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Sample records for 3-grabbing nonintegrin dc-sign

  1. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) recognizes a novel ligand, Mac-2-binding protein, characteristically expressed on human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Motohiro; Ma, Bruce Yong; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Kawabe, Keiko; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Hodohara, Keiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2011-06-24

    Dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) is a type II transmembrane C-type lectin expressed on DCs such as myeloid DCs and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). Recently, we have reported that DC-SIGN interacts with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expressed on colorectal carcinoma cells. CEA is one of the most widely used tumor markers for gastrointestinal cancers such as colorectal cancer. On the other hand, other groups have reported that the level of Mac-2-binding protein (Mac-2BP) increases in patients with pancreatic, breast, and lung cancers, virus infections such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and autoimmune diseases. Here, we first identified Mac-2BP expressed on several colorectal carcinoma cell lines as a novel DC-SIGN ligand through affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. Interestingly, we found that DC-SIGN selectively recognizes Mac-2BP derived from some colorectal carcinomas but not from the other ones. Furthermore, we found that the α1-3,4-fucose moieties of Le glycans expressed on DC-SIGN-binding Mac-2BP were important for recognition. DC-SIGN-dependent cellular interactions between immature MoDCs and colorectal carcinoma cells significantly inhibited MoDC functional maturation, suggesting that Mac-2BP may provide a tolerogenic microenvironment for colorectal carcinoma cells through DC-SIGN-dependent recognition. Importantly, Mac-2BP was detected as a predominant DC-SIGN ligand expressed on some primary colorectal cancer tissues from certain parts of patients in comparison with CEA from other parts, suggesting that DC-SIGN-binding Mac-2BP bearing tumor-associated Le glycans may become a novel potential colorectal cancer biomarker for some patients instead of CEA.

  2. Distribution of dendritic cells expressing dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209): Morphological analysis using a novel Photoshop-aided multiple immunohistochemistry technique.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akihiro; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2014-08-01

    The distribution of dendritic cells (DCs) expressing DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209) and the morphological interaction of DC-SIGN⁺ DCs with other cells, especially B cells, in tonsillar and other lymphoid tissues were investigated by multiple immunohistochemistry (IHC) using the graphics editing program Photoshop, which enabled staining with 4 or more antibodies in formalin-fixed paraffin sections. Images obtained by repetition of conventional IHC using diaminobenzidine color development in a tissue section were processed on Photoshop for multiple staining. DC-SIGN⁺ DCs were present in the area around the lymphoid follicles and formed a DC-SIGN⁺ DC-rich area, and these cells contacted not only T cells, fascin⁺ DCs, and blood vessels but also several subsets of B cells simultaneously, including naïve and memory B cells. DC-SIGN⁺ DCs may play an important role in the regulation of the immune response mediated by not only T cells but also B cells. The multiple IHC method introduced in the present study is a simple and useful method for analyzing details of complex structures. Because this method can be applied to routinely processed paraffin sections with conventional IHC with diaminobenzidine, it can be applied to a wide variety of archival specimens.

  3. Vitamin C Attenuates Hemorrhagic Shock-induced Dendritic Cell-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 3-grabbing Nonintegrin Expression in Tubular Epithelial Cells and Renal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Fei, Jian; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Bing; Yang, Zhi-Tao; Wang, Lu; Sheng, Hui-Qiu; Chen, Er-Zhen; Mao, En-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: The expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in renal tubular epithelial cells has been thought to be highly correlated with the occurrence of several kidney diseases, but whether it takes place in renal tissues during hemorrhagic shock (HS) is unknown. The present study aimed to investigate this phenomenon and the inhibitory effect of Vitamin C (VitC). Methods: A Sprague–Dawley rat HS model was established in vivo in this study. The expression level and location of DC-SIGN were observed in kidneys. Also, the degree of histological damage, the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in the renal tissues, and the serum concentration of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine at different times (2–24 h) after HS (six rats in each group), with or without VitC treatment before resuscitation, were evaluated. Results: HS induced DC-SIGN expression in rat tubular epithelial cells. The proinflammatory cytokine concentration, histological damage scores, and functional injury of kidneys had increased. All these phenomena induced by HS were relieved when the rats were treated with VitC before resuscitation. Conclusions: The results of the present study illustrated that HS could induce tubular epithelial cells expressing DC-SIGN, and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the kidney tissues improved correspondingly. The results also indicated that VitC could suppress the DC-SIGN expression in the tubular epithelial cells induced by HS and alleviate the inflammation and functional injury in the kidney. PMID:27411463

  4. Mannosyl Glycodendritic Structure Inhibits DC-SIGN-Mediated Ebola Virus Infection in cis and in trans

    PubMed Central

    Lasala, Fátima; Arce, Eva; Otero, Joaquín R.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    We have designed a glycodendritic structure, BH30sucMan, that blocks the interaction between dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and Ebola virus (EBOV) envelope. BH30sucMan inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated EBOV infection at nanomolar concentrations. BH30sucMan may counteract important steps of the infective process of EBOV and, potentially, of microorganisms shown to exploit DC-SIGN for cell entry and infection. PMID:14638512

  5. Dendritic cells respond to nasopharygeal carcinoma cells through annexin A2-recognizing DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chao-Wen; Hsu, Tin-Jui; Lin, Yun-Tien; Lai, Chang-Hao; Liao, Chen-Chung; Chen, Wei-Yu; Leung, Ting-Kai; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Yung-Feng; Chen, Chien-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an essential role in immunity and are used in cancer immunotherapy. However, these cells can be tuned by tumors with immunosuppressive responses. DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-Grabbing Nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a C-type lectin expressed on DCs, recognizes certain carbohydrate structures which can be found on cancer cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an epithelial cell-derived malignant tumor, in which immune response remains unclear. This research is to reveal the molecular link on NPC cells that induces the immunosuppressive responses in DCs. In this article, we report identification of annexin A2 (ANXA2) on NPC cells as a ligand for DC-SIGN on DCs. N-linked mannose-rich glycan on ANXA2 may mediate the interaction. ANXA2 was abundantly expressed in NPC, and knockdown of ANXA2 suppressed NPC xenograft in mice, suggesting a crucial role of ANXA2 in NPC growth. Interaction with NPC cells caused DC-SIGN activation in DCs. Consequently DC maturation and the proinflammatory interleukin (IL)-12 production were inhibited, and the immunosuppressive IL-10 production was promoted. Blockage of either DC-SIGN or ANXA2 eliminated the production of IL-10 from DCs. This report suggests that suppression of ANXA2 at its expression or glycosylation on NPC may improve DC-mediated immunotherapy for the tumor. PMID:25402728

  6. AFM force spectroscopy reveals how subtle structural differences affect the interaction strength between Candida albicans and DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Figdor, Carl G; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common cause of mycotic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Little is known about the initial interactions between Candida and immune cell receptors, such as the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intracellular cell adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), because a detailed characterization at the structural level is lacking. DC-SIGN recognizes specific Candida-associated molecular patterns, that is, mannan structures present in the cell wall of Candida. The molecular recognition mechanism is however poorly understood. We postulated that small differences in mannan-branching may result in considerable differences in the binding affinity. Here, we exploit atomic force microscope-based dynamic force spectroscopy with single Candida cells to gain better insight in the carbohydrate recognition capacity of DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that slight differences in the N-mannan structure of Candida, that is, the absence or presence of a phosphomannan side chain, results in differences in the recognition by DC-SIGN as follows: (i) it contributes to the compliance of the outer cell wall of Candida, and (ii) its presence results in a higher binding energy of 1.6 kB T. The single-bond affinity of tetrameric DC-SIGN for wild-type C. albicans is ~10.7 kB T and a dissociation constant kD of 23 μM, which is relatively strong compared with other carbohydrate-protein interactions described in the literature. In conclusion, this study shows that DC-SIGN specifically recognizes mannan patterns on C. albicans with high affinity. Knowledge on the binding pocket of DC-SIGN and its pathogenic ligands will lead to a better understanding of how fungal-associated carbohydrate structures are recognized by receptors of the immune system and can ultimately contribute to the development of new anti-fungal drugs.

  7. Characterization of the duplicate L-SIGN and DC-SIGN genes in miiuy croaker and evolutionary analysis of L-SIGN in fishes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chang; Wang, Shanchen; Xu, Tianjun

    2015-05-01

    Dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN/CD209) and liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-grabbing non-integrin (L-SIGN/CD299) which are homologues of DC-SIGN are important members in C-type lectin receptors family as key molecules to recognize and eliminate pathogens in the innate immune system. DC-SIGN and L-SIGN have become hot topics in recent studies which both served as cell adhesion and phagocytic pathogen recognition receptors in mammals. However, there have been almost no studies of DC-SIGN and L-SIGN structure and characters in fish, only DC-SIGN in the zebrafish had been studied. In our study, we identified and characterized the full-length miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) DC-SIGN (mmDC-SIGN) and L-SIGN (mmL-SIGN) genes. The sequence analysis results showed that mmDC-SIGN and mmL-SIGN have the same domains with other vertebrates except primates, and share some conserved motifs in CRD among all the vertebrates which play a crucial role in interacting with Ca(2+) and for recognizing mannose-containing motifs. Gene synteny of DC-SIGN and L-SIGN were analyzed for the first time and gene synteny of L-SIGN was conserved among the five fishes. Interestingly, one gene next to L-SIGN from gene synteny had high similarity with L-SIGN gene that was described as L-SIGN-like in fish species. While only one L-SIGN gene existed in other vertebrates, two L-SIGN in fish may be in consequence of the fish-specific genome duplication to adapt the specific environment. The evolutionary analysis showed that the ancestral lineages of L-SIGN gene in fishes experienced purifying selection and the current lineages of L-SIGN gene in fishes underwent positive selection, indicating that the ancestral lineages and current lineages of L-SIGN gene in fishes underwent different evolutionary patterns. Both mmDC-SIGN and mmL-SIGN were expressed in all tested tissues and ubiquitously up-regulated in infected liver, spleen and kidney at different sampling time points

  8. In situ Delivery of Antigen to DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+) Dermal Dendritic Cells Results in Enhanced CD8(+) T-Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Fehres, Cynthia M; van Beelen, Astrid J; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Unger, Wendy W J; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Storm, Gert; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-09-01

    CD14(+) dendritic cells (DCs) present in the dermis of human skin represent a large subset of dermal DCs (dDCs) that are considered macrophage-like cells with poor antigen (cross)-presenting capacity and limited migratory potential to the lymph nodes. CD14(+) dDC highly express DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor containing potent endocytic capacity, facilitating intracellular routing of antigens to major histocompatibility complex I and II (MHC-I andII) loading compartments for the presentation to antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Here we show using a human skin explant model that the in situ targeting of antigens to DC-SIGN using glycan-modified liposomes enhances the antigen-presenting capacity of CD14(+) dDCs. Intradermal vaccination of liposomes modified with the DC-SIGN-targeting glycan Lewis(X), containing melanoma antigens (MART-1 or Gp100), accumulated in CD14(+) dDCs and resulted in enhanced Gp100- or MART-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. Simultaneous intradermal injection of the cytokines GM-CSF and IL-4 as adjuvant enhanced the migration of the skin DCs and increased the expression of DC-SIGN on the CD14(+) and CD1a(+) dDCs. These data demonstrate that human CD14(+) dDCs exhibit potent cross-presenting capacity when targeted in situ through DC-SIGN. PMID:25885805

  9. N-Glycans on the Rift Valley Fever Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Gn and Gc Redundantly Support Viral Infection via DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Slack, Olga A.L.; Carpio, Victor H.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-transmitted, zoonotic disease that infects humans and ruminants. Dendritic cell specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3) grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) acts as a receptor for members of the phlebovirus genus. The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) glycoproteins (Gn/Gc) encode five putative N-glycan sequons (asparagine (N)–any amino acid (X)–serine (S)/threonine (T)) at positions: N438 (Gn), and N794, N829, N1035, and N1077 (Gc). The N-glycosylation profile and significance in viral infection via DC-SIGN have not been elucidated. Gc N-glycosylation was first evaluated by using Gc asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) mutants. Subsequently, we generated a series of recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain mutants, which encode N-to-Q mutations, and the infectivity of each mutant in Jurkat cells stably expressing DC-SIGN was evaluated. Results showed that Gc N794, N1035, and N1077 were N-glycosylated but N829 was not. Gc N1077 was heterogeneously N-glycosylated. RVFV Gc made two distinct N-glycoforms: “Gc-large” and “Gc-small”, and N1077 was responsible for “Gc-large” band. RVFV showed increased infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN compared to cells lacking DC-SIGN. Infection via DC-SIGN was increased in the presence of either Gn N438 or Gc N1077. Our study showed that N-glycans on the Gc and Gn surface glycoproteins redundantly support RVFV infection via DC-SIGN. PMID:27223297

  10. N-Glycans on the Rift Valley Fever Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Gn and Gc Redundantly Support Viral Infection via DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Inaia; Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E; Huante, Matthew B; Slack, Olga A L; Carpio, Victor H; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-transmitted, zoonotic disease that infects humans and ruminants. Dendritic cell specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3) grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) acts as a receptor for members of the phlebovirus genus. The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) glycoproteins (Gn/Gc) encode five putative N-glycan sequons (asparagine (N)-any amino acid (X)-serine (S)/threonine (T)) at positions: N438 (Gn), and N794, N829, N1035, and N1077 (Gc). The N-glycosylation profile and significance in viral infection via DC-SIGN have not been elucidated. Gc N-glycosylation was first evaluated by using Gc asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) mutants. Subsequently, we generated a series of recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain mutants, which encode N-to-Q mutations, and the infectivity of each mutant in Jurkat cells stably expressing DC-SIGN was evaluated. Results showed that Gc N794, N1035, and N1077 were N-glycosylated but N829 was not. Gc N1077 was heterogeneously N-glycosylated. RVFV Gc made two distinct N-glycoforms: "Gc-large" and "Gc-small", and N1077 was responsible for "Gc-large" band. RVFV showed increased infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN compared to cells lacking DC-SIGN. Infection via DC-SIGN was increased in the presence of either Gn N438 or Gc N1077. Our study showed that N-glycans on the Gc and Gn surface glycoproteins redundantly support RVFV infection via DC-SIGN. PMID:27223297

  11. Visualization of DC-SIGN-mediated entry pathway of engineered lentiviral vectors in target cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yarong; Tai, April; Joo, Kye-Il; Wang, Pin

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and therefore have enormous potential as vaccine targets. We have previously developed an engineered lentiviral vector (LV) that is pseudotyped with a mutated Sindbis virus glycoprotein (SVGmu), which is capable of targeting DCs through Dendritic Cell-specific ICAM3-grabbing Nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor that is predominantly expressed by DCs. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the internalization and trafficking mechanisms of this viral vector system through direct visualization of GFP-Vpr-tagged viral particles in target DCs, which was further corroborated by drug inhibition and dominant-negative mutants of cellular proteins that regulate the endocytic traffic. We demonstrated that our engineered LVs enter the cell via receptor-mediated clathrin- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Microtubule networks were also involved in a productive infection. Viral vector fusion was low-pH-dependent and occurred in the early endosomal stage of the intracellular transport. Autophagy was also examined for its effect on transduction efficiency, and we observed that enhanced autophage activity reduced vector infectivity, while suppressed autophagy boosted transduction efficiency. This study shed some light on the internalization and trafficking mechanisms of DC-directed LVs and offers some strategies to further improve the efficiency of LV-mediated gene therapy.

  12. Isolation and propagation of Dengue virus in Vero and BHK-21 cells expressing human DC-SIGN stably.

    PubMed

    Phanthanawiboon, Supranee; A-nuegoonpipat, Atchareeya; Panngarm, Narawan; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Anantapreecha, Surapee; Kurosu, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    The "standard" methods of isolating dengue virus (DENV) utilize the mosquito cell line C6/36, monkey kidney LLC-MK2 cells, Vero cells, or baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells. However, these cells lines lack a particular DENV receptor, known as dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), which is expressed on immature dendritic cells and monocytes/macrophages. This may result in less efficient virus isolation and propagation. The present study used a lentivirus vector to establish Vero and BHK-21 cell lines (Vero-DC and BHK-DC) that express human DC-SIGN stably. Five DENV strains, each passaged several times in C6/36 cells, replicated more efficiently in Vero-DC and BHK-DC than in the parental Vero or BHK-21 cells. Vero/Vero-DC and BHK-21/BHK-DC were used to isolate virus from buffy coats and plasma samples derived from 13 patients infected with DENV. Most of the viruses showed increased production in cell lines expressing DC-SIGN. However, the isolation rate was lower (15.4-46.2%) than that from C6/36 cells (84.6%). Interestingly, when the viruses were isolated in C6/36 cells prior to infecting Vero/Vero-DC and BHK-21/BHK-DC, the rate of virus production increased markedly, reaching levels higher than those initially achieved in C6/36 cells. These data suggest that Vero-DC and BHK-DC could be useful tools for virus propagation, and that human specimens may contain a factor that interferes with virus growth in mammalian cells.

  13. The Consequences of Multiple Simultaneous C-Type Lectin–Ligand Interactions: DCIR Alters the Endo-Lysosomal Routing of DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallejo, Juan J.; Bloem, Karien; Knippels, Léon M. J.; Garssen, Johan; van Vliet, Sandra J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are equipped with multiple receptors to allow proper pathogen recognition and capture. C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize glycan structures on pathogens and endogenous glycoproteins for internalization and antigen processing and presentation. Often, the glycan specificity of these receptors is overlapping and/or pathogens are decorated with ligands for multiple CLRs, posing the question whether interference or cooperativity within the CLR family exists. Here, we used imaging flow cytometry to investigate the internalization properties of four different CLRs [mannose receptor, DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), macrophage galactose-type lectin, and dendritic cell immunoreceptor (DCIR)] on different APCs, as well as their intracellular routing. Although the internalization score of the investigated CLRs was similar on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs), DCIR internalization rates were lower compared to the other CLRs. Upon triggering, DCIR routed to intracellular compartments outside of the classical endo-lysosomal pathway, resulting in poor CD4+ T-cell stimulation. Although DC maturation reduced CLR expression levels, it did not affect their internalization rates. Although CLR internalization appeared to be independently regulated, DC-SIGN routing was affected when DCIR was triggered simultaneously. In conclusion, our results provide new insights for the design of DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies and suggest that DCIR is an inferior target in this respect. PMID:25806031

  14. DC-SIGN (CD209) recognition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is circumvented by lipooligosaccharide variation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Schwartz, Olivier; Pantelic, Milica; Li, Geling; Knazze, Quita; Nobile, Cinzia; Radovich, Milan; He, Johnny; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Klena, John; Chen, Tie

    2006-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) or Escherichia coli HB101 (hereafter referred to as E. coli) expressing opacity (Opa) proteins adhere to human host cells and stimulate phagocytosis as a result of the interaction of certain Opa proteins to carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a) receptors. Our experiments show that the Opa-CEACAM1 interaction does not play a significant role in adherence between these bacteria and dendritic cells (DCs). Instead, phagocytosis of GC and E. coli by DCs is mediated by the DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-grabbing nonintegrin, (SIGN; CD209) receptor. DC-SIGN recognition and subsequent phagocytosis of GC are limited, however, to a lipooligosaccharide (LOS) mutant (lgtB) of GC. This conclusion is supported by experiments demonstrating that HeLa cells expressing human DC-SIGN (HeLa-DC-SIGN) bind exclusively to and engulf an lgtB mutant of GC, and this interaction is blocked specifically by an anti-DC-SIGN antibody. The experiments suggest that LOS variation may have evolved as a mechanism for GC to avoid phagocytosis by DCs. PMID:16461738

  15. Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with C-Type Lectin Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM Grabbing Nonintegrin

    PubMed Central

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina; Moran, Anthony P.; Fol, Marek; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Walencka, Maria; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    In this study we asked whether Helicobacter pylori whole cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) utilize sugar moieties of Lewis (Le) antigenic determinants to interact with DC-SIGN (dendritic cell specific ICAM grabbing nonintegrin) receptor on dendritic cells (DCs). For this purpose the soluble DC-SIGN/Fc adhesion assay and the THP-1 leukemia cells with induced expression of DC-SIGN were used. We showed that the binding specificity of DC-SIGN with H. pylori LeX/Y positive whole cells and H. pylori LPS of LeX/Y type was fucose dependent, whereas in LeXY negative H. pylori strains and LPS preparations without Lewis determinants, this binding was galactose dependent. The binding of soluble synthetic LeX and LeY to the DC-SIGN-like receptor on THP-1 cells was also observed. In conclusion, the LeXY dependent as well as independent binding of H. pylori whole cells and H. pylori LPS to DC-SIGN was described. Moreover, we demonstrated that THP-1 cells may serve as an in vitro model for the assessment of H. pylori-DC-SIGN interactions mediated by LeX and LeY determinants. PMID:22550396

  16. DC-SIGN(+) Macrophages Control the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Conde, Patricia; Rodriguez, Mercedes; van der Touw, William; Jimenez, Ana; Burns, Matthew; Miller, Jennifer; Brahmachary, Manisha; Chen, Hui-ming; Boros, Peter; Rausell-Palamos, Francisco; Yun, Tae Jin; Riquelme, Paloma; Rastrojo, Alberto; Aguado, Begoña; Stein-Streilein, Joan; Tanaka, Masato; Zhou, Lan; Zhang, Junfeng; Lowary, Todd L; Ginhoux, Florent; Park, Chae Gyu; Cheong, Cheolho; Brody, Joshua; Turley, Shannon J; Lira, Sergio A; Bronte, Vincenzo; Gordon, Siamon; Heeger, Peter S; Merad, Miriam; Hutchinson, James; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Ochando, Jordi

    2015-06-16

    Tissue effector cells of the monocyte lineage can differentiate into different cell types with specific cell function depending on their environment. The phenotype, developmental requirements, and functional mechanisms of immune protective macrophages that mediate the induction of transplantation tolerance remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that costimulatory blockade favored accumulation of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages that inhibited CD8(+) T cell immunity and promoted CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell expansion in numbers. Mechanistically, that simultaneous DC-SIGN engagement by fucosylated ligands and TLR4 signaling was required for production of immunoregulatory IL-10 associated with prolonged allograft survival. Deletion of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages in vivo, interfering with their CSF1-dependent development, or preventing the DC-SIGN signaling pathway abrogated tolerance. Together, the results provide new insights into the tolerogenic effects of costimulatory blockade and identify DC-SIGN(+) suppressive macrophages as crucial mediators of immunological tolerance with the concomitant therapeutic implications in the clinic.

  17. Human DC-SIGN Binds Specific Human Milk Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Alexander J.; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys, and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBPs) expressed by dendritic cells (DC) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and Siglecs expressed by DC for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-SIGN showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglecs-5 and -9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBPs bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) and 3-fucosyllactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2′-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2′-FL had an IC50 of ~1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2′-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBPs expressed by DC binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant. PMID:26976925

  18. Pseudo-Mannosylated DC-SIGN Ligands as Immunomodulants

    PubMed Central

    Berzi, Angela; Ordanini, Stefania; Joosten, Ben; Trabattoni, Daria; Cambi, Alessandra; Bernardi, Anna; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin mainly expressed by DCs, mediates antigen uptake and can induce specific immune responses, depending on the ligand involved. Owing to these properties, DC-SIGN is an attracting target for approaches aimed at tailoring the immune response towards specific immunologic outcomes. A multivalent DC-SIGN ligand (Polyman26), containing at its core a fluorescent “rod-like” spacer and able to inhibit DC-SIGN mediated HIV infection in nanomolar concentration, has been recently developed by our group. We investigated the internalization pattern and the ability of Polyman26 to elicit innate immune responses. Results obtained by confocal microscopy indicate that Polyman26 is internalized by DCs via receptor- mediated endocytosis and is then routed to endolysosomal compartments, thus being presented together with MHC class II molecules, with important implications for the development of vaccines. Moreover, Polyman26 up-regulated the production of β-chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and TNFα) as well as the expression of TLR9 and CD40L. These results indicate that glycomimetic DC-SIGN ligands should be further investigated and suggest that these compounds could be used to differentially stimulate immune responses. PMID:27734954

  19. The Core Lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli Is a Ligand for the Dendritic-Cell-Specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule Nonintegrin CD209 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Klena, John; Zhang, Pei; Schwartz, Olivier; Hull, Sheila; Chen, Tie

    2005-01-01

    The dendritic-cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) CD209 is a receptor for Escherichia coli K-12 that promotes bacterial adherence and phagocytosis. However, the ligand of E. coli for DC-SIGN has not yet been identified. In this study, we found that DC-SIGN did not mediate the phagocytosis of several pathogenic strains of E. coli, including enteropathogenic E. coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, and uropathogenic E. coli, in dendritic cells or HeLa cells expressing human DC-SIGN antigen. However, we showed that an outer core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (rough) mutant, unlike an inner core LPS (deep rough) mutant or O-antigen-expressing recombinant of E. coli K-12 was phagocytosed. These results demonstrate that the host cells expressing DC-SIGN can phagocytose E. coli in part by interacting with the complete core region of the LPS molecule. These results provide a mechanism for how O antigen acts as an antiphagocytic factor. PMID:15716442

  20. DC-SIGN specifically recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 3 and 14.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Estella A; Saeland, Eirikur; de Cooker, Désirée J M; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2005-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. The ever-increasing frequency of antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae strains severely hampers effective treatments. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease is needed; in particular, of the initial interactions that take place between the host and the bacterium. Recognition of pathogens by dendritic cells is one of the most crucial steps in the induction of an immune response. For efficient pathogen recognition, dendritic cells express various kinds of receptors, including the DC-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN. Pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV target DC-SIGN to escape immunity. Here the in vitro binding of DC-SIGN with S. pneumoniae was investigated. DC-SIGN specifically interacts with S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and 14 in contrast to other serotypes such as 19F. While the data described here suggest that DC-SIGN interacts with S. pneumoniae serotype 14 through a ligand expressed by the capsular polysaccharide, the binding to S. pneumoniae serotype 3 appears to depend on an as yet unidentified ligand. Despite the binding capacity of the capsular polysaccharide of S. pneumoniae 14 to DC-SIGN, no immunomodulatory effects on the dendritic cells were observed. The immunological consequences of the serotype-specific capacity to interact with DC-SIGN should be further explored and might result in new insights in the development of new and more potent vaccines.

  1. Unique DC-SIGN clustering activity of a small glycomimetic: A lesson for ligand design.

    PubMed

    Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Thépaut, Michel; Sattin, Sara; Berzi, Angela; McGeagh, John; Grudinin, Sergei; Weiser, Jörg; Le Roy, Aline; Reina, Jose J; Rojo, Javier; Clerici, Mario; Bernardi, Anna; Ebel, Christine; Fieschi, Franck

    2014-06-20

    DC-SIGN is a dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin receptor that recognizes highly glycosylated ligands expressed on the surface of various pathogens. This receptor plays an important role in the early stages of many viral infections, including HIV, which makes it an interesting therapeutic target. Glycomimetic compounds are good drug candidates for DC-SIGN inhibition due to their high solubility, resistance to glycosidases, and nontoxicity. We studied the structural properties of the interaction of the tetrameric DC-SIGN extracellular domain (ECD), with two glycomimetic antagonists, a pseudomannobioside (1) and a linear pseudomannotrioside (2). Though the inhibitory potency of 2, as measured by SPR competition experiments, was 1 order of magnitude higher than that of 1, crystal structures of the complexes within the DC-SIGN carbohydrate recognition domain showed the same binding mode for both compounds. Moreover, when conjugated to multivalent scaffolds, the inhibitory potencies of these compounds became uniform. Combining isothermal titration microcalorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and dynamic light scattering techniques to study DC-SIGN ECD interaction with these glycomimetics revealed that 2 is able, without any multivalent presentation, to cluster DC-SIGN tetramers leading to an artificially overestimated inhibitory potency. The use of multivalent scaffolds presenting 1 or 2 in HIV trans-infection inhibition assay confirms the loss of potency of 2 upon conjugation and the equal efficacy of chemically simpler compound 1. This study documents a unique case where, among two active compounds chemically derived, the compound with the lower apparent activity is the optimal lead for further drug development.

  2. Docking, synthesis, and NMR studies of mannosyl trisaccharide ligands for DC-SIGN lectin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Díaz, Irene; Nieto, Pedro M; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2008-08-01

    DC-SIGN, a lectin, which presents at the surface of immature dendritic cells, constitutes nowadays a promising target for the design of new antiviral drugs. This lectin recognizes highly glycosylated proteins present at the surface of several pathogens such as HIV, Ebola virus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, etc. Understanding the binding mode of this lectin is a topic of tremendous interest and will permit a rational design of new and more selective ligands. Here, we present computational and experimental tools to study the interaction of di- and trisaccharides with DC-SIGN. Docking analysis of complexes involving mannosyl di- and trisaccharides and the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN have been performed. Trisaccharides Manalpha1,2[Manalpha1,6]Man 1 and Manalpha1,3[Manalpha1,6]Man 2 were synthesized from an orthogonally protected mannose as a common intermediate. Using these ligands and the soluble extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN, NMR experiments based on STD and transfer-NOE were performed providing additional information. Conformational analysis of the mannosyl ligands in the free and bound states was done. These studies have demonstrated that terminal mannoses at positions 2 or 3 in the trisaccharides are the most important moiety and present the strongest contact with the binding site of the lectin. Multiple binding modes could be proposed and therefore should be considered in the design of new ligands. PMID:18633532

  3. Mannose glycoconjugates functionalized at positions 1 and 6. Binding analysis to DC-SIGN using biosensors.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Maldonado, Olivia S; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2007-01-01

    The design of glycoconjugates to allow the generation of multivalent ligands capable of interacting with the receptor DC-SIGN is a topic of high interest due to the role played by this lectin in pathogen infections. Mannose, a ligand of this lectin, could be conjugated at two different positions, 1 and 6, not implicated in the binding process. We have prepared mannose conjugates at these two positions with a long spacer to allow their attachment to a biosensor chip surface. Analysis of the interaction between these surfaces and the tetravalent extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN by SPR biosensor has demonstrated that both positions are available for this conjugation without affecting the protein binding process. These results emphasize the possibility to conjugate mannose at position 6, allowing the incorporation of hydrophobic groups at the anomeric position to interact with hydrophobic residues in the carbohydrate recognition domain of DC-SIGN, increasing binding affinities. This fact is relevant for the future design of new ligands and the corresponding multivalent systems for DC-SIGN. PMID:17348701

  4. Low copy numbers of DC-SIGN in cell membrane microdomains: implications for structure and function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Itano, Michelle S; Neumann, Aaron K; de Silva, Aravinda M; Jacobson, Ken; Thompson, Nancy L

    2014-02-01

    Presently, there are few estimates of the number of molecules occupying membrane domains. Using a total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) imaging approach, based on comparing the intensities of fluorescently labeled microdomains with those of single fluorophores, we measured the occupancy of DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin, in membrane microdomains. DC-SIGN or its mutants were labeled with primary monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in either dendritic cells (DCs) or NIH3T3 cells, or expressed as GFP fusions in NIH3T3 cells. The number of DC-SIGN molecules per microdomain ranges from only a few to over 20, while microdomain dimensions range from the diffraction limit to > 1 µm. The largest fraction of microdomains, appearing at the diffraction limit, in either immature DCs or 3 T3 cells contains only 4-8 molecules of DC-SIGN, consistent with our preliminary super-resolution Blink microscopy estimates. We further show that these small assemblies are sufficient to bind and efficiently internalize a small (∼ 50 nm) pathogen, dengue virus, leading to infection of host cells. PMID:24313910

  5. Docking, synthesis, and NMR studies of mannosyl trisaccharide ligands for DC-SIGN lectin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Díaz, Irene; Nieto, Pedro M; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2008-08-01

    DC-SIGN, a lectin, which presents at the surface of immature dendritic cells, constitutes nowadays a promising target for the design of new antiviral drugs. This lectin recognizes highly glycosylated proteins present at the surface of several pathogens such as HIV, Ebola virus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, etc. Understanding the binding mode of this lectin is a topic of tremendous interest and will permit a rational design of new and more selective ligands. Here, we present computational and experimental tools to study the interaction of di- and trisaccharides with DC-SIGN. Docking analysis of complexes involving mannosyl di- and trisaccharides and the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN have been performed. Trisaccharides Manalpha1,2[Manalpha1,6]Man 1 and Manalpha1,3[Manalpha1,6]Man 2 were synthesized from an orthogonally protected mannose as a common intermediate. Using these ligands and the soluble extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN, NMR experiments based on STD and transfer-NOE were performed providing additional information. Conformational analysis of the mannosyl ligands in the free and bound states was done. These studies have demonstrated that terminal mannoses at positions 2 or 3 in the trisaccharides are the most important moiety and present the strongest contact with the binding site of the lectin. Multiple binding modes could be proposed and therefore should be considered in the design of new ligands.

  6. Mannose glycoconjugates functionalized at positions 1 and 6. Binding analysis to DC-SIGN using biosensors.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Maldonado, Olivia S; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2007-01-01

    The design of glycoconjugates to allow the generation of multivalent ligands capable of interacting with the receptor DC-SIGN is a topic of high interest due to the role played by this lectin in pathogen infections. Mannose, a ligand of this lectin, could be conjugated at two different positions, 1 and 6, not implicated in the binding process. We have prepared mannose conjugates at these two positions with a long spacer to allow their attachment to a biosensor chip surface. Analysis of the interaction between these surfaces and the tetravalent extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN by SPR biosensor has demonstrated that both positions are available for this conjugation without affecting the protein binding process. These results emphasize the possibility to conjugate mannose at position 6, allowing the incorporation of hydrophobic groups at the anomeric position to interact with hydrophobic residues in the carbohydrate recognition domain of DC-SIGN, increasing binding affinities. This fact is relevant for the future design of new ligands and the corresponding multivalent systems for DC-SIGN.

  7. DC-SIGN mediates avian H5N1 influenza virus infection in cis and in trans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.-F.; Huang, Jason C.; Lee, Y.-M.; Liu, S.-J.; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Chau, Y.-P.; Chong, P.; Chen, Y.-M.A.

    2008-09-05

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed in dendritic cells (DCs), has been identified as a receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, and the SARS coronavirus. We used H5N1 pseudotyped and reverse-genetics (RG) virus particles to study their ability to bind with DC-SIGN. Electronic microscopy and functional assay results indicate that pseudotyped viruses containing both HA and NA proteins express hemagglutination and are capable of infecting cells expressing {alpha}-2,3-linked sialic acid receptors. Results from a capture assay show that DC-SIGN-expressing cells (including B-THP-1/DC-SIGN and T-THP-1/DC-SIGN) and peripheral blood dendritic cells are capable of transferring H5N1 pseudotyped and RG virus particles to target cells; this action can be blocked by anti-DC-SIGN monoclonal antibodies. In summary, (a) DC-SIGN acts as a capture or attachment molecule for avian H5N1 virus, and (b) DC-SIGN mediates infections in cis and in trans.

  8. Colorectal mucus binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Stax, Martijn J; Mouser, Emily E I M; van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W; de Vries, Henry J C; Dekker, Henk L; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1-3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa.

  9. Colorectal Mucus Binds DC-SIGN and Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection of CD4+ T-Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Dekker, Henk L.; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1–3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa. PMID:25793526

  10. BODIPY-labeled DC-SIGN-targeting glycodendrons efficiently internalize and route to lysosomes in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Viana, Renato; García-Vallejo, Juan J; Collado, Daniel; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Bloem, Karien; van Kooyk, Yvette; Rojo, Javier

    2012-10-01

    Glycodendrons bearing nine copies of mannoses or fucoses have been prepared by an efficient convergent strategy based on Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). These glycodendrons present a well-defined structure and have an adequate size and shape to interact efficiently with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN. We have selected a BODIPY derivative to label these glycodendrons due to its interesting physical and chemical properties as chromophore. These BODIPY-labeled glycodendrons were internalized into dendritic cells by mean of DC-SIGN. The internalized mannosylated and fucosylated dendrons are colocalized with LAMP1, which suggests routing to lysosomes. The interaction of these glycodendrons with DC-SIGN at the surface of dendritic cells did not induce maturation of the cells. Signaling analysis by checking different cytokines indicated also the lack of induction the expression of inflammatory and noninflammatory cytokines by these second generation glycodendrons. PMID:22920925

  11. Association of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR Repeat Regions with Susceptibility to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Zahedan, Southeastern Iran.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Mohammad; Hashemi, Mohammad; Soroush, Navid; Amininia, Shadi; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    There are conflicting results concerning DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR VNTR polymorphisms. The present study aimed to evaluate the possible association between DC-SIGN as well as DC-SIGNR VNTR polymorphisms and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in a sample of Iranian population. This case-control study was done on 171 PTB and 161 healthy subjects. The variants were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DC-SIGNR VNTR genotypes in cases were 12.7% for 5/5, 2.4% for 6/5, 32.7% for 7/7, 38.2% for 7/5, 5.5% for 7/6, 1.2% for /5, 0.6% for 9/6, 6.7% for 9/7 in PTB patients and 19.7% for 5/5, 2.0% for 6/5, 31.6% for 7/7, 37.5% for 7/5, 5.7% for 7/6, 0.0% for 9/5, 0.7% for 9/6, 2.6% for 9/7 in controls. The findings showed no significant association between DC-SIGNR VNTR polymorphism and PTB. All subjects in cases and controls were 7/7 genotype regarding DC-SIGN VNTR polymorphism. Our data propose that DC-SIGNR VNTR, as well as DC-SIGN VNTR, were not associated with the risk of PTB in a sample of Iranian population. PMID:27309478

  12. Extracellular vesicles from Paracoccidioides pathogenic species transport polysaccharide and expose ligands for DC-SIGN receptors

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Roberta Peres; Heiss, Christian; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Puccia, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate non-conventional transport of molecules across the fungal cell wall. We aimed at describing the carbohydrate composition and surface carbohydrate epitopes of EVs isolated from the pathogenic fungi Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii using standard procedures. Total EV carbohydrates were ethanol-precipitated from preparations depleted of lipids and proteins, then analyzed by chemical degradation, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and size-exclusion chromatography. EV glycosyl residues of Glc, Man, and Gal comprised most probably two major components: a high molecular mass 4,6-α-glucan and a galactofuranosylmannan, possibly an oligomer, bearing a 2-α-Manp main chain linked to β-Galf (1,3) and α-Manp (1,6) end units. The results also suggested the presence of small amounts of a (1→6)-Manp polymer, (1→3)-glucan and (1→6)-glucan. Glycan microarrays allowed identification of EV surface lectin(s), while plant lectin microarray profiling revealed terminal Man and GlcNAc residues exposed at the EVs surface. Mammalian lectin microarray profiling showed that DC-SIGN receptors recognized surface carbohydrate in Paracoccidioides EVs. Our results suggest that oligosaccharides, cytoplasmic storage, and cell wall polysaccharides can be exported in fungal EVs, which also expose surface PAMPs and lectins. The role of these newly identified components in the interaction with the host remains to be unraveled. PMID:26387503

  13. Extracellular vesicles from Paracoccidioides pathogenic species transport polysaccharide and expose ligands for DC-SIGN receptors

    DOE PAGES

    da Silva, Roberta Peres; Heiss, Christian; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Puccia, Rosana

    2015-09-21

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate non-conventional transport of molecules across the fungal cell wall. We aimed at describing the carbohydrate composition and surface carbohydrate epitopes of EVs isolated from the pathogenic fungi Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii using standard procedures. Total EV carbohydrates were ethanol-precipitated from preparations depleted of lipids and proteins, then analyzed by chemical degradation, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and size-exclusion chromatography. EV glycosyl residues of Glc, Man, and Gal comprised most probably two major components: a high molecular mass 4,6-α-glucan and a galactofuranosylmannan, possibly an oligomer, bearing a 2-α-Manp main chain linked to β-Galf (1,3) andmore » α-Manp (1,6) end units. The results also suggested the presence of small amounts of a (1→6)- Manp polymer, (1→3)-glucan and (1→6)-glucan. Glycan microarrays allowed identification of EV surface lectin(s), while plant lectin microarray profiling revealed terminal Man and GlcNAc residues exposed at the EVs surface. Mammalian lectin microarray profiling showed that DC-SIGN receptors recognized surface carbohydrate in Paracoccidioides EVs. Our results suggest that oligosaccharides, cytoplasmic storage, and cell wall polysaccharides can be exported in fungal EVs, which also expose surface PAMPs and lectins. As a result, the role of these newly identified components in the interaction with the host remains to be unraveled.« less

  14. Differential Use of the C-Type Lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN for Phlebovirus Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Léger, Psylvia; Tetard, Marilou; Youness, Berthe; Cordes, Nicole; Rouxel, Ronan N; Flamand, Marie; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2016-06-01

    Bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to humans and livestock globally. The receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely unidentified and poorly characterized. DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin highly expressed on dermal dendritic cells that has been found to act as an authentic entry receptor for many phleboviruses (Bunyaviridae), including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Toscana virus (TOSV) and Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). We found that these phleboviruses can exploit another C-type lectin, L-SIGN, for infection. L-SIGN shares 77% sequence homology with DC-SIGN and is expressed on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. L-SIGN is required for UUKV binding but not for virus internalization. An endocytosis-defective mutant of L-SIGN was still able to mediate virus uptake and infection, indicating that L-SIGN acts as an attachment receptor for phleboviruses rather than an endocytic receptor. Our results point out a fundamental difference in the use of the C-type lectins L-SIGN and DC-SIGN by UUKV to enter cells, although both proteins are closely related in terms of molecular structure and biological function. This study sheds new light on the molecular mechanisms by which phleboviruses target the liver and also highlights the added complexity in virus-receptor interactions beyond attachment. PMID:26990254

  15. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  16. DC-SIGN activation mediates the differential effects of SAP and CRP on the innate immune system and inhibits fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nehemiah; Pilling, Darrell; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-07-01

    Fibrosis is caused by scar tissue formation in internal organs and is associated with 45% of deaths in the United States. Two closely related human serum proteins, serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP), strongly affect fibrosis. In multiple animal models, and in Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials, SAP affects several aspects of the innate immune system to reduce fibrosis, whereas CRP appears to potentiate fibrosis. However, SAP and CRP bind the same Fcγ receptors (FcγR) with similar affinities, and why SAP and CRP have opposing effects is unknown. Here, we report that SAP but not CRP binds the receptor DC-SIGN (SIGN-R1) to affect the innate immune system, and that FcγR are not necessary for SAP function. A polycyclic aminothiazole DC-SIGN ligand and anti-DC-SIGN antibodies mimic SAP effects in vitro. In mice, the aminothiazole reduces neutrophil accumulation in a model of acute lung inflammation and, at 0.001 mg/kg, alleviates pulmonary fibrosis by increasing levels of the immunosuppressant IL-10. DC-SIGN (SIGN-R1) is present on mouse lung epithelial cells, and SAP and the aminothiazole potentiate IL-10 production from these cells. Our data suggest that SAP activates DC-SIGN to regulate the innate immune system differently from CRP, and that DC-SIGN is a target for antifibrotics.

  17. DC-SIGN (CD209) Carbohydrate Recognition Domain Is Not Polymorphic in Dengue Virus-Infected Indonesian Patients.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Tri; Wijayanti, Nastiti; Arguni, Eggi; Laksono, Ida Safitri

    2015-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a significant burden in Indonesia and other tropical countries. DENV infection has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, i.e. asymptomatic, dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The variety of clinical manifestations may be due to the diversity of genetic constitution of the host. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) has been identified as the major dengue receptor on human dendritic cells. There are at least five polymorphisms in exon 5 and 6 of the DC-SIGN encoded gene which have been identified and recorded in dbSNP. The aim of this work is to measure the frequency of these polymorphisms among asymptomatic and hospitalized DENV-infected patients. We enrolled 23 hospitalized and 73 asymptomatic DENV-infected patients. Among the subjects, we performed PCR amplification and DNA direct seqencing for 23 hospitalized DENV-infected patients and 24 asymptomatic DENV-infected patients. The result showed that there were no polymorphic nucleotides in the CD209 encoded gene among the patients. PMID:26161028

  18. Expression of CCR5, CXCR4 and DC-SIGN in Cervix of HIV-1 Heterosexually Infected Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G; Ramirez-Pineda, Antonio; Amaya-Garcia, Patricia Irene; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background: A number of studies have demonstrated that receptor and co-receptor expression levels which may affect viral entry, promoting cervical HIV infection. The aim was to evaluate the expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4and DC-SIGN mRNA in a sample of heterosexually HIV infected Mexican women. Methods: We enrolled twenty-six HIV heterosexual infected women attending a local infectious diseases medical unit.RNA was isolated from the cervix and gene expression analysis was performed using real-time PCR. Results: Expression rates for mRNA of CCR5 (median 1.82; range 0.003–2934) were higher than those observed for CXCR4 (0.79; 0.0061–3312) and DC-SIGN (0.33; 0.006–532) receptors (p < 0.05). A high correlation was found between the mRNA expression levels of these three receptors (rs = 0.52 to 0.85, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Levels of expression of the tested chemokine receptors in the cervix are different from each other and alsovary from woman to woman, and seem to support the suggestion that chemokine receptor expression in genital tissues may be playing a role in the HIV transmission. PMID:23115608

  19. DC-SIGN (CD209) Carbohydrate Recognition Domain Is Not Polymorphic in Dengue Virus-Infected Indonesian Patients.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, Tri; Wijayanti, Nastiti; Arguni, Eggi; Laksono, Ida Safitri

    2015-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a significant burden in Indonesia and other tropical countries. DENV infection has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, i.e. asymptomatic, dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The variety of clinical manifestations may be due to the diversity of genetic constitution of the host. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) has been identified as the major dengue receptor on human dendritic cells. There are at least five polymorphisms in exon 5 and 6 of the DC-SIGN encoded gene which have been identified and recorded in dbSNP. The aim of this work is to measure the frequency of these polymorphisms among asymptomatic and hospitalized DENV-infected patients. We enrolled 23 hospitalized and 73 asymptomatic DENV-infected patients. Among the subjects, we performed PCR amplification and DNA direct seqencing for 23 hospitalized DENV-infected patients and 24 asymptomatic DENV-infected patients. The result showed that there were no polymorphic nucleotides in the CD209 encoded gene among the patients.

  20. Fucose-specific DC-SIGN signalling directs T helper cell type-2 responses via IKKε- and CYLD-dependent Bcl3 activation.

    PubMed

    Gringhuis, Sonja I; Kaptein, Tanja M; Wevers, Brigitte A; Mesman, Annelies W; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2014-05-28

    Carbohydrate-specific signalling through DC-SIGN provides dendritic cells with plasticity to tailor immunity to the nature of invading microbes. Here we demonstrate that recognition of fucose-expressing extracellular pathogens like Schistosoma mansoni and Helicobacter pylori by DC-SIGN favors T helper cell type-2 (TH2) responses via activation of atypical NF-κB family member Bcl3. Crosstalk between TLR and DC-SIGN signalling results in TLR-induced MK2-mediated phosphorylation of LSP1, associated with DC-SIGN, upon fucose binding. Subsequently, IKKε and CYLD are recruited to phosphorylated LSP1. IKKε activation is pivotal for suppression of CYLD deubiquitinase activity and subsequent nuclear translocation of ubiquitinated Bcl3. Bcl3 activation represses TLR-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression, while enhancing interleukin-10 (IL-10) and TH2-attracting chemokine expression, shifting TH differentiation from TH1 to TH2 polarization. Thus, DC-SIGN directs adaptive TH2 immunity to fucose-expressing pathogens via an IKKε-CYLD-dependent signalling pathway leading to Bcl3 activation, which might be targeted in vaccination strategies or to prevent aberrant inflammation and allergy.

  1. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K3 and K5 proteins down regulate both DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sabine M; Bynoe, Meisha O F; Karki, Roshan; Tartell, Michael A; Means, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of multicentric Castleman's disease, primary effusion lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma. In this study, we show that like the C-type lectin DC-SIGN, the closely related DC-SIGNR can also enhance KSHV infection. Following infection, they are both targeted for down modulation and our data indicate that the KSHV MARCH-family ubiquitin ligase K5 is mediating this regulation and subsequent targeting for degradation of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR in the context of the virus. The closely related viral K3 protein, is also able to target these lectins in exogenous expressions studies, but only weakly during viral infection. In addition to requiring a functional RING-CH domain, several protein trafficking motifs in the C-terminal region of both K3 and K5 are important in regulation of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR. Further exploration of this modulation revealed that DC-SIGN is endocytosed from the cell surface in THP-1 monocytes, but degraded from an internal location with minimal endocytosis in HEK-293 cells. Pull-down data indicate that both K3 and K5 preferentially associate with immature forms of the lectins, mediating their ubiquitylation and degradation. Together, these data emphasize the molecular complexities of K3 and K5, while expanding the repertoire of targets of these two viral proteins. PMID:23460925

  2. Fucose-based PAMPs prime dendritic cells for follicular T helper cell polarization via DC-SIGN-dependent IL-27 production.

    PubMed

    Gringhuis, Sonja I; Kaptein, Tanja M; Wevers, Brigitte A; van der Vlist, Michiel; Klaver, Elsenoor J; van Die, Irma; Vriend, Lianne E M; de Jong, Marein A W P; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2014-10-03

    Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate antibody-mediated responses to combat extracellular pathogens including parasites by initiating T helper cell differentiation. Here we demonstrate that carbohydrate-specific signalling by DC-SIGN drives follicular T helper cell (TFH) differentiation via IL-27 expression. Fucose, but not mannose, engagement of DC-SIGN results in activation of IKKε, which collaborates with type I IFNR signalling to induce formation and activation of transcription factor ISGF3. Notably, ISGF3 induces expression of IL-27 subunit p28, and subsequent IL-27 secreted by DC-SIGN-primed DCs is pivotal for the induction of Bcl-6(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(hi)Foxp1(lo) TFH cells, IL-21 secretion by TFH cells and T-cell-dependent IgG production by B cells. Thus, we have identified an essential role for DC-SIGN-induced ISGF3 by fucose-based PAMPs in driving IL-27 and subsequent TFH polarization, which might be harnessed for vaccination design.

  3. TLR4 and DC-SIGN receptors recognized Mycobacterium scrofulaceum promoting semi-activated phenotype on bone marrow dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Aguilar, Marisa; Castillo-Rodal, Antonia I; Schcolnik-Cabrera, Alejandro; Bonifaz, Laura C; Molina, Gabriela; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2016-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are recognized as emerging pathogens and their immune regulatory mechanisms are not well described yet. From them, Mycobacterium avium is known to be a weak activator of dendritic cells (DCs) that impairs the response induced by BCG vaccine. However, whether other NTM such as Mycobacterium scrofulaceum may modulate the activation of DCs, has not been extensively studied. Here, we exposed bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) to M. scrofulaceum and we analyzed the effect on the activation of DCs. We found that M. scrofulaceum has a comparable ability to induce a semi-mature DC phenotype, which was produced by its interaction with DC-SIGN and TLR4 receptors in a synergic effect. BMDCs exposed to M. scrofulaceum showed high expression of PD-L2 and production of IL-10, as well as low levels of co-stimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition to immunophenotype induced on DCs, changes in morphology, re-organization of cytoskeleton and decreased migratory capacity are consistent with a semi-mature phenotype. However, unlike other pathogenic mycobacteria, the DC-semi-mature phenotype induced by M. scrofulaceum was reversed after re-exposure to BCG, suggesting that modulation mechanisms of DC-activation used by M. scrofulaceum are different to other known pathogenic mycobacteria. This is the first report about the immunophenotypic characterization of DC stimulated by M. scrofulaceum.

  4. Extracellular vesicles from Paracoccidioides pathogenic species transport polysaccharide and expose ligands for DC-SIGN receptors

    SciTech Connect

    da Silva, Roberta Peres; Heiss, Christian; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Puccia, Rosana

    2015-09-21

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate non-conventional transport of molecules across the fungal cell wall. We aimed at describing the carbohydrate composition and surface carbohydrate epitopes of EVs isolated from the pathogenic fungi Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii using standard procedures. Total EV carbohydrates were ethanol-precipitated from preparations depleted of lipids and proteins, then analyzed by chemical degradation, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and size-exclusion chromatography. EV glycosyl residues of Glc, Man, and Gal comprised most probably two major components: a high molecular mass 4,6-α-glucan and a galactofuranosylmannan, possibly an oligomer, bearing a 2-α-Manp main chain linked to β-Galf (1,3) and α-Manp (1,6) end units. The results also suggested the presence of small amounts of a (1→6)- Manp polymer, (1→3)-glucan and (1→6)-glucan. Glycan microarrays allowed identification of EV surface lectin(s), while plant lectin microarray profiling revealed terminal Man and GlcNAc residues exposed at the EVs surface. Mammalian lectin microarray profiling showed that DC-SIGN receptors recognized surface carbohydrate in Paracoccidioides EVs. Our results suggest that oligosaccharides, cytoplasmic storage, and cell wall polysaccharides can be exported in fungal EVs, which also expose surface PAMPs and lectins. As a result, the role of these newly identified components in the interaction with the host remains to be unraveled.

  5. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Non-Integrin Laminin Receptor Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Venticinque, Lisa; Meruelo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Human non-integrin laminin receptor is a multifunctional protein acting as an integral component of the ribosome and a cell surface receptor for laminin-1. Laminin receptor is overexpressed in several human cancers and is also the cell surface receptor for several viruses and pathogenic prion protein, making it a pathologically significant protein. This study focused on the proteomic characterization of laminin receptor interacting proteins from mus musculus. The use of affinity chromatography with immobilized recombinant laminin receptor coupled with mass spectrometry analysis identified 45 proteins with high confidence. Following validation through co-immunoprecipitation, the proteins were classified based on predicted function into ribosomal, RNA processing, signal transduction/ metabolism, protein processing, cytoskeleton/ cell anchorage, DNA/ chromatin and unknown functions. A significant portion of the identified proteins is related to functions or localizations previously described for laminin receptor. This work represents a comprehensive proteomic approach to studying laminin receptor, and provides an essential stepping-stone to a better mechanistic understanding of this protein’s diverse functions. PMID:22909348

  6. Effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on the expression of mannose receptor, DC-SIGN and autophagy genes in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Afsal, K; Selvaraj, P

    2016-07-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is a powerful immuno-modulator, which enhances expression of antimicrobial peptides and induces autophagy in monocytes/macrophages. Since 1,25(OH)2D3 increases the phagocytic potential of monocytes/macrophages, we have explored the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on the expression of receptors such as mannose receptor (CD206) and DC-SIGN (CD209) as well as autophagy genes such as ATG5 and Beclin-1 (BECN1) in monocytes/macrophages of healthy controls (HCs) and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients with and without cavitary disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 40 HCs and 40 PTB patients and were cultured for 72 h with Mtb in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)2D3 at 10(-7) M concentration. 1,25(OH)2D3 significantly upregulated the expression of mannose receptor, ATG5 and BECN1; whereas DC-SIGN expression was suppressed in Mtb infected cells of both study groups (p < 0.05). The 1,25(OH)2D3-induced expression of CD206, ATG5 and BECN1 genes was lower in PTB patients compared to HCs, whereas expression of these genes was impaired in PTB patients with cavitary disease. Moreover, the relative expression of ATG5 and BECN1 was positively correlated with monocyte/macrophage phagocytosis and cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene expression in HCs and PTB patients (p < 0.05). Our study results suggest that vitamin D supplementation in PTB patients without cavitary disease could enhance innate immune functions and may help to control intracellular growth of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  7. Identification of a porcine DC-SIGN-related C-type lectin, porcine CLEC4G (LSECtin), and its order of intron removal during splicing: comparative genomic analyses of the cluster of genes CD23/CLEC4G/DC-SIGN among mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y W; Meng, X J

    2009-06-01

    Human CLEC4G (previously named LSECtin), DC-SIGN, and L-SIGN are three important C-type lectins capable of mediating viral and bacterial pathogen recognitions. These three genes, together with CD23, form a lectin gene cluster at chromosome 19p13.3. In this study, we have experimentally identified the cDNA and the gene encoding porcine CLEC4G (pCLEC4G). Full-length pCLEC4G cDNA encodes a type II transmembrane protein of 290 amino acids. pCLEC4G gene has the same gene structure as the human and the predicted bovine, canis, mouse and rat CLEC4G genes with nine exons. A multi-species-conserved site at the extreme 3'-untranslated region of CLEC4G mRNAs was predicted to be targeted by microRNA miR-350 in domesticated animals and by miR-145 in primates, respectively. We detected pCLEC4G mRNA expression in liver, lymph node and spleen tissues. We also identified a series of sequential intermediate products of pCLEC4G pre-mRNA during splicing from pig liver. The previously unidentified porcine CD23 cDNA containing the complete coding region was subsequently cloned and found to express in spleen, thymus and lymph node. Furthermore, we compared the chromosomal regions syntenic to the human cluster of genes CD23/CLEC4G/DC-SIGN/L-SIGN in representative mammalian species including primates, domesticated animal, rodents and opossum. The L-SIGN homologues do not exist in non-primates mammals. The evolutionary processes of the gene cluster, from marsupials to primates, were proposed based upon their genomic structures and phylogenetic relationships.

  8. Human dendritic cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 mediate complementary immune regulatory activities in response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O'Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses.

  9. Human Dendritic Cell DC-SIGN and TLR-2 Mediate Complementary Immune Regulatory Activities in Response to Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Schiavi, Elisa; Ziegler, Mario; Groeger, David; Healy, Selena; Grant, Ray; O’Mahony, Liam

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota is required for optimal host development and ongoing immune homeostasis. Lactobacilli are common inhabitants of the mammalian large intestine and immunoregulatory effects have been described for certain, but not all, strains. The mechanisms underpinning these protective effects are beginning to be elucidated. One such protective organism is Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 (Lb. rhamnosus JB-1). Lb. murinus has no such anti-inflammatory protective effects and was used as a comparator organism. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) were co-incubated with bacteria and analysed over time for bacterial adhesion and intracellular processing, costimulatory molecule expression, cytokine secretion and induction of lymphocyte polarization. Neutralising antibodies were utilized to identify the responsible MDDC receptors. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhered to MDDCs, but internalization and intracellular processing was significantly delayed, compared to Lb. murinus which was rapidly internalized and processed. Lb. murinus induced CD80 and CD86 expression, accompanied by high levels of cytokine secretion, while Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 was a poor inducer of costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine secretion. Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 primed MDDCs induced Foxp3 expression in autologous lymphocytes, while Lb. murinus primed MDDCs induced Foxp3, T-bet and Ror-γt expression. DC-SIGN was required for Lb. rhamnosus JB-1 adhesion and influenced IL-12 secretion, while TLR-2 influenced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion. Here we demonstrate that the delayed kinetics of bacterial processing by MDDCs correlates with MDDC activation and stimulation of lymphocytes. Thus, inhibition or delay of intracellular processing may be a novel strategy by which certain commensals may avoid the induction of proinflammatory responses. PMID:25816321

  10. Deciphering the complex three-way interaction between the non-integrin laminin receptor, galectin-3 and Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Fulwah; Mahdavi, Jafar; Wheldon, Lee M.; Vassey, Matthew; Pirinccioglu, Necmettin; Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Qarani, Suzan M.; Morroll, Shaun; Stoof, Jeroen; Holliday, Nicholas D.; Teo, Siew Y.; Oldfield, Neil J.; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The non-integrin laminin receptor (LAMR1/RPSA) and galectin-3 (Gal-3) are multi-functional host molecules with roles in diverse pathological processes, particularly of infectious or oncogenic origins. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and confocal imaging, we demonstrate that the two proteins homo- and heterodimerize, and that each isotype forms a distinct cell surface population. We present evidence that the 37 kDa form of LAMR1 (37LRP) is the precursor of the previously described 67 kDa laminin receptor (67LR), whereas the heterodimer represents an entity that is distinct from this molecule. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the single cysteine (C173) of Gal-3 or lysine (K166) of LAMR1 are critical for heterodimerization. Recombinant Gal-3, expressed in normally Gal-3-deficient N2a cells, dimerized with endogenous LAMR1 and led to a significantly increased number of internalized bacteria (Neisseria meningitidis), confirming the role of Gal-3 in bacterial invasion. Contact-dependent cross-linking determined that, in common with LAMR1, Gal-3 binds the meningococcal secretin PilQ, in addition to the major pilin PilE. This study adds significant new mechanistic insights into the bacterial–host cell interaction by clarifying the nature, role and bacterial ligands of LAMR1 and Gal-3 isotypes during colonization. PMID:25274119

  11. Deciphering the complex three-way interaction between the non-integrin laminin receptor, galectin-3 and Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Fulwah; Mahdavi, Jafar; Wheldon, Lee M; Vassey, Matthew; Pirinccioglu, Necmettin; Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Qarani, Suzan M; Morroll, Shaun; Stoof, Jeroen; Holliday, Nicholas D; Teo, Siew Y; Oldfield, Neil J; Wooldridge, Karl G; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A A

    2014-10-01

    The non-integrin laminin receptor (LAMR1/RPSA) and galectin-3 (Gal-3) are multi-functional host molecules with roles in diverse pathological processes, particularly of infectious or oncogenic origins. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and confocal imaging, we demonstrate that the two proteins homo- and heterodimerize, and that each isotype forms a distinct cell surface population. We present evidence that the 37 kDa form of LAMR1 (37LRP) is the precursor of the previously described 67 kDa laminin receptor (67LR), whereas the heterodimer represents an entity that is distinct from this molecule. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the single cysteine (C(173)) of Gal-3 or lysine (K(166)) of LAMR1 are critical for heterodimerization. Recombinant Gal-3, expressed in normally Gal-3-deficient N2a cells, dimerized with endogenous LAMR1 and led to a significantly increased number of internalized bacteria (Neisseria meningitidis), confirming the role of Gal-3 in bacterial invasion. Contact-dependent cross-linking determined that, in common with LAMR1, Gal-3 binds the meningococcal secretin PilQ, in addition to the major pilin PilE. This study adds significant new mechanistic insights into the bacterial-host cell interaction by clarifying the nature, role and bacterial ligands of LAMR1 and Gal-3 isotypes during colonization.

  12. Monocyte cell surface glycosaminoglycans positively modulate IL-4-induced differentiation toward dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    den Dekker, Els; Grefte, Sander; Huijs, Tonnie; ten Dam, Gerdy B; Versteeg, Elly M M; van den Berk, Lieke C J; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2008-03-15

    IL-4 induces the differentiation of monocytes toward dendritic cells (DCs). The activity of many cytokines is modulated by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In this study, we explored the effect of GAGs on the IL-4-induced differentiation of monocytes toward DCs. IL-4 dose-dependently up-regulated the expression of DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), CD80, CD206, and CD1a. Monocytes stained positive with Abs against heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) B (CSB; dermatan sulfate), but not with Abs that recognize CSA, CSC, and CSE. Inhibition of sulfation of monocyte/DC cell surface GAGs by sodium chlorate reduced the reactivity of sulfate-recognizing single-chain Abs. This correlated with hampered IL-4-induced DC differentiation as evidenced by lower expression of DC-SIGN and CD1a and a decreased DC-induced PBL proliferation, suggesting that sulfated monocyte cell surface GAGs support IL-4 activity. Furthermore, removal of cell surface chondroitin sulfates by chondroitinase ABC strongly impaired IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation, whereas removal of HS by heparinase III had only a weak inhibitory effect. IL-4 bound to heparin and CSB, but not to HS, CSA, CSC, CSD, and CSE. Binding of IL-4 required iduronic acid, an N-sulfate group (heparin) and specific O sulfates (CSB and heparin). Together, these data demonstrate that monocyte cell surface chondroitin sulfates play an important role in the IL-4-driven differentiation of monocytes into DCs.

  13. Synthesis and microarray-assisted binding studies of core xylose and fucose containing N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Echeverria, Begoña; Serna, Sonia; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a collection of 33 xylosylated and core-fucosylated N-glycans found only in nonmammalian organisms such as plants and parasitic helminths has been achieved by employing a highly convergent chemo-enzymatic approach. The influence of these core modifications on the interaction with plant lectins, with the human lectin DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin), and with serum antibodies from schistosome-infected individuals was studied. Core xylosylation markedly reduced or completely abolished binding to several mannose-binding plant lectins and to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor present on antigen presenting cells. Employing the synthetic collection of core-fucosylated and core-xylosylated N-glycans in the context of a larger glycan array including structures lacking these core modifications, we were able to dissect core xylose and core fucose specific antiglycan antibody responses in S. mansoni infection sera, and we observed clear and immunologically relevant differences between children and adult groups infected with this parasite. The work presented here suggests that, quite similar to bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, core xylose distorts the conformation of the unsubstituted glycan, with important implications for the immunogenicity and protein binding properties of complex N-glycans.

  14. The relationship of interacting immunological components in dengue pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, David G

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are over 50 million cases of dengue fever reported annually and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk. Mild dengue fever presents with headache, fever, rash, myalgia, osteogenic pain, and lethargy. Severe disease can manifest as dengue shock syndrome (DSS) or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Symptoms of DSS/DHF are leukopenia, low blood volume and pressure encephalitis, cold and sweaty skin, gastrointestinal bleeding, and spontaneous bleeding from gums and nose. Currently, there are no therapeutics available beyond supportive care and untreated complicated dengue fever can have a 50% mortality rate. According to WHO DSS/DHF is the leading cause of childhood mortality in some Asian countries. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells that are primary targets in a dengue infection. Dengue binds to Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN). DC-SIGN has a high affinity for ICAM3 which is expressed in activating T-cells. Previous studies have demonstrated an altered T-cell phenotype expressed in dengue infected patients that could be potentially mediated by dengue-infected DCs.Dengue is enhanced by three interacting components of the immune system. Dengue begins by infecting dendritic cells which in immature dendritic cells is mediated by DC-SIGN. In mature dendritic cells, antibodies can enhance dengue infection via Fc receptors. Downstream of dendritic cells T-cells become activated and generate the very cytokines implicated in vascular leak and shock in addition to activating effector cells. Both the virus and the antibodies are involved in release of complement and anaphylatoxins which can cause or exacerbate DHF/DSS. These systems are inextricable and strongly associated with dengue pathogenesis.

  15. Specific Neuropilins Expression in Alveolar Macrophages among Tissue-Specific Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Naing Ye; Ohe, Rintaro; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    In the immune system, neuropilins (NRPs), including NRP-1 and NRP-2, are expressed in thymocytes, dendritic cells, regulatory T cells and macrophages. Their functions on immune cells around the neoplastic cells vary into pro-angiogenesis, tumor progression and anti-angiogenesis according to their ligands. Even though NRPs expression on malignant tumors and immune system has studied, a PubMed-based literature query did not yield any articles describing NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages. The aims of this study were (i) to detect NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages in the brain, liver, spleen, lymph node and lung; (ii) to observe NRPs expression in classes of macrophages, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), bronchial macrophages (BMs), interstitial macrophages (IMs), intravascular macrophages (IVMs) and macrophage subsets (M1, M2 and Mox) in lung; and (iii) to detect the co-expression of NRPs and dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in AMs. Both NRPs were specifically detected in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages by immunohistochemistry (IHC). NRPs mRNA expression levels were characterized in normal lung by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ-polymerase chain reaction (in situ-PCR). The expression of both NRPs was detected in AMs, BMs and IVMs by IHC. The frequency of NRPs+ AMs in lung tissue adjacent to the cancer margin was significantly higher than the frequencies in inflamed and normal lung tissue. Double and triple IHC demonstrated that NRPs are expressed on all macrophage subsets in lung. Double IHC showed co-expression of DC-SIGN and NRPs in AMs. This study demonstrated for the first time the specific expression of both NRPs in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages and their expression on M1, M2 and Mox macrophages. Furthermore, the possible origin of AMs from blood monocytes could be suggested from a co-expression of NRPs and DC-SIGN. PMID:26900851

  16. The effect of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) on dendritic cells and its role in T cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Wang, Hsin-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Liang; Liao, En-Chih

    2016-11-01

    The innate signaling pathway for Th2 immunity activated by inhaled allergens has not been well defined. Dendritic cells (DCs) can use their innate pattern-recognition Toll-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors to generate innate immunity and influence adaptive responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the glycoform of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) and its functional interaction with dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN). Both bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) derived from mice and monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to investigate the function of Der p 7. Dendritic cells derived from THP1 were used to investigate the glycol form of Der p 7. Der p 7 interacted with DC-SIGN as recognized by immunoprecipitation and glycoprotein staining, and its function was partially inhibited by deglycosylation. When BMDCs were cultured with Der p 7, the secretion of IL-6 and gene expressions of IL-6, OX40L and Jagged-1 were increased. IL4(+)/CD4(+) T cells could be induced by Der p 7, however IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T cells were down-regulated. The effects of Der p 7 on DCs were down-regulated in the presence of DC-SIGN or TLR4 antibodies and deglycosylation. rDer p 7 enhanced the DC differentiation of CD80 and CD86. The effects of Der p 7 pulsed-MDDCs on IL4(+)/CD4(+) and IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T-cell differentiation of human PBMCs were significantly increased after Der p 7 stimulation and decreased by DC-SIGN antibody inhibition. In conclusion, the Der p 7 is a glycoprotein and its function was partially through glycan binding. BMDCs could be activated by Der p 7 through TLR4 and DC-SIGN, and followed by the expression of OX40 ligand (OX40L) and Jagged-1, the expressions of IL4(+)/CD4(+) cells were enhanced. These findings identify a previously unrecognized function of Der p 7 and establish a link between innate TLR4/C

  17. The effect of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) on dendritic cells and its role in T cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Wang, Hsin-Chieh; Chiu, Chih-Liang; Liao, En-Chih

    2016-11-01

    The innate signaling pathway for Th2 immunity activated by inhaled allergens has not been well defined. Dendritic cells (DCs) can use their innate pattern-recognition Toll-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors to generate innate immunity and influence adaptive responses. The aim of this study was to investigate the glycoform of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 7 allergen (Der p 7) and its functional interaction with dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN). Both bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) derived from mice and monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to investigate the function of Der p 7. Dendritic cells derived from THP1 were used to investigate the glycol form of Der p 7. Der p 7 interacted with DC-SIGN as recognized by immunoprecipitation and glycoprotein staining, and its function was partially inhibited by deglycosylation. When BMDCs were cultured with Der p 7, the secretion of IL-6 and gene expressions of IL-6, OX40L and Jagged-1 were increased. IL4(+)/CD4(+) T cells could be induced by Der p 7, however IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T cells were down-regulated. The effects of Der p 7 on DCs were down-regulated in the presence of DC-SIGN or TLR4 antibodies and deglycosylation. rDer p 7 enhanced the DC differentiation of CD80 and CD86. The effects of Der p 7 pulsed-MDDCs on IL4(+)/CD4(+) and IFN-γ(+)/CD4(+) T-cell differentiation of human PBMCs were significantly increased after Der p 7 stimulation and decreased by DC-SIGN antibody inhibition. In conclusion, the Der p 7 is a glycoprotein and its function was partially through glycan binding. BMDCs could be activated by Der p 7 through TLR4 and DC-SIGN, and followed by the expression of OX40 ligand (OX40L) and Jagged-1, the expressions of IL4(+)/CD4(+) cells were enhanced. These findings identify a previously unrecognized function of Der p 7 and establish a link between innate TLR4/C

  18. Host Langerin (CD207) is a receptor for Yersinia pestis phagocytosis and promotes dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Park, Chae G; Cheong, Cheolho; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Zhang, Shusheng; Zhang, Pei; He, Yingxia; Jiang, Lingyu; Huang, Hongping; Ding, Honghui; Wu, Yiping; Wang, Shaogang; Zhang, Lin; Li, Anyi; Xia, Lianxu; Bartra, Sara S; Plano, Gregory V; Skurnik, Mikael; Klena, John D; Chen, Tie

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes plague. After Y. pestis overcomes the skin barrier, it encounters antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as Langerhans and dendritic cells. They transport the bacteria from the skin to the lymph nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial transmission are unclear. Langerhans cells (LCs) express Langerin (CD207), a calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin. Furthermore, Y. pestis possesses exposed core oligosaccharides. In this study, we show that Y. pestis invades LCs and Langerin-expressing transfectants. However, when the bacterial core oligosaccharides are shielded or truncated, Y. pestis propensity to invade Langerhans and Langerin-expressing cells decreases. Moreover, the interaction of Y. pestis with Langerin-expressing transfectants is inhibited by purified Langerin, a DC-SIGN (DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin)-like molecule, an anti-CD207 antibody, purified core oligosaccharides and several oligosaccharides. Furthermore, covering core oligosaccharides reduces the mortality associated with murine infection by adversely affecting the transmission of Y. pestis to lymph nodes. These results demonstrate that direct interaction of core oligosaccharides with Langerin facilitates the invasion of LCs by Y. pestis. Therefore, Langerin-mediated binding of Y. pestis to APCs may promote its dissemination and infection. PMID:25829141

  19. CD209a Expression on Dendritic Cells is Critical for the Development of Pathogenic Th17 Cell Responses in Murine Schistosomiasis1

    PubMed Central

    Ponichtera, Holly E.; Shainheit, Mara G.; Liu, Beiyun C.; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Larkin, Bridget M.; Russo, Joanne M.; Salantes, D. Brenda; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Parnell, Laurence D.; Yun, Tae J.; Cheong, Cheolho; Bunnell, Stephen C.; Hacohen, Nir; Stadecker, Miguel J.

    2014-01-01

    In murine schistosomiasis, immunopathology and cytokine production in response to parasite eggs is uneven and strain dependent. CBA mice develop severe hepatic granulomatous inflammation associated with prominent T helper 17 (Th17) cell responses driven by dendritic cell (DC)-derived IL-1β and IL-23. Such Th17 cells fail to develop in low-pathology BL/6 mice, and the reasons for these strain-specific differences in antigen (Ag) presenting cell (APC) reactivity to eggs remain unclear. We show by gene profiling that CBA DCs display an 18-fold higher expression of the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) CD209a, a murine homologue of human DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), than BL/6 DCs. Higher CD209a expression was observed in CBA splenic and granuloma APC subpopulations, but only DCs induced Th17 cell differentiation in response to schistosome eggs. Gene silencing in CBA DCs, and over-expression in BL/6 DCs, demonstrated that CD209a is essential for egg-elicited IL-1β and IL-23 production and subsequent Th17 cell development, which is associated with SRC, RAF-1, and ERK1/2 activation. These findings reveal a novel mechanism controlling the development of Th17 cell-mediated severe immunopathology in helminthic disease. PMID:24729611

  20. Host genome polymorphisms and tuberculosis infection: What we have to say?

    PubMed Central

    Khalilullah, Said Alfin; Harapan, Harapan; Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Winardi, Wira; Ichsan, Ichsan; Mulyadi, Mulyadi

    2015-01-01

    Several epidemiology studies suggest that host genetic factors play important roles in susceptibility, protection and progression of tuberculosis infection. Here we have reviewed the implications of some genetic polymorphisms in pathways related to tuberculosis susceptibility, severity and development. Large case-control studies examining single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes have been performed in tuberculosis patients in some countries. Polymorphisms in natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-10, vitamin D receptor (VDR), dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), nucleotide oligomerization binding domain 2 (NOD2), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and surfactant proteins A (SP-A) have been reviewed. These genes have been variably associated with tuberculosis infection and there is strong evidence indicating that host genetic factors play critical roles in tuberculosis susceptibility, severity and development. PMID:26966339

  1. Low expression of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-grabbing nonintegrin-related protein in lung cancer and significant correlations with brain metastasis and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Hua; Su, Lijie; Yang, Peng; Xin, Zhiqiang; Zou, Junwei; Ren, Shuangyi; Zuo, Yunfei

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-grabbing nonintegrin-related protein (DC-SIGNR) is a type II transmembrane protein which has been reported to bind a variety of pathogens as well as participate in immunoregulation. But the association between the level of DC-SIGNR and lung cancer is unknown. To investigate the clinical diagnostic significance of DC-SIGNR in lung cancer, we investigated serum DC-SIGNR levels in 173 lung cancer patients and 134 healthy individuals using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results showed that serum DC-SIGNR levels in lung cancer patients were lower than that in healthy controls (P = 0.0003). A cut-off value of 3.8998 ng/L for DC-SIGNR predicted the presence of lung cancer with 78.03% sensitivity and 49.25% specificity (area under the curve = 0.6212, P = 0.0003). Strikingly, serum DC-SIGNR levels were significantly higher in lung cancer patients with brain metastasis compared to those without metastasis (P = 0.0283). Moreover, the serum concentrations of DC-SIGNR in lung cancer patients also correlated significantly with serum natural killer cells percentage (P = 0.0017). In addition, immunohistochemistry assay demonstrated that the expression of DC-SIGNR in lung tissues of 31 lung cancer patients and 13 tuberculosis patients was significantly lower than that in 18 normal lung tissues (P = 0.0418, 0.0289), and there is no significant difference between tuberculosis tissues and lung cancer tissues (P = 0.2696). These results suggest that DC-SIGNR maybe a promising biological molecule that has the potential for clinical research of lung cancer, whereas its underlying roles are needed to be investigated in further studies.

  2. Weak Ergodicity Breaking of Receptor Motion in Living Cells Stemming from Random Diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Massignan, Pietro; Lapeyre, Gerald J.; Lewenstein, Maciej; Garcia Parajo, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular transport in living systems regulates numerous processes underlying biological function. Although many cellular components exhibit anomalous diffusion, only recently has the subdiffusive motion been associated with nonergodic behavior. These findings have stimulated new questions for their implications in statistical mechanics and cell biology. Is nonergodicity a common strategy shared by living systems? Which physical mechanisms generate it? What are its implications for biological function? Here, we use single-particle tracking to demonstrate that the motion of dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor with unique pathogen-recognition capabilities, reveals nonergodic subdiffusion on living-cell membranes In contrast to previous studies, this behavior is incompatible with transient immobilization, and, therefore, it cannot be interpreted according to continuous-time random-walk theory. We show that the receptor undergoes changes of diffusivity, consistent with the current view of the cell membrane as a highly dynamic and diverse environment. Simulations based on a model of an ordinary random walk in complex media quantitatively reproduce all our observations, pointing toward diffusion heterogeneity as the cause of DC-SIGN behavior. By studying different receptor mutants, we further correlate receptor motion to its molecular structure, thus establishing a strong link between nonergodicity and biological function. These results underscore the role of disorder in cell membranes and its connection with function regulation. Because of its generality, our approach offers a framework to interpret anomalous transport in other complex media where dynamic heterogeneity might play a major role, such as those found, e.g., in soft condensed matter, geology, and ecology.

  3. MicroRNA Expression Profiles of Human Blood Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells and Macrophages Reveal miR-511 as Putative Positive Regulator of Toll-like Receptor 4*

    PubMed Central

    Tserel, Liina; Runnel, Toomas; Kisand, Kai; Pihlap, Maire; Bakhoff, Lairi; Kolde, Raivo; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak; Peterson, Pärt; Rebane, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MFs) are important multifunctional immune cells. Like other cell types, they express hundreds of different microRNAs (miRNAs) that are recently discovered post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Here we present updated miRNA expression profiles of monocytes, DCs and MFs. Compared with monocytes, ∼50 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in immature and mature DCs or MFs, with major expression changes occurring during the differentiation. Knockdown of DICER1, a protein needed for miRNA biosynthesis, led to lower DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and enhanced CD14 protein levels, confirming the importance of miRNAs in DC differentiation in general. Inhibition of the two most highly up-regulated miRNAs, miR-511 and miR-99b, also resulted in reduced DC-SIGN level. Prediction of miRNA-511 targets revealed a number of genes with known immune functions, of which TLR4 and CD80 were validated using inhibition of miR-511 in DCs and luciferase assays in HEK293 cells. Interestingly, under the cell cycle arrest conditions, miR-511 seems to function as a positive regulator of TLR4. In conclusion, we have identified miR-511 as a novel potent modulator of human immune response. In addition, our data highlight that miRNA influence on gene expression is dependent on the cellular environment. PMID:21646346

  4. Dermal CD14(+) Dendritic Cell and Macrophage Infection by Dengue Virus Is Stimulated by Interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Evelyne; Flacher, Vincent; Papageorgiou, Vasiliki; Decossas, Marion; Fauny, Jean-Daniel; Krämer, Melanie; Mueller, Christopher G

    2015-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is responsible for the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral infection in humans. Events decisive for disease development occur in the skin after virus inoculation by the mosquito. Yet, the role of human dermis-resident immune cells in dengue infection and disease remains elusive. Here we investigated how dermal dendritic cells (dDCs) and macrophages (dMs) react to DENV and impact on immunopathology. We show that both CD1c(+) and CD14(+) dDC subsets were infected, but viral load greatly increased in CD14(+) dDCs upon IL-4 stimulation, which correlated with upregulation of virus-binding lectins Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin (DC-SIGN/CD209) and mannose receptor (CD206). IL-4 also enhanced T-cell activation by dDCs, which was further increased upon dengue infection. dMs purified from digested dermis were initially poorly infected but actively replicated the virus and produced TNF-α upon lectin upregulation in response to IL-4. DC-SIGN(+) cells are abundant in inflammatory skin with scabies infection or Th2-type dermatitis, suggesting that skin reactions to mosquito bites heighten the risk of infection and subsequent immunopathology. Our data identify dDCs and dMs as primary arbovirus target cells in humans and suggest that dDCs initiate a potent virus-directed T-cell response, whereas dMs fuel the inflammatory cascade characteristic of dengue fever. PMID:25521455

  5. Dengue virus binding and replication by platelets.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ayo Y; Sutherland, Michael R; Pryzdial, Edward L G

    2015-07-16

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes ∼200 million cases of severe flulike illness annually, escalating to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome in ∼500,000. Although thrombocytopenia is typical of both mild and severe diseases, the mechanism triggering platelet reduction is incompletely understood. As a probable initiating event, direct purified DENV-platelet binding was followed in the current study by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and confirmed antigenically. Approximately 800 viruses specifically bound per platelet at 37°C. Fewer sites were observed at 25°C, the blood bank storage temperature (∼350 sites), or 4°C, known to attenuate virus cell entry (∼200 sites). Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were implicated as coreceptors because only the combination of anti-DC-SIGN and low-molecular-weight heparin prevented binding. Interestingly, at 37°C and 25°C, platelets replicated the positive sense single-stranded RNA genome of DENV by up to ∼4-fold over 7 days. Further time course experiments demonstrated production of viral NS1 protein, which is known to be highly antigenic in patient serum. The infectivity of DENV intrinsically decayed in vitro, which was moderated by platelet-mediated generation of viable progeny. This was shown using a transcription inhibitor and confirmed by freeze-denatured platelets being incapable of replicating the DENV genome. For the first time, these data demonstrate that platelets directly bind DENV saturably and produce infectious virus. Thus, expression of antigen encoded by DENV is a novel consideration in the pathogen-induced thrombocytopenia mechanism. These results furthermore draw attention to the possibility that platelets may produce permissive RNA viruses in addition to DENV.

  6. Innate Immune Gene Polymorphisms in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sadee, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause worldwide of human mortality attributable to a single infectious agent. Recent studies targeting candidate genes and “case-control” association have revealed numerous polymorphisms implicated in host susceptibility to TB. Here, we review current progress in the understanding of causative polymorphisms in host innate immune genes associated with TB pathogenesis. We discuss genes encoding several types of proteins: macrophage receptors, such as the mannose receptor (MR, CD206), dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN, CD209), Dectin-1, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18), nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and NOD2, CD14, P2X7, and the vitamin D nuclear receptor (VDR); soluble C-type lectins, such as surfactant protein-A (SP-A), SP-D, and mannose-binding lectin (MBL); phagocyte cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18; chemokines, such as IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), RANTES, and CXCL10; and other important innate immune molecules, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and solute carrier protein 11A1 (SLC11A1). Polymorphisms in these genes have been variably associated with susceptibility to TB among different populations. This apparent variability is probably accounted for by evolutionary selection pressure as a result of long-term host-pathogen interactions in certain regions or populations and, in part, by lack of proper study design and limited knowledge of molecular and functional effects of the implicated genetic variants. Finally, we discuss genomic technologies that hold promise for resolving questions regarding the evolutionary paths of the human genome, functional effects of polymorphisms, and corollary impacts of adaptation on human health, ultimately leading to novel approaches to controlling TB. PMID:22825450

  7. DC-SIGN: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-06-16

    In this issue of Immunity, Conde et al. (2015) showed that a costimulatory blockade favors the accumulation of CD209a(+) macrophages which, upon interaction with fucosylated tissue ligands, promotes the expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell number. PMID:26084017

  8. Mannosylated Mucin-Type Immunoglobulin Fusion Proteins Enhance Antigen-Specific Antibody and T Lymphocyte Responses

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Tomas; Nilsson, Anki; Chatzissavidou, Nathalie; Sjöblom, Magnus; Rova, Ulrika; Holgersson, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC) improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR) and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA) responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented. OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in 51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays. Immunizations with the OVA − mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass) OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect. Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:23071675

  9. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells.

    PubMed

    Mouser, Emily E I M; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William; de Jong, Esther C; Paxton, William A

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  10. Brugia malayi Antigen (BmA) Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection but Neither BmA nor ES-62 Alter HIV-1 Infectivity of DC Induced CD4+ Th-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouser, Emily E. I. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Harnett, William

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of HIV-1 disease is the association of heightened CD4+ T-cell activation with HIV-1 replication. Parasitic helminths including filarial nematodes have evolved numerous and complex mechanisms to skew, dampen and evade human immune responses suggesting that HIV-1 infection may be modulated in co-infected individuals. Here we studied the effects of two filarial nematode products, adult worm antigen from Brugia malayi (BmA) and excretory-secretory product 62 (ES-62) from Acanthocheilonema viteae on HIV-1 infection in vitro. Neither BmA nor ES-62 influenced HIV-1 replication in CD4+ enriched T-cells, with either a CCR5- or CXCR4-using virus. BmA, but not ES-62, had the capacity to bind the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) thereby inhibiting HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ enriched T-cells. As for their effect on DCs, neither BmA nor ES-62 could enhance or inhibit DC maturation as determined by CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression, or the production of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α. As expected, due to the unaltered DC phenotype, no differences were found in CD4+ T helper (Th) cell phenotypes induced by DCs treated with either BmA or ES-62. Moreover, the HIV-1 susceptibility of the Th-cell populations induced by BmA or ES-62 exposed DCs was unaffected for both CCR5- and CXCR4-using HIV-1 viruses. In conclusion, although BmA has the potential capacity to interfere with HIV-1 transmission or initial viral dissemination through preventing the virus from interacting with DCs, no differences in the Th-cell polarizing capacity of DCs exposed to BmA or ES-62 were observed. Neither antigenic source demonstrated beneficial or detrimental effects on the HIV-1 susceptibility of CD4+ Th-cells induced by exposed DCs. PMID:26808476

  11. Association of Oligoadenylate Synthetase Gene Cluster and DC-SIGN (CD209) Gene Polymorphisms with Clinical Symptoms in Chikungunya Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chaaithanya, Itta Krishna; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Surya, Palani; Anwesh, Maile; Alagarasu, Kalichamy; Vijayachari, Paluru

    2016-01-01

    Biology and pathogenesis of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) are not clearly established. Host factors play an important role in determining the progression and severity of the disease. Polymorphisms in the promoter region of CD209 gene (rs735239, rs4804803, rs2287886) and OAS1 (rs1131454 and rs10774671), OAS2 (rs15895 and rs1732778), and OAS3 (rs2285932 and rs2072136) genes were investigated in 100 patients with CHIKV infection and 101 healthy controls to find out the association of these polymorphisms with CHIKV infection. To evaluate the association of OAS and CD209 gene polymorphisms with the presence or absence of disease symptoms in CHIKV-infected patients. DNA was extracted and typed using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. Results revealed that the allele and genotype frequencies of OAS1, OAS3, and OAS2 gene polymorphisms were not different between healthy controls and CHIKV patients. The frequency of CD209 gene G/G genotype of rs4804803 was significantly higher in CHIKV patients compared to healthy controls (p = 0.046). The present study suggests that rs4804803 GG genotype of CD209 gene is associated with susceptibility to CHIKV infection. To conclude, the present preliminary study suggests that OAS gene cluster and CD209 gene polymorphisms influence the risk of developing clinical symptoms in CHIKV-infected patients. Further follow-up studies with a large number of samples are needed to assess the role of these genes in association with post-sequela symptoms observed in CHIKV patients. A detailed research is required in these directions to understand the biology behind CHIKV infection and disease severity.

  12. Utilization of human DC-SIGN and L-SIGN for entry and infection of host cells by the New World arenavirus, Junín virus

    PubMed Central

    Belouzard, Sandrine; Cordo, Sandra M.; Candurra, Nélida A.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    The target cell tropism of enveloped viruses is regulated by interactions between viral proteins and cellular receptors determining susceptibility at a host cell, tissue or species level. However, a number of additional cell-surface moieties can also bind viral envelope glycoproteins and could act as capture receptors, serving as attachment factors to concentrate virus particles on the cell surface, or to disseminate the virus infection to target organs or susceptible cells within the host. Here, we used Junín virus (JUNV) or JUNV glycoprotein complex (GPC)-pseudotyped particles to study their ability to be internalized by the human C-type lectins hDC- or hL-SIGN. Our results provide evidence that hDC- and hL-SIGN can mediate the entry of Junín virus into cells, and may play an important role in virus infection and dissemination in the host. PMID:24183720

  13. Allergy-Protective Arabinogalactan Modulates Human Dendritic Cells via C-Type Lectins and Inhibition of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Peters, Marcus; Guidato, Patrick M; Peters, Karin; Megger, Dominik A; Sitek, Barbara; Classen, Birgit; Heise, Esther M; Bufe, Albrecht

    2016-02-15

    Arabinogalactan (AG) isolated from dust of a traditional farm prevents disease in murine models of allergy. However, it is unclear whether this polysaccharide has immune regulatory properties in humans. The aim of this study was to test the influence of AG on the immune-stimulating properties of human dendritic cells (DCs). Moreover, we sought to identify the receptor to which AG binds. AG was produced from plant callus tissue under sterile conditions to avoid the influence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns in subsequent experiments. The influence of AG on the human immune system was investigated by analyzing its impact on monocyte-derived DCs. To analyze whether the T cell stimulatory capacity of AG-stimulated DCs is altered, an MLR with naive Th cells was performed. We revealed that AG reduced T cell proliferation in a human MLR. In the search for a molecular mechanism, we found that AG binds to the immune modulatory receptors DC-specific ICAM-3 -: grabbing non integrin (DC-SIGN) and macrophage mannose receptor 1 (MMR-1). Stimulation of these receptors with AG simultaneously with TLR4 stimulation with LPS increased the expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase tripartite motif -: containing protein 21 and decreased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 in DCs. This led to a reduced activation profile with reduced costimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokine production. Blocking of MMR-1 or DC-SIGN with neutralizing Abs partially inhibits this effect. We conclude that AG dampens the activation of human DCs by LPS via binding to DC-SIGN and MMR-1, leading to attenuated TLR signaling. This results in a reduced T cell activation capacity of DCs. PMID:26746190

  14. DC-SIGN–expressing macrophages trigger activation of mannosylated IgM B-cell receptor in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rada; Mourcin, Frédéric; Uhel, Fabrice; Pangault, Céline; Ruminy, Philippe; Dupré, Loic; Guirriec, Marion; Marchand, Tony; Fest, Thierry; Lamy, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) results from the accumulation of malignant germinal center (GC) B cells leading to the development of an indolent and largely incurable disease. FL cells remain highly dependent on B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and on a specific cell microenvironment, including T cells, macrophages, and stromal cells. Importantly, FL BCR is characterized by a selective pressure to retain surface immunoglobulin M (IgM) BCR despite an active class-switch recombination process, and by the introduction, in BCR variable regions, of N-glycosylation acceptor sites harboring unusual high-mannose oligosaccharides. However, the relevance of these 2 FL BCR features for lymphomagenesis remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that IgM+ FL B cells activated a stronger BCR signaling network than IgG+ FL B cells and normal GC B cells. BCR expression level and phosphatase activity could both contribute to such heterogeneity. Moreover, we underlined that a subset of IgM+ FL samples, displaying highly mannosylated BCR, efficiently bound dendritic cell–specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), which could in turn trigger delayed but long-lasting BCR aggregation and activation. Interestingly, DC-SIGN was found within the FL cell niche in situ. Finally, M2 macrophages induced a DC-SIGN–dependent adhesion of highly mannosylated IgM+ FL B cells and triggered BCR-associated kinase activation. Interestingly, pharmacologic BCR inhibitors abolished such crosstalk between macrophages and FL B cells. Altogether, our data support an important role for DC-SIGN–expressing infiltrating cells in the biology of FL and suggest that they could represent interesting therapeutic targets. PMID:26272216

  15. Costimulation of CD3/TcR complex with either integrin or nonintegrin ligands protects CD4+ allergen-specific T-cell clones from programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Bini, P; Migliorati, G; Nicoletti, I; Bassotti, G; Riccardi, C; Bertotto, A; Spinozzi, F

    1995-08-01

    An optimal stimulation of CD4+ cells in an immune response requires not only signals transduced via the TcR/CD3 complex, but also costimulatory signals delivered as a consequence of interactions between T-cell surface-associated costimulatory receptors and their counterparts on antigen-presenting cells (APC). The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) efficiently costimulates proliferation of resting, but not antigen-specific, T cells. In contrast, CD28 and CD2 support interleukin (IL)-2 synthesis and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells more efficiently than those of resting T cells. The molecular basis for this differential costimulation of T cells is poorly understood. Cypress-specific T-cell clones (TCC) were generated from four allergic subjects during in vivo seasonal exposure to the allergen. Purified cypress extract was produced directly from fresh collected pollen and incubated with the patients' mononuclear cells. Repeated allergen stimulation was performed in T-cell cultures supplemented with purified extract and autologous APC. The limiting-dilution technique was then adopted to generate allergen-specific TCC, which were also characterized by their cytokine secretion pattern as Th0 (IL-4 plus interferon-gamma) or Th2 (IL-4). Costimulation-induced proliferation or apoptosis was measured by propidium iodide cytofluorometric assay. By cross-linking cypress-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones with either anti-CD3 or anti-CD2, anti-CD28, and anti-CD54 monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrated that CD4+ clones (with Th0- or Th2-type cytokine production pattern) undergo programmed cell death only after anti-CD3 stimulation, whereas costimulation with either anti-CD54 or anti-CD28 protects target cells from apoptosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7503404

  16. Looking into laminin receptor: critical discussion regarding the non-integrin 37/67-kDa laminin receptor/RPSA protein.

    PubMed

    DiGiacomo, Vincent; Meruelo, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The 37/67-kDa laminin receptor (LAMR/RPSA) was originally identified as a 67-kDa binding protein for laminin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that provides cellular adhesion to the basement membrane. LAMR has evolutionary origins, however, as a 37-kDa RPS2 family ribosomal component. Expressed in all domains of life, RPS2 proteins have been shown to have remarkably diverse physiological roles that vary across species. Contributing to laminin binding, ribosome biogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and nuclear functions, this protein governs critical cellular processes including growth, survival, migration, protein synthesis, development, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly given its purview, LAMR has been associated with metastatic cancer, neurodegenerative disease and developmental abnormalities. Functioning in a receptor capacity, this protein also confers susceptibility to bacterial and viral infection. LAMR is clearly a molecule of consequence in human disease, directly mediating pathological events that make it a prime target for therapeutic interventions. Despite decades of research, there are still a large number of open questions regarding the cellular biology of LAMR, the nature of its ability to bind laminin, the function of its intrinsically disordered C-terminal region and its conversion from 37 to 67 kDa. This review attempts to convey an in-depth description of the complexity surrounding this multifaceted protein across functional, structural and pathological aspects.

  17. Pattern Recognition Receptors and Cytokines in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection—The Double-Edged Sword?

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Murad; Norazmi, Mohd-Nor

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis, an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains a major cause of human death worldwide. Innate immunity provides host defense against Mtb. Phagocytosis, characterized by recognition of Mtb by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is the first step of the innate immune defense mechanism. The recognition of Mtb is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), expressed on innate immune cells, including toll-like receptors (TLRs), complement receptors, nucleotide oligomerization domain like receptors, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), mannose receptors, CD14 receptors, scavenger receptors, and FCγ receptors. Interaction of mycobacterial ligands with PRRs leads macrophages and DCs to secrete selected cytokines, which in turn induce interferon-γ- (IFNγ-) dominated immunity. IFNγ and other cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) regulate mycobacterial growth, granuloma formation, and initiation of the adaptive immune response to Mtb and finally provide protection to the host. However, Mtb can evade destruction by antimicrobial defense mechanisms of the innate immune system as some components of the system may promote survival of the bacteria in these cells and facilitate pathogenesis. Thus, although innate immunity components generally play a protective role against Mtb, they may also facilitate Mtb survival. The involvement of selected PRRs and cytokines on these seemingly contradictory roles is discussed. PMID:24350246

  18. Targeting self- and foreign antigens to dendritic cells via DC-ASGPR generates IL-10-producing suppressive CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Romain, Gabrielle; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Duluc, Dorothée; Dullaers, Melissa; Li, Xiao-Hua; Zurawski, Sandra; Bosquet, Nathalie; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Le Grand, Roger; O'Garra, Anne; Zurawski, Gerard; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, Sangkon

    2012-01-16

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can initiate and shape host immune responses toward either immunity or tolerance by their effects on antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. DC-asialoglycoprotein receptor (DC-ASGPR), a lectinlike receptor, is a known scavenger receptor. Here, we report that targeting antigens to human DCs via DC-ASGPR, but not lectin-like oxidized-LDL receptor, Dectin-1, or DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin favors the generation of antigen-specific suppressive CD4(+) T cells that produce interleukin 10 (IL-10). These findings apply to both self- and foreign antigens, as well as memory and naive CD4(+) T cells. The generation of such IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells requires p38/extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and IL-10 induction in DCs. We further demonstrate that immunization of nonhuman primates with antigens fused to anti-DC-ASGPR monoclonal antibody generates antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that produce IL-10 in vivo. This study provides a new strategy for the establishment of antigen-specific IL-10-producing suppressive T cells in vivo by targeting whole protein antigens to DCs via DC-ASGPR.

  19. Sialylated intravenous immunoglobulin suppress anti-ganglioside antibody mediated nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Massaad, Cynthia A; Gao, Tong; Pillai, Laila; Bogdanova, Nataliia; Ghauri, Sameera; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2016-08-01

    The precise mechanisms underlying the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in autoimmune neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are not known. Anti-ganglioside antibodies have been reported to be pathogenic in some variants of GBS, and we have developed passive transfer animal models to study anti-ganglioside antibody mediated-endoneurial inflammation and associated neuropathological effects and to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. Some studies indicate that IVIg's anti-inflammatory activity resides in a minor sialylated IVIg (sIVIg) fractions and is dependent on an innate Th2 response via binding to a specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin related 1 receptor (SIGN-R1). Therefore the efficacy of IVIg, IVIg fractions with various IgG Fc sialylation status, and the involvement of Th2 pathway were examined in one of our animal model of antibody-mediated inhibition of axonal regeneration. We demonstrate that both IVIg and sIVIg ameliorated anti-glycan antibody mediated-pathological effect, whereas, the unsialylated fractions of IVIg were not beneficial in our model. Tenfold lower doses of sIVIg compared to whole IVIg provided equivalent efficacy in our studies. Moreover, we found that whole IVIg and sIVIg significantly upregulates the gene expression of IL-33, which itself can provide protection from antibody-mediated nerve injury in our model. Our results support that the SIGN-R1-Th2 pathway is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of IVIg on endoneurium in our model and elements of this pathway including IL-33 can provide novel therapeutics in inflammatory neuropathies. PMID:27208700

  20. A Molecular Approach Designed to Limit the Replication of Mature DENV2 in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Muhsin; Zaidi, Najam Us Sahar Sadaf

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dengue virus (DENV) is an arthropod-borne virus, which belongs to the Flaviviridae family, and completes its life cycle in two hosts: humans and mosquitoes. For DENV maturation, the surface pre-membrane (prM) protein is cleaved to form a mature membrane protein (M) by furin, which is a cellular enzyme subsequently releasing the mature virus from the host dendritic cell. The objective of the current study was to inhibit mature DENV isotype 2 (DENV2) by RNA-interference in a Vero-81 cell line. Mature DENV2 was propagated in and isolated from U937 cells expressing dendritic cell-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin. Maturation of DENV2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis, where virus stock lacking prM was considered mature. Inhibition studies were carried out by transfection of Vero-81 cells with six synthetic siRNAs along with a control siRNA. Reduction in cellular DENV2 was observed also by focus-reduction assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Cells transfected with DENV2SsiRNA2, which was targeting the structural region M of mature DENV2, was able to reduce DENV2 titer by up to 85% in focus reduction assays. A significant reduction in mature DENV2 RNA load was observed by RT-qPCR, confirming the previous findings. IFA also revealed reduced levels of cellular DENV2. These results demonstrated that mature DENV2 can be effectively inhibited by synthetic siRNA targeting the structural region of the genome. Mature DENV2 can be successfully inhibited by siRNAs, and specifically high knock-down efficiency is observed by siRNAs against M region of mature DENV2. This study shows that M represents a potential target for RNAi based inhibitory approaches. PMID:26154890

  1. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; de Jong, Marein A W P; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2008-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an attractive target to prevent interactions with DCs and subsequent viral transmission. Here, we have investigated whether the structural homologue of DC-SIGN, the nematode C-type lectin Mermaid can be used to prevent HIV-1 transmission by DCs. Our data demonstrate that Mermaid interacts with high mannose structures present on HIV-1 gp120 and thereby inhibits HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN on DCs. Moreover, Mermaid inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission from DC to T cells. We have identified Mermaid as a non-cytotoxic agent that shares the glycan specificity with DC-SIGN and inhibits DC-SIGN-gp120 interaction. The results are important for the anti-HIV-1 microbicide development directed at preventing DC-HIV-1 interactions. PMID:18597806

  2. Is fucose the answer to the immunomodulatory paradox of Quillaja saponins?

    PubMed

    Marciani, Dante J

    2015-12-01

    Quillaja saponins, e.g. QS-21, are immunomodulating aldehyde-carrying triterpene glycosides, which depending on the acylation state of their single fucosyl residue (Fucp) induce either Th1/Th2 or Th2 immunity. Indeed, their changes in immunomodulation or adjuvanticity from Th1/Th2 to sole Th2 immunity, correlate with the presence of acylated and de-acylated Fucp residues, respectively. Thus, it is possible to infer that the single Fucp residue is responsible for the Th2 immunity biasing induced by de-acylated Q. saponins (QT-0101). That removal of the fucosylated oligosaccharide from de-acylated Q. saponins results once more in the induction of Th1/Th2 immunity supports the Fucp role in polarizing the response toward Th2 immunity. From structural and functional analogies with the helminths' fucosylated glycans, it is possible to infer that these saponins' Fucp must bind to the lectin DC-SIGN on dendritic cells (DC). This binding to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin that shows significant pliability in its binding interactions, must result in polarization toward Th2 while inhibiting Th1 immunity. Apparently, acylation of the Fucp by large fatty acids sterically hinders this sugar from binding to DC-SIGN, preventing a biasing to Th2 immunity. Evidently, de-acylation of Q. saponins may negatively affect vaccines requiring Th1 immunity for immune protection, particularly those against pathogens that use DC-SIGN to infect DCs and modulate Th2 immunity. However, it could be valuable in vaccines that require a sole Th2 immunity, like those against proteinopathies, e.g. Alzheimer's disease. Hence, it would valuable to elucidate the possible interactions between DC-SIGN and the QT-0101 immunomodulator. PMID:26603552

  3. Is fucose the answer to the immunomodulatory paradox of Quillaja saponins?

    PubMed

    Marciani, Dante J

    2015-12-01

    Quillaja saponins, e.g. QS-21, are immunomodulating aldehyde-carrying triterpene glycosides, which depending on the acylation state of their single fucosyl residue (Fucp) induce either Th1/Th2 or Th2 immunity. Indeed, their changes in immunomodulation or adjuvanticity from Th1/Th2 to sole Th2 immunity, correlate with the presence of acylated and de-acylated Fucp residues, respectively. Thus, it is possible to infer that the single Fucp residue is responsible for the Th2 immunity biasing induced by de-acylated Q. saponins (QT-0101). That removal of the fucosylated oligosaccharide from de-acylated Q. saponins results once more in the induction of Th1/Th2 immunity supports the Fucp role in polarizing the response toward Th2 immunity. From structural and functional analogies with the helminths' fucosylated glycans, it is possible to infer that these saponins' Fucp must bind to the lectin DC-SIGN on dendritic cells (DC). This binding to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin that shows significant pliability in its binding interactions, must result in polarization toward Th2 while inhibiting Th1 immunity. Apparently, acylation of the Fucp by large fatty acids sterically hinders this sugar from binding to DC-SIGN, preventing a biasing to Th2 immunity. Evidently, de-acylation of Q. saponins may negatively affect vaccines requiring Th1 immunity for immune protection, particularly those against pathogens that use DC-SIGN to infect DCs and modulate Th2 immunity. However, it could be valuable in vaccines that require a sole Th2 immunity, like those against proteinopathies, e.g. Alzheimer's disease. Hence, it would valuable to elucidate the possible interactions between DC-SIGN and the QT-0101 immunomodulator.

  4. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides. PMID:15308605

  5. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides.

  6. STS 130 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the Shuttle (STS-130) and International Space Station (20A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of 3 grab sample canisters (GSCs) from the Shuttle are reported in Table 1. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. The recoveries of the 3 surrogates ( 13C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene) from the 3 Shuttle GSCs averaged 96, 90, and 85 %, respectively. Based on the end-of-mission sample, the Shuttle atmosphere was acceptable for human respiration.

  7. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  8. The interaction between uPAR and vitronectin triggers ligand-independent adhesion signalling by integrins

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Schulte, Carsten; Buttiglione, Valentina; De Lorenzi, Valentina; Piontini, Andrea; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Madsen, Chris D; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a non-integrin vitronectin (VN) cell adhesion receptor linked to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid anchor. Through structure–function analyses of uPAR, VN and integrins, we document that uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to VN triggers a novel type of integrin signalling that is independent of integrin–matrix engagement. The signalling is fully active on VN mutants deficient in integrin binding site and is also efficiently transduced by integrins deficient in ligand binding. Although integrin ligation is dispensable, signalling is crucially dependent upon an active conformation of the integrin and its association with intracellular adaptors such as talin. This non-canonical integrin signalling is not restricted to uPAR as it poses no structural constraints to the receptor mediating cell attachment. In contrast to canonical integrin signalling, where integrins form direct mechanical links between the ECM and the cytoskeleton, the molecular mechanism enabling the crosstalk between non-integrin adhesion receptors and integrins is dependent upon membrane tension. This suggests that for this type of signalling, the membrane represents a critical component of the molecular clutch. PMID:25168639

  9. Alcohol-Induced miR-27a Regulates Differentiation and M2 Macrophage Polarization of Normal Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Banishree; Bruneau, Johanna C.; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of liver disease characterized by liver inflammation, fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, or liver cirrhosis. Immunomodulatory effects of alcohol on monocytes and macrophages contribute to alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol use, an independent risk factor for progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection–mediated liver disease, impairs host defense and alters cytokine production and monocyte/macrophage activation. We hypothesized that alcohol and HCV have synergistic effects on the phenotype and function of monocytes. Our data show that acute alcohol binge drinking in healthy volunteers results in increased frequency of CD16+ and CD68+ and M2-type (CD206+, dendritic cell [DC]-SIGN+–expressing and IL-10–secreting) circulating CD14+ monocytes. Expression of HCV-induced CD68 and M2 markers (CD206 and DC-SIGN) in normal monocytes was further enhanced in the presence of alcohol. The levels of microRNA (miR)-27a was significantly upregulated in monocytes cultured in the presence of alcohol or alcohol and HCV as compared with HCV alone. The functional role of miR-27a in macrophage polarization was demonstrated by transfecting monocytes with an miR-27a inhibitor that resulted in reduced alcohol- and HCV- mediated monocyte activation (CD14 and CD68 expression), polarization (CD206 and DC-SIGN expression), and IL-10 secretion. Over-expression of miR-27a in monocytes enhanced IL-10 secretion via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. We found that miR-27a promoted ERK phosphorylation by downregulating the expression of ERK inhibitor sprouty2 in monocytes. Thus, we identified that sprouty2 is a target of miR-27a in human monocytes. In summary, our study demonstrates the regulatory role of miR-27a in alcohol-induced monocyte activation and polarization. PMID:25716995

  10. Uukuniemi Phlebovirus Assembly and Secretion Leave a Functional Imprint on the Virion Glycome

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, David J.; Bitto, David; Halldorsson, Steinar; Bonomelli, Camille; Edgeworth, Matthew; Scrivens, James H.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2014-01-01

    Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) is a model system for investigating the genus Phlebovirus of the Bunyaviridae. We report the UUKV glycome, revealing differential processing of the Gn and Gc virion glycoproteins. Both glycoproteins display poly-N-acetyllactosamines, consistent with virion assembly in the medial Golgi apparatus, whereas oligomannose-type glycans required for DC-SIGN-dependent cellular attachment are predominant on Gc. Local virion structure and the route of viral egress from the cell leave a functional imprint on the phleboviral glycome. PMID:24942574

  11. The Presence of a Galactosamine Substituent on the Arabinogalactan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Abrogates Full Maturation of Human Peripheral Blood Monocyte-Derived Dendritic cells and Increases Secretion of IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, William H.; Dhouib, Rabeb; Angala, Shiva K.; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Dobos, Karen; Nigou, Jérôme; Spencer, John S.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Slow-growing and pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. are characterized by the presence of galactosamine (GalN) that modifies the interior branched arabinosyl residues of the arabinogalactan (AG) that is a major heteropolysaccharide cell wall component. The availability of null mutants of the polyprenyl-phospho-N-acetylgalactosaminyl synthase (Rv3631, PpgS) and the (N-acetyl-) galactosaminyl transferase (Rv3779) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has provided a means to elucidate the role of the GalN substituent of AG in terms of host-pathogen interactions. Comparisons of treating human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (hPMC-DCs) with wild-type, Rv3631 and Rv3779 mutant strains of Mtb revealed increased expression of DC maturation markers, decreased affinity for a soluble DC-SIGN probe, reduced IL-10 secretion and increased TLR-2-mediated NF-κB activation among GalN-deficient Mtb strains compared to GalN-producing strains. Analysis of surface expression of a panel of defined or putative DC-SIGN ligands on both WT strains or either Rv3631 or Rv3779 mutant did not show significant differences suggesting that the role of the GalN substituent of AG may be to modulate access of the bacilli to immunologically-relevant receptor domains on DCs or contribute to higher ordered pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)/pattern recognition receptor (PRR) interactions rather than the GalN-AG components having a direct immunological effect per se. PMID:26048627

  12. Generation and characterization of β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharide probes from Brucella abortus cyclic β-glucan and their recognition by C-type lectins of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongtao; Palma, Angelina S; Zhang, Yibing; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Mitchell, Daniel A; Guidolin, Leticia S; Weigel, Wilfried; Mulloy, Barbara; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2016-01-01

    The β1,2-glucans produced by bacteria are important in invasion, survival and immunomodulation in infected hosts be they mammals or plants. However, there has been a lack of information on proteins which recognize these molecules. This is partly due to the extremely limited availability of the sequence-defined oligosaccharides and derived probes for use in the study of their interactions. Here we have used the cyclic β1,2-glucan (CβG) of the bacterial pathogen Brucella abortus, after removal of succinyl side chains, to prepare linearized oligosaccharides which were used to generate microarrays. We describe optimized conditions for partial depolymerization of the cyclic glucan by acid hydrolysis and conversion of the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, with degrees of polymerization 2–13, to neoglycolipids for the purpose of generating microarrays. By microarray analyses, we show that the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGNR, like the closely related DC-SIGN we investigated earlier, binds to the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, as does the soluble immune effector serum mannose-binding protein. Exploratory studies with DC-SIGN are suggestive of the recognition also of the intact CβG by this receptor. These findings open the way to unravelling mechanisms of immunomodulation mediated by β1,2-glucans in mammalian systems. PMID:27053576

  13. Targeting the expression of integrin receptors in tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Sharon; Liang, Kexian; Dorshow, Richard B.; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel I.

    2004-06-01

    Expression of integrin αvβ3 is upregulated in a number of cancers including colon, pancreas, lung and breast. Additionally, αvβ3 integrin expression has been linked to tumor metastasis and targeting this cell surface protein could provide a viable approach to image and evaluate the metastatic potential of tumors. Accordingly, we evaluated the selective retention of some near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes in nude mice bearing A549 lung cancer xenograft that express αvβ3 integrin. Our preliminary results indicate that a novel NIR probe designed to target this integrin selectively accumulated in A549 tumor while other non-integrin specific probes were not retained in the tumor. Blocking studies show that tumor uptake of the probe is mediated by αvβ3 integrin receptor.

  14. A sea urchin lectin, SUL-1, from the Toxopneustid sea urchin induces DC maturation from human monocyte and drives Th1 polarization in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Masao . E-mail: mtakei@fz-borstel.de; Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2006-05-15

    The sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus belonging to the family Toxopneustidae, they have well-developed globiferous pedicellariae with pharmacologically active substances. We have purified a novel sea urchin lectin-1 (SUL-1) from the large globiferous pedicellariae of T. pileolus. Dendritic cells (DC) are professional APC and play a pivotal role in controlling immune responses. This study investigated whether SUL-1 can drive DC maturation from human immature monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Human monocytes were cultured with GM-CSF and IL-4 for 6 days followed by another 1 day in the presence of SUL-1 or LPS. DC harvested on day 7 were examined using functional assays. The expression levels of CD1a, CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR as expressed by mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) on DC differentiated from immature DC after culture with 1.0 {mu}g/ml of SUL-1 for 1 day were enhanced and decreased endocytic activity. SUL-1-treated DC also displayed enhanced T cell stimulatory capacity in an MLR, as measured by T cell proliferation. Cell surface expression of CD80, CD83 and CD86 on SUL-1-treated DC was inhibited by anti-DC-SIGN mAb, while anti-DC-SIGN mAb had no influence on allogeneic T cell proliferation by SUL-1-treated DC. DC differentiated with SUL-1 induced the differentiation of naive T cell towards a helper T cell type 1 (Th1) response at DC/T (1:5) cells ratio depending on IL-12 secretion. In CTL assay, the production of IFN-{gamma} and {sup 51}Cr release on SUL-1-treated DC were more augmented than of immature DC or LPS-treated DC. SUL-1-treated DC expressed CCR7 and had a high migration to MIP-3{beta}. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in SUL-1-treated DC was also induced by MIP-3{beta}. These results suggest that SUL-1 bindings to DC-SIGN on surface of immature DC may lead to differentiate DC from immature DC. Moreover, it suggests that SUL-1 may be used on DC-based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22529868

  16. Measuring antibody neutralization of dengue virus (DENV) using a flow cytometry-based technique.

    PubMed

    de Alwis, Ruklanthi; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an emerging virus that threatens over two-third of the world's population. The specific diagnosis of dengue infection by serology is based on assays that detect DENV-specific antibodies including neutralizing antibodies (Abs). Neutralizing Abs are an important, if not the main, mechanism of protection from natural dengue virus (DENV) infection as well. The current gold-standard assay for measuring neutralizing Ab responses against DENV is the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT). However, this assay is slow and laborious and utilizes physiologically irrelevant cell lines. Here, we describe a relatively high-throughput, flow cytometry-based neutralization assay for DENV that has been optimized for use with a human monocytic suspension cell line, U937 + DC-SIGN, or the more commonly used adherent monkey kidney cells, Vero-81. PMID:24696329

  17. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Michelle; Graus, Matthew; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith; Thompson, Nancy; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (~80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to four hours. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150-175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal nanodomain structure, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of < 30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen.

  18. Frequency of SNP -336A/G in the promoter region of CD209 in a population from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, P N; Ferreira-Fernandes, H; de Oliveira, J S; Pereira, A C T C; Pinto, G R; Ferreira, G P

    2015-08-14

    Dendritic cells (DCs) mediate the initiation of the immune response against a variety of pathogens. The DC-SIGN receptor is encoded by the gene CD209 and is expressed on the surface of DCs. It binds to mannose-rich carbohydrates and enables the recognition of bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. SNP -336A/G in the promoter region of CD209 influences the expression of the DC-SIGN receptor. Several studies have associated this SNP with an increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and the development of more severe forms of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of SNP -336A/G in a population from northeastern Brazil. We analyzed 181 individuals from the general population of Parnaíba, Piauí, Brazil, of which 37% were men and 63% were women. SNP -336A/G was detected by polymerase chain reaction and treatment with the restriction enzyme MscI and visualized by electrophoresis on an 8% polyacrylamide gel stained with silver nitrate. Of the individuals analyzed, 116 (64.1%) were homozygous AA, 57 (31.5%) were heterozygous (AG), and 8 (4.4%) were homozygous GG. The allele frequency of -336G was 20.2%. Genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the frequency of the CD209 SNP -336A/G in a population in the State of Piauí. Further studies are needed to determine the relationship between this SNP and the vulnerability of this population to major infectious diseases.

  19. Identification of OmpA-Like Protein of Tannerella forsythia as an O-Linked Glycoprotein and Its Binding Capability to Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Toshi; Inomata, Megumi; Into, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins are associated with physiological and pathogenic functions of bacteria. It remains unclear whether bacterial glycoproteins can bind to specific classes of lectins expressed on host cells. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative oral anaerobe that contributes to the development of periodontitis. In this study, we aimed to find lectin-binding glycoproteins in T. forsythia. We performed affinity chromatography of wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and sialic acid (Sia), and identified OmpA-like protein as the glycoprotein that has the highest affinity. Mass spectrometry revealed that OmpA-like protein contains O-type N-acetylhexosamine and hexose. Fluorometry quantitatively showed that OmpA-like protein contains Sia. OmpA-like protein was found to bind to lectins including E-selectin, P-selectin, L-selectin, Siglec-5, Siglec-9, Siglec-10, and DC-SIGN. The binding of OmpA-like protein to these lectins, except for the Siglecs, depends on the presence of calcium. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc), which is the most abundant Sia, inhibited the binding of OmpA-like protein to all of these lectins, whereas GlcNAc and mannose only inhibited the binding to DC-SIGN. We further found that T. forsythia adhered to human oral epithelial cells, which express E-selectin and P-selectin, and that this adhesion was inhibited by addition of NeuAc. Moreover, adhesion of an OmpA-like protein-deficient T. forsythia strain to the cells was reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain. Our findings indicate that OmpA-like protein of T. forsythia contains O-linked sugar chains that can mediate interactions with specific lectins. This interaction is suggested to facilitate adhesion of T. forsythia to the surface of host cells. PMID:27711121

  20. Lewis Lung Cancer Cells Promote SIGNR1(CD209b)-Mediated Macrophages Polarization Induced by IL-4 to Facilitate Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaolong; Li, Wenhai; Pan, Lei; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Chen, Min; Mu, Deguang

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages are a prominent component of lung cancer and contribute to tumor progression by facilitating the immune evasion of cancer cells. DC-SIGN (CD209) assists in the immune evasion of a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplasms by inhibiting the maturation of DCs and subsequent cytokines production. However, the expression of DC-SIGN in macrophages and its role in mediating immune evasion in lung cancer and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Our study aimed to identify the immunosuppressive role of SIGNR1 in murine macrophage differentiation and lung cancer progression. We found that SIGNR1-positive RAW264.7 macrophages were enriched in mixed cultures with Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) (ratio of RAW 264.7 to LLC being 1:1) after stimulation with IL-4. Moreover, LLC-educated macrophages exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-10 but lower IL-12 in response to IL-4 treatment as determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. However, inhibition of SIGNR1 markedly hampered the production of IL-10, indicating that SIGNR1 was indispensable for IL-4+LLC induced macrophage polarization towards the M2 subtype. Furthermore, polarized M2 cells immersed in a tumor microenvironment promoted the migration of LLCs, as measured by transwell assays, but migration was suppressed after blockade of SIGNR1 using CD209b antibody. In addition, IL-4+LLC-educated macrophages reduced the proliferation of the activated T cells and reduced IFN-γ-mediated Th1 response in T cells, while SIGNR1 inhibition rescued Th1 cell functions. In conclusion, murine SIGNR1 expressed in LLC-educated macrophages appears to mediate IL-4-induced RAW264.7 macrophage polarization and thus facilitate lung cancer evasion.

  1. Probiotic Gut Microbiota Isolate Interacts with Dendritic Cells via Glycosylated Heterotrimeric Pili

    PubMed Central

    Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; van Teijlingen, Nienke H.; Sullan, Ruby May A.; Douillard, François P.; Rasinkangas, Pia; Messing, Marcel; Reunanen, Justus; Satokari, Reetta; Vanderleyden, Jos; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; de Vos, Willem M.; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of the microbial molecules underlying microbiota-host interactions is key to understand how microbiota preserve mucosal homeostasis. A pivotal family of such bacterial molecules are pili. Pili are proteinaceous cell wall appendages with a well-documented role in adhesion, whilst their role in immune interaction with the host is less established. Gram-positive pili are often posttranslationally modified by sortase-specific cleavage reactions and the formation of intramolecular peptide bonds. Here we report glycosylation as a new level of posttranslational modification of sortase-dependent pili of a beneficial microbiota species and its role in immune modulation. We focused on the SpaCBA pili of the model probiotic and beneficial human gut microbiota isolate Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. A unique combination of molecular techniques, nanoscale mechanical and immunological approaches led to the identification of mannose and fucose residues on the SpaCBA pili. These glycans on the pili are recognized by human dendritic cells via the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN, a key carbohydrate-dependent immune tailoring pattern recognition receptor. This specific lectin-sugar interaction is moreover of functional importance and modulated the cytokine response of dendritic cells. This provides insight into the direct role bacterial glycoproteins can play in the immunomodulation of the host. Modification of the complex heterotrimeric pili of a model probiotic and microbiota isolate with mannose and fucose is of importance for the functional interaction with the host immune lectin receptor DC-SIGN on human dendritic cells. Our findings shed light on the yet underappreciated role of glycoconjugates in bacteria-host interactions. PMID:26985831

  2. Super-resolution imaging of C-type lectin spatial rearrangement within the dendritic cell plasma membrane at fungal microbe contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Itano, Michelle S.; Graus, Matthew S.; Pehlke, Carolyn; Wester, Michael J.; Liu, Ping; Lidke, Keith A.; Thompson, Nancy L.; Jacobson, Ken; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells express DC-SIGN and CD206, C-type lectins (CTLs) that bind a variety of pathogens and may facilitate pathogen uptake for subsequent antigen presentation. Both proteins form punctate membrane nanodomains (∼80 nm) on naïve cells. We analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution of CTLs following host-fungal particle contact using confocal microscopy and three distinct methods of cluster identification and measurement of receptor clusters in super-resolution datasets: DBSCAN, Pair Correlation and a custom implementation of the Getis spatial statistic. Quantitative analysis of confocal and super-resolution images demonstrated that CTL nanodomains become concentrated in the contact site relative to non-contact membrane after the first hour of exposure and established that this recruitment is sustained out to 4 h. DC-SIGN nanodomains in fungal contact sites exhibit a 70% area increase and a 38% decrease in interdomain separation. Contact site CD206 nanodomains possess 90% greater area and 42% lower interdomain separation relative to non-contact regions. Contact site CTL clusters appear as disk-shaped domains of approximately 150–175 nm in diameter. The increase in length scale of CTL nanostructure in contact sites suggests that the smaller nanodomains on resting membranes may merge during fungal recognition, or that they become packed closely enough to achieve sub-resolution inter-domain edge separations of <30 nm. This study provides evidence of local receptor spatial rearrangements on the nanoscale that occur in the plasma membrane upon pathogen binding and may direct important signaling interactions required to recognize and respond to the presence of a relatively large pathogen. PMID:25506589

  3. A phenyl-thiadiazolylidene-amine derivative ejects zinc from retroviral nucleocapsid zinc fingers and inactivates HIV virions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sexual acquisition of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through mucosal transmission may be prevented by using topically applied agents that block HIV transmission from one individual to another. Therefore, virucidal agents that inactivate HIV virions may be used as a component in topical microbicides. Results Here, we have identified 2-methyl-3-phenyl-2H-[1,2,4]thiadiazol-5-ylideneamine (WDO-217) as a low-molecular-weight molecule that inactivates HIV particles. Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 virions pretreated with this compound were unable to infect permissive cells. Moreover, WDO-217 was able to inhibit infections of a wide spectrum of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1, including clinical isolates, HIV-2 and SIV strains. Whereas the capture of virus by DC-SIGN was unaffected by the compound, it efficiently prevented the transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virus to CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Interestingly, exposure of virions to WDO-217 reduced the amount of virion-associated genomic RNA as measured by real-time RT-qPCR. Further mechanism-of-action studies demonstrated that WDO-217 efficiently ejects zinc from the zinc fingers of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein NCp7 and inhibits the cTAR destabilization properties of this protein. Importantly, WDO-217 was able to eject zinc from both zinc fingers, even when NCp7 was bound to oligonucleotides, while no covalent interaction between NCp7 and WDO-217 could be observed. Conclusion This compound is a new lead structure that can be used for the development of a new series of NCp7 zinc ejectors as candidate topical microbicide agents. PMID:23146561

  4. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  5. INS-1 cell glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is reduced by the downregulation of the 67 kDa laminin receptor.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Georges; Dubiel, Evan A; Kuehn, Carina; Khalfaoui, Taoufik; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Vermette, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Understanding β cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions can advance our knowledge of the mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and improve culture methods used in islet transplantation for the treatment of diabetes. Laminin is the main constituent of the basement membrane and is involved in pancreatic β cell survival and function, even enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Most of the studies on cell responses towards laminin have focused on integrin-mediated interactions, while much less attention has been paid on non-integrin receptors, such as the 67 kDa laminin receptor (67LR). The specificity of the receptor-ligand interaction through the adhesion of INS-1 cells (a rat insulinoma cell line) to CDPGYIGSR-, GRGDSPC- or CDPGYIGSR + GRGDSPC-covered surfaces was evaluated. Also, the effects of the 67LR knocking down over glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were investigated. Culture of the INS-1 cells on the bioactive surfaces was improved compared to the low-fouling carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) surfaces, while downregulation of the 67LR resulted in reduced cell adhesion to surfaces bearing the CDPGYIGSR peptide. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was hindered by downregulation of the 67LR, regardless of the biological motif available on the biomimetic surfaces on which the cells were cultured. This finding illustrates the importance of the 67LR in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and points to a possible role of the 67LR in the mechanisms of insulin secretion.

  6. CD44 and beta3 integrin organize two functionally distinct actin-based domains in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Chabadel, Anne; Bañon-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Cluet, David; Rudkin, Brian B; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard; Genot, Elisabeth; Jurdic, Pierre; Anton, Ines M; Saltel, Frédéric

    2007-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton of mature osteoclasts (OCs) adhering to nonmineralized substrates is organized in a belt of podosomes reminiscent of the sealing zone (SZ) found in bone resorbing OCs. In this study, we demonstrate that the belt is composed of two functionally different actin-based domains: podosome cores linked with CD44, which are involved in cell adhesion, and a diffuse cloud associated with beta3 integrin, which is involved in cell adhesion and contraction. Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASp) Interacting Protein (WIP)-/- OCs were devoid of podosomes, but they still exhibited actin clouds. Indeed, WIP-/- OCs show diminished expression of WASp, which is required for podosome formation. CD44 is a novel marker of OC podosome cores and the first nonintegrin receptor detected in these structures. The importance of CD44 is revealed by showing that its clustering restores podosome cores and WASp expression in WIP-/- OCs. However, although CD44 signals are sufficient to form a SZ, the presence of WIP is indispensable for the formation of a fully functional SZ.

  7. Versican and the Control of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Thomas N.; Kang, Inkyung; Merrilees, Mervyn J.

    2014-01-01

    Versican is an extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycan that interacts with cells by binding to non-integrin and integrin receptors and to other ECM components that associate with the cell surface. Recent studies have shown also that versican interacts with myeloid and lymphoid cells promoting their adhesion and production of inflammatory cytokines. Versican is produced by stromal cells, as well as leukocytes, and is markedly increased in inflammation. Inflammatory agonists, such as double-stranded RNA mimetics (e.g., poly I:C), stimulate stromal cells, such as smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, to produce fibrillar ECMs enriched in versican and hyaluronan (HA) that interact with leukocytes promoting their adhesion. Interference with the incorporation of versican into this ECM blocks monocyte adhesion and dampens the inflammatory response. Tumor cells also express elevated levels of versican which interact with myeloid cells to promote an inflammatory response, through stimulating cytokine release, and metastasis. In addition, myeloid cells, such as macrophages in tumors, synthesize versican which affects tumor cell phenotypes, inflammation, and subsequent metastasis. Versican, by binding to hyaluronan, influences T lymphocyte phenotypes and in part controls the ability of these cells to synthesize and secrete cytokines that influence the immune response. Collectively, these studies indicate that versican as an ECM molecule plays a central role in inflammation and as a result it is emerging as a potential target promising wide therapeutic benefits. PMID:24513039

  8. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  9. Extracellular Matrix Proteins in Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Hynes, Richard O.

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion and aggregation of platelets during hemostasis and thrombosis represents one of the best-understood examples of cell–matrix adhesion. Platelets are exposed to a wide variety of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins once blood vessels are damaged and basement membranes and interstitial ECM are exposed. Platelet adhesion to these ECM proteins involves ECM receptors familiar in other contexts, such as integrins. The major platelet-specific integrin, αIIbβ3, is the best-understood ECM receptor and exhibits the most tightly regulated switch between inactive and active states. Once activated, αIIbβ3 binds many different ECM proteins, including fibrinogen, its major ligand. In addition to αIIbβ3, there are other integrins expressed at lower levels on platelets and responsible for adhesion to additional ECM proteins. There are also some important nonintegrin ECM receptors, GPIb-V-IX and GPVI, which are specific to platelets. These receptors play major roles in platelet adhesion and in the activation of the integrins and of other platelet responses, such as cytoskeletal organization and exocytosis of additional ECM ligands and autoactivators of the platelets. PMID:21937733

  10. An autopsy case of pneumococcal Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome with possible functional asplenia/hyposplenia

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Yukiko; Chiba, Takashi; Ohtani, Maki; Ishizawa, Shin; Nishida, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of rapid progressive Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (WFS) associated with Streptococcus pneumonia infection in a previously healthy man. Although he once visited a hospital about 6 hours before death, the both physical and serological examination did not show any sign of overwhelming infection. Autopsy showed massive adrenal hemorrhage without inflammation, and showed proliferation of gram positive cocci and microthrombosis in the vessels of many organs. The pathological change of respiratory tract was extremely minimal. Size and weight of the spleen possible decreased than normal. However, histological examination showed that obscuration of germinal center and decreasing the immunological cells of mantle and marginal zone. Immunohisitochemically, marked decreasing the marginal zone macrophages, which are positive for specific intercellular adhesion molecule grabbing nonintegrin receptor-1 (SIGN-R1) and macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), were decreased comparing with age-matched control case. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using each DNA, extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimen (FFPE) samples of lung, adrenal gland, heart, spleen, and kidney showed positive the ply gene and the lytA gene specific for Streptococcus pneumonia. Present case showed possible acquired atrophy of spleen, especially decreasing marginal zone macrophage may correlate with rapid progression of sepsis of Streptococcus pneumonia with massive adrenal hemorrhage. In addition, present case showed the usefulness of PCR using FFPE for the postmortem diagnosis of WFS. PMID:26261663

  11. An investigation into IgE-facilitated allergen recognition and presentation by human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergen recognition by dendritic cells (DCs) is a key event in the allergic cascade leading to production of IgE antibodies. C-type lectins, such as the mannose receptor and DC-SIGN, were recently shown to play an important role in the uptake of the house dust mite glycoallergen Der p 1 by DCs. In addition to mannose receptor (MR) and DC-SIGN the high and low affinity IgE receptors, namely FcϵRI and FcϵRII (CD23), respectively, have been shown to be involved in allergen uptake and presentation by DCs. Objectives This study aims at understanding the extent to which IgE- and IgG-facilitated Der p 1 uptake by DCs influence T cell polarisation and in particular potential bias in favour of Th2. We have addressed this issue by using two chimaeric monoclonal antibodies produced in our laboratory and directed against a previously defined epitope on Der p 1, namely human IgE 2C7 and IgG1 2C7. Results Flow cytometry was used to establish the expression patterns of IgE (FcϵRI and FcϵRII) and IgG (FcγRI) receptors in relation to MR on DCs. The impact of FcϵRI, FcϵRII, FcγRI and mannose receptor mediated allergen uptake on Th1/Th2 cell differentiation was investigated using DC/T cell co-culture experiments. Myeloid DCs showed high levels of FcϵRI and FcγRI expression, but low levels of CD23 and MR, and this has therefore enabled us to assess the role of IgE and IgG-facilitated allergen presentation in T cell polarisation with minimal interference by CD23 and MR. Our data demonstrate that DCs that have taken up Der p 1 via surface IgE support a Th2 response. However, no such effect was demonstrable via surface IgG. Conclusions IgE bound to its high affinity receptor plays an important role in Der p 1 uptake and processing by peripheral blood DCs and in Th2 polarisation of T cells. PMID:24330349

  12. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC-SIGN

  13. LOS oligosaccharide modification enhances dendritic cell responses to meningococcal native outer membrane vesicles expressing a non-toxic lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hannah E; Copland, Alastair; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Cohen, Jonathan; Brown, Jeremy; Klein, Nigel; van der Ley, Peter; Dixon, Garth

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are released by many bacteria, and contain immunogenic antigens in addition to harmful inflammatory factors, like lipopolysaccharides. Chemically detoxified OMV have been used in vaccines against Neisseria meningitidis (Nm); however, little is known about their interaction with antigen presenting cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of Nm OMV with human dendritic cells (DC) to gain further understanding of their biological activity. We engineered a novel serogroup B Nm that is unencapsulated (siaD), expresses pentacylated lipid A (lpxL1), hence conferring reduced toxicity, and expresses an lgtB oligosaccharide structure designed to target OMV to DC via DC-SIGN. We show that the lgtB moiety is critical for internalization of NOMV by DC. Furthermore, the lgtB moiety significantly enhances DC maturation, IL-10 and IL-23 production in the presence of a pentacylated lipid A. While different DC phenotypes were observed for each NOMV, this had little effect on Th1 and Th2 cell differentiation; however, lgtBsignificantly increased Th17 cell expansion in the presence of pentacylated lipid A. We believe that lpxL1/lgtB NOMV should be considered further as a vaccine vector, particularly considering the importance of lgtB in antigen uptake and further human studies on antigen-specific responses should be considered. PMID:24152255

  14. Role of Dendritic Cells in the Pathogenesis of Whipple's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schinnerling, Katina; Geelhaar-Karsch, Anika; Allers, Kristina; Friebel, Julian; Conrad, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Kühl, Anja A.; Erben, Ulrike; Ignatius, Ralf; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Tropheryma whipplei-stuffed macrophages in the duodenum, impaired T. whipplei-specific Th1 responses, and weak secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12) are hallmarks of classical Whipple's disease (CWD). This study addresses dendritic cell (DC) functionality during CWD. We documented composition, distribution, and functionality of DC ex vivo or after in vitro maturation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and by immunohistochemistry in situ. A decrease in peripheral DC of untreated CWD patients compared to healthy donors was due to reduced CD11chigh myeloid DC (M-DC). Decreased maturation markers CD83, CD86, and CCR7, as well as low IL-12 production in response to stimulation, disclosed an immature M-DC phenotype. In vitro-generated monocyte-derived DC from CWD patients showed normal maturation and T cell-stimulatory capacity under proinflammatory conditions but produced less IL-12 and failed to activate T. whipplei-specific Th1 cells. In duodenal and lymphoid tissues, T. whipplei was found within immature DC-SIGN+ DC. DC and proliferating lymphocytes were reduced in lymph nodes of CWD patients compared to levels in controls. Our results indicate that dysfunctional IL-12 production by DC provides suboptimal conditions for priming of T. whipplei-specific T cells during CWD and that immature DC carrying T. whipplei contribute to the dissemination of the bacterium. PMID:25385798

  15. Computational and Experimental Prediction of Human C-Type Lectin Receptor Druggability

    PubMed Central

    Aretz, Jonas; Wamhoff, Eike-Christian; Hanske, Jonas; Heymann, Dario; Rademacher, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian C-type lectin receptors (CTLRS) are involved in many aspects of immune cell regulation such as pathogen recognition, clearance of apoptotic bodies, and lymphocyte homing. Despite a great interest in modulating CTLR recognition of carbohydrates, the number of specific molecular probes is limited. To this end, we predicted the druggability of a panel of 22 CTLRs using DoGSiteScorer. The computed druggability scores of most structures were low, characterizing this family as either challenging or even undruggable. To further explore these findings, we employed a fluorine-based nuclear magnetic resonance screening of fragment mixtures against DC-SIGN, a receptor of pharmacological interest. To our surprise, we found many fragment hits associated with the carbohydrate recognition site (hit rate = 13.5%). A surface plasmon resonance-based follow-up assay confirmed 18 of these fragments (47%) and equilibrium dissociation constants were determined. Encouraged by these findings we expanded our experimental druggability prediction to Langerin and MCL and found medium to high hit rates as well, being 15.7 and 10.0%, respectively. Our results highlight limitations of current in silico approaches to druggability assessment, in particular, with regard to carbohydrate-binding proteins. In sum, our data indicate that small molecule ligands for a larger panel of CTLRs can be developed. PMID:25071783

  16. Selective Susceptibility of Human Skin Antigen Presenting Cells to Productive Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, Daniela; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Shin, Amanda; Bigliardi, Paul; Tan, Bien Keem; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Tan, Ern Yu; Ginhoux, Florent; Fink, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14+ and CD1c+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response. PMID:25474532

  17. Gold manno-glyconanoparticles for intervening in HIV gp120 carbohydrate-mediated processes.

    PubMed

    Di Gianvincenzo, Paolo; Chiodo, Fabrizio; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2012-01-01

    After nearly three decades since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (1983), no effective vaccine or microbicide is available, and the virus continues to infect millions of people worldwide each year. HIV antiretroviral drugs reduce the death rate and improve the quality of life in infected patients, but they are not able to completely remove HIV from the body. The glycoprotein gp120, part of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) of HIV, is responsible for virus entry and infection of host cells. High-mannose type glycans that decorate gp120 are involved in different carbohydrate-mediated HIV binding. We have demonstrated that oligomannoside-coated gold nanoparticles (manno-GNPs) are able to interfere with HIV high-mannose glycan-mediated processes. In this chapter, we describe the methods for the preparation and characterization of manno-GNPs and the experiments performed by means of SPR and STD-NMR techniques to evaluate the ability of manno-GNPs to inhibit 2G12 antibody binding to gp120. The antibody 2G12-mediated HIV neutralization and the lectin DC-SIGN-mediated HIV trans-infection in cellular systems are also described.

  18. Dendritic Cells from HIV Controllers Have Low Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection In Vitro but High Capacity to Capture HIV-1 Particles.

    PubMed

    Hamimi, Chiraz; David, Annie; Versmisse, Pierre; Weiss, Laurence; Bruel, Timothée; Zucman, David; Appay, Victor; Moris, Arnaud; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noëlle; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2016-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs), rare HIV-1 infected individuals able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, are characterized by an efficient polyfunctional and cytolytic HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The mechanisms underlying the induction and maintenance of such response in many HICs despite controlled viremia are not clear. Dendritic cells play a crucial role in the generation and reactivation of T cell responses but scarce information is available on those cells in HICs. We found that monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from HICs are less permissive to HIV-1 infection than cells from healthy donors. In contrast MDDCs from HICs are particularly efficient at capturing HIV-1 particles when compared to cells from healthy donors or HIV-1 patients with suppressed viral load on antiretroviral treatment. MDDCs from HICs expressed on their surface high levels of syndecan-3, DC-SIGN and MMR, which could cooperate to facilitate HIV-1 capture. The combination of low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection but enhanced capacity to capture particles might allow MDDCs from HICs to preserve their function from the deleterious effect of infection while facilitating induction of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells by cross-presentation in a context of low viremia. PMID:27505169

  19. Essential Role of Dengue Virus Envelope Protein N Glycosylation at Asparagine-67 during Viral Propagation▿

    PubMed Central

    Mondotte, Juan A.; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Amara, Ali; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2007-01-01

    Dengue virus envelope protein (E) contains two N-linked glycosylation sites, at Asn-67 and Asn-153. The glycosylation site at position 153 is conserved in most flaviviruses, while the site at position 67 is thought to be unique for dengue viruses. N-linked oligosaccharide side chains on flavivirus E proteins have been associated with viral morphogenesis, infectivity, and tropism. Here, we examined the relevance of each N-linked glycan on dengue virus E protein by removing each site in the context of infectious viral particles. Dengue viruses lacking Asn-67 were able to infect mammalian cells and translate and replicate the viral genome, but production of new infectious particles was abolished. In addition, dengue viruses lacking Asn-153 in the E showed reduced infectivity. In contrast, ablation of one or both glycosylation sites yielded viruses that replicate and propagate in mosquito cells. Furthermore, we found a differential requirement of N-linked glycans for E secretion in mammalian and mosquito cells. While secretion of E lacking Asn-67 was efficient in mosquito cells, secretion of the same protein expressed in mammalian cells was dramatically impaired. Finally, we found that viruses lacking the carbohydrate at position 67 showed reduced infection of immature dendritic cells, suggesting interaction between this glycan and the lectin DC-SIGN. Overall, our data defined different roles for the two glycans present at the E protein during dengue virus infection, highlighting the involvement of distinct host functions from mammalian and mosquito cells during dengue virus propagation. PMID:17459925

  20. Autoantibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens in metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Martin; Taylor, Samuel; Shaffer, James

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-established effector functions of IgGs, including direct cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, some populations of IgGs may exert anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we describe a population of antibodies that form in the natural course of metastatic cancer and contain glycans that terminate with sialic acid. We demonstrate that both the titer of these antibodies and their level of sialylation are relatively stable throughout the progression of metastatic melanoma. The sialylation pattern of these antibodies somehow correlates with their specificity for tumor-associated antigens, as IgGs targeting several antigens associated with infectious agents are relatively poor of sialic acid. We also show that some antibodies targeting the melanoma-associated antigen NY-ESO-1 bind to the human C-type lectin CD209 (DC-SIGN). We propose that these antibodies are candidate anti-inflammatory antibodies. The presence of anti-inflammatory antibodies in cancer patients may explain, at least in part, why tumors persist and spread in the host despite strong tumor-specific humoral responses. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the induction of anti-inflammatory antibodies specific for tumor-associated antigens and their function may yield important insights into how tumors evade immune detection and progress. PMID:23894724

  1. Dendritic Cells from HIV Controllers Have Low Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection In Vitro but High Capacity to Capture HIV-1 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Hamimi, Chiraz; David, Annie; Versmisse, Pierre; Weiss, Laurence; Bruel, Timothée; Zucman, David; Appay, Victor; Moris, Arnaud; Ungeheuer, Marie-Noëlle; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Boufassa, Faroudy; Lambotte, Olivier; Pancino, Gianfranco; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2016-01-01

    HIV controllers (HICs), rare HIV-1 infected individuals able to control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy, are characterized by an efficient polyfunctional and cytolytic HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response. The mechanisms underlying the induction and maintenance of such response in many HICs despite controlled viremia are not clear. Dendritic cells play a crucial role in the generation and reactivation of T cell responses but scarce information is available on those cells in HICs. We found that monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from HICs are less permissive to HIV-1 infection than cells from healthy donors. In contrast MDDCs from HICs are particularly efficient at capturing HIV-1 particles when compared to cells from healthy donors or HIV-1 patients with suppressed viral load on antiretroviral treatment. MDDCs from HICs expressed on their surface high levels of syndecan-3, DC-SIGN and MMR, which could cooperate to facilitate HIV-1 capture. The combination of low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection but enhanced capacity to capture particles might allow MDDCs from HICs to preserve their function from the deleterious effect of infection while facilitating induction of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells by cross-presentation in a context of low viremia. PMID:27505169

  2. HCV RNA Activates APCs via TLR7/TLR8 While Virus Selectively Stimulates Macrophages Without Inducing Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; El-Far, Mohamed; Dupuy, Franck P.; Abdel-Hakeem, Mohamed S.; He, Zhong; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Shi, Yu; Haddad, Elias K.; Ancuta, Petronela; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Said, Elias A.

    2016-01-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems fail to control HCV infection in the majority of infected individuals. HCV is an ssRNA virus, which suggests a role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 in initiating the anti-viral response. Here we demonstrate that HCV genomic RNA harbours specific sequences that initiate an anti-HCV immune response through TLR7 and TLR8 in various antigen presenting cells. Conversely, HCV particles are detected by macrophages, but not by monocytes and DCs, through a TLR7/8 dependent mechanism; this leads to chloroquine sensitive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, while the antiviral type I Interferon response is not triggered in these cells. Antibodies to DC-SIGN, a c-type lectin selectively expressed by macrophages but not pDCs or mDCs, block the production of cytokines. Novel anti-HCV vaccination strategies should target the induction of TLR7/8 stimulation in APCs in order to establish potent immune responses against HCV. PMID:27385120

  3. Scavenger Receptor C-Type Lectin Binds to the Leukocyte Cell Surface Glycan Lewis By a Novel Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Taylor, M.E.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-10

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is unique in the family of class A scavenger receptors, because in addition to binding sites for oxidized lipoproteins it also contains a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) that interacts with specific glycans. Both human and mouse SRCL are highly specific for the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, which is commonly found on the surfaces of leukocytes and some tumor cells. Structural analysis of the CRD of mouse SRCL in complex with Lewis(x) and mutagenesis show the basis for this specificity. The interaction between mouse SRCL and Lewis(x) is analogous to the way that selectins and DC-SIGN bind to related fucosylated glycans, but the mechanism of the interaction is novel, because it is based on a primary galactose-binding site similar to the binding site in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Crystals of the human receptor lacking bound calcium ions reveal an alternative conformation in which a glycan ligand would be released during receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  4. Abundant expression of HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in the foreskin tissue of young Kenyan men.

    PubMed

    Hirbod, Taha; Bailey, Robert C; Agot, Kawango; Moses, Stephen; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah; Murugu, Ruth; Andersson, Jan; Nilsson, Jakob; Broliden, Kristina

    2010-06-01

    A biological explanation for the reduction in HIV-1 (HIV) acquisition after male circumcision may be that removal of the foreskin reduces the number of target cells for HIV. The expression of potential HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in foreskin tissue of men at risk of HIV infection were thus analyzed. Thirty-three foreskin tissue samples, stratified by Herpes simplex virus type 2 status, were obtained from a randomized, controlled trial conducted in Kenya. The samples were analyzed by confocal in situ imaging microscopy and mRNA quantification by quantitative RT-qPCR. The presence and location of T cells (CD3(+)CD4(+)), Langerhans cells (CD1a(+)Langerin/CD207(+)), macrophages (CD68(+) or CD14(+)), and submucosal dendritic cells (CD123(+)BDCA-2(+) or CD11c(+)DC-SIGN(+)) were defined. C-type lectin receptor expressing cells were detected in both the epithelium and submucosa, and distinct lymphoid aggregates densely populated with CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells were identified in the submucosa. Although the presence of lymphoid aggregates and mRNA expression of selected markers varied between study subjects, Herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus was not the major determinant for the detected differences. The detection of abundant and superficially present potential HIV target cells and submucosal lymphoid aggregates in foreskin mucosa from a highly relevant HIV risk group demonstrate a possible anatomical explanation that may contribute to the protective effect of male circumcision on HIV transmission. PMID:20395432

  5. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  6. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  7. Case of Yellow Fever Vaccine–Associated Viscerotropic Disease with Prolonged Viremia, Robust Adaptive Immune Responses, and Polymorphisms in CCR5 and RANTES Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pulendran, Bali; Miller, Joseph; Querec, Troy D.; Akondy, Rama; Moseley, Nelson; Laur, Oscar; Glidewell, John; Monson, Nathan; Zhu, Tuofu; Zhu, Haiying; Staprans, Sylvija; Lee, David; Brinton, Margo A.; Perelygin, Andrey A.; Vellozzi, Claudia; Brachman, Philip; Lalor, Susan; Teuwen, Dirk; Eidex, Rachel B.; Cetron, Marty; Priddy, Frances; del Rio, Carlos; Altman, John; Ahmed, Rafi

    2013-01-01

    Background The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine 17D (YF-17D) is one of the most effective vaccines. Despite its excellent safety record, some cases of viscerotropic adverse events develop, which are sometimes fatal. The mechanisms underlying such events remain a mystery. Here, we present an analysis of the immunologic and genetic factors driving disease in a 64-year-old male who developed viscerotropic symptoms. Methods We obtained clinical, serologic, virologic, immunologic and genetic data on this case patient. Results Viral RNA was detected in the blood 33 days after vaccination, in contrast to the expected clearance of virus by day 7 after vaccination in healthy vaccinees. Vaccination induced robust antigen-specific T and B cell responses, which suggested that persistent virus was not due to adaptive immunity of suboptimal magnitude. The genes encoding OAS1, OAS2, TLR3, and DC-SIGN, which mediate antiviral innate immunity, were wild type. However, there were heterozygous genetic polymorphisms in chemokine receptor CCR5, and its ligand RANTES, which influence the migration of effector T cells and CD14+CD16bright monocytes to tissues. Consistent with this, there was a 200-fold increase in the number of CD14+CD16bright monocytes in the blood during viremia and even several months after virus clearance. Conclusion; In this patient, viscerotropic disease was not due to the impaired magnitude of adaptive immunity but instead to anomalies in the innate immune system and a possible disruption of the CCR5-RANTES axis. PMID:18598196

  8. Molecular identification of Salp15, a key salivary gland protein in the transmission of lyme disease spirochetes, from Ixodes persulcatus and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Hojgaard, Andrias; Biketov, Sergey F; Shtannikov, Alexander V; Zeidner, Nordin S; Piesman, Joseph

    2009-11-01

    Salp15 is a multifunctional protein, vital to the tick in its need to obtain vertebrate host blood without stimulating a host inflammatory and immune response. The Salpl5 protein from both Ixodes scapularis Say and Ixodes ricinus (L.), the principal vectors of the Lyme disease spirochete in eastern North America and Europe, respectively, have been well characterized and found to bind the murine CD4 receptor, DC-SIGN, and the OspC protein of Borrelia burgdorferi. In the current study, we characterized the full salp15 gene in Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls and Ixodes persulcatus Schulze, the principal vectors of Lyme disease spirochetes in western North America and Asia, respectively. In comparing the Salp15 protein of all four principal vector ticks of public health importance for the transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes, we find the 53 C-terminal amino acids to have a high degree of similarity. There are at least three clades in the tree of Salp15 and its homologues, probably representing a multigene family.

  9. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  10. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is associated with polymorphisms in JAK1.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciano K; Blanton, Ronald E; Parrado, Antonio R; Melo, Paulo S; Morato, Vanessa G; Reis, Eliana A G; Dias, Juarez P; Castro, Jesuina M; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Barreto, Maurício L; Reis, Mitermayer G; Teixeira, M Glória

    2010-11-01

    To identify genes associated with the clinical presentation of dengue, 50 cases of probable or possible dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 236 dengue fever (DF), and 236 asymptomatic infections were genotyped for 593 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 56 genes across the type 1 interferon (IFN) response pathway as well as other important candidate genes. By single locus analysis comparing DHF with DF, 11 of the 51 markers with P<0.05 were in the JAK1 gene. Five markers were significantly associated by false discovery rate criteria (q<0.20 when P<6 × 10(-4)). The JAK1 SNPs showed differential distribution by ethnicity and ancestry consistent with epidemiologic observations in the Americas. The association remained significant after controlling for ancestry and income. No association was observed with markers in the gene encoding CD209 (DC-SIGN). An association between DHF and JAK1 polymorphisms is in agreement with expression profiles showing generalized decreased type 1 IFN-stimulated gene expression in these patients.

  11. Emerging concepts in dengue pathogenesis: interplay between plasmablasts, platelets, and complement in triggering vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Hottz, Eugenio D; Garcia-Bates, Tatiana M; Bozza, Fernando; Marques, Ernesto T A; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV) that represents a serious and expanding global health threat. Most DENV infections are inapparent or produce mild and self-limiting illness; however a significant proportion results in severe disease characterized by vasculopathy and plasma leakage that may culminate in shock and death. The cause of dengue-associated vasculopathy is likely to be multifactorial but remains essentially unknown. Severe disease is manifest during a critical phase from 4 to 7 days after onset of symptoms, once the virus has disappeared from the circulation but before the peak of T-cell activation, suggesting that other factors mediate vasculopathy. Here, we present evidence for a combined role of plasmablasts, complement, and platelets in driving severe disease in DENV infection. Massive expansion of virus-specific plasmablasts peaks during the critical phase of infection, coincident with activation of complement and activation and depletion of platelets. We propose a step-wise model in which virus-specific antibodies produced by plasmablasts form immune complexes, leading to activation of complement and release of vasoactive anaphylatoxins. Platelets become activated through binding of complement- and antibody-coated virus, as well as direct binding of virus to DC-SIGN, leading to the release of inflammatory microparticles and cytokines and sequestration of platelets in the microvasculature. We suggest that the combined effects of anaphylatoxins, inflammatory microparticles, and platelet sequestration serve as triggers of vasculopathy in severe dengue.

  12. Measles Virus Transmission from Dendritic Cells to T Cells: Formation of Synapse-Like Interfaces Concentrating Viral and Cellular Components

    PubMed Central

    Koethe, Susanne; Avota, Elita

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of measles virus (MV) to T cells by its early CD150+ target cells is considered to be crucial for viral dissemination within the hematopoietic compartment. Using cocultures involving monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells, we now show that T cells acquire MV most efficiently from cis-infected DCs rather than DCs having trapped MV (trans-infection). Transmission involves interactions of the viral glycoprotein H with its receptor CD150 and is therefore more efficient to preactivated T cells. In addition to rare association with actin-rich filopodial structures, the formation of contact interfaces consistent with that of virological synapses (VS) was observed where viral proteins accumulated and CD150 was redistributed in an actin-dependent manner. In addition to these molecules, activated LFA-1, DC-SIGN, CD81, and phosphorylated ezrin-radixin-moesin proteins, which also mark the HIV VS, redistributed toward the MV VS. Most interestingly, moesin and substance P receptor, both implicated earlier in assisting MV entry or cell-to-cell transmission, also partitioned to the transmission structure. Altogether, the MV VS shares important similarities to the HIV VS in concentrating cellular components potentially regulating actin dynamics, conjugate stability, and membrane fusion as required for efficient entry of MV into target T cells. PMID:22761368

  13. Glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of glycan-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Mori, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Noboru; Yabe, Rikio; Iwaki, Jun; Shikanai, Toshihide; Angata, Takashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-10-01

    The extensive involvement of glycan-binding proteins (GBPs) as regulators in diverse biological phenomena provides a fundamental reason to investigate their glycan-binding specificities. Here, we developed a glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of GBPs. Eighty-nine selected multivalent glycoconjugates comprising natural glycoproteins, neo-glycoproteins, and polyacrylamide (PAA)-conjugated glycan epitopes were immobilized on an epoxy-activated glass slide. The GBP binding was monitored by an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted scanner at equilibrium without washing steps. The detection principle also allows direct application of unpurified GBPs with the aid of specific antibodies. Model experiments using plant lectins (RCA120, ConA, and SNA), galectins (3 and 8), a C-type lectin (DC-SIGN) and a siglec (CD22) provided data consistent with previous work within 4 h using less than 40 ng of GBPs per analysis. As an application, serum profiling of antiglycan antibodies (IgG and IgM) was performed with Cy3-labeled secondary antibodies. Moreover, novel carbohydrate-binding ability was demonstrated for a human IL-18 binding protein. Thus, the developed glycan array is useful for investigation of various types of GBPs, with the added advantage of wash-free analysis.

  14. Gut commensal microvesicles reproduce parent bacterial signals to host immune and enteric nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Mian, M Firoz; Hossain, Nazia; Karimi, Khalil; Mao, Yu-Kang; Forsythe, Paul; Min, Kevin K; Stanisz, Andrew M; Kunze, Wolfgang A; Bienenstock, John

    2015-02-01

    Ingestion of a commensal bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1, has potent immunoregulatory effects, and changes nerve-dependent colon migrating motor complexes (MMCs), enteric nerve function, and behavior. How these alterations occur is unknown. JB-1 microvesicles (MVs) are enriched for heat shock protein components such as chaperonin 60 heat-shock protein isolated from Escherichia coli (GroEL) and reproduce regulatory and neuronal effects in vitro and in vivo. Ingested labeled MVs were detected in murine Peyer's patch (PP) dendritic cells (DCs) within 18 h. After 3 d, PP and mesenteric lymph node DCs assumed a regulatory phenotype and increased functional regulatory CD4(+)25(+)Foxp3+ T cells. JB-1, MVs, and GroEL similarly induced phenotypic change in cocultured DCs via multiple pathways including C-type lectin receptors specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin-related 1 and Dectin-1, as well as TLR-2 and -9. JB-1 and MVs also decreased the amplitude of neuronally dependent MMCs in an ex vivo model of peristalsis. Gut epithelial, but not direct neuronal application of, MVs, replicated functional effects of JB-1 on in situ patch-clamped enteric neurons. GroEL and anti-TLR-2 were without effect in this system, suggesting the importance of epithelium neuron signaling and discrimination between pathways for bacteria-neuron and -immune communication. Together these results offer a mechanistic explanation of how Gram-positive commensals and probiotics may influence the host's immune and nervous systems.

  15. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (LR) inhibitor, NSC47924, affects 37/67kDa LR cell surface localization and interaction with the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarnataro, Daniela; Pepe, Anna; Altamura, Gennaro; De Simone, Imma; Pesapane, Ada; Nitsch, Lucio; Montuori, Nunzia; Lavecchia, Antonio; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The 37/67 kDa laminin receptor (LR) is a non-integrin protein, which binds both laminin-1 of the extracellular matrix and prion proteins, that hold a central role in prion diseases. The 37/67 kDa LR has been identified as interactor for the prion protein (PrPC) and to be required for pathological PrP (PrPSc) propagation in scrapie-infected neuronal cells, leading to the possibility that 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction is related to the pathogenesis of prion diseases. A relationship between 37/67 kDa LR and PrPC in the presence of specific LR inhibitor compounds has not been investigated yet. We have characterized the trafficking of 37/67 kDa LR in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, finding the receptor on the cell surface and nuclei, and identified the 67 kDa LR as the almost exclusive isoform interacting with PrPC. Here, we show that the treatment with the 37/67 kDa LR inhibitor, NSC47924, affects both the direct 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction in vitro and the formation of the immunocomplex in live cells, inducing a progressive internalization of 37/67 kDa LR and stabilization of PrPC on the cell surface. These data reveal NSC47924 as a useful tool to regulate PrPC and 37/67 kDa LR trafficking and degradation, representing a novel small molecule to be tested against prion diseases. PMID:27071549

  16. Why Integrin as a Primary Target for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is involved in many essential normal cellular and pathological functions including cell survival, growth, differentiation, migration, inflammatory responses, platelet aggregation, tissue repair and tumor invasion. 24 different heterodimerized transmembrane integrin receptors are combined from 18 different α and 8 different β subunits. Each integrin subunit contains a large extracellular domain, a single transmembrane domain and a usually short cytoplasmic domain. Integrins bind extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins through their large extracellular domain, and engage the cytoskeleton via their short cytoplasmic tails. These integrin-mediated linkages on either side of the plasma membrane are dynamically linked. Thus, integrins communicate over the plasma membrane in both directions, i.e., outside-in and inside-out signaling. In outside-in signaling through integrins, conformational changes of integrin induced by ligand binding on the extracellular domain altered the cytoplasmic domain structures to elicit various intracellular signaling pathways. Inside-out signaling originates from non-integrin cell surface receptors or cytoplasmic molecules and it activates signaling pathways inside the cells, ultimately resulting in the activation/deactivation of integrins. Integrins are one of key family proteins for cell adhesion regulation through binding to a large number of ECM molecules and cell membrane proteins. Lack of expression of integrins may result in a wide variety of effects ranging from blockage in pre-implantation to embryonic or perinatal lethality and developmental defects. Based on both the key role they played in angiogenesis, leukocytes function and tumor development and easy accessibility as cell surface receptors interacting with extracellular ligands, the integrin superfamily represents the best opportunity of targeting both antibodies and small-molecule antagonists for both therapeutic and diagnostic utility in various

  17. The evolution of the dystroglycan complex, a major mediator of muscle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Josephine C.; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrices are crucial for the coordination of different tissue layers. A matrix adhesion receptor that is important for BM function and stability in many mammalian tissues is the dystroglycan (DG) complex. This comprises the non-covalently-associated extracellular α-DG, that interacts with laminin in the BM, and the transmembrane β-DG, that interacts principally with dystrophin to connect to the actin cytoskeleton. Mutations in dystrophin, DG, or several enzymes that glycosylate α-DG underlie severe forms of human muscular dystrophy. Nonwithstanding the pathophysiological importance of the DG complex and its fundamental interest as a non-integrin system of cell-ECM adhesion, the evolution of DG and its interacting proteins is not understood. We analysed the phylogenetic distribution of DG, its proximal binding partners and key processing enzymes in extant metazoan and relevant outgroups. We identify that DG originated after the divergence of ctenophores from porifera and eumetazoa. The C-terminal half of the DG core protein is highly-conserved, yet the N-terminal region, that includes the laminin-binding region, has undergone major lineage-specific divergences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the C-terminal IG2_MAT_NU region identified three distinct clades corresponding to deuterostomes, arthropods, and mollusks/early-diverging metazoans. Whereas the glycosyltransferases that modify α-DG are also present in choanoflagellates, the DG-binding proteins dystrophin and laminin originated at the base of the metazoa, and DG-associated sarcoglycan is restricted to cnidarians and bilaterians. These findings implicate extensive functional diversification of DG within invertebrate lineages and identify the laminin-DG-dystrophin axis as a conserved adhesion system that evolved subsequent to integrin-ECM adhesion, likely to enhance the functional complexity of cell-BM interactions in early metazoans. PMID:26319583

  18. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Human Steady State CD14+ and CD1a+ Antigen Presenting Cells and Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia. M.; Bruijns, Sven C. M.; Sotthewes, Brigit N.; Kalay, Hakan; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the induction and regulation of skin immune responses. The human skin contains phenotypically and functionally distinct APCs subsets that are present at two separated locations. While CD1ahigh LCs form a dense network in the epidermis, the CD14+ and CD1a+ APCs reside in the dermal compartment. A better understanding of the biology of human skin APC subsets is necessary for the improvement of vaccine strategies that use the skin as administration route. In particular, progress in the characterization of uptake and activatory receptors will certainly improve APC-targeting strategies in vaccination. Here we performed a detailed analysis of the expression and function of glycan-binding and pattern-recognition receptors in skin APC subsets. The results demonstrate that under steady state conditions human CD1a+ dermal dendritic cells (DCs) were phenotypically most mature as measured by the expression of CD83 and CD86, whereas the CD14+ cells showed a higher expression of the CLRs DC-SIGN, mannose receptor and DCIR and had potent antigen uptake capacity. Furthermore, steady state LCs showed superior antigen cross-presentation as compared to the dermal APC subsets. Our results also demonstrate that the TLR3 ligand polyribosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (pI:C) was the most potent stimulator of cytokine production by both LCs and dDCs. These studies warrant further exploration of human CD1a+ dDCs and LCs as target cells for cancer vaccination to induce anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:26605924

  19. Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Monocytes Exhibit Tolerogenic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) is rich in diverse hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to differentiate into various cell types with immunological compatibility at transplantation. Thus, UCB is a potential source for the preparation of dendritic cells (DCs) to be used for cell therapy against inflammatory disorders or cancers. However, the immunological properties of UCB-derived DCs are not fully characterized. In this study, we investigated the phenotypes and functions of UCB monocyte-derived DCs (UCB-DCs) in comparison with those of adult peripheral blood (APB) monocyte-derived DCs (APB-DCs). UCB-DCs contained less CD1a(+) DCs, which is known as immunostimulatory DCs, than APB-DCs. UCB-DCs exhibited lower expression of CD80, MHC proteins, and DC-SIGN, but higher endocytic activity, than APB-DCs. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of UCB-DCs minimally augmented the expression of maturation markers and production of interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but potently expressed IL-10. When UCB-DCs were cocultured with CD14(+) cell-depleted allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells, they weakly induced the proliferation, surface expression of activation markers, and interferon (IFN)-γ production of T lymphocytes compared with APB-DCs. UCB possessed higher levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than APB, which might be responsible for tolerogenic phenotypes and functions of UCB-DCs. Indeed, APB-DCs prepared in the presence of PGE2 exhibited CD1a(-)CD14(+) phenotypes with tolerogenic properties, including weak maturation, impaired IL-12 production, and negligible T lymphocyte activation as UCB-DCs did. Taken together, we suggest that UCB-DCs have tolerogenic properties, which might be due to PGE2 highly sustained in UCB.

  20. In vitro impact of bisphenols BPA, BPF, BPAF and 17β-estradiol (E2) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell generation, maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Švajger, Urban; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Jeras, Matjaž

    2016-05-01

    Bisphenols (BPs) are widely spread pollutants that act as estrogen-like endocrine disruptors and are potentially affecting human health on a long run. We explored the effects of BPA, BPF and BPAF, on in vitro differentiation and maturation of MDDCs. Monocytes were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) and each BP at the beginning of their differentiation into iMDDCs. We found that 10 and 50 μM of BPA and BPF, 10 and 30μM of BPAF and 10 and 50 nM of E2 did not affect cell viability. However, 50 μM of BPA and BPF, as well as 10 and 30 μM of BPAF, significantly decreased the endocytotic capacity of iMDDCs. Both, BPA (50 μM) and BPAF (30 μM) decreased the expression of CD1a and increased the amount of DC-SIGN molecules on iMDDCs. The E2 pre-treatment moderately decreased expression of CD80, CD86 and CD83 co-stimulatory molecules while increasing the numbers of HLA-DR on mMDDCs. Only BPAF significantly influenced the expression of CD80 and CD86 (both decreased), as well as CD83 and HLA-DR molecules (both increased) on mMDDCs. In addition, BPAF modulated DC maturation signaling pathways by lowering the phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappaB) and ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) 1/2 proteins. Consequently, the in vitro proliferation of allogeneic T cells, stimulated with differently pre-treated iMDDCs and mMDDCs, was significantly reduced only in case of BPAF.

  1. Linear biocompatible glyco-polyamidoamines as dual action mode virus infection inhibitors with potential as broad-spectrum microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Nicolò; Ferruti, Paolo; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Manfredi, Amedea; Berzi, Angela; Clerici, Mario; Cagno, Valeria; Lembo, David; Palmioli, Alessandro; Sattin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The initial steps of viral infections are mediated by interactions between viral proteins and cellular receptors. Blocking the latter with high-affinity ligands may inhibit infection. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed by immature dendritic cells and macrophages, mediates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by recognizing mannose clusters on the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Mannosylated glycodendrimers act as HIV entry inhibitors thanks to their ability to block this receptor. Previously, an amphoteric, but prevailingly cationic polyamidoamine named AGMA1 proved effective as infection inhibitor for several heparan sulfate proteoglycan-dependent viruses, such as human papilloma virus HPV-16 and herpes simplex virus HSV-2. An amphoteric, but prevailingly anionic PAA named ISA23 proved inactive. It was speculated that the substitution of mannosylated units for a limited percentage of AGMA1 repeating units, while imparting anti-HIV activity, would preserve the fundamentals of its HPV-16 and HSV-2 infection inhibitory activity. In this work, four biocompatible linear PAAs carrying different amounts of mannosyl-triazolyl pendants, Man-ISA7, Man-ISA14, Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5, were prepared by reaction of 2-(azidoethyl)-α-D-mannopyranoside and differently propargyl-substituted AGMA1 and ISA23. All mannosylated PAAs inhibited HIV infection. Both Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5 maintained the HPV-16 and HSV-2 activity of the parent polymer, proving broad-spectrum, dual action mode virus infection inhibitors. PMID:27641362

  2. Microbial Carriage State of Peripheral Blood Dendritic cells (DCs) in Chronic Periodontitis Influences DC Differentiation, Atherogenic Potential†

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, Julio; Scisci, Elizabeth; Miles, Brodie; Sabino, Gregory J.; Zeituni, Amir E; Gu, Ying; Bear, Adam; Genco, Caroline A; Brown, David L.; Cutler, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    The low grade oral infection chronic periodontitis (CP) has been implicated in coronary artery disease risk, but the mechanisms are unclear. Here, a pathophysiological role for blood dendritic cells (DCs) in systemic dissemination of oral mucosal pathogens to atherosclerotic plaques was investigated in humans. The frequency and microbiome of CD19−BDCA-1+DC-SIGN+ blood myeloid DCs (mDCs) were analyzed in CP subjects with, or without existing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and in healthy controls (CTL). FACS analysis revealed a significant increase in blood mDCs in the following order: CTL

  3. C-type Lectin Receptor Expression on Human Basophils and Effects of Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, K; Rydnert, F; Broos, S; Andersson, M; Greiff, L; Lindstedt, M

    2016-09-01

    Basophils are emerging as immunoregulatory cells capable of interacting with their environment not only via their characteristic IgE-mediated activation, but also in an IgE-independent manner. Basophils are known to express and respond to stimulation via TLR2, TLR4, DC-SIGN and DCIR, but whether basophils also express other C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the CLR expression profile of human basophils using multicolour flow cytometry. As FcRs as well as some CLRs are associated with allergen recognition and shown to be involved in subsequent immune responses, the expression of CLRs and FcRs on peripheral blood basophils, as well as their frequency, was monitored for 1 year in subjects undergoing subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT). Here, we show that human basophils express CLECSF14, DEC205, Dectin-1, Dectin-2 and MRC2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the frequencies of basophils expressing the allergy-associated CLRs Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 were significantly reduced after 1 year and 8 weeks of AIT, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of basophils positive for FcγRII, as well as the fraction of total basophils, significantly increased after 1 year of AIT. The herein demonstrated expression of various CLRs on basophils, and their altered CLR and FcR expression profile upon AIT, suggest yet unexplored ways by which basophils can interact with antigens and may point to novel immunoregulatory functions targeted through AIT. PMID:27354239

  4. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy Alters the Frequency, as well as the FcR and CLR Expression Profiles of Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Broos, Sissela; Andersson, Morgan; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) induces tolerance and shifts the Th2 response towards a regulatory T-cell profile. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, but dendritic cells (DC) play a vital role as key regulators of T-cell responses. DCs interact with allergens via Fc receptors (FcRs) and via certain C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), including CD209/DC-SIGN, CD206/MR and Dectin-2/CLEC6A. In this study, the effect of AIT on the frequencies as well as the FcR and CLR expression profiles of human DC subsets was assessed. PBMC was isolated from peripheral blood from seven allergic donors before and after 8 weeks and 1 year of subcutaneous AIT, as well as from six non-allergic individuals. Cells were stained with antibodies against DC subset-specific markers and a panel of FcRs and CLRs and analyzed by flow cytometry. After 1 year of AIT, the frequency of CD123+ DCs was increased and a larger proportion expressed FcεRI. Furthermore, the expression of CD206 and Dectin-2 was reduced on CD141+ DCs after 1 year of treatment and CD206 as well as Dectin-1 was additionally down regulated in CD1c+ DCs. Interestingly, levels of DNGR1/CLEC9A on CD141+ DCs were increased by AIT, reaching levels similar to cells isolated from non-allergic controls. The modifications in phenotype and occurrence of specific DC subsets observed during AIT suggest an altered capacity of DC subsets to interact with allergens, which can be part of the mechanisms by which AIT induces allergen tolerance. PMID:26863539

  5. Linear biocompatible glyco-polyamidoamines as dual action mode virus infection inhibitors with potential as broad-spectrum microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Nicolò; Ferruti, Paolo; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Manfredi, Amedea; Berzi, Angela; Clerici, Mario; Cagno, Valeria; Lembo, David; Palmioli, Alessandro; Sattin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The initial steps of viral infections are mediated by interactions between viral proteins and cellular receptors. Blocking the latter with high-affinity ligands may inhibit infection. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed by immature dendritic cells and macrophages, mediates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by recognizing mannose clusters on the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Mannosylated glycodendrimers act as HIV entry inhibitors thanks to their ability to block this receptor. Previously, an amphoteric, but prevailingly cationic polyamidoamine named AGMA1 proved effective as infection inhibitor for several heparan sulfate proteoglycan-dependent viruses, such as human papilloma virus HPV-16 and herpes simplex virus HSV-2. An amphoteric, but prevailingly anionic PAA named ISA23 proved inactive. It was speculated that the substitution of mannosylated units for a limited percentage of AGMA1 repeating units, while imparting anti-HIV activity, would preserve the fundamentals of its HPV-16 and HSV-2 infection inhibitory activity. In this work, four biocompatible linear PAAs carrying different amounts of mannosyl-triazolyl pendants, Man-ISA7, Man-ISA14, Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5, were prepared by reaction of 2-(azidoethyl)-α-D-mannopyranoside and differently propargyl-substituted AGMA1 and ISA23. All mannosylated PAAs inhibited HIV infection. Both Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5 maintained the HPV-16 and HSV-2 activity of the parent polymer, proving broad-spectrum, dual action mode virus infection inhibitors. PMID:27641362

  6. Comparative evaluation of three assays for measurement of dengue virus neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Putnak, J Robert; de la Barrera, Rafael; Burgess, Timothy; Pardo, Jorge; Dessy, Francis; Gheysen, Dirk; Lobet, Yves; Green, Sharone; Endy, Timothy P; Thomas, Stephen J; Eckels, Kenneth H; Innis, Bruce L; Sun, Wellington

    2008-07-01

    Plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNTs) are commonly used for measuring levels of dengue virus (DENV) neutralizing antibodies. However, these assays lack a standardized format, generally have a low sample throughput, and are labor-intensive. The objective of the present study was to evaluate two alternative DENV neutralizing antibody assays: an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based microneutralization (MN) assay, and a fluorescent antibody cell sorter-based, DC-SIGN expresser dendritic cell (DC) assay. False-positive rates, serotype specificity, reproducibility, sensitivity, and agreement among the assay methods were assessed using well-characterized but limited numbers of coded test sera. Results showed that all three assays had false-positive rates of less than 10% with titers near the cut-off and generally below the estimated limits of detection. All three methods demonstrated a high degree of specificity and good agreement when used to assay sera and serum mixtures from monovalent vaccinees and sera from patients after primary natural infection, with the only notable exception being moderate-to-high neutralizing antibody titers against DENV 2 measured by PRNT in a mixture containing only DENV 3 and DENV 4 sera. The MN and DC assays demonstrated good reproducibility. All three assays were comparable in their sensitivity, except that the PRNT was less sensitive for measuring DENV 4 antibody, and the MN and DC assays were less sensitive for measuring DENV 2 antibody. However, when used to test sera from persons after tetravalent DENV vaccination or secondary DENV infection, there was poor specificity and poor agreement among the different assays.

  7. Linear biocompatible glyco-polyamidoamines as dual action mode virus infection inhibitors with potential as broad-spectrum microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, Nicolò; Ferruti, Paolo; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Manfredi, Amedea; Berzi, Angela; Clerici, Mario; Cagno, Valeria; Lembo, David; Palmioli, Alessandro; Sattin, Sara

    2016-09-01

    The initial steps of viral infections are mediated by interactions between viral proteins and cellular receptors. Blocking the latter with high-affinity ligands may inhibit infection. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed by immature dendritic cells and macrophages, mediates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by recognizing mannose clusters on the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Mannosylated glycodendrimers act as HIV entry inhibitors thanks to their ability to block this receptor. Previously, an amphoteric, but prevailingly cationic polyamidoamine named AGMA1 proved effective as infection inhibitor for several heparan sulfate proteoglycan-dependent viruses, such as human papilloma virus HPV-16 and herpes simplex virus HSV-2. An amphoteric, but prevailingly anionic PAA named ISA23 proved inactive. It was speculated that the substitution of mannosylated units for a limited percentage of AGMA1 repeating units, while imparting anti-HIV activity, would preserve the fundamentals of its HPV-16 and HSV-2 infection inhibitory activity. In this work, four biocompatible linear PAAs carrying different amounts of mannosyl-triazolyl pendants, Man-ISA7, Man-ISA14, Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5, were prepared by reaction of 2-(azidoethyl)-α-D-mannopyranoside and differently propargyl-substituted AGMA1 and ISA23. All mannosylated PAAs inhibited HIV infection. Both Man-AGMA6.5 and Man-AGMA14.5 maintained the HPV-16 and HSV-2 activity of the parent polymer, proving broad-spectrum, dual action mode virus infection inhibitors.

  8. Antigen presenting cell-selective drug delivery by glycan-decorated nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Theresa; Grabski, Elena; Durán, Verónica; Hozsa, Constantin; Stępczyńska, Anna; Furch, Marcus; Gieseler, Robert K; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems hold promise for selective provision of active compounds to distinct tissues or cell subsets. Thus, locally enhanced drug concentrations are obtained that would confer improved efficacy. As a consequence adverse effects should be diminished, as innocent bystander cells are less affected. Currently, several controlled drug delivery systems based on diverse materials are being developed. Some systems exhibit material-associated toxic effects and/or show low drug loading capacity. In contrast, liposomal nanocarriers are particularly favorable because they are well tolerated, poorly immunogenic, can be produced in defined sizes, and offer a reasonable payload capacity. Compared with other immune cells, professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) demonstrate enhanced liposome uptake mediated by macropinocytosis, phagocytosis and presumably also by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In order to further enhance the targeting efficacy toward APCs, receptor-mediated uptake appears advisable. Since APC subsets generally do not express single linage-specific receptors, members of the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) family are compelling targets. Examples of CLR expressed by APCs include DEC-205 (CD205) expressed by myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, the mannose receptor C type 1 (MR, CD206) expressed by DC, monocytes and macrophages, DC-SIGN (CD209) expressed by DC, and several others. These receptors bind glycans, which are typically displayed by pathogens and thus support pathogen uptake and endocytosis. Further research will elucidate whether glycan-decorated liposomes will not only enhance APCs targeting but also enable preferential delivery of their payload to discrete subcellular compartments. PMID:25701806

  9. Characteristics of immunogenic and tolerogenic dendritic cells within the arterial wall in atherosclerosis and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhengdong; Deng, Qiong; Hu, Hejie; Wang, Xiaotian; Sun, Xiaojie; Ge, Xinbao; Wang, Peishuang

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the characteristic of mature dendritic cell (mDC) and tolerogenic dendritic cell (TDC) in human lower limb atherosclerosis occlusion syndrome (ASO) and diabetic foot and in vitro. Methods: 58 human ASO and diabetic foot arterial specimens were collected from surgical operation and autopsy. Immunohistochemical and Western blotting method were used to examine the distribution and the content of CD83 and CD1a positive reaction mDC and CD11b and DC-SIGN positive reaction TDC. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived DCs were induced by rmGM-CSF and rmIL-4 in the presence or absence of LPS in vitro. The percent of CD11c+CD11b+TDC and CD11c+CD83+mDC were analyzed by flow cytometry. The effects of TDC and mDC on T lymphocytes were analyzed by the IL-17 level, the percent of Th17, and IL-17 mRNA expression. Results: Immunogenicity mDC was heavily found in intima plaque and around the small vessel of adventitia on artherosclerosis aorta of lesion group, and was positively correlated to the progress of the disease. However, there were low expression of TDC and was negatively correlated to the progress of the disease. Meanwhile, we found that there is a close relationship between high glucose and disease progression. TDC expressed high levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 and down-regulated the percent of CD4+IL-17+ Th17, IL-17 mRNA and the level of IL-17 in vitro. Conclusion: TDC and mDC are assembled in the process of ASO, and the progression of the disease might be aggravated by DC-maturation. High glucose might closely relate to the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25663981

  10. Polymorphisms in the feline TNFA and CD209 genes are associated with the outcome of feline coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ting; Hsieh, Li-En; Dai, Yu-Rou; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2014-12-16

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection, is a highly lethal disease without effective therapy and prevention. With an immune-mediated disease entity, host genetic variant was suggested to influence the occurrence of FIP. This study aimed at evaluating cytokine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), receptor-associated SNPs, i.e., C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209), and the five FIP-associated SNPs identified from Birman cats of USA and Denmark origins and their associations with the outcome of FCoV infection in 71 FIP cats and 93 FCoV infected non-FIP cats in a genetically more diverse cat populations. A promoter variant, fTNFA - 421 T, was found to be a disease-resistance allele. One SNP was identified in the extracellular domain (ECD) of fCD209 at position +1900, a G to A substitution, and the A allele was associated with FIP susceptibility. Three SNPs located in the introns of fCD209, at positions +2276, +2392, and +2713, were identified to be associated with the outcome of FCoV infection, with statistical relevance. In contrast, among the five Birman FIP cat-associated SNPs, no genotype or allele showed significant differences between our FIP and non-FIP groups. As disease resistance is multifactorial and several other host genes could involve in the development of FIP, the five genetic traits identified in this study should facilitate in the future breeding of the disease-resistant animal to reduce the occurrence of cats succumbing to FIP.

  11. Polymorphisms in the feline TNFA and CD209 genes are associated with the outcome of feline coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ting; Hsieh, Li-En; Dai, Yu-Rou; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection, is a highly lethal disease without effective therapy and prevention. With an immune-mediated disease entity, host genetic variant was suggested to influence the occurrence of FIP. This study aimed at evaluating cytokine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), receptor-associated SNPs, i.e., C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209), and the five FIP-associated SNPs identified from Birman cats of USA and Denmark origins and their associations with the outcome of FCoV infection in 71 FIP cats and 93 FCoV infected non-FIP cats in a genetically more diverse cat populations. A promoter variant, fTNFA - 421 T, was found to be a disease-resistance allele. One SNP was identified in the extracellular domain (ECD) of fCD209 at position +1900, a G to A substitution, and the A allele was associated with FIP susceptibility. Three SNPs located in the introns of fCD209, at positions +2276, +2392, and +2713, were identified to be associated with the outcome of FCoV infection, with statistical relevance. In contrast, among the five Birman FIP cat-associated SNPs, no genotype or allele showed significant differences between our FIP and non-FIP groups. As disease resistance is multifactorial and several other host genes could involve in the development of FIP, the five genetic traits identified in this study should facilitate in the future breeding of the disease-resistant animal to reduce the occurrence of cats succumbing to FIP. PMID:25512064

  12. Mannose-specific plant lectins from the Amaryllidaceae family qualify as efficient microbicides for prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Princen, Katrien; Aquaro, Stefano; Perno, Carlo-Federico; De Clercq, Erik; Egberink, Herman; Vanden Mooter, Guy; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Schols, Dominique

    2004-10-01

    The plant lectins derived from Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) (GNA) and Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) selectively inhibited a wide variety of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 strains and clinical (CXCR4- and CCR5-using) isolates in different cell types. They also efficiently inhibited infection of T lymphocytes by a variety of mutant virus strains. GNA and HHA markedly prevented syncytium formation between persistently infected HUT-78/HIV cells and uninfected T lymphocytes. The plant lectins did not measurably affect the antiviral activity of other clinically approved anti-HIV drugs used in the clinic when combined with these drugs. Short exposure of the lectins to cell-free virus particles or persistently HIV-infected HUT-78 cells markedly decreased HIV infectivity and increased the protective (microbicidal) activity of the plant lectins. Flow cytometric analysis and monoclonal antibody binding studies and a PCR-based assay revealed that GNA and HHA do not interfere with CD4, CXCR4, CCR5, and DC-SIGN and do not specifically bind with the membrane of uninfected cells. Instead, GNA and HHA likely interrupt the virus entry process by interfering with the virus envelope glycoprotein. HHA and GNA are odorless, colorless, and tasteless, and they are not cytotoxic, antimetabolically active, or mitogenic to human primary T lymphocytes at concentrations that exceed their antivirally active concentrations by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. GNA and HHA proved stable at high temperature (50 degrees C) and low pH (5.0) for prolonged time periods and can be easily formulated in gel preparations for microbicidal use; they did not agglutinate human erythrocytes and were not toxic to mice when administered intravenously.

  13. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  14. In vitro impact of bisphenols BPA, BPF, BPAF and 17β-estradiol (E2) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell generation, maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Švajger, Urban; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Jeras, Matjaž

    2016-05-01

    Bisphenols (BPs) are widely spread pollutants that act as estrogen-like endocrine disruptors and are potentially affecting human health on a long run. We explored the effects of BPA, BPF and BPAF, on in vitro differentiation and maturation of MDDCs. Monocytes were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) and each BP at the beginning of their differentiation into iMDDCs. We found that 10 and 50 μM of BPA and BPF, 10 and 30μM of BPAF and 10 and 50 nM of E2 did not affect cell viability. However, 50 μM of BPA and BPF, as well as 10 and 30 μM of BPAF, significantly decreased the endocytotic capacity of iMDDCs. Both, BPA (50 μM) and BPAF (30 μM) decreased the expression of CD1a and increased the amount of DC-SIGN molecules on iMDDCs. The E2 pre-treatment moderately decreased expression of CD80, CD86 and CD83 co-stimulatory molecules while increasing the numbers of HLA-DR on mMDDCs. Only BPAF significantly influenced the expression of CD80 and CD86 (both decreased), as well as CD83 and HLA-DR molecules (both increased) on mMDDCs. In addition, BPAF modulated DC maturation signaling pathways by lowering the phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappaB) and ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) 1/2 proteins. Consequently, the in vitro proliferation of allogeneic T cells, stimulated with differently pre-treated iMDDCs and mMDDCs, was significantly reduced only in case of BPAF. PMID:26945833

  15. Virological and preclinical characterization of a dendritic cell targeting, integration-deficient lentiviral vector for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Odegard, Jared M; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Tareen, Semih U; Campbell, David J; Flynn, Patrick A; Nicolai, Christopher J; Slough, Megan M; Vin, Chintan D; McGowan, Patrick J; Nelson, Lisa T; Ter Meulen, Jan; Dubensky, Thomas W; Robbins, Scott H

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential antigen-presenting cells for the initiation of cytotoxic T-cell responses and therefore attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. We have developed an integration-deficient lentiviral vector termed ID-VP02 that is designed to deliver antigen-encoding nucleic acids selectively to human DCs in vivo. ID-VP02 utilizes a genetically and glycobiologically engineered Sindbis virus glycoprotein to target human DCs through the C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) and also binds to the homologue murine receptor SIGNR1. Specificity of ID-VP02 for antigen-presenting cells in the mouse was confirmed through biodistribution studies showing that following subcutaneous administration, transgene expression was only detectable at the injection site and the draining lymph node. A single immunization with ID-VP02 induced a high level of antigen-specific, polyfunctional effector and memory CD8 T-cell responses that fully protected against vaccinia virus challenge. Upon homologous readministration, ID-VP02 induced a level of high-quality secondary effector and memory cells characterized by stable polyfunctionality and expression of IL-7Rα. Importantly, a single injection of ID-VP02 also induced robust cytotoxic responses against an endogenous rejection antigen of CT26 colon carcinoma cells and conferred both prophylactic and therapeutic antitumor efficacy. ID-VP02 is the first lentiviral vector which combines integration deficiency with DC targeting and is currently being investigated in a phase I trial in cancer patients. PMID:25658613

  16. Sugared biomaterial binding lectins: achievements and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bojarová, P; Křen, V

    2016-07-19

    Lectins, a distinct group of glycan-binding proteins, play a prominent role in the immune system ranging from pathogen recognition and tuning of inflammation to cell adhesion or cellular signalling. The possibilities of their detailed study expanded along with the rapid development of biomaterials in the last decade. The immense knowledge of all aspects of glycan-lectin interactions both in vitro and in vivo may be efficiently used in bioimaging, targeted drug delivery, diagnostic and analytic biological methods. Practically applicable examples comprise photoluminescence and optical biosensors, ingenious three-dimensional carbohydrate microarrays for high-throughput screening, matrices for magnetic resonance imaging, targeted hyperthermal treatment of cancer tissues, selective inhibitors of bacterial toxins and pathogen-recognising lectin receptors, and many others. This review aims to present an up-to-date systematic overview of glycan-decorated biomaterials promising for interactions with lectins, especially those applicable in biology, biotechnology or medicine. The lectins of interest include galectin-1, -3 and -7 participating in tumour progression, bacterial lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IL), E. coli (Fim-H) and Clostridium botulinum (HA33) or DC-SIGN, receptors of macrophages and dendritic cells. The spectrum of lectin-binding biomaterials covered herein ranges from glycosylated organic structures, calixarene and fullerene cores over glycopeptides and glycoproteins, functionalised carbohydrate scaffolds of cyclodextrin or chitin to self-assembling glycopolymer clusters, gels, micelles and liposomes. Glyconanoparticles, glycan arrays, and other biomaterials with a solid core are described in detail, including inorganic matrices like hydroxyapatite or stainless steel for bioimplants. PMID:27075026

  17. Microvirin, a Novel α(1,2)-Mannose-specific Lectin Isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, Has Anti-HIV-1 Activity Comparable with That of Cyanovirin-N but a Much Higher Safety Profile*

    PubMed Central

    Huskens, Dana; Férir, Geoffrey; Vermeire, Kurt; Kehr, Jan-Christoph; Balzarini, Jan; Dittmann, Elke; Schols, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Microvirin (MVN), a recently isolated lectin from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806, shares 33% identity with the potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protein cyanovirin-N (CV-N) isolated from Nostoc ellipsosporum, and both lectins bind to similar carbohydrate structures. MVN is able to inhibit infection by a wide variety of HIV-1 laboratory-adapted strains and clinical isolates of different tropisms and subtypes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. MVN also inhibits syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1-infected T cells and uninfected CD4+ T cells and inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 binding and transmission to CD4+ T cells. Long term passaging of HIV-1 exposed to dose-escalating concentrations of MVN resulted in the selection of a mutant virus with four deleted high mannose-type glycans in the envelope gp120. The MVN-resistant virus was still highly sensitive to various other carbohydrate binding lectins (e.g. CV-N, HHA, GNA, and UDA) but not anymore to the carbohydrate-specific 2G12 monoclonal antibody. Importantly, MVN is more than 50-fold less cytotoxic than CV-N. Also in sharp contrast to CV-N, MVN did not increase the level of the activation markers CD25, CD69, and HLA-DR in CD4+ T lymphocytes, and subsequently, MVN did not enhance viral replication in pretreated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Therefore, MVN may qualify as a useful lectin for potential microbicidal use based on its broad and potent antiviral activity and virtual lack of any stimulatory properties and cellular toxicity. PMID:20507987

  18. Comparable mRNA expression of inflammatory markers but lower claudin-1 mRNA levels in foreskin tissue of HSV-2 seropositive versus seronegative asymptomatic Kenyan young men

    PubMed Central

    Röhl, Maria; Tjernlund, Annelie; Mehta, Supriya D; Pettersson, Pernilla; Bailey, Robert C; Broliden, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Skin biopsies from local sites of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2)-induced ulcers can show infiltrates of inflammatory cells several months after macroscopic healing. We hypothesise that foreskin tissue samples of asymptomatic HSV-2 seropositive men had remaining signs of inflammation at the molecular level. Even in the absence of clinical lesions, genital inflammation may contribute to increased HIV susceptibility on sexual exposure to the virus. Setting Foreskin tissue samples were collected from men undergoing elective circumcision in Kisumu, Kenya. Participants The foreskin tissue samples (n=86) were stratified into study groups based on HSV-2 serology and assessed for mRNA expression of inflammatory markers. Markers of interest were further assessed by immunohistochemical staining within the tissue samples. Results The two study groups had comparable levels of all molecular markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD69, CCR5, HLA-DR, Langerin, DC-SIGN, Mannose Receptor 1, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, β7, IgA, IFN-α, CCL5, E-cadherin, ZO-1 and occludin), except for lower mRNA levels of the epithelial junction protein claudin-1 in the HSV-2 seropositive group (p=0.008). Although mRNA levels of claudin-1 were lower in HSV-2 seropositive individuals, the corresponding protein could be visualised in the foreskin epithelium of all samples tested. Conclusions Whereas no general inflammation was demonstrated in the foreskin of asymptomatic HSV-2 seropositive individuals, a decreased expression of claudin-1 indicates a less robust genital epithelial barrier. An intact epithelial barrier is essential for blocking mucosal entry of genital infections, including HIV. PMID:25694458

  19. IL-10 Conditioning of Human Skin Affects the Distribution of Migratory Dendritic Cell Subsets and Functional T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lindenberg, Jelle J.; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C.; Lougheed, Sinéad M.; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G. M.; Santegoets, Saskia J. A. M.; Tijssen, Henk J.; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Scheper, Rik J.; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D.

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14+CD141+DC-SIGN+ DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a+ subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8+ T cells, migration of immature CD14+ DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance. PMID:23875023

  20. Human Mucosal Mast Cells Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Wei, Ji-Fu; Guo, Ming-Gao; Qin, Yan; Guo, Qian-Qian; Ma, Li; Liu, Bao-Chi; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gastrointestinal mucosa is the primary site where human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades, amplifies, and becomes persistently established, and cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 plays a pivotal role in mucosal viral dissemination. Mast cells are widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract and are early targets for invasive pathogens, and they have been shown to have increased density in the genital mucosa in HIV-infected women. Intestinal mast cells express numerous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and have been shown to combat various viral, parasitic, and bacterial infections. However, the role of mast cells in HIV-1 infection is poorly defined. In this study, we investigated their potential contributions to HIV-1 transmission. Mast cells isolated from gut mucosal tissues were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs), such as DC-SIGN, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin, which mediate capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Intriguingly, following coculture with CD4+ T cells, mast cell surface-bound viruses were efficiently transferred to target T cells. Prior blocking with anti-HAF antibody or mannan before coculture impaired viral trans-infection. Cell-cell conjunctions formed between mast cells and T cells, to which viral particles were recruited, and these were required for efficient cell-to-cell HIV-1 transmission. Our results reveal a potential function of gut mucosal mast cells in HIV-1 dissemination in tissues. Strategies aimed at preventing viral capture and transfer mediated by mast cells could be beneficial in combating primary HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate the role of human mast cells isolated from mucosal tissues in mediating HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. This finding facilitates our understanding of HIV-1 mucosal infection and will benefit the development of strategies to combat primary HIV-1 dissemination. PMID:26719250

  1. Characterization of a plant-produced recombinant human secretory IgA with broad neutralizing activity against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Matthew; Reljic, Rajko; Klein, Katja; Drake, Pascal MW; van Dolleweerd, Craig; Pabst, Martin; Windwarder, Markus; Arcalis, Elsa; Stoger, Eva; Altmann, Friedrich; Cosgrove, Catherine; Bartolf, Angela; Baden, Susan; Ma, Julian K-C

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Secretory IgA (SIgA) complexes have the potential to improve antibody-based passive immunotherapeutic approaches to combat many mucosal pathogens. In this report, we describe the expression, purification and characterization of a human SIgA format of the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2G12, using both transgenic tobacco plants and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana as expression hosts (P2G12 SIgA). The resulting heterodecameric complexes accumulated in intracellular compartments in leaf tissue, including the vacuole. SIgA complexes could not be detected in the apoplast. Maximum yields of antibody were 15.2 μg/g leaf fresh mass (LFM) in transgenic tobacco and 25 μg/g LFM after transient expression, and assembly of SIgA complexes was superior in transgenic tobacco. Protein L purified antibody specifically bound HIV gp140 and neutralised tier 2 and tier 3 HIV isolates. Glycoanalysis revealed predominantly high mannose structures present on most N-glycosylation sites, with limited evidence for complex glycosylation or processing to paucimannosidic forms. O-glycan structures were not identified. Functionally, P2G12 SIgA, but not IgG, effectively aggregated HIV virions. Binding of P2G12 SIgA was observed to CD209 / DC-SIGN, but not to CD89 / FcalphaR on a monocyte cell line. Furthermore, P2G12 SIgA demonstrated enhanced stability in mucosal secretions in comparison to P2G12 IgG mAb. PMID:25484063

  2. Cell-Free versus Cell-to-Cell Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: Exploring the Link among Viral Source, Viral Trafficking, and Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Dutartre, Hélène; Clavière, Mathieu; Journo, Chloé; Mahieux, Renaud

    2016-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are complex retroviruses mainly infecting CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In addition, antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) are targeted in vivo by both viruses, although to a lesser extent. Interaction of HIV-1 with DCs plays a key role in viral dissemination from the mucosa to CD4(+) T lymphocytes present in lymphoid organs. While similar mechanisms may occur for HTLV-1 as well, most HTLV-1 data were obtained from T-cell studies, and little is known regarding the trafficking of this virus in DCs. We first compared the efficiency of cell-free versus cell-associated viral sources of both retroviruses at infecting DCs. We showed that both HIV-1 and HTLV-1 cell-free particles are poorly efficient at productively infecting DCs, except when DC-SIGN has been engaged. Furthermore, while SAMHD-1 accounts for restriction of cell-free HIV-1 infection, it is not involved in HTLV-1 restriction. In addition, cell-free viruses lead mainly to a nonproductive DC infection, leading to trans-infection of T-cells, a process important for HIV-1 spread but not for that of HTLV-1. Finally, we show that T-DC cell-to-cell transfer implies viral trafficking in vesicles that may both increase productive infection of DCs ("cis-infection") and allow viral escape from immune surveillance. Altogether, these observations allowed us to draw a model of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 trafficking in DCs.

  3. Sulfated polysaccharide, curdlan sulfate, efficiently prevents entry/fusion and restricts antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection in vitro: a possible candidate for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Koji; Gopala Reddy, Sindhoora Bhargavi; Zhang, Li Feng; Chin, Wei Xin; Muschin, Tegshi; Heinig, Lars; Suzuki, Youichi; Nanjundappa, Haraprasad; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Ryo, Akihide; Nomura, Nobuo; Ooi, Eng Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Yoshida, Takashi; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Curdlan sulfate (CRDS), a sulfated 1→3-β-D glucan, previously shown to be a potent HIV entry inhibitor, is characterized in this study as a potent inhibitor of the Dengue virus (DENV). CRDS was identified by in silico blind docking studies to exhibit binding potential to the envelope (E) protein of the DENV. CRDS was shown to inhibit the DENV replication very efficiently in different cells in vitro. Minimal effective concentration of CRDS was as low as 0.1 µg/mL in LLC-MK2 cells, and toxicity was observed only at concentrations over 10 mg/mL. CRDS can also inhibit DENV-1, 3, and 4 efficiently. CRDS did not inhibit the replication of DENV subgenomic replicon. Time of addition experiments demonstrated that the compound not only inhibited viral infection at the host cell binding step, but also at an early post-attachment step of entry (membrane fusion). The direct binding of CRDS to DENV was suggested by an evident reduction in the viral titers after interaction of the virus with CRDS following an ultrafiltration device separation, as well as after virus adsorption to an alkyl CRDS-coated membrane filter. The electron microscopic features also showed that CRDS interacted directly with the viral envelope, and caused changes to the viral surface. CRDS also potently inhibited DENV infection in DC-SIGN expressing cells as well as the antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV-2 infection. Based on these data, a probable binding model of CRDS to DENV E protein was constructed by a flexible receptor and ligand docking study. The binding site of CRDS was predicted to be at the interface between domains II and III of E protein dimer, which is unique to this compound, and is apparently different from the β-OG binding site. Since CRDS has already been tested in humans without serious side effects, its clinical application can be considered.

  4. Unravelling Glucan Recognition Systems by Glycome Microarrays Using the Designer Approach and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Angelina S.; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Yibing; McCleary, Barry V.; Yu, Guangli; Huang, Qilin; Guidolin, Leticia S.; Ciocchini, Andres E.; Torosantucci, Antonella; Wang, Denong; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Mulloy, Barbara; Childs, Robert A.; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2015-01-01

    Glucans are polymers of d-glucose with differing linkages in linear or branched sequences. They are constituents of microbial and plant cell-walls and involved in important bio-recognition processes, including immunomodulation, anticancer activities, pathogen virulence, and plant cell-wall biodegradation. Translational possibilities for these activities in medicine and biotechnology are considerable. High-throughput micro-methods are needed to screen proteins for recognition of specific glucan sequences as a lead to structure–function studies and their exploitation. We describe construction of a “glucome” microarray, the first sequence-defined glycome-scale microarray, using a “designer” approach from targeted ligand-bearing glucans in conjunction with a novel high-sensitivity mass spectrometric sequencing method, as a screening tool to assign glucan recognition motifs. The glucome microarray comprises 153 oligosaccharide probes with high purity, representing major sequences in glucans. Negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation was used for complete linkage analysis of gluco-oligosaccharides in linear “homo” and “hetero” and branched sequences. The system is validated using antibodies and carbohydrate-binding modules known to target α- or β-glucans in different biological contexts, extending knowledge on their specificities, and applied to reveal new information on glucan recognition by two signaling molecules of the immune system against pathogens: Dectin-1 and DC-SIGN. The sequencing of the glucan oligosaccharides by the MS method and their interrogation on the microarrays provides detailed information on linkage, sequence and chain length requirements of glucan-recognizing proteins, and are a sensitive means of revealing unsuspected sequences in the polysaccharides. PMID:25670804

  5. Progesterone-Based Intrauterine Device Use Is Associated with a Thinner Apical Layer of the Human Ectocervical Epithelium and a Lower ZO-1 mRNA Expression1

    PubMed Central

    Tjernlund, Annelie; Carias, Ann M.; Andersson, Sonia; Gustafsson-Sanchez, Susanna; Röhl, Maria; Petersson, Pernilla; Introini, Andrea; Hope, Thomas J.; Broliden, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Currently, whether hormonal contraceptives affect male to female human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is being debated. In this study, we investigated whether the use of progesterone-based intrauterine devices (pIUDs) is associated with a thinning effect on the ectocervical squamous epithelium, down-regulation of epithelial junction proteins, and/or alteration of HIV target cell distribution in the human ectocervix. Ectocervical tissue biopsies from healthy premenopausal volunteers using pIUDs were collected and compared to biopsies obtained from two control groups, namely women using combined oral contraceptives (COCs) or who do not use hormonal contraceptives. In situ staining and image analysis were used to measure epithelial thickness and the presence of HIV receptors in tissue biopsies. Messenger RNA levels of epithelial junction markers were measured by quantitative PCR. The epithelial thickness displayed by women in the pIUD group was similar to those in the COC group, but significantly thinner as compared to women in the no hormonal contraceptive group. The thinner epithelial layer of the pIUD group was specific to the apical layer of the ectocervix. Furthermore, the pIUD group expressed significantly lower levels of the tight junction marker ZO-1 within the epithelium as compared to the COC group. Similar expression levels of HIV receptors and coreceptors CD4, CCR5, DC-SIGN, and Langerin were observed in the three study groups. Thus, women using pIUD displayed a thinner apical layer of the ectocervical epithelium and reduced ZO-1 expression as compared to control groups. These data suggest that pIUD use may weaken the ectocervical epithelial barrier against invading pathogens, including HIV. PMID:25588510

  6. Laminin Peptide-Immobilized Hydrogels Modulate Valve Endothelial Cell Hemostatic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Balaoing, Liezl Rae; Post, Allison Davis; Lin, Adam Yuh; Tseng, Hubert; Moake, Joel L.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2015-01-01

    , utilization of non-integrin adhesive peptide sequences derived from basement membrane ECM may recapitulate balanced VEC function and may benefit endothelialization of valve implants. PMID:26090873

  7. Biology of Zika Virus Infection in Human Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Neyret, Aymeric; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Choumet, Valérie; Briant, Laurence; Desprès, Philippe; Amara, Ali; Yssel, Hans

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, that causes a mosquito-borne disease transmitted by the Aedes genus, with recent outbreaks in the South Pacific. Here we examine the importance of human skin in the entry of ZIKV and its contribution to the induction of antiviral immune responses. We show that human dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and immature dendritic cells are permissive to the most recent ZIKV isolate, responsible for the epidemic in French Polynesia. Several entry and/or adhesion factors, including DC-SIGN, AXL, Tyro3, and, to a lesser extent, TIM-1, permitted ZIKV entry, with a major role for the TAM receptor AXL. The ZIKV permissiveness of human skin fibroblasts was confirmed by the use of a neutralizing antibody and specific RNA silencing. ZIKV induced the transcription of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, and MDA5, as well as several interferon-stimulated genes, including OAS2, ISG15, and MX1, characterized by strongly enhanced beta interferon gene expression. ZIKV was found to be sensitive to the antiviral effects of both type I and type II interferons. Finally, infection of skin fibroblasts resulted in the formation of autophagosomes, whose presence was associated with enhanced viral replication, as shown by the use of Torin 1, a chemical inducer of autophagy, and the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The results presented herein permit us to gain further insight into the biology of ZIKV and to devise strategies aiming to interfere with the pathology caused by this emerging flavivirus. IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. Vector-mediated transmission of ZIKV is initiated when a blood-feeding female Aedes mosquito injects the virus into the skin of its mammalian host, followed by infection of permissive cells via specific receptors. Indeed, skin immune

  8. Accessory cells with a veiled morphology and movement pattern generated from monocytes after avoidance of plastic adherence and of NADPH oxidase activation. A comparison with GM-CSF/IL-4-induced monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ruwhof, Cindy; Canning, Martha O; Grotenhuis, Kristel; de Wit, Harm J; Florencia, Zenovia Z; de Haan-Meulman, Meeny; Drexhage, Hemmo A

    2002-07-01

    Veiled cells (VC) present in afferent lymph transport antigen from the periphery to the draining lymph nodes. Although VC in lymph form a heterogeneous population, some of the cells clearly belong on morphological grounds to the Langerhans cell (LC)/ dendritic cell (DC) series. Here we show that culturing monocytes for 24 hrs while avoiding plastic adherence (polypropylene tubes) and avoiding the activation of NADPH oxidase (blocking agents) results in the generation of a population of veiled accessory cells. The generated VC were actively moving cells like lymph-borne VC in vivo. The monocyte (mo)-derived VC population existed of CD14(dim/-) and CD14(brighT) cells. Of these the CD14(dim/-) VC were as good in stimulating allogeneic T cell proliferation as immature DC (iDC) obtained after one week of adherent culture of monocytes in granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/interleukin (IL)-4. This underscores the accessory cell function of the mo-derived CD14(dim/-) VC. Although the CD14(dim/-)VC had a modest expression of the DC-specific marker CD83 and were positive for S100, expression of the DC-specific markers CD1a, Langerin, DC-SIGN, and DC-LAMP were absent. This indicates that the here generated CD14(dim/-) VC can not be considered as classical LC/DC. It was also impossible to turn the CD14(dim/-) mo-derived VC population into typical DC by culture for one week in GM-CSF/IL-4 or LPS. In fact the cells died tinder such circumstances, gaining some macrophage characteristics before dying. The IL-12 production from mo-derived CD14(dim/-) VC was lower, whereas the production of IL-10 was higher as compared to iDC. Consequently the T cells that were stimulated by these mo-derived VC produced less IFN-gamma as compared with T cells stimulated by iDC. Our data indicate that it is possible to rapidly generate a population of CD14(dim/-) veiled accessory cells from monocytes. The marker pattern and cytokine production of these VC indicate that this

  9. Several N-Glycans on the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 Preferentially Locate Near Disulphide Bridges and Are Required for Efficient Infectivity and Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Mathys, Leen; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 contains nine disulphide bridges and is highly glycosylated, carrying on average 24 N-linked glycans. Using a probability calculation, we here demonstrate that there is a co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-linked glycans in HIV-1 gp120, with a predominance of N-linked glycans in close proximity to disulphide bridges, at the C-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Also, N-glycans are frequently found immediately adjacent to disulphide bridges in gp120 at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. In contrast, N-glycans at positions close to, but not immediately neighboring disulphide bridges seem to be disfavored at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Such a pronounced co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-glycans was also found for the N-glycans on glycoprotein E1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) but not for other heavily glycosylated proteins such as E2 from HCV and the surface GP from Ebola virus. The potential functional role of the presence of N-glycans near disulphide bridges in HIV-1 gp120 was studied using site-directed mutagenesis, either by deleting conserved N-glycans or by inserting new N-glycosylation sites near disulphide bridges. The generated HIV-1NL4.3 mutants were subjected to an array of assays, determining the envelope glycoprotein levels in mutant viral particles, their infectivity and the capture and transmission efficiencies of mutant virus particles by DC-SIGN. Three N-glycans located nearby disulphide bridges were found to be crucial for the preservation of several of these functions of gp120. In addition, introduction of new N-glycans upstream of several disulphide bridges, at locations where there was a significant absence of N-glycans in a broad variety of virus strains, was found to result in a complete loss of viral infectivity. It was shown that the N-glycan environment around well-defined disulphide bridges of gp120 is highly critical to allow efficient viral infection

  10. A Peptide Mimetic of 5-Acetylneuraminic Acid-Galactose Binds with High Avidity to Siglecs and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L.; Spyroulias, Georgios A.; Jones, Norman G.; Hanson, Carl V.; Hoober, J. Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified several peptide sequences that mimicked the terminal sugars of complex glycans. Using plant lectins as analogs of lectin-type cell-surface receptors, a tetravalent form of a peptide with the sequence NPSHPLSG, designated svH1C, bound with high avidity to lectins specific for glycans with terminal 5-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-galactose (Gal)/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) sequences. In this report, we show by circular dichroism and NMR spectra that svH1C lacks an ordered structure and thus interacts with binding sites from a flexible conformation. The peptide binds with high avidity to several recombinant human siglec receptors that bind preferentially to Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal, Neu5Ac(α2,6)GalNAc or Neu5Ac(α2,8)Neu5Ac ligands. In addition, the peptide bound the receptor NKG2D, which contains a lectin-like domain that binds Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal. The peptide bound to these receptors with a KD in the range of 0.6 to 1 μM. Binding to these receptors was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, which contains multiple glycans that terminate in Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal or Neu5Ac(α2,6)Gal, and by sialyllactose. Binding of svH1C was not detected with CLEC9a, CLEC10a or DC-SIGN, which are lectin-type receptors specific for other sugars. Incubation of neuraminidase-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with svH1C resulted in binding of the peptide to a subset of the CD14+ monocyte population. Tyrosine phosphorylation of siglecs decreased dramatically when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 100 nM svH1C. Subcutaneous, alternate-day injections of svH1C into mice induced several-fold increases in populations of several types of immune cells in the peritoneal cavity. These results support the conclusion that svH1C mimics Neu5Ac-containing sequences and interacts with cell-surface receptors with avidities sufficient to induce biological responses at low concentrations. The attenuation of inhibitory receptors suggests that svH1C has

  11. Pattern-recognition receptors and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of several human malignancies, a classic example being gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Development of GC is known to result from infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, which initially induces acute inflammation and, in a subset of patients, progresses over time to chronic inflammation, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and finally intestinal-type GC. Germ-line encoded receptors known as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines that are crucial for both Th1 and Th2 responses. Given that H. pylori is initially targeted by PRRs, it is conceivable that dysfunction within genes of this arm of the immune system could modulate the host response against H. pylori infection, and subsequently influence the emergence of GC. Current evidence suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) (NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3), a C-type lectin receptor (DC-SIGN), and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA-5), are involved in both the recognition of H. pylori and gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, polymorphisms in genes involved in the TLR (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and CD14) and NLR (NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRP12, NLRX1, CASP1, ASC, and CARD8) signaling pathways have been shown to modulate the risk of H. pylori infection, gastric precancerous lesions, and/or GC. Further, the modulation of PRRs has been suggested to suppress H. pylori-induced inflammation and enhance GC cell apoptosis, highlighting their potential relevance in GC therapeutics. In this review, we present current advances in our understanding of the role of the TLR and NLR signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of GC, address the involvement of other recently identified PRRs in GC, and discuss the potential implications of PRRs in GC immunotherapy.

  12. Several N-Glycans on the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 Preferentially Locate Near Disulphide Bridges and Are Required for Efficient Infectivity and Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mathys, Leen; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 contains nine disulphide bridges and is highly glycosylated, carrying on average 24 N-linked glycans. Using a probability calculation, we here demonstrate that there is a co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-linked glycans in HIV-1 gp120, with a predominance of N-linked glycans in close proximity to disulphide bridges, at the C-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Also, N-glycans are frequently found immediately adjacent to disulphide bridges in gp120 at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. In contrast, N-glycans at positions close to, but not immediately neighboring disulphide bridges seem to be disfavored at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Such a pronounced co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-glycans was also found for the N-glycans on glycoprotein E1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) but not for other heavily glycosylated proteins such as E2 from HCV and the surface GP from Ebola virus. The potential functional role of the presence of N-glycans near disulphide bridges in HIV-1 gp120 was studied using site-directed mutagenesis, either by deleting conserved N-glycans or by inserting new N-glycosylation sites near disulphide bridges. The generated HIV-1NL4.3 mutants were subjected to an array of assays, determining the envelope glycoprotein levels in mutant viral particles, their infectivity and the capture and transmission efficiencies of mutant virus particles by DC-SIGN. Three N-glycans located nearby disulphide bridges were found to be crucial for the preservation of several of these functions of gp120. In addition, introduction of new N-glycans upstream of several disulphide bridges, at locations where there was a significant absence of N-glycans in a broad variety of virus strains, was found to result in a complete loss of viral infectivity. It was shown that the N-glycan environment around well-defined disulphide bridges of gp120 is highly critical to allow efficient viral infection

  13. Pattern-Recognition Receptors and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Mitchell, Hazel M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of several human malignancies, a classic example being gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Development of GC is known to result from infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, which initially induces acute inflammation and, in a subset of patients, progresses over time to chronic inflammation, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and finally intestinal-type GC. Germ-line encoded receptors known as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines that are crucial for both Th1 and Th2 responses. Given that H. pylori is initially targeted by PRRs, it is conceivable that dysfunction within genes of this arm of the immune system could modulate the host response against H. pylori infection, and subsequently influence the emergence of GC. Current evidence suggests that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) (NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3), a C-type lectin receptor (DC-SIGN), and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA-5), are involved in both the recognition of H. pylori and gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, polymorphisms in genes involved in the TLR (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and CD14) and NLR (NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, NLRP12, NLRX1, CASP1, ASC, and CARD8) signaling pathways have been shown to modulate the risk of H. pylori infection, gastric precancerous lesions, and/or GC. Further, the modulation of PRRs has been suggested to suppress H. pylori-induced inflammation and enhance GC cell apoptosis, highlighting their potential relevance in GC therapeutics. In this review, we present current advances in our understanding of the role of the TLR and NLR signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of GC, address the involvement of other recently identified PRRs in GC, and discuss the potential implications of PRRs in GC immunotherapy

  14. The Low-Cost Compound Lignosulfonic Acid (LA) Exhibits Broad-Spectrum Anti-HIV and Anti-HSV Activity and Has Potential for Microbicidal Applications

    PubMed Central

    D’huys, Thomas; Petrova, Mariya I.; Lebeer, Sarah; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela; Schols, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lignosulfonic acid (LA), a low-cost lignin-derived polyanionic macromolecule, was extensively studied for its anti-HIV and anti-HSV activity in various cellular assays, its mechanism of viral inhibition and safety profile as potential microbicide. Results LA demonstrated potent inhibitory activity of HIV replication against a wide range of R5 and X4 HIV strains and prevented the uptake of HIV by bystander CD4+ T cells from persistently infected T cells in vitro (IC50: 0.07 – 0.34 μM). LA also inhibited HSV-2 replication in vitro in different cell types (IC50: 0.42 – 1.1 μM) and in rodents in vivo. Furthermore, LA neutralized the HIV-1 and HSV-2 DC-SIGN-mediated viral transfer to CD4+ T cells (IC50: ∼1 μM). In addition, dual HIV-1/HSV-2 infection in T cells was potently blocked by LA (IC50: 0.71 μM). No antiviral activity was observed against the non-enveloped viruses Coxsackie type B4 and Reovirus type 1. LA is defined as a HIV entry inhibitor since it interfered with gp120 binding to the cell surface of T cells. Pretreatment of PBMCs with LA neither increased expression levels of cellular activation markers (CD69, CD25 and HLA-DR), nor enhanced HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, we found that LA had non-antagonistic effects with acyclovir, PRO2000 or LabyA1 (combination index (CI): 0.46 – 1.03) in its anti-HSV-2 activity and synergized with tenofovir (CI: 0.59) in its anti-HIV-1 activity. To identify mechanisms of LA resistance, we generated in vitro a mutant HIV-1 NL4.3LAresistant virus, which acquired seven mutations in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins: S160N, V170N, Q280H and R389T in gp120 and K77Q, N113D and H132Y in gp41. Additionally, HIV-1 NL4.3LAresistant virus showed cross-resistance with feglymycin, enfuvirtide, PRO2000 and mAb b12, four well-described HIV binding/fusion inhibitors. Importantly, LA did not affect the growth of vaginal Lactobacilli strains. Conclusion Overall, these data highlight LA as a potential and unique low

  15. SARS-CoV Replication and Pathogenesis in an In Vitro Model of the Human Conducting Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Amy C.; Burkett, Susan E.; Yount, Boyd; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2008-01-01

    inoculation and progeny virion egress in both polarized Calu3 and ciliated cells of HAE was the apical surface suggesting mechanisms to release large quantities of virus into the lumen of the human lung. Preincubation of the apical surface of cultures with antisera directed against hACE2 reduced viral titers by 2 logs while antisera against DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR did not reduce viral replication levels suggesting that hACE2 is the primary receptor for entry of SARS-CoV into the ciliated cells of HAE cultures. To assess infectivity in ciliated airway cultures derived from susceptible animal species we generated a recombinant SARS-CoV by deletion of open reading frame 7a/7b (ORF 7a/b) and insertion of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) resulting in SARS-CoV GFP. SARS-CoV GFP replicated to similar titers as wild type viruses in Vero E6, MA104, and CaCo2 cells. In addition, SARS-CoV replication in airway epithelial cultures generated from Golden Syrian hamster tracheas reached similar titers to the human cultures by 72 hours post infection. Efficient SARS-CoV infection of ciliated cell-types in HAE provides a useful in vitro model of human lung origin to study characteristics of SARS-CoV replication and pathogenesis. PMID:17451829