Science.gov

Sample records for 3-foot projectile impactor

  1. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Chen, Bean T.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Newton, George J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency.

  2. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Chen, B.T.; Cheng, Y.S.; Newton, G.J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor is described having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent to the inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency. 4 figs.

  3. Asteroid Kinetic Impactor Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesley, Steven

    2015-08-01

    Asteroid impact missions can be carried out as a relatively low-cost add-ons to most asteroid rendezvous missions and such impact experiments have tremendous potential, both scientifically and in the arena of planetary defense.The science returns from an impactor demonstration begin with the documentation of the global effects of the impact, such as changes in orbit and rotation state, the creation and dissipation of an ejecta plume and debris disk, and morphological changes across the body due to the transmission of seismic waves, which might induce landslides and toppling of boulders, etc. At a local level, an inspection of the impact crater and ejecta blanket reveals critical material strength information, as well as spectral differences between the surface and subsurface material.From the planetary defense perspective, an impact demonstration will prove humankind’s capacity to alter the orbit of a potentially threatening asteroid. This technological leap comes in two parts. First, terminal guidance systems that can deliver an impactor with small errors relative to the ~100-200 meter size of a likely impactor have yet to be demonstrated in a deep space environment. Second, the response of an asteroid to such an impact is only understood theoretically due to the potentially significant dependence on the momentum carried by escaping ejecta, which would tend to enhance the deflection by tens of percent and perhaps as much as a factor of a few. A lack of validated understanding of momentum enhancement is a significant obstacle in properly sizing a real-world impactor deflection mission.This presentation will describe the drivers for asteroid impact demonstrations and cover the range of such concepts, starting with ESA’s pioneering Don Quijote mission concept and leading to a brief description of concepts under study at the present time, including the OSIRIS-REx/ISIS, BASiX/KIX and AIM/DART (AIDA) concepts.

  4. Projectile stopping system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.; Pittenger, L.C.

    1996-11-26

    A projectile interceptor launches a projectile catcher into the path of a projectile. In one embodiment, signals indicative of the path of a projectile are received by the projectile interceptor. A flinger mechanism has a projectile catcher releasably attached thereto, such that the projectile catcher can be released and launched from the flinger mechanism. A controller connected to the flinger mechanism uses the signals indicative of the path of the projectile to determine the launch parameters of the projectile catcher. The controller directs the flinger mechanism to release the projectile catcher such that the projectile catcher is launched into the path of the projectile and intercepts the projectile. 13 figs.

  5. Projectile stopping system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J.; Pittenger, Lee C.

    1996-01-01

    A projectile interceptor launches a projectile catcher into the path of a projectile. In one embodiment, signals indicative of the path of a projectile are received by the projectile interceptor. A flinger mechanism has a projectile catcher releasably attached thereto, such that the projectile catcher can be released and launched from the flinger mechanism. A controller connected to the flinger mechanism uses the signals indicative of the path of the projectile to determine the launch parameters of the projectile catcher. The controller directs the flinger mechanism to release the projectile catcher such that the projectile catcher is launched into the path of the projectile and intercepts the projectile.

  6. Particle chemistry impactor experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Goodman, J. K.; Verma, S.

    1990-01-01

    Polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles are collected on impactors and studied with regard to physical and chemical properties to help explain the importance of heterogeneous chemical reactions for stratospheric ozone depletion. The nitric, hydrochloric, and sulfuric acid content of stratospheric aerosol particles collected at 18 km altitude was determined. It is suggested that nitric acid is a component of polar stratospheric clouds. This is important for two reasons: (1) it proves that chlorine activation takes place at the surface of PSC particles by converting chemically inert chlorine nitrate to chlorine radicals that can react with ozone; and (2) if the PSC particles are large enough to settle out from the stratosphere, the possibility of nitric acid removal can result in the denitrification of the stratosphere.

  7. High efficiency virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.

    1980-03-27

    Environmental monitoring of atmospheric air is facilitated by a single stage virtual impactor for separating an inlet flow (Q/sub 0/) having particulate contaminants into a coarse particle flow (Q/sub 1/) and a fine particle flow (Q/sub 2/) to enable collection of such particles on different filters for separate analysis. An inlet particle acceleration nozzle and coarse particle collection probe member having a virtual impaction opening are aligned along a single axis and spaced apart to define a flow separation region at which the fine particle flow (Q/sub 2/) is drawn radially outward into a chamber while the coarse particle flow (Q/sub 1/) enters the virtual impaction opening.

  8. High efficiency virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of atmospheric air is facilitated by a single stage virtual impactor (11) for separating an inlet flow (Q.sub.O) having particulate contaminants into a coarse particle flow (Q.sub.1) and a fine particle flow (Q.sub.2) to enable collection of such particles on different filters (19a, 19b) for separate analysis. An inlet particle acceleration nozzle (28) and coarse particle collection probe member (37) having a virtual impaction opening (41) are aligned along a single axis (13) and spaced apart to define a flow separation region (14) at which the fine particle flow (Q.sub.2) is drawn radially outward into a chamber (21) while the coarse particle flow (Q.sub.1) enters the virtual impaction opening (41). Symmetrical outlet means (47) for the chamber (21) provide flow symmetry at the separation region (14) to assure precise separation of particles about a cutpoint size and to minimize losses by wall impaction and gravitational settling. Impulse defocusing means (42) in the probe member (37) provides uniform coarse particle deposition on the filter (19a) to aid analysis. Particle losses of less than 1% for particles in the 0 to 20 micron range may be realized.

  9. Penetration of granular projectiles into a water target.

    PubMed

    González-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2014-01-01

    The penetration of low-speed projectiles into a water target has been studied in the last several years to understand the physics behind the formation and collapse of cavities. In such studies, the projectiles employed were solid bodies or liquid drops. Here we report similar impact experiments using granular projectiles, with the aim to investigate how the morphology of the cavities is determined by the balance between the dynamic pressure exerted by the fluid and the cohesive strength of the impactors. From the results we present and discuss in this manuscript, we speculate on the dynamics of meteorite disintegration in the atmosphere of our planet. PMID:25342448

  10. Penetration of Granular Projectiles into a Water Target

    PubMed Central

    González-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The penetration of low-speed projectiles into a water target has been studied in the last several years to understand the physics behind the formation and collapse of cavities. In such studies, the projectiles employed were solid bodies or liquid drops. Here we report similar impact experiments using granular projectiles, with the aim to investigate how the morphology of the cavities is determined by the balance between the dynamic pressure exerted by the fluid and the cohesive strength of the impactors. From the results we present and discuss in this manuscript, we speculate on the dynamics of meteorite disintegration in the atmosphere of our planet. PMID:25342448

  11. 20. LOCK GATES, 3 FOOT WALKWAY, ADJUSTMENT AT GUDGEON PIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. LOCK GATES, 3 FOOT WALKWAY, ADJUSTMENT AT GUDGEON PIN AND QUOIN SHOE. May 1933 - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 17, Upper Mississippi River, New Boston, Mercer County, IL

  12. A DATA REDUCTION SYSTEM FOR CASCADE IMPACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a computer-based data reduction system for cascade impactors. The system utilizes impactor-specific calibration information, together with operating conditions and other pertinent information (e.g., stage weights, sampling duration), to determine particle siz...

  13. An ordinary chondrite impactor for the Popigai crater, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagle, Roald; Claeys, Philippe

    2005-06-01

    With a diameter of ˜100 km, Popigai in Northern Siberia is the largest crater known in the Cenozoic. The concentrations in platinum group elements (PGE) were analyzed in twenty samples of homogeneous impact melt collected in the northwestern flank of the crater to identify the composition of the projectile. The method selected was preconcentration by NiS fire assay followed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This technique measures all the PGE (except Os) and by using aliquots >10g, the results are highly reproducible. The major and trace element composition of the impact melt resembles that of gneissic lithologies of the Anabar shield, which are representative of the target rock. The PGE are enriched in the melt by factors of 3 to 14 compared to the main target lithology, but the meteoritic contamination is only around 0.2 wt.%. Using plots of elemental ratios such as Ru/Rh vs. Pt/Pd or Ru/Rh vs. Pd/Ir, the Popigai impactor is clearly identified as an ordinary chondrite and most likely L-chondrite. This study indicates that PGE elemental ratios allow discrimination of the type of impactor, even in the case of low meteoritic contamination. This study confirms that a significant fraction of the crater-forming projectiles presently documented could have an ordinary chondrite composition. Their probable source, the S-type asteroids, appears to form the majority of the bodies in the main asteroid belt and among Near Earth Objects (NEOs). The ordinary chondrite origin of the Popigai projectile supports an asteroidal origin for the late Eocene impacts as a plausible alternative to the comet shower scenario proposed by Farley et al. (1998).

  14. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  15. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  16. Survival of the impactor during hypervelocity collisions - I. An analogue for low porosity targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdellidou, C.; Price, M. C.; Delbo, M.; Ioannidis, P.; Cole, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations of asteroidal surfaces indicate the presence of materials that do not match the bulk lithology of the body. A possible explanation for the presence of these exogenous materials is that they are products of interasteroid impacts in the Main Belt, and thus interest has increased in understanding the fate of the projectile during hypervelocity impacts. In order to gain insight into the fate of impactor, we have carried out a laboratory programme, covering the velocity range of 0.38-3.50 km s-1, devoted to measuring the survivability, fragmentation and final state of the impactor. Forsterite olivine and synthetic basalt projectiles were fired on to low porosity (<10 per cent) pure water-ice targets using the University of Kent's Light Gas Gun (LGG). We developed a novel method to identify impactor fragments which were found in ejecta and implanted into the target. We applied astronomical photometry techniques, using the SOURCE EXTRACTOR software, to automatically measure the dimensions of thousands of fragments. This procedure enabled us to estimate the implanted mass on the target body, which was found to be a few per cent of the initial mass of the impactor. We calculated an order of magnitude difference in the energy density of catastrophic disruption, Q*, between peridot and basalt projectiles. However, we found very similar behaviour of the size frequency distributions for the hypervelocity shots (>1 km s-1). After each shot, we examined the largest peridot fragments with Raman spectroscopy and no melt or alteration in the final state of the projectile was observed.

  17. Dependence of debris cloud formation on projectile shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, C. H.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Boslough, M. B.; Piekutowski, A. J.; Poormon, K. L.; Mullin, S. A.; Littlefield, D. L.

    1994-07-01

    A two-stage lights-gas gun has been used to impact thin zinc bumpers by zinc projectiles over the velocity range of 2.4 km/s to 6.7 km/s to determine the propagation characteristics of the impact generated debris. Constant-mass projectiles in the form of spheres, discs, cylinders, and rods were used in these studies. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact and the dynamic formation of the resulting rupture in an aluminum backing plate resulting from the loading of the debris cloud. The characteristics of the debris cloud generated upon impact is found to depend on the projectile shape. The data indicate that the debris front velocity is independent of the shape of the projectile, whereas the debris lateral/radial velocity is strongly dependent on projectile geometry. Spherical impactors generate the most radially dispersed debris cloud while the normal plate impactors result in column-like debris. It has been observed that the debris generated by the impact of thin plates on a thin bumper shield is considerably more damaging to a backwall than the debris generated by an equivalent-mass sphere.

  18. Dependence of debris cloud formation on projectile shape

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, C.H.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Boslough, M.B.; Piekutowski, A.J.; Poormon, K.L.; Mullin, S.A.; Littlefield, D.L.

    1993-07-01

    A two-stage light-gas gun has been used to impact thin zinc bumpers by zinc projectiles over the velocity range of 2.4 km/s to 6.7 km/s to determine the propagation characteristics of the impact generated debris. Constant-mass projectiles in the form of spheres, discs, cylinders and rods were used in these studies. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact and the dynamic formation of the resulting rupture in an aluminum backing plate resulting from the loading of the debris cloud. The characteristics of the debris cloud generated upon impact is found to depend on the projectile shape. The data indicate that the debris front velocity is independent of the shape of the projectile, whereas the debris lateral/radial velocity is strongly dependent on projectile geometry. Spherical impactors generate the most radially dispersed debris cloud while the normal plate impactors result in column-like debris. It has been observed that the debris generated by the impact of thin plates on a thin bumper shield is considerably more damaging to a backwall than the debris generated by an equivalent-mass sphere.

  19. Delivering a projectile component to the vestan regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, R. Terik; Schultz, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Dark material on Vesta may consist of carbonaceous chondrite-like material delivered by impact events. This study uses hypervelocity impact experiments to assess the viability of the impact delivery hypothesis. Experiments reveal that impact events deliver significant fractions of the projectile to the target during impacts at average vestan speeds. Hence, dark material can plausibly be delivered to Vesta by impacts, with the projectile component accumulating in the regolith with time. Projectile retention is sensitive to impact angle, ranging from 7% for 30° impacts (measured from horizontal) to 72% for vertical impacts. Averaged over the probability distribution of impact angles, 17% of the projectile's mass remains in or near the crater. Projectile-contaminated breccias largely remain inside the crater for vertical impacts. In oblique impacts, projectile-contaminated pieces concentrate downrange beyond the crater rim. Based on experiments, projectile delivery is expected for typical vestan impact conditions, not only for extraordinary events such as low-probability and very low-speed (e.g., <2 km s-1) impacts. These experiments indicate that other (non-dark) impactors contaminate the vestan regolith. Regolith-laden bodies in environments with similar impact speeds also may accrete significant amounts of foreign debris.

  20. The EMET railgun projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, R.L.; Witherspoon, F.D.; Goldstein, S.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the EMET projectile which uses joule heating to accelerate the projectile in a railgun with a predominantly electrothermal driving force. The structure is designed to conduct armature current within a thin annular band around the shank of the large L/D dumbbell-shaped projectile. Current is initiated by a fuse located around the shank, and an impedance of 8 m{Omega} is achieved, compared to the 1-2 m{Omega} observed for EM guns. A supersonic nozzle in the projectile tail section expands and cools the armature plasma to raise its resistivity, prevent secondary arcs and provide additional accelerating thrust. Experimental data is presented for 9.5 mm diameter, 5 gm projectiles, accelerated to nearly 600 m/sec at 55 kA in a 0.9 m railgun. The armature remains confined in the projectile structure, and 75% of the acceleration is provided electrothermally.

  1. Survivability of copper projectiles during hypervelocity impacts in porous ice: A laboratory investigation of the survivability of projectiles impacting comets or other bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Cole, M.; Burchell, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    During hypervelocity impact (>a few km s-1) the resulting cratering and/or disruption of the target body often outweighs interest on the outcome of the projectile material, with the majority of projectiles assumed to be vaporised. However, on Earth, fragments, often metallic, have been recovered from impact sites, meaning that metallic projectile fragments may survive a hypervelocity impact and still exist within the wall, floor and/or ejecta of the impact crater post-impact. The discovery of the remnant impactor composition within the craters of asteroids, planets and comets could provide further information regarding the impact history of a body. Accordingly, we study in the laboratory the survivability of 1 and 2 mm diameter copper projectiles fired onto ice at speeds between 1.00 and 7.05 km s-1. The projectile was recovered intact at speeds up to 1.50 km s-1, with no ductile deformation, but some surface pitting was observed. At 2.39 km s-1, the projectile showed increasing ductile deformation and broke into two parts. Above velocities of 2.60 km s-1 increasing numbers of projectile fragments were identified post impact, with the mean size of the fragments decreasing with increasing impact velocity. The decrease in size also corresponds with an increase in the number of projectile fragments recovered, as with increasing shock pressure the projectile material is more intensely disrupted, producing smaller and more numerous fragments. The damage to the projectile is divided into four classes with increasing speed and shock pressure: (1) minimal damage, (2) ductile deformation, start of break up, (3) increasing fragmentation, and (4) complete fragmentation. The implications of such behaviour is considered for specific examples of impacts of metallic impactors onto Solar System bodies, including LCROSS impacting the Moon, iron meteorites onto Mars and NASA's "Deep Impact" mission where a spacecraft impacted a comet.

  2. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  3. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Sauve, G.L.; Shahinpoor, M.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1993-03-02

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasma blowby.

  4. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Asay, James R.; Hall, Clint A.; Konrad, Carl H.; Sauve, Gerald L.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Susoeff, Allan R.

    1993-01-01

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasama blowby.

  5. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  6. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Bada, Jeffrey; Macklin, John; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Fleming, R. H.; Erlichman, Jozef

    1993-01-01

    We performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, fullerenes, phthalic acid crystals, and Murchison meteorite) into Al plate at velocities between 4.2 and 6.1 km/s. These tests were made to do the following: (1) determine the survivability of carbon forms and organize molecules in low hypervelocity impact; (2) characterize carbonaceous impactor residues; and (3) determine whether or not fullerenes could form from carbonaceous impactors, under our experimental conditions, or survive as impactors. An analytical protocol of field emission SEM imagery, SEM-EDX, laser Raman spectroscopy, single and 2-stage laser mass spectrometry, and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) found the following: (1) diamonds did not survive impact at 4.8 km/s, but were transformed into various forms of disordered graphite; (2) intact, well-ordered graphite impactors did survive impact at 5.9 km/sec, but were only found in the crater bottom centers; the degree of impact-induced disorder in the graphite increases outward (walls, rims, ejecta); (3) phthalic acid crystals were destroyed on impact (at 4.2 km/s, although a large proportion of phthalic acid molecules did survive impact); (4) fullerenes did not form as products of carbonaceous impactors (5.9 - 6.1 km/s, fullerene impactor molecules mostly survived impact at 5.9 km/s; and (5) two Murchison meteorite samples (launched at 4.8 and 5.9 km/s) show preservation of some higher mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the non-impacted sample. Each impactor type shows unique impactor residue morphologies produced at a given impact velocity. An expanded methodology is presented to announce relatively new analytical techniques together with innovative modifications to other methods that can be used to characterize small impact residues in LDEF craters, in addition to other acquired extraterrestrial samples.

  7. A novel graded density impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Ron; Cotton, Matthew; Harris, Ernest; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David

    2013-06-01

    Ramp loading using graded-density-impactors as flyers in plate impact experiments can yield useful information about the dynamic properties of the loaded material. Selective Laser Melting, an additive manufacture technique, was used to fabricate a graded-density flyer, termed the ``bed of nails'' (BON). A 2 mm thick x 100 mm diameter solid disc of stainless steel formed a base for an array of tapered spikes of length 6 mm and spaced 1 mm apart. Two experiments to test the concept were performed at impact velocities of 900 m/s and 1100 m/s using the 100 mm gas gun at The Institute of Shock Physics, Imperial College, London. In each experiment a BON flyer was impacted onto a copper buffer plate which helped to smooth out perturbations in the wave profile. The ramp delivered to the copper buffer was in turn transmitted to three tantalum targets of thicknesses 3, 5 and 7 mm, mounted in contact with the back face of the copper. Heterodyne velocimetry was used to measure the velocity-time history, at the back faces of the tantalum discs. The wave profiles display a smooth increase in free surface velocity over a period of about 2.5 microseconds. The measured profiles have been analysed to generate a stress vs. volume curve for tantalum.

  8. The Mass of Large Impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parisi, M. G.; Brunini, A.

    1996-01-01

    By means of a simplified dynamical model, we have computed the eccentricity change in the orbit of each giant planet, caused by a single, large impact at the end of the accretion process. In order to set an upper bound on this eccentricity change, we have considered the giant planets' present eccentricities as primordial ones. By means of this procedure, we were able to obtain an implicit relation for the impactor masses and maximum velocities. We have estimated by this method the maximum allowed mass to impact Jupiter to be approx. 1.136 x 10(exp -1), being in the case of Neptune approx. 3.99 x 10(exp -2) (expressed in units of each planet final mass). Due to the similar present eccentricities of Saturn, Uranus and Jupiter, the constraint masses and velocities of the bodies to impact them (in units of each planet final mass and velocity respectively) are almost the same for the three planets. These results are in good agreement with those obtained by Lissauer and Safronov. These bounds might be used to derive the mass distribution of planetesimals in the early solar system.

  9. A novel graded density impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Chapman, D. J.; Eakins, D.

    2014-05-01

    Ramp loading using graded-density-impactors as flyers in gas-gun-driven plate impact experiments can yield new and useful information about the equation of state and the strength properties of the loaded material. Selective Laser Melting, an additive manufacture technique, was used to manufacture a graded density flyer, termed the "bed of nails" (BON). A 2 mm thick × 100 mm diameter solid disc of stainless steel formed a base for an array of tapered spikes of length 6 mm and spaced 1 mm apart. The two experiments to test the concept were performed at impact velocities of 900 m/s and 1100 m/s using the 100 mm gas gun at the Institute of Shock Physics at Imperial College, London. In each experiment a BON flyer was impacted onto a copper buffer plate which helped to smooth out perturbations in the wave profile. The ramp delivered to the copper buffer was in turn transmitted to three tantalum targets of thicknesses 3, 5 and 7 mm, which were mounted in contact with the back face of the copper. Heterodyne velocimetry was used to measure the velocity-time history, at the back faces of the tantalum discs. The wave profiles display a smooth increase in velocity over a period of ~2.5 us, with no indication of a shock jump. The measured profiles have been analysed to generate a stress strain curve for tantalum. The results have been compared with the predictions of the Sandia National Laboratories hydrocode, CTH.

  10. SAMPLING CHARGED PARTICLES WITH CASCADE IMPACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses three sets of experiments which demonstrate that a cascade impactor sampling a charged aerosol may yield a particle size distribution measurement that deviates from the time distribution. The distributions indicated more large particles and fewer small partic...

  11. Osmium, tungsten, and chromium isotopes in sediments and in Ni-rich spinel at the K-T boundary: Signature of a chondritic impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitté, Ghylaine; Robin, Eric; Levasseur, Sylvain; Capmas, Françoise; Rocchia, Robert; Birck, Jean-Louis; Allègre, Claude Jean

    It is now established that a large extraterrestrial object hit the Earth at the end of the Cretaceous period, about 65 Ma ago. We have investigated Re-Os, Hf-W, and Mn-Cr isotope systems in sediments from the Cretaceous and the Paleogene in order to characterize the type of impactor. Within the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary layer, extraterrestrial material is mixed with terrestrial material, causing a dilution of the extraterrestrial isotope signature that is difficult to quantify. A phase essentially composed of Ni-rich spinel, formed in the atmosphere mainly from melted projectile material, is likely to contain the extraterrestrial isotopic signature of the impactor. We show that the analysis of spinel is indeed the best approach to determine the initial isotope composition of the impactor, and that W and Cr isotopes confirm that the projectile was a carbonaceous chondrite.

  12. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  13. Small caliber guided projectile

    DOEpatents

    Jones, James F.; Kast, Brian A.; Kniskern, Marc W.; Rose, Scott E.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Woods, James W.; Greene, Ronald W.

    2010-08-24

    A non-spinning projectile that is self-guided to a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber smooth bore gun barrel has an optical sensor mounted in the nose of the projectile, a counterbalancing mass portion near the fore end of the projectile and a hollow tapered body mounted aft of the counterbalancing mass. Stabilizing strakes are mounted to and extend outward from the tapered body with control fins located at the aft end of the strakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actuators for operating the control fins are located within the tapered body section. Output from the optical sensor is processed by the guidance and control electronics to produce command signals for the electromagnetic actuators. A guidance control algorithm incorporating non-proportional, "bang-bang" control is used to steer the projectile to the target.

  14. Hypervelocity projectile design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Sauve, G.L.; Vasey, A.R.; Gosling, S.M.; Hickman, R.J.

    1990-12-31

    The projectile is the easiest element of a railgun system to modify. The projectile design can also play a major role in the successful operation of a railgun. This paper presents the design and fabrication techniques that have been used to increase the strength of the projectiles used in the STARFIRE Project. In addition, various diagnostics that have been used to guide our projectile development and monitor projectile integrity are reviewed. 10 refs.

  15. Jetting during vertical impacts of spherical projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Bowling, T. J.; Melosh, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The extreme pressures reached during jetting, a process by which material is squirted out from the contact point of two colliding objects, causes melting and vaporization at low impact velocities. Jetting is a major source of melting in shocked porous material, a potential source of tektites, a possible origin of chondrules, and even a conceivable origin of the Moon. Here, in an attempt to quantify the importance of jetting, we present numerical simulation of jetting during the vertical impacts of spherical projectiles on both flat and curved targets. We find that impacts on curved targets result in more jetted material but that higher impact velocities result in less jetted material. For an aluminum impactor striking a flat Al target at 2 km/s we find that 3.4% of a projectile mass is jetted while 8.3% is jetted for an impact between two equal sized Al spheres. Our results indicate that the theory of jetting during the collision of thin plates can be used to predict the conditions when jetting will occur. However, we find current analytic models do not make accurate predictions of the amount of jetted mass. Our work indicates that the amount of jetted mass is independent of model resolution as long as some jetted material is resolved. This is the result of lower velocity material dominating the mass of the jet.

  16. More on Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, M. I.

    2000-01-01

    Mathematically explains why the range of a projectile is most insensitive to aiming errors when the initial angle is close to 45 degrees, whereas other observables such as maximum height or flight time are most insensitive for near-vertical launching conditions. (WRM)

  17. Projectiles and Aerodynamic Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the air resistance on projectiles, examining (in separate sections) air resistance less than gravity and air resistance greater than gravity. Also considers an approximation in which a trajectory is divided into two parts, the first part neglecting gravity and the second part neglecting the air resistance. (JN)

  18. A COMPUTER-BASED CASCADE IMPACTOR DATA REDUCTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a cascade impactor data reduction system written in the Fortran IV language. The overall system incorporates six programs: MPPROG, SPLIN1, GRAPH, STATIS, PENTRA, and PENLOG. Impactor design, particulate catch information, and sampling conditions from single i...

  19. Dispersion of Projectile and Target Debris Upon Penetration of Thin Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynn, D.; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Horz, F.

    1996-03-01

    We continue to conduct penetration experiments of thin foils to support the development of cosmic-dust flight instruments that utilize thin films for the measurement of particle trajectories, or for the potential soft capture of hypervelocity impactors for subsequent compositional analysis upon retrieval to Earth. Each experiment is equipped with a witness plate, mounted to the rear of the target and fabricated from soft Aluminum-1100, ~30 x 30 cm in size and ranging from 2 to 5 mm thick; these witness plates essentially simulate the rear wall of a capture cell onto which the projectile material will plate out, including material that is being dislodged from the penetrated foil itself. Using compositionally contrasting projectile and foil materials in the laboratory, such as soda-lime glass impactors and aluminum targets, one produces two distinct populations of craters on the witness plates.

  20. Subcaliber discarding sabot airgun projectiles.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Schönekeß, Holger; Herbst, Jörg; Staats, Hans-Georg; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Nguyen, Thanh Tien; Bockholdt, Britta

    2014-03-01

    Medical literature abounds with reports on injuries and fatalities caused by airgun projectiles. While round balls or diabolo pellets have been the standard projectiles for airguns for decades, today, there are a large number of different airgun projectiles available. A very uncommon--and until now unique--discarding sabot airgun projectile (Sussex Sabo Bullet) was introduced into the market in the 1980s. The projectile, available in 0.177 (4.5 mm) and 0.22 (5.5 mm) caliber, consists of a plastic sabot cup surrounding a subcaliber copper-coated lead projectile in typical bullet shape. Following the typical principle of a discarding sabot projectile, the lightweight sabot is supposed to quickly loose velocity and to fall to the ground downrange while the bullet continues on target. These sabot-loaded projectiles are of special forensic interest due to their non-traceability and ballistic parameters. Therefore, it is the aim of this work to investigate the ballistic performance of these sabot airgun projectiles by high-speed video analyses and by measurement of the kinetic parameters of the projectile parts by a transient recording system as well as observing their physical features after being fired. While the sabot principle worked properly in high-energy airguns (E > 17 J), separation of the core projectile from the sabot cup was also observed when discharged in low-energy airguns (E < 7.5 J). While the velocity of the discarded Sussex Sabo core projectile was very close to the velocity of a diabolo-type reference projectile (RWS Meisterkugel), energy density was up to 60 % higher. To conclude, this work is the first study to demonstrate the regular function of this uncommon type of airgun projectile. PMID:24263305

  1. Direct detection of projectile relics from the end of the lunar basin-forming epoch.

    PubMed

    Joy, Katherine H; Zolensky, Michael E; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Huss, Gary R; Ross, D Kent; McKay, David S; Kring, David A

    2012-06-15

    The lunar surface, a key proxy for the early Earth, contains relics of asteroids and comets that have pummeled terrestrial planetary surfaces. Surviving fragments of projectiles in the lunar regolith provide a direct measure of the types and thus the sources of exogenous material delivered to the Earth-Moon system. In ancient [>3.4 billion years ago (Ga)] regolith breccias from the Apollo 16 landing site, we located mineral and lithologic relics of magnesian chondrules from chondritic impactors. These ancient impactor fragments are not nearly as diverse as those found in younger (3.4 Ga to today) regolith breccias and soils from the Moon or that presently fall as meteorites to Earth. This suggests that primitive chondritic asteroids, originating from a similar source region, were common Earth-Moon-crossing impactors during the latter stages of the basin-forming epoch. PMID:22604725

  2. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1994-01-04

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  3. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Susoeff, Allan R.

    1994-01-01

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  4. Impactor Populations on the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Merline, W. J.; Bierhaus, B.; Keller, J.; Brooks, S.

    1997-07-01

    Galilean satellite images from Galileo, considered in the context of Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts and other evidence, raise crucial questions about the nature of impactor populations in the Jovian system. Several observations suggest that the current impactor population (generally believed to be extinct Jupiter-family comets) is relatively deficient in comets smaller than S-L 9, compared with usually adopted power-laws. These include: (a) lack of saturated surfaces at diameters <100 m; (b) predominance of secondary craters in some regions far from sources; and (c) apparent dearth of small crater chains (catenae). None of these indications is yet conclusive (for example, catenae would be predicted to mimic the cometary size distribution only for certain idealized models of S-L 9-like comet break-up). It is also plausible (certain, in the case of Europa) that there are currently active erosional and resurfacing processes on Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto that contribute to erasing small craters. The often adopted assumption that the heavily cratered terrains on Ganymede and Callisto reflect the same Late Heavy Bombardment recorded on the Moon, while conceivably true, is only one of a number of plausible possibilities. We discuss the qualitative roles of different impactor populations. We thank the Galileo Imaging Team and associates for discussions, and the Galileo Project, NASA, and NSF for support.

  5. Cascade impactor and jet plate for same

    DOEpatents

    Dahlin, Robert S.; Farthing, William E.; Landham Jr., Edward C.

    2004-02-03

    A sampling system and method for sampling particulate matter from a high-temperature, high-pressure gas stream. A cyclone sampler for use at high temperatures and pressures, and having threadless sacrificial connectors is disclosed. Also disclosed is an improved cascade impactor including jet plates with integral spacers, and alignment features provided for aligning the jet plates with their associated collection substrates. An activated bauxite alkali collector is disclosed, and includes an alumina liner. The sampling system can be operated remotely or locally, and can be permanently installed or configured as a portable system.

  6. Geochemical processes between steel projectiles and silica-rich targets in hypervelocity impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Matthias; Hecht, Lutz; Deutsch, Alexander; Kenkmann, Thomas; Wirth, Richard; Berndt, Jasper

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of fractionation processes between projectile and target matter is critical with regard to the classification of the impactor type from geochemical analysis of impactites from natural craters. Here we present results of five hypervelocity MEMIN impact experiments (Poelchau et al., 2013) using the Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel D290-1 as projectile and two different silica-rich lithologies (Seeberger sandstone and Taunus quartzite) as target materials. Our study is focused on geochemical target-projectile interaction occurring in highly shocked and projectile-rich ejecta fragments. In all of the investigated impact experiments, whether sandstone or quartzite targets, the ejecta fragments show (i) shock-metamorphic features e.g., planar-deformation features (PDF) and the formation of silica glasses, (ii) partially melting of projectile and target, and (iii) significant mechanical and chemical mixing of the target rock with projectile material. The silica-rich target melts are strongly enriched in the "projectile tracer elements" Cr, V, and Fe, but have just minor enrichments of Co, W, and Mo. Inter-element ratios of these tracer elements within the contaminated target melts differ strongly from the original ratios in the steel. The fractionation results from differences in the reactivity of the respective elements with oxygen during interaction of the metal melt with silicate melt. Our results indicate that the principles of projectile-target interaction and associated fractionation do not depend on impact energies (at least for the selected experimental conditions) and water-saturation of the target. Partitioning of projectile tracer elements into the silicate target melt is much more enhanced in experiments with a non-porous quartzite target compared with the porous sandstone target. This is mainly the result of higher impact pressures, consequently higher temperatures and longer reaction times at high temperatures in the experiments with quartzite as

  7. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-05-20

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile. 8 figs.

  8. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile.

  9. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media. PMID:11538362

  10. Grooved impactor and inertial trap for sampling inhalable particulate matter

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.

    1984-01-01

    An inertial trap and grooved impactor for providing a sharp cutoff for particles over 15 microns from entering an inhalable particulate sampler. The impactor head has a tapered surface and is provided with V-shaped grooves. The tapered surface functions for reducing particle blow-off or reentrainment while the grooves prevent particle bounce. Water droplets and any resuspended material over the 15 micron size are collected by the inertial trap and deposited in a reservoir associated with the impactor.

  11. Evaluation of different projectiles in matched experimental eye impact simulations.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Ashley A; Kennedy, Eric A; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2011-03-01

    Eye trauma results in 30,000 cases of blindness each year in the United States and is the second leading cause of monocular visual impairment. Eye injury is caused by a wide variety of projectile impacts and loading scenarios with common sources of trauma being motor vehicle crashes, military operations, and sporting impacts. For the current study, 79 experimental eye impact tests in literature were computationally modeled to analyze global and localized responses of the eye to a variety of blunt projectile impacts. Simulations were run with eight different projectiles (airsoft pellets, baseball, air gun pellets commonly known as BBs, blunt impactor, paintball, aluminum, foam, and plastic rods) to characterize effects of the projectile size, mass, geometry, material properties, and velocity on eye response. This study presents a matched comparison of experimental test results and computational model outputs including stress, energy, and pressure used to evaluate risk of eye injury. In general, the computational results agreed with the experimental results. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to establish the stress and pressure thresholds that best discriminated for globe rupture in the matched experimental tests. Globe rupture is predicted by the computational simulations when the corneoscleral stress exceeds 17.21 MPa or the vitreous pressure exceeds 1.01 MPa. Peak stresses were located at the apex of the cornea, the limbus, or the equator depending on the type of projectile impacting the eye. A multivariate correlation analysis revealed that area-normalized kinetic energy was the best single predictor of peak stress and pressure. Additional incorporation of a relative size parameter that relates the projectile area to the area of the eye reduced stress response variability and may be of importance in eye injury prediction. The modeling efforts shed light on the injury response of the eye when subjected to a variety of blunt projectile

  12. Penetration experiments in aluminum 1100 targets using soda-lime glass projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William E.; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry L.

    1995-01-01

    The cratering and penetration behavior of annealed aluminum 1100 targets, with thickness varied from several centimeters to ultra-thin foils less than 1 micrometer thick, were experimentally investigated using 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s. The objective was to establish quantitative, dimensional relationships between initial impact conditions (impact velocity, projectile diameter, and target thickness) and the diameter of the resulting crater or penetration hole. Such dimensional relationships and calibration experiments are needed to extract the diameters and fluxes of hypervelocity particles from space-exposed surfaces and to predict the performance of certain collisional shields. The cratering behavior of aluminum 1100 is fairly well predicted. However, crater depth is modestly deeper for our silicate impactors than the canonical value based on aluminum projectiles and aluminum 6061-T6 targets. The ballistic-limit thickness was also different. These differences attest to the great sensitivity of detailed crater geometry and penetration behavior on the physical properties of both the target and impactor. Each penetration experiment was equipped with a witness plate to monitor the nature of the debris plume emanating from the rear of the target. This plume consists of both projectile fragments and target debris. Both penetration hole and witness-plate spray patterns systematically evolve in response to projectile diameter/target thickness. The relative dimensions of the projectile and target totally dominate the experimental products documented in this report; impact velocity is an important contributor as well to the evolution of penetration holes, but is of subordinate significance for the witness-plate spray patterns.

  13. Asteroid deflection using a kinetic impactor: Insights from hypervelocity impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the planned AIDA mission [1], an impactor spacecraft (DART) hits the second component of the asteroid Didymos at hypervelocity. The impact crater will be observed from the AIM spacecraft and an observation of the ejecta plume is possible [1]. This allows conclusions to be drawn about the physical properties of the target material, and the momentum transfer will be studied [1]. In preparation for this mission, hypervelocity impact experiments can provide valuable information about the outcome of an impact event as a function of impactor and target material properties and, thus, support the interpretation of the data from the DART impact. In addition, these impact experiments provide an important means to validate numerical impact simulations required to simulate large-scale impacts that cannot be studied in laboratory experiments. Impact experiments have shown that crater morphology and size, crater growth and ejecta dynamics strongly depend on the physical properties of the target material [2]. For example, porous materials like sandstone lead to a shallower and slower ejection than low-porous materials like quartzite, and the cratering efficiency is reduced in porous targets leading to a smaller amount of ejected mass [3]. These phenomena result in a reduced momentum multiplication factor (often called "beta-value"), i.e. the ratio of the change in target momentum after the impact and the momentum of the projectile is smaller for porous materials. Hypervelocity impact experiments into target materials with different porosities and densities such as quartzite (2.9 %, 2.6 g/cm3), sandstone (25.3 %, 2 g/cm3), limestone (31 %, 1.8 g/cm3), and highly porous aerated concrete (87.5 %, 0.4 g/cm3) were conducted. Projectile velocities were varied between about 3 km/s and almost 7 km/s. A ballistic pendulum was used to measure the momentum transfer. The material strength required for scaling laws was determined for all target materials. The highest

  14. Analytical electron microscopy of LDEF impactor residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Barrett, Ruth A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1995-01-01

    The LDEF contained 57 individual experiment trays or tray portions specifically designed to characterize critical aspects of meteoroid and debris environment in low-Earth orbit (LEO). However, it was realized from the beginning that the most efficient use of the satellite would be to characterize impact features from the entire surface of the LDEF. With this in mind particular interest has focused on common materials facing in all 26 LDEF facing directions; among the most important of these materials has been the tray clamps. Therefore, in an effort to better understand the nature and flux of particulates in LEO, and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impact features on LDEF tray clamp surfaces. This paper summarizes all data from 79 clamps located on Bay A & B of the LDEF. We also describe current efforts to characterize impactor residues recovered from the impact craters, and we have found that a low, but significant, fraction of these residues have survived in a largely unmelted state. These residues can be characterized sufficiently to permit resolution of the impactor origin. We have concentrated on the residue from chondritic interplanetary dust particles (micrometeoroids), as these represent the harshest test of our analytical capabilities.

  15. The cometary impactor flux at the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    2007-05-01

    Long- and short-period comets make up a small but important fraction of the potential impactors on the Earth. Because of their higher approach velocities, comets are more energetic impactors than most asteroids. Terrestrial encounters with long-period comets are difficult to predict because these comets enter the planetary region at random times and from all directions. Thus, warning times can be relatively short, only a few months in some cases. Dynamical calculations show that the mean impact probability for Earth-crossing long-period comets is 2.2 x 10-9 per perihelion passage, assuming a uniform perihelion distribution and random inclination distribution for comets interior to 1 AU. The mean impact velocity is 51.8 km s-1, and the most probable impact velocity is 56.4 km s-1. For Jupiter-family comets, whose returns are predictable (once discovered), only 22 Earth-crossers are known (excluding the many fragments of 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3). Of these, 4 are lost, 8 have only been observed on one return, and 1 is no longer Earth-crossing. Their mean impact probability is 7.3 x 10-9 per orbit or 1.3 x 10-9 per year, and their mean encounter velocity with the Earth is 22.9 km s-1, with a most probable encounter velocity of 19.9 km s-1. For Halley-type comets, whose returns are also predictable, another 16 Earth-crossers are known, of which 1 is lost and 6 have not yet made a second observed appearance. Their mean impact probability is 7.0 x 10-9 per orbit but only 0.16 x 10-9 per year because of their longer orbital periods. Their mean encounter velocity is 45.4 km s-1, with a most probable encounter velocity of 52.3 km s-1. Recent efforts at determining the size distribution of Jupiter-family comets has made it possible to estimate the actual impactor flux on the Earth. However, this is not true for Halley-type comets, where only a few nucleus radii have been reliably estimated, or for long-period comets where few if any reliable measurements exist. Additional

  16. Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment mission: Kinetic impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Stickle, A.; Barnouin, O.; Ernst, C.; Atchison, J.; Pravec, P.; Richardson, D. C.

    2016-02-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission will be the first space experiment to demonstrate asteroid impact hazard mitigation by using a kinetic impactor to deflect an asteroid. AIDA is an international cooperation, consisting of two mission elements: the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and the ESA Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) rendezvous mission. The primary goals of AIDA are (i) to test our ability to perform a spacecraft impact on a potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid and (ii) to measure and characterize the deflection caused by the impact. The AIDA target will be the binary near-Earth asteroid (65803) Didymos, with the deflection experiment to occur in late September, 2022. The DART impact on the secondary member of the binary at ~7 km/s is expected to alter the binary orbit period by about 4 minutes, assuming a simple transfer of momentum to the target, and this period change will be measured by Earth-based observatories. The AIM spacecraft will characterize the asteroid target and monitor results of the impact in situ at Didymos. The DART mission is a full-scale kinetic impact to deflect a 150 m diameter asteroid, with known impactor conditions and with target physical properties characterized by the AIM mission. Predictions for the momentum transfer efficiency of kinetic impacts are given for several possible target types of different porosities, using Housen and Holsapple (2011) crater scaling model for impact ejecta mass and velocity distributions. Results are compared to numerical simulation results using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code of Jutzi and Michel (2014) with good agreement. The model also predicts that the ejecta from the DART impact may make Didymos into an active asteroid, forming an ejecta coma that may be observable from Earth-based telescopes. The measurements from AIDA of the momentum transfer from the DART impact, the crater size and morphology, and the evolution of an ejecta coma will

  17. DEVELOPMENT STUDY OF A NOVEL CONTINUOUS-FLOW IMPACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a development study involving feasibility verification of a novel particle impactor in which the impaction surface is the interface between two opposing jets. Particles (which would impact a solid surface in a standard impactor) cross the interface bet...

  18. Two dimensional mesoscale simulations of projectile instability during penetration in dry sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, S. K.; Teeter, R. D.; Felice, C. W.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2008-10-01

    To gain insight into the instability and trajectory change in projectiles penetrating dry sand at high velocities, two dimensional plane strain mesoscale simulations were carried out using representative models of a particulate system and of a small projectile. A program, ISP-SAND, was developed and used to generate the representative particulate system with mean grain sizes of 60 and 120 μm as well as ±30% uniform size distribution from the mean. Target porosities ranged from 30% to 40%. The penetration of ogive nose steel projectiles with caliber radius head of 3.5 and length-to-diameter (l /d) ratio of 3.85 was simulated using the updated Lagrangian explicit parallel finite element code ISP-TROTP. Deformation of the projectile and individual sand grains was analyzed using a nonlinear elastic-inelastic model for these materials. Grain-grain and grain-projectile interactions were analyzed using a contact algorithm with and without friction. Projectile instability was quantified and compared using the lateral displacement of the center of mass, lateral force acting on the projectile, and its rotational momentum about the center of mass. The main source of projectile instability and the ensuing trajectory change in the penetration simulations was found to be the inhomogeneous loading of the projectile due to the heterogeneities and randomness inherent in a particulate media like sand. The granularity of the media has not been considered explicitly in previous work. Projectile instability increased with impact velocity, as expected. However, it also increased for the case of elastic impactor that preserved the nose shape, with an increase in grain size, and for uniform grain sizes. Moreover, friction, inherently present in geologic materials, was found to be a major contributor to instability. Conclusions derived from one projectile depth simulations were confirmed by two deeper penetration simulations considering up to three full lengths of penetration (requiring

  19. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  20. Projectile penetration into ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Swain, M V; Kieser, D C; Shah, S; Kieser, J A

    2014-01-01

    Ballistic gelatin is frequently used as a model for soft biological tissues that experience projectile impact. In this paper we investigate the response of a number of gelatin materials to the penetration of spherical steel projectiles (7 to 11mm diameter) with a range of lower impacting velocities (<120m/s). The results of sphere penetration depth versus projectile velocity are found to be linear for all systems above a certain threshold velocity required for initiating penetration. The data for a specific material impacted with different diameter spheres were able to be condensed to a single curve when the penetration depth was normalised by the projectile diameter. When the results are compared with a number of predictive relationships available in the literature, it is found that over the range of projectiles and compositions used, the results fit a simple relationship that takes into account the projectile diameter, the threshold velocity for penetration into the gelatin and a value of the shear modulus of the gelatin estimated from the threshold velocity for penetration. The normalised depth is found to fit the elastic Froude number when this is modified to allow for a threshold impact velocity. The normalised penetration data are found to best fit this modified elastic Froude number with a slope of 1/2 instead of 1/3 as suggested by Akers and Belmonte (2006). Possible explanations for this difference are discussed. PMID:24184862

  1. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  2. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  3. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  4. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  5. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.

    1989-04-20

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF{sub 6}. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has traveled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 9 figs.

  6. Target and Projectile: Material Effects on Crater Excavation and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L. B.; Burleson, T.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relationships allow the initial conditions of an impact to be related to the excavation flow and final crater size and have proven useful in understanding the various processes that lead to the formation of a planetary-scale crater. In addition, they can be examined and tested through laboratory experiments in which the initial conditions of the impact are known and ejecta kinematics and final crater morphometry are measured directly. Current scaling relationships are based on a point-source assumption and treat the target material as a continuous medium; however, in planetary-scale impacts, this may not always be the case. Fragments buried in a megaregolith, for instance, could easily approach or exceed the dimensions of the impactor; rubble-pile asteroids could present similar, if not greater, structural complexity. Experiments allow exploration into the effects of target material properties and projectile deformation style on crater excavation and dimensions. This contribution examines two of these properties: (1) the deformation style of the projectile, ductile (aluminum) or brittle (soda-lime glass) and (2) the grain size of the target material, 0.5-1 mm vs. 1-3 mm sand.

  7. USE AND LIMITATIONS OF IN-STACK IMPACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic evaluation of the operating parameters for four commercially available in-stack cascade impactors was carried out with polydisperse test aerosols. Test aerosols used were polystyrene latex spheres, uranine, sodium chloride, dioctyl-phthalate, or dinonyl phthalate. Th...

  8. Effect of impactor area on collision rate estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Analytic and numercial estimates provide an assessment of the effect of impactor area on space debris collision rates, which is sufficiently small and insensitive to parameters of inerest that it could be neglected or corrected.

  9. Atmospheric behavior of the Chelyabinsk impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.; Spurný, P.; Brown, P.; Kalenda, P.; Shrbený, L.

    2014-07-01

    The impact of a 19-m diameter asteroid near Chelyabinsk, Russia on February 15, 2013 has already been studied extensively [e.g., 1--3]. The main sources of information were casually recorded videos, which provided the images of the superbolide as well as acoustic records of the sonic booms. From these data, the bolide trajectory, velocity, deceleration, and lightcurve have been derived after careful calibration and analysis. Such detailed data are not available for any other impactor larger than about 5 meters. The Chelyabinsk event represents therefore a unique opportunity to study the interaction of asteroids in the decameter size range through the terrestrial atmosphere. In comparison with our previous study [1], we used more calibrated videos in this work. We will present the refined trajectory, velocity, and orbit but will mainly concentrate on the atmospheric fragmentation analysis. The extent of the dust trail up to the heights of 70 km demonstrates that significant mass loss occurred from the early parts of the luminous trajectory. Nevertheless, no flare was seen on the early portion of the lightcurve, suggesting that no sudden disruption occurred here and the mass was probably being lost from the asteroid surface. The first break-up occurred at the height of about 47 km. The large scale disruption, documented both by the lightcurve and sonic booms, occurred between the heights of 39--30 km. The fragmentation then ceased temporarily, but a number of surviving meter-sized boulders fragmented extensively again below 26 km. We will present a fragmentation model fitting both the observed lightcurve and deceleration. At lower heights, the deceleration of several individual fragments could be measured. The transverse speed of the major fragment was 400 m/s, much larger than expected, but of the same order of magnitude as observed in other cases including a sample of tiny meteoroids [4]. The unique aspect of Chelyabinsk was the formation of an extended dust trail

  10. Projectile Motion Without Trigonometric Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz; Kohneh, Zahra A.

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we provide a treatment of projectile motion that is accessible to students who are unfamiliar with trigonometry but do have a minimal knowledge of elementary algebra and know the Pythagorean theorem. In this approach, we view the initial velocity of the projectile as being a combination of a vertical part (component) v0V and a horizontal component v0H (see Fig. 1). This is in contrast to the usual approach of taking the initial speed v0 and the launch angle as being given. We let the initial position be the origin and neglect air drag. Assuming that the constant acceleration kinematics equations are known, we may write vH = v0H, and the horizontal distance traveled is x = v0H t, where t is the elapsed time. We also have vV = v0V - gt, where g is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. And the vertical displacement is y = v0V t - ½ gt2. These equations may be used to find the location and velocity of the projectile at any time t. We can also find the equation of the path of the projectile by combining Eq. [1(b)] and Eq. [2(b)] to get y = -(g/2v0H2)x2 + (v0V/v0H) x, which is the equation of a concave-down parabola.

  11. Multiple impacts of dusty projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Güttler, Carsten; Blum, Jurgen

    In the context of early stages of planetesimal formation we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small dust-aggregate projectiles into solid sintered dust targets. Both collision partners consisted of 1.5 µm monodisperse spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 (projectiles) and 0.35 (targets), respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid accelerator with a linear projectile magazine, which enabled us to perform 25 impacts within 4.5 s of microgravity time in the Bremen drop tower. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency for different impact velocities between 3 and 5 m s-1 , using an analytical balance and imaging methods. Furthermore, we observed random collisions among small dust aggregates with sizes around 1 mm and collision velocities of the order of 0.25 m s-1 and used them to improve the dust-aggregate collision model of Güttler et al. (2010). u

  12. Projectile-generating explosive access tool

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos; Hughs, Chance G; Todd, Steven N

    2013-06-11

    A method for generating a projectile using an explosive device that can generate a projectile from the opposite side of a wall from the side where the explosive device is detonated. The projectile can be generated without breaching the wall of the structure or container. The device can optionally open an aperture in a solid wall of a structure or a container and form a high-kinetic-energy projectile from the portion of the wall removed to create the aperture.

  13. Influence of giant impactors on the terrestrial core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, G.-P.; Golabek, G. J.; Gerya, T. V.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge about the mechanism of terrestrial core formation is still poorly understood. Current thinking indicates the importance of giant impacts [e.g. Tonks and Melosh, 1993; Rubie et al., 2003] on this process. However it is not clear whether the impactors will be emulsified [Rubie et al., 2003] or will penetrate on a short timescale to the center of the planet [Dahl, 2005; Stevenson, 2008]. In our model we explore the implications of the second mechanism as until now most numerical models of core formation neglected giant impactors. We perform 2D cylindrical simulations using the code I2ELVIS applying the newly developed "spherical-Cartesian" methodology [Gerya and Yuen, 2007]. The code combines finite differences on a fully staggered rectangular Eulerian grid and Lagrangian marker-in-cell technique for solving momentum, continuity and temperature equations as well as the Poisson equation for gravity potential in a self-gravitating planetary body. In the model the planet is surrounded by a low viscosity, massless fluid ("sticky air") to simulate a free surface [Schmeling et al., 2008]. We apply a temperature- and stress-dependent viscoplastic rheology inside planets ranging from Mars- to Earth-size and include heat release due to radioactive decay, shear and adiabatic heating. As initial condition we use randomly distributed iron diapirs with random sizes in the range 50 to 100 km radius inside the accreting planet, which represent the iron delivered by predifferentiated impactors. Additionally we add a giant impactor into the model. For simplicity we neglect the heating of the planet by the impact itself. Additionally we assume the impactor to be at rest at the beginning of the simulation. A systematic investigation of the influence of giant impactors with varying radius on different-sized planets is being performed. Results indicate that for Mars-sized bodies a giant impactor can induce due to shear heating effects a runaway differentiation process limited to

  14. Having Fun with a 3-D Projectile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammi, Matthew; Greenhalgh, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The use of projectiles is a concept familiar to most students, whether it is a classic slingshot, bow and arrow, or even a spit wad through a straw. Perhaps the last thing a teacher wants is more projectiles in the classroom. However, the concept of projectiles is relevant to most students and may provide a means of bringing more authenticity into…

  15. Analysis of cascade impactor mass distributions.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Craig; Mitchell, Jolyon

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the approaches for analyzing cascade impactor (CI) mass distributions produced by pulmonary drug products and the considerations necessary for selecting the appropriate analysis procedure. There are several methods available for analyzing CI data, yielding a hierarchy of information in terms of nominal, ordinal and continuous variables. Mass distributions analyzed as a nominal function of the stages and auxiliary components is the simplest approach for examining the whole mass emitted by the inhaler. However, the relationship between the mass distribution and aerodynamic diameter is not described by such data. This relationship is a critical attribute of pulmonary drug products due to the association between aerodynamic diameter and the mass of particulates deposited to the respiratory tract. Therefore, the nominal mass distribution can only be utilized to make decisions on the discrete masses collected in the CI. Mass distributions analyzed as an ordinal function of aerodynamic diameter can be obtained by introducing the stage size range, which generally vary in magnitude from one stage to another for a given type of CI, and differ between CIs of different designs. Furthermore, the mass collected by specific size ranges within the CI are often incorrectly used to estimate in vivo deposition at various regions of the respiratory tract. A CI-generated mass distribution can be directly related to aerodynamic diameter by expressing the mass collected by each size-fractionating stage in terms of either mass frequency or cumulative mass fraction less than the aerodynamic size appropriate to each stage. Analysis of the aerodynamic diameter as a continuous variable allows comparison of mass distributions obtained from different products, obtained by different CI designs, as well as providing input to in vivo particle deposition models. The lack of information about the mass fraction emitted by the inhaler that is not size-analyzed by

  16. Characteristics of a cascade impactor under specific conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, H.; Masuda, H.; Iinoya, K.

    1983-01-01

    If a dust current is blown out of a nozzle and collides with a flat plate, particles larger than a certain dimension will collide with and be captured by the flat plate, and particles smaller than that will entrain an air current and go astray without colliding with the flat plate. It is therefore possible to measure particle size distribution with the use of a set of impactors, each consisting of a nozzle for classifying a smaller particle size and a flat plate. However, this measurement of size distribution of almost monodispersed particles with an impactor differs from true particle size distribution, because particle size classification does not change rapidly from 0 to 1. The magnitude of theoretical errors in the measurement of size distribution of almost monodispersed particles with impactors, experiments relating to maximum suction flow rate, and a variation in the theoretical diameter of a particle which is collected with a 50% accuracy measured with impactors at high altitude (low temperature and pressure) are presented. It is assumed that the impactors are free from rescattering, rebound, and wall losses.

  17. Differential impact cratering of Saturn's satellites by heliocentric impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Naoyuki

    2016-02-01

    Saturnian satellites are thought to have been struck by two different types of impactors: those with heliocentric origins and those with planetocentric origins. Many of the impacts are suggested to come from planetocentric debris, while many crater count studies assume an ecliptic comet origin when determining the ages of the surfaces. To assess the contribution of planetocentric impactors, this study examines the global distribution and apex-antapex asymmetry of impact craters on Rhea and Iapetus. The results demonstrate that the craters of Rhea (more than 20 km in diameter) and Iapetus (more than 30 km in diameter) show an apex-antapex asymmetry. This suggests that most of the large craters are formed from heliocentric impacts. In contrast, the craters less than 20 km in diameter seem to show no asymmetry. Possible explanations for this are either planetocentric impactor origins or saturation with impact craters.

  18. A space mission to detect imminent Earth impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, G. B.; Perozzi, E.; Rossi, A.

    2015-03-01

    One of the goals of NEO surveys is to discover Earth impactors before they hit. How much warning time is desirable depends on the size of the impactors: for the larger ones more time is needed to mount effective mitigation measures. Initially, NEO surveys were aimed at large impactors, that can have significant global effects; however, their typical time scale is orders of magnitude larger than human lifetime. At the other extreme, monthly and annual events, liberating energies of the order of 1 to 10 kilotons, are immaterial as a threat to mankind, not justifying substantial expenditure on them. Intermediate events are of more concern: in the megatons range, timescales are of the order of centuries, and the damage can be substantial. A classical example is the Tunguska event, in which a body with a diameter of about 30 to 50 m liberated about 5 megatons in the atmosphere, devastating 2 000 square kilometers of Siberian forest.

  19. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  20. Wind-influenced projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, Reginald Christian; Perico Esguerra, Jose; Day Vallejos, Jazmine; Jerard Canda, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    We solved the wind-influenced projectile motion problem with the same initial and final heights and obtained exact analytical expressions for the shape of the trajectory, range, maximum height, time of flight, time of ascent, and time of descent with the help of the Lambert W function. It turns out that the range and maximum horizontal displacement are not always equal. When launched at a critical angle, the projectile will return to its starting position. It turns out that a launch angle of 90° maximizes the time of flight, time of ascent, time of descent, and maximum height and that the launch angle corresponding to maximum range can be obtained by solving a transcendental equation. Finally, we expressed in a parametric equation the locus of points corresponding to maximum heights for projectiles launched from the ground with the same initial speed in all directions. We used the results to estimate how much a moderate wind can modify a golf ball’s range and suggested other possible applications.

  1. The impactor flux in the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    Current impact rates of comets on Pluto and Charon are estimated. It is shown that the dominant sources of impactors are comets from the Kuiper belt and the inner Oort cloud, each of whose perihelion distribution extends across Pluto's orbit. In contrast, long-period comets from the outer Oort cloud are a negligible source of impactors. The total predicted number of craters is not sufficient to saturate the surface areas of either Pluto of Charon over the age of the Solar System. However, heavy cratering may have occurred early in the Solar System's history during clearing of planetesimals from the outer planets' zone.

  2. Craters in aluminum 1100 targets using glass projectiles at 1-7 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Hoerz, F.; Cintala, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    We report on impact experiments using soda-lime glass spheres of 3.2 mm diameter and aluminum targets (1100 series). The purpose is to assist in the interpretation of LDEF instruments and in the development of future cosmic-dust collectors in low-Earth orbit. Because such instruments demand understanding of both the cratering and penetration process, we typically employ targets with thicknesses that range from massive, infinite half-space targets, to ultrathin films. This report addresses a subset of cratering experiments that were conducted to fine-tune our understanding of crater morphology as a function of impact velocity. Also, little empirical insight exists about the physical distribution and shock-metamorphism of the impactor residues as a function of encounter speed, despite their recognized significance in the analysis of space-exposed surfaces. Soda-lime glass spheres were chosen as a reasonable analog to extraterrestrial silicates, and aluminum 1100 was chosen for targets, which among the common Al-alloys, best represents the physical properties of high-purity aluminum. These materials complement existing impact studies that typically employed metallic impactors and less ductile Al-alloys. We have completed dimensional analyses of the resulting craters and are in the process of investigating the detailed distribution of the unmelted and melted impactor residues via SEM methods, as well as potential compositional modifications of the projectile melts via electron microprobe.

  3. Use of a New Portable Instrumented Impactor on the NASA Composite Crew Module Damage Tolerance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Polis, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Damage tolerance performance is critical to composite structures because surface impacts at relatively low energies may result in a significant strength loss. For certification, damage tolerance criteria require aerospace vehicles to meet design loads while containing damage at critical locations. Data from standard small coupon testing are difficult to apply to larger more complex structures. Due to the complexity of predicting both the impact damage and the residual properties, damage tolerance is demonstrated primarily by testing. A portable, spring-propelled, impact device was developed which allows the impact damage response to be investigated on large specimens, full-scale components, or entire vehicles. During impact, both the force history and projectile velocity are captured. The device was successfully used to demonstrate the damage tolerance performance of the NASA Composite Crew Module. The impactor was used to impact 18 different design features at impact energies up to 35 J. Detailed examples of these results are presented, showing impact force histories, damage inspection results, and response to loading.

  4. Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Chu, Henry S.; Novascone, Stephen R.

    2011-11-15

    Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

  5. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  10. Experimental Characterization of Microfabricated VirtualImpactor Efficiency

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air-Microfluidics Group is developing a microelectromechanical systems-based direct reading particulate matter (PM) mass sensor. The sensor consists of two main components: a microfabricated virtual impactor (VI) and a PM mass sensor. The VI leverages particle inertia to sepa...

  11. EFFECTS OF CHARGED PARTICLES ON CASCADE IMPACTOR CALIBRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a determination of collection characteristics for charged and uncharged particles in cascade impactors. Impaction collection efficiency was shown to be as much as 20 percent greater for charged particles than for uncharged particles with certain substr...

  12. HIGH VOLUME VIRTUAL IMPACTOR FOR SAMPLING FINE AND COARSE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Final design, calibration, and field testing have been completed for a new 1.3 m3/min (40 cfm) High-Volume Virtual Impactor (HVVI). ield tests have demonstrated that the new classifier/collector works well as an accessory to the existing PM10 Size Selective Inlet high-volume samp...

  13. Particle impactor assembly for size selective high volume air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Langer, Gerhard

    1988-08-16

    Air containing entrained particulate matter is directed through a plurality of parallel, narrow, vertically oriented impactor slots of an inlet element toward an adjacently located, relatively large, dust impaction surface preferably covered with an adhesive material. The air flow turns over the impaction surface, leaving behind the relatively larger particles according to the human thoracic separation system and passes through two elongate exhaust apertures defining the outer bounds of the impaction collection surface to pass through divergent passages which slow down and distribute the air flow, with entrained smaller particles, over a fine filter element that separates the fine particles from the air. The elongate exhaust apertures defining the impaction collection surface are spaced apart by a distance greater than the lengths of elongate impactor slots in the inlet element and are oriented to be normal thereto. By appropriate selection of dimensions and the number of impactor slots air flow through the inlet element is provided a nonuniform velocity distribution with the lower velocities being obtained near the center of the impactor slots, in order to separate out particles larger than a certain predetermined size on the impaction collection surface. The impaction collection surface, even in a moderately sized apparatus, is thus relatively large and permits the prolonged sampling of air for periods extending to four weeks.

  14. INERTIAL CASCADE IMPACTOR SUBSTRATE MEDIA FOR FLUE GAS SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes Southern Research Institute's experience with greases and glass fiber filter material used as collection substrates in inertial cascade impactors. Available greases and glass fiber filter media have been tested to determine which are most suitable for flue g...

  15. Projectile-generating explosive access tool

    DOEpatents

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos; Todd, Steven N.

    2011-10-18

    An explosive device that can generate a projectile from the opposite side of a wall from the side where the explosive device is detonated. The projectile can be generated without breaching the wall of the structure or container. The device can optionally open an aperture in a solid wall of a structure or a container and form a high-kinetic-energy projectile from the portion of the wall removed to create the aperture.

  16. Projectile Motion Gets the Hose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Liyanage, Chinthaka

    2011-10-01

    Students take a weekly quiz in our introductory physics course. During the week in which material focused on projectile motion, we not-so-subtly suggested what problem the students would see on the quiz. The quiz problem was an almost exact replica of a homework problem we worked through in the class preceding the quiz. The goal of the problem is to find the launch speed if the final horizontal and vertical positions and launch angle are given. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the trajectory.

  17. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaneets, Roman Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force is due to the protons.

  18. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2002-01-09

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant considered for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development experiments and the development of the electric launch system design.

  19. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susoeff, A. R.; Hawke, R. S.; Ang, J. A.; Asay, J. R.; Hall, C. A.; Konrad, C. H.; Sauve, G. L.

    1992-03-01

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experimentation at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  20. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Sauve, G.L.; Konrad, C.H.; Hickman, R.J.

    1991-02-01

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experience at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  1. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S. ); Ang, J.A.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H. ); Sauve, G.L. . Rocky Flats Plant); Hickman, R.J. )

    1992-03-20

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experiment at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  2. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2002-10-12

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant investigated for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the progress made in the program during the past quarter. It reports on projectile development and the development of the electric launch system design.

  3. INVERTING CASCADE IMPACTOR DATA FOR SIZE-RESOLVED CHARACTERIZATION OF FINE PARTICULATE SOURCE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cascade impactors are particularly useful in determining the mass size distributions of particulate and individual chemical species. The impactor raw data must be inverted to reconstruct a continuous particle size distribution. An inversion method using a lognormal function for p...

  4. Aerosol sampling: Comparison of two rotating impactors for field droplet sizing and volumetric measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper compares the collection characteristics of a new rotating impactor for ultra fine aerosols (FLB) with the industry standard (Hock). The volume and droplet size distribution collected by the rotating impactors were measured via spectroscopy and microscopy. The rotary impactors were co-lo...

  5. Re-accretion Efficiencies in Small Impactor - Large Target Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Tim; Wurm, G.; Jens, T.

    2013-10-01

    During the formation process of planets, small dust particles grow to km-sized planetesimals via collisions. While the collision partners are equally sized in early phases, fragmentation, catastrophic destruction and other recycling processes can lead to collisions between partners with various size ranges. The gas in protoplanetary disks exerts size- and mass-dependent drag forces on the dust particles and bodies present which is why the relative velocities between the small particles and larger bodies increase. A field of investigation are the small-impactor large-target collisions where (partial) erosion can occur and small ejected dust particles can be produced. These ejecta can couple to the gas quite rapidly and can then be recaptured by the target and stick to it in secondary collisions. We use a Monte-Carlo code to calculate re-accretion efficiencies under certain conditions i.e. in free molecular flow regime (stream lines end on target body; impactors are completely coupled to the gas). Using experimental data we developed a model for the amount, masses, directions, and velocities of the ejecta depending on the impactor mass and velocity and the position of impact. The amount of re-accreted ejecta as well as the total re-accreted mass can be determined by using the solution of the equation of motion for particles in gaseous environments. Both - the amount dependent efficiency as well as the mass dependent efficiency - are highly dependent on the seven free parameters (impact velocity, impactor size and density, target size and density, gas pressure and temperature) but generally benefit from high gas velocities and a large size difference between target and impactor. Our final intention is to provide an analytical expression for the re-accretion efficiencies in respect to the free parameters and to use this in different disk models for sweeping the free parameters dependent on the distance to the central star. One major advantage of our code is the

  6. Aerodynamic flail for a spinning projectile

    DOEpatents

    Cole, James K.

    1990-05-01

    A flail is provided which reduces the spin of a projectile in a recovery system which includes a parachute, a cable connected to the parachute, a swivel, and means for connecting the swivel to the projectile. The flail includes a plurality of flexible filaments and a rotor for attaching the filaments to the front end of the projectile. The rotor is located radially with respect to the spinning axis of the projectile. In one embodiment, the projectile includes a first nose cone section housing a deployable spin damping assembly; a second nose cone section, housing a deployable parachute assembly; a shell section, supporting the first and second nose cone sections during flight of the projectile; a mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second cone section; and a mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section. In operation of this embodiment, the deployable spin damping assembly deploys during flight of the projectile when the mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second nose cone section are actuated. Then, upon actuation of the mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section, two things happen: the spin damping assembly separates from the projectile; and the deployable parachute assembly is deployed.

  7. Aerodynamic flail for a spinning projectile

    DOEpatents

    Cole, James K.

    1990-01-01

    A flail is provided which reduces the spin of a projectile in a recovery system which includes a parachute, a cable connected to the parachute, a swivel, and means for connecting the swivel to the projectile. The flail includes a plurality of flexible filaments and a rotor for attaching the filaments to the front end of the projectile. The rotor is located radially with respect to the spinning axis of the projectile. In one embodiment, the projectile includes a first nose cone section housing a deployable spin damping assembly; a second nose cone section, housing a deployable parachute assembly; a shell section, supporting the first and second nose cone sections during flight of the projectile; a mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second cone section; and a mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section. In operation of this embodiment, the deployable spin damping assembly deploys during flight of the projectile when the mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second nose cone section are actuated. Then, upon actuation of the mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section, two things happen: the spin damping assembly separates from the projectile; and the deployable parachute assembly is deployed.

  8. Graphical Method for Determining Projectile Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. C.; Baker, J. C.; Franzel, L.; McMahon, D.; Songer, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a nontrigonometric graphical method for predicting the trajectory of a projectile when the angle and initial velocity are known. Students enrolled in a general education conceptual physics course typically have weak backgrounds in trigonometry, making inaccessible the standard analytical calculation of projectile range. Furthermore,…

  9. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  10. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-10-12

    The hypothesis to be tested is that the addition of steel or other synthetic fiber and/or high strength, low cost aggregate to strong grouts or concrete will result in a projectile of sufficient strength to produce cracking and spall enough to make its use cost effective for mining. Based on experiments conducted to date, no conclusions can yet be reached. Results of the experiments conducted suggest that reinforcement of a concrete projectile can yield performance that portends cost effective projectile based excavation. It is recognized that the projectile is but one component of the matrix. The electric launch system to be developed in the next phase of the program is the other factor that weighs heavily in the cost effectiveness equation. At this point, however, emerging low cost options for the projectile are very promising.

  11. Sampling at controlled relative humidity with a cascade impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliou, Joseph G.; Sorensen, Diana; McMurry, Peter H.

    The design and function of a device that regulates the relative humidity of an ambient aerosol sample is described. We use this RH controller upstream of MOUDI impactors to permit sampling at relative humidities in the 70-80% range. Humidity control is achieved by allowing the aerosol to approach equilibrium with a saturated salt solution. Benefits to sampling with impactors in this relative humidity range include greatly reduced bounce of fine, hygroscopic particles, minimal flow-induced sizing errors, and minimization of uncertainties in measured size distributions due to diurnal variations in relative humidity during sampling. Data from field measurements in a humid environment (Look Rock, TN) and arid environments (Las Vegas, NV and Meadview, AZ) are discussed.

  12. Analysis of portable impactor performance for enumeration of viable bioaerosols.

    PubMed

    Yao, Maosheng; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2007-07-01

    Portable impactors are increasingly being used to estimate concentration of bioaerosols in residential and occupational environments; however, little data are available about their performance. This study investigated the overall performances of the SMA MicroPortable, BioCulture, Microflow, Microbiological Air Sampler (MAS-100), Millipore Air Tester, SAS Super 180, and RCS High Flow portable microbial samplers when collecting bacteria and fungi both indoors and outdoors. The performance of these samplers was compared with that of the BioStage impactor. The Button Aerosol Sampler equipped with gelatin filter was also included in the study. Results showed that the sampling environment can have a statistically significant effect on sampler performance, most likely due to the differences in airborne microorganism composition and/or their size distribution. Data analysis using analysis of variance showed that the relative performance of all samplers (except the RCS High Flow and MAS-100) was statistically different (lower) compared with the BioStage. The MAS-100 also had statistically higher performance compared with other portable samplers except the RCS High Flow. The Millipore Air Tester and the SMA had the lowest performances. The relative performance of the impactors was described using a multiple linear regression model (R(2) = 0.83); the effects of the samplers' cutoff sizes and jet-to-plate distances as predictor variables were statistically significant. The data presented in this study will help field professionals in selecting bioaerosol samplers. The developed empirical formula describing the overall performance of bioaerosol impactors can assist in sampler design. PMID:17538812

  13. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  14. Multi-shock assembly for protecting a spacecraft surface from hypervelocity impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Bruce D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield assembly for protecting a spacecraft surface from hypervelocity impactors. The shield assembly includes at least one sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer of hypervelocity impactor disrupting/shocking material. A primary spacing element, including space-rated open cell foam material, is positioned between the at least one sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer and a spacecraft surface. A cover member is arranged and disposed relative to the sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer and the primary spacing element to maintain the integrity of the hypervelocity impact shield assembly. In the event of exposure to a hypervelocity impactor, the sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer is perforated while shocking the impactor breaking it into fragments, and/or melting it, and/or vaporizing it, thus providing a dispersion in the form of an expanding debris cloud/plume which spreads the impact energy of the impactor over a volume formed by the primary spacing element between the sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer and the spacecraft surface. This significantly reduces impact lethality at the spacecraft surface. The space-rated open cell foam material provides an extremely lightweight, low-cost, efficient means of spacing and supporting the at least one sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer before, during, and after launch. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is in the form of a multi-shock assembly including a plurality of sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layers. In such instance, the hypervelocity impact shield assembly includes a plurality of secondary spacing elements. Each secondary spacing element is positioned adjacent an associated sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layer to form a multi-shock subassembly. Thus, a plurality of multi-shock subassemblies are provided which include alternating layers of sacrificial impactor disrupting/shocking layers and secondary spacing

  15. Projectile channeling in chain bundle dusty plasma liquids: Wave excitation and projectile-wave interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Tseng, Yu-Ping; I, Lin

    2011-03-15

    The microscopic channeling dynamics of projectiles in subexcitable chain bundle dusty plasma liquids consisting of long chains of negatively charged dusts suspended in low pressure glow discharges is investigated experimentally using fast video-microscopy. The long distance channeling of the projectile in the channel formed by the surrounding dust chain bundles and the excitation of a narrow wake associated with the elliptical motions of the background dusts are demonstrated. In the high projectile speed regime, the drag force due to wake wave excitation increases with the decreasing projectile speed. The excited wave then leads the slowed down projectile after the projectile speed is decreased below the resonant speed of wave excitation. The wave-projectile interaction causes the increasing projectile drag below the resonant speed and the subsequent oscillation around a descending average level, until the projectile settles down to the equilibrium point. Long distance projectile surfing through the resonant crest trapping by the externally excited large amplitude solitary wave is also demonstrated.

  16. Projectile dynamics at low barrel pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chankaev, S. K.; Yakovlev, V. Ya.

    2007-11-01

    A mathematical model for a projectile shot at low pressures in the space behind the projectile space is developed. The pressure rise is limited because of the nonsimultaneity of propellant ignition and combustion and the discharge of the propellant combustion products through the gap between the projectile and the walls of the gun barrel. The kinetic characteristics of flame propagation over the propellant particles are determined. A comparison of calculation and experimental data is performed. The calculation results are used in designing 2A85 self-propelled launchers and upgrading 2A30 self-propelled launchers.

  17. Effects of barrel joints on hypervelocity projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.; Asay, J.R.; Dixon, W.R.; Hawke, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Development of new hypervelocity launchers is necessary for equation of state (EOS) studies at high impact velocities. The requirements for barrel joint alignment and concentricity at high velocities place severe constraints on fabrication and assembly procedures; small steps or longitudinal direction changes at joints may cause major damage to precision projectiles. Research has been initiated to identify the technical limits of fabrication and assembly tolerances for hypervelocity gun barrels. Numerical and experimental studies have evaluated projectile performance at velocities of 6 to 15 km/s and have identified failure modes for Lexan projectiles with thin metal facings.

  18. Electromagnetic theta gun and tubular projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, T.J.; Cnare, E.C.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Beard, S.G.; Cowan, M.

    1980-12-01

    Unlike the better known rail gun, the theta gun applies the propelling force along the length of its projectile. This is shown to allow much greater acceleration of high fineness ratio projectiles for a given barrel pressure, allowing much shorter barrels for military applications. A computer code which simulates performance of the theta gun is described and experimental results from a few simple, low energy experiments show close agreement with code predictions. Trajectories and aerodynamic heating for three candidate military projectiles are calculated for vertical and horizontal atmospheric launches where initial velocity is as high as 3 km/s. The calculations indicate that in some cases a thin layer of heatshield (ablator) will be required to control projectile heating.

  19. Hypervelocity High Speed Projectile Imagery and Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains video showing the results of hypervelocity impact. One is showing a projectile impact on a Kevlar wrapped Aluminum bottle containing 3000 psi gaseous oxygen. One video show animations of a two stage light gas gun.

  20. REDUCED ENERGY CONSUMPTION THROUGH PROJECTILE BASED EXCAVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Machina

    2003-06-06

    The Projectile Based Excavation (ProjEX) program has as its goal, the reduction of energy required for production mining and secondary breakage through the use of a projectile based excavation system. It depends on the development of a low cost family of projectiles that will penetrate and break up different types of ore/rock and a low cost electric launch system. The electric launch system will eliminate the need for high cost propellant considered for similar concepts in the past. This document reports on the program findings through the first two phases. It presents projectile design and experiment data and the preliminary design for electric launch system. Advanced Power Technologies, Inc., now BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technologies, Inc., was forced to withdraw from the program with the loss of one of our principal mining partners, however, the experiments conducted suggest that the approach is feasible and can be made cost effective.

  1. Graphical Method for Determining Projectile Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Baker, J. C.; Franzel, L.; McMahon, D.; Songer, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present a nontrigonometric graphical method for predicting the trajectory of a projectile when the angle and initial velocity are known. Students enrolled in a general education conceptual physics course typically have weak backgrounds in trigonometry, making inaccessible the standard analytical calculation of projectile range. Furthermore, research shows that standard instructional techniques fail to confront student misconceptions about motion in a gravitational field.1-4 We have designed a guided inquiry-based lesson that specifically addresses these misconceptions with minimal mathematics.

  2. Elastic scattering with weakly bound projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Abriola, D.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Marti, G. V.; Martinez Heinmann, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Testoni, J. E.; Barbara, E. de; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2007-02-12

    Possible effects of the break-up channel on the elastic scattering threshold anomaly has been investigated. We used the weakly bound 6,7Li nuclei, which is known to undergo break-up, as projectiles in order to study the elastic scattering on a 27Al target. In this contribution we present preliminary results of these experiments, which were analyzed in terms of the Optical Model and compared with other elastic scattering data using weakly bound nuclei as projectile.

  3. Projectile compositions and modal frequencies on the chemistry of micrometeoroids LDEF experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; See, Thomas H.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1993-01-01

    The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids Experiment (LDEF instrument A0187-1) exposed witness plates of high-purity gold (greater than 99.99 percent Au) and commercial aluminum (greater than 99 percent Al) with the objective of analyzing the residues of cosmic-dust and orbital-debris particles associated with hypervelocity impact craters. The gold substrates were located approximately 8 deg off LDEF's trailing edge (Bay A03), while the aluminum surfaces resided in Bay A11, approximately 52 deg from LDEF's leading edge. SEM-EDX techniques were employed to analyze the residues associated with 199 impacts on the gold and 415 impacts on the aluminum surfaces. The residues that could be analyzed represent natural or man-made materials. The natural particles dominate at all particle sizes less than 5 micron. It is possible to subdivide both particle populations into subclasses. Chondritic compositions dominate the natural impactors (71 percent), followed by monomineralic, mafic-silicate compositions (26 percent), and by Fe-Ni rich sulfides (approximately 3 percent). Approximately 30 percent of all craters on the gold collectors were caused by man-made debris such as aluminum, paint flakes, and other disintegrated, structural and electronic components. Equations-of-state and associated calculations of shock stresses for typical LDEF impacts into the gold and aluminum substrates suggest that substantial vaporization may have occurred during many of the impacts and is the reason why approximately 50 percent of all craters did not contain sufficient residue to permit analysis by the SEM-EDX technique. After converting the crater diameters into projectile sizes using encounter speeds typical for the trailing-edge and forward-facing (Row 11) directions, and accounting for normalized exposure conditions of the CME collectors, we derived the absolute and relative fluxes of specific projectile classes. The natural impactors encounter all LDEF pointing directions with comparable, modal

  4. Orbital and Physical Characteristics of Meter-sized Earth Impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter G.; Wiegert, Paul; Clark, David; Tagliaferri, Edward

    2015-11-01

    We have analysed the orbits and ablation characteristics in the atmosphere of more than 60 earth-impacting meteoroids of one meter in diameter or larger. Using heights at peak luminosity as a proxy for strength, we find that there is roughly an order of magnitude spread in the apparent strength of the population of meter-sized impactors at the Earth. The orbits and physical strength of these objects are consistent with the majority being asteroidal bodies originating from the inner main asteroid belt. We find ~10-15% of our objects have a probable cometary (Jupiter-Family comet and/or Halley-type comet) origin based on orbital characteristics alone. Only half this number, however, show evidence for the expected weaker than average structure compared to asteroidal bodies. Almost all impactors show peak brightness between 20-40 km altitude. Several events have exceptionally high (relative to the remainder of the population) heights of peak brightness. These are physically most consistent with high microporosity objects, though all were on asteroidal-type orbits. We also find three events, including the Oct 8, 2009 airburst near Sulawesi, Indonesia, which display comparatively low heights of peak brightness, consistent with strong monolithic stones or iron meteoroids. Based on orbital similarity, we find a probable connection among several NEOs in our population with the Taurid meteoroid complex. No other major meteoroid streams show linkages with the pre-atmospheric orbits of our meter-class impactors. Our events cover almost four orders of magnitude in mass, but no trend in height of peak brightness is evident, suggesting no strong trend in strength with size for small NEOs, a finding consistent with the results of Popova et al (2011).

  5. Craters on Pluto and Charon: Characteristics and Impactor Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Kelsi N.; Schenk, Paul M.; Robbins, Stuart J.; Bray, Veronica J.; McKinnon, William B.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Howett, Carly J. A.; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Beyer, Ross; Parker, Alex H.; Porter, Simon B.; Zangari, Amanda M.; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Although both Pluto and Charon have a surprising number of young-looking surfaces, there are still plenty of craters for impact-phenomenon enthusiasts. We will present size, morphology, ejecta, and albedo pattern statistics, in addition to correlations with color/composition where possible. We use images and topography from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI; Cheng et al., 2008, SSR 140, 189-215) and data from the Ralph (Reuter et al., 2008, SSR 140, 129-154) color/composition instruments.Impactor sizes will be estimated from relevant scaling laws for cold water ice (see details in Singer and Stern, 2015, ApJL 808, L50). For Pluto, an image strip at 125 m px-1 includes some cratered terrains, and much of the encounter hemisphere (the anti-Charon hemisphere) will be covered at ~400 m px-1. The ~smallest craters observable at these pixel scales (using a 5 pixel limit) would be ~0.63 km, and ~2 km in diameter, respectively, with impactor diameters estimated at ~50 m, and ~200 m. However, it is likely that degradation processes may obscure small craters, thus this lower observation limit will depend on terrain type. Additionally, lighting and observation geometries vary across the disk, which may make crater detection difficult in some areas. All of the illuminated portions of Pluto (during its 6.4 day rotation period) were imaged at ~20 km px-1 or better during the encounter. The highest resolution images of Pluto (at ~80 m px-1) occur in a narrow strip and are not scheduled for downlink before the DPS.The highest resolution Charon coverage (a strip at ~160 m px-1), a broader swath at 400 m px-1, and the entire encounter hemisphere (the sub-Pluto hemisphere) at ~890 m px-1 may yield craters as small as 0.8, 2, and 4.5 km in diameter, respectively. The inferred impactor sizes for these craters would be ~50 m, 160 m, and 440 m.Although the dataset is limited, we will discuss what constraints can be put on the impactor population. This work was supported by the

  6. Earth impactors: threat analysis and multistage intervention mission architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy; Fevig, Ronald A.

    2012-06-01

    Earth impactors (EIs) pose a significant threat. Upon EI detection, a response mission is required. The proposed architecture is suitable for responding to 75% of EIs. For rapid response, the reconnaissance and the tactical nuclear intervener craft are launched in close succession. The extended response timeframe allows collected data analysis before launching an intervener craft to slowly shift the EI's orbit. A small spacecraft equipped with a radio science package, visual camera, multi-spectral imager, LIDAR and, optionally, a radar tomography sensor will be used for reconnaissance. Sensor tasking and control will be autonomous based on controller-supplied objectives.

  7. The origin of planetary impactors in the inner solar system.

    PubMed

    Strom, Robert G; Malhotra, Renu; Ito, Takashi; Yoshida, Fumi; Kring, David A

    2005-09-16

    Insights into the history of the inner solar system can be derived from the impact cratering record of the Moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury and from the size distributions of asteroid populations. Old craters from a unique period of heavy bombardment that ended approximately 3.8 billion years ago were made by asteroids that were dynamically ejected from the main asteroid belt, possibly due to the orbital migration of the giant planets. The impactors of the past approximately 3.8 billion years have a size distribution quite different from that of the main belt asteroids but very similar to that of near-Earth asteroids. PMID:16166515

  8. Nonideal collection characteristics of a cascade impactor with various collection substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.B.; Newton, G.J.; Yeh, H.C.

    1982-09-01

    A series of collection substrates was used to evaluate the dependence of collection efficiency on substrate type on one stage of a seven-stage cascade impactor. Data obtained were used to determine which substrates yielded the best collection characteristics for cascade impactors. Stainless steel, silver membrane filters, and cellulose acetate membrane filters as cascade impactor collection substrates showed stage collection characteristics that closely fit theoretical predictions. Fiber-type substrates showed the most deviation from the theoretical efficiency curve.

  9. Calibration and evaluation of a real-time cascade impactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, C.I.; Wheat, L.D.

    1984-04-01

    A 10-stage cascade impactor made by California Measurement Inc., can determine aerodynamic size distributions of dilute aerosols in a few minutes. Collection of impacted particles on greased, vibrating piezoelectric crystals produces changes in vibrational frequency proportional to the collected mass. Based on frequency changes and sampling time, a data reduction module calculates the mass collected on each stage. Calibration of the assembled impactor was performed with monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) and Eosin-Y (E-Y) aerosols for the lower stages (4-10), and PSL and pollen particles (ragweed and mulberry) for the upper stages (1-3). The stage experimental effective cutoff aerodynamic diameters (ECAD) were up to 22 percent different from theoretical ECADs with the exception of Stages 1 and 2 which were respectively 30 and 35 percent different from theoretical ECADs. The overall loss of particles > 3- and < 0.3-..mu..m was severe. Also, considerable scatter of particles was observed on the collection crystals of Stages 1 and 2. Although a majority of particles were in the impaction area, a large fraction was scattered over the outer portions of these crystals.

  10. The dynamics of impactors on a synchronous planetary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Alessi, Elisa Maria; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    We have applied the extension of Opik's theory of close encounters by Valsecchi et al. (2003) to the case of a satellite in a circular orbit about a planet that, in turn, is in a circular orbit about the Sun, with the further assumption that the plane of the planetocentric orbit of the satellite is the same as that of the heliocentric orbit of the planet.The goal is to understand the effects on the satellite surface of the cratering caused by impacts due to a population of small bodies on planet-crossing, inclined orbits.With this setup, we have computed analytically the velocity and the elongation from the apex of the bodies impacting the satellite, as simple functions of the heliocentric orbital elements of the impactor and of the longitude of the satellite at impact (Valsecchi et al. 2014).In the present work, we delve deeper into the dynamics of the impactors, taking into account the gravitational deflection induced by the gravity of the planet; in this way, we are able to treat also trajectories leading to impacts on the satellite just after a close encounter with the planet.

  11. The dynamics of impactors on a synchronous planetary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, G.; Alessi, E.; Rossi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We have applied the extension of Opik's theory of close encounters by Valsecchi et al. (2003) to the case of a satellite in a circular orbit about a planet that, in turn, is in a circular orbit about the Sun, with the further assumption that the plane of the planetocentric orbit of the satellite is the same as that of the heliocentric orbit of the planet. The goal is to understand the effects on the satellite surface of the cratering caused by impacts due to a population of small bodies on planet-crossing, inclined orbits. With this setup, we have already computed analytically the velocity and the elongation from the apex of the bodies impacting the satellite, as simple functions of the heliocentric orbital elements of the impactor and of the longitude of the satellite at impact. In the present work, we delve deeper into the dynamics of the impactors, taking into account also trajectories leading to impacts on the satellite just after a close encounter with the Earth.

  12. Characterization of a Regenerable Impactor Filter for Spacecraft Cabin Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerable filters will play an important role in human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Life Support Systems aboard crewed spacecrafts will have to operate reliably and with little maintenance over periods of more than a year, even multiple years. Air filters are a key component of spacecraft life support systems, but they often require frequent routine maintenance. Bacterial filters aboard the International Space Station require almost weekly cleaning of the pre-filter screen to remove large lint debris captured in the microgravity environment. The source of the airborne matter which is collected on the filter screen is typically from clothing fibers, biological matter (hair, skin, nails, etc.) and material wear. Clearly a need for low maintenance filters requiring little to no crew intervention will be vital to the success of the mission. An impactor filter is being developed and tested to address this need. This filter captures large particle matter through inertial separation and impaction methods on collection surfaces, which can be automatically cleaned after they become heavily loaded. The impactor filter can serve as a pre-filter to augment the life of higher efficiency filters that capture fine and ultrafine particles. A prototype of the filter is being tested at the Particulate Filtration Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center to determine performance characteristics, including particle cut size and overall efficiency. Model results are presented for the flow characteristics near the orifice plate through which the particle-laden flow is accelerated as well as around the collection bands.

  13. Closed loop terminal guidance navigation for a kinetic impactor spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Kennedy, Brian

    2014-10-01

    A kinetic impactor spacecraft is a viable method to deflect an asteroid which poses a threat to the Earth. The technology to perform such a deflection has been demonstrated by the Deep Impact (DI) mission, which successfully collided with comet Tempel 1 in July 2005 using an onboard autonomous navigation system, called AutoNav, for the terminal phase of the mission. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of AutoNav to impact a wider range of scenarios that a deflection mission could encounter, varying parameters such as the approach velocity, phase angle, size of the asteroid, and the attitude determination accuracy. In particular, we evaluated the capability of AutoNav to impact 100-300 m size asteroids at speeds between 7.5 and 20 km/s at various phase angles. Using realistic Monte Carlo simulations, we tabulated the probability of success of the deflection as a function of these parameters and find the highest sensitivity to be due to the spacecraft attitude determination error. In addition, we also specifically analyzed the impact probability for a proposed mission (called ISIS) which would send an impactor to the asteroid 1999RQ36. We conclude with some recommendations for future work.

  14. An automated system for the prediction of imminent impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoto, Federica; Milani Comparetti, Andrea; Tommei, Giacomo; Bernardi, Fabrizio; Del Vigna, Alessio

    2015-08-01

    The lack of an automated system for the prediction of short-term impacts became evident for the first time after the impact of the asteroid 2014 AA on the Earth. In such cases it is very important to know whether or not there is the possibility of an immediate impact with the Earth. The impact probability computation is a difficult tasks because these objects usually have very few observations, and it strongly depends upon the astrometric errors of the observations, the assumed population model and the minimum size of impactors.We present a new automatic tool for the computation of the risk assessment within few minutes from the posting of new observations of a recently detected object on the MPC-NEOCP list. This activity is by far different from the classical impact monitoring of CLOMON-NEODyS2. When such asteroids are discovered, the confidence region resulting from preliminary orbit determination is not elongated in one direction, thus the Line of Variations (LOV) is not representative of the entire region. Therefore we need to introduce the Manifold of Variations (MOV) to predict imminent impactors. We also assign a Probability Density Function to the MOV, taking into account the observations, but also some constraints deriving from the population models.

  15. Closed Loop Terminal Guidance Navigation for a Kinetic Impactor Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Kennedy, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A kinetic impactor spacecraft is a viable method to deflect an asteroid which poses a threat to the Earth. The technology to perform such a deflection has been demonstrated by the Deep Impact (DI) mission, which successfully collided with comet Tempel 1 in July 2005 using an onboard autonomous navigation system, called AutoNav, for the terminal phase of the mission. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of AutoNav to impact a wide range of scenarios that an deflection mission could encounter, varying parameters such as the approach velocity, phase angle, size of the asteroid, and the determination of spacecraft attitude. Using realistic Monte Carlo simulations, we tabulated the probability of success of the deflection as a function of these parameters, and the highest sensitivity to be due the spacecraft attitude determination mode. In addition, we also specifically analyzed the impact probability for a proposed mission which would send an impactor to the asteroid 1999RQ36. We conclude with some recommendations for future work.

  16. Flight trajectory simulation of fluid payload projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, H.R.; Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    A flight trajectory simulation method has been developed for calculating the six degree of freedom motion of fluid filled projectiles. Numerically calculated internal fluid moments and experimentally known aerodynamic forces and moments are coupled to the projectile motion. Comparisons of predicted results with flight test data of an M483 155mm artillery projectile with a highly viscous payload confirm the accuracy of the simulation. This simulation clearly shows that the flight instability is due to the growth of the nutation component of angular motion caused by the viscous effects of the fluid payload. This simulation procedure, when used in conjunction with the previously developed method for calculating internal fluid moments, allows the designer to examine the effects of various liquid payloads and container geometries on the dynamic behavior of flight vehicles.

  17. Ocular injuries due to projectile impacts.

    PubMed

    Scott, W R; Lloyd, W C; Benedict, J V; Meredith, R

    2000-01-01

    An animal model has been developed using enucleated porcine eyes to evaluate ocular trauma. The eyes were pressurized to approximately 18 mmHg and mounted in a container with a 10% gelatin mixture. The corneas of sixteen pressurized eyes were impacted by a blunt metal projectile (mass of 2.6 gm, 3.5 gm or 45.5 gm) at velocities of 4.0 to 38.1 m/s. The impacted eyes were evaluated by an ophthalmologist. A numerical classification scheme was used to categorize the severity of the ocular injury. A chi-squared test indicates that the injury level is associated with the kinetic energy (KE) and not the momentum of the projectile. The enucleated eyes began to experience lens dislocations when the KE of the projectile was approximately 0.75 Nm, and retinal injuries when the KE was approximately 1.20 Nm. PMID:11558084

  18. Additional Crime Scenes for Projectile Motion Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Dan; Bonner, David

    2011-12-01

    Building students' ability to transfer physics fundamentals to real-world applications establishes a deeper understanding of underlying concepts while enhancing student interest. Forensic science offers a great opportunity for students to apply physics to highly engaging, real-world contexts. Integrating these opportunities into inquiry-based problem solving in a team environment provides a terrific backdrop for fostering communication, analysis, and critical thinking skills. One such activity, inspired jointly by the museum exhibit "CSI: The Experience"2 and David Bonner's TPT article "Increasing Student Engagement and Enthusiasm: A Projectile Motion Crime Scene,"3 provides students with three different crime scenes, each requiring an analysis of projectile motion. In this lesson students socially engage in higher-order analysis of two-dimensional projectile motion problems by collecting information from 3-D scale models and collaborating with one another on its interpretation, in addition to diagramming and mathematical analysis typical to problem solving in physics.

  19. Terrestrial impactors at geological boundary events - Comets or asteroids?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    In the present evaluation of evidence presented to date for a 26-28 million year periodicity in the extinction record and the age of large, well dated terrestrial impact craters, it is noted that no simple, one-to-one relationship emerges between major asteroid and/or comet impacts, siderophile anomalies, and biological extinction events. While impacts may indeed be the major extinction-triggering event in some or even most cases, either other major events, or secondary effects of the impacts, may be the actual extinction-causing mechanism. Long term obscuration of insolation, planetary cooling, or lethal atmospheric pollution may vary among extinctions, depending on the actual state of the planet and its biota during the geological period in question. The source of 28 million year-period asteroidal impactors, moreover, remains unknown and thereby casts doubt on the entire periodicity scenario.

  20. Simultaneous Red - Blue Lidar and Airborne Impactor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Blifford, I. H.; Fuller, W. H.; Grams, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneous two-color (0.6943 micrometers and 0.3472 micrometers) LIDAR measurements were made in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over Boulder, Colorado during March 1973. In addition, on the evening of March 26, airborne single-stage impactor measurements were made at four altitudes-- 10,500, 25,000, 33,000 and 43,000 feet MSL. These data were integrated at constant altitude for 15,45, 45, and 60 minutes respectively. The LIDAR data were taken with Langley's 48" LIDAR using a dichroic beamsplitter to separate the return at 0.6943 micrometers and 0.3472 micrometers. The analog waveforms for both colors were digitized simultaneously; one on an NCAR data acquisition system and the other on the 48" Langley data acquisition system. A discussion of the preliminary results from these measurements will be presented.

  1. Flight Operations for the LCROSS Lunar Impactor Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Paul D.; Hunt, Rusty; D'Ortenzio, Matt D.; Strong, James; Galal, Ken; Bresina, John L.; Foreman, Darin; Barber, Robert; Shirley, Mark; Munger, James; Drucker, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The LCROSS (Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite) mission was conceived as a low-cost means of determining the nature of hydrogen concentrated at the polar regions of the moon. Co-manifested for launch with LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter), LCROSS guided its spent Centaur upper stage into the Cabeus crater as a kinetic impactor, and observed the impact flash and resulting debris plume for signs of water and other compounds from a Shepherding Spacecraft. Led by NASA Ames Research Center, LCROSS flight operations spanned 112 days, from June 18 through October 9, 2009. This paper summarizes the experiences from the LCROSS flight, highlights the challenges faced during the mission, and examines the reasons for its ultimate success.

  2. The current impactor flux on Mars and its seasonal variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JeongAhn, Youngmin; Malhotra, Renu

    2014-11-01

    We calculate the current impactor flux on Mars and its variation over the Martian year, using the available data on the orbital distribution of known Mars-crossing minor planets. To mitigate the problem of observational incompleteness, we adopt the orbital distribution of the nearly complete set of bright (absolute magnitude H<16) Mars-crossers as the intrinsic orbital distribution of the impactor population, and we use this distribution to generate a large number of clones to simulate the impact flux. We use the Öpik-Wetherill formulation for calculating collision probabilities. Our study pays careful attention to the effects of the non-uniform distribution of the perihelion longitudes (owed to planetary secular perturbations) and the non-uniform distribution of impact velocities. We find that these previously neglected non-uniformities have a significant effect on the mean annual impact flux as well as its seasonal variation. The impact flux peaks when Mars is at aphelion. The near-alignment of Mars' eccentricity vector with the mean direction of the eccentricity vector distribution of Mars-crossers causes the mean annual impact flux as well as the amplitude of the seasonal variation to be significantly lower than the estimate based on a uniform random distribution of perihelion longitudes of Mars-crossers. Extrapolation of our results to a de-biased population model of fainter (smaller) Mars-crossers provides theoretical predictions that can be tested with observational data of impacts that is becoming available from spacecraft currently in orbit about Mars.This research was supported by NSF grant #AST-1312498.

  3. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Paque, Julie M.; Becker, Luann; Vedder, James F.; Erlichman, Jozef

    1995-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments were performed to further test the survivability of carbonaceous impactors and to determine potential products that may have been synthesized during impact. Diamonds were launched by the Ames two-stage light gas gun into Al plate at velocities of 2.75 and 3.1 km sec(exp -1). FESEM imagery confirms that diamond fragments survived in both experiments. Earlier experiments found that diamonds were destroyed on impact above 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Thus, the upper stability limit for diamond on impact into Al, as determined from our experimental conditions, is between 3.1 and 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Particles of the carbonaceous chondrite Nogoya were also launched into Al at a velocity of 6.2 km sec (exp -1). Laser desorption (L (exp 2) MS) analyses of the impactor residues indicate that the lowest and highest mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) were largely destroyed on impact; those of intermediate mass (202-220 amu) remained at the same level or increased in abundance. In addition, alkyl-substituted homologs of the most abundant pre-impacted PAH's were synthesized during impact. These results suggest that an unknown fraction of some organic compounds can survive low to moderate impact velocities and that synthesized products can be expected to form up to velocities of, at least, 6.5 km sec(exp -1). We also present examples of craters formed by a unique microparticle accelerator that could launch micron-sized particles of almost any coherent material at velocities up to approximately 15 km sec(exp -1). Many of the experiments have a direct bearing on the interpretation of LDEF craters.

  4. PIXE analysis of cascade impactor samples collected over the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raemdonck, H.; Maenhaut, W.; Ferek, R. J.; Andreae, M. O.

    1984-04-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on a cruise of the R/V Conrad in the Pacific Ocean. The cruise track was divided into two legs, the first one on the Peru/Ecuador shelf, the second through the equatorial and tropical Pacific to Hawaii. Sampling took place by means of two 1 l/min, ten-stage Battelle-type cascade impactors positioned on the foremast of the ship at about 20 m above the sea surface. Strict precautions were taken to avoid contamination of the samples by the ship itself. The impactor slides and back-up filters were analyzed for 25 elements by PIXE using a 2.4 MeV proton beam, produced by a compact cyclotron. In the samples, collected on leg 1, a significant anthropogenic component could be detected. Excess fine sulfur, excess fine potassium, and V, Ni, Cu and Zn in < 2 μ m particles were as high as 600, 10, 0.8, 0.2, 3 and 4 ng/m 3, respectively. On the other hand, most of the samples, collected on leg 2, were representative of clean marine air which was little influenced by continentally derived aerosols. The sulfur size distribution showed a very pronounced submicrometer mode of about 100 ng/m 3, suggesting a nearby sulfur source of marine origin. After crossing the intertropical convergence zone from south to north, concentrations of Fe and other crustal elements increased significantly. The size distributions and interelement ratios indicated that the elevated concentrations of these elements were due to long-range transport of mineral dust.

  5. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors, part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, T.E.; Paque, J.M.; Becker, L.; Vedder, J.F.; Erlichman, J. ||

    1995-02-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments were performed to further test the survivability of carbonaceous impactors and to determine potential products that may have been synthesized during impact. Diamonds were launched by the Ames two-stage light gas gun into Al plate at velocities of 2.75 and 3.1 km sec(exp -1). FESEM imagery confirms that diamond fragments survived in both experiments. Earlier experiments found that diamonds were destroyed on impact above 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Thus, the upper stability limit for diamond on impact into Al, as determined from our experimental conditions, is between 3.1 and 4.3 km sec(exp -1). Particles of the carbonaceous chondrite Nogoya were also launched into Al at a velocity of 6.2 km sec (exp -1). Laser desorption (L (exp 2) MS) analyses of the impactor residues indicate that the lowest and highest mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH`s) were largely destroyed on impact; those of intermediate mass (202-220 amu) remained at the same level or increased in abundance. In addition, alkyl-substituted homologs of the most abundant pre-impacted PAH`s were synthesized during impact. These results suggest that an unknown fraction of some organic compounds can survive low to moderate impact velocities and that synthesized products can be expected to form up to velocities of, at least, 6.5 km sec(exp -1). The authors also present examples of craters formed by a unique microparticle accelerator that could launch micron-sized particles of almost any coherent material at velocities up to approximately 15 km sec(exp -1). Many of the experiments have a direct bearing on the interpretation of LDEF craters.

  6. Uncovering the Impactor Population for the Outer Solar System from Saturnian Satellite Cratering Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Minton, D. A.; Thomas, P. C.; Kirchoff, M.

    2012-03-01

    We use crater counts for seven saturnian satellites to constrain the outer solar system impactor population, showing the Kuiper Belt as the most likely source, and that impactor flux levels 2-3 decades higher than current are needed to model the records.

  7. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile`s initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  8. Influence of Impactor Mass on the Damage Characteristics and Failure Strength of Laminated Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Kemmerly, Heather L.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the effect of impactor mass on the low-speed impact response of laminated flat composite plates is presented. Dropped weight impact response, damage characteristics, and residual strengths of quasi-isotropic flat plates are presented for a range of energy levels by systematically varying the mass of the impactor. Measured contact forces and damage areas are also presented. The results indicate that the contact force and damage area are nonlinear functions of the impactor mass and vary considerably over the entire range of energy levels considered. The different damage levels induced in a plate specimen when impacted at a given energy level with impactors of different masses significantly influence its compressive residual strength. The results provide clear and consistent trends in contact force, damage area, and compression-after-impact strength when the data are expressed as a function of the impactor momentum.

  9. Dynamic effects of interaction of composite projectiles with targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    The process of high-speed impact of projectiles against targets of finite thickness is experimentally investigated. Medium-hard steel plates are used as targets. The objective of this research is to carry out a comparative analysis of dynamic effects of interaction of various types of projectiles with targets, such as characteristics of destruction of the target, the state of the projectile behind the target, and particularities of the after-penetration stream of fragments after the target has been pierced. The projectiles are made of composites on the basis of tungsten carbide obtained by caking and the SHS-technology. To compare effectiveness of composite projectiles steel projectiles are used. Their effectiveness was estimated in terms of the ballistic limit. High density projectiles obtained by means of the SHS-technology are shown to produce results comparable in terms of the ballistic limit with high-strength projectiles that contain tungsten received by caking.

  10. Aerodynamic characteristics of nebulized terbutaline sulphate using the Andersen Cascade Impactor compared to the Next Generation Impactor.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, Mohamed E

    2011-04-01

    Characterization of the aerosol emitted from nebulizers is determined using the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). The Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) was previously used but the limitation of high flow rate used decreased its uses. We have investigated the use of ACI with different operational conditions compared to the NGI methodology. NGI was operated at a flow rate of 15 L min⁻¹ after cooling at 5°C for 90 min. ACI was operated using flow rates 15 and 28.3 L min⁻¹ at room (ROOM) temperature and after cooling at 5 °C for 60 min (COLD). ACI was also operated using a flow rate 15 L min⁻¹ through the nebulizer T-piece with a flow rate 28.3 L min⁻¹ through ACI (15 Mix) using the mixing valve at ROOM and COLD. Two nebulizer systems, the Sidestream (SIDE) and the Aeroneb Pro (AERO) were used to nebulize terbutaline sulphate respiratory solution. Overall there was a highly significant difference (P < 0.001) between different ACI operating conditions for FPF and MMAD of both nebulizer systems. The ACI at higher flow rate increased the evaporation effect whilst cooling minimized evaporation of both nebulizer systems. Hence cooling and using slow flow rate minimizes evaporation effects with ACI. The ACI 15COLD results were similar to that of NGI. That supports the use of ACI at inhalation flow rate 15 L min⁻¹ without fear of domination of gravity on ACI stages. PMID:20100034

  11. Speed, acceleration, chameleons and cherry pit projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Likar, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the mechanics of cherry pit projectiles and ends with showing the similarity between cherry pit launching and chameleon tongue projecting mechanisms. The whole story is written as an investigation, following steps that resemble those typically taken by scientists and can therefore serve as an illustration of scientific reasoning and how scientific knowledge is built.

  12. Ballistics projectile image analysis for firearm identification.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongguang

    2006-10-01

    This paper is based upon the observation that, when a bullet is fired, it creates characteristic markings on the cartridge case and projectile. From these markings, over 30 different features can be distinguished, which, in combination, produce a "fingerprint" for a firearm. By analyzing features within such a set of firearm fingerprints, it will be possible to identify not only the type and model of a firearm, but also each and every individual weapon just as effectively as human fingerprint identification. A new analytic system based on the fast Fourier transform for identifying projectile specimens by the line-scan imaging technique is proposed in this paper. This paper develops optical, photonic, and mechanical techniques to map the topography of the surfaces of forensic projectiles for the purpose of identification. Experiments discussed in this paper are performed on images acquired from 16 various weapons. Experimental results show that the proposed system can be used for firearm identification efficiently and precisely through digitizing and analyzing the fired projectiles specimens. PMID:17022254

  13. An Inexpensive Mechanical Model for Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2011-01-01

    As experienced physicists, we see the beauty and simplicity of projectile motion. It is merely the superposition of uniform linear motion along the direction of the initial velocity vector and the downward motion due to the constant acceleration of gravity. We see the kinematic equations as just the mathematical machinery to perform the…

  14. Speed, Acceleration, Chameleons and Cherry Pit Projectiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Likar, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the mechanics of cherry pit projectiles and ends with showing the similarity between cherry pit launching and chameleon tongue projecting mechanisms. The whole story is written as an investigation, following steps that resemble those typically taken by scientists and can therefore serve as an illustration of scientific…

  15. Developing Impact Marking Projectiles Using Triboluminescent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, William; Fontenot, Ross; Broussard, Brady; Goedeke, Shawn; Guidry, Corey

    2011-06-01

    In 1888, Wiedemann and Schmidt defined triboluminescence as the emission of light produced by mechanical action. In 1999, Sage and Geddes patented a design for a sensor capable of discerning the locations of impacts. Their design involved embedding a sensor inside a material coated with a triboluminescent crystal. Using this idea, the authors have been investigating the triboluminescent properties of several materials (like ZnS:Mn) for their possible use as the active element in ballistic projectiles. These new and improved rounds would be very useful because triboluminescence would mark the landing point of the projectile. This light would be ``cold'' in the sense it was not generated as a result of burning gunpowder or similar pyrotechnics. This light emission would also have a relatively short duration compared to other new projectiles, which generate long-term phosphorescence when two chemicals are mixed at impact (chemiluminescence). This presentation will give a status report in our efforts to develop practical impact marking ballistic projectiles using a triboluminescent charge.

  16. High School Students' Understanding of Projectile Motion Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilber, Refik; Karaman, Ibrahim; Duzgun, Bahattin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change-based instruction and traditionally designed physics instruction on students' understanding of projectile motion concepts. Misconceptions related to projectile motion concepts were determined by related literature on this subject. Accordingly, the Projectile Motion…

  17. Geochemistry of impact glasses and target rocks from the Zhamanshin impact structure, Kazakhstan: Implications for mixing of target and impactor matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonášová, Šárka; Ackerman, Lukáš; Žák, Karel; Skála, Roman; Ďurišová, Jana; Deutsch, Alexander; Magna, Tomáš

    2016-10-01

    Internal structure and element chemistry including contents of highly siderophile elements (HSE) and Os isotope ratios have been studied in target rocks and several groups of impact glasses of the Zhamanshin impact structure, Kazakhstan. These include larger irregularly-shaped fragments and blocks of impact glass (zhamanshinites), and three types of tektite-like splash-form glasses, part of fallback ejecta. These glassy objects typically are up to 30 mm large and are shaped as teardrops, irregularly bent and curved glass rods and fibers. They can be subdivided into acidic types (irghizites; typically 69-76 wt.% SiO2), basic splash-forms (typically 53-56 wt.% SiO2), and rarely occurring highly inhomogeneous composites with abundant mineral inclusions. A comparison with the target rocks shows that zhamanshinites and basic splash-forms usually have no detectable admixture of the projectile matter, indicated by major and trace elements as well as highly siderophile element contents, with the exception of one sample containing Fe-, Cr-, Ni- and Ti-enriched particles and elevated HSE contents. In contrast, irghizites exhibit clear admixture of the projectile matter, which was incorporated by complex processes accompanied by strong element fractionations. Microscopic investigations confirm that irghizites were formed mainly by coalescence of smaller molten glass droplets sized typically below 1 mm. Irghizites exhibit significant enrichments in Ni, Co and Cr, whose concentrations are locally elevated in the rims of the original small droplets. A portion of these elements and also part of Fe and Mn and other elements were derived from the impactor, most likely a Ni-rich carbonaceous chondrite. The contents of HSE are low and strongly fractionated, with moderate depletions of Pt and Pd and strong depletions of other HSE with respect to chondritic element ratios. Osmium shows the strongest depletion, likely related to the presence of oxygen in the post-impact atmosphere

  18. Meteorites and projectiles in terrestrial impact craters: implications for the composition of the asteroid belt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagle, R.; Claeys, Ph.

    The main asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter contain over 670 000 asteroids larger than 1km [1]. Their orbits are affected by a variety of resonances mainly responsible for the transport of asteroidal material, such as meteorites, to Earth. The number of meteorites known, representing different parent bodies (asteroids), is estimated between 100 and 150 from which most of them are iron meteorites [2]. The majority of the meteorites reaching Earth are ordinary chondrites (OC), they form ~74% of observed falls [3]. However, OC most likely represent samples from only 3 different parent bodies. Therefore it was argued that ordinary chondrites are not common in the asteroid belt [4]. Based on the abundance of S-type asteroids, suggested to be related to OC, OC appear to be common in the asteroid belt, in contradiction to the results of meteorite studies. The spectrum of S-type asteroids is influenced by "space weathering" what affects their spectra and hampers a definite assignment to OC [e.g. 5]. Taking into consideration the large number of asteroids, it is questionable if meteorites in collections are representative of the composition of asteroid belt, or if they merely correspond to the actual population, as almost all meteorites have relatively young terrestrial ages (<<1m.y.). The identification of projectiles in impact craters of Earth and Moon provides the opportunity to study ancient material flux from the asteroid belt. Methodical and analytical improvements in the last years allow to identify the projectile component to a unprecedented level of detail. Preliminary results from the identification of projectiles in impact structures show that OC and non-magmatic iron meteorites (NMI) are highly common in the impactor population. The large amount of projectiles with OC composition might suggest that OC are indeed common in the asteroid belt, supporting the S-type/OC relation. The abundance of OC can be bias due to the effective transport of

  19. Initiation of Gaseous Detonation by Conical Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, Jimmy

    Initiation and stabilization of detonation by hypersonic conical projectiles launched into combustible gas mixtures is investigated. This phenomenon must be understood for the design and optimization of specific hypersonic propulsion devices, such as the oblique detonation wave engine and the ram accelerator. The criteria for detonation initiation by a projectile is also related to fundamental aspects of detonation research, such as the requirement for direct initiation of a detonation by a blast wave. Experimental results of this problem also offer useful references for validation of numerical and theoretical modeling. Projectiles with cone half angles varying from 15° to 60° were launched into stoichiometric mixtures of hydrogen/oxygen with 70% argon dilution at initial pressures between 10 and 200 kPa. The projectiles were launched from a combustion-driven gas gun at velocities up to 2.2 km/s (corresponding to 133% of the Chapman Jouguet velocity). Pictures of the flowfields generated by the projectiles were taken via Schlieren photography. Five combustion regimes were observed about the projectile ranging from prompt and delayed oblique detonation wave formation, combustion instabilities, a wave splitting, and an inert shock wave. Two types of transition from the prompt oblique detonation wave regime to the inert shock regime were observed. The first (the delayed oblique detonation wave regime) showed an inert shock attached to the tip of the projectile followed by a sharp kink at the onset of an oblique detonation wave; this regime occurred by decreasing the cone angle at high mixture pressures. The second (the combustion instabilities regime) exhibited large density gradients due to combustion ignition and quenching phenomena; this regime occurred by decreasing the mixture pressure at large cone angles. A number of theoretical models were considered to predict critical conditions for the initiation of oblique detonations. The Lee-Vasiljev model agreed

  20. Method of and apparatus for accelerating a projectile

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Yeshayahu S. A.; Tidman, Derek A.

    1986-01-01

    A projectile is accelerated along a confined path by supplying a pulsed high pressure, high velocity plasma jet to the rear of the projectile as the projectile traverses the path. The jet enters the confined path at a non-zero angle relative to the projectile path. The pulse is derived from a dielectric capillary tube having an interior wall from which plasma forming material is ablated in response to a discharge voltage. The projectile can be accelerated in response to the kinetic energy in the plasma jet or in response to a pressure increase of gases in the confined path resulting from the heat added to the gases by the plasma.

  1. ESA NEOCC effort to eliminate high Palermo Scale virtual impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, M.; Koschny, D.; Hainaut, O.; Bernardi, F.

    2014-07-01

    At the moment of this writing about 4 % of the known near-Earth objects are known to have at least one future close approach scenario with a non-negligible collision probability within the next century, as routinely computed by the NEODyS and Sentry systems. The most straightforward way to improve the knowledge of the future dynamics of an NEO in order to exclude (or possibly confirm) some of these possible future impact is to obtain additional astrometric observations of the object as soon as it becomes observable again. In particular, since a large fraction (>98 %) of the known objects currently recognized as possible future impactors have been observed during a single opposition, this usually corresponds to obtaining a new set of observations during a second opposition, a so called ''recovery''. However, in some cases the future observability windows for the target after the discovery apparition may be very limited, either because the object is intrinsically small (and therefore requires a very close and consequently rare approach to become observable) or because its orbital dynamic prevents the observability from the ground for a long timespan (as in the case of quasi-resonant objects with a long synodic period). When this happens, the only short-term way to clarify an impact scenario is to look toward the past, and investigate the possibility that unrecognized detections of the object are already present in the databases of old astronomical images, which are often archived by professional telescopes and made available to the community a few months to years after they are exposed. We will here present an effort lead by the newly formed ESA NEO Coordination Centre (NEOCC) in Frascati to pursue both these avenues with the intent of improving the orbital knowledge of the highest-rated possible impactors, as defined by the Palermo Technical Impact Hazard Scale (PS in the following). As an example of our ongoing observational activities, we will first present our

  2. Apparatus and method for the acceleration of projectiles to hypervelocities

    DOEpatents

    Hertzberg, Abraham; Bruckner, Adam P.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    1990-01-01

    A projectile is initially accelerated to a supersonic velocity and then injected into a launch tube filled with a gaseous propellant. The projectile outer surface and launch tube inner surface form a ramjet having a diffuser, a combustion chamber and a nozzle. A catalytic coated flame holder projecting from the projectile ignites the gaseous propellant in the combustion chamber thereby accelerating the projectile in a subsonic combustion mode zone. The projectile then enters an overdriven detonation wave launch tube zone wherein further projectile acceleration is achieved by a formed, controlled overdriven detonation wave capable of igniting the gaseous propellant in the combustion chamber. Ultrahigh velocity projectile accelerations are achieved in a launch tube layered detonation zone having an inner sleeve filled with hydrogen gas. An explosive, which is disposed in the annular zone between the inner sleeve and the launch tube, explodes responsive to an impinging shock wave emanating from the diffuser of the accelerating projectile thereby forcing the inner sleeve inward and imparting an acceleration to the projectile. For applications wherein solid or liquid high explosives are employed, the explosion thereof forces the inner sleeve inward, forming a throat behind the projectile. This throat chokes flow behind, thereby imparting an acceleration to the projectile.

  3. Study of critical ricochet angle for conical nose shape projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Vijayalakshmi; Law, Manish G.; Naik, Smita D.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to formulate a generic analytical model to assess the phenomena of water ricochet for a conical nose shaped projectile. A theoretical model is analyzed to study the critical angle of conical nose shaped projectile entering in water and is extended for different mediums as normal sand and mercury. Numerical Simulation has been carried out to find the effect of tip angle of the conical nose shaped projectile on the critical angle. Critical angle is defined as that angle of impact of the projectile above which ricochet will occur. This angle is obtained by balancing the momentums acting on the projectile at the time of impact on the basis of Newtonian theory. Major factors affecting critical angle are impact velocity, impact angle, density of the projectile and the target. An attempt has been made to study the effect of longitudinal spin of the projectile on the critical angle.

  4. Shallow-angle water entry of ballistic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Gomez, Jason T.; Beal, David N.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2008-11-01

    The water-entry of ballistic projectiles is investigated using high-speed digital imaging. Projectiles enter the water at shallow angles to the free surface, 5^o-15^o, without ricochet at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 2.0. Projectile dynamics, critical entry angle, and cavity growth are discussed. Geometric modifications to a projectile allow it to travel large distances underwater assuming a sufficiently large air-cavity is formed after impact, which dramatically decreases drag on the projectile. Results show that successful water-entry occurs for projectiles with modified tip geometries at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 2; these projectile modifications include tip geometry and material properties. A theoretical cavity model compares well with the experimental data and will be discussed for a range of experimental conditions.

  5. An Inexpensive Mechanical Model for Projectile Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David

    2011-05-01

    As experienced physicists, we see the beauty and simplicity of projectile motion. It is merely the superposition of uniform linear motion along the direction of the initial velocity vector and the downward motion due to the constant acceleration of gravity. We see the kinematic equations as just the mathematical machinery to perform the calculations. What do our students see? Likely, most see no deeper than the operational understanding needed to use the kinematic equations. Described below is a device (shown in Fig. 1) that illustrates the physicist's view of projectile motion. It can be used as a classroom demonstration or as a project for your students, and it costs less than three dollars to make.

  6. Modeling projectile impact onto prestressed ceramic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Johnson, G. R.

    2003-09-01

    This work presents computed results for the responses of ceramic targets, with and without prestress, subjected to projectile impact. Also presented is a computational technique to include prestress. Ceramic materials have been considered for armor applications for many years because of their high strength and low density. Many researchers have demonstrated that providing confinement enhances the ballistic performance of ceramic targets. More recently, prestressing the ceramic is being considered as an additional enhancement technique. This work investigates the effect of prestressing the ceramic for both thin and thick target configurations subjected to projectile impact. In all cases the targets with ceramic prestress provided enhanced ballistic performance. The computed results indicate that prestressed ceramic reduces and/or delays failure, resulting in improved ceramic performance and ballistic efficiency.

  7. The aerodynamics of some guided projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some characteristic projectile shapes are considered with various added components intended to provide lift, stability, and control. The intent of the additions is to provide some means for altering the normal ballistic flight path of a projectile for various purposes such as: achieving greater accuracy at the impact point, selecting alternate impact points, extending range, improved evasion, and so on. The configurations presented illustrate the effects of a flare, wings, and tails for providing stability and lift, and the effects of aft-tails, a close-coupled flap, and all-moving forward wings for control. The relative merits of the various configurations, all of which provided for flight path alterations, are discussed.

  8. The aerodynamics of some guided projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some characteristic projectile shapes are considered with various added components intended to provide lift, stability, and control. The intent of the additions is to provide some means for altering the normal ballistic flight path of a projectile for various purposes such as: achieving greater accuracy at the impact point, selecting alternate impact points, extending range, improved evasion, and so on. The configurations presented illustrate the effects of a flare, wings, and tails for providing stability and lift, and the effects of aft-tails, a close-coupled flap, and all-moving forward wings for control. The relative merits of the various configurations, all of which provided for flight path alterations are discussed.

  9. Projectile Density Effects on Shield Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana; Lyons, Frankel; Davis, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In the past, the orbital debris environment was modeled as consisting entirely of aluminum particles. As a consequence, most of the impact test database on spacecraft micro-meteoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shields, and the resulting ballistic limit equations used to predict shielding performance, has been based on using aluminum projectiles. Recently, data has been collected from returned spacecraft materials and other sources that indicate higher and lower density components of orbital debris also exist. New orbital debris environment models such as ORDEM2008 provide predictions of the fraction of orbital debris in various density bins (high = 7.9 g/cu cm, medium = 2.8 g/cu cm, and low = 0.9-1.1 g/cu cm). This paper describes impact tests to assess the effects of projectile density on the performance capabilities of typical MMOD shields. Updates to shield ballistic limit equations are provided based on results of tests and analysis.

  10. Energy loss of hydrogen projectiles in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefermueller, A.; Golser, R.; Stohl, R.; Semrad, D. )

    1993-12-01

    The stopping cross sections of H[sub 2], D[sub 2], He, and Ne for hydrogen projectiles in the energy range 3--20 keV per nucleon have been measured by time of flight. We compare our experimental result to the sum of the individual contributions due to excitation and ionization of the target and of the projectile, respectively, and due to charge exchange, using published cross-section data. Satisfactory agreement is found only for the He target and only at moderate projectile velocities, whereas for H[sub 2] and D[sub 2] the calculated values are about 30% too low. A Monte Carlo program allows us to simulate the measured time-of-flight spectra and to explain minor trends in the experimental data: for increased Ne gas pressure, an increased specific energy loss has been found that can be traced to different regions of impact parameters selected in our transmission geometry. This also explains, in part, the increased specific energy loss for deuterons compared to protons of equal velocity that is most evident for Ne. In contrast, a decrease of the specific energy loss with increasing pressure for He may be explained by impurities in the target gas. If we correct for the effect of impurities, the stopping cross section of He at 4 keV per nucleon is slightly smaller (0.60[times]10[sup [minus]15] eV cm[sup 2]) than published earlier (0.72[times]10[sup [minus]15] eV cm[sup 2]) and depends on the 3.8th power of projectile velocity.

  11. A hypervelocity projectile launcher for well perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Fugelso, L.E.; Lagner, G.C.; Burns, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Current oil well perforation techniques use low- to medium-velocity gun launchers for completing wells in soft rock. Shaped-charge jets are normally used in harder, more competent rock. A device to create a much higher velocity projectile was designed. This launcher will provide an alternative technique to be used when the conventional devices do not yield the maximum well performance. It is an adaptation of the axial cavity in a high explosive (HE) annulus design, with the axial cavity being filled with a low density foam material. Two configurations were tested; both had an HE annulus filled with organic foam, one had a projectile. Comparison of the two shots was made. A time sequence of Image Intensifier Camera photographs and sequential, orthogonal flash x-ray radiographs provided information on the propagation of the foam fragments, the first shock wave disturbance, the projectile motion and deformation, and the direct shock wave transmission from the main HE charge. DYNA2D calculations were made to assist in the experimental interpretation. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Improvements to a model of projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, S.; Chaudhuri, G.; Das Gupta, S.

    2011-11-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.83.044612 83, 044612 (2011)] we proposed a model for calculating cross sections of various reaction products which arise from disintegration of projectile-like fragments resulting from heavy-ion collisions at intermediate or higher energy. The model has three parts: (1) abrasion, (2) disintegration of the hot abraded projectile-like fragment (PLF) into nucleons and primary composites using a model of equilibrium statistical mechanics, and (3) possible evaporation of hot primary composites. It was assumed that the PLF resulting from abrasion has one temperature T. Data suggested that, while just one value of T seemed adequate for most cross-section calculations, a single value failed when dealing with very peripheral collisions. We have now introduced a variable T=T(b) where b is the impact parameter of the collision. We argue that there are data which not only show that T must be a function of b but, in addition, also point to an approximate value of T for a given b. We propose a very simple formula: T(b)=D0+D1[As(b)/A0] where As(b) is the mass of the abraded PLF and A0 is the mass of the projectile; D0 and D1 are constants. Using this model we compute cross sections for several collisions and compare with data.

  13. Fragmentation of hypervelocity aluminum projectiles on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Schäfer, Frank; Destefanis, Roberto; Faraud, Moreno; Lambert, Michel

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents work performed for a study investigating the ability of different flexible materials to induce fragmentation of a hypervelocity projectile. Samples were chosen to represent a wide range of industrially available types of flexible materials like ceramic, aramid and carbon fabrics as well as a thin metallic mesh. Impact conditions and areal density were kept constant for all targets. Betacloth and multi-layer insulation (B-MLI) are mounted onto the targets to account for thermal system engineering requirements. All tests were performed using the Space light-gas gun facility (SLGG) of the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI. Projectiles were aluminum spheres with 5 mm diameter impacting at approximately 6.3 km/s. Fragmentation was evaluated using a witness plate behind the target. An aramid and a ceramic fabric lead the ranking of fabrics with the best projectile fragmentation and debris cloud dispersion performance. A comparison with an equal-density rigid aluminum plate is presented. The work presented can be applied to optimize the micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) shielding structure of inflatable modules.

  14. Developing Supersonic Impactor and Aerodynamic Lens for Separation and Handling of Nano-Sized Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2008-06-30

    A computational model for supersonic flows of compressible gases in an aerodynamic lens with several lenses and in a supersonic/hypersonic impactor was developed. Airflow conditions in the aerodynamic lens were analyzed and contour plots for variation of Mach number, velocity magnitude and pressure field in the lens were evaluated. The nano and micro-particle trajectories in the lens and their focusing and transmission efficiencies were evaluated. The computational model was then applied to design of a aerodynamic lens that could generate focus particle beams while operating under atmospheric conditions. The computational model was also applied to airflow condition in the supersonic/hypersonic impactor. Variations of airflow condition and particle trajectories in the impactor were evaluated. The simulation results could provide understanding of the performance of the supersonic and hypersonic impactors that would be helpful for the design of such systems.

  15. Magnetic Properties of Tektites and Related Glasses: Discriminating Among Different Fields and Impactor Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Moustard, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Devouard, B.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of tektites and related glass is a good proxy for total amount of iron, as well as impactor contamination. We present new data from bediasites, ivoirites, atacamaites, Darwin, LDG and Wabar glasses.

  16. Possible Impactor Remnants on Shatter Cone Surfaces from the Steinheim Basin, SW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, E.; Schmieder, M.

    2015-07-01

    Surfaces of Steinheim shatter cones are covered by mineral coatings that consist of Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pt, and Au mineral assemblages. A plausible explanation is that they represent impactor matter remobilized in an impact-induced hydrothermal system.

  17. Fabrication of Machined and Shrink Fitted Impactor; Composite Liners for the Los Alamos HEDP Program

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, B.

    1999-10-19

    Composite liners have been fabricated for the Los Alamos liner driven HEDP experiments using impactors formed by physical vapor deposition (PVD), electroplating, machining and shrink fitting. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been proposed for some ATLAS liner applications. This paper describes the processes used to fabricate machined and shrink fitted impactors which have been used for copper impactors in 1100 aluminum liners and 6061 T-6 aluminum impactors in 1100 aluminum liners. The most successful processes have been largely empirically developed and rely upon a combination of shrink fitted and light press fitting. The processes used to date will be described along with some considerations for future composite liners requirements in the HEDP Program.

  18. Stop Hitting Yourself: Did most Terrestrial Impactors Originate from the Terrestrial Planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, A. P.; Asphaug, E.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Minton, D. A.

    2015-02-01

    In addition to building planets giant impacts also release large quantities of debris. The ultimate fate of this is largely re-accretion, and this debris population could be the dominant source of impactors in the early solar system.

  19. Debris from Borealis Basin Formation as the Primary Impactor Population of Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, D. A.; Jackson, A. P.; Asphaug, E.; Fassett, C. I.; Richardson, J. E.

    2015-02-01

    Here we investigate a novel Giant Impact Debris (GID) hypothesis to explain a number of observations regarding the LHB. In the GID hypothesis, the formation of the crustal dichotomy on Mars (Borealis Basin) generates LHB impactors.

  20. INTERCOMP2000: ionic constitution and comparison of filter and impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Acker, Karin; Müller, Konrad; Spindler, Gerald; Brüggemann, Erika; Maenhaut, Willy; Chi, Xuguang; Hitzenberger, Regina; Bauer, Heidi; Brink, Harry ten

    The field campaign INTERCOMP2000 was organised within the EUROTRAC-2 subproject AEROSOL for characterisation of aerosol at a rural site. The groups involved used a wide range of measurement methods for aerosol particles. Although the focus was on critical aerosol properties like mass, nitrate and carbon, in this paper particular attention is given to the role of inorganic soluble material being main part of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here, we compare methods used in Europe also for inorganic ion mass concentrations: three high-volume samplers (2 Digitel and 1 Sierra Andersen, equipped with quartz fibre filters), four low-volume samplers (1 Rupprecht Patashnik with Teflon filter; 3 stacked filter units with Teflon, cellulose ester or Whatman 41 filter), and 2 low-pressure impactors (Berner type with Tedlar foils). Ten parallel 24 h samples were compared. The data for the main ions nitrate, sulphate and ammonium agree well for the PM10 as well for PM2.5 aerosol fraction; relative standard deviation of about 20-40% were found. The single values for calcium, sodium and chloride which contribute only minor to the soluble inorganic mass scatter very strongly around the calculated averages: about 50% in PM10 mode, and even 100% in PM2.5 mode. While laboratory calibrations typically indicate performance close to design specifications, methods during field operation are subject to a number of sampling and handling artefacts. We know that the different sampling principles used in this study, and the analytical procedures done by each group with their own methodology will cause a main part of the observed uncertainties. In reality, due to different reasons (availability, costs, manpower, different analysis from the same sample, size and time resolution, etc) in many networks and field studies a high variability of methods for aerosol characterisation is used and often those experimental figures will be used for statistical interpretations. Thus, our paper will emphasise

  1. Small carry-on impactor of Hayabusa2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiki, Takanao; Sawada, Hirotaka; Okamoto, Chisato; Yano, Hajime; Takagi, Yasuhiko; Akahoshi, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    A Japanese spacecraft, Hayabusa2, the successor of Hayabusa, which came back from the Asteroid Itokawa with sample materials after its 7-year-interplanetary journeys, is a current mission of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and scheduled to be launched in 2014. Although its design basically follows Hayabusa, some new components are planned to be equipped in Hayabusa2 mission. A Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI), a small explosive device, is one of the challenges that were not seen with Hayabusa. An important scientific objective of Hayabusa2 is to investigate chemical and physical properties of the internal materials and structures. SCI creates an artificial crater on the surface of the asteroid and the mother spacecraft observes the crater and tries to get sample materials. High kinetic energy is required to creating a meaningful crater. The SCI would become complicated and heavy if the traditional acceleration devices like thrusters and rocket motors are used to hit the asteroid because the acceleration distance is quite large and guidance system is necessary. In order to make the system simpler, a technology of special type of shaped charge is used for the acceleration of the impact head. By using this technology, it becomes possible to accelerate the impact head very quickly and to hit the asteroid without guidance system. However, the impact operation should be complicated because SCI uses powerful explosive and it scatters high speed debris at the detonation. This paper presents the overview of our new small carry-on impact system and the impact operation of Hayabusa2 mission.

  2. Forensic and clinical issues in the use of frangible projectile.

    PubMed

    Komenda, Jan; Hejna, Petr; Rydlo, Martin; Novák, Miroslav; Krajsa, Jan; Racek, František; Rejtar, Pavel; Jedlička, Luděk

    2013-08-01

    Frangible projectiles for firearms, which break apart on impact, are mainly used by law enforcement agencies for training purposes, but can also be used for police interventions. Apart from the usual absence of lead in the projectiles, the main advantage of using frangible projectiles is the reduced risk of ricochet after impact with a hard target. This article describes the design and function of frangible projectiles, and describes gunshot wounds caused by ultra-frangible projectiles which fragment after penetration of soft tissues. Shooting experiments performed by the authors confirmed that differences in the geometry and technology of frangible projectiles can significantly modify their wounding effects. Some frangible projectiles have minimal wounding effects because they remain compact after penetration of soft tissues, comparable to standard fully jacketed projectiles. However, a number of ultra-frangible projectiles disintegrate into very small fragments after impact with a soft tissue substitute. In shooting experiments, we found that the terminal behavior of selected ultra-frangible projectiles was similar in a block of ballistic gel and the soft tissues of the hind leg of a pig, except that the degree of disintegration was less in the gel. PMID:23910864

  3. On the forces produced by oblique projectile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yew, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    A mathematical model for calculating the force produced by projectile impact on terrestrial target was developed based on assumptions that (1) the projectile was rigid, and (2) the target material near the nose section was displaced normally to the nose surface by the penetrating projectile. The assumption suggested that the crater or tunnel produced by the penetrating projectile was similar to that produced by a series of dynamic spherical cavity expansions initiated at the nose tip, and the growth rate of cavities was restricted by the nose shape of the projectile and its penetrating velocity vector. The model allowed the calculation of pressure against the penetrating projectile by taking the inertia and the resistant pressure of the moving soil into consideration. The effect of projectile obliquity on pressure distribution on the nose section of projectile could also be calculated by relating the angle of attack and the angle of incidence to the rate of local radius change of the expanding cavity. Using this model, the time history of force vector exerted on the projectile as well as the corresponding trajectory of penetration were calculated. For a small angle of incidence, the calculated axial and lateral forces exerted on the nose of projectile showed a reasonable agreement with those measured from reverse ballistic impact tests. It was demonstrated that the magnitude of forces depended upon the impact velocity, the shape of projectile`s nose section, and the relative density between the projectile and the target material. There were no quantitative measurement of forces when the angle of incidence was large i.e., a shallow impact. For this case, the calculated forces were compared and discussed with the results from similitude analysis.

  4. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile's initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  5. Impact cratering as a major process in planet formation: Projectile identification of meteorite craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G.; Kratz, K.

    2009-12-01

    Ancient surfaces of solid planets show that impact cratering is a major process in planet formation. Understanding origin and influence of impactors on the chemical composition of planets (core, mantle and crust) it is important to know the relative abundances of highly siderophile elements (Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Rh, Pd) in the silicate mantle and crust of planets and meteorites. Refractory highly siderophile elements, such as Os and Ir, are abundant in most meteorites but depleted in crustal rocks (low target/meteorite ratios) and thus the most reliable elements for projectile identification. However, target/meteorite ratios are high if target rocks consist of mantle rocks. In such cases elements are enriched in impactites due to relatively high abundances (ng/g level) in target rocks to make the identification of projectile types difficult (e.g., Gardnos impact structure in Norway). The Ru/Ir ratio is the most reliable key ratio that rules out Earth primitive upper mantle (PUM) derived refractory highly siderophile element components in impactites. The well established Ru/Ir ratio of the Earth mantle of 2.0 ± 0.1 (e.g. Schmidt and Kratz 2004) is significantly above the chondritic ratios varying from 1.4 to 1.6. On Earth Rh/Ir, Ru/Ir, Pd/Ir, and Pt/Os derived from PUM match the ratios of group IV irons with fractionated trace element patterns. The question raise if HSE in mantle rocks are added to the accreting Earth by a late bombardment of pre-differentiated objects or the cores of these objects (magmatic iron meteorites as remnants of the first planetesimals, e.g. Kleine et al. 2009) or some unsampled inner solar system materials from the Mercury-Venus formation region, not sampled through meteorite collections (Schmidt 2009). The PGE and Ni systematics of the upper continental crust (UCC) closely resembles group IIIAB iron meteorites with highly fractionated refractory trace element patterns, pallasites, and the evolved suite of Martian meteorites (representing

  6. Hign-speed penetration of projectile with cavitator into sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurskikh, Anna; Veldanov, Vladislav

    2011-06-01

    Cavitators are used in underwater projectiles design to form a cavern in which projectile could move with no or significantly reduced drag. An investigation of possible application of this structural element for penetration into porous media was conducted. High-speed impact of a conical-shaped head projectile with cavitator was studied in terms of its influence on penetration capacity and projectile stability in sand for impact velocity about 1500 m/s. Cavitators were manufactured of steel with different strength moduli, and thus two penetration regimes (with eroding/non-eroding cavitator) were compared. Numerical simulations showing wave propagation in target and projectile were performed in AUTODYN with Johnson-Cook model for projectile and granular model for sand.

  7. Railgun using plasma initiation separated from the projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, S.; Akiyama, H.; Yamada, T.; Eguchi, N.; Maeda, S.; Sato, K.N.

    1993-12-01

    Preacceleration of a projectile is quite important to reduce the erosion of the bore surface in a railgun. Gas guns, electrothermal guns and other railguns have been used to preaccelerate the projectile. Here, the new method using Plasma Initiation Separated from the Projectile (PISP method) is proposed, and its effectiveness is confirmed experimentally. A thin copper is placed near the edge of the railgun, which explodes and forms a plasma that has a fast flow velocity due to the Lorentz force. This fast flowing plasma collides with the projectile which obtains an initial velocity mainly by the momentum transfer. Since the current increases while only the plasma is accelerated, the driving force of the projectile just after the collision of the plasma with the projectile is large. In other words, the PISP method works as an inductive energy storage circuit with an opening switch.

  8. Design and fabrication of projectiles for round bore railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.

    1985-03-07

    A hypervelocity railgun system which operates in a vacuum and uses a gas gun injector to pre-accelerate the projectiles required that the projectile seal operate over wide pressure and velocity ranges. In our case, the helium gas gun injector operated at up to 35 MPa (5 ksi) while the railgun, using a plasma arc armature, operated at up to 150 MPa (22 ksi). In addition to gas and arc sealing, it was necessary that a metal fuse be attached to the rear of the projectile in order to electrically commutate the rails upon entry to the railgun. This paper discusses procedures and techniques in the design and fabrication of projectiles for a round bore railgun. It is divided into three sections: (1) machining the projectile; (2) fuse fabrication; and (3) assembly of the projectile/fuse package.

  9. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.R.; Fowler, C.M.

    1984-03-01

    The results of high-pressure tests of four railgun designs and four projectile types are presented. All tests were conducted at the Los Alamos explosive magnetic-flux compression facility in Ancho Canyon. The data suggest that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than the lowstrength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. The railguns were powered by explosive magneticflux compression generators. Calculations to predict railgun and power supply performance were performed by Kerrisk.

  10. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.R.; Fowler, C.M.; Cummings, C.E.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Parker, J.V.; Marsh, S.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1983-01-01

    The results of high-pressure tests of four railgun designs and four projectile types are presented. All tests were conducted at the Los Alamos explosive magnetic-flux compression facility in Ancho Canyon. The data suggest that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than the low-strength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. The railguns were powered by explosive magnetic-flux compression generators. Calculations to predict railgun and power supply performance were performed.

  11. Flight dynamics of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1989-02-01

    During the past twenty years Sandia National Laboratories and the US Army have vertically gun launched numerous 155mm and eight-inch diameter flight test projectiles. These projectiles are subsequently recovered using an on-board parachute recovery system which is attached to the forward case structure of the projectile. There have been at least five attempts to describe, through analytical and numerical simulations, the translational and rotational motions of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute. However, none of these investigations have correctly described the large nutational motion of the projectile since all of them overlooked the fundamental mechanism which causes these angular motions. Numerical simulations as well as a closed form analytical solution show conclusively that the Magnus moment is responsible for the large nutational motion of the projectile. That is, when the center of pressure for the Magnus force is aft of the center of mass for the projectile, the Magnus moment causes an unstable (or large) nutational motion which always tends to turn the spinning projectile upside down while it is descending on the parachute. Conversely, when the center of mass for the projectile is aft of the center of pressure for the Magnus force, the Magnus moment stabilizes the nutational motion tending to always point the base of the spinning projectile down. The results of this work are utilized to render projectile parachute recovery systems more reliable and to explain what initially may appear to be strange gyrodynamic behavior of a spinning projectile descending on a parachute. 14 refs., 20 figs.

  12. Assessment of the contribution of electron microscopy to nanoparticle characterization sampled with two cascade impactors.

    PubMed

    Noël, Alexandra; L'Espérance, Gilles; Cloutier, Yves; Plamondon, Philippe; Boucher, Julie; Philippe, Suzanne; Dion, Chantal; Truchon, Ginette; Zayed, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the contribution of electron microscopy to the characterization of nanoparticles and compared the degree of variability in sizes observed within each stage when sampled by two cascade impactors: an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). A TiO(2) nanoparticle (5 nm) suspension was aerosolized in an inhalation chamber. Nanoparticles sampled by the impactors were collected on aluminum substrates or TEM carbon-coated copper grids using templates, specifically designed in our laboratories, for scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analysis, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized using both SEM and TEM. Three different types of diameters (inner, outer, and circular) were measured by image analysis based on count and volume, for each impactor stage. Electron microscopy, especially TEM, is well suited for the characterization of nanoparticles. The MOUDI, probably because of the rotation of its collection stages, which can minimize the resuspension of particles, gave more stable results and smaller geometric standard deviations per stage. Our data suggest that the best approach to estimate particle size by electron microscopy would rely on geometric means of measured circular diameters. Overall, the most reliable data were provided by the MOUDI and the TEM sampling technique on carbon-coated copper grids for this specific experiment. This study indicates interesting findings related to the assessment of impactors combined with electron microscopy for nanoparticle characterization. For future research, since cascade impactors are extensively used to characterize nano-aerosol exposure scenarios, high-performance field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) should also be considered. PMID:23356435

  13. Penetration into limestone targets with ogive-nose steel projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, D.J.; Green, M.L.; Forrestal, M.J.; Hanchak, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments into limestone targets with 3.0 caliber-radius-head, 4340 Rc 45 steel projectiles. Powder guns launched two projectiles with length-to-diameter ratios of ten to striking velocities between 0.4 and 1.5 km/s. Projectiles had diameters and masses of 12.7 mm, 0. 117 kg and 25.4 mm, 0.610 kg. Based on data sets with these two projectile scales, we proposed an empirical penetration equation that described the target by its density and an empirical strength constant determined from penetration depth versus striking velocity data.

  14. Prediction of projectile ricochet behavior after water impact.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Yves; Bergeron, Guy

    2012-11-01

    Although not very common, forensic investigation related to projectile ricochet on water can be required when undesirable collateral damage occurs. Predicting the ricochet behavior of a projectile is challenging owing to numerous parameters involved: impact velocity, incident angle, projectile stability, angular velocity, etc. Ricochet characteristics of different projectiles (K50 BMG, 0.5-cal Ball M2, 0.5-cal AP-T C44, 7.62-mm Ball C21, and 5.56-mm Ball C77) were studied in a pool. The results are presented to assess projectile velocity after ricochet, ricochet angle, and projectile azimuth angle based on impact velocity or incident angle for each projectile type. The azimuth ranges show the highest variability at low postricochet velocity. The critical ricochet angles were ranging from 15 to 30°. The average ricochet angles for all projectiles were pretty close for all projectiles at 2.5 and 10° incident angles for the range of velocities studied. PMID:22536929

  15. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. R.; Fowler, C. M.; Cummings, C. E.; Kerrisk, J. F.; Parker, J. V.; Marsh, S. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the results of high-pressure tests involving four railgun designs and four projectile types. Explosive magnetic-flux compression generators were employed to power the railguns. On the basis of the experimental data, it appears that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than low-strength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. While confined in the bore, polycarbonate projectiles can be subjected to pressures as high as 1.3 GPa without shattering. In multishot railguns, it is important to prevent an accumulation of sooty material from the plasma armature in railgun seams.

  16. Design and testing of high-pressure railguns and projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. R.; Fowler, C. M.; Cummings, C. E.; Kerrisk, J. F.; Parker, J. V.; Marsh, S. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1984-03-01

    Attention is given to the results of high-pressure tests involving four railgun designs and four projectile types. Explosive magnetic-flux compression generators were employed to power the railguns. On the basis of the experimental data, it appears that the high-strength projectiles have lower resistance to acceleration than low-strength projectiles, which expand against the bore during acceleration. While confined in the bore, polycarbonate projectiles can be subjected to pressures as high as 1.3 GPa without shattering. In multishot railguns, it is important to prevent an accumulation of sooty material from the plasma armature in railgun seams.

  17. Electric rail gun projectile acceleration to high velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Mccormick, T. J.; Barber, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric rail accelerators are being investigated for application in electric propulsion systems. Several electric propulsion applications require that the rail accelerator be capable of launching projectiles at velocities above 10 km/s. An experimental program was conducted to develop rail accelerator technology for high velocity projectile launch. Several 6 mm bore, 3 m long rail accelerators were fabricated. Projectiles with a mass of 0.2 g were accelerated by plasmas, carrying currents up to 150 kA. Experimental design and results are described. Results indicate that the accelerator performed as predicted for a fraction of the total projectile acceleration. The disparity between predicted and measured results are discussed.

  18. Approximate analysis of balloting motion of railgun projectiles. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, S.H.

    1991-07-01

    This is the final of three reports dealing with the in-bore balloting motion of a projectile fired from an electromagnetic railgun. Knowledge of projectile in-bore motion is important to its design and the design of the railgun. It is a complicated problem since many parameters are involved and it is not easy to determine the interacting relationships between them. To make the problem easier to understand it was analyzed on several levels. Beginning from the basic simple model which computed only the axial motion, more complicated models were introduced in upper levels that included the more significant lateral forces and gun tube vibration effects. This report deals with the approximate analysis of balloting motion. This model considers the effects of the propulsion force, the friction force of the projectile package (projectile and armature), air resistance, gravity, the elastic forces, and the projectile/barrel clearance. To simplify the modeling, a plane motion configuration is assumed. Though the projectile is moving with a varying yaw angle, the axes of the barrel and the projectile package, and the projectile center of gravity are always considered in a plane containing the centerlines of the rails. Equations of motion are derived and solved. A sample computation is performed and the results plotted to give a clearer understanding of projectile in-bore motion.

  19. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Shahinpoor, M.; Hickman, R.

    1988-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A. ); Shahinpoor, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Hickman, R. )

    1989-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed.

  1. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Ang, J.A.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Sauve, G.L.; Hickman, R.J.

    1992-03-20

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experiment at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  2. Microcraters formed in glass by low density projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeville, J.-C.; Vedder, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Microcraters were produced in soda-lime glass by the impact of low density projectiles of polystyrene with masses between 0.7 and 62 picograms and velocities between 2 and 14 kilometers per second. The morphology of the craters depends on the velocity and angle of incidence of the projectiles. The transitions in morphology of the craters formed by polystyrene spheres occur at higher velocities than they do for more dense projectiles. For oblique impact, the craters are elongated and shallow with the spallation threshold occuring at higher velocity. For normal incidence, the total displaced mass of the target material per unit of projectile kinetic energy increases slowly with the energy.

  3. Penetration of projectiles into granular targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.

    2013-06-01

    Energetic collisions of subatomic particles with fixed or moving targets have been very valuable to penetrate into the mysteries of nature. But the mysteries are quite intriguing when projectiles and targets are macroscopically immense. We know that countless debris wandering in space impacted (and still do) large asteroids, moons and planets; and that millions of craters on their surfaces are traces of such collisions. By classifying and studying the morphology of such craters, geologists and astrophysicists obtain important clues to understand the origin and evolution of the Solar System. This review surveys knowledge about crater phenomena in the planetary science context, avoiding detailed descriptions already found in excellent papers on the subject. Then, it examines the most important results reported in the literature related to impact and penetration phenomena in granular targets obtained by doing simple experiments. The main goal is to discern whether both schools, one that takes into account the right ingredients (planetary bodies and very high energies) but cannot physically reproduce the collisions, and the other that easily carries out the collisions but uses laboratory ingredients (small projectiles and low energies), can arrive at a synergistic intersection point.

  4. Powder metallurgy process for manufacturing core projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Taufik; Setyowati, Vuri Ayu; Widyastuti

    2013-09-01

    Bullets are part of the defense equipment which the development is very rapid. There are a variety of forms but the bullet Lead is a metal that has always been used for applications projectiles. Lead core constituent materials are combined with antimony. In this research will be conducted by making the material for the core projectile with Tin Lead. The addition of Tin will increase the stiffness of Lead which is soft in nature. The Lead Tin composition variation was given in 10% weight of Sn. The manufacturing process using powder metallurgy using temperature and holding time variations of sintering at 100, 150, and 200°C for 1,2, and 3 hours. XRD samples will be tested to determine the form and phase morphology was observed using SEM-EDX. These results revealed that Pb-10%wtSn Composite which is sintered in temperature 200°C for 3 hours has the greatest density, 10.695 g/cm3 as well as the smallest porosity, 2.2%. In agreement with theoretical analysis that increasing higher temperature and longer holding time give decrease in porosity level due to activation energy which further promotes grain growth. Moreover, there is no intermetallic phase formation as well as no oxide found on composites.

  5. Penetration of projectiles into granular targets.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2013-06-01

    Energetic collisions of subatomic particles with fixed or moving targets have been very valuable to penetrate into the mysteries of nature. But the mysteries are quite intriguing when projectiles and targets are macroscopically immense. We know that countless debris wandering in space impacted (and still do) large asteroids, moons and planets; and that millions of craters on their surfaces are traces of such collisions. By classifying and studying the morphology of such craters, geologists and astrophysicists obtain important clues to understand the origin and evolution of the Solar System. This review surveys knowledge about crater phenomena in the planetary science context, avoiding detailed descriptions already found in excellent papers on the subject. Then, it examines the most important results reported in the literature related to impact and penetration phenomena in granular targets obtained by doing simple experiments. The main goal is to discern whether both schools, one that takes into account the right ingredients (planetary bodies and very high energies) but cannot physically reproduce the collisions, and the other that easily carries out the collisions but uses laboratory ingredients (small projectiles and low energies), can arrive at a synergistic intersection point. PMID:23660625

  6. Evaluation of an abbreviated impactor for fine particle fraction (FPF) determination of metered dose inhalers (MDI).

    PubMed

    Guo, Changning; Ngo, Diem; Ahadi, Shafiq; Doub, William H

    2013-09-01

    Abbreviated impactors have been developed recently to allow more rapid evaluation of inhalation products as alternates to the eight-stage Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) which has been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for assessing aerodynamic particle size distribution. In this paper, a two-stage abbreviated impactor, Westech Fine Particle Dose Impactor (WFPD), was used to characterize the aerodynamic particle size of metered dose inhaler (MDI) products, and the results were compared with those obtained using the standard eight-stage ACI. Seven commercial MDI products, with different propellants (chlorofluorocarbon/hydrofluoroalkane) and formulation types (suspension/solution, dry/normal/wet), were tested in this study by both WFPD and ACI. Substantially equivalent measures of fine particle fraction were obtained for most of the tested MDI products, but larger coarse particle fraction and extra-fine particle fraction values were measured from WFPD relative to those measured using the ACI. Use of the WFPD also produced more wall loss than the ACI. Therefore, it is recommended that the system suitability be evaluated on a product-by-product basis to establish substantial equivalency before implementing an abbreviated impactor measurement methodology for routine use in inhaler product characterization. PMID:23780781

  7. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  8. Response of laminated composite plates to low-speed impact by different impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Chunchu; Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic procedure has been developed to determine the transient response of simply supported, retangular laminated composite plates subjected to impact loads from airgun-propelled or drop-weight impactors. A first-order shear deformation theory has been included in the analysis to represent properly any local short-wavelength transient bending response. The impact force has been modeled as a locally distributed load with cosine-cosine distribution. A double Fourier series expansion and the Timoshenko small increment method have been used to determine the contact force, out-of-plane deflections, and in-plane strains and stresses at any plate location due to an impact force at any plate location. The results of experimental and analytical studies are compared for quasi-isotropic laminates. The results indicate the importance of including transverse shear deformation effects in the analysis for predicting the response of laminated plates subjected to both airgun-propelled and dropped-weight impactors. The results also indicate that plate boundary conditions influence the axial strains more significantly than the contact force for a dropped-weight impactor. The results of parametric studies identify a scaling approach based on impactor momentum that may account for the differences in the responses of plates impacted by airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors.

  9. Fundamental Aerodynamic Investigations for Development of Arrow-Stabilized Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurzweg, Hermann

    1947-01-01

    The numerous patent applications on arrow-stabilized projectiles indicate that the idea of projectiles without spin is not new, but has appeared in various proposals throughout the last decades. As far as projectiles for subsonic speeds are concerned, suitable shapes have been developed for sometime, for example, numerous grenades. Most of the patent applications, though, are not practicable particularly for projectiles with supersonic speed. This is because the inventor usually does not have any knowledge of aerodynamic flow around the projectile nor any particular understanding of the practical solution. The lack of wind tunnels for the development of projectiles made it necessary to use firing tests for development. These are obviously extremely tedious or expensive and lead almost always to failures. The often expressed opinion that arrow-stabilized projectiles cannot fly supersonically can be traced to this condition. That this is not the case has been shown for the first time by Roechling on long projectiles with foldable fins. Since no aerodynamic investigations were made for the development of these projectiles, only tedious series of firing tests with systematic variation of the fins could lead to satisfactory results. These particular projectiles though have a disadvantage which lies in the nature cf foldable fins. They occasionally do not open uniformly in flight, thus causing unsymmetry in flow and greater scatter. The junctions of fins and body are very bad aerodynamically and increase the drag. It must be possible to develop high-performance arrow-stabilized projectiles based on the aerodynamic research conducted during the last few years at Peenemuende and new construction ideas. Thus the final shape, ready for operational use, could be developed in the wind tunnel without loss of expensive time in firing tests. The principle of arrow-stabilized performance has been applied to a large number of caliburs which were stabilized by various means Most

  10. Corrected Launch Speed for a Projectile Motion Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Justin M.; Boleman, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    At our university, students in introductory physics classes perform a laboratory exercise to measure the range of a projectile fired at an assigned angle. A set of photogates is used to determine the initial velocity of the projectile (the launch velocity). We noticed a systematic deviation between the experimentally measured range and the range…

  11. Microcraters formed in glass by projectiles of various densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedder, J. F.; Mandeville, J.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment was conducted investigating the effect of projectile density on the structure and size of craters in soda lime glass and fused quartz. The projectiles were spheres of polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB), aluminum, and iron with velocities between 0.5 and 15 km/sec and diameters between 0.4 and 5 microns. The projectile densities spanned the range expected for primary and secondary particles of micrometer size at the lunar surface, and the velocities spanned the lower range of micrometeoroid velocities and the upper range of secondary projectile velocities. There are changes in crater morphology as the impact velocity increases, and the transitions occur at lower velocities for the projectiles of higher density. The sequence of morphological features of the craters found for PS-DVB impacting soda lime glass for increasing impact velocity, described in a previous work (Mandeville and Vedder, 1971), also occurs in fused quartz and in both targets with the more dense aluminum and iron projectiles. Each transition in morphology occurs at impact velocities generating a certain pressure in the target. High density projectiles require a lower velocity than low-density projectiles to generate a given shock pressure.

  12. Adaptation of a Cascade Impactor to Flight Measurement of Droplet Size in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joseph; Kleinknecht, Kenneth S.

    1951-01-01

    A cascade impactor, an instrument for obtaining: the size distribution of droplets borne in a low-velocity air stream, was adapted for flight cloud droplet-size studies. The air containing the droplets was slowed down from flight speed by a diffuser to the inlet-air velocity of the impactor. The droplets that enter the impactor impinge on four slides coated with magnesium oxide. Each slide catches a different size range. The relation between the size of droplet impressions and the droplet size was evaluated so that the droplet-size distributions may be found from these slides. The magnesium oxide coating provides a permanent record. of the droplet impression that is not affected by droplet evaporation after the. droplets have impinged.

  13. Evaluation of aerosol sizing characteristic of an impactor using imaging plate technique.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Naureen Mahbub; Iida, Takao; Saito, Fumihiro; Koarashi, Jun; Yamasaki, Keizou; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun

    2007-01-01

    The activity-size distribution of radon decay products are normally determined using two approaches: direct and indirect. The present study utilises the direct approach to evaluate sizing information of a low pressure cascade impactor using imaging plate (IP) technique for radon decay products. The experiment verified the use of the collection media as suggested by the manufacturer of impactor and proposed a few improvements toward sizing characteristics of impactor. The obtained relative activity-size distribution of radon decay products presents a sharp unimodal log-normal distribution of the particle characterised by activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 268 nm and geometric standard deviation (sigma(g)) of 1.66. The obtained data with all the suggested improvements were evaluated by the data obtained from a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, Model 3934, TSI Inc), as reference data. The verification lead to a derivative area ratio of 0.803 between the reference and experimental data. PMID:16936289

  14. The ISIS Mission Concept: An Impactor for Surface and Interior Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesley, Steven R.; Elliot, John O.; Abell, Paul A.; Asphaug, Erik; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Lam, Try; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2013-01-01

    The Impactor for Surface and Interior Science (ISIS) mission concept is a kinetic asteroid impactor mission to the target of NASA's OSIRIS-REx (Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer) asteroid sample return mission. The ISIS mission concept calls for the ISIS spacecraft, an independent and autonomous smart impactor, to guide itself to a hyper-velocity impact with 1999 RQ36 while the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft observes the collision. Later the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft descends to reconnoiter the impact site and measure the momentum imparted to the asteroid through the impact before departing on its journey back to Earth. In this paper we discuss the planetary science, human exploration and impact mitigation drivers for mission, and we describe the current mission concept and flight system design.

  15. Three-Dimensional Shapes and Impactor Size Estimation of Stardust Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iida, Y.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Kadono, T.; Nakamura, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Nakano, T.; Uesugi, K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Impact tracks formed by cometary dust capture in silica aerogel collectors in the Stardust mission [1] have a variety of shapes, showing diversity of the cometary dust [2]. We have investigated 3-D structures and elemental distributions of three impact tracks using synchrotron radiation x-ray analyses (microtomography and XRF) as one of the preliminary examination [3]. In this study, additional five tracks were investigated by the same analytical method. Impactor sizes of the tracks were estimated from the track entrance sizes and Fe abundances. Size parameters, such as length, of the tracks were normalized by the impactor size to compare track shape

  16. Projectile impact Hugoniot parameters for selected materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M G

    1989-08-01

    The Rankine Hugoniot equation relating the conversion of momentum across a shock front and the empirical relationship for shock velocity as a function of particle velocity are used to calculate the impact pressures for selected materials. The shock velocity and particle velocities are then calculated as a function of impact pressures. The calculated data are graphically presented sets of three figures for the selected materials as follows: Impact pressure as a function of impact velocity, impact pressure as a function of particle velocity, impact pressure as a function of shock velocity. Given the projectile impact velocity and material Hugoniot information, this graphical representation of the data allows for a fast approximation of the impact pressure particle velocity, and shock velocity in the target material. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Turbulent Flow Past Projectiles: A Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2010-11-01

    Projectiles with free spinning bases are often used for smart munitions to provide effective control, stability and terminal guidance. Computational investigations are performed for flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to and separated at various distances from a non-spinning fore-body. The energy spectrum is modified to incorporate the effects of swirl and rotation using a parametric characterization of the model coefficients. An efficient finite-volume algorithm is used to solve the time-averaged equations of motion and energy along with the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation. Computations are performed for both rigid cylinders as well as cylinders with free-spinning bases. Experimental data for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions obtained from subsonic wind tunnel with sting-mounted spinning cylinders is used for validating the computational findings.

  18. Microscopic impactor debris in the soil around Kamil crater (Egypt): Inventory, distribution, total mass, and implications for the impact scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folco, Luigi; D'Orazio, Massimo; Fazio, Agnese; Cordier, Carole; Zeoli, Antonio; Ginneken, Matthias; El-Barkooky, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    We report on the microscopic impactor debris around Kamil crater (45 m in diameter, Egypt) collected during our 2010 geophysical expedition. The hypervelocity impact of Gebel Kamil (Ni-rich ataxite) on a sandstone target produced a downrange ejecta curtain of microscopic impactor debris due SE-SW of the crater (extending ~300,000 m2, up to ~400 m from the crater), in agreement with previous determination of the impactor trajectory. The microscopic impactor debris include vesicular masses, spherules, and coatings of dark impact melt glass which is a mixture of impactor and target materials (Si-, Fe-, and Al-rich glass), plus Fe-Ni oxide spherules and mini shrapnel, documenting that these products can be found in craters as small as few tens of meters in diameter. The estimated mass of the microscopic impactor debris (<290 kg) derived from Ni concentrations in the soil is a small fraction of the total impactor mass (~10 t) in the form of macroscopic shrapnel. That Kamil crater was generated by a relatively small impactor is consistent with literature estimates of its pre-atmospheric mass (>20 t, likely 50-60 t).

  19. Experimental and numerical study on fragmentation of steel projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Råkvaag, K. G.; Børvik, T.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Westermann, I.

    2012-08-01

    A previous experimental study on penetration and perforation of circular Weldox 460E target plates with varying thicknesses struck by blunt-nose projectiles revealed that fragmentation of the projectile occurred if the target thickness or impact velocity exceeded a certain value. Thus, numerical simulations that do not account for fragmentation during impact can underestimate the perforation resistance of protective structures. Previous numerical studies have focused primarily on the target plate behaviour. This study considers the behaviour of the projectile and its possible fragmentation during impact. Hardened steel projectiles were launched at varying velocities in a series of Taylor tests. The impact events were captured using a high-speed camera. Fractography of the fragmented projectiles showed that there are several fracture mechanisms present during the fragmentation process. Tensile tests of the projectile material revealed that the hardened material has considerable variations in yield stress and fracture stress and strain. In the finite element model, the stress-strain behaviour from tensile tests was used to model the projectile material with solid elements and the modified Johnson-Cook constitutive relation. Numerical simulations incorporating the variations in material properties are capable of reproducing the experimental fracture patterns, albeit the predicted fragmentation velocities are too low.

  20. Veterinary Forensics: Firearms and Investigation of Projectile Injury.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Siemens, N; Brower, A I

    2016-09-01

    Projectile injury represents an estimated 14% of reported animal cruelty cases in the United States. Cases involving projectiles are complicated by gross similarities to other common types of injury, including bite wounds and motor vehicle injuries, by weapons and ammunition not commonly recognized or understood by veterinary medical professionals, and by required expertise beyond that employed in routine postmortem examination. This review describes the common types of projectile injuries encountered within the United States, as well as firearms and ammunition associated with this form of injury. The 3 stages of ballistics-internal, external, and terminal-and wounding capacity are discussed. A general understanding of firearms, ammunition, and ballistics is necessary before pursuing forensic projectile cases. The forensic necropsy is described, including gunshot wound examination, projectile trajectories, different imaging procedures, collection and storage of projectile evidence, and potential advanced techniques for gunpowder analysis. This review presents aspects of projectile injury investigation that must be considered in tandem with standard postmortem practices and procedures to ensure reliable conclusions are reached for medicolegal as well as diagnostic purposes. PMID:27312366

  1. ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR THE CORRECTION OF BIOAEROSOL DATA COLLECTED WITH MULTIPLE JET IMPACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple jet impactors are routinely used to measure airborne microbial concentrations in a variety of work and residential environments. nalyses of data collected with these units, however, should account for the possibility of multiple impactions at single sites. ata are usuall...

  2. DESIGN AND CALIBRATION OF THE EPA PM 2.5 WELL IMPACTOR NINETY-SIX (WINS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA well-type impactor ninety-six (WINS) was designed and calibrated to serve as a particle size separation device for the EPA reference method sampler for particulate matter under 2.5 um aerodynamic diameter. The WINS was designed to operate downstream of a PM10 inlet at a...

  3. DESIGN AND CALIBRATION OF THE EPA PM2.5 WELL IMPACTOR NINETY-SIX (WINS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA well-type impactor ninety-six (WINS) was designed and calibrated to serve as a particle size separation device for the EPA reference method sampler for particulate matter under 2.5 um aerodynamic diameter. The WINS was designed to operate downstream of a PM10 inlet at a v...

  4. Corrected Launch Speed for a Projectile Motion Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Justin M.; Boleman, Michael W.

    2013-09-01

    At our university, students in introductory physics classes perform a laboratory exercise to measure the range of a projectile fired at an assigned angle. A set of photogates is used to determine the initial velocity of the projectile (the launch velocity). We noticed a systematic deviation between the experimentally measured range and the range calculated using the speed as determined by the photogates. In this paper, we will discuss the origin of this systematic error and derive a simple formula to correct it. In particular, we find that the launch speed given by our instrument is significantly different from the actual launch speed of our projectile.

  5. Microcraters formed in glass by low density projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeville, J.-C.; Vedder, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Microcraters were produced in soda-lime glass by the impact of low density projectiles of polystyrene (p = 1.06 g/cu cm) with masses between 0.7 and 62 picograms and velocities between 2 and 14 km/s. The morphology of the craters depended on the velocity and the angle of incidence of the projectiles and these are discussed in detail. It was found that the transitions in morphology of the craters formed by polystyrene spheres occurred at higher velocities than they did for more dense projectiles.

  6. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of {open_quotes}rough-handling{close_quotes}-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  7. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of [open quotes]rough-handling[close quotes]-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  8. Comparison of less lethal 40 mm sponge projectile and the 37 mm projectile for injury assessment on human thorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsiampa, N.; Robbe, C.; Oukara, A.; Papy, A.

    2012-08-01

    Since there is an increasing interest in avoiding human body injury in diverse situations like crowd control or peacekeeping missions, less lethal ammunition are more and more used. In this study we focus only on kinetic energy non-lethal (KENLW) projectiles. Their desired effects on human body are the temporary incapacitation through blunt trauma. There are different types of KENLW projectiles ranging from rigid to deformable projectiles. Unfortunately, the effects of such projectiles are not really well known as it is difficult to measure the force transmitted to the human body or the related deformation. Because the potential of injury excludes human living tests, tests are performed on cadavers, animals or human tissue surrogates. Besides these tests, numerical simulations are more and more used to gain more understanding, to assess or to predict the effects of this kind of projectile on human body. In this paper a comparison based on the viscous criterion between the 37 mm rigid projectile and the 40 mm sponge projectile was made.

  9. On the Nature of the Impactor That Formed the Shackleton Crater on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, Svetlana G.; Feoktistova, Ekaterina A.; Shevchenko, Vladislav V.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper attempts to assess the characteristics of the impactor that formed the Shackleton crater, located at the south pole of the Moon. The crater's morphometric parameters were analyzed based on the data of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Conclusions were drawn regarding the possible range of the impact angle and the parameters of the transient crater, such as depth and volume. The thickness of ejecta deposits on the transient crater rim and the volume of these deposits at a certain distance from the crater rim were assessed. These assessments enabled determining the type and characteristics of impactors (velocity, density, size, and impact angle) that could have formed the Shackleton crater. It was shown that the Shackleton crater could have been formed by an impact of a low-velocity (3 km/s) comets with diameter 4-4.5 km, chondrite or achondrite with a diameter of 2 km at a 45°-50° angle, whose velocity did not exceed 6 km/s, as well as stony-iron or iron-nickel impactors with a 1-2 km diameter for stony-iron asteroids and 1-1.5 km for iron-nickel asteroids. The impact velocity of stony-iron impactors, according to the authors' calculations, can reach 12 km/s. The impact velocities of iron-nickel asteroids range from 6 to 9 km/s. The impactor's substance mass that could have remained in the crater after it was formed was assessed.

  10. Measurements of size-segregated emission particles by a sampling system based on the cascade impactor

    SciTech Connect

    Janja Tursic; Irena Grgic; Axel Berner; Jaroslav Skantar; Igor Cuhalev

    2008-02-01

    A special sampling system for measurements of size-segregated particles directly at the source of emission was designed and constructed. The central part of this system is a low-pressure cascade impactor with 10 collection stages for the size ranges between 15 nm and 16 {mu}m. Its capability and suitability was proven by sampling particles at the stack (100{sup o}C) of a coal-fired power station in Slovenia. These measurements showed very reasonable results in comparison with a commercial cascade impactor for PM10 and PM2.5 and with a plane device for total suspended particulate matter (TSP). The best agreement with the measurements made by a commercial impactor was found for concentrations of TSP above 10 mg m{sup -3}, i.e., the average PM2.5/PM10 ratios obtained by a commercial impactor and by our impactor were 0.78 and 0.80, respectively. Analysis of selected elements in size-segregated emission particles additionally confirmed the suitability of our system. The measurements showed that the mass size distributions were generally bimodal, with the most pronounced mass peak in the 1-2 {mu}m size range. The first results of elemental mass size distributions showed some distinctive differences in comparison to the most common ambient anthropogenic sources (i.e., traffic emissions). For example, trace elements, like Pb, Cd, As, and V, typically related to traffic emissions, are usually more abundant in particles less than 1 {mu}m in size, whereas in our specific case they were found at about 2 {mu}m. Thus, these mass size distributions can be used as a signature of this source. Simultaneous measurements of size-segregated particles at the source and in the surrounding environment can therefore significantly increase the sensitivity of the contribution of a specific source to the actual ambient concentrations. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Perforation of woven fabric by spherical projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, V.P.W.; Tan, V.B.C.; Tay, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Rectangular specimens of Twaron{reg_sign} fabric, clamped on two opposite sides, are subjected to impact perforation by 9.5 mm diameter spherical steel projectiles at speeds ranging from 140 m/s to 420 m/s. This plain woven fabric, comprising PPTA (poly-paraphenylene terepthalamide) fibers, is commonly employed in flexible an-nor applications. Its perforation response is examined in terms of residual velocity, energy absorbed and resulting deformation patterns. The existence of a critical or transition impact velocity, beyond which there is a significant reduction in energy absorbed by perforation, is observed. Differences in creasing and deformation induced in specimens are also demarcated by this transition impact velocity. Effects of difference in boundary conditions (clamped and free) on yarn breakage are also noted. A numerical model, based on an initially orthogonal network of pin-jointed bars interconnected at nodes, is formulated to simulate the fabric. Fiber yam mechanical properties are represented via a three-element spring-dashpot model which encapsulates viscoelastic behavior and fiber failure. Numerical results exhibit good correlation with experimental observations in terms of prediction of threshold perforation velocity, energy absorbed, occurrence of a transition critical velocity and fabric deformation characteristics.

  12. 22. Emplacement no. 1 showing well for projectile hoist at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Emplacement no. 1 showing well for projectile hoist at right. at left is passage toward the shot gallery. View looking northwest - Fort Wadsworth Battery Romeyn B. Ayers, South side of Ayers Road, Staten Island, Rosebank, Richmond County, NY

  13. Penetration analysis of projectile with inclined concrete target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. W.; Yoo, Y. H.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis result of projectile penetration with concrete target. We applied dynamic material properties of 4340 steels, aluminium and explosive for projectile body. Dynamic material properties were measured with static tensile testing machine and Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Moreover, we used three concrete damage models included in LS-DYNA 3D, such as SOIL_CONCRETE, CSCM (cap model with smooth interaction) and CONCRETE_DAMAGE (K&C concrete) models. Strain rate effect for concrete material is important to predict the fracture deformation and shape of concrete, and penetration depth for projectiles. CONCRETE_DAMAGE model with strain rate effect also applied to penetration analysis. Analysis result with CSCM model shows good agreement with penetration experimental data. The projectile trace and fracture shapes of concrete target were compared with experimental data.

  14. 32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER SLAB AND UNDERSIDE OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Oblique Perforation of Thick Metallic Plates by Rigid Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Qingming; Fan, Saucheong

    2006-08-01

    Oblique perforation of thick metallic plates by rigid projectiles with various nose shapes is studied in this paper. Two perforation mechanisms, i.e., the hole enlargement for a sharp projectile nose and the plugging formation for a blunt projectile nose, are considered in the proposed analytical model. It is shown that the perforation of a thick plate is dominated by several non-dimensional numbers, i.e., the impact function, the geometry function of projectile, the non-dimensional thickness of target and the impact obliquity. Explicit formulae are obtained to predict the ballistic limit, residual velocity and directional change for the oblique perforation of thick metallic plates. The proposed model is able to predict the critical condition for the occurrence of ricochet. The proposed model is validated by comparing the predictions with other existing models and independent experimental data.

  16. Fusion and direct reactions for strongly and weakly bound projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugi, M.; Lang, J.; Müller, R.; Ungricht, E.; Bodek, K.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Magiera, A.; Strzałkowski, A.; Willim, G.

    1981-09-01

    The interaction of 6Li, 9Be and 12C projectiles with a 28Si target was investigated by measuring the angular distributions of the elastically scattered projectiles and of the emitted protons, deuterons and α-particles. The experiment was performed in order to deduce direct and compound nucleus process contributions to the total reaction cross section and to study the influence of the projectile structure on the relative importance of these two mechanisms. Optical model parameters and therefore the total reaction cross section are strongly influenced by the binding energy of the projectile. The parameters of the Glas-Mosel model describing the fusion reaction vary smoothly with the atomic number. In the system 9Be + 28Si around 50% of all reactions are direct processes even at energies near the Coulomb barrier, whereas in the other systems the direct part amounts to 15 % ( 12C) and 30 % ( 6Li) only.

  17. Projectile-power-compressed magnetic-field pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Barlett, R.H.; Takemori, H.T.; Chase, J.B.

    1983-03-17

    Design considerations and experimental results are presented of a compressed magnetic field pulsed energy source. A 100-mm-diameter, gun-fired projectile of approx. 2MJ kinetic energy was the input energy source. An initial magnetic field was trapped and compressed by the projectile. With a shorted load, a magajoule in a nanohenry was the design goal, i.e., 50 percent energy transformation from kinetic to magnetic. Five percent conversion was the highest recorded before gauge failure.

  18. Classification of Low Velocity Impactors Using Spiral Sensing of Acousto-Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbasi, Chijioke Raphael

    The non-linear elastodynamics of a flat plate subjected to low velocity foreign body impacts is studied, resembling the space debris impacts on the space structure. The work is based on a central hypothesis that in addition to identifying the impact locations, the material properties of the foreign objects can also be classified using acousto-ultrasonic signals (AUS). Simultaneous localization of impact point and classification of impact object is quite challenging using existing state-of-the-art structural health monitoring (SHM) approaches. Available techniques seek to report the exact location of impact on the structure, however, the reported information is likely to have errors from nonlinearity and variability in the AUS signals due to materials, geometry, boundary conditions, wave dispersion, environmental conditions, sensor and hardware calibration etc. It is found that the frequency and speed of the guided wave generated in the plate can be quantized based on the impactor's relationship with the plate (i.e. the wave speed and the impactor's mechanical properties are coupled). In this work, in order to characterize the impact location and mechanical properties of imapctors, nonlinear transient phenomenon is empirically studied to decouple the understanding using the dominant frequency band (DFB) and Lag Index (LI) of the acousto-ultrasonic signals. Next the understanding was correlated with the elastic modulus of the impactor to predict transmitted force histories. The proposed method presented in this thesis is especially applicable for SHM where sensors cannot be widely or randomly distributed. Thus a strategic organization and localization of the sensors is achieved by implementing the geometric configuration of Theodorous Spiral Sensor Cluster (TSSC). The performance of TSSC in characterizing the impactor types are compared with other conventional sensor clusters (e.g. square, circular, random etc.) and it is shown that the TSSC is advantageous over

  19. Response of simulated propellants and explosives to projectile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, W.

    1990-11-01

    This dissertation deals with experimental, analytical and numerical investigations into the response of two types of simulated propellants and explosives, known as Propergol, to projectile impact. The targets consisted of a polymeric mixture composed of potassium chloride, plaster of Paris and a polyurethane binder. Following the determination of the constitutive behavior of Propergol, experiments were conducted to study their penetration, perforation and fragmentation by projectiles. Both pneumatic and powder guns were employed in the tests, perfragmentation by projectiles. Both pneumatic and powder guns were employed in the tests, permitting impact velocities ranging from 40 to 1100 m/s, for flat- and conically-tipped as well as armor-piercing projectiles. The specimens include monolithic, composite and constrained Propergol circular disks and cylinders of 140 mm diameter with thicknesses ranging from 9 to 90 mm. Penetration tests were also conducted on model warheads loaded with the simulant material. Ballistic limit velocities for various target/projectile combinations were determined. Damage modes, such as cracking and fragmentation, were examined using experimental evidence including high-speed film data and microscopic photographs. Two types of fragments, Propergol clusters and crystalline particles, were recognized, and their size distributions were found to fit exponential functions. The dependent of fragment number and volume on initial projectile velocity was also studied. 103 refs., 172 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Orientation estimation algorithm applied to high-spin projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. F.; Lin, J.; Zhang, X. M.; Li, J.

    2014-06-01

    High-spin projectiles are low cost military weapons. Accurate orientation information is critical to the performance of the high-spin projectiles control system. However, orientation estimators have not been well translated from flight vehicles since they are too expensive, lack launch robustness, do not fit within the allotted space, or are too application specific. This paper presents an orientation estimation algorithm specific for these projectiles. The orientation estimator uses an integrated filter to combine feedback from a three-axis magnetometer, two single-axis gyros and a GPS receiver. As a new feature of this algorithm, the magnetometer feedback estimates roll angular rate of projectile. The algorithm also incorporates online sensor error parameter estimation performed simultaneously with the projectile attitude estimation. The second part of the paper deals with the verification of the proposed orientation algorithm through numerical simulation and experimental tests. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the orientation estimator can effectively estimate the attitude of high-spin projectiles. Moreover, online sensor calibration significantly enhances the estimation performance of the algorithm.

  1. a Study of Ricochet Phenomenon for Inclined Impact of Projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Young-Shin

    In this study, the numerical simulation using AUTODYN-3D program was investigated for trajectory prediction for inclined impacts of projectiles. The penetration and perforation of polycarbonate(PC) plate by 7.62 mm projectile was investigated numerically. The characteristic structure of the projectile's trajectory in the PC plates was studied. Two combined failure criteria were used in the target plate, and the target plate was modeled with the properties of polycarbonate for simulating the ricochet phenomenon. The numerical analyses were used to study the effect of the angle of inclination on the trajectory and kinetic energy of the projectile. The dynamic deformation behaviors tests of PC were compared with numerical simulation results which can be used for predictive purpose. Ricochet phenomenon for angles of inclination of 0° ≤ θ ≤ 20° in the analysis. The projectile perforated the plate for θ > 30°, thus defined a failure envelope for numerical configuration. The numerical analyses was used to study the effect under the projectile impact velocity on the depth of penetration(DOP).

  2. Effect of tubing deposition, breathing pattern, and temperature on aerosol mass distribution measured by cascade impactor.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Burak K; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols produced by nebulizers are often characterized on the bench using cascade impactors. We studied the effects of connecting tubing, breathing pattern, and temperature on mass-weighted aerodynamic particle size aerosol distributions (APSD) measured by cascade impaction. Our experimental setup consisted of a piston ventilator, low-flow (1.0 L/min) cascade impactor, two commercially available nebulizers that produced large and small particles, and two "T"-shaped tubes called "Tconnector(cascade)" and "Tconnector(nebulizer)" placed above the impactor and the nebulizer, respectively. Radiolabeled normal saline was nebulized using an airtank at 50 PSIG; APSD, mass balance, and Tconnector(cascade) deposition were measured with a gamma camera and radioisotope calibrator. Flow through the circuit was defined by the air tank (standing cloud, 10 L/min) with or without a piston pump, which superimposed a sinusoidal flow on the flow from the air tank (tidal volume and frequency of breathing). Experiments were performed at room temperature and in a cooled environment. With increasing tidal volume and frequency, smaller particles entered the cascade impactor (decreasing MMAD; e.g., Misty-Neb, 4.2 +/- 0.9 microm at lowest ventilation and 2.7 +/- 0.1 microm at highest, p = 0.042). These effects were reduced in magnitude for the nebulizer that produced smaller particles (AeroTech II, MMAD 1.8 +/- 0.1 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 microm; p = 0.0044). Deposition on Tconnector(cascade) increased with ventilation but was independent of cascade impactor flow. Imaging of the Tconnector(cascade) revealed a pattern of deposition unaffected by cascade impactor flow. These measurements suggest that changes in MMAD with ventilation were not artifacts of tubing deposition in the Tconnector(cascade). At lower temperatures, APSD distributions were more polydisperse. Our data suggest that, during patient inhalation, changes in particle distribution occur that are related to conditions in the tubing and

  3. SIMS Studies of Allende Projectiles Fired into Stardust-type Aluminum Foils at 6 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Stadermann, Frank J.; Stephan, Thomas; Floss, Christine; Leitner, Jan; Marhas, Kuljeet; Horz, Friedrich

    2006-01-01

    We have explored the feasibility of C-, N-, and O-isotopic measurements by NanoSIMS and of elemental abundance determinations by TOF-SIMS on residues of Allende projectiles that impacted Stardust-type aluminum foils in the laboratory at 6 km/s. These investigations are part of a consortium study aimed at providing the foundation for the characterization of matter associated with micro-craters that were produced during the encounter of the Stardust space probe with comet 81P/Wild 2. Eleven experimental impact craters were studied by NanoSIMS and eighteen by TOF-SIMS. Crater sizes were between 3 and 190 microns. The NanoSIMS measurements have shown that the crater morphology has only a minor effect on spatial resolution and on instrumental mass fractionation. The achievable spatial resolution is always better than 200 nm, and C- and O-isotopic ratios can be measured with a precision of several percent at a scale of several 100 nm, the typical size of presolar grains. This clearly demonstrates that presolar matter, provided it survives the impact into the aluminum foil partly intact, is recognizable even if embedded in material of Solar System origin. TOF-SIMS studies are restricted to materials from the crater rim. The element ratios of the major rockforming elements in the Allende projectiles are well characterized by the TOF-SIMS measurements, indicating that fractionation of those elements during impact can be expected to be negligible. This permits information on the type of impactor material to be obtained. For any more detailed assignments to specific chondrite groups, however, information on the abundances of the light elements, especially C, is crucial.

  4. Mission opportunities for the flight validation of the kinetic impactor concept for asteroid deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Sonia; Barbee, Brent W.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Getzandanner, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    The kinetic impactor technique for deflecting near-Earth objects (NEOs), whereby a spacecraft is directed to collide with a NEO to alter its orbit via momentum transfer, is one of several proposed methods for defending Earth against hazardous NEOs (asteroids and comets). In this paper we present detailed mission design concepts for a feasible and affordable kinetic impactor flight validation mission deployed to a currently known near-Earth asteroid (NEA). Several filter steps are devised that utilize relevant criteria to optimally balance key parameters, such as approach phase angle, estimated NEA diameter, relative velocity at intercept, and current NEA orbit knowledge, and produce refined lists of the most promising candidate target NEAs.

  5. Contaminant Interferences with SIMS Analyses of Microparticle Impactor Residues on LDEF Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Batchelor, D.; Griffis, D. P.; Hunter, J. L.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental analyses of impactor residues on high purity surface exposed to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment for 5.8 years on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has revealed several probable sources for microparticles at this altitude, including natural micrometeorites and manmade debris ranging from paint pigments to bits of stainless steel. A myriad of contamination interferences were identified and their effects on impactor debris identification mitigated during the course of this study. These interferences included pre-, post-, and in-flight deposited particulate surface contaminants, as well as indigenous heterogeneous material contaminants. Non-flight contaminants traced to human origins, including spittle and skin oils, contributed significant levels of alkali-rich carbonaceous interferences. A ubiquitous layer of in-flight deposited silicaceous contamination varied in thickness with location on LDEF and proximity to active electrical fields. In-flight deposited (low velocity) contaminants included urine droplets and bits of metal film from eroded thermal blankets.

  6. Mission Opportunities for the Flight Validation of the Kinetic Impactor Concept for Asteroid Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Sonia; Barbee, Brent W.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Getzandanner, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The kinetic impactor technique for deflecting near-Earth objects (NEOs), whereby a spacecraft is directed to collide with a NEO to alter its orbit via momentum transfer, is one of several proposed methods for defendingEarth against hazardous NEOs (asteroids and comets). In this paper we present detailed mission design concepts for a notionally feasible and aff ordable kinetic impactor flight validation mission deployed to a currently known near-Earth asteroid (NEA). Several filter steps are devised that utilize relevant criteria to optimally balance keyparameters, such as approach phase angle, estimated NEA diameter, relative velocity at intercept, and current NEA orbit knowledge, and produce refined lists of the most promising candidate target NEAs.

  7. Influence of impactor operating flow rate on particle size distribution of four jet nebulizers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Brasel, Trevor L; Kracko, Dean; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Ahuja, Amitkumar; Norenberg, Jeffrey P; Kelly, H William

    2007-01-01

    When a nebulizer is evaluated by the Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI), the flow rate is generally maintained at 28.3 L/min, as recommended by the manufacturer. However, the nebulizer flow rate that a patient inhales is only around 18 L/min. Because the drive flow of a nebulizer is approximately 6-8 L/min, the nebulized drug is mixed with outside air when delivered. Evaluating impactor performance at the 28.3 L/min flow rate is less than ideal because an additional 10 L/min of outside air is mixed with the drug, thereby affecting the drug size distribution and dose before inhalation and deposition in the human lung. In this study we operated the ACI at an 18.0 L/min flow rate to test whether the effect of the changing ambient humidity was being exaggerated by the 28.3 L/min flow rate. The study was carried out at three different relative humidity levels and two different impactor flow rates with four commercially available nebulizers. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD) of the droplets were found to increase when the impactor was operated at a flow rate of 18 L/min compared to that of 28.3 L/min. The higher MMAD and GSD could cause the patient to inhale less of the drug than expected if the nebulizer was evaluated by the ACI at the operating flow rate of 28.3 L/min. PMID:17763140

  8. Properties of original impactors estimated from three-dimensional analysis of whole Stardust tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Michael; Ebel, Denton S.

    2012-07-25

    The Stardust mission captured comet Wild 2 particles in aerogel at 6.1 km s{sup -1}. We performed high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and X-ray fluorescence mapping of whole cometary tracks in aerogel. We present the results of a survey of track structures using laser scanning confocal microscopy, including measurements of track volumes, entry hole size, and cross-sectional profiles. We compare various methods for measuring track parameters. We demonstrate a methodology for discerning hypervelocity particle ablation rates using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence, combined with mass and volume estimates of original impactors derived from measured track properties. Finally, we present a rough framework for reconstruction of original impactor size, and volume of volatilized material, using our measured parameters. The bulk of this work is in direct support of nondestructive analysis and identification of cometary grains in whole tracks, and its eventual application to the reconstruction of the size, shape, porosity, and chemical composition of whole Stardust impactors.

  9. Spherule layers, crater scaling laws, and the population of ancient terrestrial impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brandon C.; Collins, Gareth S.; Minton, David A.; Bowling, Timothy J.; Simonson, Bruce M.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-06-01

    Ancient layers of impact spherules provide a record of Earth's early bombardment history. Here, we compare different bombardment histories to the spherule layer record and show that 3.2-3.5 Ga the flux of large impactors (10-100 km in diameter) was likely 20-40 times higher than today. The E-belt model of early Solar System dynamics suggests that an increased impactor flux during the Archean is the result of the destabilization of an inward extension of the main asteroid belt (Bottke et al., 2012). Here, we find that the nominal flux predicted by the E-belt model is 7-19 times too low to explain the spherule layer record. Moreover, rather than making most lunar basins younger than 4.1 Gyr old, the nominal E-belt model, coupled with a corrected crater diameter scaling law, only produces two lunar basins larger than 300 km in diameter. We also show that the spherule layer record when coupled with the lunar cratering record and careful consideration of crater scaling laws can constrain the size distribution of ancient terrestrial impactors. The preferred population is main-belt-like up to ∼50 km in diameter transitioning to a steep distribution going to larger sizes.

  10. Combining Saturnian Craters and Kuiper Belt Observations to Build an Outer Solar System Impactor Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, D. A.; Richardson, J. E.; Thomas, P.; Kirchoff, M.; Schwamb, M. E.

    2012-05-01

    Using Cassini mission imagery of the icy satellites of Saturn, numerical simulations, and telescopic observation data we produce a model size frequency distribution for outer solar system impactors spanning tens of meters to thousands of kilometers.

  11. Combining Saturnian Craters and Kuiper Belt Observations to Build an Outer Solar System Impactor Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, D. A.; Richardson, J. E.; Thomas, P.; Kirchoff, M.; Schwamb, M. E.

    2012-03-01

    Using Cassini mission imagery of the icy satellites of Saturn, numerical simulations, and telescopic observation data we produce a model size frequency distribution for outer solar system impactors spanning tens of meters to thousands of kilometers.

  12. Tritium projectiles for fueling magnetic fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet (cylindrical projectile of frozen hydrogenic gas at a temperature in the range 6--16 K) injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase 2 (TPOP-2) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-2 program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter {approximately} 7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In initial tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. The pellets, typically 7.4 mm in diameter and up to 11 mm in length, are the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 11% density perturbation to ITER. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first-wall tritium inventories by a process called isotopic fueling in which tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge.

  13. Injury risk assessment of non-lethal projectile head impacts.

    PubMed

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as "force wall approach" suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the "force wall approach" and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  14. Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as “force wall approach” suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the “force wall approach” and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  15. Characterization of the dominant impactor signature for Apollo 17 impact melt rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Miriam; Gerasimenko, Iva; Loudin, Lorne C.; Liu, Jingao; James, Odette B.; Puchtel, Igor S.; Walker, Richard J.

    2014-04-01

    Concentrations of the highly siderophile elements (HSE) Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, and Pd and 187Os/188Os isotopic compositions are reported for seven Apollo 17 impact melt rocks. These data are used to examine the dominant chemical signature of the impactor that formed the melts. Six of the samples (72355, 72435, 72535, 76035, 76055, and 76135) have poikilitic textures; one sample (73235) has an aphanitic texture. Data for the samples define linear correlations when Ir is plotted versus other HSE concentrations, with y-intercepts indistinguishable from zero for most HSE in most rocks. Scatter about some of the trends, and occasional trends with positive y-intercepts, indicate either mixing of additional components that are heterogeneously distributed within several rocks, or modest fractionation of some HSE by volatilization, crystal fractionation, or other processes, during formation and evolution of the melt sheet. There is no statistical difference between the aphanitic and poikilitic samples in terms of HSE ratios after visible granulitic clasts were removed from aphanite 73235. Hence, earlier speculations that the two types of impact melt rocks at this site may have been generated by different impactors are not supported by our data. Most Apollo 17 samples examined here and in prior studies are characterized by very similar HSE signatures, consistent with a common impactor. These samples are characterized by elevated Ru/Ir, Pd/Ir, and Re/Os, relative to most chondrites. Collectively, the data indicate that the impactor was characterized by the following HSE ratios (2σ): Re/Ir 0.093 ± 0.020, Os/Ir 1.03 ± 0.28, Ru/Ir 1.87 ± 0.30, Pt/Ir 2.36 ± 0.31, Pd/Ir 1.85 ± 0.41, and present-day 187Os/188Os of 0.1322 ± 0.0013. The results most likely mean that the impactor was a body with a bulk composition that was just outside the range of meteoritic compositions currently sampled on Earth.

  16. Perforation of HY-100 steel plates with long rod projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchak, S.J.; Altman, B.S.; Forrestal, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    The authors conducted perforation experiments with 4340 steel, rod projectiles and HY-100 steel, target plates at striking velocities between 80 and 370 m/s. Projectiles were machined to nominally 30-mm-diameter and 281-mm-length so they could be launched from a 30-mm-powder gun without sabots. The target plates were rigidly clamped at 305-mm diameter and had a nominal thickness of 10.2 mm. In addition to measuring striking and residual projectile velocities, they obtained back surface framing camera data that showed clearly the plate deformation and plug ejection process. An Imacon 792 camera provided up to 20 frames per experiment with an interframe time duration of 10 {mu}s. The modeling work is in progress, but they present a beam model that exhibits the features observed in the experiments.

  17. Influence of the projectiles' material in a coilgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinaje, Melika; Netter, Denis

    2006-09-01

    A simple model of an electromagnetic launcher is introduced in this paper. The proposed model is an electrical one and is suitable for undergraduate students. The work consists of establishing an electrical model whose resolution gives the induced current and the speed of the projectile at a given inductor current and material projectile. In this manner by changing the material of the projectile we can deduce which one is the best. Then, a simple experiment illustrating the principles of a coilgun is described and some test results are given. Therefore, students learn electromagnetic phenomena through an electrical model which is simpler to study than a magnetic one. They have to solve a system of differential equations of the second order using numerical method. And finally, their theoretical study of the coilgun leads to an experimental bench.

  18. Using Tracker as a pedagogical tool for understanding projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Loo Kang; Chew, Charles; Hwee Goh, Giam; Tan, Samuel; Lee, Tat Leong

    2012-07-01

    This article reports on the use of Tracker as a pedagogical tool in the effective learning and teaching of projectile motion in physics. When a computer model building learning process is supported and driven by video analysis data, this free Open Source Physics tool can provide opportunities for students to engage in active enquiry-based learning. We discuss the pedagogical use of Tracker to address some common misconceptions concerning projectile motion by allowing students to test their hypothesis by juxtaposing their mental models against the analysis of real-life videos. Initial research findings suggest that allowing learners to relate abstract physics concepts to real life through coupling computer modelling with traditional video analysis could be an innovative and effective way to learn projectile motion.

  19. Projectile transverse motion and stability in electromagnetic induction launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1993-12-31

    The transverse motion of a projectile in an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered. The equations of motion for translation and rotation are derived assuming a rigid projectile and a flyway restoring force per unit length that is proportional to the local displacement. Linearized transverse forces and torques due to energized coils are derived for displaced or tilted armature elements based on a first order perturbation method. The resulting equations of motion for a rigid projectile composed of multiple elements in a multi-coil launcher are analyzed as a coupled oscillator system of equations and a simple linear stability condition is derived. The equations of motion are incorporated into the 2-D Slingshot circuit code and numerical solutions for the transverse motion are obtained. For a launcher with a 10 cm bore radius with a 40 cm long solid armature, we find that stability is achieved with a restoring force (per unit length) constant of k {approx} 1 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2}. For k = 1.5 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2} and sample coil misalignment modeled as a sine wave of 1 mm amplitude at wavelengths of one or two meters, the projectile displacement grows to a maximum of 4 mm. This growth is due to resonance between the natural frequency of the projectile transverse motion and the coil displacement wavelength. This resonance does not persist because of the changing axial velocity. Random coil displacement is also found to cause roughly the same projectile displacement. For the maximum displacement a rough estimate of the transverse pressure is 50 bars. Results for a wound armature with uniform current density throughout show very similar displacements.

  20. Definition of lethality thresholds for KE less-lethal projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadros, Jaime H.

    1997-01-01

    The interest in the definition and application of the lethality threshold for KE less-lethal projectiles has increased in the last few years, as the demand for proper use of these weapons has increased from the public at large and the law enforcement community. Experiments have been performed and reported utilizing commercially available projectiles in 12 ga., 37 mm against an anthropomorphic dummy and damage criteria developed by the automobile industry. The utility of the method is discussed and future trends are presented.

  1. Projectile general motion in a vacuum and a spreadsheet simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives the solution and analysis of projectile motion in a vacuum if the launch and impact heights are not equal. Formulas for the maximum horizontal range and the corresponding angle are derived. An Excel application that simulates the motion is also presented, and the result of an experiment in which 38 secondary school students developed the application and investigated the system is given. A questionnaire survey was carried out to find out whether the students found the lessons interesting, learned new skills and wanted to model projectile motion in the air as an example of more realistic motion. The results are discussed.

  2. [The dynamics of projectile wounding. Concepts in ballistic injuries].

    PubMed

    Houdelette, P

    1998-04-01

    Analysis of the structure and terminal ballistic behavior of bullets provides a better understanding of their wounding power. The studies of ballistics specialists serve as a base. The concept of "scientific shot" remains an intellectual approach to a random phenomenon. Wound ballistic studies examine the behavior of projectiles in vivo or in a simulation medium. War events, in which projectiles do not meet requirements of international conventions, sport or hunting accidents, urban violence may confront the surgeon with various types of ballistic pathologies. The appropriate saying of Lindsey that the surgeons has to treat a wound and not a weapon should not justify etiologic ignorance. PMID:9768076

  3. Numerical simulation of fluid flow around a scramaccelerator projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.; Sobota, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the fluid motion and temperature distribution around a 'scramaccelerator' projectile are obtained for Mach numbers in the 5-10 range. A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for inviscid and viscous two-dimensional or axisymmetric compressible flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly, using bilinear isoparametric quadrilateral elements, mass lumping, and a shock-capturing Petrov-Galerkin formulation. Computed results indicate that maintaining on-design performance for controlling and stabilizing oblique detonation waves is critically dependent on projectile shape and Mach number.

  4. Diverse impactors in Apollo 15 and 16 impact melt rocks: Evidence from osmium isotopes and highly siderophile elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingao; Sharp, Miriam; Ash, Richard D.; Kring, David A.; Walker, Richard J.

    2015-04-01

    Concentrations of highly siderophile elements (HSE) and 187Os/188Os isotopic compositions for eleven impact related rocks from the Apollo 15 and 16 landing sites are reported and combined with existing geochronological data to investigate the chemical nature and temporal changes in the large impactors implicated in the formation of the lunar basins. Data for the samples all define linear trends on plots of HSE versus Ir concentrations, whose slopes likely reflect the relative HSE compositions of the dominant impactors that formed the rocks. The inferred Imbrium basin impactor that generated Apollo 15 impact melt rocks 15445 and 15455 was characterized by modestly suprachondritic 187Os/188Os, Ru/Ir, Pt/Ir and Pd/Ir ratios. Diverse impactor components are revealed in the Apollo 16 impact melt rocks. The 187Os/188Os and HSE/Ir ratios of the impactor components in melt rocks 60635, 63595 and 68416, with reported ages <3.84 Ga, are within the range of chondritic meteorites, but slightly higher than ratios characterizing previously studied granulitic impactites with reported ages >4.0 Ga. By contrast, the impactor components in melt rocks 60235, 62295 and 67095, with reported ages of ∼3.9 Ga, are characterized by suprachondritic 187Os/188Os and HSE/Ir ratios similar to the Apollo 15 impact melt rocks, and may also sample the Imbrium impactor. Three lithic clasts from regolith breccias 60016 and 65095, also with ∼3.9 Ga ages, contain multiple impactor components, of which the dominant composition is considerably more suprachondritic than those implicated for Imbrium and Serenitatis (Apollo 17) impactors. The dominant composition recorded in these rocks was most likely inherited from a pre-Imbrium impactor. Consideration of composition versus age relations among lunar impact melt rocks reveals no discernable trend. Virtually all lunar impact melt rocks sampled by the Apollo missions, as well as meteorites, are characterized by 187Os/188Os and HSE/Ir ratios that, when

  5. Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distributions (SFD) on Saturnian Satellites in Comparison with Possible Impactor Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmedemann, Nico; Neukum, Gerhard; Denk, Tilmann; Wagner, Roland; Hartmann, Oliver

    2010-05-01

    One of the major goals of the Cassini imaging experiment (ISS) is the examination of the geologic history of the saturnian satellites [1]. The understanding of the impact crater SFD of the saturnian satellites allows insights of the bombardment history of the early outer solar system. Thus it provides not only information of the geologic development of the target bodies but is also key for the determination of the impactor sources as well. The impact-crater SFD of the mid-sized saturnian satellites has been measured as described by [2]. There are high similarities in the shapes of the asteroid-body SFD around the 3:1 mean motion resonance (MMR) gap with Jupiter and the measured impact crater SFD on the saturnian satellites. This allows for an estimation of the impact-crater scaling. The observationally derived scale factor between the impactor diameter and the respective impact-crater diameter is about three to four in case of Iapetus's larger craters and doesn't change much on other mid-sized saturnian satellites like Rhea or Dione. Hence, by shifting the impact-crater SFD curve of Iapetus to smaller sizes by the amount of the scaling factor of three to four, we get the impactor-body SFD for Iapetus. Thus we can compare the impactor-body SFD of Iapetus with body SFD of possible populations of impacting bodies like Kuiper- Belt objects (KBO), asteroids or the irregular satellites of Saturn. As stated by [3], intensive analyses of the impact crater diameter SFDs of the surfaces of the inner solar system bodies have revealed a characteristic W-shaped curve in the R-plot. The measurements of the crater-diameter SFD on the saturnian satellites Mimas, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Iapetus also show high similarities to those W-shaped curves of the inner solar system bodies. The derived body SFD of the asteroid belt (method of abs. magnitude to size conversion by [4]) around the 3:1 MMR with Jupiter gives a very good match to the lunar SFD and thus to the jovian and saturnian

  6. MEMIN: Chemical Modification of Projectile Spheres, Target Melts and Shocked Quartz in Hypervelocity Impact Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M.; Hecht, L.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2011-03-01

    We present results of hypervelocity cratering experiments using iron meteorite as projectile and a sandstone target. The ejecta show shock features (melting, PDFs, lechatelierite) and physical as well as chemical mixing between projectile and target.

  7. A 500-kiloton airburst over Chelyabinsk and an enhanced hazard from small impactors.

    PubMed

    Brown, P G; Assink, J D; Astiz, L; Blaauw, R; Boslough, M B; Borovička, J; Brachet, N; Brown, D; Campbell-Brown, M; Ceranna, L; Cooke, W; de Groot-Hedlin, C; Drob, D P; Edwards, W; Evers, L G; Garces, M; Gill, J; Hedlin, M; Kingery, A; Laske, G; Le Pichon, A; Mialle, P; Moser, D E; Saffer, A; Silber, E; Smets, P; Spalding, R E; Spurný, P; Tagliaferri, E; Uren, D; Weryk, R J; Whitaker, R; Krzeminski, Z

    2013-11-14

    Most large (over a kilometre in diameter) near-Earth asteroids are now known, but recognition that airbursts (or fireballs resulting from nuclear-weapon-sized detonations of meteoroids in the atmosphere) have the potential to do greater damage than previously thought has shifted an increasing portion of the residual impact risk (the risk of impact from an unknown object) to smaller objects. Above the threshold size of impactor at which the atmosphere absorbs sufficient energy to prevent a ground impact, most of the damage is thought to be caused by the airburst shock wave, but owing to lack of observations this is uncertain. Here we report an analysis of the damage from the airburst of an asteroid about 19 metres (17 to 20 metres) in diameter southeast of Chelyabinsk, Russia, on 15 February 2013, estimated to have an energy equivalent of approximately 500 (±100) kilotons of trinitrotoluene (TNT, where 1 kiloton of TNT = 4.185×10(12) joules). We show that a widely referenced technique of estimating airburst damage does not reproduce the observations, and that the mathematical relations based on the effects of nuclear weapons--almost always used with this technique--overestimate blast damage. This suggests that earlier damage estimates near the threshold impactor size are too high. We performed a global survey of airbursts of a kiloton or more (including Chelyabinsk), and find that the number of impactors with diameters of tens of metres may be an order of magnitude higher than estimates based on other techniques. This suggests a non-equilibrium (if the population were in a long-term collisional steady state the size-frequency distribution would either follow a single power law or there must be a size-dependent bias in other surveys) in the near-Earth asteroid population for objects 10 to 50 metres in diameter, and shifts more of the residual impact risk to these sizes. PMID:24196713

  8. A 500-kiloton airburst over Chelyabinsk and an enhanced hazard from small impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P. G.; Assink, J. D.; Astiz, L.; Blaauw, R.; Boslough, M. B.; Borovička, J.; Brachet, N.; Brown, D.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Ceranna, L.; Cooke, W.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Drob, D. P.; Edwards, W.; Evers, L. G.; Garces, M.; Gill, J.; Hedlin, M.; Kingery, A.; Laske, G.; Le Pichon, A.; Mialle, P.; Moser, D. E.; Saffer, A.; Silber, E.; Smets, P.; Spalding, R. E.; Spurný, P.; Tagliaferri, E.; Uren, D.; Weryk, R. J.; Whitaker, R.; Krzeminski, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Most large (over a kilometre in diameter) near-Earth asteroids are now known, but recognition that airbursts (or fireballs resulting from nuclear-weapon-sized detonations of meteoroids in the atmosphere) have the potential to do greater damage than previously thought has shifted an increasing portion of the residual impact risk (the risk of impact from an unknown object) to smaller objects. Above the threshold size of impactor at which the atmosphere absorbs sufficient energy to prevent a ground impact, most of the damage is thought to be caused by the airburst shock wave, but owing to lack of observations this is uncertain. Here we report an analysis of the damage from the airburst of an asteroid about 19 metres (17 to 20 metres) in diameter southeast of Chelyabinsk, Russia, on 15 February 2013, estimated to have an energy equivalent of approximately 500 (+/-100) kilotons of trinitrotoluene (TNT, where 1 kiloton of TNT = 4.185×1012 joules). We show that a widely referenced technique of estimating airburst damage does not reproduce the observations, and that the mathematical relations based on the effects of nuclear weapons--almost always used with this technique--overestimate blast damage. This suggests that earlier damage estimates near the threshold impactor size are too high. We performed a global survey of airbursts of a kiloton or more (including Chelyabinsk), and find that the number of impactors with diameters of tens of metres may be an order of magnitude higher than estimates based on other techniques. This suggests a non-equilibrium (if the population were in a long-term collisional steady state the size-frequency distribution would either follow a single power law or there must be a size-dependent bias in other surveys) in the near-Earth asteroid population for objects 10 to 50 metres in diameter, and shifts more of the residual impact risk to these sizes.

  9. Surveying the South Pole-Aitken basin magnetic anomaly for remnant impactor metallic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David J.; Klima, Rachel L.; Blewett, David T.

    2014-11-01

    The Moon has areas of magnetized crust ("magnetic anomalies"), the origins of which are poorly constrained. A magnetic anomaly near the northern rim of South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin was recently postulated to originate from remnant metallic iron emplaced by the SPA basin-forming impactor. Here, we remotely examine the regolith of this SPA magnetic anomaly with a combination of Clementine and Lunar Prospector derived iron maps for any evidence of enhanced metallic iron content. We find that these data sets do not definitively detect the hypothesized remnant metallic iron within the upper tens of centimeters of the lunar regolith.

  10. Surveying the South Pole-Aitken basin magnetic anomaly for remnant impactor metallic iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, Joshua T.S.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David M.; Klima, Rachel L.; Blewett, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon has areas of magnetized crust ("magnetic anomalies"), the origins of which are poorly constrained. A magnetic anomaly near the northern rim of South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin was recently postulated to originate from remnant metallic iron emplaced by the SPA basin-forming impactor. Here, we remotely examine the regolith of this SPA magnetic anomaly with a combination of Clementine and Lunar Prospector derived iron maps for any evidence of enhanced metallic iron content. We find that these data sets do not definitively detect the hypothesized remnant metallic iron within the upper tens of centimeters of the lunar regolith.

  11. Collection efficiency and interstage loss of nanoparticles in micro-orifice-based cascade impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Nan; Awasthi, Amit; Hung, Yi-Hung; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two micro-orifice-based cascade impactors, including the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI, MSP Model 110) and the NCTU micro-orifice cascade impactor (NMCI), were tested for the collection efficiency and interstage loss of nanoparticles. In the NMCI, new nozzle plates with smooth nozzle shape made by the LIGA (Lithography, Electroplating, and Molding) process were used to replace the 7th-10th stages in one of the MOUDI. Test results show that after adjusting proper S/W ratios (S: jet to plate distance, W: nozzle diameter) to 2.52, 3.01, 13.44, and 24.75 for the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th stage of the NMCI, respectively, and 5.56, 11.18, 9.3, and 10.9 for the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th stage of the MOUDI, respectively, the cutoff aerodynamic diameters (dpa50) are close to the nominal values given in Marple et al. (1991). Different S/W ratios are needed due to differences in the nozzle shape and nozzle diameter between two cascade impactors. Total interstage loss of nanoparticles from the inlet to the 6th-10th stage of the MOUDI exists due to the convection-diffusion mechanism, which increases with decreasing dpa. For the MOUDI, total loss is 2.9-15.3 % (dpa: 105.8 to 15.4 nm) for the inlet to the 6th stage and it increases to 20.1-26.1 % (dpa: 23 to 15.4 nm) for the inlet to the 10th stage, respectively. Similar but slightly lower loss also exists in the NMCI. Field comparison tests in the ambient air show that mass size distributions measured by the MOUDI agree well with those of the NMCI. Finally, nozzle clogging tests using high concentration incense smokes indicate that the NMCI has a much less tendency for particles to clog in the nozzles than the MODUI.

  12. Using Tracker as a Pedagogical Tool for Understanding Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Loo Kang; Chew, Charles; Goh, Giam Hwee; Tan, Samuel; Lee, Tat Leong

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the use of Tracker as a pedagogical tool in the effective learning and teaching of projectile motion in physics. When a computer model building learning process is supported and driven by video analysis data, this free Open Source Physics tool can provide opportunities for students to engage in active enquiry-based…

  13. Fusion of a polarized projectile with a polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Christley, J.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Thompson, I.J.

    1995-07-15

    The fusion cross sections for a polarized target with both unpolarized and polarized projectiles are studied. Expressions for the observables are given for the case when both nuclei are polarized. Calculations for fusion of an aligned {sup 165}Ho target with {sup 16}O and polarized {sup 7}Li beams are presented.

  14. 73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE CAR, CAMERA TOWER, CANTILEVERED WALKWAYS AND ELECTRICAL GEAR, August 17, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 22. VAL, VIEW OF PROJECTILE LOADING DECK LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VAL, VIEW OF PROJECTILE LOADING DECK LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD TOP OF CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING DRIVE CABLES, DRIVE GEAR, BOTTOM OF CAMERA TOWER AND 'CROWS NEST' CONTROL ROOM. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Projectile deformation effects in the breakup of 37Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubhchintak; Chatterjee, R.; Shyam, R.

    2016-05-01

    We study the breakup of 37Mg on Pb at 244MeV/u with the recently developed extended theory of Coulomb breakup within the postform finite range distorted wave Born approximation that includes deformation of the projectile. Comparing our calculated cross section with the available Coulomb breakup data we determine the possible ground state configuration of 37Mg.

  17. On the Trajectories of Projectiles Depicted in Early Ballistic Woodcuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by quaint woodcut depictions often found in many late 16th and 17th century ballistic manuals of cannonballs fired in air, a comparison of their shapes with those calculated for the classic case of a projectile moving in a linear resisting medium is made. In considering the asymmetrical nature of such trajectories, the initial launch…

  18. Projectile Motion in the "Language" of Orbital Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We consider the orbit of projectiles launched with arbitrary speeds from the Earth's surface. This is a generalization of Newton's discussion about the transition from parabolic to circular orbits, when the launch speed approaches the value [image omitted]. We find the range for arbitrary launch speeds and angles, and calculate the eccentricity of…

  19. The Long Decay Model of One-Dimensional Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattery, Mark Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a research study on student model formation and development in introductory mechanics. As a point of entry, I present a detailed analysis of the Long Decay Model of one-dimensional projectile motion. This model has been articulated by Galileo ("in De Motu") and by contemporary students. Implications for instruction are…

  20. Projectile General Motion in a Vacuum and a Spreadsheet Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives the solution and analysis of projectile motion in a vacuum if the launch and impact heights are not equal. Formulas for the maximum horizontal range and the corresponding angle are derived. An Excel application that simulates the motion is also presented, and the result of an experiment in which 38 secondary school students…

  1. Apparatus for Teaching Physics: A Versatile Projectile Motion Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigo, Robert B.; Korda, Anthony

    1984-01-01

    Describes the design and use of a projectile motion apparatus to illustrate a variety of projective motion results typically discussed in an introductory course. They include independence of horizontal (constant speed) and vertical (constant acceleration) motions, parabolic path shape, and other types of motion. (JN)

  2. Survivability of Meteorite Projectiles - Results from Impact Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, P. A.; Cintala, M. J.; Hoerz, F.; Cressey, G.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental impact study investigating the fragmentation of various projectiles, including meteorite, at speeds up to 1.8 km/s. The results have implications for the survivability of meteorites impacting planetary and asteroidal surfaces. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. High performance projectile seal development for non perfect railgun bores

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, T.R.; Vine, F.E. Le; Riedy, P.E.; Panlasigui, A.; Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The sealing of high pressure gas behind an accelerating projectile has been developed over centuries of use in conventional guns and cannons. The principal concern was propulsion efficiency and trajectory accuracy and repeatability. The development of guns for use as high pressure equation-of-state (EOS) research tools, increased the importance of better seals to prevent gas leakage from interfering with the experimental targets. The development of plasma driven railguns has further increased the need for higher quality seals to prevent gas and plasma blow-by. This paper summarizes more than a decade of effort to meet these increased requirements. In small bore railguns, the first improvement was prompted by the need to contain the propulsive plasma behind the projectile to avoid the initiation of current conducting paths in front of the projectile. The second major requirements arose from the development of a railgun to serve as an EOS tool where it was necessary to maintain an evacuated region in front of the projectile throughout the acceleration process. More recently, the techniques developed for the small bore guns have been applied to large bore railguns and electro-thermal chemical guns in order to maximize their propulsion efficiency. Furthermore, large bore railguns are often less rigid and less straight than conventional homogeneous material guns. Hence, techniques to maintain seals in non perfect, non homogeneous material launchers have been developed and are included in this paper.

  4. 78. PHOTO OF A PROJECTILE FIRING USING A SABOT TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PHOTO OF A PROJECTILE FIRING USING A SABOT TAKEN WITH A 70 MM MITCHEL MOTION PICTURE CAMERA, Date unknown, circa 1950. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) Photograph represents central frame of negative. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Response of laminated composite plates to low-speed impact by airgun-propelled and dropped-weight impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Chunchu B.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed to determine the transient response of simply supported, rectangular laminated composite plates subjected to impact loads from airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors. A first-order shear-deformation theory has been included in the analysis to represent properly any local short-wavelength transient bending response. The impact force has been modeled as a locally distributed load with a cosine-cosine distribution. A double Fourier series expansion and the Timoshenko small increment method have been used to determine the contact force, out-of-plane deflections, and inplane strains and stresses at any plate location due to an impact force at any plate location. The results of experimental and analytical studies are compared for quasi-isotropic laminates. The results indicate the importance of including transverse shear deformation effects in the analysis for predicting the response of laminated plates subjected to both airgun-propelled and dropped-weight impactors. The results also indicate that plate boundary conditions influence the axial strains more significantly than the contact force for a dropped-weight impactor. The results of parametric studies identify a scaling approach based on impactor momentum that suggests an explanation for the differences in the responses of plates impacted by airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors.

  6. Comparison of experimental and numerical studies of the performance characteristics of a pumped counterflow virtual impactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Afchine, Armin; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-03

    Experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to evaluate the performance characteristics of a Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (PCVI). Tests were conducted for various flow configurations for which the diameter at which 50% of the particles were transmitted was determined. Experimentally determined 50% cutpoints varied from 2.2 to 4.8 micrometers and CFD predicted diameters agreed within ± 0.4 microns. Both experimental and CFD results showed similar transmission efficiency (TE) curves. CFD TE was always greater than experimental results, most likely due to impaction losses in fittings not included in the simulations. Ideal transmission, corresponding to 100% TE, was never realized in either case due to impaction losses and small scale flow features such as eddies. Areas where CFD simulations showed such flow recirculation zones were also found to be the locations where particulate residue was deposited during experiments. CFD parametric tests showed that PCVI performance can be affected by the nozzle geometry and misalignment between the nozzle and collector orifice. We conclude that CFD can be used with confidence for counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) design. Modifications to improve the performance characteristics of the PCVI are suggested.

  7. LDEF impact craters formed by carbon-rich impactors: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Dibrozolo, F. Radicati; Fleming, Ronald H.; Harris, David W.; Brownlee, Don; Reilly, Terrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Two impact craters found in Al from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment tray have residues concentrated in the bottoms, along the walls, and on top of overturned rims. Analyses indicate a 'chondritic' compositional signature (Si, S, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Ni) for the bulk residue. In one crater (number 74), round to irregular silicate grains are overlain by carbon. In addition, carbon also partially covers the crater walls, the top of the raised overturned rim, and extends outward from the crater. The second crater (number 31) also contains carbon with similar distribution in and about the crater, although the silicate residue appears to be glassy. Silver, I, K, and F (possibly some of the Ca, S, and Cl) appear to be contaminants as well as analyzed aromatic carbonaceous species associated with the raised rim and the area surrounding the crater. The origin of the impactors is assumed to be extraterrestrial. The existence of impactor residue in two craters implies impact velocities less than or equal to 6 km, based on experimental hypervelocity studies.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Graded Impedance Gas Gun Impactors from Tape Cast Metal Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L P; Nguyen, J H

    2005-11-21

    Fabrication of compositionally graded structures for use as light-gas gun impactors has been demonstrated using a tape casting technique. Mixtures of metal powders in the Mg-Cu system were cast into a series of tapes with uniform compositions ranging from 100% Mg to 100% Cu. The individual compositions were fabricated into monolithic pellets for characterization by laminating multiple layers together, thermally removing the organics, and hot-pressing to near-full density. The pellets were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and measurement of density and sound wave velocity. The density and acoustic impedance were observed to vary monotonically (and nearly linearly) with composition. Graded structures were fabricated by stacking layers of different compositions in a sequence calculated to yield a desired acoustic impedance profile. The measured physical properties of the graded structures compare favorably with those predicted from the monolithic-pellet characteristics. Fabrication of graded impactors by this technique is of significant interest for providing improved control of the pressure profile in gas gun experiments.

  9. Particle-bound PAHs quantification using a 3-stages cascade impactor in French indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Liaud, Céline; Dintzer, Thierry; Tschamber, Valérie; Trouve, Gwénaëlle; Le Calvé, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Cascade Impactor is a powerful sampling method to collect airborne particles as a function of their size. The 3-stages Cascade Impactor used in this study allowed to sample simultaneously particles with aerodynamic diameter Dae>10 μm, 2.5 μm

  10. Size Effect and Material Property Effect of the Impactor on the Damage Modes of the Single-Layer Kiewitt-8 Reticulated Dome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Fan, Feng; Zhi, XuDong; Yin, HongFeng

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic response of large space structures under accidental impact has been the subject of intense research since the occurrence of the 9/11 incident. In the present paper, using the 3D ANSYS/LS-DYNA, size effect and material property effect of the impactor on the damage modes of the single-layer Kiewitt-8 reticulated dome were investigated, respectively, where the impactor was the cylinder and the impact direction was vertical. Firstly, analytical results with the rigid impactor indicated that the impactor size can change the damage mode of the reticulated dome. It was found that the probability happening to the global collapse has an obvious rise with the size increase of the impactor. Furthermore, the deformable impactor was considered to figure out the difference with the rigid impactor; the comparisons indicated that the deformable impactor, which has the same mass and the same striking velocity with the rigid impactor, can contribute to the occurrence of the global collapse at a certain initial striking condition. PMID:24027451

  11. Dark-ray and dark-floor craters on Ganymede, and the provenance of large impactors in the Jovian system

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M.; Mckinnon, W.B. Washington Univ., Saint Louis, MO )

    1991-02-01

    The dark-floor and dark-ray craters on the icy Jovian satellite, Ganymede, may derive their visual characteristics from impactor contamination. It is presently hypothesized that the rays darken as a result of the near-surface concentration of impactor material; this could occur, first, due to magnetic sputtering while the rays are bright, and subsequently, once a critical albedo is reached, due to thermal sublimation into discrete icy and nonicy patches. Voyager visible spectra of dark rays indicate that most large-ray systems are redder than grooved or cratered terrains, and are among the reddest units on Ganymede. More than half of the recent impactors on Ganymede may have been reddish D-type asteroids or comets, accounting for the albedos and colors of dark terrains on both Ganymede and Callisto. 108 refs.

  12. Orbital and physical characteristics of meter-scale impactors from airburst observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Wiegert, P.; Clark, D.; Tagliaferri, E.

    2016-03-01

    We have analyzed the orbits and ablation characteristics in the atmosphere of 59 Earth-impacting fireballs, produced by meteoroids 1 m in diameter or larger, described here as meter-scale. Using heights at peak luminosity as a proxy for strength, we determine that there is roughly an order of magnitude spread in strengths of the population of meter-scale impactors at the Earth. We use fireballs producing recovered meteorites and well documented fireballs from ground-based camera networks to calibrate our ablation model interpretation of the observed peak height of luminosity as a function of speed. The orbits and physical strength of these objects are consistent with the majority being asteroidal bodies originating from the inner main asteroid belt. This is in contrast to earlier suggestions by Ceplecha (Ceplecha, Z. [1994]. Astron. Astrophys. 286, 967-970) that the majority of meter-tens of meter sized meteoroids are "… cometary bodies of the weakest known structure". We find a lower limit of ∼10-15% of our objects have a possible cometary (Jupiter-Family comet and/or Halley-type comet) origin based on orbital characteristics alone. Only half this number, however, also show evidence for weaker than average structure. Two events, Sumava and USG 20131121, have exceptionally high (relative to the remainder of the population) heights of peak brightness. These are physically most consistent with high microporosity objects, though both were on asteroidal-type orbits. We also find three events, including the Oct 8, 2009 airburst near Sulawesi, Indonesia, which display comparatively low heights of peak brightness, consistent with strong monolithic stones or iron meteoroids. Based on orbital similarity, we find a probable connection among several events in our population with the Taurid meteoroid complex; no other major meteoroid streams show probable linkages to the orbits of our meter-scale population. Our impactors cover almost four orders of magnitude in mass, but

  13. Ballistics considerations for small-caliber, low-density projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.

    1993-11-01

    One major application for single- and two-stage light gas guns is for fueling magnetic fusion confinement devices. Powder guns are not a feasible alternative due to possible plasma contamination by residual powder gases and the eventual requirement of steady-state operation at {approximately} 1 Hz, which will dictate a closed gas handling system where propellant gases are recovered, processed and recompressed. Interior ballistic calculations for single-stage light gas guns, both analytical and numerical, are compared to an extensive data base for low density hydrogenic projectiles (pellets). Some innovative range diagnostics are described for determining the size and velocity of these small (several mm) size projectiles. A conceptual design of a closed cycle propellant gas system is presented including tradeoffs between different light propellant gases.

  14. Developmental changes in children's understanding of horizontal projectile motion.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi; Zhu, Liqi; Chen, Zhe

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated 5- to 13-year-old children's performance in solving horizontal projectile motion problems, in which they predicted the trajectory of a carried object released from a carrier in three different contexts. The results revealed that 5- and 8-year-olds' trajectory predictions were easily distracted by salient contextual features (e.g. the relative spatial locations between objects), whereas a proportion of 11- and 13-year-olds' performance suggested the engagement of the impetus concept in trajectory prediction. The impetus concept is a typical misconception of inertial motion that assumes that motion is caused by force. Children's performance across ages suggested that their naïve knowledge of projectile motion was neither well-developed and coherent nor completely fragmented. Instead, this study presented the dynamic process in which children with age gradually overcame the influences of contextual features and consistently used the impetus concept across motion problems. PMID:25187174

  15. Investigation of shock-induced combustion past blunt projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixtures at various free-stream conditions and parameters. Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A seven-species, seven reactions finite rate hydrogen-air chemical reaction mechanism is used combined with a finite-difference, shock-fitting method to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. The study has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model.

  16. Performance of the Projectile Fragmentation Wall at CELSIUS Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwek, A.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Gburek, T.; Jakobsson, B.; Kozik, E.; Skwirczyńska, I.; Westerberg, L.

    The projectile fragmentation wall [Budzanowski, A. et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A482, 528 (2002).] (PFW) is a part of a bigger detection system comprising of the CHICSi detector [Jakobsson, B., Nucl. Phys. News Int. 9:2, 22 (1999). Siwek, A., Nucl. Phys., A654, 2695 (1999)] and a recoil detectors array [Kuznetsov, A. V. et al, Nucl. Instr. Meth. A452, 525 (2000)]. The system is designed to register products of proton- and heavy ion-induced reactions at the energies 50-450 MeV/nucleon (see Bo Jakobsson's contribution to this conference). The aim of PFW is to register and identify projectile like fragments emitted in forward direction not covered by the CHICSi detector.

  17. Computational and Experimental Investigations of Turbulent Flow Past Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Pasquale; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2008-11-01

    Experimental and computational investigations of turbulent flow past projectiles is modeled as axial flow past a cylinder with a free-spinning base. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. In addition, a free-jet facility is used for benchmarking the experimental set up. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  18. Projectile and Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Electromagnetic Dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Adamczyk, Anne; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Differential cross sections for electromagnetic dissociation in nuclear collisions are calculated for the first time. In order to be useful for three - dimensional transport codes, these cross sections have been calculated in both the projectile and lab frames. The formulas for these cross sections are such that they can be immediately used in space radiation transport codes. Only a limited amount of data exists, but the comparison between theory and experiment is good.

  19. Measuring the Effects of Lift and Drag on Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    The trajectory of a projectile through the air is affected both by gravity and by aerodynamic forces. The latter forces can conveniently be ignored in many situations, even when they are comparatively large. For example, if a 145-g, 74-mm diameter baseball is pitched at 40 ms[superscript -1] (89.5 mph), it experiences a drag force of about 1.5 N.…

  20. Schottky Mass Spectrometry on 152Sm Projectile Fragments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knöbel, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S. A.; Münzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Plass, W. R.; Sanjari, M. S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Tu, X. L.; Wang, M.; Weick, H.; Winckler, N.; Winkler, M.; Xu, H. S.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.

    Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient 152Sm projectile fragments were conducted at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI by employing the time-resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry. 311 different nuclides were identified by means of their revolution frequencies. Charge-dependent systematic differences between the fitted mass values and the literature mass values are observed in the data analysis. The origin of this systematic deviation is still under discussion. The latest progress on the data analysis is presented.

  1. Learning Projectile Motion with the Computer Game ``Scorched 3D``

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcevic, John S.

    2008-01-01

    For most of our students, video games are a normal part of their lives. We should take advantage of this medium to teach physics in a manner that is engrossing for our students. In particular, modern video games incorporate accurate physics in their game engines, and they allow us to visualize the physics through flashy and captivating graphics. I recently used the game "Scorched 3D" to help my students understand projectile motion.

  2. Chunk projectile launch using the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique is described to launch an intact ``chunk,`` i.e. a 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm diameter cylindrical titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) flyer, to 10.2 km/s. The ability to launch fragments having such an aspect ratio is important for hypervelocity impact phenomenology studies. The experimental techniques used to accomplish this launch were similar but not identical to techniques developed for the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL). A confined barrel impact is crucial in preventing the two-dimensional effects from dominating the loading response of the projectile chunk. The length to diameter ratio of the metallic chunk that is launched to 10.2 km/s is 0.5 and is an order of magnitude larger than those accomplished using the conventional hypervelocity launcher. The multi-dimensional, finite-difference (finite-volume), hydrodynamic code CTH was used to evaluate and assess the acceleration characteristics i.e., the in-bore ballistics of the chunky projectile launch. A critical analysis of the CTH calculational results led to the final design and the experimental conditions that were used in this study. However, the predicted velocity of the projectile chunk based on CTH calculations was {approximately} 6% lower than the measured velocity of {approximately}10.2 km/S.

  3. An asteroid breakup 160 Myr ago as the probable source of the K/T impactor.

    PubMed

    Bottke, William F; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David

    2007-09-01

    The terrestrial and lunar cratering rate is often assumed to have been nearly constant over the past 3 Gyr. Different lines of evidence, however, suggest that the impact flux from kilometre-sized bodies increased by at least a factor of two over the long-term average during the past approximately 100 Myr. Here we argue that this apparent surge was triggered by the catastrophic disruption of the parent body of the asteroid Baptistina, which we infer was a approximately 170-km-diameter body (carbonaceous-chondrite-like) that broke up 160(-20)+30Myr ago in the inner main asteroid belt. Fragments produced by the collision were slowly delivered by dynamical processes to orbits where they could strike the terrestrial planets. We find that this asteroid shower is the most likely source (>90 per cent probability) of the Chicxulub impactor that produced the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) mass extinction event 65 Myr ago. PMID:17805288

  4. Geochemical arguments for an Earth-like Moon-forming impactor.

    PubMed

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Burkhardt, Christoph; Warren, Paul H; Fang-Zhen, Teng

    2014-09-13

    Geochemical evidence suggests that the material accreted by the Earth did not change in nature during Earth's accretion, presumably because the inner protoplanetary disc had uniform isotopic composition similar to enstatite chondrites, aubrites and ungrouped achondrite NWA 5363/5400. Enstatite meteorites and the Earth were derived from the same nebular reservoir but diverged in their chemical evolutions, so no chondrite sample in meteorite collections is representative of the Earth's building blocks. The similarity in isotopic composition (Δ(17)O, ε(50)Ti and ε(54)Cr) between lunar and terrestrial rocks is explained by the fact that the Moon-forming impactor came from the same region of the disc as other Earth-forming embryos, and therefore was similar in isotopic composition to the Earth. The heavy δ(30)Si values of the silicate Earth and the Moon relative to known chondrites may be due to fractionation in the solar nebula/protoplanetary disc rather than partitioning of silicon in Earth's core. An inversion method is presented to calculate the Hf/W ratios and ε(182)W values of the proto-Earth and impactor mantles for a given Moon-forming impact scenario. The similarity in tungsten isotopic composition between lunar and terrestrial rocks is a coincidence that can be explained in a canonical giant impact scenario if an early formed embryo (two-stage model age of 10-20 Myr) collided with the proto-Earth formed over a more protracted accretion history (two-stage model age of 30-40 Myr). PMID:25114316

  5. Direct-trauma model of posttraumatic syringomyelia with a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor.

    PubMed

    Wong, Johnny H Y; Song, Xin; Hemley, Sarah J; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of posttraumatic syringomyelia remains enigmatic and is not adequately explained by current theories. Experimental investigations require a reproducible animal model that replicates the human condition. Current animal models are imperfect because of their low reliability, severe neurological deficits, or dissimilar mechanism of injury. The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible rodent model of posttraumatic syringomyelia using a spinal cord impactor that produces an injury that more closely mimics the human condition and does not produce severe neurological deficits. METHODS The study consisted of 2 parts. Seventy animals were studied overall: 20 in Experiment 1 and 48 in Experiment 2 after two rats with severe deficits were killed early. Experiment 1 aimed to determine the optimal force setting for inducing a cystic cavity without neurological deficits using a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor. Twenty animals received an impact that ranged from 50 to 150 kDyn. Using the optimal force for producing an initial cyst determined from Experiment 1, Experiment 2 aimed to compare the progression of cavities in animals with and those without arachnoiditis induced by kaolin. Forty-eight animals were killed at 1, 3, 6, or 12 weeks after syrinx induction. Measurements of cavity size and maximum anteroposterior and lateral diameters were evaluated using light microscopy. RESULTS In Experiment 1, cavities were present in 95% of the animals. The duration of limb weakness and spinal cord cavity size correlated with the delivered force. The optimal force chosen for Experiment 2 was 75 kDyn. In Experiment 2, cavities occurred in 92% of the animals. Animals in the kaolin groups developed larger cavities and more vacuolations and enlarged perivascular spaces than those in the nonkaolin groups. CONCLUSIONS This impact model reliably produces cavities that resemble human posttraumatic syringomyelia and is suitable for further

  6. Geochemical arguments for an Earth-like Moon-forming impactor

    PubMed Central

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Burkhardt, Christoph; Warren, Paul H.; Fang-Zhen, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical evidence suggests that the material accreted by the Earth did not change in nature during Earth's accretion, presumably because the inner protoplanetary disc had uniform isotopic composition similar to enstatite chondrites, aubrites and ungrouped achondrite NWA 5363/5400. Enstatite meteorites and the Earth were derived from the same nebular reservoir but diverged in their chemical evolutions, so no chondrite sample in meteorite collections is representative of the Earth's building blocks. The similarity in isotopic composition (Δ17O, ε50Ti and ε54Cr) between lunar and terrestrial rocks is explained by the fact that the Moon-forming impactor came from the same region of the disc as other Earth-forming embryos, and therefore was similar in isotopic composition to the Earth. The heavy δ30Si values of the silicate Earth and the Moon relative to known chondrites may be due to fractionation in the solar nebula/protoplanetary disc rather than partitioning of silicon in Earth's core. An inversion method is presented to calculate the Hf/W ratios and ε182W values of the proto-Earth and impactor mantles for a given Moon-forming impact scenario. The similarity in tungsten isotopic composition between lunar and terrestrial rocks is a coincidence that can be explained in a canonical giant impact scenario if an early formed embryo (two-stage model age of 10–20 Myr) collided with the proto-Earth formed over a more protracted accretion history (two-stage model age of 30–40 Myr). PMID:25114316

  7. Good Cascade Impactor Practice (GCIP) and considerations for "in-use" specifications.

    PubMed

    Nichols, S C; Mitchell, J P; Shelton, C M; Roberts, D L

    2013-03-01

    The multi-stage cascade impactor (CI) is widely used to determine aerodynamic particle size distributions (APSDs) of orally inhaled products. Its size-fractionating capability depends primarily on the size of nozzles of each stage. Good Cascade Impactor Practice (GCIP) requires that these critical dimensions are linked to the accuracy of the APSD measurement based on the aerodynamic diameter size scale. Effective diameter (Deff) is the critical dimension describing any nozzle array, as it is directly related to stage cut-point size (d50). d50 can in turn be determined by calibration using particles of known aerodynamic diameter, providing traceability to the international length standard. Movements in Deff within manufacturer tolerances for compendial CIs result in the worst case in shifts in d50 of <±10%. Stage mensuration therefore provides satisfactory control of measurement accuracy. The accurate relationship of Deff to d50 requires the CI system to be leak-free, which can be checked by sealing the apparatus at the entry to the induction port and isolating it from the vacuum source and measuring the rate of pressure rise before each use. Mensuration takes place on an infrequent basis compared with the typical interval between individual APSD determinations. Measurement of stage flow resistance (pressure drop; ΔPstage) could enable the user to know that the CI stages are fit for use before every APSD measurement, by yielding an accurate measure of Deff. However, more data are needed to assess the effects of wear and blockage before this approach can be advocated as part of GCIP. PMID:23344853

  8. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR HARVARD PM IMPACTOR CALIBRATION AND LEAK TESTING (UA-L-7.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for the periodic calibration and leak testing of Harvard particulate matter (PM) impactor units. This procedure applies directly to the calibration and leak testing of Harvard PM impactor units used during the Arizona NHEXAS ...

  9. Reevaluation of siderophile element abundances and ratios across the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary: Implications for the nature of the projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderis, S.; Tagle, R.; Belza, J.; Smit, J.; Montanari, A.; Vanhaecke, F.; Erzinger, J.; Claeys, Ph.

    2013-11-01

    projectile identification using (highly) siderophile elements. Only when considering improved databases of siderophile element concentrations in meteorites, in combination with linear regression analysis to calculate inter-element ratios from a large suite of ejecta deposit sites, the nature of the K-Pg projectile can be resolved. Application of this methodology to an extensive data set of continental and marine sites, very proximal to distal to the Chicxulub impact structure, supports a carbonaceous chondritic impactor (type CM or CO).

  10. Gaseous detonation initiation and stabilization by hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneshige, Michael Jiro

    An experimental investigation of gaseous detonations initiated and stabilized by high-speed spherical projectiles has been carried out. Detonation initiation by projectiles is closely related to propulsion concepts such as the ram accelerator and the oblique detonation wave engine, in which, theoretically, rapid combustion occurs in detonation waves stabilized on solid objects. The criteria for initiation and stabilization by projectiles are also related to other initiation and propagation criteria such as blast initiation and failure of diffracting detonations. Experimental data of this type are useful for identifying relevant assumptions and important processes, and for providing validation for computational and analytical models. Experiments were performed in the Caltech T5 shock tunnel laboratory. T5 was used in a shock-compression light gas gun mode, with 25.4-mm diameter nylon spheres and velocities around 2300 m/s. Gaseous mixtures studied included 2H2+O2+βN2 (1 >= β >= 13.76), C2H4+3O2+5N2, and C2H 2+2.5O2+9.4N2 at initial pressures of 0.08-2.56 bar. Flow visualization results obtained by differential interferometry, shadowgraphy, and intensified CCD imaging were augmented by wall pressure records. A wide variety of results were observed, including non- detonative shock-induced combustion, unstably initiated detonations, stabilized prompt initiations, and stabilized delayed initiations. These results can be roughly correlated in terms of the ratio of projectile velocity to mixture Chapman-Jouguet detonation speed, and the ratio of projectile diameter to detonation cell size or reaction zone thickness, although the effects of confinement and unsteadiness complicate this categorization. Two basic approaches to modeling the results have been attempted. In the first, a global model for initiation is based on an existing blast-initiation model using the hypersonic blast-wave analogy. This model is simple, and roughly predicts the experimental results, but

  11. Laboratory investigations of marine impact events: Factors influencing crater formation and projectile survivability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, D. J.; Baldwin, E. C.; Burchell, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Given that the Earth’s surface is covered in around two-thirds water, the majority of impact events should have occurred in marine environments. However, with the presence of a water layer, crater formation may be prohibited. Indeed, formation is greatly controlled by the water depth to projectile diameter ratio, as discussed in this paper. Previous work has shown that the underlying target material also influences crater formation (e.g., Gault and Sonett 1982; Baldwin et al. 2007). In addition to the above parameters we also show the influence of impact angle, impact velocity and projectile density for a variety of water depths on crater formation and projectile survivability. The limiting ratio of water depth to projectile diameter on cratering represents the point at which the projectile is significantly slowed by transit through the water layer to reduce the impact energy to that which prohibits cratering. We therefore study the velocity decay produced by a water layer using laboratory, analytical and numerical modelling techniques, and determine the peak pressures endured by the projectile. For an impact into a water depth five times the projectile diameter, the velocity of the projectile is found to be reduced to 26-32% its original value. For deep water impacts we find that up to 60% of the original mass of the projectile survives in an oblique impact, where survivability is defined as the solid or melted mass fraction of the projectile that could be collected after impact.

  12. Characteristics and measurement of supersonic projectile shock waves by a 32-microphone ring array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho; Wu, Yan-Chyuan; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses about the characteristics of supersonic projectile shock wave in muzzle region during firing of high explosive anti-tank (HEAT) and high explosive (HE) projectiles. HEAT projectiles are fired horizontally at a muzzle velocity of Mach 3.5 from a medium caliber tank gun equipped with a newly designed multi-perforated muzzle brake, whereas HE projectiles are fired at elevation angles at a muzzle velocity of Mach 2 from a large caliber howitzer equipped with a newly designed double-baffle muzzle brake. In the near field, pressure signatures of the N-wave generated from projectiles are measured by 32-microphone ring array wrapped by cotton sheath. Records measured by the microphone array are used to demonstrate several key characteristics of the shock wave of supersonic projectile. All measurements made in this study can be a significant reference for developing guns, tanks, or the chassis of fighting vehicles.

  13. The drag force on a subsonic projectile in a fluid complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Zhukhovitskii, D. I.

    2012-09-15

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is employed to describe a subsonic particle flow induced in complex plasmas by a moving projectile. Drag forces acting on the projectile in different flow regimes are calculated. It is shown that, along with the regular neutral gas drag, there is an additional force exerted on the projectile due to dissipation in the surrounding particle fluid. This additional force provides significant contribution to the total drag.

  14. Influence of rheology and giant impactors on the terrestrial core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Gerya, T.; Kaus, B. J.; Ziethe, R.; Moll, G.; Tackley, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge about the terrestrial core formation mechanism is still very limited. Several core formation modes have been proposed: The fracturing mode suggests that a central unmelted region is displaced by a degree one mode from the center of the accreting body and is fragmented due to the large stresses created by an overlying asymmetric iron layer (Stevenson, 1981). In contrast, core formation via iron diapirs (e.g. Ziethe and Spohn, 2007), which can be formed by giant impacts (e.g. Ricard et al, 2009), has been proposed. We investigate which core formation mode is active under certain conditions. Therefore we perform 2D simulations using the code I2ELVIS applying the newly developed “spherical-Cartesian” methodology (Gerya and Yuen, 2007). It combines finite differences on a fully staggered rectangular Eulerian grid and Lagrangian marker-in-cell technique for solving momentum, continuity and temperature equations as well as the Poisson equation for gravity potential in a self-gravitating planetary body. In the model, the planetary body is surrounded by a low viscosity massless fluid (“sticky air”) to simulate a free surface. We apply a temperature- and stress-dependent viscoplastic rheology inside Mars- to Earth-sized bodies and include heat release due to radioactive decay, shear and adiabatic heating. As initial condition we use stochastically distributed iron diapirs with random sizes in the range of 50 to 100 km radius inside the accreting planet, representing the iron delivered by pre-differentiated impactors. Additionally, we add a giant impactor core into several models. For simplicity, we neglect the heating of the planetary body by the impact itself. We assume the impactor core to be at rest at the beginning of the simulation. A systematic investigation of the influence of silicate rheology, temperature and diapir radii on different-sized protoplanets is being performed. We show that depending on the silicate rheology, which is strongly dependent

  15. Stagnation pressure activated fuel release mechanism for hypersonic projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Cartland, Harry E.; Hunter, John W.

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion-assisted projectile has a body, a cowl forming a combustion section and a nozzle section. The body has a fuel reservoir within a central portion of the body, and a fuel activation system located along the central axis of the body and having a portion of the fuel activation system within the fuel reservoir. The fuel activation system has a fuel release piston with a forward sealing member where the fuel release piston is adapted to be moved when the forward sealing member is impacted with an air flow, and an air-flow channel adapted to conduct ambient air during flight to the fuel release piston.

  16. Ionization of water molecules by fast charged projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Carniato, S.; Fainstein, P. D.; Hansen, J. P.

    2011-07-15

    Single-ionization cross sections of water molecules colliding with fast protons are calculated from lowest-order perturbation theory by taking all electrons and molecular orientations consistently into account. Explicit analytical formulas based on the peaking approximation are obtained for differential ionization cross sections with the partial contribution from the various electron orbitals accounted for. The results, which are in very good agreement with total and partial cross sections at high electron and projectile energies, display a strong variation on molecular orientation and molecular orbitals.

  17. Impact Features and Projectile Residues in Aerogel Exposed on Mir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörz, F.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Warren, J. L.

    2000-10-01

    Approximately 0.63 m 2 of SiO 2-based aerogel (0.02 g cm -3) was exposed for 18 months on the Mir Station to capture hypervelocity particles from both man-made and natural sources. Optical inspection revealed two major classes of hypervelocity impact features in the aerogel: (1) long, carrot-shaped tracks, well known from laboratory impact experiments, that exhibit a depth- ( t) to-diameter ( D) relationship of t/ D>10, typically 20-30, and (2) shallow pits ( t/ D<10; typically 1-3) that have no laboratory analog. Blunt-nosed, yet deep ( t/ D=5-10), cylindrically shaped cavities suggest the existence of transitional morphologies between these tracks and pits. All tracks contain projectile residues that are unmelted, while pits rarely contain even traces of projectile material. These and other observations suggest that slender tracks form at lower impact velocities than the shallow pits. In addition, we observed that the measured track-length does not systematically correlate with the size of the projectile residue. This renders the reconstruction of encounter velocity and/or projectile mass from measured track dimensions not feasible at present. Recovery of particles from individual tracks is time-consuming, yet readily accomplished by operators familiar with the handling of individual, micrometer-sized particles. Compositional analyses by SEM-EDS identified a variety of man-made and natural particles. A few natural particles were embedded in epoxy, microtomed, and analyzed by TEM. All were polymineralic aggregates that contained olivine exhibiting sharp electron-diffraction spots, and suggesting that the materials had experienced only minimal shock-deformation, if any. One natural particle contained olivine, augite, diopside, troilite, chromite/magnetite, and hercynite, the latter existing as pristine, undeformed octahedral crystals. The olivine in two of the particles were Fo 60-70 and Fo 39-53, and thus, more equilibrated than olivines in most stratospheric

  18. Excitation of the projectile helium ion impacting on hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, R.P.

    1984-04-01

    The Vainshtein-Presnyakov-Sobel'man approximation (VPSA) has been applied to calculate the 2s excitation cross section of projectile He/sup +/ in the reaction He/sup +/(1s)+H(1s) ..-->..He/sup +/(2s)+H(1s). Calculations have been performed for both post and prior forms assuming the peaking approximation. Comparison is made with the existing theoretical calculations and experimental data. It is found that the VPSA (post form) cross sections agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The VPSA (prior form) is in disagreement with other theoretical calculations. At high energies all the theoretical calculations give identical results.

  19. Ballistic Impact of Braided Composites With a Soft Projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Binienda, Wieslaw; Xie, Ming; Braley, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Impact tests using a soft gelatin projectile were performed to identify failure modes that occur at high strain energy density during impact loading. Use of a soft projectile allows a large amount of kinetic energy to be transferred into strain energy in the target before penetration occurs. Failure modes were identified for flat aluminum plates and for flat composite plates made from a triaxial braid having a quasi-isotropic fiber architecture with fibers in the 0 and +/- 60 deg. directions. For the aluminum plates, a large hole formed as a result of crack propagation from the initiation site at the center of the plate to the fixed boundaries. For the composite plates, fiber tensile failure occurred in the back ply at the center of the plate. Cracks then propagated from this site along the +/- 60 deg. fiber directions until triangular flaps opened to allow the projectile to pass through the plate. The damage size was only slightly larger than the initial impact area. It was difficult to avoid slipping of the fixed edges of the plates during impact, and slipping was shown to have a large effect on the penetration threshold. Failure modes were also identified for composite half-rings fabricated with the 0 deg. fibers aligned circumferentially. Slipping of the edges was not a problem in the half-ring tests. For the composite half-rings, fiber tensile failure also occurred in the back ply. However, cracks initially propagated from this site in a direction transverse to the 0 deg. fibers. The cracks then turned to follow the +/- 60 deg. fibers for a short distance before turning again to follow 0 deg. fibers until two approximately rectangular flaps opened to allow the projectile to pass through the plate. The damage size in the composite half-rings was also only slightly larger than the initial impact area. Cracks did not propagate to the boundaries, and no delamination was observed. The damage tolerance demonstrated by the quasi-isotropic triaxial braid composites

  20. Increasing Student Engagement and Enthusiasm: A Projectile Motion Crime Scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, David

    2010-05-01

    Connecting physics concepts with real-world events allows students to establish a strong conceptual foundation. When such events are particularly interesting to students, it can greatly impact their engagement and enthusiasm in an activity. Activities that involve studying real-world events of high interest can provide students a long-lasting understanding and positive memorable experiences, both of which heighten the learning experiences of those students. One such activity, described in depth in this paper, utilizes a murder mystery and crime scene investigation as an application of basic projectile motion.

  1. Study of projectile fragmentation reaction with isochronous mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, X. L.; Mei, B.; Zhang, Y. H.; Xu, H. S.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Huang, W. J.; Podolyak, Z.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Zhang, W.; Litvinov, S. A.; Blaum, K.; Zhou, X. H.; Shuai, P.; Wang, M.; Gao, B. S.; Chen, X. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, J. C.; Hu, Z. G.; Ma, X. W.; Sun, B. H.; Yan, X. L.; Mao, R. S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Xiao, G. Q.; Xu, X.; Walker, P. M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bosch, F.; Winckler, N.; Chen, R. J.; Xing, Y. M.; Fu, C. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Zeng, Q.; Ge, Z.; Sun, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Relative yields of fragments following the 78Kr projectile fragmentation in a beryllium target were measured in a storage ring by using isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS). Odd-even staggering of the relative fragment yields is observed and can be explained by the odd-even staggering of the particle-emission threshold energies. IMS is a complementary technique to γ-ray spectroscopy for measuring isomeric ratios, in particular for nuclides with long lifetimes. It was found that the isomeric yield ratios in 53Fe are almost constant for different longitudinal momenta.

  2. Features of transformation of water projectiles moving through high-temperature combustion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, R. S.; Zabelin, M. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of transformation of water projectiles (spherical "balls" with a volume of 50-1000 mL) in the course of their free fall (from a height of 3 m) within a high-temperature (about 1100 K) gaseous medium (with the application of the standardized fire) are represented. Investigations are carried out for projectiles of water, its solutions with NaCl, and suspensions with carbon particles. Conditions and characteristics of disruption of projectiles are determined as they move through high-temperature gases. The transformation deceleration of the projectile was revealed because of its "compression" in the high-temperature zone (in comparison with moderate temperatures).

  3. Chemical modification of projectile residues and target material in a MEMIN cratering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Matthias; Hecht, Lutz; Deutsch, Alexander; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the MEMIN project, a hypervelocity cratering experiment has been performed using a sphere of the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo as projectile accelerated to 4.56 km s-1, and a block of Seeberger sandstone as target material. The ejecta, collected in a newly designed catcher, are represented by (1) weakly deformed, (2) highly deformed, and (3) highly shocked material. The latter shows shock-metamorphic features such as planar deformation features (PDF) in quartz, formation of diaplectic quartz glass, partial melting of the sandstone, and partially molten projectile, mixed mechanically and chemically with target melt. During mixing of projectile and target melts, the Fe of the projectile is preferentially partitioned into target melt to a greater degree than Ni and Co yielding a Fe/Ni that is generally higher than Fe/Ni in the projectile. This fractionation results from the differing siderophile properties, specifically from differences in reactivity of Fe, Ni, and Co with oxygen during projectile-target interaction. Projectile matter was also detected in shocked quartz grains. The average Fe/Ni of quartz with PDF (about 20) and of silica glasses (about 24) are in contrast to the average sandstone ratio (about 422), but resembles the Fe/Ni-ratio of the projectile (about 14). We briefly discuss possible reasons of projectile melting and vaporization in the experiment, in which the calculated maximum shock pressure does not exceed 55 GPa.

  4. Correlation effects due to an axial propagation of projectiles in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Nasim, M.H.; Murtaza, G.

    2005-03-01

    Generalized expressions for the Debye potential and the wake field potential are derived due to an axial propagation of dust grain projectiles. The dust grain projectiles are assumed to lie on sets of concentric circles propagating through the dusty plasma with a constant velocity along the z axis. Each circle carries N number of dust grain projectiles having radius r{sub l} and angular position (2{pi}m)/N. A couple of specific cases of electrostatic potential due to four and eight projectiles are studied in some detail both analytically and numerically.

  5. The effect of giant impactors on the magnetic field energy of an early Martian dynamo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, McGregor; Thieulot, Cedric; Monteux, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Through the cratering record embedded on its surface, Mars is one of the key planets required for investigating the formation and impact frequency in the early history of our Solar System. This record also holds clues to the events that may have caused the observed hemispheric dichotomy and cessation of the magnetic field that was present within the first 500 Myr of the planets' formation. We investigate the influence of giant impacts on the early Martian dynamo using the numerical dynamo modelling code PARODY-JA [1]. We hypothesize that the input heat from a giant impact will decrease the total heat flux at the CMB through mantle heating which leads to a decrease in the Rayleigh number of the core. As boundary conditions for the heat flux anomaly size, we use numerical results of a 750 km diameter impactor from the Monteux and Arkani-Hamed, 2014 [2] study which investigated impact heating and core merging of giant impacts in early Mars. We also determine the decrease in Rayleigh number from the change in total heat flux at the CMB using these results, where the decrease after impact is due to shock heating at the CMB. We calculate the time-averaged total magnetic field energy for an initial homogeneous heat flux model using a range of Rayleigh numbers (5 x 103 - 1 x 10^5). The Rayleigh number is then decreased for three new models - homogeneous, north pole impact and equatorial impact - and the time-averaged energy again determined. We find that the energy decreases more in our impact models, compared with the homogeneous, along with a variation in energy between the north pole and equatorial impact models. We conclude that giant impacts in Mars' early history would have decreased the total magnetic energy of the field and the decrease in energy is also dependent on the location of the impact. The magnetic field could have been disrupted beyond recovery from a planetesimal-sized collision; such as the suggested Borealis basin forming impact, or through the

  6. Ejecta Behavior and Dynamics within the Proposed ISIS Kinetic Impactor Demonstration Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Chesley, S. R.

    2013-10-01

    Impactor for Surface and Interior Science (ISIS) is a proposed mission of opportunity which would demonstrate and test kinetic impact (KI) as a method of imparting a small ΔV to a hypothetical Near Earth Object (NEO) found in the future to be hazardous, i.e. have a non-negligible probability of Earth impact. In contrast to Deep Impact, 'test' here means having another spacecraft in rendezvous with the KI target, and accumulating sufficient tracking of that spacecraft, and target observations from it, both before and after the KI event, to measure the ΔV imparted to the target. A bounty of scientific information about cratering mechanics, geomorphology, and even internal structure of small asteroids would also result from in-situ observations of the event and its aftermath. For ISIS, the non-hazardous target and observing spacecraft would be respectively 1999 RQ36 (Bennu) and the OSIRIX-REx sample return mission. Motivated by a need to understand any hazard to OSIRIS-REx and any necessary changes to its plan of proximity operations, we embarked on a detailed study of the ejecta/debris that would be liberated by the KI event. For an event energy matching a 440 kg impactor at 13.43 km/s closing velocity, we modeled ejecta generation from the cratering itself, considering the on-surface net acceleration environment. We propagated the ejecta particles under all relevant dynamical effects, e.g. shape-model-derived full body gravity, differential solar tide acceleration, and solar radiation pressure accounting for particle size, optical properties, and shadowing. We present the proportion of particles reaching the dynamical fates of return impact or escape, and the time history of their doing so. We find clearing times from the system are nonlinearly dependent on particle size as expected. We present the size-frequency distribution of the population remaining at 1, 5, 10, etc. days post-impact, and where the re-accreted ejecta deposits on the surface. We also further

  7. Dynamical Behavior of Ejecta Produced by the Proposed ISIS Kinetic Impactor Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Chesley, Steven R.; Farnocchia, Davide

    2014-05-01

    Impactor for Surface and Interior Science (ISIS) is a proposed mission of opportunity that would demonstrate and test kinetic impact (KI) for orbit modification of a hypothetical NEO to reduce its Earth impact probability. Unlike Deep Impact, this test entails measuring ΔV imparted to a far smaller asteroidal target body (Bennu) using another spacecraft in rendezvous with that body both before and after the KI event (OSIRIX-REx). To quantify any hazard to OSIRIS-REx from collision with liberated ejecta, we perform detailed study of the ejecta's dynamical behavior. For KI event energy matching a 440 kg impactor at 13.43 km/s closing velocity, we model crater formation and ejecta generation consistent with the small net surface acceleration in the targeted equatorial region of the sunlit hemisphere at the February 2021 impact epoch, and reasonable material strength for such a low-density rubble-pile. A crater ≈25 m in diameter is excavated over several minutes, liberating several thousand metric tons of material, with maximum velocity ≈34 m/s. We propagate ejecta under all relevant dynamical effects, including shape-model-derived full body gravity, differential solar tide acceleration, and solar radiation pressure (SRP) accounting for realistic particle size-frequency distribution, optical properties, and shadowing. We present the proportion of particles reaching the dynamical fates of return impact or exit from the region of importance to OSIRIS-REx operations, vs. time. We show where the re-accreted ejecta deposits on the surface, and the size-frequency distribution of the population remaining at 1, 5, 10, etc. days post-impact. We find clearing times from the system are nonlinearly dependent on particle size as expected, especially for low-velocity ejecta which stream away anti-sunward under the action of SRP within a paraboloid zone. Higher-velocity ejecta persist for longer durations within a sunward extension of the original ejecta cone. We visualize

  8. Satellite and correlative measurements of the stratospheric aerosol. III - Comparison of measurements by SAM II, SAGE, dustsondes, filters, impactors and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Swissler, T. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The SAM II and SAGE satellite sensors, dustsondes, impactors, a filter collector and an airborne lidar were used in a large satellite validation experiment on July 16-19, 1979, at Poker Flat, Alaska. Independent measurements of extinction profiles by SAM II and SAGE are noted to agree with each other and with those derived from the other instruments (within combined uncertainties). The wire impactor-derived results, while also consistent with the others, are coarse due to the relatively large uncertainties in impactor-derived mass, extinction, and number of particles/unit volume whose radius is greater than x microns.

  9. Fiber-interferometric detection of gun-launched projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Peter; Marshall, Bruce; Gustavsen, Richard; Lang, John; Pacheco, Adam; Loomis, Eric; Dattelbaum, Dana

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a new diagnostic useful for the non-invasive detection of projectile passage in the launch tube of a gas gun. The sensing element consists of a fiber-loop that is epoxy-bonded around the external circumference of launch tube. The hoop strain induced in the launch tube by the passage of the projectile causes a momentary expansion of the fiber loop. This transient change in path length is detected with high sensitivity using a fiber-optic based interferometer developed by the NSTec Special Technologies Laboratory. We have fielded this new diagnostic, along with fiber-Bragg grating (FBG) strain gauges we previously used for this purpose, on a variety of light gas guns used for shock compression studies at Los Alamos. Our preliminary results show that the fiber interferometer has improved sensitivity and dynamic range compared that of the FBG strain gauge approach. Moreover, the interferometric approach requires no hands-on alignment immediately prior to the experiment and is therefore easier to implement. Both approaches provide early, pre-event signals useful for triggering high-latency diagnostics.

  10. Evidence for a large radius of the 11Be projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, W. Y.; Choi, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate ratios of the elastic scattering cross section to Rutherford cross section, PE, and angular distributions of breakup cross section by using an optical model which exploits various long-range dynamic polarization potentials as well as short-range nuclear bare potentials for the 11Be projectile. From these simultaneous analyses, we extract a large radius of a halo projectile from the experimental data for PE and the angular distribution of the breakup cross section of the 11Be + 64Zn and 11 + 120Sn systems. It results from the fact that a large radius for the long-range nuclear potential is more reasonable for properly explaining these data simultaneously. The extracted reduced interaction radius turns out to be r0=3.18 ˜3.61 fm for 11Be nucleus, which is larger than the conventional value of r0=1.1 ˜1.5 fm used in the standard radius form R =r0A1 /3 . Furthermore, the larger radius as well as the normalization constant N is shown to be important for understanding Coulomb dipole strength distribution.

  11. ''Theta gun,'' a multistage, coaxial, magnetic induction projectile accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, T.J.; Duggin, B.W.; Cowan, M. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    We experimentally and theoretically studied a multistage coaxial magnetic induction projectile accelerator. We call this system a ''theta gun'' to differentiate it from other coaxial accelerator concepts such as the mass driver. We conclude that this system can theoretically attain railgun performance only for large caliber or very high injection velocity and, even then, only for long coil geometry. Our experiments with a three-stage, capactor bank-driven accelerator are described. The experiments are modeled with a 1-1/2 dimensional equivalent circuit-hydrodynamics code which is also described. We derive an expression for the conditions of coaxial accelerator-railgun ''velocity breakeven'' in the absence of ohmic and hydrodynamic effects. This, in conjunction with an expression for the magnetic coupling coefficient, defines a set of geometric relations which the coaxial system must simultaneously satisfy. Conclusions concerning both the existence and configuration of a breakeven coaxial system follow from this requirement. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the coaxial induction projectile accelerator, previously cited in the literature, are critiqued from the viewpoint of our analysis and experimental results. We find that the advantages vis-a-vis the railgun have been overstated. 13 refs., 17 figs.

  12. Distal Ejecta from the Ries Crater: Moldavites and Projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artemieva, N. A.

    2003-01-01

    Using detailed geological, petrographic, geochemical, and geographical constraints we have performed numerical modeling studies that relate the Steinheim crater (Da = 3.8 km), the Ries crater (D(sub a) = 24 km) in Southern Germany, and the moldavite (tektite) strewn field. The known moldavite strewn field extends from about 200 to 450 km from the center of the Ries to the ENE forming a fan with an angle of about 57 deg. An oblique impact of a binary asteroid from a WSW direction appears to explain the locations of the craters and the formation and distribution of the moldavites. In a presented study we attempt to answer more questions concerning this particular strewn field as well as other questions common for all tektites. What is the maximum 'numerical' size of the moldavite strewn field? How is this size connected with the crater size and the impact conditions? How many tektites may be found theoretically without weathering and surface erosion? What is the size of tektites? Why they are not contaminated by projectile? Where is the projectile material?

  13. Measuring Sub-micron Size Fractionated Particulate Matter on Aluminum Impactor Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Zermeno, P; Hwang, H; Young, T M

    2009-07-28

    Sub-micron sized airborne particulate matter is not collected well on regular quartz or glass fiber filter papers. We used a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to size fractionate particulate matter (PM) into six size fractions and deposit it on specially designed high purity thin aluminum disks. The MOUDI separated PM into fractions 56-100 nm, 100-180 nm, 180-320 nm, 320-560 nm, 560-1000 nm, and 1000-1800 nm. Since MOUDI have low flow rates, it takes several days to collect sufficient carbon on 47 mm foil disks. The small carbon mass (20-200 microgram C) and large aluminum substrate ({approx}25 mg Al) presents several challenges to production of graphite targets for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis. The Al foil consumes large amounts of oxygen as it is heated and tends to melt into quartz combustion tubes, causing gas leaks. We describe sample processing techniques to reliably produce graphitic targets for {sup 14}C-AMS analysis of PM deposited on Al impact foils.

  14. Constraining the Flux of Impactors Postdating Heavy Bombardment Using U-Pb Ages of Impact Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Norman, M. L.; Ziegler, R. A.; Grange, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Spherules of glass varying in size from a few micrometres to a few millimetres are common in the lunar regolith. While some of these glass beads are products of pyroclastic fire fountains others originate as impact melt ejected from the target that breaks into small droplets and solidifies as spherical particles while raining back to the lunar surface. These glasses preserve information about the chemical composition of the target and often contain sufficient amount of radioactive nuclides such as 40K to enable Ar-40-Ar-39 dating of individual beads. Studies measuring the age of glass beads have been used in attempts to establish variations in the flux of impactors hitting the Moon, particularly during the period that postdates the formation of major impact basins [1,2]. These studies proposed a possibility of spike in the impact flux about 800 Ma [2] and over the last 400 Ma [1]. More recently U-Th-Pb isotopic systems have been also utilized to determine the age of impact glasses from the Apollo 17 regolith [3]. Our aim is to extend the application of the U-Pb system in impact glasses to spherules isolated from Apollo 14 soil 14163 in an attempt to further investigate the applicability of this isotopic system to the chronology of impact glass beads and gain additional information on the impact flux in the inner Solar system.

  15. Measuring Submicron-Sized Fractionated Particulate Matter on Aluminum Impactor Disks

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Zermeño, Paula; Hwang, Hyun-Min; Young, Thomas M.; Guilderson, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-micron sized airborne particulate matter (PM) is not collected well on regular quartz or glass fiber filter papers. We used a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to fractionate PM into six size fractions and deposit it on specially designed high purity thin aluminum disks. The MOUDI separated PM into fractions 56–100 nm, 100–180 nm, 180–320 nm, 320–560 nm, 560–1000 nm, and 1000–1800 nm. Since the MOUDI has a low flow rate (30 L/min), it takes several days to collect sufficient carbon on 47 mm foil disks. The small carbon mass (20–200 microgram C) and large aluminum substrate (~25 mg Al) present several challenges to production of graphite targets for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis. The Al foil consumes large amounts of oxygen as it is heated and tends to melt into quartz combustion tubes, causing gas leaks. We describe sample processing techniques to reliably produce graphitic targets for 14C-AMS analysis of PM deposited on Al impact foils. PMID:22228915

  16. Measuring Submicron-Sized Fractionated Particulate Matter on Aluminum Impactor Disks.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Bruce A; Zermeño, Paula; Hwang, Hyun-Min; Young, Thomas M; Guilderson, Thomas P

    2010-08-01

    Sub-micron sized airborne particulate matter (PM) is not collected well on regular quartz or glass fiber filter papers. We used a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to fractionate PM into six size fractions and deposit it on specially designed high purity thin aluminum disks. The MOUDI separated PM into fractions 56-100 nm, 100-180 nm, 180-320 nm, 320-560 nm, 560-1000 nm, and 1000-1800 nm. Since the MOUDI has a low flow rate (30 L/min), it takes several days to collect sufficient carbon on 47 mm foil disks. The small carbon mass (20-200 microgram C) and large aluminum substrate (~25 mg Al) present several challenges to production of graphite targets for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis. The Al foil consumes large amounts of oxygen as it is heated and tends to melt into quartz combustion tubes, causing gas leaks. We describe sample processing techniques to reliably produce graphitic targets for (14)C-AMS analysis of PM deposited on Al impact foils. PMID:22228915

  17. Environmental continuous air monitor inlet with combined preseparator and virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.

    2007-06-19

    An inlet for an environmental air monitor is described wherein a pre-separator interfaces with ambient environment air and removes debris and insects commonly associated with high wind outdoors and a deflector plate in communication with incoming air from the pre-separator stage, that directs the air radially and downward uniformly into a plurality of accelerator jets located in a manifold of a virtual impactor, the manifold being cylindrical and having a top, a base, and a wall, with the plurality of accelerator jets being located in the top of the manifold and receiving the directed air and accelerating directed air, thereby creating jets of air penetrating into the manifold, where a major flow is deflected to the walls of the manifold and extracted through ports in the walls. A plurality of receiver nozzles are located in the base of the manifold coaxial with the accelerator jets, and a plurality of matching flow restrictor elements are located in the plurality of receiver nozzles for balancing and equalizing the total minor flow among all the plurality of receiver nozzles, through which a lower, fractional flow extracts large particle constituents of the air for collection on a sample filter after passing through the plurality of receiver nozzles and the plurality of matching flow restrictor elements.

  18. Peak acceleration during impact with helmet materials: effects of impactor mass and speed.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Timothy Paul

    2014-01-01

    The impact properties of six foam materials used for energy absorption as the liner of children's helmets, reported by Gimbel and Hoshizaki are considered further. In high-energy impacts, almost complete compression of the energy-absorbing material (bottoming out) may occur, and the severity of the impact increases greatly. Too soft a material means bottoming out occurs at low speeds, but if it is too stiff, the material itself is injurious. The fitting of equations to results in 'no bottoming out' and 'bottoming out' conditions may help assessment of what compromise is appropriate. The equations in this article correspond to peak acceleration being proportional to power functions of impactor speed and mass. 1. When there was no bottoming out, peak acceleration was found to be proportional to m (∧)(c-1).v (∧)(2c), with c being approximately 0.25. 2. For bottoming out, peak acceleration was found to be proportional to m (∧)(p).v (∧)(q), with p and q being approximately 2 and approximately 3. 3. The constants of proportionality were related to material density in a regular way. PMID:24444232

  19. Stop hitting yourself: did most terrestrial impactors originate from the terrestrial planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Alan; Asphaug, Erik; Elkins-Tanton, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Although the asteroid belt is the main source of impactors in the inner solar system today, it contains only 0.0006 Earth mass, or 0.05 Lunar mass. While the asteroid belt would have been more massive when it formed, it is unlikely to have had greater than 0.5 Lunar mass since the formation of Jupiter and the dissipation of the solar nebula. By comparison, giant impacts onto the terrestrial planets typically release debris equal to several per cent of the planets mass. The Moon-forming impact on Earth and the dichotomy forming impact on Mars, to consider but two of these major events, released 1.3 and 0.3 Lunar mass in debris respectively, many times the mass of the present day asteroid belt. This escaping impact debris is less long lived than the main asteroid belt, as it is injected on unstable, planet-crossing orbits, but this same factor also increases the impact probability with the terrestrial planets and asteroids. We show that as a result terrestrial ejecta played a major role in the impact history of the early inner solar system, and we expect the same is also likely to be true in other planetary systems.

  20. A statistical dynamical study of meteorite impactors: A case study based on parameters derived from the Bosumtwi impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiazzo, M. A.; Bazsó, Á.; Huber, M. S.; Losiak, A.; Dvorak, R.; Koeberl, C.

    2013-11-01

    The study of meteorite craters on Earth provides information about the dynamic evolution of bodies within the Solar System. the Bosumtwi crater is a well studied, 10.5 km in diameter, ca. 1.07 Myr old impact structure located in Ghana. (Koeberl et al., 1997a). The impactor was ˜ 1 km in diameter, an ordinary chondrite and struck the Earth with an angle between 30o and 45o (Artemieva et al., 2004) from the horizontal. We have used a two phase backward integration to constrain the most probable parent region of the impactor. We find that the most likely source region is a high inclination object from the Middle Main Belt.

  1. Scale effect of spherical projectiles for stabilization of oblique detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, S.; Sumiya, S.; Kasahara, J.; Matsuo, A.

    2015-03-01

    Oblique detonation waves (ODWs) were stabilized by launching a spherical projectile with 1.2-1.4 times the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) velocity into detonable mixtures at rest. We used smaller projectiles (3.18 mm diameter) than those (4.76 mm diameter) in our previous studies and investigated the effect of the projectile scale on the stabilization of ODWs. We carried out high time resolution schlieren visualization using a high-speed camera. The detonable mixtures used were stoichiometric oxygen mixtures with acetylene, ethylene or hydrogen. They were diluted with argon with a 50 % volumetric fraction, and a dilute mixture containing 75 % argon was also tested for the acetylene/oxygen mixture. Here, we discuss the detonation stability in terms of the curvature effect arising from the three-dimensional nature of a stabilized ODW around a projectile. The curvature effect attenuated the detonation wave to below its C-J velocity in the vicinity of the projectile before the wave velocity asymptotically reached the C-J velocity in the far field. Our previous study showed that the propagation limit of the curvature effect is responsible for the stabilizing criticality of detonation waves. By obtaining detailed distributions of the wave propagation velocity and radius of curvature at the stabilizing criticality, we showed that the radius of curvature at the local minimum point of the wave propagation velocity represents the critical radius of curvature required for curved self-sustained detonation. In this study, we focused on this critical mode of the stabilized ODW for a small projectile (3.18 mm diameter). Distributions of the wave velocity and radius of curvature were obtained in the critical mode of the stabilized ODW. We compare these distributions with those for a larger projectile (4.76 mm diameter) and discuss the stabilizing criticality. For the small projectile, the observed combustion regimes had qualitatively the same trend for the initial pressure of the mixture

  2. Preliminary Analysis of Delta-V Requirements for a Lunar CubeSat Impactor with Deployment Altitude Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Joo; Ho, Jin; Kim, Bang-Yeop

    2015-09-01

    Characteristics of delta-V requirements for deploying an impactor from a mother-ship at different orbital altitudes are analyzed in order to prepare for a future lunar CubeSat impactor mission. A mother-ship is assumed to be orbiting the moon with a circular orbit at a 90 deg inclination and having 50, 100, 150, 200 km altitudes. Critical design parameters that are directly related to the success of the impactor mission are also analyzed including deploy directions, CubeSat flight time, impact velocity, and associated impact angles. Based on derived delta-V requirements, required thruster burn time and fuel mass are analyzed by adapting four different miniaturized commercial onboard thrusters currently developed for CubeSat applications. As a result, CubeSat impact trajectories as well as thruster burn characteristics deployed at different orbital altitudes are found to satisfy the mission objectives. It is concluded that thrust burn time should considered as the more critical design parameter than the required fuel mass when deducing the onboard propulsion system requirements. Results provided through this work will be helpful in further detailed system definition and design activities for future lunar missions with a CubeSat-based payload.

  3. Gas Dynamics, Characterization, and Calibration of Fast Flow Flight Cascade Impactor Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) for Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.R.; Thorpe, A. N.; James, C.; Michael, A.; Ware, M.; Senftle, F.; Smith, S.

    1997-01-01

    During recent high altitude flights, we have tested the aerosol section of the fast flow flight cascade impactor quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) on loan to Howard University from NASA. The aerosol mass collected during these flights was disappointingly small. Increasing the flow through the QCM did not correct the problem. It was clear that the instrument was not being operated under proper conditions for aerosol collect ion primarily because the gas dynamics is not well understood. A laboratory study was therefore undertaken using two different fast flow QCM's in an attempt to establish the gas flow characteristics of the aerosol sections and its effect on particle collection, Some tests were made at low temperatures but most of the work reported here was carried out at room temperature. The QCM is a cascade type impactor originally designed by May (1945) and later modified by Anderson (1966) and Mercer et al (1970) for chemical gas analysis. The QCM has been used extensively for collecting and sizing stratospheric aerosol particles. In this paper all flow rates are given or corrected and referred to in terms of air at STP. All of the flow meters were kept at STP. Although there have been several calibration and evaluation studies of moderate flow cascade impactors of less than or equal to 1 L/rein., there is little experimental information on the gas flow characteristics for fast flow rates greater than 1 L/rein.

  4. Exploring pulse shaping for Z using graded-density impactors on gas guns (final report for LDRD project 79879).

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael David; Reinhart, William Dodd; Anderson, William W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Hixson, Rob (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kipp, Marlin E.

    2005-10-01

    While isentropic compression experiment (ICE) techniques have proved useful in deducing the high-pressure compressibility of a wide range of materials, they have encountered difficulties where large-volume phase transitions exist. The present study sought to apply graded-density impactor methods for producing isentropic loading to planar impact experiments to selected such problems. Cerium was chosen due to its 20% compression between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa. A model was constructed based on limited earlier dynamic data, and applied to the design of a suite of experiments. A capability for handling this material was installed. Two experiments were executed using shock/reload techniques with available samples, loading initially to near the gamma-alpha transition, then reloading. As well, two graded-density impactor experiments were conducted with alumina. A method for interpreting ICE data was developed and validated; this uses a wavelet construction for the ramp wave and includes corrections for the ''diffraction'' of wavelets by releases or reloads reflected from the sample/window interface. Alternate methods for constructing graded-density impactors are discussed.

  5. Reaction dynamics of {sup 34-38}Mg projectile with carbon target using Glauber model

    SciTech Connect

    Shama, Mahesh K.; Panda, R. N.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Patra, S. K.

    2015-08-28

    We have studied nuclear reaction cross-sections for {sup 34-38}Mg isotopes as projectile with {sup 12}C target at projectile energy 240AMeV using Glauber model with the conjunction of densities from relativistic mean filed formalism. We found good agreement with the available experimental data. The halo status of {sup 37}Mg is also investigated.

  6. The Effect of Projectile Density and Disruption on the Crater Excavation Flow-Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Jennifer L. B.; Schultz, P. H.

    2005-01-01

    The ejection parameters of material excavated by a growing crater directly relate to the subsurface excavation flow-field. The ejection angles and speeds define the end of subsurface material streamlines at the target surface. Differences in the subsurface flow-fields can be inferred by comparing observed ejection parameters of various impacts obtained using three-dimensional particle image velocimetry (3D PIV). The work presented here investigates the observed ejection speeds and angles of material ejected during vertical (90 impact angle) experimental impacts for a range of different projectile types. The subsurface flow-fields produced during vertical impacts are simple when compared with that of oblique impacts, affected primarily by the depth of the energy and momentum deposition of the projectile. This depth is highly controlled by the projectile/target density ratio and the disruption of the projectile (brittle vs. ductile deformation). Previous studies indicated that cratering efficiency and the crater diameter/depth ratio were affected by projectile disruption, velocity, and the projectile/target density ratio. The effect of these projectile properties on the excavation flow-field are examined by comparing different projectile materials.

  7. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  8. Damage tolerance of composite sandwich structures subjected to projectile impact. [of low velocity foreign object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of low velocity projectile impact on the strength carrying ability of secondary aerospace structural components fabricated with graphite/epoxy composite materials. The preload and the impact energy combinations necessary to cause catastrophic failure were determined. Those specimens that survived the projectile impact were evaluated for the residual strength.

  9. Spreadsheet Application Showing the Proper Elevation Angle, Points of Shot and Impact of a Projectile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides the formula for the elevation angle at which a projectile has to be fired in a vacuum from a general position to hit a target at a given distance. A spreadsheet application that models the trajectory is presented, and the problem of finding the points of shot and impact of a projectile moving in a vacuum if three points of the…

  10. Magnetic induction system for two-stage gun projectile velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, R L; Konrad, C H

    1984-05-01

    A magnetic induction technique for measuring projectile velocities has been implemented on Sandia's two-stage light gas gun. The system has been designed to allow for projectile velocity measurements to an accuracy of approx. 0.2 percent. The velocity system has been successfully tested in a velocity range of 3.5 km/s to 6.5 km/s.

  11. An Analytic Approach to Projectile Motion in a Linear Resisting Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sean M.

    2006-01-01

    The time of flight, range and the angle which maximizes the range of a projectile in a linear resisting medium are expressed in analytic form in terms of the recently defined Lambert W function. From the closed-form solutions a number of results characteristic to the motion of the projectile in a linear resisting medium are analytically confirmed,…

  12. Projectile Motion on an Inclined Misty Surface: I. Capturing and Analysing the Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, S. Y.; Foong, S. K.; Lim, C. H.; Lim, C. C.; Lin, K.; Kuppan, L.

    2009-01-01

    Projectile motion is usually the first non-uniform two-dimensional motion that students will encounter in a pre-university physics course. In this article, we introduce a novel technique for capturing the trajectory of projectile motion on an inclined Perspex plane. This is achieved by coating the Perspex with a thin layer of fine water droplets…

  13. Semi-theoretical analyses of the concrete plate perforated by a rigid projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Fang, Qin; Zhang, Ya-Dong; Gong, Zi-Ming

    2012-12-01

    Based on the three-stage perforation model, a semi-theoretical analysis is conducted for the ballistic performances of a rigid kinetic projectile impacting on concrete plates. By introducing the projectile resistance coefficients, dimensionless formulae are proposed for depth of penetration (DOP), perforation limit thickness, ballistic limit velocity, residual velocity and perforation ratio, with the projectile nosed geometries and projectile-target interfacial friction taken into account. Based on the proposed formula for DOP and lots of penetration tests data of normal and high strength concrete targets, a new expression is obtained for target strength parameter. By comparisons between the results of the proposed formulae and existing empirical formulae and large amount of projectile penetration or perforation tests data for monolithic and segmented concrete targets, the validations of the proposed formulae are verified. It is found that the projectile-target interfacial friction can be neglected in the predictions of characteristic ballistic parameters. The dimensionless DOP for low-to-mid speed impacts of non-flat nosed projectiles increases almost linearly with the impact factor by a coefficient of 2/(π S). The anti-perforation ability of the multilayered concrete plates is dependent on both the target plate thickness and the projectile impact velocity. The variation range of the perforation ratio is 1-3.5 for concrete targets.

  14. Deformation and Melting of Iron-Rich Projectiles in Hypervelocity MEMIN Cratering Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, T.; Ebert, M.; Trullenque, G.; Deutsch, A.; Hecht, L.; Salge, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.

    2013-09-01

    We conducted 23-54 kJ impact experiments using projectiles composed of steel and iron meteorite Campo del Cielo to study the structural changes that occur upon impact in these projectiles. Extensive melting is largely the result of plastic deformation.

  15. Solution to Projectile Motion with Quadratic Drag and Graphing the Trajectory in Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This note gives the analytical solution to projectile motion with quadratic drag by decomposing the velocity vector to "x," "y" coordinate directions. The solution is given by definite integrals. First, the impact angle is estimated from above, then the projectile coordinates are computed, and the trajectory is graphed at various launch angles and…

  16. Real-time estimation of projectile roll angle using magnetometers: in-lab experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changey, S.; Pecheur, E.; Wey, P.; Sommer, E.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the roll angle of a projectile is decisive to apply guidance and control law. For example, the goal of ISL's project GSP (Guided Supersonic Projectile) is to change the flight path of an airdefence projectile in order to correct the aim error due to the target manoeuvres. The originality of the concept is based on pyrotechnical actuators and onboard sensors which control the angular motion of the projectile. First of all, the control of the actuators requires the precise control of the roll angle of the projectile. To estimate the roll angle of the projectile, two magnetometers are embedded in the projectile to measure the projection of the Earth magnetic field along radial axes of the projectiles. Then, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) is used to compute the roll angle estimation. As the rolling frequency of the GSP is about 22 Hz, it was easy to test the navigation algorithm in laboratory. In a previous paper [1], the In-Lab demonstration of this concept showed that the roll angle estimation was possible with an accuracy of about 1◦ . In this paper, the demonstration is extended to high-speed roll rate, up to 1000 Hz. Thus, two magnetometers, a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) and a LED (Light Eminent Diode), are rotated using a pneumatic motor; the DSP runs an EKF and a guidance algorithm to compute the trigger times of the LED. By using a high-speed camera, the accuracy of the method can be observed and improved.

  17. Impact Interaction of Projectile with Conducting Wall at the Presence of Electric Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemerys, Volodymyr T.; Raychenko, Aleksandr I.; Karpinos, Boris S.

    2002-07-01

    The paper introduces with schemes of possible electromagnetic armor augmentation. The interaction of projectile with a main wall of target after penetration across the pre-defense layer is of interest here. The same problem is of interest for the current-carrying elements of electric guns. The theoretical analysis is done in the paper for the impact when the kinetic energy of projectile is enough to create the liquid layer in the crater of the wall's metal. Spherical head of projectile and right angle of inclination have been taken for consideration. The solution of problem for the liquid layer of metal around the projectile head has resulted a reduction of the resistant properties of wall material under current influence, in view of electromagnetic pressure appearance, what is directed towards the wall likely the projectile velocity vector.

  18. Projectile acceleration in a single-stage gun at breech pressures below 50 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasoh, A.; Ohba, S.; Takayama, K.

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate projectile acceleration in a single-stage gun at breech pressures below 50 MPa. The gun was driven by firing either liquid or solid propellant. In-bore projectile velocity was continuously recorded using the well-known, precise VISAR interferometer technique so that accurate projectile acceleration data could be deduced. Both the attained projectile acceleration and muzzle exit velocity depend upon the charge-to-mass ratio and the pressure at which the blow-out disk ruptures. The results obtained from these experiments render information on the interplay between propellant combustion and projectile acceleration for low in-bore pressure regimes, and they provide the input data required for adequate numerical simulation.

  19. Penetration and perforation of composite sandwich panels by hemispherical and conical projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, T.Y.; Wen, H.M.; Reid, S.R.; Soden, P.D.

    1998-05-01

    The results of penetration and perforation tests carried out on composite sandwich panels with GRP skins and PVC foam cores using hemispherical-ended and conical-nosed indenters/projectiles under quasi-static, drop-weight, and ballistic impact conditions, with impact velocities up to 305 m/s, are described. Load-displacement characteristics under quasi-static loading are presented and the ballistic limits as well as perforation energies are determined. A classification of the sandwich panel responses based on the panel thickness-to-projectile diameter ratio is deduced. General empirical formulas that predict the dynamic perforation energies for fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) laminates and composite sandwich panels loaded by hemispherical-ended projectiles are derived. The empirical equations correlate well with available experimental data. It is shown that, to a first approximation, the formulas obtained for hemispherical-ended projectiles are also applicable to conical-nosed projectiles.

  20. Earliest Stone-Tipped Projectiles from the Ethiopian Rift Date to >279,000 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Sahle, Yonatan; Hutchings, W. Karl; Braun, David R.; Sealy, Judith C.; Morgan, Leah E.; Negash, Agazi; Atnafu, Balemwal

    2013-01-01

    Projectile weapons (i.e. those delivered from a distance) enhanced prehistoric hunting efficiency by enabling higher impact delivery and hunting of a broader range of animals while reducing confrontations with dangerous prey species. Projectiles therefore provided a significant advantage over thrusting spears. Composite projectile technologies are considered indicative of complex behavior and pivotal to the successful spread of Homo sapiens. Direct evidence for such projectiles is thus far unknown from >80,000 years ago. Data from velocity-dependent microfracture features, diagnostic damage patterns, and artifact shape reported here indicate that pointed stone artifacts from Ethiopia were used as projectile weapons (in the form of hafted javelin tips) as early as >279,000 years ago. In combination with the existing archaeological, fossil and genetic evidence, these data isolate eastern Africa as a source of modern cultures and biology. PMID:24236011

  1. The terminal effects of chisel-shape projectile penetrating into metallic target plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xu; Yao, Xiaohu; Ma, Wei

    2015-09-01

    This work performs the analysis and simulation investigations of penetration behaviors of chisel-shape projectile. In analysis, the projectile is assumed to be a rigid body and the target plate is elastic-plastic material. By introducing the velocity potential function, the velocity field in target is first obtained. Then, the momentum equation is solved for determining the pressure and stress fields in the elastic and plastic regions in target. The variation of the resultant force subjected by the projectiles with the penetration depth is studied. The approximate expressions of penetration depth and the residual velocity with the initial impacting velocity are obtained for the exploration of the penetration mechanisms of the chisel-shape projectile. In numerical simulation, the main attention focuses on the dissipation mechanisms of the kinetic energy of the chisel-shape projectile in penetration process.

  2. Impact response of graphite-epoxy flat laminates using projectiles that simulate aircraft engine encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, J. L., Jr.; Cook, T. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the response of a graphite-epoxy material to foreign object impact was made by impacting spherical projectiles of gelatin, ice, and steel normally on flat panels. The observed damage was classified as transverse (stress wave delamination and cracking), penetrative, or structural (gross failure): the minimum, or threshold, velocity to cause each class of damage was established as a function of projectile characteristics. Steel projectiles had the lowest transverse damage threshold, followed by gelatin and ice. Making use of the threshold velocities and assuming that the normal component of velocity produces the damage in nonnormal impacts, a set of impact angles and velocities was established for each projectile material which would result in damage to composite fan blades. Analysis of the operating parameters of a typical turbine fan blade shows that small steel projectiles are most likely to cause delamination and penetration damage to unprotected graphite-epoxy composite fan blades.

  3. Design and performance of Sandia's contactless coilgun for 50 mm projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Ronald J.; Cnare, Eugene C.; Cowan, M.; Duggin, Billy W.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Marder, Barry M.; Douglas, Gary M.; Shimp, Kenneth J.

    1991-10-01

    A multi-stage, contactless coilgun is being designed to demonstrate the applicability of this technology to accelerate nominal 50 mm (2 inch) diameter projectiles to velocities of 3 km/s. Forty stages of this design (Phase 1 coilgun) will provide a testbed for coil designs and system components while accelerating 200 to 400 gram projectiles to 1 km/s. We have successfully qualified the Phase 1 gun by operating 40 stages at half energy (10 kJ stored/stage) accelerating 340 gram, room-temperature, aluminum-armature projectiles to 406 m/s. We expect to accelerate 200 gram projectiles cooled to -196 C to three times this velocity when operating at full energy. This paper describes the design and performance of the Phase 1 coilgun and includes discussion of coil development, projectile design, capacitor banks, firing system, and integration.

  4. Design and performance of Sandia's contactless coilgun for 50 mm projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Cnare, E.C.; Cowan, M.; Duggin, B.W.; Lipinski, R.J.; Marder, B.M. ); Douglas, G.M. ); Shimp, K.J. )

    1991-01-01

    A multi-stage, contactless coilgun is being designed to demonstrate the applicability of this technology to accelerate nominal 50 mm (2 inch) diameter projectiles to velocities of 3 km/s. Forty stages of this design (Phase 1 coilgun) will provide a testbed for coil designs and system components while accelerating 200 to 400 gram projectiles to 1 km/s. We have successfully qualified the Phase 1 gun by operating 40 stages at half energy (10 kJ stored/stage) accelerating 340 gram, room-temperature, aluminum-armature projectiles to 406 m/s. We expect to accelerate 200 gram projectiles cooled to {minus}196{degrees}C to three times this velocity when operating at full energy. This paper describes the design and performance of the Phase 1 coilgun and includes discussion of coil development, projectile design, capacitor banks, firing system, and integration. 10 refs.

  5. Design and performance of Sandia`s contactless coilgun for 50 mm projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Cnare, E.C.; Cowan, M.; Duggin, B.W.; Lipinski, R.J.; Marder, B.M.; Douglas, G.M.; Shimp, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    A multi-stage, contactless coilgun is being designed to demonstrate the applicability of this technology to accelerate nominal 50 mm (2 inch) diameter projectiles to velocities of 3 km/s. Forty stages of this design (Phase 1 coilgun) will provide a testbed for coil designs and system components while accelerating 200 to 400 gram projectiles to 1 km/s. We have successfully qualified the Phase 1 gun by operating 40 stages at half energy (10 kJ stored/stage) accelerating 340 gram, room-temperature, aluminum-armature projectiles to 406 m/s. We expect to accelerate 200 gram projectiles cooled to {minus}196{degrees}C to three times this velocity when operating at full energy. This paper describes the design and performance of the Phase 1 coilgun and includes discussion of coil development, projectile design, capacitor banks, firing system, and integration. 10 refs.

  6. On the Resistance of the Air at High Speeds and on the Automatic Rotation of Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riabouchinski, D

    1921-01-01

    Here, the laws governing the flow of a compressible fluid through an opening in a thin wall are applied to the resistance of the air at high speeds, especially as applied to the automatic rotation of projectiles. The instability which we observe in projectiles shot into the air without being given a moment of rotation about their axis of symmetry, or without stabilizing planes, is a phenomenon of automatic rotation. It is noted that we can prevent this phenomenon of automatic rotation by bringing the center of gravity sufficiently near one end, or by fitting the projectile with stabilizing planes or a tail. The automatic rotation of projectiles is due to the suction produced by the systematic formation of vortices behind the extremity of the projectile moving with the wind.

  7. Size-separated sampling and analysis of isocyanates in workplace aerosols. Part I. Denuder--cascade impactor sampler.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jakob; Spanne, Mårten; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Isocyanates in the workplace atmosphere are typically present both in gas and particle phase. The health effects of exposure to isocyanates in gas phase and different particle size fractions are likely to be different due to their ability to reach different parts in the respiratory system. To reveal more details regarding the exposure to isocyanate aerosols, a denuder-impactor (DI) sampler for airborne isocyanates was designed. The sampler consists of a channel-plate denuder for collection of gaseous isocyanates, in series with three-cascade impactor stages with cut-off diameters (d(50)) of 2.5, 1.0 and 0.5 mum. An end filter was connected in series after the impactor for collection of particles smaller than 0.5 mum. The denuder, impactor plates and the end filter were impregnated with a mixture of di-n-butylamine (DBA) and acetic acid for derivatization of the isocyanates. During sampling, the reagent on the impactor plates and the end filter is continuously refreshed, due to the DBA release from the impregnated denuder plates. This secures efficient derivatization of all isocyanate particles. The airflow through the sampler was 5 l min(-1). After sampling, the samples containing the different size fractions were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The DBA impregnation was stable in the sampler for at least 1 week. After sampling, the DBA derivatives were stable for at least 3 weeks. Air sampling was performed in a test chamber (300 l). Isocyanate aerosols studied were thermal degradation products of different polyurethane polymers, spraying of isocyanate coating compounds and pure gas-phase isocyanates. Sampling with impinger flasks, containing DBA in toluene, with a glass fiber filter in series was used as a reference method. The DI sampler showed good compliance with the reference method, regarding total air levels. For the different aerosols studied, vast differences were revealed in the distribution of isocyanate in gas and

  8. Shock initiation of bare and covered explosives by projectile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, K L; Vantine, H C; Weingart, R C

    1981-04-22

    Shock initiation thresholds of bare and covered PBX-9404 and an HMX/TATB explosive called RX-26-AF were measured. The shocks were produced by the impact of flat-nosed and round-nosed steel projectiles in the velocity range of 0.5 to 2.2 km/s. Three types of coverings were used, 2 or 6 mm of tantalum, and a composite of aluminum and plastic. An Eulerian code containing material-strength and explosive-initiation models was used to evaluate our ability to calculate the shock initiation thresholds. These code calculations agreed well with the flat-nosed experimental data, but not so well with the round-nosed data.

  9. OPTIMIZING TRANSPARENT ARMOR DESIGN SUBJECT TO PROJECTILE IMPACT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Lai, Canhai; Gorsich, Tara; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2009-03-01

    Design and manufacturing of transparent armor have been historically carried out using experimental approaches. In this study, we use advanced computational modeling tools to perform virtual design evaluations of transparent armor systems under different projectile impact conditions. AHPCRC developed modeling software EPIC’06 [1] is used in predicting the penetration resistance of transparent armor systems. LaGrangian-based finite element analyses combined with particle dynamics are used to simulate the damage initiation and propagation process for the armor system under impact conditions. It is found that a 1-parameter single state model can be used to predict the impact penetration depth with relatively good accuracy, suggesting that the finely comminuted glass particles follow the behavior similar to a viscous fluid. Even though the intact strength of borosilicate and soda lime glass are different, the same fractured strength can be used for both glasses to capture the penetration depth.

  10. Measuring the Effects of Lift and Drag on Projectile Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-02-01

    The trajectory of a projectile through the air is affected both by gravity and by aerodynamic forces. The latter forces can conveniently be ignored in many situations, even when they are comparatively large. For example, if a 145-g, 74-mm diameter baseball is pitched at 40 ms-1 (89.5 mph), it experiences a drag force of about 1.5 N. The gravitational force on the ball 1.42 N. Nevertheless, the trajectory of a baseball pitched without spin is not strongly affected by the drag force. Because the ball is relatively heavy and the flight distance is relatively small (about 60 ft), the drag force reduces the ball speed by only about 10% by the time it reaches the batter. As a result, the time taken for the ball to reach the batter is only about 5% longer than in a vacuum, and the actual trajectory is also very similar.2

  11. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  12. Lightweight Exoatmospheric Projectile (LEAP) test program. Supplemental environmental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    The proposed action is to modify previously planned Lightweight Exoatmospheric Projectile (LEAP) Test Program activities (LEAP EA, July 1991, Ref 32) at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico; Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR), U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA); and Wake Island. The proposed action includes modifications of flight trajectories for LEAP flights 3, 5, and 6. Two additional flights, LEAP-X and LEAP-7 have been added to the program. LEAP-X is a single rocket test flight from KMR and LEAP-7 is a two-rocket test flight from KMR and Wake Island. Component/assembly ground tests will take place at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC), Space Data Division (SDD), Chandler, Arizona; Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, California; Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International; Boeing Aerospace and Electronics, Kent, Washington; Hughes Aircraft Corporation, Missile Systems Group, Canoga Park California; Aerojet, Sacramento, California; and Thiokol Corporation, Elkton, Maryland.

  13. Electric Solar Wind Sail Kinetic Energy Impactor for Asteroid Deflection Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kouhei; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    An electric solar wind sail uses the natural solar wind stream to produce low but continuous thrust by interacting with a number of long thin charged tethers. It allows a spacecraft to generate a thrust without consuming any reaction mass. The aim of this paper is to investigate the use of a spacecraft with such a propulsion system to deflect an asteroid with a high relative velocity away from an Earth collision trajectory. To this end, we formulate a simulation model for the electric solar wind sail. By summing thrust vectors exerted on each tether, a dynamic model which gives the relation between the thrust and sail attitude is proposed. Orbital maneuvering by fixing the sail's attitude and changing tether voltage is considered. A detailed study of the deflection of fictional asteroids, which are assumed to be identified 15 years before Earth impact, is also presented. Assuming a spacecraft characteristic acceleration of 0.5 mm/s 2, and a projectile mass of 1,000 kg, we show that the trajectory of asteroids with one million tons can be changed enough to avoid a collision with the Earth. Finally, the effectiveness of using this method of propulsion in an asteroid deflection mission is evaluated in comparison with using flat photonic solar sails.

  14. Techniques for Transition and Surface Temperature Measurements on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities- A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    A research effort to advance techniques for determining transition location and measuring surface temperatures on graphite-tipped projectiles in hypersonic flight in a ballistic range is described. Projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of approx. 4.7 km/sec into air at pressures of 190-570 Torr. Most launches had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.5-5 degrees at pressures of 380 Torr and above and 3-6 degrees at pressures of 190-380 Torr. Arcjet-ablated and machined, bead-blasted projectiles were launched; special cleaning techniques had to be developed for the latter class of projectiles. Improved methods of using helium to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) camera images were taken are described. Two ICCD cameras with a wavelength sensitivity range of 480-870 nm have been used in this program for several years to obtain images. In the last year, a third camera, with a wavelength sensitivity range of 1.5-5 microns [in the infrared (IR)], has been added. ICCD and IR camera images of hemisphere nose and 70 degree sphere-cone nose projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.7 km/sec are presented. The ICCD images clearly show a region of steep temperature rise indicative of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Preliminary temperature data for the graphite projectile noses are presented.

  15. Systematics of the breakup probability function for 6Li and 7Li projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.; Pacheco, A. J.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Martinez Heimann, D.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental non-capture breakup cross sections can be used to determine the probability of projectile and ejectile fragmentation in nuclear reactions involving weakly bound nuclei. Recently, the probability of both type of dissociations has been analyzed in nuclear reactions involving 9Be projectiles onto various heavy targets at sub-barrier energies. In the present work we extend this kind of systematic analysis to the case of 6Li and 7Li projectiles with the purpose of investigating general features of projectile-like breakup probabilities for reactions induced by stable weakly bound nuclei. For that purpose we have obtained the probabilities of projectile and ejectile breakup for a large number of systems, starting from a compilation of the corresponding reported non-capture breakup cross sections. We parametrize the results in accordance with the previous studies for the case of beryllium projectiles, and we discuss their systematic behavior as a function of the projectile, the target mass and the reaction Q-value.

  16. Non-invasive timing of gas gun projectiles with light detection and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, P. M.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Wu, M.; Dattelbaum, D. M.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) diagnostic to track the position of a projectile inside of a gas gun launch tube in real-time. This capability permits the generation of precisely timed trigger pulses useful for triggering high-latency diagnostics such as a flash lamp-pumped laser. An initial feasibility test was performed using a 72 mm bore diameter single-stage gas gun routinely used for dynamic research at Los Alamos. A 655 nm pulsed diode laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz was used to interrogate the position of the moving projectile in real-time. The position of the projectile in the gun barrel was tracked over a distance of ~ 3 meters prior to impact. The position record showed that the projectile moved at a velocity of 489 m/s prior to impacting the target. This velocity was in good agreement with independent measurements of the projectile velocity by photon Doppler velocimetry and timing of the passage of the projectile through optical marker beams positioned at the muzzle of the gun. The time-to-amplitude conversion electronics used enable the LIDAR data to be processed in real-time to generate trigger pulses at preset separations between the projectile and target.

  17. Penetration into low-density media: In situ observation of penetration process of various projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, Toshihiko; Niimi, Rei; Okudaira, Kyoko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Tabata, Makoto; Tsuchiyama, Akira

    2012-11-01

    In order to understand the penetration process of projectiles into lower-density targets, we carry out hypervelocity impact experiments using low-density (60 mg cm-3) aerogel targets and various types of projectiles, and observe the track formation process in the targets using a high-speed camera. A carrot shaped track, a bulbous, and a “hybrid” one consisting of bulbous and thin parts, are formed. The results of the high-speed camera observations reveal the similarity and differences on the temporal evolution of the penetration depth and maximum diameter of these tracks. At very early stages of an impact, independent of projectile type, the temporal penetration depth is described by hydrodynamic models for the original projectiles. Afterward, when the breakup of projectiles does not occur, intact projectiles continue to penetrate the aerogels. In the case of the breakup of projectiles, the track expands with a velocity of about a sound velocity of the aerogel at final stages. If there are large fragments, they penetrate deeper and the tracks become a hybrid type. The penetration of the large fragments is described by hydrodynamic models. Based on these results, we discuss the excavation near the impact point by shock waves.

  18. A Gas-Actuated Projectile Launcher for High-Energy Impact Testing of Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Lawson, Robin E.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Lyle, Karen H.

    1999-01-01

    A gas-act,uated penetration device has been developed for high-energy impact testing of structures. The high-energy impact. t,estiiig is for experimental simulation of uncontained engine failures. The non-linear transient finite element, code LS-DYNA3D has been used in the numerical simula.tions of a titanium rectangular blade with a.n aluminum target, plate. Threshold velocities for different combinations of pitch and yaw angles of the impactor were obtained for the impactor-target, t8est configuration in the numerica.1 simulations. Complet,e penet,ration of the target plate was also simulat,ed numerically. Finally, limited comparison of analytical and experimental results is presented for complete penetration of the target by the impactor.

  19. Aerodynamic characteristics of nebulized terbutaline sulphate using the Next Generation Impactor (NGI) and CEN method.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, Mohamed E; Chrystyn, Henry

    2009-03-01

    Characterization of the aerosolized dose emitted from a nebulized system can be determined using CEN (prEN13544-1) methodology and more recently with a Next Generation Impactor (NGI), but evaporative effects can influence the results. We have investigated these characteristics using different flows and cooling with the NGI and compared the results to the standard CEN method using two different nebulizer systems. The NGI was operated using flows of 15 and 30 L min(-1) at room (ROOM) temperature and immediately after cooling at 5 degrees C for 90 min (COLD). Two nebulizer systems, the Sidestream jet nebulizer (SIDE) and the Aeroneb Pro (AERO), were used to nebulize terbutaline sulphate respiratory solution. The CEN method was also used to provide the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosolized dose from these two nebulizer systems. The mean (SD) mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) using 15COLD, 15ROOM, 30COLD, 30ROOM, and CEN for AERO was 5.0(0.1), 4.1(0.3), 4.4(0.2), 2.0(0.3), and 3.0(1.1) microm, respectively, and 4.2(0.4), 2.6(0.4), 3.5(0.1), 1.7(0.1), and 3.2(0.3) microm for SIDE. The fine particle fraction (FPF), using the NGI, followed the expected trend associated with the corresponding MMAD values, ranging from 48.1 to 70.5% from AERO and 57.3 to 87.8% for SIDE. The mean FPF for AERO and SIDE using the CEN methodology was 72.5 and 63.6%. Overall there was a highly significant difference (p < 0.001) between the different operating conditions for the FPF and MMAD of both nebulizer systems. All methods revealed a significant difference between AERO and SIDE except CEN. Both nebulizer systems were prone to evaporation effects during in vitro testing. Cooling and using a slow flow minimizes evaporation effects with the NGI and should be adopted as the recommended compendial method. The CEN method provides different values to those of the NGI operating conditions and could not differentiate between the two nebulizers. PMID:19392586

  20. Dynamical sequestration of the Moon-forming impactor in co-orbital resonance with Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.; Hartmann, William K.

    2016-09-01

    Recent concerns about the giant impact hypothesis for the origin of the Moon, and an associated "isotope crisis" may be assuaged if the impactor was a local object that formed near Earth. We investigated a scenario that may meet this criterion, with protoplanets assumed to originate in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. Using N-body numerical simulations we explored the dynamical consequences of placing Mars-mass companions in various co-orbital configurations with a proto-Earth of 0.9 Earth-masses (M⊕). We modeled 162 different configurations, some with just the four terrestrial planets and others that included the four giant planets. In both the 4- and 8-planet models we found that a single Mars-mass companion typically remained a stable co-orbital of Earth for the entire 250 million year (Myr) duration of our simulations (59 of 68 unique simulations). In an effort to destabilize such a system we carried out an additional 94 simulations that included a second Mars-mass co-orbital companion. Even with two Mars-mass companions sharing Earth's orbit about two-thirds of these models (66) also remained stable for the entire 250 Myr duration of the simulations. Of the 28 2-companion models that eventually became unstable 24 impacts were observed between Earth and an escaping co-orbital companion. The average delay we observed for an impact of a Mars-mass companion with Earth was 102 Myr, and the longest delay was 221 Myr. In 40% of the 8-planet models that became unstable (10 out of 25) Earth collided with the nearly equal mass Venus to form a super-Earth (loosely defined here as mass ≥1.7 M⊕). These impacts were typically the final giant impact in the system and often occurred after Earth and/or Venus has accreted one or more of the other large objects. Several of the stable configurations involved unusual 3-planet hierarchical co-orbital systems.

  1. Calibration of the modified Electrical Low-Pressure Impactor (ELPI) for use with pressurized pharmaceutical aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kotian, Reshma; Peart, Joanne; Bryner, Joan; Byron, Peter R

    2009-03-01

    The modified Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) is currently being used in several laboratories to determine inherent electrostatic charge of pharmaceutical aerosols as a function of their particle size. However, the ELPI appears to underestimate the aerodynamic particle size distributions (aPSDs) of pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs), casting doubt upon the manufacturer's calibration. In the present study, four commercially available pMDIs with a range of aPSDs were used to recalibrate cutoff diameters (d50s) of the ELPI stages using a reference ACI. Particle size analyses were performed in a mensurated ACI and a calibrated modified ELPI (n = 5); stage coating was employed in both instruments. The ACI data were fitted to a lognormal cumulative distribution function by nonlinear regression analysis. Best estimates for mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) for each pMDI were obtained and used in combination with impaction results from the modified ELPI to determine new d50s for each of the ELPI stages by numerical methods. Ventolin HFA was employed to validate the new ELPI d50 values. The curve-fitting procedure produced excellent fits of the ACI data for all the calibration pMDIs, which were well modeled as mono-modal and lognormally distributed. The mean d50s obtained following recalibration of the modified ELPI were found to deviate increasingly from the manufacturer-supplied values as aerodynamic diameter decreased. Ventolin HFA's MMAD determined using the modified ELPI with the manufacturer-supplied d50s was 2.06 +/- 0.08 microm. The MMAD calculated using the recalibrated d50s was 2.63 +/- 0.09 microm, which was statistically indistinguishable (p = 0.0852) from that determined for Ventolin HFA using the ACI (2.73 +/- 0.09 microm). In the absence of a comprehensive recalibration of the ELPI using monodisperse aerosols, the mean d50s for stages 4-12 of ELPI reported offer a practical way of analyzing the a

  2. An explanation of spin-up instabilities for a 155mm binary projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damico, W. P., Jr.

    1984-04-01

    In 1971 during the development testing of the 155mm XM687 binary projectile, liquid-induced flight instabilities were observed. Tests were conducted that indicated unstable behavior for fill ratios of 80 to 100%. However, stable flights occurred for a fill ratio of 65%. A solid, cylindrical spacer was fitted to the interior of the aft end of the rear payload canister, thus shortening the overall interior length of the payload compartment. This simple modification yielded stable flights and was incorporated into the standard projectile. This report presents yawsonde data and analytical models that explain the stabilizing effect of the spacer which was eventually employed in the M687 projectile.

  3. A Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Bumpers as a Means of Reducing Projectile Penetration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funkhouser, John O.

    1961-01-01

    The results of an investigation to determine the effect of bumpers on projectile penetration indicate that for impact velocities up to 12,500 feet per second, the penetration of 0.062-inch-diameter copper projectiles in to aluminum targets can be definitely reduced by using a properly selected bumper spaced a short distance in front of the main target surface. Bumpers and main targets were made of 2024-T4 aluminum alloy, and spherical projectiles made of 0.062-inch-diameter copper were used in all tests.

  4. Cavity dynamics and particle alignment in the wake of a supersonic projectile penetrating a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, O.; Caliebe, D.; Piel, A.

    2011-06-15

    The penetration of a projectile into a strongly coupled dusty plasma was studied in a radio-frequency discharge under microgravity conditions. A supersonic projectile produces an elongated dust-free cavity in its wake. The dynamics of the cavity is analyzed and compared with Langevin dynamics simulations. Besides a three-dimensional Mach cone structure, the simulation shows that the cavity dynamics can be subdivided into three phases: An opening phase with fixed time scale, a closing phase, whose duration is affected by the projectile speed and, finally, a phase of particle realignment in the target cloud, which persists for a long time after the closure of the cavity.

  5. Effects of parametric variations of complex targets on damage from projectile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a hypervelocity projectile striking complex targets have been investigated. The targets consisted of metallic and low-density shock attenuating layers and void regions. The major features of the targets were systematically varied to correlate changes in the targets with the projectile's effectiveness in damaging the targets. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were done with the Eulerian computational fluid dynamics program PINON. Projectile effectiveness against the various targets was measured by determining the maximum pressure, pressure integral, P{sup 2}{tau} value, and hole size at several locations in the targets. 9 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Projectile motion in real-life situation: Kinematics of basketball shooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changjan, A.; Mueanploy, W.

    2015-06-01

    Basketball shooting is a basic practice for players. The path of the ball from the players to the hoop is projectile motion. For undergraduate introductory physics courses student must be taught about projectile motion. Basketball shooting can be used as a case study for learning projectile motion from real-life situation. In this research, we discuss the relationship between optimal angle, minimum initial velocity and the height of the ball before the player shoots the ball for basketball shooting problem analytically. We found that the value of optimal angle and minimum initial velocity decreases with increasing the height of the ball before the player shoots the ball.

  7. Dissemination and fractionation of projectile materials in the impact melts from Wabar Crater, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; See, Thomas H.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from the analyses of small ballistically dispersed melt samples (occurring in the form of aerodynamically shaped spheres, dumbbells, and teardrops) from the Wabar Crater (Saudi Arabia) and of melts from the Wabar and Nejed meteorites. On the basis of the data obtained and of models for crater forming processes it is concluded that the ballistically-dispersed glasses were formed from material at shallow levels in the target zone where temperatures were higher and where intimate physical contact with the disrupting impactor was achieved. Siderophile element fractionation was completed early, while the impactor was undergoing decompression and prior to mixing with the target glasses.

  8. Effect of Target Thickness on Cratering and Penetration of Projectiles Impacting at Velocities to 13,000 Feet Per Second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Lambert, C. H., Jr.; Schryer, David R.; Casey, Francis W., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    In order to determine the effects of target thickness on the penetration and cratering of a target resulting from impacts by high-velocity projectiles, a series of experimental tests have been run. The projectile-target material combinations investigated were aluminum projectiles impacting aluminum targets and steel projectiles impacting aluminum and copper targets. The velocity spectrum ranged from 4,000 ft/sec to 13,000 ft/sec. It has been found that the penetration is a function of target thickness provided that the penetration is greater than 20 percent of the target thickness. Targets of a thickness such that the penetration amounts to less than 20 percent of the thickness may be regarded as quasi-infinite. An empirical formula has been established relating the penetration to the target thickness and to the penetration of a projectile of the same mass, configuration, and velocity into a quasi- infinite target. In particular, it has been found that a projectile can completely penetrate a target whose thickness is approximately one and one-half times as great as the penetration of a similar projectile into a quasi-infinite target. The diameter of a crater has also been found to be a function of the target thickness provided that the target thickness is not greater than the projectile length in the case of cylindrical projectiles and not greater than two to three times the projectile diameter in the case of spherical projectiles.

  9. Micro-abrasion package capture cell experiment on the trailing edge of LDEF: Impactor chemistry and whipple bumper shield efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Howard J.; Yano, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    Four of the eight available double layer microparticle capture cells, flown as the experiment A0023 on the trailing (West) face of LDEF, have been extensively studied. An investigation of the chemistry of impactors has been made using SEM/EDX techniques and the effectiveness of the capture cells as bumper shields has also been examined. Studies of these capture cells gave positive EDX results, with 53 percent of impact sites indicating the presence of some chemical residues, the predominant residue identified as being silicon in varying quantities.

  10. Measurement of acceleration using an instrumented railgun projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littrell, Donald M.; Jamison, Keith A.; Hudson, Roger D.; Fernandez, Michael J.; Ager, Scott A.

    1992-06-01

    An instrumented package has been accelerated in a railgun projectile to measure the inbore acceleration as a function of time. Direct, continuous acceleration profiles have been repeatedly obtained with this package during electromagnetic launch and downrange soft catch. These proof-of-principle experiments were conducted using a square bore railgun and off-the-shelf components for the in situ measurement, digitization, and storage of acceleration data. A continuous record of the entire launch event clearly shows gas injection, electromagnetic propulsion, and downrange deceleration in a soft catch recovery system. The launch package was subject to peak accelerations of nearly 30 kilogees (2.8 x 105 m/sq. sec) in the electromagnetic propulsion phase of the launch. Velocity and position data obtained through integration of this data are correlated with velocity data derived from conventional static diagnostic (e.g., magnetic flux loops) to validate the technique. The peak acceleration was slightly more than anticipated from the electrical current delivered to the railgun, and this deviation is examined. The paper presents a description of the experimental apparatus, acquired data, a comparison of the data with code simulations, and suggestions for future work.

  11. Laboratory technique for simulation of projectile penetration into geological targets

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.; Guzman, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new approach to laboratory-scale experiments on high-velocity penetration of projectiles into geological materials is demonstrated. This method utilizes a commercial accelerometer mounted within a small penetrator model that impacts a sample of target material. As in previous laboratory-scale experiments at high velocities, a compressed-gas gun is used in a reverse-ballistics configuration to accelerate a geological sample into an initially stationary penetrator. The present approach provides an acceleration history during the penetration, rather than displacement or velocity data as in these previous studies. Two experiments were conducted at each of two impact velocities using a conical-nosed penetrator and a simulated soft-sandstone target. The recorded accelerometer signals show high-frequency transducer resonances superimposed on the response expected for rigid-body acceleration. Direct numerical techniques are used to extract the rigid-body acceleration history. In addition to demonstrating the effectiveness of this approach, the present results provide useful information on how peak penetrator forces vary with impact velocity during conical-nosed penetration into the simulated sandstone.

  12. Ballistic Impact of Braided Composites with a Soft Projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Xie, Ming; Braley, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Impact tests using a soft gelatin projectile were performed to identify failure modes that occur at high strain energy density during impact loading. Failure modes were identified for aluminum plates and for composites plates and half-rings made from triaxial carbon fiber braid having a 0/+/- 60deg architecture. For aluminum plates, a large hole formed as a result of crack propagation from the initiation site at the center of the plate. For composite plates, fiber tensile failure occurred in the back ply at the center of the plate. Cracks then propagated from this site along the +/-60deg fiber directions until triangular flaps opened to form a hole. For composite half-rings fabricated with 0deg fibers aligned circumferentially, fiber tensile failure also occurred in the back ply. Cracks first propagated from this site perpendicular the 0deg fibers. The cracks then turned to follow the +/-60deg fibers and 0deg fibers until rectangular flaps opened to form a hole. Damage in the composites was localized near the impact site, while cracks in the aluminum extended to the boundaries.

  13. Global optical model potential for A=3 projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, D. Y.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Varner, R. L.; Wolski, R.

    2009-02-15

    A global optical model potential (GDP08) for {sup 3}He projectiles has been obtained by simultaneously fitting the elastic scattering data of {sup 3}He from targets of 40{<=}A{sub T}{<=}209 at incident energies of 30{<=}E{sub inc}{<=}217 MeV. Uncertainties and correlation coefficients between the global potential parameters were obtained by using the bootstrap statistical method. GDP08 was found to satisfactorily account for the elastic scattering of {sup 3}H as well, which makes it a global optical potential for the A=3 nuclei. Optical model calculations using the GDP08 global potential are compared with the experimental angular distributions of differential cross sections for {sup 3}He-nucleus and {sup 3}H-nucleus scattering from different targets of 6{<=}A{sub T}{<=}232 at incident energies of 4{<=}E{sub inc}{<=}450 MeV. The optical potential for the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 40}Ca, the low-energy correction to the real potential for nuclei with 58 < or approx. A{sub T} < or approx. 120 at E{sub inc}<30 MeV, the comparison with double-folding model calculations and the CH89 potential, and the spin-orbit potential parameters are discussed.

  14. Global optical model potential for A=3 projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, D. Y.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Varner, R. L.; Wolski, R.

    2009-02-01

    A global optical model potential (GDP08) for He3 projectiles has been obtained by simultaneously fitting the elastic scattering data of He3 from targets of 40⩽AT⩽209 at incident energies of 30⩽Einc⩽217 MeV. Uncertainties and correlation coefficients between the global potential parameters were obtained by using the bootstrap statistical method. GDP08 was found to satisfactorily account for the elastic scattering of H3 as well, which makes it a global optical potential for the A=3 nuclei. Optical model calculations using the GDP08 global potential are compared with the experimental angular distributions of differential cross sections for He3-nucleus and H3-nucleus scattering from different targets of 6⩽AT⩽232 at incident energies of 4⩽Einc⩽450 MeV. The optical potential for the doubly-magic nucleus Ca40, the low-energy correction to the real potential for nuclei with 58≲AT≲120 at Einc<30 MeV, the comparison with double-folding model calculations and the CH89 potential, and the spin-orbit potential parameters are discussed.

  15. Study of Hypervelocity Projectile Impact on Thick Metal Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; Machorro, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments: Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.

  16. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; et al

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments:more » Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.« less

  17. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Laoutaris, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Mertzimekis, T.; Andrianis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Benis, E. P.; Sulik, B.; Valastyán, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre "Demokritos" in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target.

  18. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; Machorro, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments: Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.

  19. MEMIN Project: The Search for Suitable Projectile Material in Meso-Scale Hypervelocity Cratering Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, I.; Deutsch, A.; Hecht, L.; Kenkmann, T.

    2010-03-01

    We report textural and geochemical data (EMP, LA-ICP-MS) for different types of steel and the iron meteorites Arispe (IC) and Campo del Cielo (IAB) that are evaluated as projectile materials in hypervelocity cratering experiments .

  20. A modular high precision digital system for hypervelocity projectile performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Singh, Bipin; Miller, Stuart; Campbell, Larry; Bishel, Ron; Rushing, Rick

    2008-04-01

    The performance measurement of hypervelocity projectiles in flight is critical in ensuring proper projectile operation, for designing new long-range missile systems with improved accuracy, and for assessing damage to the target upon impact to determine the projectile's lethality. We are developing a modular, low cost, digital X-ray imaging system to measure hypervelocity projectile parameters with high precision and to almost instantaneously map its trajectory in 3D space to compute its pitch, yaw, displacement from its path, and velocity. The preliminary data suggest that this system can render an accuracy of 0.25° in measuring pitch and yaw, an accuracy of 0.03" in estimating displacement from the centerline, and a precision of +/-0.0001% in measuring velocity, which is well beyond the capability of any existing system.

  1. Projectile containing metastable intermolecular composites and spot fire method of use

    DOEpatents

    Asay, Blaine W.; Son, Steven F.; Sanders, V. Eric; Foley, Timothy; Novak, Alan M.; Busse, James R.

    2012-07-31

    A method for altering the course of a conflagration involving firing a projectile comprising a powder mixture of oxidant powder and nanosized reductant powder at velocity sufficient for a violent reaction between the oxidant powder and the nanosized reductant powder upon impact of the projectile, and causing impact of the projectile at a location chosen to draw a main fire to a spot fire at such location and thereby change the course of the conflagration, whereby the air near the chosen location is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause a spot fire at such location. The invention also includes a projectile useful for such method and said mixture preferably comprises a metastable intermolecular composite.

  2. Target-projectile interaction during impact melting at Kamil Crater, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Agnese; D'Orazio, Massimo; Cordier, Carole; Folco, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In small meteorite impacts, the projectile may survive through fragmentation; in addition, it may melt, and chemically and physically interact with both shocked and melted target rocks. However, the mixing/mingling between projectile and target melts is a process still not completely understood. Kamil Crater (45 m in diameter; Egypt), generated by the hypervelocity impact of the Gebel Kamil Ni-rich ataxite on sandstone target, allows to study the target-projectile interaction in a simple and fresh geological setting. We conducted a petrographic and geochemical study of macroscopic impact melt lapilli and bombs ejected from the crater, which were collected during our geophysical campaign in February 2010. Two types of glasses constitute the impact melt lapilli and bombs: a white glass and a dark glass. The white glass is mostly made of SiO2 and it is devoid of inclusions. Its negligible Ni and Co contents suggest derivation from the target rocks without interaction with the projectile (<0.1 wt% of projectile contamination). The dark glass is a silicate melt with variable contents of Al2O3 (0.84-18.7 wt%), FeOT (1.83-61.5 wt%), and NiO (<0.01-10.2 wt%). The dark glass typically includes fragments (from few μm to several mm in size) of shocked sandstone, diaplectic glass, lechatelierite, and Ni-Fe metal blebs. The metal blebs are enriched in Ni compared to the Gebel Kamil meteorite. The dark glass is thus a mixture of target and projectile melts (11-12 wt% of projectile contamination). Based on recently proposed models for target-projectile interaction and for impact glass formation, we suggest a scenario for the glass formation at Kamil. During the transition from the contact and compression stage and the excavation stage, projectile and target liquids formed at their interface and chemically interact in a restricted zone. Projectile contamination affected only a shallow portion of the target rocks. The SiO2 melt that eventually solidified as white glass behaved as

  3. Development of odd-Z-projectile reactions for transactinide element synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Folden III, Charles Marvin

    2004-11-04

    The development of new odd-Z-projectile reactions leading to the production of transactinide elements is described. The cross section of the even-Z-projectile 208Pb(64Ni, n)271Ds reaction was measured at two new energies using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. In total, seven decay chains attributable to 271Ds were observed. These data, combined with previous results, establish an excitation function for the production of 271Ds. The maximum cross section was 20 +15 -11 pb at a center-of-target energy of 311.5 MeV in the laboratory frame.The data from the 271Ds experiments were used to estimate the optimum beam energy for the new odd-Z-projectile 208Pb(65Cu, n)272-111 reaction using the Fusion by Diffusion theory proposed by Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski. A cross section for this reaction was measured for the first time, at a center-of-target energy of 321.1 MeV in the laboratory frame. The excitation energy f or compound nuclei formed at the target center was 13.2 MeV. One decay chain was observed, resulting in a measured cross section of 1.7 +3.9 -1.4 pb. This decay chain is in good agreement with previously published data on the decay of 272-111.The new odd-Z-projectile 208Pb(55Mn, n)262Bh reaction was studied at three different projectile energies, and 33 decay chains of 262Bh were observed. The existence of a previously reported alpha-decaying isomeric state in this nuclide was confirmed. Production of the ground state was preferred at all three beam energies. The maximum cross section was 540 +180 -150 pb at a projectile center-of-target energy of 264.0 MeV. This cross section is much larger than that previously reported for the even-Z-projectile 209Bi(54Cr, n)262Bh reaction, which may be because the 54Cr projectile energies in the latter reaction were too high for optimum production of the 1n product. At the highest projectile energy of 268.0 MeV in the target center, two decay

  4. Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, R.A.; McCoig, T.M.; Dooley, J.B.

    1999-10-05

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic base material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics.

  5. Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.; McCoig, Thomas M.; Dooley, Joseph B.

    1999-01-01

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic base material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics.

  6. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.; McCoig, Thomas M.; Dooley, Joseph B.

    2000-01-01

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic phase material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics.

  7. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.; McCoig, Thomas M.; Dooley, Joseph B.

    1998-01-01

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic phase material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics.

  8. Size-dependent earth impactor warning times and corresponding campaign mission recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzych, Todd A.

    2012-05-01

    NASA seeks to reliably detect potential Earth Impactors (EI) in time to defend the planet by deflecting them. Congress has given an unfunded mandate to NASA to lead Spaceguard, a coalition of worldwide observatories and scientists who find, track, and determine impact probabilities for potential EIs (Udall, 2007). This effort fits within the first stages of a typical military targeting cycle, which begins by detecting and characterizing targets. In the first half of this analysis, military targeting is applied to the EI challenge through the development of a methodology to characterize early warning times for different size objects. In the second half, recommendations for acting on different warning time scenarios are presented, to include augmentation of observation technology and use of a precursor transponder implantation mission. An interdisciplinary approach is taken to measure the success of the Spaceguard efforts in increasing the warning times for approaches of variously sized bodies. A multi-step method is developed, beginning with determining past and present warning times for asteroids entering the 0.05 AU Astronomical Unit (AU) Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance (MOID) of Earth. Using source data from NASA's NEO Program database of close approaches, JPL's Small Body Database, and the IAU Minor Planet Center, the differences between the dates of first discovery of these Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHA) and the dates of 7300 penetrations of the MOID to graph warning times for known PHAs' penetration of the MOID were aggregated. The method also includes the estimate of PHA discovery, rates of objects with high orbital uncertainties, and missed approach rates. A discussion of potential sources for error and directions to take for further development of the model is included. Finally, recommendations for campaigns against EIs are provided, given different warning time and size scenarios. The most significant of the conclusions is that, given current

  9. Fragmentation of armor piercing steel projectiles upon oblique perforation of steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, V.; Weiss, A.; Vizel, A.; Ran, E.; Aizik, F.

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a constitutive strength and failure model for a steel core of a14.5 mm API projectile was developed. Dynamic response of a projectile steel core was described by the Johnson-Cook constitutive model combined with principal tensile stress spall model. In order to obtain the parameters required for numerical description of projectile core material behavior, a series of planar impact experiments was done. The parameters of the Johnson-Cook constitutive model were extracted by matching simulated and experimental velocity profiles of planar impact. A series of oblique ballistic experiments with x-ray monitoring was carried out to study the effect of obliquity angle and armor steel plate thickness on shattering behavior of the 14.5 mm API projectile. According to analysis of x-ray images the fragmentation level increases with both steel plate thickness and angle of inclination. The numerical modeling of the ballistic experiments was done using commercial finite element code, LS-DYNA. Dynamic response of high hardness (HH) armor steel was described using a modified Johnson-Cook strength and failure model. A series of simulations with various values of maximal principal tensile stress was run in order to capture the overall fracture behavior of the projectile's core. Reasonable agreement between simulated and x-ray failure pattern of projectile core has been observed.

  10. keV fullerene interaction with hydrocarbon targets: Projectile penetration, damage creation and removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcorte, Arnaud; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-02-01

    The physics of energetic fullerene projectile penetration, damage creation and sputtering in organic solids is investigated via molecular dynamics simulations. Two models are used, the first one based on a full atomistic description of the target and the second one, using a coarse-grain prescription that was recently developed and tested for a benzene molecular crystal [E. Smiley, Z. Postawa, I.A. Wojciechowski, N. Winograd, B. J. Garrison, Appl. Surf. Sci. 252 (2006) 6436]. The results explore the mechanism of energy transfer from the C 60 projectile to the organic target atoms/molecules through the comparison with significantly different projectiles (Argon) and samples (Ag crystal). The effects of the projectile energy on the penetration and fast energy transfer processes (200 fs) are also delineated. The second part of the results investigates the 'long term' consequences (20-50 ps) of fullerene impacts in hydrocarbon sample surfaces. In an icosane (C 20H 42) solid, a 5 keV C 60 projectile induces a crater of ˜10 nm diameter surrounded by a ˜4 nm wide rim and ejects ˜70 intact molecules. More than 75% of the fragments generated by the fullerene in the surface are also sputtered away by the end of the event. The perspective considers the capabilities of fullerene projectiles for depth profile analysis of molecular samples by particle-induced desorption mass spectrometry.

  11. Pepper spray projectile/disperser for countering hostage and barricade situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Roy

    1997-01-01

    An improved less-than-lethal projectile for use in hostage, barricade and tactical assault situations has been developed. The projectile is launched from a standoff position and disperse the incapacitating agent oleoresin capsicum in the form of atomized droplets. A literature search followed by an experimental study were conducted of the mechanism of barrier defeat for various shaped projectiles against the targets of interest in this work: window glass, plasterboard and plywood. Some of the trade- offs between velocity, standoff, projectile shape and size, penetration, and residual energy were quantified. Analysis of the ballistic trajectory and recoil, together with calculations of he amount of pepper spray needed to incapacitate the occupants of a typical barricaded structure, indicated the suitability of using a fin stabilized projectile fired from a conventional 37 mm riot control gas gun. Two projectile designs were considered, manufactured and tested. The results of static tests to simulate target impact, together with live firing trials against a variety of targets, showed that rear ejection of the atomized spray was more reproducible and effective than nose ejection. The performance characteristics of the finalized design were investigated in trials using the standard barrier for testing barrier penetrating tear gas agents as defined by the National Institute of Justice.

  12. Effect of Projectile Materials on Foreign Object Damage of a Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Racz, Zsolt; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Brewer, David N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of AS800 silicon nitride was determined using four different projectile materials at ambient temperature. The target test specimens rigidly supported were impacted at their centers by spherical projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm. Four different types of projectiles were used including hardened steel balls, annealed steel balls, silicon nitride balls, and brass balls. Post-impact strength of each target specimen impacted was determined as a function of impact velocity to better understand the severity of local impact damage. The critical impact velocity where target specimens fail upon impact was highest with brass balls, lowest with ceramic ball, and intermediate with annealed and hardened steel balls. Degree of strength degradation upon impact followed the same order as in the critical impact velocity with respect to projectile materials. For steel balls, hardened projectiles yielded more significant impact damage than annealed counterparts. The most important material parameter affecting FOD was identified as hardness of projectiles and was correlated in terms of critical impact velocity, impact deformation, and impact load.

  13. Experimental investigation on ballistic stability of high-speed projectile in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, Yafei; Huang, Wei; Li, Dacheng; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    The investigation on ballistic stability of high-speed projectile in granular materials is important to the study of the earth penetrating weapon(EPW). Laboratory-scaled sand entry experiments for the trajectory in the sand have been performed with four different nosed projectiles at a range of velocities from 20 m/s to 250 m/s. The slender projectiles were designed into flat, ogival, hemi-sperical, truncated-ogival nose shapes to make comparisons on the trajectory when those projectiles were launched at vertical and oblique impact angles (0° ~ 25°) along a view window. A high-speed camera placed at the side of the window was employed to capture the entire process of projectiles' penetration. Basing on the comparison of different tests, theoretical analysis is carried out on the relationships between ballistic stability and associated conditions. It can be obtained that projectile with flat nose has the best ballistic stability, followed by truncated-ogival nose, and ogival nose is the least at the same velocity. Additionally, a semi-empirical model based on a corrected drag coefficient is established to predict the depth of penetration. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088)

  14. Basic simple modeling of balloting motion of railgun projectiles. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, S.H.

    1991-07-01

    This is the second of three basic reports dealing with the in-bore balloting motion of a projectile launched in an electromagnetic railgun. The first report addressed axial projectile motion without cocking and was titled A Basic Single Model of In-bore Motion of Railgun Projectiles. Understanding the inbore motion of a projectile is important to its design and its ability to hit a target with some effectiveness. Analysis of in-bore motion is a complicated problem since many parameters are involved and the interacting relationships between them must be determined. To make the problem easier to understand, it was analyzed on several levels beginning with the basic simple model which computed only the axial motion and followed by more complicated models in the upper analysis levels that included as many lateral forces and gun tube vibration effects as possible. This report deals with the second basic or zero level of balloting analysis. A basic simple model considering only the effect of the propulsion force, the friction force of the armature, and the clearance between the projectile and the barrel is presented. The computation of the axial projectile motion with a certain cocking angle is the goal of this analysis. Equations of motion are derived and solved. A sample computation with available data is performed and the results plotted to give a clearer understanding of balloting action.

  15. Ablation and deceleration of mass-driver launched projectiles for space disposal of nuclear wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Bowen, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The energy cost of launching a projectile containing nuclear waste is two orders of magnitude lower with a mass driver than with a typical rocket system. A mass driver scheme will be feasible, however, only if ablation and deceleration are within certain tolerable limits. It is shown that if a hemisphere-cylinder-shaped projectile protected thermally with a graphite nose is launched vertically to attain a velocity of 17 km/sec at an altitude of 40 km, the mass loss from ablation during atmospheric flight will be less than 0.1 ton, provided the radius of the projectile is under 20 cm and the projectile's mass is of the order of 1 ton. The velocity loss from drag will vary from 0.4 to 30 km/sec, depending on the mass and radius of the projectile, the smaller velocity loss corresponding to large mass and small radius. Ablation is always within a tolerable range for schemes using a mass driver launcher to dispose of nuclear wastes outside the solar system. Deceleration can also be held in the tolerable range if the mass and diameter of the projectile are properly chosen.

  16. Hybrid Projectile Body Angle Estimation for Selectable Range Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioia, Christopher J.

    A Hybrid Projectile (HP) is a tube launched munition that transforms into a gliding UAV, and is currently being researched at West Virginia University. A simple launch timer was first envisioned to control the transformation point in order to achieve maximum distance. However, this timer would need to be reprogrammed for any distance less than maximum range due to the nominal time to deployment varying with launch angle. A method was sought for automatic wing deployment that would not require reprogramming the round. A body angle estimation system was used to estimate the pitch of the HP relative to the Earth to determine when the HP is properly oriented for the designed glide slope angle. It was also necessary to filter out noise from a simulated inertial measurement unit (IMU), GPS receiver, and magnetometer. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) was chosen to estimate the Euler angles, position and velocity of the HP while an algorithm determined when to deploy the wings. A parametric study was done to verify the optimum deployment condition using a Simulink aerodynamic model. Because range is directly related to launch angle, various launch angles were simulated in the model. By fixing the glide slope angle to -10° as a deployment condition for all launch angles, the range differed only by a maximum of 6.1% from the maximum possible range. Based on these findings, the body angle deployment condition provides the most flexible option to maintain maximum distance without the need of reprogramming. Position and velocity estimates were also determined from the EKF using the GPS measurements. Simulations showed that the EKF estimates exhibited low root mean squared error values, corresponding to less than 3% of the total position values. Because the HP was in flight for less than a minute in this experiment, the drift encountered was acceptable.

  17. Meso-scale hypervelocity cratering experiments (MEMIN project): Characterization of projectile material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Isabelle; Deutsch, Alex; Hecht, Lutz; Kenkmann, Thomas; Berndt, Jasper

    2010-05-01

    The DFG-funded "MEMIN" (multidisciplinary experimental and modelling impact crater research network) research group is aimed at a better understanding of the impact cratering process by combining (i) numerical modelling of crater formation, (ii) investigation of terrestrial craters and (iii) meso-scale hypervelocity impact experiments using the large two-stage light gas gun at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI; Efringen-Kirchen, Germany). In the framework of MEMIN, 1 cm-sized projectiles of the steel SAE 4130 (mass of 4.1 g) have been fired with a velocity of ~ 5.3 km s-1 onto blocks of Seeberger sandstone (size 100 x 100 x 50 cm, grain size 169+/-8 μm; porosity 12-20 vol.%). One goal of MEMIN is to document, analyze, and understand the fate of the projectile and its distribution between crater and ejecta; hence, the use of well-analyzed projectile material is mandatory. For this purpose, we use optical, and electron microscopy, electron microprobe (WWU, and MfN), and LA-ICP-MS microanalysis (WWU). Currently we evaluate which steel or iron meteorite is adequate for the intended use. Important properties of a projectile are (i) textural and chemical homogeneity, (ii) clear chemical distinction to the target sandstone, (iii) presence of elements such as Co, Ni, Cr, PGE that as "meteoritic component" are used in terrestrial craters to trace projectile matter, and characterize the type of the projectile (i.e., meteorite group), and finally (iv) mechanical properties that guarantee stability during sphere production, launch and flight. Strong chemical differences to the target material and geochemical homogeneity of the projectile will allow detection of small volumes of projectile matter by high spatial resolution in-situ analysis with the LA-ICP-MS. Steel SAE 4130 is heterogeneous at the 100-µm scale and has low trace element contents. In future, we plan the use of the alloyed heat treatable steel D290-1 as projectile as its texture is quite homogenous at the scale of

  18. KSC-05PD-0116

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo., the impactor on the Deep Impact spacecraft is tested. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface, Deep Impacts flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the craters depth and diameter, as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. The impactor will separate from the flyby spacecraft 24 hours before it impacts the surface of Tempel 1's nucleus. The impactor delivers 19 Gigajoules (that's 4.8 tons of TNT) of kinetic energy to excavate the crater. This kinetic energy is generated by the combination of the mass of the impactor and its velocity when it impacts. To accomplish this feat, the impactor uses a high-precision star tracker, the Impactor Target Sensor (ITS), and Auto-Navigation algorithms developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory to guide it to the target. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission. Launch of Deep Impact is scheduled for Jan. 12 from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.

  19. A comparison of in-bore projectile motion from an electromagnetic railgun versus that of a conventional cannon barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Lawrence W.

    1993-10-01

    An investigation was undertaken to examine electromagnetic (EM) gun-barrel/projectile interaction. The RASCAL code was used in this study because of its ability to easily manipulate relevant parameters such as gun tube centerline, projectile contact stiffness, and projectile design geometry. This work compares the projectile performance in the 9-MJ EM railgun at the University of Texas Center for Electromechanics (UTCEM) to that in a double-travel conventional gun. This comparison was made by varying the parameters listed above for two projectile designs: the M829 Link round; and a preliminary EM design. It was believed that adoption of this format would identify specific areas of the EM gun-projectile system that excite transverse loading. The results of the analysis are presented.

  20. Chemical projectile-target interaction during hypervelocity cratering experiments (MEMIN project).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M.; Hecht, L.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The detection and identification of meteoritic components in impact-derived rocks are of great value for confirming an impact origin and reconstructing the type of extraterrestrial material that repeatedly stroke the Earth during geologic evolution [1]. However, little is known about processes that control the projectile distribution into the various impactites that originate during the cratering and excavation process, and inter-element fractionation between siderophile elements during impact cratering. In the context of the MEMIN project, cratering experiments have been performed using spheres of Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel and of the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo (IAB) as projectiles accelerated to about 5 km/s, and blocks of Seeberger sandstone as target. The experiments were carried out at the two-stage acceleration facilities of the Fraunhofer Ernst-Mach-Institute (Freiburg). Our results are based on geochemical analyses of highly shocked ejecta material. The ejecta show various shock features including multiple sets of planar deformations features (PDF) in quartz, diaplectic quartz, and partial melting of the sandstone. Melting is concentrated in the phyllosilicate-bearing sandstone matrix but involves quartz, too. Droplets of molten projectile have entered the low-viscosity sandstone melt but not quartz glass. Silica-rich sandstone melts are enriched in the elements that are used to trace the projectile, like Fe, Ni, Cr, Co, and V (but no or little W and Mo). Inter-element ratios of these "projectile" tracer elements within the contaminated sandstone melt may be strongly modified from the original ratios in the projectiles. This fractionation most likely result from variation in the lithophile or siderophile character and/or from differences in reactivity of these tracer elements with oxygen [2] during interaction of metal melt with silicate melt. The shocked quartz with PDF is also enriched in Fe and Ni (experiment with a meteorite iron projectile) and in Fe

  1. Ages of Zhamanshin Crater Impactites and Projectile Tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izokh, E. P.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Korotkova, N. N.

    1993-07-01

    The Zhamanshin impact crater is the only one in which impactites have been found together with layered Muong Nong-type glasses and tektites-irghizites associated with microtektites. The K-Ar ages of these tektites vary from 0.69 to 5.2 m.y, while fission-track ages vary from 0.75 to 1.08 m.y. All geological data demonstrate a 10,000-year age of the impact event; this age coincides with the age of the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary [1]. A very young fission-track age of the Zhamanshin basic impactites was obtained [2]; however, these results were contested [3]. To eliminate the suggested high differences in thermal stability between basic and acidic Zhamanshin glasses, glass heating experiments were performed. The ~0.01-m.y. age (Table 1) of the basic impact glass collected from the deep bore holes shows that secondary heating and fission-track annealing by Sun-heating, fires, etc., must be excluded. The same age differences (1-2 orders of magnitude) were confirmed by thermoluminescence. Furthermore, in the Muong Nong-type Zhamanshinite, which is full of target rock inclusions, two different fission-track groups were recognized (Table 2). Therefore the Muong Nong-type Zhamanshinites are not local impactites, but instead represent a part of the projectile, as first suggested by J. O'Keefe [4]. In the Zhamanshin case, few tektites that fell opposite to impact explosion were partially remelted, while tektites that landed just after explosion are practically intact, like all other Australasian tektites [1,5]. Tables 1 and 2 appear here in the hard copy. References: [1] Izokh E. (1991) Soviet Geol. and Geophys., 32, 1-10. [2] Kashkarov L. et al. (1987) 2nd Intl. Conf. on Nat. Glasses, Prague, 199-202. [3] Koeberl C. and Storzer D., ibid., 207-213. [4] O'Keefe J. (1987) Meteoritics, 22, 219-228. [5] Izokh E. and Le duc An (1983) Meteoritika, 42, 158-169.

  2. A versatile sensor performance evaluation platform with an impactor-inspired sample chamber and virtual pin grid array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Christopher R.; Tamanaha, Cy R.; Woytowitz, Morgan; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-06-01

    We present the details necessary for building a scalable, flexible, and universal sensor performance evaluation platform with an impactor-inspired sample chamber and a virtual pin grid array for maintaining electrical connections. The system is designed to accommodate a wide range of sensors varying in physical dimensions, electrical connections, and transduction mechanisms. By integrating a switch matrix system with a commercial chip carrier, we have built a platform for rapidly screening sensors for promise in military, homeland security, and commercial applications without requiring custom circuits or packages for each sensor technology. Intuitive, graphical software is written and provided to control and monitor temperature, flow rate, and electrical connections. The system is capable of operating and interfacing with a variety of vapor delivery systems for chemical vapor detection measurements of emerging sensor technologies.

  3. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Sace Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Ion Beam Analysis of Subtle Impactor Traces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Colaux, J. L.; Kearsley, A. T.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of origin for particles responsible for impact damage on spacecraft such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) relies upon postflight analysis of returned materials. A unique opportunity arose in 2009 with collection of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) from HST by shuttle mission STS-125. A preliminary optical survey confirmed that there were hundreds of impact features on the radiator surface. Following extensive discussion between NASA, ESA, NHM and IBC, a collaborative research program was initiated, employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ion beam analysis (IBA) to determine the nature of the impacting grains. Even though some WFPC2 impact features are large, and easily seen without the use of a microscope, impactor remnants may be hard to find.

  4. Research on Impact Stress and Fatigue Simulation of a New Down-to-the-Hole Impactor Based on ANSYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Aiguo; Li, Yongbo; He, Wangyong; Fei, Dongdong

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, a down-to-the-hole electric hammer driven by linear motor is reported for drilling engineering. It differs from the common hydraulic or pneumatic hammers in that it can be applied to some special occasions without circulating medium due to its independence of the drilling fluid. The impact stress caused by the reciprocating motion between stator and rotor and the fatigue damage in key components of linear motor are analyzed by the ANSYS Workbench software and 3D model. Based on simulation results, the hammer's structure is optimized by using special sliding bearing, increasing the wall thickness of key and multilayer buffer gasket. Fatigue life and coefficient issues of the new structure are dramatically improved. However buffer gasket reduces the impactor's energy, different bumper structure effect on life improving and energy loss have also been elaborated.

  5. Risk functions for human and porcine eye rupture based on projectile characteristics of blunt objects.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eric A; Ng, Tracy P; McNally, Craig; Stitzel, Joel D; Duma, Stephan M

    2006-11-01

    Eye ruptures are among the most devastating eye injuries and can occur in automobile crashes, sporting impacts, and military events, where blunt projectile impacts to the eye can be encountered. The purpose of this study was to develop injury risk functions for globe rupture of both human and porcine eyes from blunt projectile impacts. This study was completed in two parts by combining published eye experiments with new test data. In the first part, data from 57 eye impact tests that were reported in the literature were analyzed. Projectile characteristics such as mass, cross-sectional area, and velocity, as well as injury outcome were noted for all tests. Data were sorted by species type and areas were identified where a paucity of data existed, based on the kinetic and normalized energy of assaulting objects. For the second part, a total of 126 projectile tests were performed on human and porcine eyes. Projectiles used for these tests included blunt aluminum projectiles, BBs, foam pellets, Airsoft pellets, and paintballs. Data for each projectile were recorded prior to testing and high-speed video was used to determine projectile velocity prior to striking the eye. In part three the data were pooled for a total of 183 eye impact tests, 83 human and 100 porcine, and were analyzed to develop the injury risk criteria. Binary logistic regression was used to develop injury risk functions based on kinetic and normalized energy. Probit analysis was used to estimate confidence intervals for the injury risk functions. Porcine eyes were found to be significantly stronger than human eyes in resisting globe rupture (p=0.01). For porcine eyes a 50% risk of globe rupture was found to be 71,145 J/m2, with a confidence interval of 63,245 J/m2 to 80,390 J/m2. Human eyes were found to have a 50% risk of globe rupture at a lower, 35,519 J/m2, with confidence intervals of 32,018 J/m2 to 40,641 J/m2. The results presented in this paper are useful in estimating the risk of globe

  6. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324648

  7. On the universal scaling in the electronic stopping cross section for heavy ion projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Martínez-Flores, C.; Trujillo-López, L. N.; Serkovic-Loli, L. N.

    2016-02-01

    Energy deposition of heavy ions when penetrating a material is of crucial importance in determining the damage to materials with implications in areas such as material science, plasma physics, radiotherapy and dosimetry. Due to the N-body electron problem, it has been thought that the electronic stopping cross section is unique for a given projectile-target combination and differs from system to system. In this work, we show that within the Bethe theory, there is a universal scaling when the electronic stopping cross sections and projectile kinetic energy are scaled properly in terms of the target mean excitation energy, ?, for all projectile-target combinations. We show that the scaling is given by ? as a function of ?, thus showing the importance of the characterization of the mean excitation energy. The scaling law expresses a systematic and universal behavior among complex projectile-target systems in the energy deposition, characterized by the minimum momentum transfer during the slowing down process. We provide an analytic expression for the universal scaling law for the stopping cross section of any projectile-target combination valid at high collision energies. Finally, we verify the universal scaling law by comparison to atomic and molecular experimental data available in the literature. We expect our findings will motivate further experimental work to verify our universal scaling for more complex systems in the absence of experimental data.

  8. Hydrocode Simulation with Modified Johnson-Cook Model and Experimental Analysis of Explosively Formed Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G.; Hameed, A.; Hetherington, J. G.; Barton, P. C.; Malik, A. Q.

    2013-04-01

    The formation of mild steel (MS) and copper (Cu) explosively formed projectiles (EFPs) was simulated in AUTODYN using both the Johnson-Cook (JC) and modified Johnson-Cook (JCM) constitutive models. The JC model was modified by increasing the hardening constant by 10%. The previously established semi-empirical equations for diameter, length, velocity, and depth of penetration were used to verify the design of the EFP. The length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of the warhead used in the simulation varied between 1 < L/D < 2. To avoid projectile distortion or breakup for large standoff applications, the design of the EFP warhead was modified to obtain a lower L/D ratio. Simulations from the JC model underestimated the EFP diameter, resulting in an unrealistically elongated projectile. This shortcoming was resolved by employing the JCM model, giving good agreement with the experimental results. The projectile velocity and hole characteristics in 10-mm-thick aluminum target plates were studied for both models. The semi-empirical equations and the JC model overestimated the projectile velocity, whereas the JCM model underestimated the velocity slightly when compared to the experimental results. The depths of penetration calculated by the semi-empirical equations in the aluminum (Al) target plate were 55 and 52 mm for Cu and MS EFPs, respectively.

  9. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure.

  10. Cluster formation at metal surfaces under bombardment with SFm+ (m = 1, …, 5) and Ar+ projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalab, S.; Wucher, A.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the formation of ionic and neutral clusters emitted from a polycrystalline indium surface under bombardment with SFm+ (m = 1, …, 5) and Ar+ projectile ions at 10 keV impact energy. Mass spectra of secondary ions and sputtered neutral particles are recorded under otherwise identical conditions. The neutral species are post-ionized prior to mass analysis by means of single photon-ionization using an intense UV laser at a wavelength of 193 nm. It is found that the measured secondary ion signals increase much more than those of the corresponding neutral particles if SFm+ projectiles are used instead of Ar+ ions, indicating that the ionization probability under bombardment with SFm+ is enhanced by a chemical matrix effect induced by fluorine incorporation into the surface. Interestingly, the largest values of the ionization probability are observed for SF3+ projectiles. The total sputtering yield is found to be larger for SFm+ compared to Ar+ projectiles and to increase linearly with increasing m. Both findings are shown to be understandable in the framework of linear cascade sputtering theory. The partial sputtering yields of Inn clusters exhibit a stronger enhancement than the sputtered monomers, the magnitude of the effect increasing with increasing cluster size and projectile nuclearity.

  11. Experimental investigation on underwater trajectory deviation of high-speed projectile with different nose shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yubo; Qi, Yafei; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory-scaled oblique water entry experiments for the trajectory stability in the water column have been performed with four different nosed-projectiles at a range of velocities from 20m /s to 250 m /s . The slender projectiles are designed with flat, ogival, hemi-sperical, truncated-ogival noses to make comparisons on the trajectory deviation when they are launched at vertical and oblique impact angles (0°~25°). Two high-speed cameras that are positioned orthogonal to each other and normal to the column are employed to capture the entire process of projectiles' penetration. From the experimental results, the sequential images in two planes are presented to compare the trajectory deviation of different impact tests and the 3D trajectory models are extracted based on the location recorded by cameras. Considering the effect influenced by the impact velocities and noses of projectiles, it merited concluded that trajectory deviation is affected from most by impact angle, and least by impact velocities. Additionally, ogival projectiles tend to be more sensitive to oblique angle and experienced the largest attitude changing. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088).

  12. Penetration Experiments with Limestone Targets and Ogive-Nose Steel Projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Forrestal, M.J.; Frew, D.J.; Hanchak, S.J.

    1999-04-08

    We conducted three sets of depth-of-penetration experiments with limestone targets and 3.0 caliber-radius-head (CRH), ogive-nose steel rod projectiles. The limestone targets had a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 60 MPa, a density of 2.31 kg/m{sup 3}, a porosity of 15%, and a water content less than 0.4%. The ogive-nose rod projectiles with length-to-diameter ratios often were machined from 4340 R{sub c} 45 and Aer Met 100 R{sub c} 53 steel, round stock and had diameters and masses of 7.1 mm, 0.020 kg; 12.7 mm, 0.117 kg; and 25.4 mm, 0.931 kg. Powder guns or a two-stage, light-gas gun launched the projectiles at normal impacts to striking velocities between 0.4 and 1.9 km/s. For the 4340 R{sub c} 45 and Aer Met 100 R{sub c} 53 steel projectiles, penetration depth increased as striking velocity increased to a striking velocity of 1.5 and 1.7 km/s, respectively. For larger striking velocities, the projectiles deformed during penetration without nose erosion, deviated from the shot line, and exited the sides of the target. We also developed an analytical penetration equation that described the target resistance by its density and a strength parameter determined from depth of penetration versus striking velocity data.

  13. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure.

  14. Accuracy Improvement Capability of Advanced Projectile Based on Course Correction Fuze Concept

    PubMed Central

    Elsaadany, Ahmed; Wen-jun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in terminal accuracy is an important objective for future artillery projectiles. Generally it is often associated with range extension. Various concepts and modifications are proposed to correct the range and drift of artillery projectile like course correction fuze. The course correction fuze concepts could provide an attractive and cost-effective solution for munitions accuracy improvement. In this paper, the trajectory correction has been obtained using two kinds of course correction modules, one is devoted to range correction (drag ring brake) and the second is devoted to drift correction (canard based-correction fuze). The course correction modules have been characterized by aerodynamic computations and flight dynamic investigations in order to analyze the effects on deflection of the projectile aerodynamic parameters. The simulation results show that the impact accuracy of a conventional projectile using these course correction modules can be improved. The drag ring brake is found to be highly capable for range correction. The deploying of the drag brake in early stage of trajectory results in large range correction. The correction occasion time can be predefined depending on required correction of range. On the other hand, the canard based-correction fuze is found to have a higher effect on the projectile drift by modifying its roll rate. In addition, the canard extension induces a high-frequency incidence angle as canards reciprocate at the roll motion. PMID:25097873

  15. Numerical Investigation of Bending-Body Projectile Aerodynamics for Maneuver Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Eric; Silton, Sidra

    2015-11-01

    Precision munitions are an active area of research for the U.S. Army. Canard-control actuators have historically been the primary mechanism used to maneuver fin-stabilized, gun-launched munitions. Canards are small, fin-like control surfaces mounted at the forward section of the munition to provide the pitching moment necessary to rotate the body in the freestream flow. The additional lift force due to the rotated body and the canards then alters the flight path toward the intended target. As velocity and maneuverability requirements continue to increase, investigation of other maneuver mechanisms becomes necessary. One option for a projectile with a large length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) is a bending-body design, which imparts a curvature to the projectile body along its axis. This investigation uses full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics simulations to evaluate the effectiveness of an 8-degree bent nose tip on an 8-degree bent forward section of an L/D =10 projectile. The aerodynamic control effectiveness of the bending-body concept is compared to that of a standard L/D =10 straight-body projectile as well as that of the same projectile with traditional canards. All simulations were performed at supersonic velocities between Mach 2-4.

  16. Accuracy improvement capability of advanced projectile based on course correction fuze concept.

    PubMed

    Elsaadany, Ahmed; Wen-jun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in terminal accuracy is an important objective for future artillery projectiles. Generally it is often associated with range extension. Various concepts and modifications are proposed to correct the range and drift of artillery projectile like course correction fuze. The course correction fuze concepts could provide an attractive and cost-effective solution for munitions accuracy improvement. In this paper, the trajectory correction has been obtained using two kinds of course correction modules, one is devoted to range correction (drag ring brake) and the second is devoted to drift correction (canard based-correction fuze). The course correction modules have been characterized by aerodynamic computations and flight dynamic investigations in order to analyze the effects on deflection of the projectile aerodynamic parameters. The simulation results show that the impact accuracy of a conventional projectile using these course correction modules can be improved. The drag ring brake is found to be highly capable for range correction. The deploying of the drag brake in early stage of trajectory results in large range correction. The correction occasion time can be predefined depending on required correction of range. On the other hand, the canard based-correction fuze is found to have a higher effect on the projectile drift by modifying its roll rate. In addition, the canard extension induces a high-frequency incidence angle as canards reciprocate at the roll motion. PMID:25097873

  17. An experimental, metallurgical and modelling analysis of silver and copper explosively formed projectiles (EFPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, J.; Church, P.; Cullis, I.; Findlay, S.; Hart, A.; Wickenden, M.

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental, metallurgical and modelling study into the structure and properties of silver and copper explosively fonned projectiles. The project started with the conditioning, processing and characterisation of the non-shocked silver and copper materials. Here, the material constants were derived for the Goldthorpe path-dependant constitutive model[1]. For the purposes of this study the warhead designs produced some conservative EFP projectiles. These were designed using the indigenous Eulerian hydrocode GRIM. Due to the ductile nature of both silver and copper, care was taken with respect to the equation of state, in particular with the temperature supplied to the constitutive models. The EFP projectiles were then experimentally recovered using soft-capturing techniques[2]. The comparison of the code predictions with the experimental radiography results was very good, suggesting that there could not be large material phase changes or significant changes to the microstructure of the material due to the explosively applied shock. Finally, the sectioning and metallurgical analysis of the recovered projectiles showed that although there were some variations in both grain size, microstructure and material hardness throughoutlacross the sectioned projectiles, these were not significant.

  18. Particle Size Distributions of Particulate Emissions from the Ferroalloy Industry Evaluated by Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI)

    PubMed Central

    Kero, Ida; Naess, Mari K.; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The present article presents a comprehensive evaluation of the potential use of an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) in the ferroalloy industry with respect to indoor air quality and fugitive emission control. The ELPI was used to assess particulate emission properties, particularly of the fine particles (Dp ≤ 1 μm), which in turn may enable more satisfactory risk assessments for the indoor working conditions in the ferroalloy industry. An ELPI has been applied to characterize the fume in two different ferroalloy plants, one producing silicomanganese (SiMn) alloys and one producing ferrosilicon (FeSi) alloys. The impactor classifies the particles according to their aerodynamic diameter and gives real-time particle size distributions (PSD). The PSD based on both number and mass concentrations are shown and compared. Collected particles have also been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. From the ELPI classification, particle size distributions in the range 7 nm – 10 μm have been established for industrial SiMn and FeSi fumes. Due to the extremely low masses of the ultrafine particles, the number and mass concentration PSD are significantly different. The average aerodynamic diameters for the FeSi and the SiMn fume particles were 0.17 and 0.10 μm, respectively. Based on this work, the ELPI is identified as a valuable tool for the evaluation of airborne particulate matter in the indoor air of metallurgical production sites. The method is well suited for real-time assessment of morphology (particle shape), particle size, and particle size distribution of aerosols. PMID:25380385

  19. Characterization and first results of an ice nucleating particle measurement system based on counterflow virtual impactor technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, L. P.; Mertes, S.; Kästner, U.; Frank, F.; Nillius, B.; Bundke, U.; Rose, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schneider, J.; Worringen, A.; Kandler, K.; Bukowiecki, N.; Ebert, M.; Curtius, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2014-10-01

    A specific instrument combination was developed to achieve a better microphysical and chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosol particles that have the potential to act as ice nucleating particles (INP). For this purpose a pumped counterflow virtual impactor system called IN-PCVI was set up and characterized to separate ice particles that had been activated on INP in the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) from interstitial, non-activated particles. This coupled setup consisting of FINCH (ice particle activation and counting), IN-PCVI (INP separation and preparation), and further aerosol instrumentation (INP characterization) had been developed for the application in field experiments. The separated INP were characterized on-line with regard to their total number concentration, number size distribution and chemical composition, especially with the Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer ALABAMA. Moreover, impactor samples for electron microscopy were taken. Due to the coupling the IN-PCVI had to be operated with different flow settings than known from literature, which required a further characterization of its cut-off-behavior. Taking the changed cut-off-behavior into account, the INP number concentration measured by the IN-PCVI system was in good agreement with the one detected by the FINCH optics for water saturation ratios up to 1.01 (ice saturation ratios between 1.21-1.34 and temperatures between -18 and -26 °C). First field results of INP properties are presented which were gained during the INUIT-JFJ/CLACE 2013 campaign at the high altitude research station Jungfraujoch in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.).

  20. Particle size distributions of particulate emissions from the ferroalloy industry evaluated by electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI).

    PubMed

    Kero, Ida; Naess, Mari K; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The present article presents a comprehensive evaluation of the potential use of an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) in the ferroalloy industry with respect to indoor air quality and fugitive emission control. The ELPI was used to assess particulate emission properties, particularly of the fine particles (Dp ≤ 1 μm), which in turn may enable more satisfactory risk assessments for the indoor working conditions in the ferroalloy industry. An ELPI has been applied to characterize the fume in two different ferroalloy plants, one producing silicomanganese (SiMn) alloys and one producing ferrosilicon (FeSi) alloys. The impactor classifies the particles according to their aerodynamic diameter and gives real-time particle size distributions (PSD). The PSD based on both number and mass concentrations are shown and compared. Collected particles have also been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. From the ELPI classification, particle size distributions in the range 7 nm - 10 μm have been established for industrial SiMn and FeSi fumes. Due to the extremely low masses of the ultrafine particles, the number and mass concentration PSD are significantly different. The average aerodynamic diameters for the FeSi and the SiMn fume particles were 0.17 and 0.10 μm, respectively. Based on this work, the ELPI is identified as a valuable tool for the evaluation of airborne particulate matter in the indoor air of metallurgical production sites. The method is well suited for real-time assessment of morphology (particle shape), particle size, and particle size distribution of aerosols. PMID:25380385

  1. Constraints on the Nature and Distribution of Iridium Host Phases at the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary: Implications for Projectile Identity and dispersal on impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1997-01-01

    Among Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sites worldwide, variations in the concentrations and ratios of elements commonly enriched in meteorites complicate traditional geochemical attempts at impactor identification. Yet they may provide constraints on the physical and chemical processes associated with large-body disruption and dispersal, as well as with diagenesis of projectile components. To this end, we continue our efforts to identify the mineral host-phases of projectile-derived elements, particularly for Ir, and to document their partitioning between crater deposits and ejecta resulting from the Chicxulub basin-forming impact. Building on earlier work, we used INAA to measure Ir concentrations in successively smaller splits of finely powdered impact melt breccia from the Chicxulub Crater in Mexico (sample Y6Nl9-R(b)), and K/T boundary fish clay from Stevns Klint, Denmark (sample FC-1, split from 40 kg of homogenized material intended as an analytical standard). Results for the Chicxulub sample show a heterogeneous Ir distribution and document that at least five discrete Ir-bearing host phases were isolated in subsequent splits, having Ir masses equivalent to pure Ir spheres from about 0.8 to about 3.5 mm in diameter. Three of these are within a sufficiently reduced mass of powder to warrant searching for them using backscattered electron microscopy. In contrast, successively smaller splits of the Stevns Klint fish clay show no statistically significant deviation from the reported value of 32 +/- 2 ng/g Ir, suggesting a uniform Ir host-phase distribution. For the smallest split obtained thus far (100 +/- 40 ng/g Ir), a pure Ir sphere of equivalent Ir mass would be <0.05 min in diameter. (n.b. Although homogenizing and sieving of FC-1 to <75 min obviously obscured variations in stratigraphic distribution, it is unlikely to have affected the size-frequency distribution of Ir host phases.) We previously identified micrometer-scale Ir host phases by electron

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PREPARATION OF PM AND URG IMPACTORS AND IMPACTION PLATES (UA-L-8.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the stages of preparation required for Harvard particulate matter (PM) sampler impactor: (1) prior to in-field use of the particulate sampling system, (2) in-field sampling, and (3) disassembly after field use. This procedure applies direct...

  3. Tearing resistance of a thin shell against projectile penetration: Material property effects

    SciTech Connect

    Trinh, K.V.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents results from a series of finite element analyses performed to study material effects on the tearing resistance of a thin shell subjected to projectile penetration. These analyses simulated a round, slender projectile impacting the top center of a metallic cylindrical shell at high speed. We varied eight selected shell material properties systematically using an L18 matrix (design of experiment technique). From the results, we determined effects of the eight properties on the minimum projectile velocity required to penetrate the shell. The material properties examined here included: yield strength, hardening and recovery characteristics, heat coefficient, initial porosity, and damage exponent (a void growth parameter). The DYNA2D finite element code along with the Sandia plasticity/damage model for ductile metals were used in the analyses.

  4. Spin alignment of excited projectiles due to target spin-flip interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.; Elson, J. M.; Manfredi, J.; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Kilburn, M.; Lee, Jenny; Lynch, W. G.; Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J.; Youngs, M.; Marley, S. T.; Shetty, D. V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    The sequential breakup of E /A =65.5 -MeV7Be and E /A =36.6 -MeV6Li projectiles excited through inelastic interactions with 9Be target nuclei has been studied. For events where the target nucleus remained in its ground state, significant alignment of the excited projectile's spin axis parallel or antiparallel to the beam direction was observed. This unusual spin alignment was found to be largely independent of the projectile's scattering angle and it was deduced that the target nucleus has a significant probability of changing its spin orientation during the interaction. It is proposed that the unusual spin alignment is a consequence of the molecular structure of the 9Be nucleus.

  5. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M; Colgan, J; Wong, T G; Madison, D H

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  6. Six degree of freedom simulation of fluid payload projectiles using numerically computed fluid moments

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, H.R.; Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-07-01

    A flight trajectory simulation method has been developed for calculating the six degree of freedom motion of fluid filled projectiles. Numerically calculated internal fluid moments and experimentally known aerodynamic forces and moments are coupled to the projectile motion. Comparisons of predicted results with flight test data of an M483 155mm artillery projectile with a highly viscous payload confirm the accuracy of the simulation. This simulation clearly shows that the flight instability is due to the growth of the nutation component of angular motion caused by the viscous effects of the fluid payload. This simulation procedure, when used in conjunction with the previously developed method for calculating internal fluid moments, allows the designer to examine the effects of various liquid payloads and container geometries on the dynamic behavior of flight vehicles.

  7. Evaluating simulant materials for understanding cranial backspatter from a ballistic projectile.

    PubMed

    Das, Raj; Collins, Alistair; Verma, Anurag; Fernandez, Justin; Taylor, Michael

    2015-05-01

    In cranial wounds resulting from a gunshot, the study of backspatter patterns can provide information about the actual incidents by linking material to surrounding objects. This study investigates the physics of backspatter from a high-speed projectile impact and evaluates a range of simulant materials using impact tests. Next, we evaluate a mesh-free method called smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the splashing mechanism during backspatter. The study has shown that a projectile impact causes fragmentation at the impact site, while transferring momentum to fragmented particles. The particles travel along the path of least resistance, leading to partial material movement in the reverse direction of the projectile motion causing backspatter. Medium-density fiberboard is a better simulant for a human skull than polycarbonate, and lorica leather is a better simulant for a human skin than natural rubber. SPH is an effective numerical method for modeling the high-speed impact fracture and fragmentations. PMID:25739515

  8. Projectile motion of a once rotating object: physical quantities at the point of return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabasi, Sameer

    2016-09-01

    Vertical circular motion is a widely used example to explain non-uniform circular motion in most undergraduate general physics textbooks. However, most of these textbooks do not elaborate on the case when this motion turns into projectile motion under certain conditions. In this paper, we describe thoroughly when a mass attached to a cord, moving in a vertical circular motion, turns into a projectile and its location and velocity when it rejoins the circular orbit. This paper provides an intuitive understanding, supported by basic kinematic equations, to give an interesting elegant connection between circular motion and projectile motion—something lacking in most physics textbooks—and will be very useful to present to an undergraduate class to deepen their understanding of both models of motion.

  9. [Lodged bullet or bullet penetration? Re-entry of a projectile and pseudo-shot].

    PubMed

    Grimm, U; Zollinger, U

    1996-01-01

    In an extended suicide an 11-year-old boy was killed by two shots into the back. In spite of corresponding entry and exit points one of the projectiles was found inside the body. By laying open the respective bullet track, examination of the deformations of the bullet, on which a total of three ricochet points were identified, and a second visit to the scene both the order in which the shots were fired and the reason why one of the projectiles was lodged inside the body, although there was an exit point, could be clarified: On firing the second shot the victim had been lying on the wooden threshold of a door, from which the projectile ricochetted. The terms "reentry" and "pseudo exit point" are discussed. The retention of the bullet in the depth of an alleged exit wound emphasizes the importance of post-mortal X-ray examinations. PMID:8687277

  10. Hypervelocity impact on brittle materials of semi-infinite thickness: fracture morphology related to projectile diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Emma A.; Kay, Laurie; Shrine, Nick R. G.

    Hypervelocity impact on brittle materials produces features not observed on ductile targets. Low fracture toughness and high yield strength produce a range of fracture morphologies including cracking, spallation and shatter. For sub-mm diameter projectiles, impact features are characterised by petaloid spallation separated by radial cracks. The conchoidal or spallation diameter is a parameter in current cratering equations. An alternative method for interpreting hypervelocity impacts on glass targets of semi-infinite thickness is tested against impact data produced using the Light Gas Gun (LGG) facility at the University of Kent at Canterbury (UKC), U.K. Spherical projectiles of glass and other materials with diameters 30-300 μm were fired at ~5 km s^-1 at a glass target of semi-infinite thickness. The data is used to test a power law relationship between projectile diameter and crack length. The results of this work are compared with published cratering/spallation equations for brittle materials.

  11. Energy loss for the assemblies of charged projectiles in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Murtaza, G.; Nasim, M.H.

    2005-07-15

    Expressions for the electrostatic potential and the energy loss are derived for a variety of arrays of dust grain projectiles, arranged at different orientations and separations and moving with a constant velocity along the z axis in an unmagnetized collisionless dusty plasma, using linear dielectric theory. By employing the dielectric constant of dust acoustic wave, the Debye and wake potentials are calculated for the projectiles. It is found that a projectile moving with high speed forms a negative wake behind and a shock in front of it. Further, for particular values of interspacing, the three different assemblies exhibit almost similar behavior of the energy loss and thus permit the possibility of all of them to move in unison to establish a dynamical equilibrium in a hexagonal geometry.

  12. Study on measurement method for projectile location based on light screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Feng; Liu, QunHua; Sun, GuoBin

    2008-09-01

    In weapon-ammunition system, firing accuracy of projectile is major characteristic parameter weighing fire effect and capability of weapon-ammunition system for target. At present, firing accuracy of projectile is obtained by measuring the two-dimensional coordinates of projectile for target. In order to measure the parameters of two-dimensional coordinates of projectile for target, a new type of measurement system is proposed. The measurement system is composed of four high sensitivity light screens (known as target) with special geometrical frame. Light source of the screens is formed by special infrared LED array. The PIN infrared photodiodes array is used as the sensors. The longest effective distance between light source and sensors is 4m. It is impossible to achieve using traditional methods. Four light screens and high-precision timers are combined in order to acquire the value of time when the projectile flies across the position of four light screens. The real-time data acquirement and processing and display of two-dimensional coordinates and the projectile velocity can be realized. The principle of measurement system and the design of high sensitivity light screen are introduced emphatically. The measurement system was verified by using five kinds of small caliber pellets. As compared with the paper target sheet, the measurement system designed can meet the demand of check-up test of gun, bullet and ammunition. The firing testing in the target field has proved that the measurement system has the advantages of simple construction, easy operation and high precision and high sensitivity.

  13. Computational studies of projectile melt in impact with typical whipple shields

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, C.E. Jr.; Alme, M.L.

    1994-12-01

    Protecting space-based structures against the impact of orbital debris is an important problem of current interest. This paper presents scaling results based on simulations with the CALE computer program of aluminum projectile impacting typical aluminum Whipple shields at speeds of 6 to 14 km/s. The objective was to determine the extent of projectile and shield material melting. The approach was to perform a matrix of computer simulations varying the impact speed from 6 to 14 km/s and varying the areal density of the shield from 5 percent to 80 percent of the centerline areal density of the projectile. The projectile radius was fixed at 9.5 mm (mass = 1.27 grams). The melt state of the projectile material and the shield material was assessed after release of the initial shock. The post-release specific energy in the projectile and in the shield was compared with the enthalpy of incipient melt and the enthalpy of complete melt provided in the Hultgren Tables. Material with specific energy greater than the enthalpy of complete melt was assumed to be fully melted. Material with specific energy greater than the enthalpy of incipient melt but less than that of complete melt was assumed to be partially solid and partially melted mixed phase material with no strength. Material with specific energy less than the enthalpy of incipient melt was assumed to be in a solid state with strength. It is likely that this solid material is in a highly fragmented state as a result of the initial shock.

  14. Refrigeration and freezing of porcine tissue does not affect the retardation of fragment simulating projectiles.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Carr, D J; Mabbott, A; Beckett, S; Clasper, J C

    2015-05-01

    Explosively propelled fragments are the most common cause of injury to UK service personnel in modern conflicts. Numerical injury models to simulate such injuries utilise algorithms based upon gelatin and animal tissue testing but data is limited on many fragment simulating projectiles and these simulants cannot represent human anatomy. Testing with post mortem specimens may overcome this limitation but no information exists about how post mortem tissue changes and storage conditions in humans or animals may affect projectile penetration. Two chisel nosed cylinders (0.49 g and 1.10 g) and a 0.51 g (5 mm) sphere were fired into three groups of porcine tissue (fresh, refrigerated and frozen then refrigerated) and compared to 20% gelatin. Depth of projectile penetration was ascertained with the assistance of computed tomography and kinetic energy absorption by tissues measured using Doppler radar and high speed photography. No difference in depth of penetration was found between porcine tissue stored in the different manners compared with 20% gelatin by impact velocities less than 100 m/s. Insufficient numbers of projectiles were retained in tissue at higher velocities for statistical analysis to be undertaken. Energy absorbed per millimetre of tissue ranged between 0.42 and 0.98 J/mm for different porcine tissue despite differing storage. This pilot study would suggest that the effect of refrigerating or freezing porcine tissue followed by thawing has no effect on its ability to retard these projectiles. Further research is required to ascertain if these results occur at greater velocities and for other types of projectile. PMID:25882156

  15. Numerical simulation of reacting flow in a thermally choked ram accelerator projectile launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael J.

    1991-06-01

    CFD solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations are presently applied to a ram-accelerator projectile launcher's reacting and nonreacting turbulent flowfields. The gases in question are a hydrocarbon such as CH4, an oxidizer such as O2, and an inert gas such as N2. Numerical simulations are presented which highlight in-bore flowfield details and allow comparisons with measured launch tube wall pressures and projectile thrust as a function of velocity. The computation results thus obtained are used to ascertain the operational feasibility of a proposed 120-mm-bore ram accelerator system.

  16. Maximum projectile range with drag and lift, with particular application to golf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    1983-04-01

    This paper explores the interesting problem of projectile motion without the vacuum idealization. Particular attention is paid to golf ball trajectories with and without lift. No lift trajectories with linear and quadratic drag are considered first. Then, trajectories with lift and linear drag are investigated. Projection angles for maximum range are determined for all these cases. Computer solutions are used throughout, with a Runge-Kutta routine used for all cases except for the well-known closed solution for the no lift, linear drag projectile.

  17. [A sign of the rotational impact of the gunshot projectile on the flat bone].

    PubMed

    Leonov, S V

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the mechanisms of formation of the gunshot fracture of the flat bones with special reference to the translational and rotational motion of the projectile. A total of 120 real and experimental injuries of this type were available for the investigation with the use of simulation by the finite-elemental analysis. A set of morphological features has been identified that make it possible to determine the direction of rotation of the gunshot projectile. PMID:25764858

  18. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, R.A.; McCoig, T.M.; Dooley, J.B.

    1998-06-02

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic phase material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics. 7 figs.

  19. Model for projectile fragmentation: Case study for Ni on Ta and Be, and Xe on Al

    SciTech Connect

    Mallik, S.; Chaudhuri, G.; Das Gupta, S.

    2011-04-15

    For projectile fragmentation, we work out details of a model whose origin can be traced back to the Bevalac era. The model positions itself between the phenomenological empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections (EPAX) and microscopic transport models like the heavy ion phase-space exploration (HIPSE) model and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) model. We apply the model to some recent data of projectile fragmentation of Ni on Ta and Be at beam energy 140 MeV/nucleon and some older data of Xe on Al at beam energy 790 MeV/nucleon. Reasonable values of cross sections for various composites populated in the reactions are obtained.

  20. An historical context of modern principles in the management of intracranial injury from projectiles.

    PubMed

    Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Dunn, Gavin P; Laws, Edward R

    2010-05-01

    The contemporary management of projectile head injuries owes much to the lessons neurosurgeons have distilled from their experiences in war. Through early investigation and an increasingly detailed account of wartime clinical experience, neurosurgeons--including the field's early giants--began to gain a greater understanding not only of intracranial missile pathophysiology but also of appropriate management. In this paper, the authors trace the development of the principles of managing intracranial projectile injury from the Crimean War in the 19th century through the Vietnam War to provide a context that frames a summary of today's core management principles. PMID:20568940

  1. Determination of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene surface contamination on M107 artillery projectiles and sampling method evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, S.

    2005-06-01

    The Army is interested in determining the explosive signatures of different types of munitions ranging from landmines to artillery projectiles. While a significant amount of work has been performed to determine the explosive signature of landmines, a relatively little amount of research has focused on artillery projectiles. This paper focuses on determining the levels of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) existing on the exterior surface of M107 artillery projectiles. The hypothesis is that there will be detectable levels of TNT on the surfaces of these projectiles due to their manufacture as well as their storage conditions. It is believed that this surface contamination provides one source of TNT that can then contaminate the surrounding environment. It is the goal of this research to determine whether or not projectiles that are manufactured and stored in similar fashions will exhibit a predictable range of TNT concentrations. This data can then be used to predict the level of environmental contamination that would occur if the projectile were present. Initially, the problem of sample collection is addressed. Specifically, quantifying the collection efficiency of different sampling techniques is investigated. This experimental aspect is crucial in determining the total quantity of TNT found of the surfaces of the projectiles. Considerations such as total amount of TNT removed compared to total amount of TNT present (on control samples) as well as the method's ease of use in the field are addressed. Data collected from M107 projectiles being stored at an Army test facility will then be analyzed and discussed.

  2. Physics Learning Achievement Study: Projectile, Using Mathematica Program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutem, Artit; Kerdmee, Supoj

    2013-01-01

    The propose of this study is to study Physics Learning Achievement, projectile motion, using the Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students, comparing with Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students who study the projectile motion experiment set. The samples are…

  3. The African Origin of Complex Projectile Technology: An Analysis Using Tip Cross-Sectional Area and Perimeter

    PubMed Central

    Sisk, Matthew L.; Shea, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a body of literature focusing on the functionality of modern and stylistically distinct projectile points, comparatively little attention has been paid to quantifying the functionality of the early stages of projectile use. Previous work identified a simple ballistics measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Area, as a way of determining if a given class of stone points could have served as effective projectile armatures. Here we use this in combination with an alternate measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Perimeter, a more accurate proxy of the force needed to penetrate a target to a lethal depth. The current study discusses this measure and uses it to analyze a collection of measurements from African Middle Stone Age pointed stone artifacts. Several point types that were rejected in previous studies are statistically indistinguishable from ethnographic projectile points using this new measure. The ramifications of this finding for a Middle Stone Age origin of complex projectile technology is discussed. PMID:21755048

  4. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  5. The Effect of Cooperative Learning on Grade 12 Learners' Performance in Projectile Motions, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibirige, Israel; Lehong, Moyahabo Jeridah

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the effect of cooperative learning on Grade 12 learners' performance in projectile motions. A quasi-experimental research design with non-equivalent control group was used. Two schools were purposively selected from Maleboho Central circuit in South Africa based on their performance in Physical Sciences Grade 12 results of 2011.…

  6. On projectile fragmentation at high-velocity perforation of a thin bumper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    By means of 3D numerical simulations, we study the statistical properties of the fragments cloud formed during high-velocity impact of a spherical projectile on a mesh bumper. We present a quantitative description of the projectile fragmentation, and study the nature of the transition from the damage to the fragmentation of the projectile when the impact velocity varies. A distinctive feature of the present work is that the calculations are carried out by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method applied to the equations of mechanics of deformable solids (MDS). We describe the materials behavior by the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model for the yield strength. The maximum principal stress spall model is used as the fracture model. It is shown that the simulation results of fragmentation based on the MDS equations by the SPH method are qualitatively consistent with the results obtained earlier on the basis of the molecular dynamics and discrete element models. It is found that the power-law distribution exponent does not depend on energy imparted to the projectile during the high-velocity impact. At the same time, our calculations show that the critical impact velocity, the power-law exponent and other critical exponents depend on the fracture criterion.

  7. Amazing Physics: Learning about Work, Energy and Projectile Motion in a Historical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tural, Guner

    2013-01-01

    Teaching physics through a historical context provides effective learning and increases students' motivation for and interest in physics. For example, trebuchets and mangonels may be interesting historical contexts for learning about energy, work, and projectile motion. In this study, the implementation of physics lessons related to these…

  8. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  9. Measurement of projectile trajectory in dielectric target with micropower-impluse radar

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, D.W.; Kuklo, R.M.; Rosenbury, E.T.; Simonson, S.C.

    1997-11-20

    The micropower-impulse radar has been adapted for non-intrusive tracking of projectiles in dielectric targets. The main application of this technique is intended to be the validation of continuum mechanics simulation codes and material models used in the study of the interaction between high-velocity penetrators and concrete targets. Two experiments have been conducted in which a gun-launched 90-mm-diameter projectile was fired at velocities of 160 and 230 m/s into a cubical box filled with dry sand and tracked with the micropower-impulse radar. The system was adjusted so that a 2-m range in sand was divided into 511 timing intervals, which were swept every 0.1 ms. As the projectile took approximately 40 ms to come to rest this meant that there were 400measurements of its position. The CALE continuum mechanics simulation was used to model the projectile motion in the target, and close agreement was found with the measured trajectory.

  10. Analytical evaluation of the trajectories of hypersonic projectiles launched into space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, John David

    An equation of motion has been derived that may be solved using simple analytic functions which describes the motion of a projectile launched from the surface of the Earth into space accounting for both Newtonian gravity and aerodynamic drag. The equation of motion is based upon the Kepler equation of motion differential and variable transformations with the inclusion of a decaying angular momentum driving function and appropriate simplifying assumptions. The new equation of motion is first compared to various numerical and analytical trajectory approximations in a non-rotating Earth reference frame. The Modified Kepler solution is then corrected to include Earth rotation and compared to a rotating Earth simulation. Finally, the modified equation of motion is used to predict the apogee and trajectory of projectiles launched into space by the High Altitude Research Project from 1961 to 1967. The new equation of motion allows for the rapid equalization of projectile trajectories and intercept solutions that may be used to calculate firing solutions to enable ground launched projectiles to intercept or rendezvous with targets in low Earth orbit such as ballistic missiles.

  11. A heavy ion spectrometer system for the measurement of projectile fragmentation of relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelage, J.; Crawford, H. J.; Albergo, S.; Kuo, C.; Caccia, Z.; Chen, C.-X.; Costa, S.; Cronqvist, M.; Flores, L.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Mitchell, J. W.

    1996-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) at the LBL Bevalac provided a unique facility for measuring projectile fragmentation cross sections important in deconvolving the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) source composition. The general characteristics of the apparatus specific to this application are described and the main features of the event reconstruction and analysis used in the TRANSPORT experiment are discussed.

  12. Approximate Formula for the Vertical Asymptote of Projectile Motion in Midair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudinov, Peter Sergey

    2010-01-01

    The classic problem of the motion of a point mass (projectile) thrown at an angle to the horizon is reviewed. The air drag force is taken into account with the drag factor assumed to be constant. An analytical approach is used for the investigation. An approximate formula is obtained for one of the characteristics of the motion--the vertical…

  13. Minimum velocity necessary for nonconventional projectiles to penetrate the eye: an experimental study using pig eyes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John W; Dahlstrom, Dean B; Powley, Kramer D

    2011-06-01

    To satisfy the Criminal Code of Canada's definition of a firearm, a barreled weapon must be capable of causing serious bodily injury or death to a person. Canadian courts have accepted the forensically established criteria of "penetration or rupture of an eye" as serious bodily injury. The minimal velocity of nonconventional ammunition required to penetrate the eye including airsoft projectiles has yet to be established. To establish minimal threshold requirements for eye penetration, empirical tests were conducted using a variety of airsoft projectiles. Using the data obtained from these tests, and previous research using "air gun" projectiles, an "energy density" parameter was calculated for the minimum penetration threshold of an eye. Airsoft guns capable of achieving velocities in excess of 99 m/s (325 ft/s) using conventional 6-mm airsoft ammunition will satisfy the forensically established criteria of "serious bodily injury." The energy density parameter for typical 6-mm plastic airsoft projectiles is 4.3 to 4.8 J/cm². This calculation also encompasses 4.5-mm steel BBs. PMID:21263287

  14. Evaluation of eye injury risk from projectile shooting toys using the focus headform - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Bisplinghoff, Jill A; Duma, Stefan M

    2009-01-01

    Half of eye injuries in the United States are caused by a blunt impact and more specifically, eye injuries effecting children often result from projectile shooting toys. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk of eye injuries of currently available projectile shooting toys. In order to assess the risk of each toy, a Facial and Ocular Countermeasure Safety (FOCUS) headform was used to measure the force applied to the eye during each hit for a total of 18 tests. The selected toys included a dart gun, a foam launcher, and a ball launcher. The force ranged from 4-93 N and was analyzed using the injury risk function for globe rupture for the FOCUS headform. Projectile characteristics were also examined using normalized energy to determine risk of corneal abrasion, hyphema, lens dislocation, retinal damage and globe rupture. It was found that the three toys tested produced peak loads corresponding with risk of globe rupture between 0% and 17.3%. The normalized energy results show no risk of hyphema, lens dislocation, retinal damage or globe rupture and a maximum risk of corneal abrasion of 5.9%. This study concludes that although there are many eye injuries caused by projectiles, the selected toys show a very low risk of eye injury. PMID:19369748

  15. Development of a numerical model for the ballistic penetration of Fackler gelatine by small calibre projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, L.; Rabet, L.; Imad, A.; Kakogiannis, D.; Coghe, F.

    2016-05-01

    Among the different material surrogates used to study the effect of small calibre projectiles on the human body, ballistic gelatine is one of the most commonly used because of its specific material properties. For many applications, numerical simulations of this material could give an important added value to understand the different phenomena observed during ballistic testing. However, the material response of gelatine is highly non-linear and complex. Recent developments in this field are available in the literature. Experimental and numerical data on the impact of rigid steel spheres in gelatine available in the literature were considered as a basis for the selection of the best model for further work. For this a comparison of two models for Fackler gelatine has been made. The selected model is afterwards exploited for a real threat consisting of two types of ammunitions: 9 mm and .44 Magnum calibre projectiles. A high-speed camera and a pressure sensor were used in order to measure the velocity decay of the projectiles and the pressure at a given location in the gelatine during penetration of the projectile. The observed instability of the 9 mm bullets was also studied. Four numerical models were developed and solved with LS-DYNA and compared with the experimental data. Good agreement was obtained between the models and the experiments validating the selected gelatine model for future use.

  16. Molecular dynamics of nanodroplet impact: The effect of the projectile's molecular mass on sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Fernan; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    The impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on ceramics at several km/s alters the atomic order of the target, causing sputtering, surface amorphization and cratering. The molecular mass of the projectile is known to have a strong effect on the impact phenomenology, and this article aims to rationalize this dependency using molecular dynamics. To achieve this goal, the article models the impact of four projectiles with molecular masses between 45 and 391 amu, and identical diameters and kinetic energies, 10 nm and 63 keV, striking a silicon target. In agreement with experiments, the simulations show that the number of sputtered atoms strongly increases with molecular mass. This is due to the increasing intensity of collision cascades with molecular mass: when the fixed kinetic energy of the projectile is distributed among fewer, more massive molecules, their collisions with the target produce knock-on atoms with higher energies, which in turn generate more energetic and larger numbers of secondary and tertiary knock-on atoms. The more energetic collision cascades intensify both knock-on sputtering and, upon thermalization, thermal sputtering. Besides enhancing sputtering, heavier molecules also increase the fraction of the projectile's energy that is transferred to the target, as well as the fraction of this energy that is dissipated.

  17. Jamming effectiveness analysis of IR smoke projectile based on sight optical observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longtao; Liu, Zhenxing; Wang, Falong

    2013-09-01

    This text makes use of the similar of the principle between IR imaging guided missile detection system and the general sight optics probe. In this text, the synopsis analysis on the jamming effectiveness of the IR smoke projectile resist the IR imaging guided missile is discussed. This research of the jamming technique to IR imaging guided missile have a very realistic meaning.

  18. Projectile Motion with a Drag Force: Were the Medievals Right After All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    An educational and historical study of the projectile motion with drag forces dependent on speed shows, by simple results, that trajectories quite similar to those depicted before the Galilean era may be obtained with a realistic choice of quantities involved. Numerical simulations of the trajectory in space and velocity coordinates help us to…

  19. [Possible errors in measuring gunshot distance with ricochet full jacket projectiles].

    PubMed

    Schyma, C; Bittner, M

    1995-01-01

    Experiments with ricocheted 9 mm Luger full jacket projectiles showed results which feign shots from short distance. The morphology of the wound and the destruction in textile is very varying. The marks of scattered lead were examined by micro radiography. PMID:7575091

  20. Eulerian simulation of the perforation of aluminum plates by nondeforming projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, S.A.

    1992-03-01

    A new algorithm for the treatment of sliding interfaces between solids with or without friction in an Eulerian wavecode is described. The algorithm has been implemented in the two-dimensional version of the CTH code. The code was used to simulate penetration and perforation of aluminum plates by rigid, conical-nosed tungsten projectiles. Comparison with experimental data is provided.

  1. KSC-05PD-0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    the Fischer Assembly building at Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo. Deep Impact will probe beneath the surface of Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005, when the comet is 83 million miles from Earth, and reveal the secrets of its interior. After releasing a 3- by 3- foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface, Deep Impacts flyby spacecraft will collect pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the craters depth and diameter, as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact. The impactor will separate from the flyby spacecraft 24 hours before it impacts the surface of Tempel 1's nucleus. The impactor delivers 19 Gigajoules (that's 4.8 tons of TNT) of kinetic energy to excavate the crater. This kinetic energy is generated by the combination of the mass of the impactor and its velocity when it impacts. To accomplish this feat, the impactor uses a high-precision star tracker, the Impactor Target Sensor (ITS), and Auto-Navigation algorithms developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory to guide it to the target. Deep Impact is a NASA Discovery mission. Launch of Deep Impact is scheduled for Jan. 12 from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.

  2. Experimental study of the expansion dynamic of 9 mm Parabellum hollow point projectiles in ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Bresson, F; Ducouret, J; Peyré, J; Maréchal, C; Delille, R; Colard, T; Demondion, X

    2012-06-10

    We study in this paper the expanding behaviour of hollow point 9 mm Parabellum projectiles (Hornady XTP(®) and Speer Gold Dot(®)). We defined a deformation rate that takes into account both the diameter increase and the length reduction. We plotted the behaviour of this parameter versus impact velocity (we refer to this curve as the expanding law). This expanding law has been plotted for different gelatin weight ratios and different gelatin block lengths. We completed our experiments with a set of high speed movies in order to correlate the deceleration to the state of expansion and size of the temporary cavity. Our results pointed out that full expansion is reached shortly after the projectile fully penetrates the gelatin. This result shows that the key point to accurately simulate human body interaction with a hollow point projectile is to accurately simulate the interface (skin, skull, clothes thoracic walls). Simulating accurately organs is only an issue if a quantitative comparison between penetration depths is required, but not if we only focus on the state of expansion of the projectile. By varying the gelatin parameters, we discovered that the expanding law exhibits a velocity threshold below which no expansion occurs, followed by a rather linear curve. The parameters of that expanding law (velocity threshold and line slope) vary with the gelatin parameters, but our quantitative results demonstrate that these parameters are not extremely critical. Finally, our experiments demonstrate that the knowledge of the expansion law can be a useful tool to investigate a gunshot in a human body with a semi-jacketed projectile, giving an estimation of the impact velocity and thus the shooting distance. PMID:22269130

  3. Analysis of cascade impactor and EPA method 29 data from the americium/curium pilot melter system

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    The offgas system of the Am/Cm pilot melter at TNX was characterized by measuring the particulate evolution using a cascade impactor and EPA Method 29. This sampling work was performed by John Harden of the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory, under SCUREF Task SC0056. Elemental analyses were performed by the SRTC Mobile Laboratory.Operation of the Am/Cm melter with B2000 frit has resulted in deposition of PbO and boron compounds in the offgas system that has contributed to pluggage of the High Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Sampling of the offgas system was performed to quantify the amount of particulate in the offgas system under several sets of conditions. Particulate concentration and particle size distribution were measured just downstream of the melter pressure control air addition port and at the HEME inlet. At both locations, the particulate was measured with and without steam to the film cooler while the melter was idled at about 1450 degrees Celsius. Additional determinations were made at the melter location during feeding and during idling at 1150 degrees Celsius rather than 1450 degrees Celsius (both with no steam to the film cooler). Deposition of particulates upstream of the melter sample point may have, and most likely did occur in each run, so the particulate concentrations measured do no necessarily reflect the total particulate emission at the melt surface. However, the data may be used in a relative sense to judge the system performance.

  4. Physics Based Reaction Burn Model Prediction of Reaction Initiation and Growth in RDX for Thin and Thick Impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sunil; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2011-06-01

    PBRB model for reactive composites simulates the reaction initiation and growth leading to detonation with built-in models for multiple individual as well as coupled phenomena: pre-existing statistical pore distribution, energy dissipation during shock loading and hot spot formations, surface temperature increase of the planar pore surfaces, surface reaction by sublimation, gas phase reaction, gas phase temperature rise and reverse heat flow to the pore surface aiding the surface reaction, solid phase heat conduction, etc. 1D idealized hot spot cell (1DHSC) version of the 3D PBRB model has been converted to a vectorized EOS form for the first time. Results validating the model with the pop plot of RDX in agreement with data through simulation of an assumed plate impact experiment will be presented. In addition, the effect of the surface sublimation model parameters on the rate of reaction, detonation shock pressure, and von-Neumann's peak for thin and thick inert impactor will be presented. We acknowledge Dr. Betsy Rice (ARL), Dr. Suhithi Peiris (DTRA) and Dr. John Brennan (ARL) for their support and discussion. This work is supported by Eglin AFB contract FA8651-08-0108/027 and in part by DTRA contract HDTRA-1-10-1-0035.

  5. Ice Nuclei in Mid-Latitude Cirrus: Preliminary Results from a New Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) Aircraft Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Cziczo, D. J.; Murphy, D. M.; Kulkarni, G.; Lawson, P.

    2011-12-01

    Cirrus cloud properties are strongly governed by the mechanism of ice particle formation and by the number and effectiveness of ambient ice nuclei. Airborne measurements of ice nuclei reveal new nucleation mechanisms, provide constraints on microphysical models, and guide laboratory investigations. For over two decades the Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI) inlet has remained the prevailing approach for sampling cloud particles to measure ice nuclei from an aircraft platform. However, traditional CVI inlets have fundamental limitations when operating on high speed aircraft, where only a small fraction of ambient cloud particles are typically sampled. A novel 'folded' CVI was constructed and deployed during the NASA MACPEX 2011 campaign. The flow design of this inlet effectively doubles the CVI length and thereby increases the size range of captured cirrus particles. Additional design elements such as an internal vortex flow, a neon carrier gas, and an infrared laser further improve the capture and evaporation of ice crystals. Preliminary results of ice nuclei composition measured by the PALMS single-particle mass spectrometer are presented from the MACPEX campaign. Examples of ice nuclei from mid-latitude cirrus are shown, including mineral dust, organic-rich aerosol with amine and diacid components, and lead-containing aerosol.

  6. Tension strength of a thick graphite/epoxy laminate after impact by a 1/2-in. radius impactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Illg, W.; Garber, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    NASA is developing graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases for solid rocket motors of the space shuttle. They are wet-wound with AS4W graphite fiber and HBRF-55A epoxy. The membrane region is about 1.4 inches thick. Two 30-inch-diameter by 12-inch-long cylinders were impacted every two inches of circumference with 1/2-inch radius impactors that were dropped from various heights. One cylinder was empty and the other was filled with inert propellant. Two-inch-wide test specimens were cut from the cylinders. Each was centered on an impact site. The specimens were x-rayed and loaded to failure in uniaxial tension. Rigid body mechanics and the Hertz law were used to predict impact force, local deformations, contact diameters, and contact pressures. The depth of impact damage was predicted using Love's solution for pressure applied on part of the boundary of a semi-infinite body. The predictions were reasonably good. The strengths of the impacted specimens were reduced by as much as 37 percent without visible surface damage. Even the radiographs did not reveal the nonvisible damage.

  7. Stability analyses of the mass abrasive projectile high-speed penetrating into concrete target. Part I: Engineering model for the mass loss and nose-blunting of ogive-nosed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Wei; He, Li-Lin; Fang, Qin

    2014-12-01

    The mass loss and nose blunting of a projectile during high-speed deep penetration into concrete target may cause structural destruction and ballistic trajectory instability of the penetrator, obviously reducing the penetration efficiency of penetrator. Provided that the work of friction between projectile and target is totally transformed into the heat to melt penetrator material at its nose surface, an engineering model is established for the mass loss and nose-blunting of the ogive-nosed projectile. A dimensionless formula for the relative mass loss of projectile is obtained by introducing the dimensionless impact function I and geometry function N of the projectile. The critical value V {0/c} of the initial striking velocity is formulated, and the mass loss of projectile tends to increase weakly nonlinearly with I/ N when V 0 < V {0/c}, whilst the mass loss is proportional to the initial kinetic energy of projectile when V 0 < V {0/c}. The theoretical prediction of V {0/c} is further confirmed to be very close to the experimental value of 1.0 km/s based on 11 sets of different penetration tests. Also the validity of the proposed expressions of mass loss and nose-blunting coefficients of a projectile are verified by the tests. Therefore, a theoretical basis is for the empirical conclusions drawn in previous publications. Regarding the completely empirical determinations of the mass loss and nose-blunting coefficients given in previous papers, the present analysis reveals its physical characteristic and also guarantees its prediction accuracy. The engineering model established in the present paper forms the basis for further discussions on the structural stability and the terminal ballistic stability of ogive-nosed projectiles high-speed penetrating into concrete targets, which will respectively be elaborated in Part II and Part III of the present study.

  8. Fabrication of graded density impactor via underwater shock wave and quasi-isentropic compression testing at two-stage gas gun facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Li, Xiaojie; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki

    2014-12-01

    We show direct evidence that underwater shock wave enables us to bond multithin plates with flat, parallel, and high-strength interfaces, which are key requirements for functionally graded material (also called graded density impactor). This phenomenon is ascribed to the super short duration of the high-speed underwater shock wave, reducing the surface tension, diffusion, evaporation, deposition, and viscous flow of matter. Thin magnesium, aluminum, titanium, copper, and molybdenum foils were welded together and designed with the increase in density. Experimental evidence and numerical simulation show that well bonding between the multilayer structures. Microstructure examinations reveal that the dominant interfacial form shifts from waviness to linearity. Graded density impactor with multilayer structure is proved that can produce quasi-isentropic compression in two-stage gas gun experiment with a designed pressure loading profile, which suggests a feasible method to simulate the conditions we want to study that were previously inaccessible in a precisely controlled laboratory environment.

  9. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  10. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  11. Application of USP inlet extensions to the TSI impactor system 3306/3320 using HFA 227 based solution metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Mogalian, Erik; Myrdal, Paul Brian

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to further evaluate the need for a vertical inlet extension when testing solution metered dose inhalers using the TSI Model 3306 Impactor Inlet in conjunction with the TSI Model 3320 Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The configurations tested using the TSI system were compared to baseline measurements that were performed using the Andersen Mark II 8-stage cascade impactor (ACI). Seven pressurized solution metered dose inhalers were tested using varied concentrations of beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP), ethanol, and HFA 227 propellant. The inhalers were tested with the cascade impactor, and with the TSI system. The TSI system had three different configurations as the manufacturer provided (0 cm) or with inlet extensions of 20 and 40 cm. The extensions were located between the USP inlet and the Model 3306 Impactor Inlet. There were no practical differences between each system for the stem, actuator, or USP inlet. The fine particle mass (aerodynamic mass < 4.7 microm) was affected by extension length and correlated well with the ACI when an extension was present. APS particle size measurements were unaffected by the extension lengths and correlated well to particle size determined from the ACI analysis. It has been confirmed that an inlet extension may be necessary for the TSI system in order to give mass results that correlate to the ACI, especially for formulations having significant concentrations of low volatility excipients. Additionally, the results generated from this study were used to evaluate the product performance of HFA 227 based solution formulations that contain varying concentrations of ethanol as a cosolvent. PMID:16316853

  12. Precision of the all-glass impinger and the andersen microbial impactor for air sampling in solid-waste handling facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Lembke, L L; Kniseley, R N; van Nostrand, R C; Hale, M D

    1981-01-01

    A method was devised to determine the precision of the all-glass impinger and the Andersen six-stage microbial impactor over a wide range of aerosol concentrations like those found in facilities which process solid waste. Simultaneous samples were collected inside a municipal solid-waste recovery system, and the data were treated statistically to estimate the precision of each air-sampling device. All-glass impingers yielded colony counts which indicated a linear relationship between samplers over an observed aerosol concentration of 1.1 X 10(3) to 2.8 X 10(7) colony-forming units per m3 of air. Impactors also yielded colony counts which indicated a linear relationship over an observed aerosol concentration range of 3.9 X 10(3) to 1.9 X 10(5) colony-forming units per m3 of air. The coefficients of variation for the all-glass impinger and the six-stage impactor in an environment with a high and variable dust level were determined to be 0.38 and 0.23, respectively. PMID:7025757

  13. Effects of dust-charge fluctuations on the potential of an array of projectiles in a partially ionized dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Nasim, M. H.; Murtaza, G.

    2003-11-01

    The expressions for the Debye and the wake potential are derived by incorporating dust-charge fluctuations of a single projectile, as well as of an array of dust grain projectiles, propagating through a partially ionized dusty plasma with a constant velocity. Numerically, the effects of the dust-charge fluctuations and the dust-neutral collisions on the electrostatic potential for a single, three, six and ten projectiles are examined. The dust-charge relaxation rate modifies the shape of the Debye as well as the wake potential. For smaller values of the relaxation rates a potential well is formed instead of Debye potential.

  14. Siderophile elements in brecciated HED meteorites and the nature of projectile materials in HED meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, N.; Okamoto, C.; Yamaguchi, A.; Ebihara, M.

    2016-03-01

    Petrological, mineralogical and geochemical studies were performed on five brecciated HED meteorites (ALH 76005, EET 92003, LEW 85300, LEW 87026 and GRO 95633) in order to elucidate the nature of impactors on the HED parent body. Some brecciated HED meteorites contain exotic materials such as FeNi-metal grains with low Co/Ni ratios (ALH 76005, EET 92003 and GRO 95633) and carbonaceous chondrite clasts (LEW 85300) in a clastic and/or impact melt matrix. Such exotic materials were incorporated during brecciation. Platinum group element (PGE) abundances vary significantly (CI × 0.002-0.05), but are higher than those of pristine rocks from the HED parent body. The PGE ratios for the five HED meteorites are inconsistent with each other, implying that the impactor components of each HED meteorites are different from each other. The various PGE ratios are consistent with those for metals from chondrites and iron meteorites, and carbonaceous chondrites. This study provides the evidence that IAB and IVA iron meteorites, and carbonaceous chondrites (CM, CO, CV, CK, CB and CR), ordinary chondrites (L and H) and enstatite chondrite (EL) are candidates of the impactor materials on the HED parent body. It is highly probable that significant amounts of siderophile elements were incorporated into the inner solar system objects like the HED parent body from both chondritic materials and differentiated materials like iron meteorites during heavy bombardment. The HED meteorites in this study and metals from mesosiderite have different Pd/Ir ratios, probably implying that HED meteorites and mesosiderites formed either at distinct settings on one common parent body or on similar parent bodies.

  15. Size distributions of mutagenic compounds and mutagenicity in atmospheric particulate matter collected with a low-pressure cascade impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanaka, Youhei; Matsumoto, Emiko; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Wang, Ning; Yun, Sun-Ja

    Size distributions of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 2-nitrofluoranthene (2-NF) and mutagenicity in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) were measured by using a low-pressure cascade impactor in Saitama, Japan. PM was separated into 12 fractions of different sizes as follows: <0.11, 0.11-0.19, 0.19-0.29, 0.29-0.48, 0.48-0.68, 0.68-1.2, 1.2-2.1, 2.1-3.5, 3.5-5.1, 5.1-7.6, 7.6-11 and >11 μm. PAHs and 2-NF in PM were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with electron impact ionization (GC/EI-MS) and with negative ion chemical ionization (GC/NCI-MS), respectively. Mutagenicity of PM was determined by Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and YG1024 under the conditions of both with and without S9 mix. The size distribution of PM was bimodal with peaks at 0.48-0.68 μm and 3.5-5.1 μm, while size distributions of total PAHs, individual PAHs, 2-NF and mutagenicity were unimodal with a peak at 0.48-0.68 μm. Nearly 87-95% of these compounds and 88-100% of mutagenicity were found in fine particles, and 2.9-5.8% of these compounds and 5.1-5.9% of mutagenicity were found in ultrafine particles. On the other hand, PAHs, 2-NF and mutagenicity per unit mass of PM increased as the particle size became smaller. The highest contents of PAHs, 2-NF and mutagenicity per unit mass of PM were observed in the fraction of <0.11 μm (ultrafine particle) or 0.11-0.19 μm.

  16. Comparison among filter-based, impactor-based and continuous techniques for measuring atmospheric fine sulfate and nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wei; Wang, Tao; Gao, Xiaomei; Pathak, Ravi Kant; Wang, Xinfeng; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Qingzhu; Yang, Lingxiao; Wang, Wenxing

    2010-11-01

    Filter-based methods for sampling aerosols are subject to great uncertainty if the gas-particle interactions on filter substrates are not properly handled. Sampling artifacts depend on both meteorological conditions and the chemical mix of the atmosphere. Despite numerous of studies on the subject, very few have evaluated filter-based methods in the Asian environments. This paper reports the results of a comparison of the performances of two filter-based samplers, including a Thermo Anderson Chemical Speciation Monitor (RAAS) and a honeycomb denuder filter-pack system, a Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) and a real-time ambient ion monitor (AIM, URG9000B) in measuring atmospheric concentrations of PM 2.5 sulfate and nitrate. Field studies were conducted at an urban site in Jinan, Shandong province, during the winter of 2007 and at a rural site near Beijing in the summer of 2008. The AIM was first compared with the honeycomb denuder filter-pack system which was considered to have minimal sampling artifacts. After some modifications made to it, the AIM showed good performance for both sulfate and nitrate measurement at the two sites and was then used to evaluate other instruments. For the un-denuded RAAS, the extent of sampling artifacts for nitrate on quartz filters was negligible, while that on Teflon filters was also minimal at high nitrate concentrations (>10 μgm -3); however, loss through evaporation was significant (˜75%) at low nitrate concentrations under hot summer conditions. The MOUDI using aluminum substrates suffered a significant loss of nitrate (50-70%) under summer conditions due to evaporation. Considering that the aluminum substrates are still being widely used to obtain size-resolved aerosol compositions because of their low cost and accurate mass weighed, caution should be taken about the potential significant under determination of semi-volatile components such as ammonium nitrate.

  17. Asteroid Retrieval Mission Concept - Trailblazing Our Future in Space and Helping to Protect Us from Earth Impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Brohpy, John R.; Merrill, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    The Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) is a robotic mission concept with the goal of returning a small (7 m diameter) near-Earth asteroid (NEA), or part of a large NEA, to a safe, stable orbit in cislunar space using a 50 kW-class solar electric propulsion (SEP) robotic spacecraft (40 kW available to the electric propulsion system) and currently available technologies. The mass of the asteroidal material returned from this mission is anticipated to be up to 1,000 metric tons, depending on the orbit of the target NEA and the thrust-to-weight and control authority of the SEP spacecraft. Even larger masses could be returned in the future as technological capability and operational experience improve. The use of high-power solar electric propulsion is the key enabling technology for this mission concept, and is beneficial or enabling for a variety of space missions and architectures where high-efficiency, low-thrust transfers are applicable. Many of the ARM operations and technologies could also be applicable to, or help inform, planetary defense efforts. These include the operational approaches and systems associated with the NEA approach, rendezvous, and station-keeping mission phases utilizing a low-thrust, high-power SEP spacecraft, along with interacting with, capturing, maneuvering, and processing the massive amounts of material associated with this mission. Additionally, the processed materials themselves (e.g., high-specific impulse chemical propellants) could potentially be used for planetary defense efforts. Finally, a ubiquitous asteroid retrieval and resource extraction infrastructure could provide the foundation of an on call planetary defense system, where a SEP fleet capable of propelling large masses could deliver payloads to deflect or disrupt a confirmed impactor in an efficient and timely manner.

  18. Investigating the Sources and Timing of Projectiles Striking the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, K. H.; Kring, D. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; McKay, D. S.; Ross, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    The lunar surface is exposed to bombardment by asteroids, comets, and debris from them. Surviving fragments of those projectiles in the lunar regolith provide a direct measure of the sources of exogenous material delivered to the Moon. Con-straining the temporal flux of their delivery will directly address key questions about the bombardment history of the inner Solar System. Regolith breccias, which are consolidated samples of the lunar regolith, were closed to further impact processing at the time they were assembled into rocks [1]. They are, therefore, time capsules of impact bombardment at different times through lunar history. Here we investigate the impact archive preserved in the Apollo 16 regolith breccias and compare this record to evidence of projectile species in other lunar samples.

  19. Projectile charge state effects on electron emission in transfer ionization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. T.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Guo, D. L.; Gao, Y.; Qian, D. B.; Li, B.; Yan, S. C.; Xu, S.; Zhang, P.; Ma, X.

    2015-07-01

    Electron emissions in transfer ionization processes were studied for 75 keV u-1 He2+, and 80 keV u-1 Ne8+on He collisions, using the well-developed reaction microscope techniques. Momentum distributions in the scattering plane, doubly differential distributions as a function of longitudinal momentum and emission angles of the ejected electrons were obtained. An apparent enhancement of electrons distributed around the projectile in the scattering plane was found for the Ne8+ incident case. Furthermore, we report the ratio of doubly differential distributions at the emission angle of 0° between these two transfer ionization processes, in which an abrupt rise is found at and above the electron capture to the continuum peak. This rise qualitatively agrees with the prediction within the framework of Dettmann’s theory. We conclude that this kind of enhancement was caused by the charge state effect of the projectile.

  20. A NASTRAN investigation of simulated projectile damage effects on a UH-1B tail boom model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Futterer, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    A NASTRAN model of a UH-1B tail boom that had been designed for another project was used to investigate the effect on structural integrity of simulated projectile damage. Elements representing skin, and sections of stringers, longerons and bulkheads were systematically deleted to represent projectile damage. The structure was loaded in a manner to represent the flight loads that would be imposed on the tail boom at a 130 knot cruise. The deflection of four points on the rear of the tail boom relative to the position of these points for the unloaded, undamaged condition of the tail boom was used as a measure of the loss of structural rigidity. The same procedure was then used with the material properties of the aluminum alloys replaced with the material properties of T300/5208 high strength graphite/epoxy fibrous composite material, (0, + or - 45, 90)s for the skin and (0, + or - 45)s for the longerons, stringers, and bulk heads.