation: whence the gradient? A new study in PLOS Biology shows cell migration in a self-generated gradient, offering an opportunity to take a broader look at the old dualism of extrinsic instruction versus intrinsic symmetry-breaking in cell biology. PMID:27196433

  20. Symmetry breaking of nematic umbilical defects through an amplitude equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, Marcel G.; Vidal-Henriquez, Estefania; Davila, Juan Diego; Kowalczyk, Michał

    2014-07-01

    The existence, stability properties, and bifurcation diagram of the nematic umbilical defects is studied. Close to the Fréedericksz transition of nematic liquid crystals with negative anisotropic dielectric constant and homeotropic anchoring, an anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau equation for the amplitude of the tilt of the director away from the vertical axis is derived by taking the three-dimensional (3D) to 2D limit of the Frank-Oseen model. The anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau equation allows us to reveal the mechanism of symmetry breaking of nematic umbilical defects. The positive defect is fully characterized as a function of the anisotropy, while the negative defect is characterized perturbatively. Numerical simulations show quite good agreement with the analytical results.

  1. Design of off-axis PIAACMC mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluzhnik, Eugene; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) provides an efficient way to control diffraction propagation effects caused by the central obstruction/segmented mirrors of the telescope. PIAACMC can be optimized in a way that takes into account both chromatic diffraction effects caused by the telescope obstructed aperture and tip/tilt sensitivity of the coronagraph. As a result, unlike classic PIAA, the PIAACMC mirror shapes are often slightly asymmetric even for an on-axis configuration and require more care in calculating off-axis shapes when an off-axis configuration is preferred. A method to design off-axis PIAA mirror shapes given an on-axis mirror design is presented. The algorithm is based on geometrical ray tracing and is able to calculate off-axis PIAA mirror shapes for an arbitrary geometry of the input and output beams. The method is demonstrated using the third generation PIAACMC design for WFIRST-AFTA telescope. Geometrical optics design issues related to the off-axis diffraction propagation effects are also discussed.

  2. Discrete symmetries and mixing of Dirac neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Arman; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We study the mixing of the Dirac neutrinos in the residual symmetries approach. The key difference from the Majorana case is that the Dirac mass matrix may have larger symmetries: Gν=Zn with n ≥3 . The symmetry group relations have been generalized to the case of Dirac neutrinos. Using them, we have found all new relations between mixing parameters and corresponding symmetry assignments, which are in agreement with the present data. The viable relations exist only for the charged lepton residual symmetry Gℓ=Z2. The relations involve elements of the rows of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix and lead to precise predictions of the 2-3 mixing angle and certain ranges of the C P violation phase. For larger symmetries Gℓ, an agreement with the data can be achieved if ˜10 % corrections related to breaking of Gℓ and Gν are included.

  3. Symmetry properties in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.; Li, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the relations among polarimetric backscattering coefficients from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. Symmetry of geophysical media encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered for both reciprocal and nonreciprocal cases. On the basis of the invariance under symmetry transformations in the linear polarization basis, the scattering coefficients are related by a set of equations which restrict the number of independent parameters in the polarimetric covariance matrix. The properties derived under these transformations are general and apply to all scattering mechanisms in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the derived symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is discussed. As a practical application, the results from this paper provide new methods for the external calibration of polarimetric radars without the deployment of man-made calibration targets.

  4. Emergence of symmetry breaking in fucoid zygotes.

    PubMed

    Homblé, Fabrice; Léonetti, Marc

    2007-06-01

    Fucoid zygotes are model cells for the study of symmetry breaking in plants. After fertilization, their initial spherical symmetry reduces to an axial symmetry, even in the absence of any external cue. This indicates that zygotes have an intrinsic ability to break symmetry in a way that is solely dependent on their internal biochemical and/or biophysical state. In our opinion, symmetry breaking is a self-organized process. It arises around the fucoid zygotes from the ion dynamics through channels (voltage-dependent calcium channels and a potassium leak) and outside the membrane (electrodiffusion owing to slower calcium diffusion compared with potassium). The robustness of this self-organized process and its lability ensure its relevance in plants where symmetry breaking is correlated with transcellular ion currents. PMID:17499009

  5. Off-axis reflective optical apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Lawrence L. (Inventor); Leary, David F. (Inventor); Mammini, Paul V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to a simple apparatus and a convenient and accurate method of mounting the components to form an off-axis reflective optical apparatus such as a collimator. In one embodiment, an off-axis reflective optical apparatus comprises a mounting block having a ferrule holder support surface and an off-axis reflector support surface which is generally perpendicular to the ferrule holder support surface. An optical reflector is mounted on the off-axis reflector support surface and has a reflected beam centerline. The optical reflector has a conic reflective surface and a conic center. A ferrule holder is mounted on the ferrule holder support surface. The ferrule holder provides a ferrule for coupling to an optical fiber and orienting a fiber tip of the optical fiber along a fiber axis toward the optical reflector. The fiber axis is nonparallel to the reflected beam centerline. Prior to mounting the optical reflector to the off-axis reflector support surface and prior to mounting the ferrule holder to the ferrule holder support surface, the optical reflector is movable on the off-axis reflector surface and the ferrule holder is movable on the ferrule holder support surface to align the conic center of the optical reflector with respect to the fiber tip of the optical fiber, and the apparatus has at least one of the following features: (1) the optical reflector is movable on the off-axis reflector support surface to adjust a focus of the fiber tip with respect to the optical reflector, and (2) the ferrule holder is movable on the ferrule holder support surface to adjust the focus of the fiber tip with respect to the optical reflector.

  6. Scars of symmetries in quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Delande, D.; Gay, J.C.

    1987-10-19

    The hydrogen atom in a magnetic field is a classically chaotic Hamiltonian system. The energy-level fluctuations have been shown recently to obey a random-matrix model. Here we go beyond the statistical analysis by studying the destruction of the low-field dynamical symmetries. We especially establish the existence of scars of symmetries in the chaotic regime. The symmetry properties are no longer associated with one given level, but fractalized onto clusters of levels, generating a long-range order.

  7. Symmetry-protected single-photon subradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Han; Wang, Da-Wei; Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-05-01

    We study the protection of subradiant states by the symmetry of the atomic distributions in the Dicke limit, in which collective Lamb shifts cannot be neglected. We find that antisymmetric states are subradiant states for distributions with reflection symmetry. Continuous symmetry can also be used to achieve subradiance. This study is relevant to the problem of robust quantum memory with long storage time and fast readout.

  8. Dual Axis Light Sensor for Tracking Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Miki; Tambo, Toyokazu

    We have developed convenient light sensors to control a platform of solar cell panel. Dual axis light sensor in the present paper has structure of 5 PD (photodiode) light sensor which is composed of 5 photodiodes attached on a frustum of pyramid(1). Light source can be captured in front of the sensor by rotating the X and Y axis as decreasing the output deviation between two pairs of outside photodiodes. We here report the mechanism of sun tacking using the dual axis 5 PD light sensor and the fundamental results performed in the dark room.

  9. Search for primordial symmetry breakings in CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2016-06-01

    There are possibilities to violate symmetries (e.g. parity and rotational invariance) in the primordial cosmological fluctuations. Such symmetry breakings can imprint very rich signatures in late-time phenomena, which may be possible to observe. Especially, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) will change its face drastically, corresponding to the symmetry-breaking types, since the harmonic-space representation is very sensitive to the statistical, spin and angular dependences of cosmological perturbations. Here, we discuss (1) general responses of CMB to the symmetry breakings, (2) some theoretical models creating interesting CMB signatures, and (3) aspects of the estimation from observational data.

  10. Asymptotic symmetries of Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Asymptotic symmetries at future null infinity ( +) of Minkowski space for electrodynamics with massless charged fields, as well as nonabelian gauge theories with gauge group G, are considered at the semiclassical level. The possibility of charge/color flux through + suggests the symmetry group is infinite-dimensional. It is conjectured that the symmetries include a G Kac-Moody symmetry whose generators are "large" gauge transformations which approach locally holomorphic functions on the conformal two-sphere at + and are invariant under null translations. The Kac-Moody currents are constructed from the gauge field at the future boundary of +. The current Ward identities include Weinberg's soft photon theorem and its colored extension.

  11. Evidence for tetrahedral symmetry in (16)O.

    PubMed

    Bijker, R; Iachello, F

    2014-04-18

    We derive the rotation-vibration spectrum of a 4α configuration with tetrahedral symmetry Td and show evidence for the occurrence of this symmetry in the low-lying spectrum of (16)O. All vibrational states with A, E, and F symmetry appear to have been observed as well as the rotational bands with LP=0+, 3-, 4+, 6+ on the A states and part of the rotational bands built on the E, F states. We derive analytic expressions for the form factors and B(EL) values of the ground-state rotational band and show that the measured values support the tetrahedral symmetry of this band. PMID:24785032

  12. A K3 sigma model with : symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Taormina, Anne; Volpato, Roberto; Wendland, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    The K3 sigma model based on the -orbifold of the D 4-torus theory is studied. It is shown that it has an equivalent description in terms of twelve free Majorana fermions, or as a rational conformal field theory based on the affine algebra . By combining these different viewpoints we show that the = (4 , 4) preserving symmetries of this theory are described by the discrete symmetry group : . This model therefore accounts for one of the largest maximal symmetry groups of K3 sigma models. The symmetry group involves also generators that, from the orbifold point of view, map untwisted and twisted sector states into one another.

  13. Noether gauge symmetry approach in quintom cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Adnan; Jamil, Mubasher; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Rashid, Muneer Ahmad; Raza, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    In literature usual point like symmetries of the Lagrangian have been introduced to study the symmetries and the structure of the fields. This kind of Noether symmetry is a subclass of a more general family of symmetries, called Noether gauge symmetries (NGS). Motivated by this mathematical tool, in this paper, we study the generalized Noether symmetry of quintom model of dark energy, which is a two component fluid model with quintessence and phantom scalar fields. Our model is a generalization of the Noether symmetries of a single and multiple components which have been investigated in detail before. We found the general form of the quintom potential in which the whole dynamical system has a point like symmetry. We investigated different possible solutions of the system for diverse family of gauge function. Specially, we discovered two family of potentials, one corresponds to a free quintessence (phantom) and the second is in the form of quadratic interaction between two components. These two families of potential functions are proposed from the symmetry point of view, but in the quintom models they are used as phenomenological models without clear mathematical justification. From integrability point of view, we found two forms of the scale factor: one is power law and second is de-Sitter. Some cosmological implications of the solutions have been investigated.

  14. Issues in standard model symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, M.

    1988-04-01

    This work discusses the symmetry breaking sector of the SU(2) x U(1) electroweak model. The first two chapters discuss Higgs masses in two simple Higgs models. The author proves low-enery theorems for the symmetry breaking sector: The threshold behavior of gauge-boson scattering is completely determined, whenever the symmetry breaking sector meets certain simple conditions. The author uses these theorems to derive event rates for the superconducting super collider (SSC). The author shows that the SSC may be able to determine whether the interactions of the symmetry breaking sector are strong or weak. 54 refs.

  15. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter; Ramek, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Logo Bregenz, the peaceful monastery of Mehrerau and the Opera on the Floating Stage again provided the setting for the international symposium 'Symmetries in Science'. The series which has been running for more than 30 years brings together leading theoreticians whose area of research is, in one way or another, related to symmetry. Since 1992 the meeting took place biannually in Brengez until 2003. In 2009, with the endorsement of the founder, Professor Bruno Gruber, we succeeded in re-establishing the series without external funding. The resounding success of that meeting encouraged us to continue in 2011 and, following on the enthusiasm and positive feedback of the participants, we expect to continue in 2013. Yet again, our meeting in 2011 was very international in flavour and brought together some 30 participants representing 12 nationalities, half of them from countries outside the European Union (from New Zealand to Mexico, Russia to Israel). The broad spectrum, a mixture of experienced experts and highly-motivated newcomers, the intensive exchange of ideas in a harmonious and relaxed atmosphere and the resulting joint projects are probably the secrets of why this meeting is considered to be so special to its participants. At the resumption in 2009 some leading experts and younger scientists from economically weak countries were unable to attend due to the lack of financial resources. This time, with the very worthy and unbureaucratic support of the 'Vereinigung von Freunden und Förderern der J W Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main' (in short: 'Friends and Supporters of the Frankfurt University'), it was possible for all candidates to participate. In particular some young, inspired scientists had the chance of presenting their work to a very competent, but also friendly, audience. We wish to thank the 'Freunde und Förderer' for supporting Symmetries in Science XV. Almost all participants contributed to the publication of this Conference Proceedings. There

  16. Symmetry constraints during the development of anisotropic spinodal patterns

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Luis; del Campo, Adolfo; Fernández, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a phase-separation phenomenon occurring at non-equilibrium conditions. In isotropic materials, it is expected to improve the physical properties, in which modulated structures arise from a single system of spinodal waves. However, in anisotropic materials this process is controversial and not very well understood. Here, we report anisotropic spinodal decomposition patterns in single crystals of K-rich feldspar with macroscopic monoclinic 2/m symmetry. The periodicity of the spinodal waves at ~450 nm produces a blue iridescence, typical of the gemstone moonstone. Stripe patterns in the (010) plane, labyrinthine patterns in the (100) plane, and coexistence of the two patterns in the (110) plane are first resolved by scanning Rayleigh scattering microscopy. Two orthogonal systems of spinodal waves with the same periodicity are derived from the features and orientations of the patterns on the crystal surfaces. The orthogonality of the waves is related to the perpendicularity of the binary axis and the mirror plane. Thus, the spinodal patterns must be controlled by symmetry constraints during phase separation at early stages. Unusual and new properties could be developed in other anisotropic materials by thermal treatment inducing two orthogonal systems of periodic spinodal waves. PMID:26860067

  17. Symmetry Breaking in a Model for Nodal Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brokaw, Charles J.

    2005-03-01

    Nodal cilia are very short cilia found in the embryonic node on the ventral surface of early mammalian embryos. They create a right to left fluid flow that is responsible for determining the normal asymmetry of the internal organs of the mammalian body. To do this, the distal end of the cilium must circle in a counterclockwise sense. Computer simulations with 3-dimensional models of flagella allow examination of 3-dimensional movements such as those of nodal cilia. 3-dimensional circling motions of short cilia can be achieved with velocity controlled models, in which dynein activity is regulated by sliding velocity. If dyneins on one outer doublet are controlled by the sliding velocity experienced by that doublet, the system is symmetric, and the 3-dimensional models can show either clockwise or counterclockwise circling. My computer simulations have examined two possible symmetry breaking mechanisms: 1) dyneins on doublet N are regulated by a mixture of the sliding velocities experienced by doublets N and N+1 (numbered in a clockwise direction, looking from the base). or 2) symmetry is broken by an off-axis force that produces a right-handed twist of the axoneme, consistent with observations that some dyneins can rotate their substrate microtubules in a clockwise direction.

  18. Symmetry constraints during the development of anisotropic spinodal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Luis; Del Campo, Adolfo; Fernández, José F.

    2016-02-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a phase-separation phenomenon occurring at non-equilibrium conditions. In isotropic materials, it is expected to improve the physical properties, in which modulated structures arise from a single system of spinodal waves. However, in anisotropic materials this process is controversial and not very well understood. Here, we report anisotropic spinodal decomposition patterns in single crystals of K-rich feldspar with macroscopic monoclinic 2/m symmetry. The periodicity of the spinodal waves at ~450 nm produces a blue iridescence, typical of the gemstone moonstone. Stripe patterns in the (010) plane, labyrinthine patterns in the (100) plane, and coexistence of the two patterns in the (110) plane are first resolved by scanning Rayleigh scattering microscopy. Two orthogonal systems of spinodal waves with the same periodicity are derived from the features and orientations of the patterns on the crystal surfaces. The orthogonality of the waves is related to the perpendicularity of the binary axis and the mirror plane. Thus, the spinodal patterns must be controlled by symmetry constraints during phase separation at early stages. Unusual and new properties could be developed in other anisotropic materials by thermal treatment inducing two orthogonal systems of periodic spinodal waves.

  19. Symmetry constraints during the development of anisotropic spinodal patterns.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Luis; Del Campo, Adolfo; Fernández, José F

    2016-01-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a phase-separation phenomenon occurring at non-equilibrium conditions. In isotropic materials, it is expected to improve the physical properties, in which modulated structures arise from a single system of spinodal waves. However, in anisotropic materials this process is controversial and not very well understood. Here, we report anisotropic spinodal decomposition patterns in single crystals of K-rich feldspar with macroscopic monoclinic 2/m symmetry. The periodicity of the spinodal waves at ~450 nm produces a blue iridescence, typical of the gemstone moonstone. Stripe patterns in the (010) plane, labyrinthine patterns in the (100) plane, and coexistence of the two patterns in the (110) plane are first resolved by scanning Rayleigh scattering microscopy. Two orthogonal systems of spinodal waves with the same periodicity are derived from the features and orientations of the patterns on the crystal surfaces. The orthogonality of the waves is related to the perpendicularity of the binary axis and the mirror plane. Thus, the spinodal patterns must be controlled by symmetry constraints during phase separation at early stages. Unusual and new properties could be developed in other anisotropic materials by thermal treatment inducing two orthogonal systems of periodic spinodal waves. PMID:26860067

  20. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  1. Symmetry breaking in self-assembled M4L6 cage complexes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wenjing; Ronson, Tanya K.; Nitschke, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe the phenomenon of symmetry breaking within a series of M4L6 container molecules. These containers were synthesized using planar rigid bis-bidentate ligands based on 2,6-substituted naphthalene, anthracene, or anthraquinone spacers and FeII ions. The planarity of the ligand spacer favors a stereochemical configuration in which each cage contains two metal centers of opposite handedness to the other two, which would ordinarily result in an S4-symmetric, achiral configuration. Reduction of symmetry from S4 to C1 is achieved by the spatial offset between each ligand’s pair of binding sites, which breaks the S4 symmetry axis. Using larger CdII or CoII ions instead of FeII resulted, in some cases, in the observation of dynamic motion of the symmetry-breaking ligands in solution. NMR spectra of these dynamic complexes thus reflected apparent S4 symmetry owing to rapid interconversion between energetically degenerate, enantiomeric C1-symmetric conformations. PMID:23754424

  2. SYMMETRY OF THE IBEX RIBBON OF ENHANCED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM (ENA) FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H. O.; Cai, D. M.; Higdon, D. M.; Larsen, B. A. E-mail: dmc@lanl.gov E-mail: balarsen@lanl.gov; and others

    2015-01-20

    The circular ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission remains a critical signature for understanding the interaction between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. We study the symmetry of the ribbon flux and find strong, spectrally dependent reflection symmetry throughout the energy range 0.7-4.3 keV. The distribution of ENA flux around the ribbon is predominantly unimodal at 0.7 and 1.1 keV, distinctly bimodal at 2.7 and 4.3 keV, and a mixture of both at 1.7 keV. The bimodal flux distribution consists of partially opposing bilateral flux lobes, located at highest and lowest heliographic latitude extents of the ribbon. The vector between the ribbon center and heliospheric nose (which defines the so-called BV plane) appears to play an organizing role in the spectral dependence of the symmetry axis locations as well as asymmetric contributions to the ribbon flux. The symmetry planes at 2.7 and 4.3 keV, derived by projecting the symmetry axes to a great circle in the sky, are equivalent to tilting the heliographic equatorial plane to the ribbon center, suggesting a global heliospheric ordering. The presence and energy dependence of symmetric unilateral and bilateral flux distributions suggest strong spectral filtration from processes encountered by an ion along its journey from the source plasma to its eventual detection at IBEX.

  3. Symmetries of S-systems.

    PubMed

    Voit, E O

    1992-04-01

    An S-system is a set of first-order nonlinear differential equations that all have the same structure: The derivative of a variable is equal to the difference of two products of power-law functions. S-systems have been used as models for a variety of problems, primarily in biology. In addition, S-systems possess the interesting property that large classes of differential equations can be recast exactly as S-systems, a feature that has been proven useful in statistics and numerical analysis. Here, simple criteria are introduced that determine whether an S-system possesses certain types of symmetries and how the underlying transformation groups can be constructed. If a transformation group exists, families of solutions can be characterized, the number of S-system equations necessary for solution can be reduced, and some boundary value problems can be reduced to initial value problems. PMID:1591448

  4. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of the proceedings ''Symmetries in Science XVI'' is dedicated to the memory of Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon who both participated several times in these Symposia. We lost not only two great scientists and colleagues, but also two wonderful persons of high esteem whom we will always remember. Dieter Schuch, Michael Ramek There is a German saying ''all good things come in threes'' and ''Symmetries in Science XVI'', convened July 20-26, 2013 at the Mehrerau Monastery, was our third in the sequel of these symposia since taking it over from founder Bruno Gruber who instigated it in 1988 (then in Lochau). Not only the time seemed to have been perfect (one week of beautiful sunshine), but also the medley of participants could hardly have been better. This time, 34 scientists from 16 countries (more than half outside the European Union) came together to report and discuss their latest results in various fields of science, all related to symmetries. The now customary grouping of renowned experts and talented newcomers was very rewarding and stimulating for all. The informal, yet intense, discussions at ''Gasthof Lamm'' occurred (progressively later) each evening till well after midnight and finally till almost daybreak! However, prior to the opening ceremony and during the conference, respectively, we were informed that Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon had recently passed away. Both attended the SIS Symposia several times and had many friends among present and former participants. Professor Peter Kramer, himself a long-standing participant and whose 80th birthday commemoration prevented him from attending SIS XVI, kindly agreed to write the obituary for Miguel Lorente. Professors Richard Kerner and Carol Penson (both also former attendees) penned, at very short notice, the tribute to Allan Solomon. The obituaries are included in these Proceedings and further tributes have been posted to our conference website. In 28 lectures and an evening poster

  5. Electroweak symmetry breaking via QCD.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Jisuke; Lim, Kher Sham; Lindner, Manfred

    2014-08-29

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the electroweak scale within the framework of QCD, which is extended to include conformally invariant scalar degrees of freedom belonging to a larger irreducible representation of SU(3)c. The electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered dynamically via the Higgs portal by the condensation of the colored scalar field around 1 TeV. The mass of the colored boson is restricted to be 350  GeV≲mS≲3  TeV, with the upper bound obtained from perturbative renormalization group evolution. This implies that the colored boson can be produced at the LHC. If the colored boson is electrically charged, the branching fraction of the Higgs boson decaying into two photons can slightly increase, and moreover, it can be produced at future linear colliders. Our idea of nonperturbative electroweak scale generation can serve as a new starting point for more realistic model building in solving the hierarchy problem. PMID:25215976

  6. Wormhole dynamics in spherical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2009-06-15

    A dynamical theory of traversable wormholes is detailed in spherical symmetry. Generically a wormhole consists of a tunnel of trapped surfaces between two mouths, defined as temporal outer trapping horizons with opposite senses, in mutual causal contact. In static cases, the mouths coincide as the throat of a Morris-Thorne wormhole, with surface gravity providing an invariant measure of the radial curvature or ''flaring-out''. The null energy condition must be violated at a wormhole mouth. Zeroth, first, and second laws are derived for the mouths, as for black holes. Dynamic processes involving wormholes are reviewed, including enlargement or reduction, and interconversion with black holes. A new area of wormhole thermodynamics is suggested.

  7. AXIS-SVO Data Centre Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, M. Teresa

    We present the process followed to create the AXIS-SVO Data Centre at the Instituto de Física de Cantabria under the standards of the Virtual Observatory using the publication tools elaborated by the ESA-VO team at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC). The current content of this Data Centre is a sample of optical spectra which are part of the AXIS-XMS sample, based on observations of the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory.

  8. Neutrino properties and fundamental symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There are two components to this work. The first is a development of a new detection scheme for neutrinos. The observed deficit of neutrinos from the Sun may be due to either a lack of understanding of physical processes in the Sun or may be due to neutrinos oscillating from one type to another during their transit from the Sun to the Earth. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is designed to use a water Cerenkov detector employing one thousand tonnes of heavy water to resolve this question. The ability to distinguish muon and tau neutrinos from electron neutrinos is crucial in order to carry out a model-independent test of neutrino oscillations. We describe a developmental exploration of a novel technique to do this using {sup 3}He proportional counters. Such a method offers considerable advantages over the initially proposed method of using Cerenkov light from capture on NaCl in the SNO. The second component of this work is an exploration of optimal detector geometry for a time-reversal invariance experiment. The question of why time moves only in the forward direction is one of the most puzzling problems in modern physics. We know from particle physics measurements of the decay of kaons that there is a charge-parity symmetry that is violated in nature, implying time-reversal invariance violation. Yet, we do not understand the origin of the violation of this symmetry. To promote such an understanding, we are developing concepts and prototype apparatus for a new, highly sensitive technique to search for time-reversal-invariance violation in the beta decay of the free neutron. The optimized detector geometry is seven times more sensitive than that in previous experiments. 15 refs.

  9. Flavor symmetries and fermion masses

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We introduce several ways in which approximate flavor symmetries act on fermions and which are consistent with observed fermion masses and mixings. Flavor changing interactions mediated by new scalars appear as a consequence of approximate flavor symmetries. We discuss the experimental limits on masses of the new scalars, and show that the masses can easily be of the order of weak scale. Some implications for neutrino physics are also discussed. Such flavor changing interactions would easily erase any primordial baryon asymmetry. We show that this situation can be saved by simply adding a new charged particle with its own asymmetry. The neutrality of the Universe, together with sphaleron processes, then ensures a survival of baryon asymmetry. Several topics on flavor structure of the supersymmetric grand unified theories are discussed. First, we show that the successful predictions for the Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix elements, V{sub ub}/V{sub cb} = {radical}m{sub u}/m{sub c} and V{sub td}/V{sub ts} = {radical}m{sub d}/m{sub s}, are a consequence of a large class of models, rather than specific properties of a few models. Second, we discuss how the recent observation of the decay {beta} {yields} s{gamma} constrains the parameter space when the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs doublets, tan{Beta}, is large. Finally, we discuss the flavor structure of proton decay. We observe a surprising enhancement of the branching ratio for the muon mode in SO(10) models compared to the same mode in the SU(5) model.

  10. Rare Isotopes and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex; Engel, Jonathan; Haxton, Wick; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Romalis, Michael; Savard, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Experiments searching for new interactions in nuclear beta decay / Klaus P. Jungmann -- The beta-neutrino correlation in sodium-21 and other nuclei / P. A. Vetter ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure and fundamental symmetries/ B. Alex Brown -- Schiff moments and nuclear structure / J. Engel -- Superallowed nuclear beta decay: recent results and their impact on V[symbol] / J. C. Hardy and I. S. Towner -- New calculation of the isospin-symmetry breaking correlation to superallowed Fermi beta decay / I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy -- Precise measurement of the [symbol]H to [symbol]He mass difference / D. E. Pinegar ... [et al.] -- Limits on scalar currents from the 0+ to 0+ decay of [symbol]Ar and isospin breaking in [symbol]Cl and [symbol]Cl / A. Garcia -- Nuclear constraints on the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction / W. C. Haxton -- Atomic PNC theory: current status and future prospects / M. S. Safronova -- Parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interactions: what can we learn from nuclear anapole moments? / B. Desplanques -- Proposed experiment for the measurement of the anapole moment in francium / A. Perez Galvan ... [et al.] -- The Radon-EDM experiment / Tim Chupp for the Radon-EDM collaboration -- The lead radius Eexperiment (PREX) and parity violating measurements of neutron densities / C. J. Horowitz -- Nuclear structure aspects of Schiff moment and search for collective enhancements / Naftali Auerbach and Vladimir Zelevinsky -- The interpretation of atomic electric dipole moments: Schiff theorem and its corrections / C. -P. Liu -- T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / M. D. Swallows ... [et al.] -- The new concept for FRIB and its potential for fundamental interactions studies / Guy Savard -- Collinear laser spectroscopy and polarized exotic nuclei at NSCL / K. Minamisono -- Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants / M. Pospelov.

  11. Nonlocalization of Nonlocal Symmetry and Symmetry Reductions of the Burgers Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan; Jia, Man; Lou, Sen-Yue

    2012-12-01

    Symmetry reduction method is one of the best ways to find exact solutions. In this paper, we study the possibility of symmetry reductions of the well known Burgers equation including the nonlocal symmetry. The related new group invariant solutions are obtained. Especially, the interactions among solitons, Airy waves, and Kummer waves are explicitly given.

  12. Symmetry Breaking Hopf Bifurcations in Equations with O(2) Symmetry with Application to the Kuramoto Sivashinsky Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amdjadi, F.; Aston, P. J.; Plecháč, P.

    1997-02-01

    In problems with O(2) symmetry, the Jacobian matrix at nontrivial steady state solutions with Dnsymmetry always has a zero eigenvalue due to the group orbit of solutions. We consider bifurcations which occur when complex eigenvalues also cross the imaginary axis and develop a numerical method which involves the addition of a new variable, namely the velocity of solutions drifting round the group orbit, and another equation, which has the form of a phase condition for isolating one solution on the group orbit. The bifurcating branch has a particular type of spatio-temporal symmetry which can be broken in a further bifurcation which gives rise to modulated travelling wave solutions which drift around the group orbit. Multiple Hopf bifurcations are also considered. The methods derived are applied to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation and we give results at two different bifurcations, one of which is a multiple Hopf bifurcation. Our results give insight into the numerical results of Hyman, Nicolaenko, and Zaleski ( Physica D23,265, 1986).

  13. Searching for hidden mirror symmetries in CMB fluctuations from WMAP 7 year maps

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, Fabio; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Starobinsky, Alexey A. E-mail: gruppuso@iasfbo.inaf.it E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru

    2012-07-01

    We search for hidden mirror symmetries at large angular scales in the WMAP 7 year Internal Linear Combination map of CMB temperature anisotropies using global pixel based estimators introduced for this aim. Two different axes are found for which the CMB intensity pattern is anomalously symmetric (or anti-symmetric) under reflection with respect to orthogonal planes at the 99.84(99.96)% CL (confidence level), if compared to a result for an arbitrary axis in simulations without the symmetry. We have verified that our results are robust to the introduction of the galactic mask. The direction of such axes is close to the CMB kinematic dipole and nearly orthogonal to the ecliptic plane, respectively. If instead the real data are compared to those in simulations taken with respect to planes for which the maximal mirror symmetry is generated by chance, the confidence level decreases to 92.39(76.65)%. But when the effect in question translates into the anomalous alignment between normals to planes of maximal mirror (anti)-symmetry and these natural axes mentioned. We also introduce the representation of the above estimators in the harmonic domain, confirming the results obtained in the pixel one. The symmetry anomaly is shown to be almost entirely due to low multipoles, so it may have a cosmological and even primordial origin. Contrary, the anti-symmetry one is mainly due to intermediate multipoles that probably suggests its non-fundamental nature. We have demonstrated that these anomalies are not connected to the known issue of the low variance in WMAP observations and we have checked that axially symmetric parts of these anomalies are small, so that the axes are not the symmetry ones.

  14. Teaching symmetry in the introductory physics curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C. T.; Lederman, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Modern physics is largely defined by fundamental symmetry principles and Noether's Theorem. Yet these are not taught, or rarely mentioned, to beginning students, thus missing an opportunity to reveal that the subject of physics is as lively and contemporary as molecular biology, and as beautiful as the arts. We prescribe a symmetry module to insert into the curriculum, of a week's length.

  15. Quantum Mechanical Observers and Time Reparametrization Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Eiji

    2012-07-01

    We propose that the degree of freedom of measurement by quantum mechanical observers originates in the Goldstone mode of the spontaneously broken time reparametrization symmetry. Based on the classification of quantum states by their nonunitary temporal behavior as seen in the measurement processes, we describe the concepts of the quantum mechanical observers via the time reparametrization symmetry.

  16. Symmetry Properties of Potentiometric Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macca, Carlo; Bombi, G. Giorgio

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates how the symmetry properties of titration curves can be efficiently and rigorously treated by means of a simple method, assisted by the use of logarithmic diagrams. Discusses the symmetry properties of several typical titration curves, comparing the graphical approach and an explicit mathematical treatment. (Author/JM)

  17. Hidden flavor symmetries of SO(10) GUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajc, Borut; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The Yukawa interactions of the SO(10) GUT with fermions in 16-plets (as well as with singlets) have certain intrinsic ("built-in") symmetries which do not depend on the model parameters. Thus, the symmetric Yukawa interactions of the 10 and 126 dimensional Higgses have intrinsic discrete Z2 ×Z2 symmetries, while the antisymmetric Yukawa interactions of the 120 dimensional Higgs have a continuous SU(2) symmetry. The couplings of SO(10) singlet fermions with fermionic 16-plets have U(1) 3 symmetry. We consider a possibility that some elements of these intrinsic symmetries are the residual symmetries, which originate from the (spontaneous) breaking of a larger symmetry group Gf. Such an embedding leads to the determination of certain elements of the relative mixing matrix U between the matrices of Yukawa couplings Y10, Y126, Y120, and consequently, to restrictions of masses and mixings of quarks and leptons. We explore the consequences of such embedding using the symmetry group conditions. We show how unitarity emerges from group properties and obtain the conditions it imposes on the parameters of embedding. We find that in some cases the predicted values of elements of U are compatible with the existing data fits. In the supersymmetric version of SO(10) such results are renormalization group invariant.

  18. Topological phases protected by point group symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Jie; Song, Hao; Hermele, Michael

    There has been remarkable progress in the theoretical understanding of symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases. However, most theories focus on internal, or on-site, symmetries, even though spatial symmetries are important in solids. In this talk, we classify bosonic SPT phases protected by crystalline point group symmetry, which we dub point group SPT (pgSPT) phases. Our approach is based on a procedure to reduce a d-dimensional pgSPT phase to lower-dimensional SPT phases protected by internal symmetry. For three-dimensional pgSPT phases, this approach allows us to gain insight into non-trivial properties at symmetry preserving surfaces. In particular, we obtain toy models for the surfaces of certain pgSPT phases at which there is a symmetry preserving Z2 topological order with anomalous symmetry fractionalization. We also discuss connections between bosonic pgSPT phases and electronic topological crystalline insulators. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES) under Award # DE-SC0014415.

  19. Cubic Icosahedra? A Problem in Assigning Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    There is a standard convention that the icosahedral groups are classified separately from the cubic groups, but these two symmetry types have been conflated as "cubic" in some chemistry textbooks. In this note, the connection between cubic and icosahedral symmetries is examined, using a simple pictorial model. It is shown that octahedral and…

  20. Copper Keplerates: High-Symmetry Magnetic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Maria A; Moreno Pineda, Eufemio; Sanz, Sergio; Inglis, Ross; Pitak, Mateusz B; Coles, Simon J; Evangelisti, Marco; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Heesing, Christian; Brechin, Euan K; Schnack, Jürgen; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2016-01-01

    Keplerates are molecules that contain metal polyhedra that describe both Platonic and Archimedean solids; new copper keplerates are reported, with physical studies indicating that even where very high molecular symmetry is found, the low-temperature physics does not necessarily reflect this symmetry. PMID:26530901

  1. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  2. Geometrical theory of aberrations near the axis in classical off-axis reflecting telescopes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seunghyuk; Prata, Aluizio

    2005-11-01

    A geometrical theory of aberrations for the vicinity of the focus of arbitrary off-axis sections of conic mirrors is derived. It is shown that an off-axis conic mirror introduces linear astigmatism in the image. However, in classical two-mirror telescopes this aberration can be eliminated by tilting the secondary parent mirror axis. It is also shown that the practical geometrical-optics performance of a classical off-axis two-mirror telescope with no linear astigmatism is equivalent to the performance of an on-axis system, proving that both systems have identical third-order coma. To demonstrate the applicability of the theory developed in a practical system, a fast (i.e., f/2), compact, obstruction-free classical off-axis Cassegrain telescope is designed. PMID:16302396

  3. Teaching Point-Group Symmetry with Three-Dimensional Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    Three tools for teaching symmetry in the context of an upper-level undergraduate or introductory graduate course on the chemical applications of group theory are presented. The first is a collection of objects that have the symmetries of all the low-symmetry and high-symmetry point groups and the point groups with rotational symmetries from 2-fold…

  4. Extracting hidden symmetry from the energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Happer, William; Altshuler, Boris L.; Shastry, Sriram B.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we revisit the problem of finding hidden symmetries in quantum mechanical systems. Our interest in this problem was renewed by nontrivial degeneracies of a simple spin Hamiltonian used to model spin relaxation in alkali-metal vapours. We consider this spin Hamiltonian in detail and use this example to outline a general approach to finding symmetries when eigenvalues and eigenstates of the Hamiltonian are known. We extract all nontrivial symmetries responsible for the degeneracy and show that the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian is SU(2). The symmetry operators have a simple meaning which becomes transparent in the limit of large spin. As an additional example we apply the method to the hydrogen atom.

  5. On Gauging Symmetry of Modular Categories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shawn X.; Galindo, César; Plavnik, Julia Yael; Wang, Zhenghan

    2016-05-01

    Topological order of a topological phase of matter in two spacial dimensions is encoded by a unitary modular (tensor) category (UMC). A group symmetry of the topological phase induces a group symmetry of its corresponding UMC. Gauging is a well-known theoretical tool to promote a global symmetry to a local gauge symmetry. We give a mathematical formulation of gauging in terms of higher category formalism. Roughly, given a UMC with a symmetry group G, gauging is a 2-step process: first extend the UMC to a G-crossed braided fusion category and then take the equivariantization of the resulting category. Gauging can tell whether or not two enriched topological phases of matter are different, and also provides a way to construct new UMCs out of old ones. We derive a formula for the {H^4} -obstruction, prove some properties of gauging, and carry out gauging for two concrete examples.

  6. Tests of gravitational symmetries with radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, LiJing; Wex, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Symmetries play important roles in modern theories of physical laws. In this paper, we review several experimental tests of important symmetries associated with the gravitational interaction, including the universality of free fall for self-gravitating bodies, time-shift symmetry in the gravitational constant, local position invariance and local Lorentz invariance of gravity, and spacetime translational symmetries. Recent experimental explorations for post-Newtonian gravity are discussed, of which, those from pulsar astronomy are highlighted. All of these tests, of very different aspects of gravity theories, at very different length scales, favor to very high precision the predictions of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) and, in particular, general relativity which embodies SEP completely. As the founding principles of gravity, these symmetries are motivated to be promoted to even stricter tests in future.

  7. Symmetries in geology and geophysics

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Donald L.; Newman, William I.

    1996-01-01

    Symmetries have played an important role in a variety of problems in geology and geophysics. A large fraction of studies in mineralogy are devoted to the symmetry properties of crystals. In this paper, however, the emphasis will be on scale-invariant (fractal) symmetries. The earth’s topography is an example of both statistically self-similar and self-affine fractals. Landforms are also associated with drainage networks, which are statistical fractal trees. A universal feature of drainage networks and other growth networks is side branching. Deterministic space-filling networks with side-branching symmetries are illustrated. It is shown that naturally occurring drainage networks have symmetries similar to diffusion-limited aggregation clusters. PMID:11607719

  8. Chiral symmetries associated with angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Kleinert, M.

    2014-03-01

    In quantum mechanics courses, symmetries of a physical system are usually introduced as operators which commute with the Hamiltonian. In this paper we will consider chiral symmetries which anticommute with the Hamiltonian. Typically, introductory courses at the (under)graduate level do not discuss these simple, useful and beautiful symmetries at all. The first time a student encounters them is when the Dirac equation is discussed in a course on relativistic quantum mechanics, or when particle-hole symmetry is studied in the context of superconductivity. In this paper, we will show how chiral symmetries can be simply elucidated using the theory of angular momentum, which is taught in virtually all introductory quantum mechanics courses.

  9. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOEpatents

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  10. Anomalous Symmetry Fractionalization and Surface Topological Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xie; Burnell, F. J.; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2015-10-01

    In addition to possessing fractional statistics, anyon excitations of a 2D topologically ordered state can realize symmetry in distinct ways, leading to a variety of symmetry-enriched topological (SET) phases. While the symmetry fractionalization must be consistent with the fusion and braiding rules of the anyons, not all ostensibly consistent symmetry fractionalizations can be realized in 2D systems. Instead, certain "anomalous" SETs can only occur on the surface of a 3D symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase. In this paper, we describe a procedure for determining whether a SET of a discrete, on-site, unitary symmetry group G is anomalous or not. The basic idea is to gauge the symmetry and expose the anomaly as an obstruction to a consistent topological theory combining both the original anyons and the gauge fluxes. Utilizing a result of Etingof, Nikshych, and Ostrik, we point out that a class of obstructions is captured by the fourth cohomology group H4(G ,U (1 )) , which also precisely labels the set of 3D SPT phases, with symmetry group G . An explicit procedure for calculating the cohomology data from a SET is given, with the corresponding physical intuition explained. We thus establish a general bulk-boundary correspondence between the anomalous SET and the 3D bulk SPT whose surface termination realizes it. We illustrate this idea using the chiral spin liquid [U (1 )2 ] topological order with a reduced symmetry Z2×Z2⊂SO (3 ) , which can act on the semion quasiparticle in an anomalous way. We construct exactly solved 3D SPT models realizing the anomalous surface terminations and demonstrate that they are nontrivial by computing three-loop braiding statistics. Possible extensions to antiunitary symmetries are also discussed.

  11. POGAL B-Axis Motor Test

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L C; Wulff, T A

    2004-06-28

    The Aerotech model S-180-69-A, a brushless DC motor of slotless design, was selected as the B-axis drive for the Precision Optical Grinder and Lathe (POGAL). It is common knowledge that a slotless motor will have effectively no magnetic cogging and much less torque ripple than a traditional slot-type motor. It is logical to believe that the radial and axial forces generated between the rotor and stator would also be smaller for a slotless design. This is important when a frameless motor is directly coupled to the axis, as these forces directly influence the axis and affect its error motion. It is the purpose of this test to determine the radial and axial forces generated by the Aerotech motor and to estimate their effect on the error motion of the axis using a mathematical model of the hydrostatic bearing being designed for POGAL. The test results combined with a mathematical model of the POGAL B axis indicate that the directly coupled Aerotech motor will be quite acceptable. In the radial direction, the residual motor force, after subtracting out the one-cycle force, could cause sub nanometer level error motion at the tool point. The axial direction is not in a sensitive direction for turning.

  12. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter; Ramek, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Symmetries Logo This volume of the proceedings "Symmetries in Science XIV" is dedicated to the memory of our colleagues and dear friends Marcos Moshinsky and Yuriĭ Smirnov who regularly participated in these Symposia and were a great inspiration to many. We shall miss them. Dieter Schuch and Michael Ramek The international symposium "Symmetries in Science XIV" held at Collegium Mehrerau in Bregenz, Austria from July 19-24, 2009, attended by 32 scientists from 11 countries, was an experiment, performed by theoreticians. Aim of this experiment was to find out if the desire to revive or even continue this conference series was stronger than the very restricted pecuniary boundary conditions. It obviously was! After its establishment by Bruno Gruber in 1979, the biennial series settled in the very stimulating atmosphere of the monastery Mehrerau, which provided the ideal environment for a limited number of invited participants to exchange ideas, without parallel sessions, and pursue deeper discussions (at the latest in the evening at "Gasthof Lamm"). When the conference series terminated in 2003, former participants were quite disappointed. Meeting again at several (larger) conferences in subsequent years, there were repeated expressions of "the lack of a Bregenz-type meeting in our field nowadays" and the question of a possible "revitalization", even without external funding. After some hesitation, but also driven by our own desire to reinstate the series, we consulted Bruno who not only approved wholeheartedly but also offered his full support. It all finally led to the symposium in July 2009. The atmosphere was really like in the "good old days" and the interesting and thought-provoking presentations culminated in the publication of these Proceedings. We are grateful to Carl Bender for establishing contact with IOP making it possible for us to publish these Proceedings in the Journal of Physics Conference Series. A majority of the participants contributed to these

  13. Natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Bindi, Luca; Yao, Nan; Lin, Chaney; Hollister, Lincoln S.; Andronicos, Christopher L.; Distler, Vadim V.; Eddy, Michael P.; Kostin, Alexander; Kryachko, Valery; MacPherson, Glenn J.; Steinhardt, William M.; Yudovskaya, Marina; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first occurrence of a natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry. The quasicrystal, with composition Al71Ni24Fe5, was discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a recently described CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Icosahedrite, Al63Cu24Fe13, the first natural quasicrystal to be identified, was found in the same meteorite. The new quasicrystal was found associated with steinhardtite (Al38Ni32Fe30), Fe-poor steinhardtite (Al50Ni40Fe10), Al-bearing trevorite (NiFe2O4) and Al-bearing taenite (FeNi). Laboratory studies of decagonal Al71Ni24Fe5 have shown that it is stable over a narrow range of temperatures, 1120 K to 1200 K at standard pressure, providing support for our earlier conclusion that the Khatyrka meteorite reached heterogeneous high temperatures [1100 < T(K) ≤ 1500] and then rapidly cooled after being heated during an impact-induced shock that occurred in outer space 4.5 Gya. The occurrences of metallic Al alloyed with Cu, Ni, and Fe raises new questions regarding conditions that can be achieved in the early solar nebula. PMID:25765857

  14. Natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry.

    PubMed

    Bindi, Luca; Yao, Nan; Lin, Chaney; Hollister, Lincoln S; Andronicos, Christopher L; Distler, Vadim V; Eddy, Michael P; Kostin, Alexander; Kryachko, Valery; MacPherson, Glenn J; Steinhardt, William M; Yudovskaya, Marina; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    We report the first occurrence of a natural quasicrystal with decagonal symmetry. The quasicrystal, with composition Al71Ni24Fe5, was discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a recently described CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Icosahedrite, Al63Cu24Fe13, the first natural quasicrystal to be identified, was found in the same meteorite. The new quasicrystal was found associated with steinhardtite (Al38Ni32Fe30), Fe-poor steinhardtite (Al50Ni40Fe10), Al-bearing trevorite (NiFe2O4) and Al-bearing taenite (FeNi). Laboratory studies of decagonal Al71Ni24Fe5 have shown that it is stable over a narrow range of temperatures, 1120 K to 1200 K at standard pressure, providing support for our earlier conclusion that the Khatyrka meteorite reached heterogeneous high temperatures [1100 < T(K) ≤ 1500] and then rapidly cooled after being heated during an impact-induced shock that occurred in outer space 4.5 Gya. The occurrences of metallic Al alloyed with Cu, Ni, and Fe raises new questions regarding conditions that can be achieved in the early solar nebula. PMID:25765857

  15. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    This volume of the proceedings ''Symmetries in Science XVI'' is dedicated to the memory of Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon who both participated several times in these Symposia. We lost not only two great scientists and colleagues, but also two wonderful persons of high esteem whom we will always remember. Dieter Schuch, Michael Ramek There is a German saying ''all good things come in threes'' and ''Symmetries in Science XVI'', convened July 20-26, 2013 at the Mehrerau Monastery, was our third in the sequel of these symposia since taking it over from founder Bruno Gruber who instigated it in 1988 (then in Lochau). Not only the time seemed to have been perfect (one week of beautiful sunshine), but also the medley of participants could hardly have been better. This time, 34 scientists from 16 countries (more than half outside the European Union) came together to report and discuss their latest results in various fields of science, all related to symmetries. The now customary grouping of renowned experts and talented newcomers was very rewarding and stimulating for all. The informal, yet intense, discussions at ''Gasthof Lamm'' occurred (progressively later) each evening till well after midnight and finally till almost daybreak! However, prior to the opening ceremony and during the conference, respectively, we were informed that Miguel Lorente and Allan Solomon had recently passed away. Both attended the SIS Symposia several times and had many friends among present and former participants. Professor Peter Kramer, himself a long-standing participant and whose 80th birthday commemoration prevented him from attending SIS XVI, kindly agreed to write the obituary for Miguel Lorente. Professors Richard Kerner and Carol Penson (both also former attendees) penned, at very short notice, the tribute to Allan Solomon. The obituaries are included in these Proceedings and further tributes have been posted to our conference website. In 28 lectures and an evening poster

  16. Dynamical flavor origin of ZN symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Dhen, Mikaël; Fong, Chee Sheng; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-05-01

    Discrete Abelian symmetries (ZN ) are a common "artifact" of beyond the standard model physics models. They provide different avenues for constructing consistent scenarios for lepton and quark mixing patterns, radiative neutrino mass generation as well as dark matter stabilization. We argue that these symmetries can arise from the spontaneous breaking of the Abelian U (1 ) factors contained in the global flavor symmetry transformations of the gauge-invariant kinetic Lagrangian. This will be the case provided the ultraviolet completion responsible for the Yukawa structure involves scalar fields carrying nontrivial U (1 ) charges. Guided by minimality criteria, we demonstrate the viability of this approach with two examples: first, we derive the "scotogenic" model Lagrangian, and second, we construct a setup where the spontaneous symmetry-breaking pattern leads to a Z3 symmetry which enables dark matter stability as well as neutrino mass generation at the two-loop order. This generic approach can be used to derive many other models, with residual ZN or ZN1×⋯×ZNk symmetries, establishing an intriguing link between flavor symmetries, neutrino masses and dark matter.

  17. Relativity symmetries and Lie algebra contractions

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Dai-Ning; Kong, Otto C.W.

    2014-12-15

    We revisit the notion of possible relativity or kinematic symmetries mutually connected through Lie algebra contractions under a new perspective on what constitutes a relativity symmetry. Contractions of an SO(m,n) symmetry as an isometry on an m+n dimensional geometric arena which generalizes the notion of spacetime are discussed systematically. One of the key results is five different contractions of a Galilean-type symmetry G(m,n) preserving a symmetry of the same type at dimension m+n−1, e.g. a G(m,n−1), together with the coset space representations that correspond to the usual physical picture. Most of the results are explicitly illustrated through the example of symmetries obtained from the contraction of SO(2,4), which is the particular case for our interest on the physics side as the proposed relativity symmetry for “quantum spacetime”. The contractions from G(1,3) may be relevant to real physics.

  18. Symmetries in fluctuations far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; del Pozo, Jesús J; Garrido, Pedro L

    2011-05-10

    Fluctuations arise universally in nature as a reflection of the discrete microscopic world at the macroscopic level. Despite their apparent noisy origin, fluctuations encode fundamental aspects of the physics of the system at hand, crucial to understand irreversibility and nonequilibrium behavior. To sustain a given fluctuation, a system traverses a precise optimal path in phase space. Here we show that by demanding invariance of optimal paths under symmetry transformations, new and general fluctuation relations valid arbitrarily far from equilibrium are unveiled. This opens an unexplored route toward a deeper understanding of nonequilibrium physics by bringing symmetry principles to the realm of fluctuations. We illustrate this concept studying symmetries of the current distribution out of equilibrium. In particular we derive an isometric fluctuation relation that links in a strikingly simple manner the probabilities of any pair of isometric current fluctuations. This relation, which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by time-reversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations. The new symmetry implies remarkable hierarchies of equations for the current cumulants and the nonlinear response coefficients, going far beyond Onsager's reciprocity relations and Green-Kubo formulas. We confirm the validity of the new symmetry relation in extensive numerical simulations, and suggest that the idea of symmetry in fluctuations as invariance of optimal paths has far-reaching consequences in diverse fields. PMID:21493865

  19. Symmetries in fluctuations far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; del Pozo, Jesús J.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations arise universally in nature as a reflection of the discrete microscopic world at the macroscopic level. Despite their apparent noisy origin, fluctuations encode fundamental aspects of the physics of the system at hand, crucial to understand irreversibility and nonequilibrium behavior. To sustain a given fluctuation, a system traverses a precise optimal path in phase space. Here we show that by demanding invariance of optimal paths under symmetry transformations, new and general fluctuation relations valid arbitrarily far from equilibrium are unveiled. This opens an unexplored route toward a deeper understanding of nonequilibrium physics by bringing symmetry principles to the realm of fluctuations. We illustrate this concept studying symmetries of the current distribution out of equilibrium. In particular we derive an isometric fluctuation relation that links in a strikingly simple manner the probabilities of any pair of isometric current fluctuations. This relation, which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti–Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by time-reversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations. The new symmetry implies remarkable hierarchies of equations for the current cumulants and the nonlinear response coefficients, going far beyond Onsager’s reciprocity relations and Green–Kubo formulas. We confirm the validity of the new symmetry relation in extensive numerical simulations, and suggest that the idea of symmetry in fluctuations as invariance of optimal paths has far-reaching consequences in diverse fields. PMID:21493865

  20. Enclosed, off-axis solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Benitez, Pablo; Grip, Robert E; Minano, Juan C; Narayanan, Authi A; Plesniak, Adam; Schwartz, Joel A

    2013-11-26

    A solar concentrator including a housing having receiving wall, a reflecting wall and at least two end walls, the receiving, reflecting and end walls defining a three-dimensional volume having an inlet, wherein a vertical axis of the housing is generally perpendicular to the inlet, a receiver mounted on the receiving wall of the housing, the receiver including at least one photovoltaic cell, wherein a vertical axis of the receiver is disposed at a non-zero angle relative to the vertical axis of the housing, at least one clip disposed on the reflecting wall an optical element received within the three-dimensional volume, the optical element including at least one tab, the tab being engaged by the clip to align the optical element with the receiver, and a window received over the inlet to enclose the housing.

  1. DARHT AXIS II Beam Position Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeff; Ekdahl, Carl; Broste, William

    2004-11-10

    One of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) primary responsibilities for national security is to certify the readiness of our nation's nuclear stockpile. Since the end of underground testing in 1994, LANL has used non-nuclear experiments and computational models to certify our stockpile. The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility is the next tool scientists will utilize for stockpile certification. DARHT will soon be capable of producing a three dimensional, time resolved radiographic image of a nuclear weapon pit during implosion. Data from these radiographic images will be used to validate the computational models used to study nuclear weapons. The first axis of DARHT with its single-pulse capability has been in use for about 2 years. Data returned from DARHT's First axis has been exceptional, producing the highest resolution radiographic image ever for a pit test.

  2. Stability of vertical and horizontal axis Levitrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Taylor, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of the new horizontal axis Levitron3 is compared with that of the vertical axis device. The rotation frequency ranges are similar because they are determined by the same precessional micro-trap, for which some theory is given. But the macro-trap of the horizontal axis system gives it far greater mechanical stability. Field-line studies allow this to be more easily visualized. The greater stability allows for educational experiments which could only be contemplated with the old Levitron: driven precession and nutation and motion along the field lines. These experiments illustrate some very fundamental space dynamics and several other topics. The enhanced stability may also lead to electro-mechanical applications.

  3. Modular off-axis solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Plesniak, Adam P; Hall, John C

    2015-01-27

    A solar concentrator including a housing defining a vertical axis and including a receiving wall connected to a reflecting wall to define an internal volume and an opening into the internal volume, wherein the reflecting wall defines at least one primary optical element, and wherein at least a portion of the reflecting wall includes a layer of reflective material, the housing further including a cover connected to the receiving wall and the reflecting wall to seal the opening, and at least one receiver mounted on the receiving wall such that a vertical axis of the receiver is disposed at a non-zero angle relative to the vertical axis of the housing, the receiver including at least one photovoltaic cell.

  4. DARHT AXIS II Beam Position Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeff; Ekdahl, Carl; Broste, William

    2004-11-01

    One of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) primary responsibilities for national security is to certify the readiness of our nation's nuclear stockpile. Since the end of underground testing in 1994, LANL has used non-nuclear experiments and computational models to certify our stockpile. The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility is the next tool scientists will utilize for stockpile certification. DARHT will soon be capable of producing a three dimensional, time resolved radiographic image of a nuclear weapon pit during implosion. Data from these radiographic images will be used to validate the computational models used to study nuclear weapons. The first axis of DARHT with its single-pulse capability has been in use for about 2 years. Data returned from DARHT's First axis has been exceptional, producing the highest resolution radiographic image ever for a pit test.

  5. [Leptin and hypothalamus-hypophysis-thyroid axis].

    PubMed

    Riccioni, G; Menna, V; Lambo, M S; Della Vecchia, R; Di Ilio, C; De Lorenzo, A; D'Orazio, N

    2004-01-01

    The leptin system is a major regulator of food intake and metabolic rate. The leptin, an adipose tissue hormone whose plasma levels reflect energy stores, plays an important rule in the pathogenesis of such eating disorders like bulimia and anorexia. Thyroid hormones are major regulators of energy homeostasis. It is possible that leptin and thyroid hormone exert their actions on thermogenesis and energy metabolism via the same common effector patways. Leptin influences feedback regulation of the hypotalamic TRH-secreting neurons by thyroid hormone. Low serum levels of thyroid hormones reflect a dysfunction of the hypotalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) and hypotalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with nervosa anorexia. Neuroendocrine effects of leptin include effects on the HPT and HPA axis. The aim of this work is to evaluated the interactions between leptina and HPT axis on the basis of recent published works and reviews in literature. PMID:15147079

  6. Aeroelastically coupled blades for vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Paquette, Joshua; Barone, Matthew F.

    2016-02-23

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a vertical axis wind turbine blade configured to rotate about a rotation axis. The vertical axis wind turbine blade includes at least an attachment segment, a rear swept segment, and optionally, a forward swept segment. The attachment segment is contiguous with the forward swept segment, and the forward swept segment is contiguous with the rear swept segment. The attachment segment includes a first portion of a centroid axis, the forward swept segment includes a second portion of the centroid axis, and the rear swept segment includes a third portion of the centroid axis. The second portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced ahead of the first portion of the centroid axis and the third portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced behind the first portion of the centroid axis in the direction of rotation about the rotation axis.

  7. Solar rotating magnetic dipole?. [around axis perpendicular to rotation axis of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.

    1974-01-01

    A magnetic dipole rotating around an axis perpendicular to the rotation axis of the sun can account for the characteristics of the surface large-scale solar magnetic fields through the solar cycle. The polarity patterns of the interplanetary magnetic field, predictable from this model, agree with the observed interplanetary magnetic sector structure.

  8. Discrete symmetries and de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Cotăescu, Ion I. Pascu, Gabriel

    2014-11-24

    Aspects of the ambiguity in defining quantum modes on de Sitter spacetime using a commuting system composed only of differential operators are discussed. Discrete symmetries and their actions on the wavefunction in commonly used coordinate charts are reviewed. It is argued that the system of commuting operators can be supplemented by requiring the invariance of the wavefunction to combined discrete symmetries- a criterion which selects a single state out of the α-vacuum family. Two such members of this family are singled out by particular combined discrete symmetries- states between which exists a well-known thermality relation.

  9. Electromagnetic Radiation under Explicit Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-04-01

    We report our observation that radiation from a system of accelerating charges is possible only when there is explicit breaking of symmetry in the electric field in space within the spatial configuration of the radiating system. Under symmetry breaking, current within an enclosed area around the radiating structure is not conserved at a certain instant of time resulting in radiation in free space. Electromagnetic radiation from dielectric and piezoelectric material based resonators are discussed in this context. Finally, it is argued that symmetry of a resonator of any form can be explicitly broken to create a radiating antenna.

  10. \\cal{PT} -symmetry in Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin; Chuang, You-Lin; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-07-01

    We propose a scheme to realize parity-time ( {PT} )-symmetry in an ensemble of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms, which act as superatoms due to the dipole blockade mechanism. We show that Rydberg-dressed 87Rb atoms in a four-level inverted Y-type configuration is highly efficient to generate the refractive index for a probe field, with a symmetric (antisymmetric) profile spatially in the corresponding real (imaginary) part. Comparing with earlier investigations, the present scheme provides a versatile platform to control the system from {PT} -symmetry to non-PT -symmetry via different external parameters, i.e., coupling field detuning, probe field intensity and control field intensity.

  11. Polytopes vibrations within Coxeter group symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadzitaskos, Goce; Patera, Jiıř´; Szajewska, Marzena

    2016-05-01

    We are considering polytopes with exact reflection symmetry group G in the real 3-dimensional Euclidean space R3. By changing one simple element of the polytope (position of one vertex or length of an edge), one can retain the exact symmetry of the polytope by simultaneously changing other corresponding elements of the polytope. A simple method of using the symmetry of polytopes in order to determine several resonant frequencies is presented. Knowledge of these frequencies, or at least their ratios can be used for control of some principal changes of the polytopes.

  12. Dark Matter from Binary Tetrahedral Flavor Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, David; Frampton, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Binary Tetrahedral Flavor Symmetry, originally developed as a quark family symmetry and later adapted to leptons, has proved both resilient and versatile over the past decade. In 2008 a minimal T' model was developed to accommodate quark and lepton masses and mixings using a family symmetry of (T'xZ2). We examine an expansion of this earlier model using an additional Z2 group that facilitates predictions of WIMP dark matter, the Cabibbo angle, and deviations from Tribimaximal Mixing, while giving hints at the nature of leptogenesis.

  13. Critical Symmetry and Supersymmetry in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Iachello, Francesco

    2006-04-26

    The role of dynamic symmetries and supersymmetries in nuclei is reviewed. The concept of critical symmetry, appropriate to describe bosonic systems (even-even nuclei) at the critical point of a phase transition, is introduced, and the symmetry, E(5), at the critical point of spherical to {gamma}-unstable shape phase transition, is discussed. The recently introduced concept of critical supersymmetry, appropriate to describe mixed systems of bosons and fermions (odd-even nuclei) at the critical point of a phase transition is presented. The case of a j=3/2 particle at the critical point of spherical to {gamma}-unstable transition, called E(5/4), is discussed.

  14. Mirror Symmetry for Quasi-Homogeneous Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnakumara, Himal; Jarvis, Tyler

    2008-10-01

    I will present an introduction to mirror symmetry in the context of string theory. Then I will describe an instance of mirror symmetry for singularties defined by quasi-homogeneous polynomials in weighted projective spaces. Milnor rings and the FJRW (Fan-Jarvis-Ruan-Witten) rings associated with these singularities and their relation to the Landua-Ginzburg A model and the Landua-Ginzburg B model will be explained. Results of the calculations for certain singularities for which the mirror symmetry conjecture has been verified will be presented.

  15. Inversion symmetry protected topological insulators and superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dung-Hai; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional topological insulator represents a class of novel quantum phases hosting robust gapless boundary excitations, which is protected by global symmetries such as time reversal, charge conservation and spin rotational symmetry. In this work we systematically study another class of topological phases of weakly interacting electrons protected by spatial inversion symmetry, which generally don't support stable gapless boundary states. We classify these inversion-symmetric topological insulators and superconductors in the framework of K-theory, and construct their lattice models. We also discuss quantized response functions of these inversion-protected topological phases, which serve as their experimental signatures.

  16. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo’s configuration)

  17. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo's configuration).

  18. PREFACE: Symmetries in Science XIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter; Ramek, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Symmetries Logo This volume of the proceedings "Symmetries in Science XIV" is dedicated to the memory of our colleagues and dear friends Marcos Moshinsky and Yuriĭ Smirnov who regularly participated in these Symposia and were a great inspiration to many. We shall miss them. Dieter Schuch and Michael Ramek The international symposium "Symmetries in Science XIV" held at Collegium Mehrerau in Bregenz, Austria from July 19-24, 2009, attended by 32 scientists from 11 countries, was an experiment, performed by theoreticians. Aim of this experiment was to find out if the desire to revive or even continue this conference series was stronger than the very restricted pecuniary boundary conditions. It obviously was! After its establishment by Bruno Gruber in 1979, the biennial series settled in the very stimulating atmosphere of the monastery Mehrerau, which provided the ideal environment for a limited number of invited participants to exchange ideas, without parallel sessions, and pursue deeper discussions (at the latest in the evening at "Gasthof Lamm"). When the conference series terminated in 2003, former participants were quite disappointed. Meeting again at several (larger) conferences in subsequent years, there were repeated expressions of "the lack of a Bregenz-type meeting in our field nowadays" and the question of a possible "revitalization", even without external funding. After some hesitation, but also driven by our own desire to reinstate the series, we consulted Bruno who not only approved wholeheartedly but also offered his full support. It all finally led to the symposium in July 2009. The atmosphere was really like in the "good old days" and the interesting and thought-provoking presentations culminated in the publication of these Proceedings. We are grateful to Carl Bender for establishing contact with IOP making it possible for us to publish these Proceedings in the Journal of Physics Conference Series. A majority of the participants contributed to these

  19. Post-imaging fiducial markers aid in the orientation determination of complexes with mixed or unknown symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Bubeck, Doryen; Filman, David J.; Kuzmin, Mikhail; Fuller, Stephen D.; Hogle, James M.

    2008-01-01

    During the entry process many icosahedral viruses must adopt a lower-order symmetry or incur a symmetry mismatch to release their genome through a single site. A membrane model system in which poliovirus was bound to receptor-decorated liposomes was used to pioneer techniques that studied the break in the symmetry of the initial attachment complex by cryo-electron microscopy. Novel methods involving a fiducial marker for the membrane contact point were developed to objectively determine the symmetry of this complex and provide a starting model to initiate a bootstrap orientation refinement. Here we analyze how errors in the subjective assignment of this position affect the determination of symmetry, and the accuracy of calculating Euler angles for each raw image. In this study we have optimized the method and applied it to study the membrane-attachment complex of Semliki Forest virus (SFV), a model system for enveloped virus fusion. The resulting reconstruction of the SFV-membrane complex with a fiducial provides the first experimental evidence that this pre-fusion cell entry intermediate approaches the membrane along the viral 5fold axis. The analysis reported here, and its subsequent application to enveloped virus fusion, indicate that this is a robust tool for solving the structures of mixed-symmetry complexes. PMID:18442921

  20. Symmetry energy of warm nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. K.; De, J. N.; Samaddar, S. K.; Centelles, M.; Viñas, X.

    2014-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the symmetry energy and symmetry free energy coefficients of infinite nuclear matter and of finite nuclei is investigated. For infinite matter, both these coefficients are found to have a weaker dependence on temperature at densities close to saturation; at low but homogeneous densities, the temperature dependence becomes stronger. For finite systems, different definitions of symmetry energy coefficients are encountered in the literature yielding different values. A resolution to this problem is suggested from a global liquid-drop-inspired fit of the energies and free energies of a host of nuclei covering the entire periodic table. The hot nucleus is modeled in a subtracted finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi framework, with dynamical surface phonon coupling to nucleonic motion plugged in. Contrary to infinite nuclear matter, a substantial change in the symmetry energy coefficients is observed for finite nuclei with temperature.

  1. RNA quaternary structure and global symmetry.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2015-04-01

    Many proteins associate into symmetric multisubunit complexes. Structural analyses suggested that, by contrast, virtually all RNAs with complex 3D structures function as asymmetric monomers. Recent crystal structures revealed that several biological RNAs exhibit global symmetry at the level of their tertiary and quaternary structures. Here we survey known examples of global RNA symmetry, including the true quaternary symmetry of the bacteriophage ϕ29 prohead RNA (pRNA) and the internal pseudosymmetry of the single-chain flavin mononucleotide (FMN), glycine, and cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) riboswitches. For these RNAs, global symmetry stabilizes the RNA fold, coordinates ligand-RNA interactions, and facilitates association with symmetric binding partners. PMID:25778613

  2. Spatial Symmetries of the Local Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Rohozinski, S.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2010-01-01

    Spatial symmetries of the densities appearing in the nuclear Density Functional Theory are discussed. General forms of the local densities are derived by using methods of construction of isotropic tensor fields. The spherical and axial cases are considered.

  3. Matrix Models, Emergent Spacetime and Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Harald; Steinacker, Harold; Lizzi, Fedele

    2009-12-15

    We discuss how a matrix model recently shown to describe emergent gravity may contain extra degrees of freedom which reproduce some characteristics of the standard model, in particular the breaking of symmetries and the correct quantum numbers of fermions.

  4. RNA quaternary structure and global symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins associate into symmetric multisubunit complexes. Structural analyses suggested that, in contrast, virtually all RNAs with complex three-dimensional structures function as asymmetric monomers. Recent crystal structures revealed that several biological RNAs exhibit global symmetry at the level of their tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we survey known examples of global RNA symmetry, including the true quaternary symmetry of the bacteriophage ϕ29 prohead RNA (pRNA), and the internal pseudosymmetry of the single-chain flavin mononucleotide (FMN), glycine, and cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) riboswitches. For these RNAs, global symmetry stabilizes the RNA fold, coordinates ligand-RNA interactions, and facilitates association with symmetric binding partners. PMID:25778613

  5. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingkai; Powell, David A.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Lapine, Mikhail; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-07-01

    Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking underpins a variety of areas such as subatomic physics and biochemistry, and leads to an impressive range of fundamental phenomena. Here we show that this prominent effect is now available in artificial electromagnetic systems, enabled by the advent of magnetoelastic metamaterials where a mechanical degree of freedom leads to a rich variety of strong nonlinear effects such as bistability and self-oscillations. We report spontaneous symmetry breaking in torsional chiral magnetoelastic structures where two or more meta-molecules with opposite handedness are electromagnetically coupled, modifying the system stability. Importantly, we show that chiral symmetry breaking can be found in the stationary response of the system, and the effect is successfully demonstrated in a microwave pump-probe experiment. Such symmetry breaking can lead to a giant nonlinear polarization change, energy localization and mode splitting, which provides a new possibility for creating an artificial phase transition in metamaterials, analogous to that in ferrimagnetic domains.

  6. Modelling Symmetry Classes 233 and 432.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, Steven I.

    1986-01-01

    Offers instructions and geometrical data for constructing solids of the enantiomorphous symmetry classes 233 and 432. Provides background information for each class and highlights symmetrical relationships and construction patterns. (ML)

  7. Space and time from translation symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, A.

    2010-01-15

    We show that the notions of space and time in algebraic quantum field theory arise from translation symmetry if we assume asymptotic commutativity. We argue that this construction can be applied to string theory.

  8. Matrix Models, Emergent Spacetime and Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Harald; Lizzi, Fedele; Steinacker, Harold

    2009-12-01

    We discuss how a matrix model recently shown to describe emergent gravity may contain extra degrees of freedom which reproduce some characteristics of the standard model, in particular the breaking of symmetries and the correct quantum numbers of fermions.

  9. Personal recollections on chiral symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    The author's work on the mass of pseudoscalar mesons is briefly reviewed. The emergence of the study of CP violation in the renormalizable gauge theory from consideration of chiral symmetry in the quark model is discussed.

  10. Shift symmetry and inflation in supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jerome

    2005-07-15

    We consider models of inflation in supergravity with a shift symmetry. We focus on models with one modulus and one inflaton field. The presence of this symmetry guarantees the existence of a flat direction for the inflaton field. Mildly breaking the shift symmetry using a superpotential which depends not only on the modulus, but also on the inflaton field allows one to lift the inflaton flat direction. Along the inflaton direction, the {eta} problem is alleviated. Combining the KKLT mechanism for modulus stabilization and a shift symmetry breaking superpotential of the chaotic inflation type, we find models reminiscent of 'mutated hybrid inflation' where the inflationary trajectory is curved in the modulus-inflaton plane. We analyze the phenomenology of these models and stress their differences with both chaotic and hybrid inflation.

  11. Compact stars and the symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Providência, Constana; Cavagnoli, Rafael; Menezes, Debora P.; Panda, Prafulla K.; Rabhi, Aziz

    2013-02-01

    The effect of the symmetry energy on some properties of compact stars which contain strange degrees of freedom is discussed. Both the onset of hyperons or kaon condensation will be considered. The hyperon-meson couplings are chosen according to experimental values of the hyperon nuclear matter potentials and possible uncertainties are considered. It is shown that a softer symmetry energy affects the onset of strangeness, namely neutral (negatively charged) strange particles set on at larger (smaller) densities, and gives rise to a smaller strangeness fraction as a function of density. A softer symmetry energy will possibily give rise to maximum mass configurations with larger masses. Hyperon-meson couplings have a strong effect on the mass of the star. It is shown that, for stars with masses above 1 Msolar, the radius of the star varies linearly with the symmetry energy slope L.

  12. Symmetry and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollock, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    A brief historical introduction to the development of observational astronomy and cosmology will be presented. The close relationship between the properties of light, symmetry, and our understanding the contents of our universe will be explored.

  13. Composite fermions and broken symmetries in graphene.

    PubMed

    Amet, F; Bestwick, A J; Williams, J R; Balicas, L; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of graphene are described by a Dirac Hamiltonian with a four-fold symmetry of spin and valley. This symmetry may yield novel fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states at high magnetic field depending on the relative strength of symmetry-breaking interactions. However, observing such states in transport remains challenging in graphene, as they are easily destroyed by disorder. In this work, we observe in the first two Landau levels the two-flux composite-fermion sequences of FQH states between each integer filling factor. In particular, the odd-numerator fractions appear between filling factors 1 and 2, suggesting a broken-valley symmetry, consistent with our observation of a gap at charge neutrality and zero field. Contrary to our expectations, the evolution of gaps in a parallel magnetic field suggests that states in the first Landau level are not spin-polarized even up to very large out-of-plane fields. PMID:25562690

  14. Composite fermions and broken symmetries in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amet, F.; Bestwick, A. J.; Williams, J. R.; Balicas, L.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of graphene are described by a Dirac Hamiltonian with a four-fold symmetry of spin and valley. This symmetry may yield novel fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states at high magnetic field depending on the relative strength of symmetry-breaking interactions. However, observing such states in transport remains challenging in graphene, as they are easily destroyed by disorder. In this work, we observe in the first two Landau levels the two-flux composite-fermion sequences of FQH states between each integer filling factor. In particular, the odd-numerator fractions appear between filling factors 1 and 2, suggesting a broken-valley symmetry, consistent with our observation of a gap at charge neutrality and zero field. Contrary to our expectations, the evolution of gaps in a parallel magnetic field suggests that states in the first Landau level are not spin-polarized even up to very large out-of-plane fields.

  15. Suppression of quantum tunneling for all spins for easy-axis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Avinash; Paranjape, M. B.

    2011-05-01

    The semiclassical limit of quantum spin systems corresponds to a dynamical Lagrangian which contains the usual kinetic energy, the couplings and interactions of the spins, and an additional, first-order kinematical term which corresponds to the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) term for the spin degree of freedom. It was shown that in the case of the kinetic dynamics determined only by the WZNW term, half-odd integer spin systems show a lack of tunneling phenomena, whereas integer spin systems are subject to it in the case of potentials with easy-plane easy-axis symmetry. Here we prove for the theory with a normal quadratic kinetic term of arbitrary strength or the first-order theory with azimuthal symmetry (which is equivalently the so-called easy-axis situation), that the tunneling is in fact suppressed for all nonzero values of spin. This model exemplifies the concept that in the presence of complex Euclidean action, it is necessary to use the ensuing complex critical points in order to define the quantum (perturbation) theory. In the present example, if we do not do so, exactly the opposite, erroneous conclusion that the tunneling is unsuppressed for all spins, is reached.

  16. Tennis Rackets and the Parallel Axis Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Derek

    2014-04-01

    This simple experiment uses an unusual graph straightening exercise to confirm the parallel axis theorem for an irregular object. Along the way, it estimates experimental values for g and the moment of inertia of a tennis racket. We use Excel to find a 95% confidence interval for the true values.

  17. Multi-axis control of telemanipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, G. M.; Kruk, Ron

    1989-01-01

    The development of multi-axis hand controllers for use in telemanipulator systems is described. Experience in the control of the SRMS (shuttle remote manipulator system) arm is reviewed together with subsequent tests involving a number of simulators and configurations, including use as a side-arm flight control for helicopters. The factors affecting operator acceptability are reviewed.

  18. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  19. Tailored airfoils for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines*

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-08-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system cost-ofenergy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  20. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-11-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  1. Three-axis adjustable loading structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, E. J.; Gray, D. T. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A three axis adjustable loading structure for testing the movable surfaces of aircraft by applying pressure, is described. The device has three electric drives where the wall angle, horizontal position, and vertical position of the test device can be rapidly and accurately positioned.

  2. Tennis Rackets and the Parallel Axis Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Derek

    2014-01-01

    This simple experiment uses an unusual graph straightening exercise to confirm the parallel axis theorem for an irregular object. Along the way, it estimates experimental values for g and the moment of inertia of a tennis racket. We use Excel to find a 95% confidence interval for the true values.

  3. Thyroid axis alterations in childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Gertig, Anna M; Niechciał, Elżbieta; Skowrońska, Bogda

    2012-01-01

    In recent years researchers have become increasingly interested in the particular relation between the function of the thyroid gland and the body mass in the population of obese children. Numerous studies have been conducted and the literature on the related issues has been abounding. Several thereof have strived at pinpointing a significant link between the function of the thyroid axis and the body mass. Yet, it still remains to be clarified whether these subtle changes in the level of thyroid hormones and TSH observed in childhood obesity are responsible for the increased body mass or rather they represent a secondary phenomenon. The mechanism most often put forward by the researchers that links obesity to thyroid function is the increased level of leptin, which affects neurones in the hypothalamus and the thyroid axis causing TRH and TSH secretion. The body mass is positively correlated with serum leptin and elevated level of leptin is connected with an increase in TSH level. However, there is still controversy whether these inconspicuous differences observed in thyroid axis merit the treatment with thyroxine since these changes seem to constitute a consequence rather than a cause of obesity. Therefore, as most authors postulate, primary importance should be placed on lifestyle changes and body weight reduction leaving substitutive treatment as a supplementary option. The purpose of this review is to present the most current issues on child obesity and the related malfunction of the thyroid axis through an overview of international publications from the years 1996-2011. PMID:23146791

  4. Horizontal Axis Levitron--A Physics Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2014-01-01

    After a brief history of the Levitron, the first horizontal axis Levitron is reported. Because it is easy to operate, it lends itself to educational physics experiments and analogies. Precession and nutation are visualized by reflecting the beam from a laser pointer off the "spignet". Precession is fundamental to nuclear magnetic…

  5. Nanostructure symmetry: Relevance for physics and computing

    SciTech Connect

    Dupertuis, Marc-André; Oberli, D. Y.; Karlsson, K. F.; Dalessi, S.; Gallinet, B.; Svendsen, G.

    2014-03-31

    We review the research done in recent years in our group on the effects of nanostructure symmetry, and outline its relevance both for nanostructure physics and for computations of their electronic and optical properties. The exemples of C3v and C2v quantum dots are used. A number of surprises and non-trivial aspects are outlined, and a few symmetry-based tools for computing and analysis are shortly presented.

  6. Noether's second theorem for BRST symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirov, D.; Giachetta, G.; Mangiarotti, L.; Sardanashvily, G.

    2005-05-01

    We present Noether's second theorem for graded Lagrangian systems of even and odd variables on an arbitrary body manifold X in a general case of BRST symmetries depending on derivatives of dynamic variables and ghosts of any finite order. As a preliminary step, Noether's second theorem for Lagrangian systems on fiber bundles Y{yields}X possessing gauge symmetries depending on derivatives of dynamic variables and parameters of arbitrary order is proved.

  7. Symmetry breaking of quasihelical stellarator equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-04-01

    A mean-field Ohm's law is used to determine the effects of the bootstrap current on quasihelically symmetric stellarator equilibria. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the effects of the bootstrap current break the quasihelical stellarator symmetry at second order in an inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic field strength. The level of symmetry breaking suggests that good approximations to quasihelical stellarator fusion reactors may not be attainable.

  8. Leptogenesis with Friedberg-Lee Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeshi; Geng, C. Q.

    We consider the µ - τ symmetric Friedberg-Lee (FL) symmetry for the neutrino sector and show that a specific FL translation leads to the tribimaximal mixing pattern of the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (MNS) matrix. We also apply the symmetry to the type-I seesaw framework and address the baryon asymmetry of the universe through the leptogenesis mechanism. We try to establish a relation between the net baryon asymmetry and CP phases included in the MNS matrix.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  10. Noether symmetries in the phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Bogar; Galindo-Linares, Elizabeth; Ramírez-Romero, Cupatitzio; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Suárez-Xique, Román; Torres del Castillo, Gerardo F.; Velázquez, Mercedes

    2014-09-01

    The constants of motion of a mechanical system with a finite number of degrees of freedom are related to the variational symmetries of a Lagrangian constructed from the Hamiltonian of the original system. The configuration space for this Lagrangian is the phase space of the original system. The symmetries considered in this manner include transformations of the time and may not be canonical in the standard sense.

  11. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kie Sang; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  12. Fluency Expresses Implicit Knowledge of Tonal Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiaoli; Li, Fengying; Qiao, Fuqiang; Guo, Xiuyan; Dienes, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were twofold. First, we sought to establish whether tonal symmetry produces processing fluency. Second, we sought to explore whether symmetry and chunk strength express themselves differently in fluency, as an indication of different mechanisms being involved for sub- and supra-finite state processing. Across two experiments, participants were asked to listen to and memorize artificial poetry showing a mirror symmetry (an inversion, i.e., a type of cross serial dependency); after this training phase, people completed a four-choice RT task in which they were presented with new artificial poetry. Participants were required to identify the stimulus displayed. We found that symmetry sped up responding to the second half of strings, indicating a fluency effect. Furthermore, there was a dissociation between fluency effects arising from symmetry vs. chunk strength, with stronger fluency effects for symmetry rather than chunks in the second half of strings. Taken together, we conjecture a divide between finite state and supra-finite state mechanisms in learning grammatical sequences. PMID:26869960

  13. SUGRA new inflation with Heisenberg symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Cefalà, Francesco E-mail: stefan.antusch@unibas.ch

    2013-10-01

    We propose a realisation of ''new inflation'' in supergravity (SUGRA), where the flatness of the inflaton potential is protected by a Heisenberg symmetry. Inflation can be associated with a particle physics phase transition, with the inflaton being a (D-flat) direction of Higgs fields which break some symmetry at high energies, e.g. of GUT Higgs fields or of Higgs fields for flavour symmetry breaking. This is possible since compared to a shift symmetry, which is usually used to protect a flat inflaton potential, the Heisenberg symmetry is compatible with a (gauge) non-singlet inflaton field. In contrast to conventional new inflation models in SUGRA, where the predictions depend on unknown parameters of the Kaehler potential, the model with Heisenberg symmetry makes discrete predictions for the primordial perturbation parameters which depend only on the order n at which the inflaton appears in the effective superpotential. The predictions for the spectral index n{sub s} can be close to the best-fit value of the latest Planck 2013 results.

  14. Fluency Expresses Implicit Knowledge of Tonal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiaoli; Li, Fengying; Qiao, Fuqiang; Guo, Xiuyan; Dienes, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were twofold. First, we sought to establish whether tonal symmetry produces processing fluency. Second, we sought to explore whether symmetry and chunk strength express themselves differently in fluency, as an indication of different mechanisms being involved for sub- and supra-finite state processing. Across two experiments, participants were asked to listen to and memorize artificial poetry showing a mirror symmetry (an inversion, i.e., a type of cross serial dependency); after this training phase, people completed a four-choice RT task in which they were presented with new artificial poetry. Participants were required to identify the stimulus displayed. We found that symmetry sped up responding to the second half of strings, indicating a fluency effect. Furthermore, there was a dissociation between fluency effects arising from symmetry vs. chunk strength, with stronger fluency effects for symmetry rather than chunks in the second half of strings. Taken together, we conjecture a divide between finite state and supra-finite state mechanisms in learning grammatical sequences. PMID:26869960

  15. Exploring symmetry in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D.; Amendt, P.; Wilks, S.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with near-vacuum hohlraums, which utilize a minimal but non-zero helium fill, have demonstrated performance improvements relative to conventional gas-filled (0.96 - 1.6 mg/cc helium) hohlraums: minimal backscatter, reduced capsule drive degradation, and minimal suprathermal electron generation. Because this is a low laser-plasma interaction platform, implosion symmetry is controlled via pulse-shaping adjustments to laser power balance. Extending this platform to high-yield designs with high-density carbon capsules requires achieving adequate symmetry control throughout the pulse. In simulations, laser propagation is degraded suddenly by hohlraum wall expansion interacting with ablated capsule material. Nominal radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have not yet proven predictive on symmetry of the final hotspot, and experiments show more prolate symmetry than preshot calculations. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the discrepancy between simulated and measured symmetry and on alternate designs for symmetry control through varying cone fraction, trade-offs between laser power and energy, and modifications to case-to-capsule ratio. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Kinetics of symmetry and asymmetry in a phase-separating bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, J. J.; Olmsted, P. D.

    2015-11-01

    We simulate a phase-separating bilayer in which the leaflets experience a direct coupling favoring local compositional symmetry ("registered" bilayer phases), and an indirect coupling due to hydrophobic mismatch that favors strong local asymmetry ("antiregistered" bilayer phases). For wide ranges of overall leaflet compositions, multiple competing states are possible. For estimated physical parameters, a quenched bilayer may first evolve toward a metastable state more asymmetric than if the leaflets were uncorrelated; subsequently, it must nucleate to reach its equilibrium, more symmetric, state. These phase-transition kinetics exhibit characteristic signatures through which fundamental and opposing interleaflet interactions may be probed. We emphasize how bilayer phase diagrams with a separate axis for each leaflet can account for overall and local symmetry or asymmetry, and capture a range of observations in the experiment and simulation literature.

  17. A two-dimensional matrix correction for off-axis portal dose prediction errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents a follow-up to a modified calibration procedure for portal dosimetry published by Bailey et al. ['An effective correction algorithm for off-axis portal dosimetry errors,' Med. Phys. 36, 4089-4094 (2009)]. A commercial portal dose prediction system exhibits disagreement of up to 15% (calibrated units) between measured and predicted images as off-axis distance increases. The previous modified calibration procedure accounts for these off-axis effects in most regions of the detecting surface, but is limited by the simplistic assumption of radial symmetry. Methods: We find that a two-dimensional (2D) matrix correction, applied to each calibrated image, accounts for off-axis prediction errors in all regions of the detecting surface, including those still problematic after the radial correction is performed. The correction matrix is calculated by quantitative comparison of predicted and measured images that span the entire detecting surface. The correction matrix was verified for dose-linearity, and its effectiveness was verified on a number of test fields. The 2D correction was employed to retrospectively examine 22 off-axis, asymmetric electronic-compensation breast fields, five intensity-modulated brain fields (moderate-high modulation) manipulated for far off-axis delivery, and 29 intensity-modulated clinical fields of varying complexity in the central portion of the detecting surface. Results: Employing the matrix correction to the off-axis test fields and clinical fields, predicted vs measured portal dose agreement improves by up to 15%, producing up to 10% better agreement than the radial correction in some areas of the detecting surface. Gamma evaluation analyses (3 mm, 3% global, 10% dose threshold) of predicted vs measured portal dose images demonstrate pass rate improvement of up to 75% with the matrix correction, producing pass rates that are up to 30% higher than those resulting from the radial correction technique alone. As in

  18. Symmetry-Protected Majorana Fermions in Topological Crystalline Superconductors: Theory and Application to Sr2RuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yuji; Yamakage, Ai; Tanaka, Yukio; Sato, Masatoshi

    2013-08-01

    Crystal point group symmetry is shown to protect Majorana fermions (MFs) in spinfull superconductors (SCs). We elucidate the condition necessary to obtain MFs protected by the point group symmetry. We argue that superconductivity in Sr2RuO4 hosts a topological phase transition to a topological crystalline SC, which accompanies a d-vector rotation under a magnetic field along the c axis. Taking all three bands and spin-orbit interactions into account, symmetry-protected MFs in the topological crystalline SC are identified. Detection of such MFs provides evidence of the d-vector rotation in Sr2RuO4 expected from Knight shift measurements but not yet verified.

  19. Neuroendocrine mechanisms mediating awakening of the human gonadotropic axis in puberty.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D

    1996-06-01

    The hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator presides over the pulsatile and feedback-regulated activities of the pituitary-gonadal axis. Awakening of synchronous activity of the GnRH neuronal ensemble in the earliest stages of puberty heralds the onset of full activation of the reproductive axis in girls and boys. Progression from prepuberty to adulthood in boys is directed by marked (30-fold) amplitude enhancement of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, as assessed by an ultrasensitive immunofluorometric assay and deconvolution analysis. There is a much less apparent rise in LH secretory burst frequency (approximately 1.3-fold increase). Consequently, human puberty is an amplitude-driven neuroendocrine maturational process. However, less is known about pulsatile follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release in puberty. Multiple pathophysiologies that result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can converge on a final common mechanism of attenuated hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator output and hence reduced LH (and FSH) secretion. Disturbances may take the form of reduced GnRH pulse frequency and/or attenuated GnRH secretory burst mass. When the pathophysiology of hypogonadism originates exclusively in a failed GnRH pulse generator, then either treatment of the primary disease process where possible (e.g., by refeeding in starvation, improved metabolic control in diabetes mellitus, dopamine agonist treatment in hyperprolactinemia, etc) and/or treatment with pulsatile GnRH (e.g., in Kallmann's syndrome, isolated hypothalamic lesions, etc.) can provide relevant therapeutic options in children and adults. PMID:8792395

  20. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Nonrelativistic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki

    The subject of condensed matter physics is very rich --- there are an infinite number of parameters producing a diversity of exciting phenomena. As a theorist, my goal is to distill general principles out of this complexity --- to construct theories that can coherently explain many known examples altogether. This thesis is composed of several attempts to develop such theories in topics related to spontaneously symmetry breaking. A remarkable feature of many-body interacting systems is that although they are described by equations respecting various symmetries, they may spontaneously organize into a state that explicitly breaks symmetries. Examples are numerous: various types of crystalline and magnetic orders, Bose-Einstein condensates of cold atoms, superfluids of liquid helium, chiral symmetry in QCD, neutron stars, and cosmic inflation. These systems with spontaneously broken continuous symmetries have gapless excitations, so called Nambu-Goldstone bosons (NGBs). Although the properties of NGBs are well understood in Lorentz-invariant systems, surprisingly, some basic properties of NGBs such as their number and dispersion in nonrelativistic systems have not been discussed from a general perspective. In the first part of this thesis, we solve this issue by developing and analyzing an effective Lagrangian that coherently captures the low-energy, long-distance physics of many different symmetry-breaking states all at once. Next, we examine whether these NGBs originating from spontaneous symmetry breaking remain to be well-defined excitations inside a metal, where low-energy electrons near Fermi surface can collide with them. Our result is a one equation criterion that specifies whether the interactions between electrons and NGBs can be ignored, or whether it completely changes their character. In the latter case, unusual phases of matter such as non-Fermi liquids may arise; in that case, NGBs are overdamped and cannot form particle-like excitations in spite of the

  1. Interfacial exchange-coupling induced chiral symmetry breaking of spin-orbit effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perna, P.; Ajejas, F.; Maccariello, D.; Fernandez Cuñado, J. L.; Guerrero, R.; Niño, M. A.; Bollero, A.; Miranda, R.; Camarero, J.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the interfacial exchange coupling in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AFM) systems induces symmetry breaking of the spin-orbit (SO) effects. This has been done by studying the field and angle dependencies of anisotropic magnetoresistance and vectorial-resolved magnetization hysteresis loops, measured simultaneously and reproduced with numerical simulations. We show how the induced unidirectional magnetic anisotropy at the FM/AFM interface results in strong asymmetric transport behaviors, which are chiral around the magnetization hard-axis direction. Similar asymmetric features are anticipated in other SO-driven phenomena.

  2. Perception of Mirror Symmetry in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falter, Christine M.; Bailey, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Gestalt grouping in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is selectively impaired for certain organization principles but for not others. Symmetry is a fundamental Gestalt principle characterizing many biological shapes. Sensitivity to symmetry was tested using the Picture Symmetry Test, which requires finding symmetry lines on pictures. Individuals…

  3. Scalar Field Theories with Polynomial Shift Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Tom; Grosvenor, Kevin T.; Hořava, Petr; Yan, Ziqi

    2015-12-01

    We continue our study of naturalness in nonrelativistic QFTs of the Lifshitz type, focusing on scalar fields that can play the role of Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. Such systems allow for an extension of the constant shift symmetry to a shift by a polynomial of degree P in spatial coordinates. These "polynomial shift symmetries" in turn protect the technical naturalness of modes with a higher-order dispersion relation, and lead to a refinement of the proposed classification of infrared Gaussian fixed points available to describe NG modes in nonrelativistic theories. Generic interactions in such theories break the polynomial shift symmetry explicitly to the constant shift. It is thus natural to ask: Given a Gaussian fixed point with polynomial shift symmetry of degree P, what are the lowest-dimension operators that preserve this symmetry, and deform the theory into a self-interacting scalar field theory with the shift symmetry of degree P? To answer this (essentially cohomological) question, we develop a new graph-theoretical technique, and use it to prove several classification theorems. First, in the special case of P = 1 (essentially equivalent to Galileons), we reproduce the known Galileon N-point invariants, and find their novel interpretation in terms of graph theory, as an equal-weight sum over all labeled trees with N vertices. Then we extend the classification to P > 1 and find a whole host of new invariants, including those that represent the most relevant (or least irrelevant) deformations of the corresponding Gaussian fixed points, and we study their uniqueness.

  4. Residual symmetries of the gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Velázquez-Rodríguez, Gerardo

    2016-02-01

    We develop a geometric criterion that unambiguously characterizes the residual symmetries of a gravitational Ansatz. It also provides a systematic and effective computational procedure for finding all the residual symmetries of any gravitational Ansatz. We apply the criterion to several examples starting with the Collinson Ansatz for circular stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. We reproduce the residual symmetries already known for this Ansatz including their conformal symmetry, for which we identify the corresponding infinite generators spanning the two related copies of the Witt algebra. We also consider the noncircular generalization of this Ansatz and show how the noncircular contributions on the one hand break the conformal invariance and on the other hand enhance the standard translation symmetries of the circular Killing vectors to supertranslations depending on the direction along which the circularity is lost. As another application of the method, the well-known relation defining conjugate gravitational potentials introduced by Chandrasekhar, which makes possible the derivation of the Kerr black hole from a trivial solution of the Ernst equations, is deduced as a special point of the general residual symmetry of the Papapetrou Ansatz. In this derivation we emphasize how the election of Weyl coordinates, which determines the Papapetrou Ansatz, breaks also the conformal freedom of the stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. Additionally, we study AdS waves for any dimension generalizing the residual symmetries already known for lower dimensions and exhibiting a very complex infinite-dimensional Lie algebra containing three families: two of them span the semidirect sum of the Witt algebra and scalar supertranslations and the third generates vector supertranslations. Independently of this complexity we manage to comprehend the true meaning of the infinite connected group as the precise diffeomorphisms subgroup allowing to locally deform the AdS background into Ad

  5. The small step toward asymmetry: Aesthetic judgment of broken symmetries.

    PubMed

    Gartus, Andreas; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry and complexity both affect the aesthetic judgment of abstract patterns. However, although beauty tends to be associated with symmetry, there are indications that small asymmetries can also be beautiful. We investigated the influence of small deviations from symmetry on people's aesthetic liking for abstract patterns. Breaking symmetry not only decreased patterns' symmetry but also increased their complexity. While an increase of complexity normally results in a higher liking, we found that even a small decrease of symmetry has a strong effect, such that patterns with slightly broken symmetries were significantly less liked than fully symmetric ones. PMID:24349695

  6. Relativistic symmetries in nuclear single-particle spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-You; Liang, Hao Zhao; Meng, Jie; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    Symmetry is a fundamental concept in quantum physics. The quasi-degeneracy between single-particle orbitals (n, l, j = l + 1/2) and (n -1, l + 2, j = l + 3/2) indicates a hidden symmetry in atomic nuclei, the so-called pseudospin symmetry. Since the pseudospin symmetry was recognized as a relativistic symmetry in 1990s, many special features, including the spin symmetry for anti-nucleons, and many new concepts have been introduced. In this Chapter, we will illustrate the schematic picture of spin and pseudospin symmetries, derive the basic formalism, highlight the recent progress from several different aspects, and discuss selected open issues in this topic.

  7. Nation's tallest VAWT (Vertical Axis Wind Turbine) turning out the watts. [Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.

    1988-05-01

    This article describes the development of the tallest and most powerful windmill of its kind in the U.S. Known as a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT), the machine is meant for testing new concepts in vertical axis turbine design. As part of its overall testing program, the turbine will supply electricity to automated water pumps used in irrigation research at the Research Laboratory in Bushland, Texas. Excess power will go to the Southwestern Public Service Company for the area power system.

  8. High payload six-axis load sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jansen, John F.; Lind, Randall F.

    2003-01-01

    A repairable high-payload six-axis load sensor includes a table, a base, and at least three shear-pin load transducers removably mounted between the table and the base. Removable mounting permits easy replacement of damaged shear pins. Preferably, the shear-pin load transducers are responsive to shear forces imparted along the two axes perpendicular to an axis of minimum sensitivity characteristic of the transducer. Responsive to an applied shear force, each shear-pin load transducer can produce an electrical signal proportional to the reaction force. The load sensor can further include a structure for receiving the proportional electrical signals and computing the applied load corresponding to the proportional electrical signals. The computed load can be expressed in terms of a three-dimensional XYZ Cartesian coordinate system.

  9. Two-axis joint assembly and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Thang D. (Inventor); Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In an embodiment, a two-axis joint that utilizes planar reactions to handle moments applied to the side of the joint thereby allowing the device to remain low profile and compact with minimal intrusion to the mounting surface of the two-axis joint. To handle larger moments, the diameter of the planar member can be increased without increasing the overall height of the joint assembly thereby retaining the low profile thereof. Upper and lower antifriction bearings may be positioned within a housing engage the planar member to reduce rotational friction. The upper and lower bearings and a hub which supports the planar member transfer forces produced by moments applied to the side of the joint so as to spread the forces over the area of the housing.

  10. Chandra Optical Axis, Aimpoint and Their Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory revolutionized the X-ray astronomy as being the first, and so far the only, X-ray telescope achieving sub-arcsecond resolution. Chandra comprises of three principal elements: the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) system, and the Science Instrument Module (SIM). To achieve and retain the unprecedented imaging quality, it is critical that these three principal elements stay rigid and stable for the entire life time of the Chandra operation. Measuring and tracking the telescope optical axis and aimpoint positions are the key to understand the stability of the telescope and to maintain the optimal Chandra operation. The study shows that both the optical axis and the aimpoint has been drifting since Chandra launch. I will review the history and current status of these drift and their impact to the Chandra operation, as well as the steps we took to ensure the Chandra science returns.

  11. Multi-Axis Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom; Parker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, portable, and simplified system has been developed that is suitable for in-situ calibration and/or evaluation of multi-axis inertial measurement instruments. This system overcomes facility restrictions and maintains or improves the calibration quality for users of accelerometer-based instruments with applications in avionics, experimental wind tunnel research, and force balance calibration applications. The apparatus quickly and easily positions a multi-axis accelerometer system into a precisely known orientation suitable for in-situ quality checks and calibration. In addition, the system incorporates powerful and sophisticated statistical methods, known as response surface methodology and statistical quality control. These methods improve calibration quality, reduce calibration time, and allow for increased calibration frequency, which enables the monitoring of instrument stability over time.

  12. The IL-23 axis in Salmonella gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Godinez, Ivan; Keestra, A Marijke; Spees, Alanna; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-11-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serotypes cause a localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. In contrast, primary immunodeficiencies that impair interleukin-23 (IL-23)-dependent pathways are associated in humans with disseminated NTS bloodstream infections (bacteraemia). The recent use of animal models has helped to define the role the IL-23 axis plays during NTS gastroenteritis, but additional work is needed to elucidate how this host defence pathway prevents NTS bacteraemia. PMID:21740501

  13. Three-Axis Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung

    1987-01-01

    Gravity gradients measured even on accelerating platforms. Three-axis superconducting gravity gradiometer based on flux quantization and Meissner effect in superconductors and employs superconducting quantum interference device as amplifier. Incorporates several magnetically levitated proof masses. Gradiometer design integrates accelerometers for operation in differential mode. Principal use in commercial instruments for measurement of Earth-gravity gradients in geo-physical surveying and exploration for oil.

  14. Interplay between tilted and principal axis rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Pradip

    2014-08-14

    At IUAC-INGA, our group has studied four neutron rich nuclei of mass-110 region, namely {sup 109,110}Ag and {sup 108,110}Cd. These nuclei provide the unique platform to study the interplay between Tilted and Principal axis rotation since these are moderately deformed and at the same time, shears structures are present at higher spins. The salient features of the high spin behaviors of these nuclei will be discussed which are the signatures of this interplay.

  15. Group Parametrized Tunneling and Local Symmetry Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, William; Mitchell, Justin

    2010-06-01

    Recently, Hougen showed an ad hoc symmetry-based parameterization scheme for analyzing tunneling dynamics and high resolution spectra of fluxional molecular structure similar to S-parameter analysis of superfine structure in SF_6 or NH_3 maser inversion dynamics by Feynman et.al. The problem is that ad hoc parametrization, like path integration in general, can lead to logjams of parameters or ``paths'' with no way to pick out the relevant ones. We show a way to identify and use relevant parameters for a tunneling Hamiltonian H having global G-symmetry-defined bases by first expressing H as a linear combination bar γ ^i {bar g}_i of operators in dual symmetry group bar G. The coefficients bar γ ^i are parameters that define a complete set of allowed paths for any H with G-symmetry and are related thru spectral decomposition of G to eigensolutions of H. Quantum G vs.bar G duality generalizes lab -vs. -body and state -vs. -particle. The number of relevant bar γ ^i-parameters is reduced if a system tends to stick in states of a local symmetry subgroup LsubsetG so the H spectrum forms level clusters labeled by induced representations d(ℓ)(L)\\uparrowG. A cluster-(ℓ) has one E(epsilon)-level labeled by G species (epsilon) for each L species (ℓ) in Depsilon(G)downarrowL by Frobenius reciprocity. Then we apply local symmetry conditions to each irrep Depsilon(bar γ ^i {bar g}_i) that has already been reduced with respect to local symmetry L. This amounts to setting each off-diagonal component Dj,kepsilon(H) to zero. Local symmetry conditions may tell which bar γ ^i-parameters are redundant or zero and directly determine d(ℓ)\\uparrowG tunneling matrix eigenvalues that give E(epsilon)-levels as well as eigenvectors. Otherwise one may need to choose a particular localizing subgroup chain LsubsetL_1subsetL_2...G and further reduce the number of path parameters to facilitate spectral fitting. J.T. Hougen, 2009 MSS RJ01, {J Mol Spect 123, 197 (1987) W.G. Harter and

  16. Statistical palaeomagnetic field modelling and symmetry considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, G.; Bouligand, C.

    2005-06-01

    In the present paper, we address symmetry issues in the context of the so-called giant gaussian process (GGP) modelling approach, currently used to statistically analyse the present and past magnetic field of the Earth at times of stable polarity. We first recall the principle of GGP modelling, and for the first time derive the complete and exact constraints a GGP model should satisfy if it is to satisfy statistical spherical, axisymmetrical or equatorially symmetric properties. We note that as often correctly claimed by the authors, many simplifying assumptions used so far to ease the GGP modelling amount to make symmetry assumptions, but not always exactly so, because previous studies did not recognize that symmetry assumptions do not systematically require a lack of cross-correlations between Gauss coefficients. We further note that GGP models obtained so far for the field over the past 5Myr clearly reveal some spherical symmetry breaking properties in both the mean and the fluctuating field (as defined by the covariance matrix of the model) and some equatorial symmetry breaking properties in the mean field. Non-zonal terms found in the mean field of some models and mismatches between variances defining the fluctuating field (in models however not defined in a consistent way) would further suggest that axial symmetry also is broken. The meaning of this is discussed. Spherical symmetry breaking trivially testifies for the influence of the rotation of the Earth on the geodynamo (a long-recognized fact). Axial symmetry breaking, if confirmed, could hardly be attributed to anything else but some influence of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions on the geodynamo (also a well-known fact). By contrast, equatorial symmetry breaking (in particular the persistence of an axial mean quadrupole) may not trivially be considered as evidence of some influence of CMB conditions. To establish this, one would need to better investigate whether or not this axial quadrupole has

  17. Angiogenic growth factor axis in autophagy regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Marissa J; Dutta, Samikshan; Polavaram, Navatha Shree; Roy, Sohini; Muders, Michael H; Datta, Kaustubh

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms promoting therapy resistance is important. Previously, we reported that VEGFC can promote cancer cell survival during stress via interaction with its receptor NRP2. While examining the molecular mechanisms involved in this survival, we performed a microarray study in which we identified two genes, WDFY1 and LAMP2, which have been suggested to function in autophagy. Our subsequent studies further confirmed the regulation of autophagy by the VEGFC-NRP2 axis in cancer during starvation- and chemotherapy-induced stress. We are currently in the process of determining the mechanism(s) through which WDFY1 and LAMP2 control autophagy; however, we did observe an increase in MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1) activity after the depletion of the VEGFC-NRP2 axis. It would therefore be interesting to study whether WDFY1 and LAMP2 can influence MTORC1 activity and regulate autophagy. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting the VEGFC-NRP2 axis in combination with chemotherapy could be an effective treatment for advanced cancers. PMID:23388383

  18. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters for polar media

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-12

    Sayers and Kachanov (1991) defined crack-influence parameters that are shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropy seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack/fracture density is small enough. These results are then applied to the problem of seismic wave propagation in polar (i.e., non-isotropic) reservoirs having HTI seismic wave symmetry due to the presence of aligned vertical fractures and resulting in azimuthal seismic wave symmetry at the earth's surface. The approach presented suggests one method of inverting for fracture density from wave-speed data. It is also observed that the angular location {theta}{sub ex} of the extreme value (peak or trough) of the quasi-SV-wave speed for VTI occurs at an angle determined approximately by the formula tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} tan {theta}{sub m} = [(c{sub 33} - c{sub 44})/(c{sub 11}-c{sub 44})]{sup 1/2}, where {theta}{sub m} is an angle determined directly (as shown) from the c{sub ij} elastic stiffnesses, whenever these are known from either quasi-static or seismic wave measurements. Alternatively, {theta}{sub ex} is given in terms of the Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters by tan {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} ([v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]/[(1 + 2{epsilon})v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]){sup 1/4}, where {epsilon} = (c{sub 11}-c{sub 33})/2c{sub 33}, v{sub p}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 33}/{rho}, and v{sub s}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 44}/{rho}, with {rho} being the background inertial mass density. The axis of symmetry is always treated here as the x{sub 3}-axis for either VTI symmetry (due, for example, to horizontal cracks), or HTI symmetry (due to aligned vertical cracks). Then the meaning of the stiffnesses is derived from the fracture analysis in the same way for VTI and HTI media, but for HTI the wave speeds relative to the earth's surface are shifted by 90{sup o} in the plane perpendicular to the aligned vertical fractures. Skempton's (1954) coefficient is

  19. The symmetries of the Carroll superparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Parra, Lorena

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent applications of Carroll symmetries we investigate, using the method of nonlinear realizations, the geometry of flat and curved (AdS) Carroll space and the symmetries of a particle moving in such a space both in the bosonic as well as in the supersymmetric case. In the bosonic case we find that the Carroll particle possesses an infinite-dimensional symmetry which only in the flat case includes dilatations. The duality between the Bargmann and Carroll algebra, relevant for the flat case, does not extend to the curved case. In the supersymmetric case we study the dynamics of the { N }=1 AdS Carroll superparticle. Only in the flat limit we find that the action is invariant under an infinite-dimensional symmetry that includes a supersymmetric extension of the Lifshitz Carroll algebra with dynamical exponent z = 0. We also discuss in the flat case the extension to { N }=2 supersymmetry and show that the flat { N }=2 superparticle is equivalent to the (non-moving) { N }=1 superparticle and that therefore it is not BPS unlike its Galilei counterpart. This is due to the fact that in this case kappa-symmetry eliminates the linearized supersymmetry. In an appendix we discuss the { N }=2 curved case in three-dimensions only and show that there are two { N }=2 theories that are physically different.

  20. Weyl-gauge symmetry of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, Alfredo

    2011-05-15

    Research Highlights: > Graphene action's Weyl symmetry identifies shapes for which the DOS is invariant. > Electrons on graphene might experience a general-relativistic-like spacetime. > Rich mathematical structures, such as the Liouville's equation, naturally arise. - Abstract: The conformal invariance of the low energy limit theory governing the electronic properties of graphene is explored. In particular, it is noted that the massless Dirac theory in point enjoys local Weyl symmetry, a very large symmetry. Exploiting this symmetry in the two spatial dimensions and in the associated three dimensional spacetime, we find the geometric constraints that correspond to specific shapes of the graphene sheet for which the electronic density of states is the same as that for planar graphene, provided the measurements are made in accordance to the inner reference frame of the electronic system. These results rely on the (surprising) general relativistic-like behavior of the graphene system arising from the combination of its well known special relativistic-like behavior with the less explored Weyl symmetry. Mathematical structures, such as the Virasoro algebra and the Liouville equation, naturally arise in this three-dimensional context and can be related to specific profiles of the graphene sheet. Speculations on possible applications of three-dimensional gravity are also proposed.

  1. Reflections on the concept of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Kuno

    2005-10-01

    The concept of symmetry is omnipresent, although originally, in Greek antiquity, distinctly different from the modern logical notion. In logic a binary relation R is called symmetric if xRy implies yRx. In Greek, "being symmetric" in general usage is synonymous with "being harmonious", and in technical usage, as in Euclid's Elements, it is synonymous with "commensurable". Due to the second meaning, which is close to the etymology of συ´μμɛτρoς, "with measure" has likewise to be read as "being [in] rational [ratios]" and displays the origin of the concept of rationality of establishing a proportion. Heraclitus can be read as a master of such connections. Exercising rationality is a case of simultaneously finding and inventing symmetries. On that basis a proposal is made of how to relate the modern logical notion of symmetry, a second-order concept, on the one hand with modern first-order usages of the term symmetric in geometry and other fields, and on the other hand with the notion of balance that derives from the ancient usage of symmetric. It is argued that symmetries as states of balance exist only in theory, in practice they function as norms vis-à-vis broken symmetries.

  2. Symmetry in social exchange and health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, Johannes

    2005-10-01

    Symmetry is a relevant concept in sociological theories of exchange. It is rooted in the evolutionary old norm of social reciprocity and is particularly important in social contracts. Symmetry breaking through violation of the norm of reciprocity generates strain in micro-social systems and, above all, in victims of non-symmetric exchange. In this contribution, adverse healthconsequences of symmetry breaking in contractual social exchange are analysed, with a main focus on the employment contract. Scientific evidence is derived from prospective epidemiological studies testing the model of effort-reward imbalance at work. Overall, a twofold elevated risk of incident disease is observed in employed men and women who are exposed to non-symmetric exchange. Health risks include coronary heart disease, depression and alcohol dependence, among others. Preliminary results suggest similar effects on health produced by symmetry breaking in other types of social relationships (e.g. partnership, parental roles). These findings underline the importance of symmetry in contractual social exchange for health and well-being.

  3. Radiant fluxes from various off-axis point sources incident on a circular disk.

    PubMed

    Tryka, Stanislaw

    2013-09-20

    A general multidomain integral formula is presented for calculating fluxes of radiation striking a circular disk from various off-axis point source types embedded in an attenuating or nonattenuating medium. This formula is expressed by double line integrals of radiant intensity and sine functions with respect to the polar and horizontal angles determining the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. The formula reduces to single line integral expressions when radiation does not depend on the horizontal angle and is directly applicable for calculating fluxes of revolutional symmetry around the optical axis of the source perpendicular to the disk. The applicability of this reduced formula is tested by computing radiant fluxes from Lambertian and Gaussian point sources using a simple numerical procedure for single integrals. The computed data are illustrated graphically, tabulated, and validated using OSLO. Finally, the accuracy, similarity, and applicability of the results provided by the integral formula and the OSLO program are analyzed. Numerical results have shown the effectiveness of the presented formulas for calculating radiant fluxes from various on- and off-axis point sources passing through a nonattenuating or attenuating homogeneous isotropic media and incident on a circular disk perpendicular to optical axes of these sources. Practical applications of these formulas include optical sensing and metrology, optical coupling, fiber optic for biomedical measurements, and creative lighting design. PMID:24085174

  4. Geometrical symmetries of nuclear systems: {{ D }}_{3h} and {{ T }}_{d} symmetries in light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof

    2016-07-01

    The role of discrete (or point-group) symmetries in α-cluster nuclei is discussed in the framework of the algebraic cluster model which describes the relative motion of the α-particles. Particular attention is paid to the discrete symmetry of the geometric arrangement of the α-particles, and the consequences for the structure of the corresponding rotational bands. The method is applied to study cluster states in the nuclei 12C and 16O. The observed level sequences can be understood in a simple way as a consequence of the underlying discrete symmetry that characterizes the geometrical configuration of the α-particles, i.e. an equilateral triangle with {{ D }}3h symmetry for 12C, and a tetrahedron with {{ T }}d symmetry for 16O. The structure of rotational bands provides a fingerprint of the underlying geometrical configuration of α-particles.

  5. Symmetry-protected topological phases in noninteracting fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2012-02-01

    Symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases are gapped quantum phases with a certain symmetry, which can all be smoothly connected to the same trivial product state if we break the symmetry. For noninteracting fermion systems with time reversal (T̂), charge conjugation (Ĉ), and/or U(1) (N̂) symmetries, the total symmetry group can depend on the relations between those symmetry operations, such as T̂N̂T̂-1=N̂ or T̂N̂T̂-1=-N̂. As a result, the SPT phases of those fermion systems with different symmetry groups have different classifications. In this paper, we use Kitaev's K-theory approach to classify the gapped free-fermion phases for those possible symmetry groups. In particular, we can view the U(1) as a spin rotation. We find that superconductors with the Sz spin-rotation symmetry are classified by Z in even dimensions, while superconductors with the time reversal plus the Sz spin-rotation symmetries are classified by Z in odd dimensions. We show that all 10 classes of gapped free-fermion phases can be realized by electron systems with certain symmetries. We also point out that, to properly describe the symmetry of a fermionic system, we need to specify its full symmetry group that includes the fermion number parity transformation (-)N̂. The full symmetry group is actually a projective symmetry group.

  6. Origin of the c-axis ultraincompressibility of Mo2GaC above about 15 GPa from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-He, Gao; Zhi-Jun, Xu; Ling, Tang; Jin, Li; An, Du; Yun-Dong, Guo; Ze-Jin, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties and structural evolution of Mo2GaC are calculated by first-principles under pressure. Our results unexpectedly found that the c axis is always stiffer than a axis within 0-100 GPa. An ultraincompressibility of c axis within 15-60 GPa is observed, with a contraction of about 0.2 Å, slightly larger than that of a axis (0.14 Å). The abnormal expansion of c axis and the fast decrease in a axis above about 15 GPa and 70 GPa failed to induce the structural instability, whereas such behavior caused the elastic softening in many mechanical quantities. The shrinkage anomaly of c axis is closely reflected by the internal coordinate (u) shift of Mo atom as it shows three different slopes within 0-15 GPa, 20-60 GPa, and 70-100 GPa, respectively. The longest Mo-Mo bond is responsible for the unusual shrinkage of c-axis under pressure as they experience nearly identical pressure dependences, whereas the a axis presents certain response with the variation of C-Mo bond particularly at 70 GPa. The electronic properties are investigated, including the energy band and density of states, and so on. At G point of K-M line, the energy decreases at 10 GPa first and increases at 30 GPa subsequently, the critical point is at about 15 GPa, with respective values of -0.17 of 0 GPa, -0.18 of 10 GPa, -0.16 of 15 GPa, and -0.13 of 30 GPa, respectively. This alternative energy change of G point, which is the symmetry center of the rhombic parallelogram of Ga atoms and the midpoint of the two bonded Mo atoms, convincingly reveal the origin of the anomalous ultraincompressibility of c axis as the Mo-Mo bond length shrinkage has to overcome the increasing energy barrier height. The Mo-Mo bond population and the electronegativity investigations of the Mo atom further reveal the most likely origin of the ultraincompressibility of c axis. This interesting result expects further experimental confirmation as this is the first nanolaminate ceramics compound presenting quite

  7. Discrete Abelian gauge symmetries and axions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honecker, Gabriele; Staessens, Wieland

    2015-07-01

    We combine two popular extensions of beyond the Standard Model physics within the framework of intersecting D6-brane models: discrete ℤn symmetries and Peccei-Quinn axions. The underlying natural connection between both extensions is formed by the presence of massive U(1) gauge symmetries in D-brane model building. Global intersecting D6-brane models on toroidal orbifolds of the type T6/ℤ2N and T6/ℤ2 × ℤ2M with discrete torsion offer excellent playgrounds for realizing these extensions. A generation-dependent ℤ2 symmetry is identified in a global Pati-Salam model, while global left-right symmetric models give rise to supersymmetric realizations of the DFSZ axion model. In one class of the latter models, the axion as well as Standard Model particles carry a non-trivial ℤ3 charge.

  8. Arbitrary lattice symmetries via block copolymer nanomeshes

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers is a powerful motif for spontaneously forming well-defined nanostructures over macroscopic areas. Yet, the inherent energy minimization criteria of self-assembly give rise to a limited library of structures; diblock copolymers naturally form spheres on a cubic lattice, hexagonally packed cylinders and alternating lamellae. Here, we demonstrate multicomponent nanomeshes with any desired lattice symmetry. We exploit photothermal annealing to rapidly order and align block copolymer phases over macroscopic areas, combined with conversion of the self-assembled organic phase into inorganic replicas. Repeated photothermal processing independently aligns successive layers, providing full control of the size, symmetry and composition of the nanoscale unit cell. We construct a variety of symmetries, most of which are not natively formed by block copolymers, including squares, rhombuses, rectangles and triangles. In fact, we demonstrate all possible two-dimensional Bravais lattices. Finally, we elucidate the influence of nanostructure on the electrical and optical properties of nanomeshes. PMID:26100566

  9. Facial symmetry assessment based on geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoping; Cao, Hanqiang

    2015-12-01

    Face image symmetry is an important factor affecting the accuracy of automatic face recognition. Selecting high symmetrical face image could improve the performance of the recognition. In this paper, we proposed a novel facial symmetry evaluation scheme based on geometric features, including centroid, singular value, in-plane rotation angle of face and the structural similarity index (SSIM). First, we calculate the value of the four features according to the corresponding formula. Then, we use fuzzy logic algorithm to integrate the value of the four features into a single number which represents the facial symmetry. The proposed method is efficient and can adapt to different recognition methods. Experimental results demonstrate its effectiveness in improving the robustness of face detection and recognition.

  10. Approximate gauge symmetry of composite vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-08-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector bosons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in a more intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  11. Breaking the Symmetry in Molecular Nanorings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Because of their unique electronic properties, cyclic molecular structures ranging from benzene to natural light-harvesting complexes have received much attention. Rigid π-conjugated templated porphyrin nanorings serve as excellent model systems here because they possess well-defined structures that can readily be controlled and because they support highly delocalized excitations. In this study, we have deliberately modified a series of six-porphyrin nanorings to examine the impact of lowering the rotational symmetry on their photophysical properties. We reveal that as symmetry distortions increase in severity along the series of structures, spectral changes and an enhancement of radiative emission strength occur, which derive from a transfer of oscillator strength into the lowest (k = 0) state. We find that concomitantly, the degeneracy of the dipole-allowed first excited (k = ±1) state is lifted, leading to an ultrafast polarization switching effect in the emission from strongly symmetry-broken nanorings. PMID:26735906

  12. How center vortices break chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Manfried; Höllwieser, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the chiral properties of near-zero modes for thick classical center vortices in SU(2) lattice gauge theory as examples of the phenomena which may arise in a vortex vacuum. In particular we analyze the creation of near-zero modes from would-be zero modes of various topological charge contributions from center vortices. We show that classical colorful spherical vortex and instanton ensembles have almost identical Dirac spectra and the low-lying eigenmodes from spherical vortices show all characteristic properties for chiral symmetry breaking. We further show that also vortex intersections are able to give rise to a finite density of near-zero modes, leading to chiral symmetry breaking via the Banks-Casher formula. We discuss the mechanism by which center vortex fluxes contribute to chiral symmetry breaking.

  13. A custodial symmetry for Zbb¯

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Contino, Roberto; Da Rold, Leandro; Pomarol, Alex

    2006-09-01

    We show that a subgroup of the custodial symmetry O (3) that protects Δρ from radiative corrections can also protect the Zbbbar coupling. This allows one to build models of electroweak symmetry breaking, such as higgsless, little Higgs or 5D composite Higgs models, that are safe from corrections to Z → bbbar. We show that when this symmetry protects Zbbbar it cannot simultaneously protect Zttbar and Wtbbar. Therefore one can expect to measure sizable deviations from the SM predictions of these couplings at future collider experiments. We also show under what circumstances ZbRbbarR can receive corrections in the right direction to explain the anomaly in the LEP/SLD forward-backward asymmetry AFBb.

  14. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Interdependent Networked Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qing; Wang, Lin; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Zhen

    2014-02-01

    Spatial evolution game has traditionally assumed that players interact with direct neighbors on a single network, which is isolated and not influenced by other systems. However, this is not fully consistent with recent research identification that interactions between networks play a crucial rule for the outcome of evolutionary games taking place on them. In this work, we introduce the simple game model into the interdependent networks composed of two networks. By means of imitation dynamics, we display that when the interdependent factor α is smaller than a threshold value αC, the symmetry of cooperation can be guaranteed. Interestingly, as interdependent factor exceeds αC, spontaneous symmetry breaking of fraction of cooperators presents itself between different networks. With respect to the breakage of symmetry, it is induced by asynchronous expansion between heterogeneous strategy couples of both networks, which further enriches the content of spatial reciprocity. Moreover, our results can be well predicted by the strategy-couple pair approximation method.

  15. Symmetry-related decompositions of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, Marlos

    2012-10-01

    In statistics, the sample mean and variance are intimately related to the symmetries of the full symmetric group describing all possible permutations of assignments of observations to sampling units. While those symmetries yield exactly two invariant subspaces (in a sense to be defined in the text) in correspondence to those summary statistics, the invariant subspaces associated with specific subgroups of the full symmetric group may then lead to much detailed decompositions of the experimental uncertainty. In the present chapter we discuss the symmetry-related summaries of data arising from dihedral experiments, specifically in the context of multinomial models for frequency counts in symbolic sequences. Special examples are given to dihedral summaries that can be potentially interpreted as measures of (molecular) chirality or handedness.

  16. Mutual information and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, A.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the metastable, symmetry-breaking ground states of quantum many-body Hamiltonians have vanishing quantum mutual information between macroscopically separated regions and are thus the most classical ones among all possible quantum ground states. This statement is obvious only when the symmetry-breaking ground states are simple product states, e.g., at the factorization point. On the other hand, symmetry-breaking states are in general entangled along the entire ordered phase, and to show that they actually feature the least macroscopic correlations compared to their symmetric superpositions is highly nontrivial. We prove this result in general, by considering the quantum mutual information based on the two-Rényi entanglement entropy and using a locality result stemming from quasiadiabatic continuation. Moreover, in the paradigmatic case of the exactly solvable one-dimensional quantum X Y model, we further verify the general result by considering also the quantum mutual information based on the von Neumann entanglement entropy.

  17. Geometric symmetries in superfluid vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kozik, Evgeny; Svistunov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Dynamics of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid feature symmetries associated with the geometric character of the complex-valued field, w(z)=x(z)+iy(z), describing the instant shape of the line. Along with a natural set of Noether's constants of motion, which - apart from their rather specific expressions in terms of w(z) - are nothing but components of the total linear and angular momenta of the fluid, the geometric symmetry brings about crucial consequences for kinetics of distortion waves on the vortex lines, the Kelvin waves. It is the geometric symmetry that renders Kelvin-wave cascade local in the wave-number space. Similar considerations apply to other systems with purely geometric degrees of freedom.

  18. Topological phases with generalized global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Beni

    2016-04-01

    We present simple lattice realizations of symmetry-protected topological phases with q -form global symmetries where charged excitations have q spatial dimensions. Specifically, we construct d space-dimensional models supported on a (d +1 ) -colorable graph by using a family of unitary phase gates, known as multiqubit control-Z gates in quantum information community. In our construction, charged excitations of different dimensionality may coexist and form a short-range entangled state which is protected by symmetry operators of different dimensionality. Nontriviality of proposed models, in a sense of quantum circuit complexity, is confirmed by studying protected boundary modes, gauged models, and corresponding gapped domain walls. We also comment on applications of our construction to quantum error-correcting codes, and discuss corresponding fault-tolerant logical gates.

  19. Anomalous Abelian symmetry in the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P.

    1995-12-31

    The observed hierarchy of quark and lepton masses can be parametrized by nonrenormalizable operators with dimensions determined by an anomalous Abelian family symmetry, a gauge extension to the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Such an Abelian symmetry is generic to compactified superstring theories, with its anomalies compensated by the Green-Schwarz mechanism. If we assume these two symmetries to be the same, we find the electroweak mixing angle to be sin {sup 2}{theta}{sub {omega}} = 3/8 at the string scale, just by setting the ratio of the product of down quark to charged lepton masses equal to one at the string scale. This assumes no GUT structure. The generality of the result suggests a superstring origin for the standard model. We generalize our analysis to massive neutrinos, and mixings in the lepton sector.

  20. Workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1984-10-01

    A theoretical workshop on electroweak symmetry breaking at the Superconducting Supercollider was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, June 4-22, 1984. The purpose of the workshop was to focus theoretical attention on the ways in which experimentation at the SSC could reveal manifestations of the phenomenon responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. This issue represents, at present, the most compelling scientific argument for the need to explore the energy region to be made accessible by the SSC, and a major aim of the workshop was to involve a broad cross section of particle theorists in the ongoing process of sharpening the requirements for both accelerator and detector design that will ensure detection and identification of meaningful signals, whatever form the electroweak symmetry breaking phenomenon should actually take. Separate entries were prepared for the data base for the papers presented.

  1. A torus bifurcation theorem with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangils, S. A.; Golubitsky, M.

    1989-01-01

    Hopf bifurcation in the presence of symmetry, in situations where the normal form equations decouple into phase/amplitude equations is described. A theorem showing that in general such degeneracies are expected to lead to secondary torus bifurcations is proved. By applying this theorem to the case of degenerate Hopf bifurcation with triangular symmetry it is proved that in codimension two there exist regions of parameter space where two branches of asymptotically stable two-tori coexist but where no stable periodic solutions are present. Although a theory was not derived for degenerate Hopf bifurcations in the presence of symmetry, examples are presented that would have to be accounted for by any such general theory.

  2. Conservation Laws, Symmetries, and Elementary Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekzema, Dick; Schooten, Gert; van den Berg, Ed; Lijnse, Piet

    2005-05-01

    The following student text on conservation laws, symmetries, and elementary particles was developed in a Dutch project for teaching modern physics to the top stream of the sixth year of secondary education (age 17-18). In a series of 35 lessons of 45-50 minutes each, students study particle-wave duality, the Heisenberg principle, probability models for properties of particles, the particle in a box, and applications, elementary particles, and astrophysics (http://www.phys.uu.nl/˜wwwpmn). In this paper we focus on particle physics and the key concepts of this chapter are: transformation, reaction equation, conservation laws, and symmetry. For recent literature regarding the teaching of symmetries and/or elementary particles, we refer to articles by Hill & Lederman, Pascolini & Pietroni,2 Kalmus,3 O'Connell,4 and Hanley.5

  3. Mixed-Symmetry States in ^93Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. J.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Lesher, S. R.; Mynk, M.; Orce, J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2003-10-01

    The neutron-proton version of the interacting boson model predicts the existence of mixed-symmetry collective excitations. In an even-even nucleus the 2^+_ms state has the distinctive signature of a strong M1 transition to the first 2^+ state and a weak E2 transiton to the ground state. Previous investigations of the N=52 isotones ^92Zr, ^94Mo and ^96Ru have have led to the identification of mixed-symmetry states. It is expected that odd-A nuclei will also display states with mixed-symmetry character. Therefore, excitation function and angular distibution measurements have been performed on ^93Nb, the lone stable odd-A N=52 isotone, using the (n,n^'γ) reaction at the University of Kentucky. Lifetimes were determined with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant No. PHY-0098813

  4. Symmetry constraints on the elastoresistivity tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, M. C.; Hlobil, Patrik; Hristov, A. T.; Maharaj, Akash V.; Fisher, I. R.

    2015-12-01

    The elastoresistivity tensor mi j ,k l characterizes changes in a material's resistivity due to strain. As a fourth-rank tensor, elastoresistivity can be a uniquely useful probe of the symmetries and character of the electronic state of a solid. We present a symmetry analysis of mi j ,k l (both in the presence and absence of a magnetic field) based on the crystalline point group, focusing for pedagogic purposes on the D4 h point group (of relevance to several materials of current interest). We also discuss the relation between mi j ,k l and various thermodynamic susceptibilities, particularly where they are sensitive to critical fluctuations proximate to a critical point at which a point-group symmetry is spontaneously broken.

  5. Symmetry transforms for ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg I

    2002-11-01

    A method for constructing ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibria is introduced. The method consists of the application of symmetry transforms to any known MHD equilibrium [ O. I. Bogoyavlenskij, Phys. Rev. E. 62, 8616, (2000)]. The transforms break the geometrical symmetries of the field-aligned solutions and produce continuous families of the nonsymmetric MHD equilibria. The method of symmetry transforms also allows to obtain MHD equilibria with current sheets and exact solutions with noncollinear vector fields B and V. A model of the nonsymmetric astrophysical jets outside of their accretion disks is developed. The total magnetic and kinetic energy of the jet is finite in any layer c(1)

  6. Nature's statistical symmetries, a characterization by wavelets.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Wavelets are the mathematical equivalent of a microscope, a means of looking at more or less detail in data. By applying wavelet transforms to remote sensing data (satellite images, atmospheric profiles, etc.), we can discover symmetries in Nature's ways of changing in lime and displaying a highly variable environment at any given time. These symmetries are not exact but statistical. The most intriguing one is 'scale-invariance' which describes how spatial statistics collected over a wide range of scales (using wave1m)follow simple power laws with respect to the scale parameter. The geometrical counterparts of statistical scale-invariance are the random fractals so often observed in Nature. This wavelet-based exploration of natural symmetry will be illustrated with clouds,

  7. Electric-magnetic symmetry and Noether's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of charges, Maxwell's equations are highly symmetrical. In particular, they place the electric and magnetic fields on equal footing. In light of this electric-magnetic symmetry, we introduce a variational description of the free electromagnetic field that is based upon the acknowledgement of both electric and magnetic potentials. We use our description, together with Noether's theorem, to demonstrate that electric-magnetic symmetry is, in essence, an expression of the conservation of optical helicity. The symmetry associated with the conservation of Lipkin's zilches is also identified. We conclude by considering, with care, the subtle separation of the rotation and boost angular momenta of the field into their ‘spin’ and ‘orbital’ contributions.

  8. New Algorithms For Automated Symmetry Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jody; Kilgore, Tammy Elaine; Klinger, Allen

    1988-02-01

    In this paper we present new methods for computer-based symmetry identification that combine elements of group theory and pattern recognition. Detection of symmetry has diverse applications including: the reduction of image data to a manageable subset with minimal information loss, the interpretation of sensor data,1 such as the x-ray diffraction patterns which sparked the recent discovery of a new "quasicrystal" phase of solid matter,2 and music analysis and composition.3,4,5 Our algorithms are expressed as parallel operations on the data using the matrix representation and manipulation features of the APL programming language. We demonstrate the operation of programs that characterize symmetric and nearly-symmetric patterns by determining the degree of invariance with respect to candidate symmetry transformations. The results are completely general; they may be applied to pattern data of arbitrary dimension and from any source.

  9. Breaking the Symmetry in Molecular Nanorings.

    PubMed

    Gong, Juliane Q; Favereau, Ludovic; Anderson, Harry L; Herz, Laura M

    2016-01-21

    Because of their unique electronic properties, cyclic molecular structures ranging from benzene to natural light-harvesting complexes have received much attention. Rigid π-conjugated templated porphyrin nanorings serve as excellent model systems here because they possess well-defined structures that can readily be controlled and because they support highly delocalized excitations. In this study, we have deliberately modified a series of six-porphyrin nanorings to examine the impact of lowering the rotational symmetry on their photophysical properties. We reveal that as symmetry distortions increase in severity along the series of structures, spectral changes and an enhancement of radiative emission strength occur, which derive from a transfer of oscillator strength into the lowest (k = 0) state. We find that concomitantly, the degeneracy of the dipole-allowed first excited (k = ±1) state is lifted, leading to an ultrafast polarization switching effect in the emission from strongly symmetry-broken nanorings. PMID:26735906

  10. Preserving Symmetry in Preconditioned Krylov Subspace Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Chow, E.; Saad, Y.; Yeung, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the problem of solving a linear system Ax = b when A is nearly symmetric and when the system is preconditioned by a symmetric positive definite matrix M. In the symmetric case, one can recover symmetry by using M-inner products in the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. This idea can also be used in the nonsymmetric case, and near symmetry can be preserved similarly. Like CG, the new algorithms are mathematically equivalent to split preconditioning, but do not require M to be factored. Better robustness in a specific sense can also be observed. When combined with truncated versions of iterative methods, tests show that this is more effective than the common practice of forfeiting near-symmetry altogether.

  11. Symmetry and Resonance in Periodic FPU Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, Bob

    The symmetry and resonance properties of the Fermi Pasta Ulam chain with periodic boundary conditions are exploited to construct a near-identity transformation bringing this Hamiltonian system into a particularly simple form. This ``Birkhoff-Gustavson normal form'' retains the symmetries of the original system and we show that in most cases this allows us to view the periodic FPU Hamiltonian as a perturbation of a nondegenerate Liouville integrable Hamiltonian. According to the KAM theorem this proves the existence of many invariant tori on which motion is quasiperiodic. Experiments confirm this qualitative behaviour. We note that one can not expect this in lower-order resonant Hamiltonian systems. So the periodic FPU chain is an exception and its special features are caused by a combination of special resonances and symmetries.

  12. Cross-axis adaptation of torsional components in the yaw-axis vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trillenberg, P.; Shelhamer, M.; Roberts, D. C.; Zee, D. S.

    2003-01-01

    The three pairs of semicircular canals within the labyrinth are not perfectly aligned with the pulling directions of the six extraocular muscles. Therefore, for a given head movement, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) depends upon central neural mechanisms that couple the canals to the muscles with the appropriate functional gains in order to generate a response that rotates the eye the correct amount and around the correct axis. A consequence of these neural connections is a cross-axis adaptive capability, which can be stimulated experimentally when head rotation is around one axis and visual motion about another. From this visual-vestibular conflict the brain infers that the slow-phase eye movement is rotating around the wrong axis. We explored the capability of human cross-axis adaptation, using a short-term training paradigm, to determine if torsional eye movements could be elicited by yaw (horizontal) head rotation (where torsion is normally inappropriate). We applied yaw sinusoidal head rotation (+/-10 degrees, 0.33 Hz) and measured eye movement responses in the dark, and before and after adaptation. The adaptation paradigm lasted 45-60 min, and consisted of the identical head motion, coupled with a moving visual scene that required one of several types of eye movements: (1) torsion alone (-Roll); (2) horizontal/torsional, head right/CW torsion (Yaw-Roll); (3) horizontal/torsional, head right/CCW torsion (Yaw+Roll); (4) horizontal, vertical, torsional combined (Yaw+Pitch-Roll); and (5) horizontal and vertical together (Yaw+Pitch). The largest and most significant changes in torsional amplitude occurred in the Yaw-Roll and Yaw+Roll conditions. We conclude that short-term, cross-axis adaptation of torsion is possible but constrained by the complexity of the adaptation task: smaller torsional components are produced if more than one cross-coupling component is required. In contrast, vertical cross-axis components can be easily trained to occur with yaw head

  13. An integrated MEMS piezoresistive tri-axis accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongping, Zhang; Changde, He; Jiaqi, Yu; Chunhui, Du; Juanting, Zhang; Xiujian, Chou; Wendong, Zhang

    2013-10-01

    An integrated MEMS accelerometer has been designed and fabricated. The device, which is based on the piezoresistive effect, accomplishes the detection of three components of acceleration by using piezoresistors to compose three Wheatstone bridges that are sensitive to the only given orientation. The fabrication of the accelerometer is described, and the theory behind its operation developed. Experimental results on sensitivity, cross-axis-coupling degree, and linearity are presented. The sensitivity of X, Y and Z were 5.49 mV/g, 5.12 mV/g and 4.82 mV/g, respectively; the nonlinearity of X, Y and Z were 0.01%, 0.04% and 0.01%, respectively; the cross-axis-coupling factor of X axis to Y axis and Z axis are 0.119% and 2.26% the cross-axis-coupling factor of Y axis to X axis and Z axis are 0.157% and 4.12% the cross-axis-coupling factor of Z axis to X axis and Y axis are 0.511% and 0.938%. The measured performance indexes attain accurate vector-detection in practical applications, and even at a navigation level. In conclusion, the accelerometer is a highly integrated sensor.

  14. Partial restoration of chiral symmetry in a confining string

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Loshaj, F.

    2014-08-01

    Here, we attempt to describe the interplay of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking in QCD by using the string model. We argue that in the quasi-Abelian picture of confinement based on the condensation of magnetic monopoles and the dual Meissner effect, the world sheet dynamics of the confining string can be effectively described by the 1+1 dimensional massless electrodynamics, which is exactly soluble. The transverse plane distribution of the chromoelectric field stretched between the quark and antiquark sources can then be attributed to the fluctuations in the position of the string. The dependence of the chiral condensate in the string on the (chromo-)electric field can be evaluated analytically, and is determined by the chiral anomaly and the θ-vacuum structure. Moreover, our picture allows us to predict the distribution of the chiral condensate in the plane transverse to the axis connecting the quark and antiquark. This prediction is compared to the lattice QCD results; a good agreement is found.

  15. Mirror-symmetry breakings in human sperm rheotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Norbert; Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Dunkel, Joern; Kantsler, Vasily

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream-swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself w.r.t. ambient flows is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments. We present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell's turning direction is is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror-symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability.

  16. Calculation of transmission in low symmetry lattices and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Manoj; Zhang, X.-G.; Cheng, H.-P.

    2010-03-01

    Conductance calculations using first-principles plane-wave method have been performed to study scattering in high symmetry lattices [1]. The Original implementation of above method in the code Quantum Espresso [2] has limitation that it only allows the transport direction along a lattice vector perpendicular to the basal plane formed by two other lattice vectors, e.g., the c-axis of a tetragonal lattice. We have generalized this method to non-orthogonal lattices with transport direction not necessarily aligned with any lattice vector. With the generalization, we have calculated transmission, reflection coefficients in transport direction and velocity of Bloch's states along various directions in the lattice. With first-principles results as input for Boltzmann's transport equations, we have obtained resistance of grain boundaries in Cu such as twin(111), σ5(100) and σ7(111). [4pt] [1] Hyoung Joon Choi and Jisoon Ihm, Phys. Rev. B 59, 2267 (1999) [0pt] [2] http://www.quantum-espresso.org/

  17. Mirror-symmetry breakings in human sperm rheotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Norbert; Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-11-01

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream-swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself w.r.t ambient flows is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments. We present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell's turning direction is is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror-symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability.

  18. Quregisters, Symmetry Groups and Clifford Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, D.; Morales-Luna, G.

    2016-03-01

    Natural one-to-one and two-to-one homomorphisms from SO(3) into SU(2) are built conventionally, and the collection of qubits, is identified with a subgroup of SU(2). This construction is suitable to be extended to corresponding tensor powers. The notions of qubits, quregisters and qugates are translated into the language of symmetry groups. The corresponding elements to entangled states in the tensor product of Hilbert spaces reflect entanglement properties as well, and in this way a notion of entanglement is realised in the tensor product of symmetry groups.

  19. Parity-time symmetry under magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We study a parity-time-(PT -) symmetric ring lattice, with one pair of balanced gain and loss located at opposite positions. The system remains PT -symmetric when threaded by a magnetic flux; however, the PT symmetry is sensitive to the magnetic flux in the presence of a large balanced gain and loss, or in a large system. We find a threshold gain or loss above which any nontrivial magnetic flux breaks the PT symmetry. We obtain the maximally tolerable magnetic flux for the exact PT -symmetric phase, which is approximately linearly dependent on a weak gain or loss.

  20. Symmetry-constrained electron vortex propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, L.; Guzzinati, G.; Béché, A.; Lubk, A.; Verbeeck, J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron vortex beams hold great promise for development in transmission electron microscopy but have yet to be widely adopted. This is partly due to the complex set of interactions that occur between a beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) and a sample. Herein, the system is simplified to focus on the interaction between geometrical symmetries, OAM, and topology. We present multiple simulations alongside experimental data to study the behavior of a variety of electron vortex beams after interacting with apertures of different symmetries and investigate the effect on their OAM and vortex structure, both in the far field and under free-space propagation.

  1. Dual technicolor with hidden local symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    We consider a dual description of the technicolor-like gauge theory within the D4/D8-brane configuration with varying confinement and electroweak symmetry breaking scales. Constructing an effective truncated model valid below a certain cutoff, we identify the particle spectrum with Kaluza-Klein modes of the model in a manner consistent with the hidden local symmetry. Integrating out heavy states, we find that the low-energy action receives nontrivial corrections stemming from the mixing between standard model and heavy gauge bosons, which results in reduction of oblique parameters.

  2. Cascading Multicriticality in Nonrelativistic Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Tom; Grosvenor, Kevin T.; Hořava, Petr; Yan, Ziqi

    2015-12-01

    Without Lorentz invariance, spontaneous global symmetry breaking can lead to multicritical Nambu-Goldstone modes with a higher-order low-energy dispersion ω ˜kn (n =2 ,3 ,… ), whose naturalness is protected by polynomial shift symmetries. Here, we investigate the role of infrared divergences and the nonrelativistic generalization of the Coleman-Hohenberg-Mermin-Wagner (CHMW) theorem. We find novel cascading phenomena with large hierarchies between the scales at which the value of n changes, leading to an evasion of the "no-go" consequences of the relativistic CHMW theorem.

  3. Weak Lie symmetry and extended Lie algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Goenner, Hubert

    2013-04-15

    The concept of weak Lie motion (weak Lie symmetry) is introduced. Applications given exhibit a reduction of the usual symmetry, e.g., in the case of the rotation group. In this context, a particular generalization of Lie algebras is found ('extended Lie algebras') which turns out to be an involutive distribution or a simple example for a tangent Lie algebroid. Riemannian and Lorentz metrics can be introduced on such an algebroid through an extended Cartan-Killing form. Transformation groups from non-relativistic mechanics and quantum mechanics lead to such tangent Lie algebroids and to Lorentz geometries constructed on them (1-dimensional gravitational fields).

  4. Dynamical systems and σ-symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicogna, G.; Gaeta, G.; Walcher, S.

    2013-06-01

    A deformation of the standard prolongation operation, defined on sets of vector fields in involution rather than on single ones, was recently introduced and christened ‘σ-prolongation’ correspondingly, one has ‘σ-symmetries’ of differential equations. These can be used to reduce the equations under study, but the general reduction procedure under σ-symmetries fails for equations of order 1. In this paper, we discuss how σ-symmetries can be used to reduce dynamical systems, i.e. sets of first-order ODEs in the form \\dot{x}^a = f^a (x).

  5. Non-standard symmetries and quantum anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Visinescu, Anca; Visinescu, Mihai

    2008-08-31

    Quantum anomalies are investigated on curved spacetimes. The intimate relation between Killing-Yano tensors and non-standard symmetries is pointed out. The gravitational anomalies are absent if the hidden symmetry is associated to a Killing-Yano tensor. The axial anomaly in a background gravitational field is directly related with the index of the Dirac operator. In the Dirac theory on curved spaces, Killing-Yano tensors generate Dirac-type operators involved in interesting algebraic structures. The general results are applied to the 4-dimensional Euclidean Taub-NUT space.

  6. Symmetry breaking in individual plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Wu, Yanpeng; Lassiter, Britt; Nehl, Colleen L.; Hafner, Jason H.; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2006-01-01

    The plasmon resonances of a concentric metallic nanoshell arise from the hybridization of primitive plasmon modes of the same angular momentum on its inner and outer surfaces. For a nanoshell with an offset core, the reduction in symmetry relaxes these selection rules, allowing for an admixture of dipolar components in all plasmon modes of the particle. This metallodielectric nanostructure with reduced symmetry exhibits a core offset-dependent multipeaked spectrum, seen in single-particle spectroscopic measurements, and exhibits significantly larger local-field enhancements on its external surface than the equivalent concentric spherical nanostructure. PMID:16829573

  7. Wormholes and Peccei-Quinn symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K.; Holman, R. )

    1990-01-08

    We show how wormholes and Peccei-Quinn symmetries are in fact complementary in solving the strong {ital CP} problem. On the one hand, Peccei-Quinn symmetries are shown to provide us with a wormhole parameter that couples only to the QCD anomaly. This then allows us to implement the wormhole solution to the strong {ital CP} problem constructed previously by the present authors as well as by Preskill, Trivedi, and Wise. On the other hand, wormholes are shown to drive the axion mass to zero or to the wormhole scale, thus avoiding the axion-energy-density crisis in either case.

  8. Hopf bifurcation in the presence of symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubitsky, M.; Stewart, I.

    1985-01-01

    Group theory is applied to obtain generalized differential equations from the Hopf bifurcation theory on branching to periodic solutions. The conditions under which the symmetry group will admit imaginary eigenvalues are delimited. The action of the symmetry group on the circle group are explored and the Liapunov-Schmidt reduction is used to prove the Hopf theorem in the symmetric case. The emphasis is on simplifying calculations of the stability of bifurcating branches. The resulting general theory is demonstrated in terms of O(2) acting on a plane, O(n) in n-space, and O(3) and an irreducible model for spherical harmonics.

  9. Broken symmetry in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of a number of cases of inviscid, isotropic, incompressible, three-dimensional fluid, and magneto-fluid turbulence has been completed. The results confirm that ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is non-ergodic if there is no external magnetic field present. This is due essentially to a canonical symmetry being broken in an arbitrary dynamical representation. The broken symmetry manifests itself as a coherent structure, i.e., a non-zero time-averaged part of the turbulent magnetic field. The coherent structure is observed, in one case, to contain about eighteen percent of the total energy.

  10. Large horizontal axis wind turbine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the NASA activities in large horizontal axis wind turbine development. First generation technology large wind turbines (Mod-0A, Mod-1) have been designed and are in operation at selected utility sites. Second generation machines (Mod-2) are scheduled to begin operations on a utility site in 1980. These machines are estimated to generate electricity at less than 4 cents/kWh when manufactured in modest production rates. Meanwhile, plans are being made to continue developing wind turbines which can meet the cost goals of 2 to 3 cents/kWh.

  11. GRADIO three-axis electrostatic accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Dedicated accelerometers for satellite gravity gradiometry (GRADIO project) are described. The design profits from experience acquired with the CACTUS accelerometer payload of the satellite CASTOR-D5B and studies of highly accurate accelerometers for inertial navigation. The principle of operation, based on a three-axis electrostatic suspension of a cubic proof mass, is well suited for the measurements of accelerations less than 0.0001 m/sec/sec. A resolution better than 10 to the minus 11th power m/sec/sec/sq root Hz is expected.

  12. Three-axis asymmetric radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Mario Pierangelo; Gedcke, Dale A.; Raudorf, Thomas W.; Sangsingkeow, Pat

    2000-01-01

    A three-axis radiation detection system whose inner and outer electrodes are shaped and positioned so that the shortest path between any point on the inner electrode and the outer electrode is a different length whereby the rise time of a pulse derived from a detected radiation event can uniquely define the azimuthal and radial position of that event, and the outer electrode is divided into a plurality of segments in the longitudinal axial direction for locating the axial location of a radiation detection event occurring in the diode.

  13. Pituitary-ovarian-splenic axis in ovulation

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Oliver R.; Frazer, Michele L.; Ko, CheMyong

    2011-01-01

    Leukocytes are rapidly recruited to the preovulatory ovary and play a crucial role as facilitators of ovulation and luteal formation. In this article, recent findings on leukocyte trafficking to the ovary, as well as the physiological role of leukocytes in the ovary, will be summarized and discussed. We then explore the novel hypothesis that the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis might include the spleen as a reservoir of leukocytes by summarizing recent reports on this topic, both in the fields of immunology and reproductive biology. PMID:21600783

  14. Horizontal axis Levitron—a physics demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2014-01-01

    After a brief history of the Levitron, the first horizontal axis Levitron is reported. Because it is easy to operate, it lends itself to educational physics experiments and analogies. Precession and nutation are visualized by reflecting the beam from a laser pointer off the ‘spignet’. Precession is fundamental to nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic resonance imaging, particle traps and the movement of bodies in space. Longitudinal and lateral bounce behaviour is explained via ‘the principle of gentle superposition’ of two traps: the micro-precessional and the macro-trap. Theory is initiated. Scaling experiments are mentioned. Industrial applications might follow. Patent pending.

  15. Pulsed 3-Axis Vector SERF Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, Morgan; Romalis, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a 3-axis atomic vector magnetometer operating in the SERF regime, using a single beam path, and capable of operating in Earth's field using field feedback. It has similar sensitivity along all 3 axes that is fundamentally limited by photon and atom shot noise. The scheme uses a high intensity pump pulse to polarize Rb atoms in ~ 1 μs and a sequence of magnetic field pulses applied while the atoms are monitored during free precession. The sequence used provides minimal sensitivity to pulse errors, while also allowing unambiguous discrimination between external magnetic fields and misalignment between laser and magnetic coil axes.

  16. Rocking ratchet induced by pure magnetic potentials with broken reflection symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez de Lara, D.; Castaño, F. J.; Ng, B. G.; Korner, H. S.; Dumas, R. K.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Liu, Kai; Ross, C. A.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Vicent, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    A ratchet effect (the rectification of an ac injected current) which is purely magnetic in origin has been observed in a superconducting-magnetic nanostructure hybrid. The hybrid consists of a superconducting Nb film in contact with an array of nanoscale magnetic triangles, circular rings, or elliptical rings. The arrays were placed into well-defined remanent magnetic states by application of different magnetic field cycles. The stray fields from these remanent states provide a magnetic landscape which influences the motion of superconducting vortices. We examined both randomly varying landscapes from demagnetized samples and ordered landscapes from samples at remanence after saturation in which the magnetic rings form parallel onion states containing two domain walls. The ratchet effect is absent if the rings are in the demagnetized state or if the vortices propagate parallel to the magnetic reflection symmetry axis (perpendicular to the magnetic domain walls) in the ordered onion state. On the other hand, when the vortices move perpendicular to the magnetic reflection symmetry axis in the ordered onion state (parallel to the domain walls) a clear ratchet effect is observed. This behavior differs qualitatively from that observed in samples containing arrays of triangular Ni nanostructures, which show a ratchet of structural origin.

  17. Single-axis gyroscopic motion with uncertain angular velocity about spin axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    A differential game approach is presented for studying the response of a gyro by treating the controlled angular velocity about the input axis as the evader, and the bounded but uncertain angular velocity about the spin axis as the pursuer. When the uncertain angular velocity about the spin axis desires to force the gyro to saturation a differential game problem with two terminal surfaces results, whereas when the evader desires to attain the equilibrium state the usual game with single terminal manifold arises. A barrier, delineating the capture zone (CZ) in which the gyro can attain saturation and the escape zone (EZ) in which the evader avoids saturation is obtained. The CZ is further delineated into two subregions such that the states in each subregion can be forced on a definite target manifold. The application of the game theoretic approach to Control Moment Gyro is briefly discussed.

  18. Axis establishment and microtubule-mediated waves prior to first cleavage in Beroe ovata.

    PubMed

    Houliston, E; Carré, D; Johnston, J A; Sardet, C

    1993-01-01

    The single axis (oral-aboral) and two planes of symmetry of the ctenophore Beroe ovata become established with respect to the position of zygote nucleus formation and the orientation of first cleavage. Bisection of Beroe eggs at different times revealed that differences in egg organisation are established in relation to the presumptive oral-aboral axis before first cleavage. Lateral fragments produced after but not before the time of first mitosis developed into larvae lacking comb-plates on one side. Time-lapse video demonstrated that waves of cytoplasmic reorganisation spread through the layer of peripheral cytoplasm (ectoplasm) of the egg during the 80 minute period between pronuclear fusion and first cleavage, along the future oral-aboral axis. These waves are manifest as the progressive displacement and dispersal of plaques of accumulated organelles around supernumerary sperm nuclei, and a series of surface movements. Their timing and direction of propagation suggest they may be involved in establishing cytoplasmic differences with respect to the embryonic axis. Inhibitor experiments suggested that the observed cytoplasmic reorganisation involves microtubules. Nocodazole and taxol, which prevent microtubule turnover,blocked plaque dispersal and reduced surface movements. The microfilament-disrupting drug cytochalasin B did not prevent plaque dispersal but induced abnormal surface contractions. We examined changes in microtubule organisation using immunofluorescence on eggs fixed at different times and in live eggs following injection of rhodamine-tubulin. Giant microtubule asters become associated with each male pronucleus after the end of meiosis. Following pronuclear fusion they disappear successively, those nearest the zygote nucleus shrinking first, to establish gradients of aster size within single eggs. Regional differences in microtubule behaviour around the time of mitosis were revealed by brief taxol treatment, which induced the formation of small

  19. Circularly Polarized Microwave Antenna Element with Very Low Off-Axis Cross-Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greem. David; DuToit, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to improve off-axis cross-polarization performance and ease of assembly of a circularly polarized microwave antenna element. To ease assembly, the initial design requirement of Hexweb support for the internal circuit part, as well as the radiating disks, was eliminated. There is a need for different plating techniques to improve soldering. It was also desirable to change the design to eliminate soldering as well as the need to use the Hexweb support. Thus, a technique was developed to build the feed without using solder, solving the lathing and soldering issue. Internal parts were strengthened by adding curvature to eliminate Hexweb support, and in the process, the new geometries of the internal parts opened the way for improving the off-axis cross-polarization performance as well. The radiating disks curvatures were increased for increased strength, but it was found that this also improved crosspolarization. Optimization of the curvatures leads to very low off-axis cross-polarization. The feed circuit was curved into a cylinder for improved strength, eliminating Hexweb support. An aperture coupling feed mechanism eliminated the need for feed pins to the disks, which would have required soldering. The aperture coupling technique also improves cross-polarization performance by effectively exciting the radiating disks very close to the antenna s central axis of symmetry. Because of the shape of the parts, it allowed for an all-aluminum design bolted together and assembled with no solder needed. The advantage of a solderless design is that the reliability is higher, with no single-point failure (solder), and no need for special plating techniques in order to solder the unit together. The shapes (curved or round) make for a more robust build without extra support materials, as well as improved offaxis cross-polarization.

  20. The numerical measure of symmetry for 3D stick creatures.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Wojciech; Komosinski, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    This work introduces a numerical, continuous measure of symmetry for 3D stick creatures and solid 3D objects. Background information about the property of symmetry is provided, and motivations for developing a symmetry measure are described. Three approaches are mentioned, and two of them are presented in detail using formal mathematical language. The best approach is used to sort a set of creatures according to their symmetry. Experiments with a mixed set of 84 individuals originating from both human design and evolution are performed to examine symmetry within these two sources, and to determine if human designers and evolutionary processes prefer symmetry or asymmetry. PMID:18573069

  1. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Keke Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  2. Erratum: A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Henrique R.; Kinney, Anne L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Antonucci, Robert

    1997-08-01

    In the paper ``A Comparison of Radio Axis with Host Galaxy Plane Axis in Seyfert Galaxies'' by Henrique R. Schmitt, Anne L. Kinney, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, & Robert Antonucci (ApJ, 477, 623 [1997]), there are errors in Table 1 and Figure 6, and there is a reference to a previous work that should be stated. With respect to the latter, the authors compare the position angle of small-scale radio structures in Seyfert galaxies with the position angle of their host galaxy major axis. In their analysis they find a zone of avoidance, where the small-scale radio axis avoids close alignment with the host galaxy minor axis. The authors wish to note that J. S. Ulvestad and A. S. Wilson (ApJ, 285, 439 [1984]) already observed a paucity of radio structures aligned with the host galaxy minor axis in Seyfert 2 galaxies, although on a smaller sample. Ulvestad & Wilson was referenced in their paper as Ulvestad & Wilson (1984b). In Table 1 there were errors in the references listed in the note to the table. A new version of Table 1 with correct references is given here, and the following reference entries should be added to the reference list of the original paper: Mulchaey, J. S., Wilson, A. S., & Tsvetanov, Z. I. 1996, ApJS, 102, 309; Oke, J. B., & Lauer, T. R. 1979, ApJ, 230, 360; Simkin, S. M. 1975, ApJ, 200, 567. Figure 6a was printed twice, once correctly and once incorrectly in place of Figure 6c. The correct version of Figure 6c appears below.

  3. Einstein-Yang-Mills theory: Asymptotic symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Lambert, Pierre-Henry

    2013-11-01

    Asymptotic symmetries of the Einstein-Yang-Mills system with or without cosmological constant are explicitly worked out in a unified manner. In agreement with a recent conjecture, one finds a Virasoro-Kac-Moody type algebra not only in three dimensions but also in the four-dimensional asymptotically flat case.

  4. Multipartite invariant states. II. Orthogonal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2006-06-15

    We construct a class of multipartite states possessing orthogonal symmetry. This new class contains multipartite states which are invariant under the action of local unitary operations introduced in our preceding paper [Phys. Rev. A 73, 062314 (2006)]. We study basic properties of multipartite symmetric states: separability criteria and multi-PPT conditions.

  5. Disordered cold atoms in different symmetry classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Fernanda; Larson, Jonas

    2015-08-01

    We consider an experimentally realizable model of noninteracting but randomly coupled atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice. By choosing appropriate real or complex-valued random fields and species-dependent energy offsets, this system can be used to analyze effects of disorder in four different symmetry classes: the chiral BDI and AIII and the nonchiral A and AI. These chiral classes are known to support a metallic phase at zero energy, which here, due to the inevitable finite size of the system, should also persist in a neighborhood of nonzero energies. As we discuss, this is of particular interest for experiments involving quenches. Away from the center of the spectrum, we find that excitations appear as domain walls in the cases with time-reversal symmetry or as vortices in the cases where time-reversal symmetry is absent. Therefore, a quench in a system with uniform density would lead to the formation of either vortices or domain walls depending on the symmetry class. For the nonchiral models in classes A and AI, a population imbalance between the two atomic species naturally occurs. In these cases, one of the two species is seen to favor a more uniform density. We also study the onset of localization as the disorder strength is increased for the different classes, and by deriving an effective model for the nonchiral cases we show how their eigenstates remain extended for larger values of the coupling with the disorder when compared to the nonchiral ones.

  6. Inversion Symmetry Breaking in Endohedral C_60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis; Anderson, Frederick

    1998-03-01

    A pseudo--Jahn--Teller model describing central atom distortions is proposed for endohedral fullerenes of the form A@C_60 where A is either a rare gas or a metal atom. A critical (dimensionless) coupling gc is found, at or below which the symmetric configuration is stable and above which inversion symmetry is broken. Vibronic parameters are given for selected endohedral fullerenes.

  7. Symmetry breaking in reconstituted actin cortices.

    PubMed

    Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-01-01

    The actin cortex plays a pivotal role in cell division, in generating and maintaining cell polarity and in motility. In all these contexts, the cortical network has to break symmetry to generate polar cytoskeletal dynamics. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms responsible for regulating cortical dynamics in vivo and inducing symmetry breaking are still unclear. Here we introduce a reconstituted system that self-organizes into dynamic actin cortices at the inner interface of water-in-oil emulsions. This artificial system undergoes spontaneous symmetry breaking, driven by myosin-induced cortical actin flows, which appears remarkably similar to the initial polarization of the embryo in many species. Our in vitro model system recapitulates the rich dynamics of actin cortices in vivo, revealing the basic biophysical and biochemical requirements for cortex formation and symmetry breaking. Moreover, this synthetic system paves the way for further exploration of artificial cells towards the realization of minimal model systems that can move and divide.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01433.001. PMID:24843007

  8. Neutrino mass and mixing with discrete symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    This is a review paper about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of see-saw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mechanisms for flavon vacuum alignment and different model building strategies that have been proposed to generate the reactor angle. We then briefly review grand unified theories (GUTs) and how they may be combined with discrete family symmetry to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing. Finally, we discuss three model examples which combine an SU(5) GUT with the discrete family symmetries A4, S4 and Δ(96).

  9. SFT Symmetry, Mathematics (Experimental): 5212.48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This is the third in a series of four guidebooks on minimum course content designed to develop geometric concepts intuitively, using the "slides, flips, and turns" approach developed by the University of Illinois, Committee on School Mathematics. Topics include the development of the concept of symmetry, triangles and quadrilateral…

  10. Gender Symmetry, Sexism, and Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Christopher T.; Swan, Suzanne C.; Raghavan, Chitra

    2009-01-01

    This study of a predominantly Hispanic sample of 92 male and 140 female college students examines both gender symmetry in intimate partner violence (IPV) and inconsistent relationships found in previous studies between sexist attitudes and IPV. Results indicate that although comparable numbers of men and women perpetrate and are victimized in…

  11. Large Hierarchies from Approximate R Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kappl, Rolf; Ratz, Michael; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Nilles, Hans Peter; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul; Vaudrevange, Patrick K. S.

    2009-03-27

    We show that hierarchically small vacuum expectation values of the superpotential in supersymmetric theories can be a consequence of an approximate R symmetry. We briefly discuss the role of such small constants in moduli stabilization and understanding the huge hierarchy between the Planck and electroweak scales.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes: From Symmetry to Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damnjanović, M.

    In this chapter, we show how the concept of symmetry gives theoretical explanation of the properties, which made carbon nanotubes (NTs) one of the most interesting materials of nanotechnology. First, in Sect. 3.1, we consider basic facts on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), including their configuration and symmetry. Then, we discuss double-wall nanotubes.Next, Sect. 3.2 is devoted to elementary symmetry-based physical properties. More precisely, we explain the energy spectrum of electrons and phonons, showing that as the consequence of the symmetry, energies must be arranged in the so-called bands. Elementary properties of these band structures may be a priory discussed, yielding easily famous conducting law, showing strong dependence of conductivity on the type of nanotube. Conserved quantum numbers enable us to extract selection rules for various physical processes. This way, radial breathing mode appears to be very important for the characterization of the samples by Raman spectroscopy. Also, optical properties are derived.Finally, in Sect. 3.3, mutual interaction between the walls of double-wall nanotubes is discussed. It is explained why this interaction is very weak, which is used to propose nanomachines with almost superslippery parts.

  13. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking from Monopole Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Csaki, Csaba; Shirman, Yuri; Terning, John

    2011-01-28

    We argue that the electroweak symmetry of the standard model (SM) could be broken via condensation of magnetic monopole bilinears. We present an extension of the SM where this could indeed happen, and where the heavy top mass is also a consequence of the magnetic interactions.

  14. Hidden superconformal symmetry of the cosmological evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2014-01-01

    In the superconformal formulation of supergravity, the standard supergravity action appears as a result of spontaneous symmetry breaking when the conformal compensator scalar field, the conformon, acquires a nonzero value, giving rise to the Planck mass. After that, many symmetries of the original theory become well hidden, and therefore they are often ignored. However, recent developments demonstrated that superconformal invariance is more than just a tool: it plays an important role in generalizing previously existing formulations of supergravity and developing new classes of inflationary models. In this paper we describe hidden superconformal symmetry of the cosmological evolution. In this formulation, inflation can be equivalently described as the conformon instability, and creation of the universe 'from nothing' can be interpreted as spontaneous symmetry breaking due to emergence of a classical conformon field. We develop a general formalism that allows to describe the cosmological evolution simultaneously with the evolution of the conformon. We find a set of gauge invariant physical observables, including the superconformally invariant generalizations of the square of the Weyl tensor, which are necessary for invariant description of the cosmological singularities.

  15. Equilibria with incompressible flows from symmetry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiroukidis, Ap E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr; Throumoulopoulos, G. N. E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr

    2015-08-15

    We identify and study new nonlinear axisymmetric equilibria with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction satisfying a generalized Grad Shafranov equation by extending the symmetry analysis presented by Cicogna and Pegoraro [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022520 (2015)]. In particular, we construct a typical tokamak D-shaped equilibrium with peaked toroidal current density, monotonically varying safety factor, and sheared electric field.

  16. Test of Lorentz symmetry with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of an experiment should not depend on the orientation of the apparatus in space. This important cornerstone of physics is deeply engrained into the Standard Model of Physics by requiring that all fields must be Lorentz invariant. However, it is well-known that the Standard Model is incomplete. Some theories conjecture that at the Planck scale Lorentz symmetry might be broken and measurable at experimentally accessible energy scales. Therefore, a search for violation of Lorentz symmetry directly probes physics beyond the Standard model. We present a novel experiment utilizing trapped calcium ions as a direct probe of Lorentz-violation in the electron-photon sector. We monitor the energy between atomic states with different orientations of the electronic wave-functions as they rotate together with the motion of the Earth. This is analogous to the famous Michelson-Morley experiment. To remove magnetic field noise, we perform the experiment with the ions prepared in the decoherence-free states. Our result improves on the most stringent bounds on Lorentz symmetry for electrons by 100 times. The experimental scheme is readily applicable to many ion species, hence opening up paths toward much improved test of Lorentz symmetry in the future. (Ph. D. Advisor: Hartmut Haeffner, University of California, Berkeley).

  17. Translational Symmetry-Breaking for Spiral Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, V. G.; Wulff, C.

    2000-10-01

    Spiral waves are observed in numerous physical situations, ranging from Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) chemical reactions, to cardiac tissue, to slime-mold aggregates. Mathematical models with Euclidean symmetry have recently been developed to describe the dynamic behavior (for example, meandering) of spiral waves in excitable media. However, no physical experiment is ever infinite in spatial extent, so the Euclidean symmetry is only approximate. Experiments on spiral waves show that inhomogeneities can anchor spirals and that boundary effects (for example, boundary drifting) become very important when the size of the spiral core is comparable to the size of the reacting medium. Spiral anchoring and boundary drifting cannot be explained by the Euclidean model alone. In this paper, we investigate the effects on spiral wave dynamics of breaking the translation symmetry while keeping the rotation symmetry. This is accomplished by introducing a small perturbation in the five-dimensional center bundle equations (describing Hopf bifurcation from one-armed spiral waves) which is SO(2)-equivariant but not equivariant under translations. We then study the effects of this perturbation on rigid spiral rotation, on quasi-periodic meandering and on drifting.

  18. Parametric Integrals and Symmetries of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    An integral, either definite or improper, cannot always be computed by elementary methods, such as reversed usage of differentiation formulae. Graphical properties, in particular symmetries, can be useful to compute the integral, via an auxiliary computation. We present graded examples, then prove a general result. (Contains 4 figures.)

  19. Fake conformal symmetry in conformal cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, R.; Pi, So-Young

    2015-03-01

    We examine the local conformal invariance (Weyl invariance) in tensor-scalar theories used in recently proposed conformal cosmological models. We show that the Noether currents associated with Weyl invariance in these theories vanish. We assert that the corresponding Weyl symmetry does not have any dynamical role.

  20. New Symmetry and Structure for Spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, N. W.; Thompson, P.; Kay, H. F.

    1983-04-01

    The crystal structure of magnesium aluminate is conventionally described within a symmetry corresponding to the centrosymmetrical space group Fd3m but this has created difficulties for the interpretation of many of its physical properties. Therefore, extensive X-ray diffraction intensity data have been collected from a small spherical synthetic single crystal and used for a structure parameter refinement assuming F{4}3m symmetry as proposed by Grimes (Phil. Mag. 26, 1217-1226 (1972)), and also for refinement according to conventional symmetry. The F{4}3m assumption yields the first direct measurement of the suspected deviations from the centrosymmetrical structure, and is found to provide a significantly superior fit to the experimental data, especially at high angles and with reflexions having structure factors less than 10.0. The weak reflexions include nine that are forbidden under Fd3m symmetry and it is shown that there is satisfactory agreement between observed and calculated structure factors in these cases.

  1. The Symmetry Group of the Permutahedron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisman, Karl-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Although it can be visualized fairly easily and its symmetry group is easy to calculate, the permutahedron is a somewhat neglected combinatorial object. We propose it as a useful case study in abstract algebra. It supplies concrete examples of group actions, the difference between right and left actions, and how geometry and algebra can work…

  2. Symmetry breaking in reconstituted actin cortices

    PubMed Central

    Abu Shah, Enas; Keren, Kinneret

    2014-01-01

    The actin cortex plays a pivotal role in cell division, in generating and maintaining cell polarity and in motility. In all these contexts, the cortical network has to break symmetry to generate polar cytoskeletal dynamics. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms responsible for regulating cortical dynamics in vivo and inducing symmetry breaking are still unclear. Here we introduce a reconstituted system that self-organizes into dynamic actin cortices at the inner interface of water-in-oil emulsions. This artificial system undergoes spontaneous symmetry breaking, driven by myosin-induced cortical actin flows, which appears remarkably similar to the initial polarization of the embryo in many species. Our in vitro model system recapitulates the rich dynamics of actin cortices in vivo, revealing the basic biophysical and biochemical requirements for cortex formation and symmetry breaking. Moreover, this synthetic system paves the way for further exploration of artificial cells towards the realization of minimal model systems that can move and divide. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01433.001 PMID:24843007

  3. The HPA axis in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahendra; Kumar, Adarsh M; Waldrop, Drenna; Antoni, Michael H; Schneiderman, Neil; Eisdorfer, Carl

    2002-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that neuroendocrine abnormalities in general and HPA axis activity in particular occur in both HIV-1 infection and individuals engaging in chronic drug use. For instance, our studies showing attenuated norepinephrine as well as ACTH and cortisol responses to a cold pressor challenge in asymptomatic HIV-1 persons support such a concept. Furthermore, our data on investigations on mirror-star tracing and speech challenges also support the finding that neuroendocrine responses are compromised in HIV-1 infection. Although the mechanisms leading to adverse effects on HPA axis activity in HIV infection are not fully understood, several lines of evidence suggest that a number of mechanisms may be involved, including homologies in molecular structures of various mediators of neuroendocrine activity and HIV-related structures, HIV as a chronic stress model, and virus-induced toxic factors. This article reviews our recent findings in this area and also presents research hypotheses needed for testing and understanding the mechanisms involved in the development of neuroendocrine abnormalities in HIV-1-infected injection drug users. PMID:12394788

  4. Dark flows and the cosmological axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2012-10-01

    Recent surveys indicate coherent large-scale peculiar motions, commonly referred to as 'dark flows', considerably stronger than expected. At the same time, an increasing number of reports suggest the presence of a weak dipolar anisotropy in the supernova data. The Universe seems to accelerate slightly faster in one direction and equally slower in the opposite. Also, this 'cosmological axis' lies fairly close to the cosmic microwave background dipole. Since apparent, dipole-like, anisotropies are the trademark signature of peculiar motions, we consider the possibility that these, seemingly unconnected, observations are actually related. In the process, we find that observers living inside a dark flow could experience locally accelerated expansion in a globally decelerating Universe. Moreover, to these observers, the acceleration should appear slightly faster in one direction and equally slower in the opposite, as if there is a preferred axis in the universe. When combined, these results open, in principle at least, the theoretical possibility of addressing the supernova data and the cosmic acceleration by appealing to dark flows rather than dark energy.

  5. The Energetics and Symmetry of Quasicrystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Subha

    In a dramatic experiment in 1984, Shechtman and co-workers observed electron diffraction patterns in rapidly cooled Al-Mn alloys, exhibiting non-crystallographic symmetry, contrary to the conventional wisdom that solid structures could be broadly classified as glassy or amorphous, and crystalline. This and subsequent experiments have spurred an intense effort by the condensed matter physics community into understanding the nature and origin of solid structures, particularly in the light of earlier abstract mathematical structures ("tilings"), invented by Penrose and others, that are space filling but non-periodic and non-random in nature. This dissertation aims at understanding the energetics and symmetry of these "quasi-crystalline" structures. It consists of two parts. In the first part, the energetics of various observed quasi-crystalline phases have been studied by using a type of phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory that has been successful in predicting the qualitative features of a wide variety of phase transitions. It is found that qualitative agreement with experiment can indeed be had regarding the relative stability of these phases. The model also predicts the most likely equilibrium structure in various regimes of parameter space. The second part is focussed towards understanding the symmetries of the density function of these phases, the symmetry of the hydrodynamic degrees of freedom, the structure of the reciprocal lattice and so on. The harmonic elastic energy, invariant under the point group of the diffraction pattern is constructed for each of the observed phases. Finally, a formalism is developed for determining the various reciprocal lattices possible with a given arbitrary point group symmetry. It is then applied to the cases of 2D Pentagonal and 3D Icosahedral structures.

  6. Computer Assisted Mechanical Axis and Kinematic TKA

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Peter; Mahoharan, Varaguna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has traditionally been and largely continues to be aligned mechanically, that being with a neutral coronal plane mechanical tibiofemoral axis and a joint line orientated at 900 to this axis. Femoral component rotation is set by gap balancing or by externally rotating 30 from any of a number femoral reference lines. This produces a rectangular flexion gap and relaxes patellar tracking. Kinematic alignment (KA) is an alternative technique that aims to restore premorbid alignment, joint orientation and ligament tension. The basic premise for this technique is based on evidence that the medial and lateral femoral condyles consistently equate to cylinders of equal or near equal size and that therefore with a fixed radius, cruciate retaining implant, matched distal femoral, posterior femoral and proximal tibial resections, accounting for bone and cartilage already lost will reproduce the premorbid joint line and restore native premorbid kinematics. Femoral rotation is therefore referenced off the prearthritic posterior condylar axis (PCA) that is on average internally rotated to the AP axis. Kinematic alignment therefore has the potential to challenge patellar tracking, increase patellar load and potentially increase patellar complications. Method: Case control study – level of evidence III-2. Between November 2012 and June 2013 the senior author completed 104 consecutive computer assisted (CAS) kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with a cruciate retaining, fixed bearing, single radius implant. The results of these surgeries were compared with the results of 91 consecutive CAS mechanically aligned TKA done between November 2011 and October 2012 using the same navigation system and implant Implant sizing and positioning as well as gap measurement and ligament balance was done with computer assistance in all cases. Data was collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Results: The Oxford Knee Score

  7. Symmetries of migration related segments of all [001] coincidence site lattice tilt boundaries in (001) projections for all holohedral cubic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moeck, Peter; York, Bryant W.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-09-11

    Utilizing bicrystallography in two dimensions (2D), the symmetries of migration related segments of Coincidence Site Lattice (CSL) boundaries are derived for projections along their [001] tilt axis in grain boundaries of crystalline materials that possess the holohedral point symmetry of the cubic system (i.e. m3m). These kinds of “edge-on” projections are typical for atomic resolution imaging of such tilt boundaries with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEM). This fact facilitates the visual confirmation of our predictions by recently published Zcontrast scanning TEM investigations [H. Yang et al., Phil. Mag. 93 (2013) 1219] and many other TEM studies.

  8. X-ray structure, symmetry and mechanism of an AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I.; Rosconi, Michael P.; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-02-02

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening a transmembrane ion channel upon binding of glutamate. Despite their crucial role in neurobiology, the architecture and atomic structure of an intact ionotropic glutamate receptor are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive, homotetrameric, rat GluA2 receptor at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a competitive antagonist. The receptor harbours an overall axis of two-fold symmetry with the extracellular domains organized as pairs of local dimers and with the ion channel domain exhibiting four-fold symmetry. A symmetry mismatch between the extracellular and ion channel domains is mediated by two pairs of conformationally distinct subunits, A/C and B/D. Therefore, the stereochemical manner in which the A/C subunits are coupled to the ion channel gate is different from the B/D subunits. Guided by the GluA2 structure and site-directed cysteine mutagenesis, we suggest that GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors have a similar architecture, with subunits arranged in a 1-2-1-2 pattern. We exploit the GluA2 structure to develop mechanisms of ion channel activation, desensitization and inhibition by non-competitive antagonists and pore blockers.

  9. Methamphetamine and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Damian G.; Jacobskind, Jason S.; Raber, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (MA) induce significant alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These changes in HPA axis function are associated with altered stress-related behaviors and might contribute to addictive processes such as relapse. In this mini-review we discuss acute and chronic effects of MA (adult and developmental exposure) on the HPA axis, including effects on HPA axis associated genes/proteins, brain regions, and behaviors such as anxiety and depression. A better understanding of the mechanisms through which MA affects the HPA axis may lead to more effective treatment strategies for MA addiction. PMID:26074755

  10. Non-abelian symmetries in tensor networks: A quantum symmetry space approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, Andreas

    2012-12-15

    A general framework for non-abelian symmetries is presented for matrix-product and tensor-network states in the presence of well-defined orthonormal local as well as effective basis sets. The two crucial ingredients, the Clebsch-Gordan algebra for multiplet spaces as well as the Wigner-Eckart theorem for operators, are accounted for in a natural, well-organized, and computationally straightforward way. The unifying tensor-representation for quantum symmetry spaces, dubbed QSpace, is particularly suitable to deal with standard renormalization group algorithms such as the numerical renormalization group (NRG), the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), or also more general tensor networks such as the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA). In this paper, the focus is on the application of the non-abelian framework within the NRG. A detailed analysis is presented for a fully screened spin- 3/2 three-channel Anderson impurity model in the presence of conservation of total spin, particle-hole symmetry, and SU(3) channel symmetry. The same system is analyzed using several alternative symmetry scenarios based on combinations of U(1){sub charge}, SU(2){sub spin}, SU(2){sub charge}, SU(3){sub channel}, as well as the enveloping symplectic Sp(6) symmetry. These are compared in detail, including their respective dramatic gain in numerical efficiency. In the Appendix, finally, an extensive introduction to non-abelian symmetries is given for practical applications, together with simple self-contained numerical procedures to obtain Clebsch-Gordan coefficients and irreducible operators sets. The resulting QSpace tensors can deal with any set of abelian symmetries together with arbitrary non-abelian symmetries with compact, i.e. finite-dimensional, semi-simple Lie algebras. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduce a transparent framework for non-abelian symmetries in tensor networks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The framework was successfully

  11. Relativistic pseudospin symmetry and shell model Hamiltonians that conserve pseudospin symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ginocchio, Joseph N

    2010-09-21

    Professor Akito Arima and his colleagues discovered 'pseudospin' doublets forty-one years ago in spherical nuclei. These doublets were subsequently discovered in deformed nuclei. We show that pseudospin symmetry is an SU(2) symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian which occurs when the scalar and vector potentials are opposite in sign but equal in magnitude. This symmetry occurs independent of the shape of the nucleus: spherical, axial deformed, triaxial, and gamma unstable. We survey some of the evidence that pseudospin symmetry is approximately conserved for a Dirac Hamiltonian with realistic scalar and vector potentials by examining the energy spectra, the lower components of the Dirac eigenfunctions, the magnetic dipole and Gamow-Teller transitions in nuclei, the upper components of the Dirac eigenfunctions, and nucleon-nucleus scattering. We shall also suggest that pseudospin symmetry may have a fundamental origin in chiral symmetry breaking by examining QCD sum rules. Finally we derive the shell model Hamiltonians which conserve pseudospin and show that they involve tensor interactions.

  12. Relativistic U(3) symmetry and pseudo-U(3) symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Ginocchio, Joseph N

    2010-01-01

    The Dirac Hamiltonian with relativistic scalar and vector harmonic oscillator potentials has been solved analytically in two limits. One is the spin limit for which spin is an invariant symmetry of the the Dirac Hamiltonian and the other is the pseudo-spin limit for which pseudo-spin is an invariant symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian. The spin limit occurs when the scalar potential is equal to the vector potential plus a constant, and the pseudospin limit occurs when the scalar potential is equal in magnitude but opposite in sign to the vector potential plus a constant. Like the non-relativistic harmonic oscillator, each of these limits has a higher symmetry. For example, for the spherically symmetric oscillator, these limits have a U(3) and pseudo-U(3) symmetry respectively. We shall discuss the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of these two limits and derive the relativistic generators for the U(3) and pseudo-U(3) symmetry. We also argue, that, if an anti-nucleon can be bound in a nucleus, the spectrum will have approximate spin and U(3) symmetry.

  13. Decomposition of the sensitivity of the symmetry energy observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, He-lei; Yong, Gao-Chan; Wen, De-Hua

    2015-04-01

    To exactly answer which density region that some frequently used symmetry-energy-sensitive observables probe, for the first time, we make a study of the decomposition of the sensitivity of some symmetry-energy-sensitive observables. It is found that for the Au+Au reaction at incident beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV/nucleon, frequently used symmetry-energy-sensitive observables mainly probe the density-dependent symmetry energy around 1.25 ρ0 (for pionic observables) or 1.5 ρ0 (for nucleonic observables). Effects of the symmetry energy in the low-density region is in general small but observable. The fact that the symmetry-energy-sensitive observables are not sensitive to the symmetry energy in the maximal baryon-density region increases the difficulty of studying nuclear symmetry energy at superdensity.

  14. Symmetry quantification and mapping using convergent beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm to quantify symmetry recorded in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns and use it for symmetry mapping in materials applications. We evaluate the effectiveness of the profile R-factor (R(p)) and the normalized cross-correlation coefficient (γ) for quantifying the amount of symmetry in a CBED pattern. The symmetry quantification procedures are automated and the algorithm is implemented as a DM (Digital Micrograph(©)) script. Experimental and simulated CBED patterns recorded from a Si single crystal are used to calibrate the proposed algorithm for the symmetry quantification. The proposed algorithm is then applied to a Si sample with defects to test the sensitivity of symmetry quantification to defects. Using the mirror symmetry as an example, we demonstrate that the normalized cross-correlation coefficient provides an effective and robust measurement of the symmetry recorded in experimental CBED patterns. PMID:23142747

  15. Symmetry protected topological orders and the group cohomology of their symmetry group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xie; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2013-04-01

    Symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases are gapped short-range-entangled quantum phases with a symmetry G. They can all be smoothly connected to the same trivial product state if we break the symmetry. The Haldane phase of spin-1 chain is the first example of SPT phases which is protected by SO(3) spin rotation symmetry. The topological insulator is another example of SPT phases which are protected by U(1) and time-reversal symmetries. In this paper, we show that interacting bosonic SPT phases can be systematically described by group cohomology theory: Distinct d-dimensional bosonic SPT phases with on-site symmetry G (which may contain antiunitary time-reversal symmetry) can be labeled by the elements in H1+d[G,UT(1)], the Borel (1+d)-group-cohomology classes of G over the G module UT(1). Our theory, which leads to explicit ground-state wave functions and commuting projector Hamiltonians, is based on a new type of topological term that generalizes the topological θ term in continuous nonlinear σ models to lattice nonlinear σ models. The boundary excitations of the nontrivial SPT phases are described by lattice nonlinear σ models with a nonlocal Lagrangian term that generalizes the Wess-Zumino-Witten term for continuous nonlinear σ models. As a result, the symmetry G must be realized as a non-on-site symmetry for the low-energy boundary excitations, and those boundary states must be gapless or degenerate. As an application of our result, we can use H1+d[U(1)⋊Z2T,UT(1)] to obtain interacting bosonic topological insulators (protected by time reversal Z2T and boson number conservation), which contain one nontrivial phase in one-dimensional (1D) or 2D and three in 3D. We also obtain interacting bosonic topological superconductors (protected by time-reversal symmetry only), in term of H1+d[Z2T,UT(1)], which contain one nontrivial phase in odd spatial dimensions and none for even dimensions. Our result is much more general than the above two examples, since it

  16. Eugene Wigner and Symmetries In Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshinsky, Marcos

    2002-04-01

    Concepts of symmetry in physics have had a long history, particularly if they are of a geometric or crystallographic origin, yet in classical physics they had a somewhat esoteric position. This situation changed radically when in the XX Century we passed from classical to quantum mechanics. In the former a state for a system of particles was given by a number of points in phase space and the transformation groups related with symmetries mainly gave the invariance of concepts such as energy or angular momentum. In the latter the state is characterized by a vector in Hilbert space in which the transformations had a representation. Eugene Wigner was the right man (for his mathematical ability and physical intuition) at the right place and time (Germany, in the twenties) to take full advantage of this new situation. His first interest was atomic spectroscopy (then a very active field) and the fact that its basic states were related with irreducible representation of the orthogonal group in three dimensions O(3). The German version of his book on ``Group theory and Application" published in 1931 established, as he quotes ``that almost all rules of spectroscopy follow from the symmetry of the problem". His later extension to the direct product of two or more representations led to his development of the 3-j symbol, that he explicitly derived, and his interest in the properties of 6-j, 9-j, etc. His awareness of the time inversion as an antiunitary operator, and the analysis of its combination with the unitary representations of other symmetries, proved fundamental for deriving the features of time reversed reactions from their direct behavior. His interest in space reflection and the concept of parity led to important selection rules, and was of relevance even in weak interactions where parity is not a good symmetry. His later interest in nuclear physics, solid state, elementary particles etc., was almost never without a component of the role of symmetry in these

  17. Search for Tetrahedral Symmetry in 70Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Khanh; Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Elder, R. M.; Jones, K. D.; Morrow, S. I.; Tabor, S. L.; Tripathi, V.; Bender, P. C.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Doring, J.

    2014-09-01

    The even-even Ge isotopes have recently become an active testing ground for a variety of exotic structural characteristics, including the existence of tetrahedral symmetry (pyramid-like shapes). Although theoretical shape calculations predict the onset of tetrahedral symmetry near 72Ge, the experimental signatures (including vanishing quadrupole moments within high-spin bands) remain elusive. This study searched for possible experimental evidence of tetrahedral symmetry in 70Ge. Excited states in 70Ge were populated at Florida State University using the 55Mn(18O,p2n) fusion-evaporation reaction at 50 MeV. Prompt γ- γ coincidences were measured with a Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The existing level scheme was enhanced through the addition of 20 new transitions and the rearrangement of five others based on the measured coincidence relations and relative intensities. Lifetimes of 24 states were measured using the Doppler-shift attenuation method, from which transition quadrupole moments were inferred. These results will be compared with those obtained from cranked Woods-Saxon calculations. The even-even Ge isotopes have recently become an active testing ground for a variety of exotic structural characteristics, including the existence of tetrahedral symmetry (pyramid-like shapes). Although theoretical shape calculations predict the onset of tetrahedral symmetry near 72Ge, the experimental signatures (including vanishing quadrupole moments within high-spin bands) remain elusive. This study searched for possible experimental evidence of tetrahedral symmetry in 70Ge. Excited states in 70Ge were populated at Florida State University using the 55Mn(18O,p2n) fusion-evaporation reaction at 50 MeV. Prompt γ- γ coincidences were measured with a Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The existing level scheme was enhanced through the addition

  18. Symmetries, currents and conservation laws of self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. D.; Bordemann, M.; Römer, H.

    1996-02-01

    We describe an infinite-dimensional algebra of hidden symmetries for the self-dual gravity equations. Besides the known diffeomorphism-type symmetries (affine extension of w∞ algebra), this algebra contains new hidden symmetries, which are an affine extension of the Lorentz rotations. The full symmetry algebra has both Kac-Moody and Virasoro-like generators, whose exponentiation maps solutions of the field equations to other solutions. Relations to problems of string theories are briefly discussed.

  19. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Min; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Zhang Fengshou

    2010-12-15

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20-250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semiempirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  20. Cell-cell interactions determine the dorsoventral axis in embryos of an equally cleaving opisthobranch mollusc.

    PubMed

    Boring, L

    1989-11-01

    Dorsoventral polarity in molluscan embryos can arise by two distinct mechanisms, where the mechanism employed is strongly correlated with the cleavage pattern of the early embryo. In species with unequal cleavage, the dorsal lineage, or "D quadrant", is determined in a cell-autonomous manner by the inheritance of cytoplasmic determinants. However, in gastropod molluscs with equal cleavage, cell-cell interactions are required to specify the fate of the dorsal blastomere. During the fifth cleavage interval in equally cleaving embryos, one of the vegetal macromeres makes exclusive contacts with the animal micromeres, and this macromere will give rise to the mesodermal precursor cell at the next division, thereby identifying the dorsal quadrant. This study examines D-quadrant determination in an equally cleaving species from a group of previously uninvestigated gastropods, the subclass Opisthobranchia. Blastomere ablation experiments were performed on embryos of Haminoea callidegenita to (i) determine the developmental potential of macromeres before and after fifth cleavage, and (ii) examine the role of micromere-macromere interactions in the establishment of bilateral symmetry. The results suggest that the macromeres are developmentally equivalent prior to fifth cleavage, but become nonequivalent soon afterward. The dorsoventral axis corresponds to the displacement of the micromeres over one macromere early in the fifth cleavage interval. This unusual cellular topology is hypothesized to result from constraints imposed on micromere-macromere interactions in an embryo that develops from a large egg and forms a stereoblastula (no cleavage cavity). Ablation of the entire first quarter of micromeres results in embryos which remain radially symmetrical in the vegetal hemisphere, indicating that micromere-macromere interactions are required for the elaboration of bilateral symmetry properties. Therefore, inductive interactions between cells may represent a general strategy