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Sample records for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coa synthase

  1. Ketogenic mitochondrial 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene expression in intestine and liver of suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Serra, D; Asins, G; Hegardt, F G

    1993-03-01

    The ketogenic mitochondrial 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase gene is expressed in intestine of suckling rats, its mRNA levels changing with age. Intestine mitochondrial mRNA values reach maximum levels on the 12th postnatal day and then decrease smoothly. Mother's milk may influence the intestine expression, since mRNA levels at birth are very low, increasing after the first lactation. Moreover, rats weaned at either Day 18 or 21 decrease their mRNA levels dramatically and there is no expression in adult rats. Mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase is also expressed in liver of suckling rats but the developmental pattern of mRNAs is different from that in intestine, showing the highest values at Day 3 of life. mRNA levels in liver are lower than in intestine for most of the suckling period, suggesting the physiological relevance of the intestine for the ketogenic process of the whole body. Liver mRNA levels on weaning and in adult rats are high enough to sustain hepatic ketogenesis.

  2. Rat mitochondrial and cytosolic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthases are encoded by two different genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ayté, J; Gil-Gómez, G; Haro, D; Marrero, P F; Hegardt, F G

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a 1994-base-pair cDNA that encompasses the entire transcription unit of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase (EC 4.1.3.5.) gene from rat. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence reveals that the cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 508 residues and 56,918-Da molecular mass. Identify of the cDNA clone isolated as mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase was confirmed by the following criteria: (i) Amino acid residues are 65% homologous with hamster cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase. (ii) A 19-amino acid sequence probably corresponding to the catalytic site is highly homologous (90%) to that reported for chicken liver mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. (iii) The expression product of the cDNA in Escherichia coli has HMG-CoA synthase activity. (iv) The protein includes a sequence of 37 amino acid residues at the N terminus that is not present in the cytosolic enzyme. The predominantly basic, hydrophobic, and hydroxylated nature of the residues of this sequence suggests that it is a leader peptide to target HMG-CoA synthase inside mitochondria. These data plus the hybridization pattern in genomic Southern blot analysis, the different transcript size (2.0 kilobases versus 3.4 kilobases for the cytosolic enzyme), and the different expression pattern shown in RNA blot experiments suggest the presence of two HMG-CoA synthase genes, one for the cytosolic and another for the mitochondrial enzyme. Images PMID:1971108

  3. Enhancement of cardenolide and phytosterol levels by expression of an N-terminally truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase in Transgenic digitalis minor.

    PubMed

    Sales, Ester; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Pathway engineering in medicinal plants attains a special significance in Digitalis species, the main industrial source of cardiac glycosides, steroidal metabolites derived from mevalonic acid via the triterpenoid pathway. In this work, the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, coding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the MVA pathway, was expressed in the cardenolide-producing plant Digitalis minor. Transgenic plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control wild plants and displayed the same developmental pattern. Constitutive expression of HMG1 resulted in an increased sterol and cardenolide production in both in vitro- and greenhouse-grown plants. This work demonstrates that transgenic D. minor plants are a valuable system to study and achieve metabolic engineering of the cardenolide pathway and in consequence for the genetic improvement of Digitalis species.

  4. Tissue-specific expression and dietary regulation of chimeric mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase/human growth hormone gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Serra, D; Fillat, C; Matas, R; Bosch, F; Hegardt, F G

    1996-03-29

    We have studied the role of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase gene in regulating ketogenesis. The gene exhibits expression in various tissues and it is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of this expression, we linked a 1148-base-pair portion of the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene and analyzed the expression of the hGH reporter gene in transgenic mice. mRNA levels of hGH were observed in liver, testis, ovary, stomach, colon, cecum, brown adipose tissue, spleen, adrenal glands, and mammary glands from adult mice, and also in liver and stomach, duodenum, jejunum, brown adipose tissue, and heart of suckling mice. There was no expression either in kidney or in any other nonketogenic tissue. The comparison between these data and those of the endogenous mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene suggests that the 1148 base pairs of the promoter contain the elements necessary for expression in liver and testis, but an enhancer is necessary for full expression in intestine of suckling animals and that a silencer prevents expression in stomach, brown adipose tissue, spleen, adrenal glands, and mammary glands in wild type adult mice. In starvation, transgenic mice showed higher expression in liver than did wild type. Both refeeding and insulin injection reduced the expression. Fat diets, composed in each case of different fatty acids, produced similar expression levels, respectively, to those found in wild type animals, suggesting that long-, medium-, and short-chain fatty acids may exert a positive influence on the transcription rate in this 1148-base-pair portion of the promoter. The ketogenic capacity of liver and the blood ketone body levels were equal in transgenic mice and in nontransgenic mice.

  5. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species.

  6. The ketogenic diet upregulates expression of the gene encoding the key ketogenic enzyme mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Tim E; Eagles, Douglas A; Sato, Hitoshi

    2002-04-01

    The ketogenic diet is a clinically and experimentally effective anti-epileptic treatment whose molecular mechanism(s) of action remain to be elucidated. As a first step in defining its effects on regulation of fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis at the genetic level, we have administered to rats: (1) a calorie-restricted ketogenic diet (KCR); (2) a calorie-restricted normal diet (NCR); or (3) a normal diet ad libitum (NAL). We have used RNase protection to co-assay diet-induced changes in abundance of the mRNA encoding the critical enzyme of ketogenesis from acetyl-CoA namely mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (mHS) in liver and brain, together with mRNAs encoding three other key enzymes of fatty acid oxidation. We demonstrate that NCR-fed rats exhibit a significant 2-fold increase in liver mHS mRNA compared to NAL-fed rats, and that KCR-fed rats exhibit a significant 2-fold increase in both liver and brain mHS mRNA compared to NAL-fed rats. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the effect of a ketogenic diet on gene expression in brain, and suggest possible anti-epileptic mechanisms for future investigation.

  7. Cloning, Expression Profiling and Functional Analysis of CnHMGS, a Gene Encoding 3-hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Synthase from Chamaemelum nobile.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng; Chen, Qiangwen; Tao, Tingting; Lei, Jing; Zhang, Weiwei; Liao, Yongling; Chang, Jie; Li, Xingxiang

    2016-03-08

    Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L.) is renowned for its production of essential oils, which major components are sesquiterpenoids. As the important enzyme in the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase (HMGS) catalyze the crucial step in the mevalonate pathway in plants. To isolate and identify the functional genes involved in the sesquiterpene biosynthesis of C. nobile L., a HMGS gene designated as CnHMGS (GenBank Accession No. KU529969) was cloned from C. nobile. The cDNA sequence of CnHMGS contained a 1377 bp open reading frame encoding a 458-amino-acid protein. The sequence of the CnHMGS protein was highly homologous to those of HMGS proteins from other plant species. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that CnHMGS clustered with the HMGS of Asteraceae in the dicotyledon clade. Further functional complementation of CnHMGS in the mutant yeast strain YSC6274 lacking HMGS activity demonstrated that the cloned CnHMGS cDNA encodes a functional HMGS. Transcript profile analysis indicated that CnHMGS was preferentially expressed in flowers and roots of C. nobile. The expression of CnHMGS could be upregulated by exogenous elicitors, including methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid, suggesting that CnHMGS was elicitor-responsive. The characterization and expression analysis of CnHMGS is helpful to understand the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid in C. nobile at the molecular level and also provides molecular wealth for the biotechnological improvement of this important medicinal plant.

  8. Gene expression of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in a poorly ketogenic mammal: effect of starvation during the neonatal period of the piglet.

    PubMed

    Adams, S H; Alho, C S; Asins, G; Hegardt, F G; Marrero, P F

    1997-05-15

    The low ketogenic capacity of pigs correlates with a low activity of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase. To identify the molecular mechanism controlling such activity, we isolated the pig cDNA encoding this enzyme and analysed changes in mRNA levels and mitochondrial specific activity induced during development and starvation. Pig mitochondrial synthase showed a tissue-specific expression pattern. As with rat and human, the gene is expressed in liver and large intestine; however, the pig differs in that mRNA was not detected in testis, kidney or small intestine. During development, pig mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene expression showed interesting differences from that in the rat: (1) there was a 2-3 week lag in the postnatal induction; (2) the mRNA levels remained relatively abundant through the suckling-weaning transition and at maturity, in contrast with the fall observed in rats at similar stages of development; and (3) the gene expression was highly induced by fasting during the suckling, whereas no such change in mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase mRNA levels has been observed in rat. The enzyme activity of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase increased 27-fold during starvation in piglets, but remained one order of magnitude lower than rats. These results indicate that post-transcriptional mechanism(s) and/or intrinsic differences in the encoded enzyme are responsible for the low activity of pig HMG-CoA synthase observed throughout development or after fasting.

  9. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Brassica juncea 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA synthase 1: expression and characterization of recombinant wild-type and mutant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2004-11-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA synthase (HMGS; EC 2.3.3.10) is the second enzyme in the cytoplasmic mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, and catalyses the condensation of acetyl-CoA with acetoacetyl-CoA (AcAc-CoA) to yield S-HMG-CoA. In this study, we have first characterized in detail a plant HMGS, Brassica juncea HMGS1 (BjHMGS1), as a His6-tagged protein from Escherichia coli. Native gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the enzyme behaves as a homodimer with a calculated mass of 105.8 kDa. It is activated by 5 mM dithioerythreitol and is inhibited by F-244 which is specific for HMGS enzymes. It has a pH optimum of 8.5 and a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, with an energy of activation of 62.5 J x mol(-1). Unlike cytosolic HMGS from chicken and cockroach, cations like Mg2+, Mn2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ did not stimulate His6-BjHMGS1 activity in vitro; instead all except Mg2+ were inhibitory. His6-BjHMGS1 has an apparent K(m-acetyl-CoA) of 43 microM and a V(max) of 0.47 micromol x mg(-1) x min(-1), and was inhibited by one of the substrates (AcAc-CoA) and by both products (HMG-CoA and HS-CoA). Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved amino acid residues in BjHMGS1 revealed that substitutions R157A, H188N and C212S resulted in a decreased V(max), indicating some involvement of these residues in catalytic capacity. Unlike His6-BjHMGS1 and its soluble purified mutant derivatives, the H188N mutant did not display substrate inhibition by AcAc-CoA. Substitution S359A resulted in a 10-fold increased specific activity. Based on these kinetic analyses, we generated a novel double mutation H188N/S359A, which resulted in a 10-fold increased specific activity, but still lacking inhibition by AcAc-CoA, strongly suggesting that His-188 is involved in conferring substrate inhibition on His6-BjHMGS1. Substitution of an aminoacyl residue resulting in loss of substrate inhibition has never been previously reported for any HMGS.

  11. Increased accumulation of the cardio-cerebrovascular disease treatment drug tanshinone in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots by the enzymes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Luo, Xiuqin; Ju, Guanhua; Yu, Xiaohong; Hao, Xiaolong; Huang, Qiang; Xiao, Jianbo; Cui, Lijie; Kai, Guoyin

    2014-09-01

    Tanshinone is widely used for treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases with increasing demand. Herein, key enzyme genes SmHMGR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase) and SmDXR (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase) involved in the tanshinone biosynthetic pathway were introduced into Salvia miltiorrhiza (Sm) hairy roots to enhance tanshinone production. Over-expression of SmHMGR or SmDXR in hairy root lines can significantly enhance the yield of tanshinone. Transgenic hairy root lines co-expressing HMGR and DXR (HD lines) produced evidently higher levels of total tanshinone (TT) compared with the control and single gene transformed lines. The highest tanshinone production was observed in HD42 with the concentration of 3.25 mg g(-1) DW. Furthermore, the transgenic hairy roots showed higher antioxidant activity than control. In addition, transgenic hairy root harboring HMGR and DXR (HD42) exhibited higher tanshinone content after elicitation by yeast extract and/or Ag(+) than before. Tanshinone can be significantly enhanced to 5.858, 6.716, and 4.426 mg g(-1) DW by YE, Ag(+), and YE-Ag(+) treatment compared with non-induced HD42, respectively. The content of cryptotanshinone and dihydrotanshinone was effectively elevated upon elicitor treatments, whereas there was no obvious promotion effect for the other two compounds tanshinone I and tanshinone IIA. Our results provide a useful strategy to improve tanshinone content as well as other natural active products by combination of genetic engineering with elicitors.

  12. The Arabidopsis FLAKY POLLEN1 gene encodes a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase required for development of tapetum-specific organelles and fertility of pollen grains.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Sumie; Nishimori, Yuka; Yamada, Miho; Saito, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Miyake, Hiroshi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-06-01

    The pollen coat is a surface component of pollen grains required for fertilization. To study how the pollen coat is produced, we identified and characterized a recessive and conditional male-sterile Arabidopsis mutant, flaky pollen1-1 (fkp1-1), whose pollen grains lack functional pollen coats. FKP1 is a single-copy gene in the Arabidopsis genome and encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMG-CoA synthase), an enzyme of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway involved in biosynthesis of isoprenoids such as sterols. We found that fkp1-1 possesses a T-DNA insertion 550 bp upstream of the initiation codon. RT-PCR and promoter analyses revealed that fkp1-1 results in knockdown of FKP1 predominantly in tapetum. Electron microscopy showed that the mutation affected the development of tapetum-specific lipid-containing organelles (elaioplast and tapetosome), causing the deficient formation of fkp1-1 pollen coats. These results suggest that both elaioplasts, which accumulate vast amount of sterol esters, and tapetosomes, which are unique oil-accumulating structures, require the MVA pathway for development. Null alleles of fkp1 were male-gametophyte lethal upon pollen tube elongation, whereas female gametophytes were normal. These results show that the MVA pathway is essential, at least in tapetal cells and pollen grains, for the development of tapetum-specific organelles and the fertility of pollen grains.

  13. Effects of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, atorvastatin and simvastatin, on the expression of endothelin-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Perera, O; Pérez-Sala, D; Navarro-Antolín, J; Sánchez-Pascuala, R; Hernández, G; Díaz, C; Lamas, S

    1998-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis has been attributed to alterations in the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway or to an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1). The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to ameliorate endothelial function. However, the physiological basis of this observation is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of Atorvastatin and Simvastatin on the pre-proET-1 mRNA expression and ET-1 synthesis and on the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) transcript and protein levels in bovine aortic endothelial cells. These agents inhibited pre-proET-1 mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion (60-70% maximum inhibition) and reduced immunoreactive ET-1 levels (25-50%). This inhibitory effect was maintained in the presence of oxidized LDL (1-50 microg/ml). No significant modification of pre-proET-1 mRNA half-life was observed. In addition, mevalonate, but not cholesterol, reversed the statin-mediated decrease of pre-proET-1 mRNA levels. eNOS mRNA expression was reduced by oxidized LDL in a dose-dependent fashion (up to 57% inhibition), whereas native LDL had no effect. Statins were able to prevent the inhibitory action exerted by oxidized LDL on eNOS mRNA and protein levels. Hence, these drugs might influence vascular tone by modulating the expression of endothelial vasoactive factors. PMID:9637705

  14. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-mediated effect of fluvastatin on cytosolic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase transcription.

    PubMed

    Mascaró, C; Ortiz, J A; Ramos, M M; Haro, D; Hegardt, F G

    2000-02-15

    The effects of acute treatment with fluvastatin, a hypocholesteremic drug, on the mRNA levels of several regulatory enzymes of cholesterogenesis and of the LDL receptor were determined in rat liver. Fluvastatin increased the hepatic mRNA levels for HMG-CoA reductase up to 12-fold in 5 weeks of treatment at a daily dose of 6. 3 mg/kg. The effect was less marked in cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase, farnesyl-PP synthase, squalene synthetase, and LDL receptor. SREBP-2 mRNA levels were also increased, but SREBP-1 were not. De novo synthesis of cholesterol in several cultured cells was reduced by increasing concentrations of fluvastatin, and the IC(50) values of fluvastatin in HepG2, CV-1, and CHO cells were respectively 0.01, 0. 05, and 0.1 microM. When CHO cells stably transfected with a chimeric gene composed of the promoter of cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase and the CAT gene as a reporter were incubated with fluvastatin, the CAT gene was overexpressed, an effect which was similar to the cotransfection with the processed form of SREBP-1a. Both ALLN and fluvastatin increased the transcriptional activity of cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase. Mutation in either SRE or NF-Y boxes abolished the increase in transcriptional rate caused by fluvastatin in the promoter of cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase. These results indicate that the increase in transcriptional activity in the HMG-CoA synthase gene attributable to fluvastatin is a consequence of the activation of the proteolytic cleavage of SREBPs by reduced levels of intracellular cholesterol.

  15. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Montalvetti, A; Peña-Díaz, J; Hurtado, R; Ruiz-Pérez, L M; González-Pacanowska, D

    2000-07-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan reductase, obtaining K(m) values for the overall reaction of 40.3+/-5.8 microM for (R,S)-HMG-CoA and 81.4+/-5.3 microM for NADPH; V(max) was 33.55+/-1.8 units x mg(-1). Gel-filtration experiments suggested an apparent molecular mass of 184 kDa with subunits of 46 kDa. Finally, in order to achieve a better understanding of the role of this enzyme in trypanosomatids, the effect of possible regulators of isoprenoid biosynthesis in cultured promastigote cells was studied. Neither mevalonic acid nor serum sterols appear to modulate enzyme activity whereas incubation with lovastatin results in significant increases in the amount of reductase protein. Western- and Northern-blot analyses indicate that this activation is apparently performed via post-transcriptional control.

  16. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Montalvetti, A; Peña-Díaz, J; Hurtado, R; Ruiz-Pérez, L M; González-Pacanowska, D

    2000-01-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan reductase, obtaining K(m) values for the overall reaction of 40.3+/-5.8 microM for (R,S)-HMG-CoA and 81.4+/-5.3 microM for NADPH; V(max) was 33.55+/-1.8 units x mg(-1). Gel-filtration experiments suggested an apparent molecular mass of 184 kDa with subunits of 46 kDa. Finally, in order to achieve a better understanding of the role of this enzyme in trypanosomatids, the effect of possible regulators of isoprenoid biosynthesis in cultured promastigote cells was studied. Neither mevalonic acid nor serum sterols appear to modulate enzyme activity whereas incubation with lovastatin results in significant increases in the amount of reductase protein. Western- and Northern-blot analyses indicate that this activation is apparently performed via post-transcriptional control. PMID:10861207

  17. Short- and long-term regulation of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by a 4-methylcoumarin.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Laura; Segatto, Marco; Simeoni, Veronica; Balducci, Valentina; Dhawan, Ashish; Parmar, Virinder S; Prasad, Ashok K; Saso, Luciano; Incerpi, Sandra; Pallottini, Valentina

    2011-07-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the most significant risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Cholesterol homeostasis is regulated by both the receptor-mediated endocytosis of Low Density Lipoproteins by LDL receptors and de novo cholesterol synthesis via the rate-limiting enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Although statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase substrate competitors, have revolutionized the management of cardiovascular diseases by lowering serum LDL, their side effects range from myalgia to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment with antioxidant compounds could represent an efficient alternative in the modulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity. Indeed it has already been demonstrated that the rise in reactive oxygen species levels causes the complete dephosphorylation and, in turn activation of the enzyme. Many coumarins and their derivatives have the special ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species or show a lipid lowering potential. Here we evaluated whether the coumarin, 4-methylesculetin could exert both the ability to scavenge ROS and to modulate 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in HepG2 cell line where the enzyme activity dysregulation induced by reactive oxygen species has already been reported. The antioxidant property of 4-methylesculetin led to the reduction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activation state through the increase of the enzyme phosphorylation. In addition, this coumarin showed the ability to modulate 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase protein levels both by transcriptional and degradational events independent of its antioxidant activity.

  18. Overexpressing 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (HMGR) in the Lactococcal Mevalonate Pathway for Heterologous Plant Sesquiterpene Production

    PubMed Central

    Song, Adelene Ai-Lian; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Abdullah, Mohd. Puad; Shafee, Norazizah; Othman, Roohaida; Tan, Ee-Fun; Noor, Normah Mohd.; Raha, Abdul Rahim

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a large and diverse group of metabolites with interesting properties such as flavour, fragrance and therapeutic properties. They are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate pathway or the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. While plants are the richest source of isoprenoids, they are not the most efficient producers. Escherichia coli and yeasts have been extensively studied as heterologous hosts for plant isoprenoids production. In the current study, we describe the usage of the food grade Lactococcus lactis as a potential heterologous host for the production of sesquiterpenes from a local herbaceous Malaysian plant, Persicaria minor (synonym Polygonum minus). A sesquiterpene synthase gene from P. minor was successfully cloned and expressed in L. lactis. The expressed protein was identified to be a β-sesquiphellandrene synthase as it was demonstrated to be functional in producing β-sesquiphellandrene at 85.4% of the total sesquiterpenes produced based on in vitro enzymatic assays. The recombinant L. lactis strain developed in this study was also capable of producing β-sesquiphellandrene in vivo without exogenous substrates supplementation. In addition, overexpression of the strain’s endogenous 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR), an established rate-limiting enzyme in the eukaryotic mevalonate pathway, increased the production level of β-sesquiphellandrene by 1.25–1.60 fold. The highest amount achieved was 33 nM at 2 h post-induction. PMID:23300671

  19. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding wheat 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, K; Beyou, A; Moon, K; Fang, L; Ulrich, T

    1993-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, EC 1.1.1.34) is a key enzyme in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. We have isolated partial cDNAs from wheat (Triticum aestivum) using the polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequences of these cDNAs shows that they represent a small family of genes that share a high degree of sequence homology among themselves as well as among genes from other organisms including tomato, Arabidopsis, hamster, human, Drosophila, and yeast. Southern blot analysis reveals the presence of at least four genes. Our results concerning the tissue-specific expression as well as developmental regulation of these HMGR cDNAs highlight the important role of this enzyme in the growth and development of wheat. PMID:8108513

  20. One statin, two statins, three statins, more: similarities and differences of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2011-01-01

    Statin drugs (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are one of the most widely prescribed drugs today. They are considered first-line therapy to lower blood serum cholesterol levels in conjunction with therapeutic lifestyle changes for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. In the following discussion, a brief explanation of the background of statins will explain why they are deemed so important today. The similarities and differences between the different statins will be addressed, including a look at dosage, side effects, and cautions for the seven 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors currently available.

  1. Feedback regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Dimster-Denk, D; Thorsness, M K; Rine, J

    1994-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells all isoprenoids are synthesized from a common precursor, mevalonate. The formation of mevalonate from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) is catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase and is the first committed step in isoprenoid biosynthesis. In mammalian cells, synthesis of HMG-CoA reductase is subject to feedback regulation at multiple molecular levels. We examined the state of feedback regulation of the synthesis of the HMG-CoA reductase isozyme encoded by the yeast gene HMG1 to examine the generality of this regulatory pattern. In yeast, synthesis of Hmg1p was subject to feedback regulation. This regulation of HMG-CoA reductase synthesis was independent of any change in the level of HMG1 mRNA. Furthermore, regulation of Hmg1p synthesis was keyed to the level of a nonsterol product of the mevalonate pathway. Manipulations of endogenous levels of several isoprenoid intermediates, either pharmacologically or genetically, suggested that mevalonate levels may control the synthesis of Hmg1p through effects on translation. Images PMID:7949422

  2. 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibition impairs muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Laura; Segatto, Marco; La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Fanelli, Francesca; Moreno, Sandra; Marino, Maria; Pallottini, Valentina

    2012-06-01

    Skeletal muscle has the ability to regenerate new muscle fibers after injury. The process of new muscle formation requires that quiescent mononuclear muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) become activated, proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into multinucleated myotubes which, in turn, undergo further differentiation and mature to form functional muscle fibers. Previous data demonstrated the crucial role played by 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, in fetal rat myoblast (L6) differentiation. This finding, along with epidemiological studies assessing the myotoxic effect of statins, HMGR inhibitors, allowed us to speculate that HMGR could be strongly involved in skeletal muscle repair. Thus, our research was aimed at evaluating such involvement: in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed on both mouse adult satellite cell derived myoblasts (SCDM) and mouse muscles injured with cardiotoxin. Results demonstrate that HMGR inhibition by the statin Simvastatin reduces SCDM fusion index, fast MHC protein levels by 60% and slow MHC by 40%. Most importantly, HMGR inhibition delays skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo. Thus, besides complaining of myopathies, patients given Simvastatin could also undergo an impairment in muscle repair.

  3. Targeting and topology in the membrane of plant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, N; Boronat, A

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate. This is the first committed step of isoprenoid biosynthesis. A common feature of all known plant HMGR isoforms is the presence of two highly conserved hydrophobic sequences in the N-terminal quarter of the protein. Using an in vitro system, we showed that the two hydrophobic sequences of Arabidopsis HMGR1S function as internal signal sequences. Specific recognition of these sequences by the signal recognition particle mediates the targeting of the protein to microsomes derived from the endoplasmic reticulum. Arabidopsis HMGR is inserted into the microsomal membrane, and the two hydrophobic sequences become membrane-spanning segments. The N-terminal end and the C-terminal catalytic domain of Arabidopsis HMGR are positioned on the cytosolic side of the membrane, whereas only a short hydrophilic sequence is exposed to the lumen. Our results suggest that the plant HMGR isoforms known to date are primarily targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and have the same topology in the membrane. This reinforces the hypothesis that mevalonate is synthesized only in the cytosol. The possibility that plant HMGRs might be located in different regions of the endomembrane system is discussed. PMID:8718626

  4. Structural (betaalpha)8 TIM barrel model of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase.

    PubMed

    Casals, Núria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Pié, Juan; Mir, Cecilia; Roca, Ramón; Puisac, Beatriz; Aledo, Rosa; Clotet, Josep; Menao, Sebastián; Serra, Dolors; Asins, Guillermina; Till, Jacqueline; Elias-Jones, Alun C; Cresto, Juan C; Chamoles, Nestor A; Abdenur, Jose E; Mayatepek, Ertan; Besley, Guy; Valencia, Alfonso; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2003-08-01

    This study describes three novel homozygous missense mutations (S75R, S201Y, and D204N) in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) lyase gene, which caused 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria in patients from Germany, England, and Argentina. Expression studies in Escherichia coli show that S75R and S201Y substitutions completely abolished the HMG-CoA lyase activity, whereas D204N reduced catalytic efficiency to 6.6% of the wild type. We also propose a three-dimensional model for human HMG-CoA lyase containing a (betaalpha)8 (TIM) barrel structure. The model is supported by the similarity with analogous TIM barrel structures of functionally related proteins, by the localization of catalytic amino acids at the active site, and by the coincidence between the shape of the substrate (HMG-CoA) and the predicted inner cavity. The three novel mutations explain the lack of HMG-CoA lyase activity on the basis of the proposed structure: in S75R and S201Y because the new amino acid residues occlude the substrate cavity, and in D204N because the mutation alters the electrochemical environment of the active site. We also report the localization of all missense mutations reported to date and show that these mutations are located in the beta-sheets around the substrate cavity.

  5. Subcellular localization of Arabidopsis 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Leivar, Pablo; González, Víctor M; Castel, Susanna; Trelease, Richard N; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Arró, Montserrat; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso; Ferrer, Albert; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Plants produce diverse isoprenoids, which are synthesized in plastids, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the nonorganellar cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate, a rate-limiting step in the cytoplasmic pathway. Several branches of the pathway lead to the synthesis of structurally and functionally varied, yet essential, isoprenoids. Several HMGR isoforms have been identified in all plants examined. Studies based on gene expression and on fractionation of enzyme activity suggested that subcellular compartmentalization of HMGR is an important intracellular channeling mechanism for the production of the specific classes of isoprenoids. Plant HMGR has been shown previously to insert in vitro into the membrane of microsomal vesicles, but the final in vivo subcellular localization(s) remains controversial. To address the latter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, we conducted a multipronged microscopy and cell fractionation approach that included imaging of chimeric HMGR green fluorescent protein localizations in transiently transformed cell leaves, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in wild-type and stably transformed seedlings, immunogold electron microscopy examinations of endogenous HMGR in seedling cotyledons, and sucrose density gradient analyses of HMGR-containing organelles. Taken together, the results reveal that endogenous Arabidopsis HMGR is localized at steady state within ER as expected, but surprisingly also predominantly within spherical, vesicular structures that range from 0.2- to 0.6-microm diameter, located in the cytoplasm and within the central vacuole in differentiated cotyledon cells. The N-terminal region, including the transmembrane domain of HMGR, was found to be necessary and sufficient for directing HMGR to ER and the spherical structures. It is believed, although not directly demonstrated, that these vesicle-like structures are derived from segments of

  6. Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase1

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; González, Víctor M.; Castel, Susanna; Trelease, Richard N.; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Arró, Montserrat; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso; Ferrer, Albert; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Plants produce diverse isoprenoids, which are synthesized in plastids, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the nonorganellar cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate, a rate-limiting step in the cytoplasmic pathway. Several branches of the pathway lead to the synthesis of structurally and functionally varied, yet essential, isoprenoids. Several HMGR isoforms have been identified in all plants examined. Studies based on gene expression and on fractionation of enzyme activity suggested that subcellular compartmentalization of HMGR is an important intracellular channeling mechanism for the production of the specific classes of isoprenoids. Plant HMGR has been shown previously to insert in vitro into the membrane of microsomal vesicles, but the final in vivo subcellular localization(s) remains controversial. To address the latter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, we conducted a multipronged microscopy and cell fractionation approach that included imaging of chimeric HMGR green fluorescent protein localizations in transiently transformed cell leaves, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in wild-type and stably transformed seedlings, immunogold electron microscopy examinations of endogenous HMGR in seedling cotyledons, and sucrose density gradient analyses of HMGR-containing organelles. Taken together, the results reveal that endogenous Arabidopsis HMGR is localized at steady state within ER as expected, but surprisingly also predominantly within spherical, vesicular structures that range from 0.2- to 0.6-μm diameter, located in the cytoplasm and within the central vacuole in differentiated cotyledon cells. The N-terminal region, including the transmembrane domain of HMGR, was found to be necessary and sufficient for directing HMGR to ER and the spherical structures. It is believed, although not directly demonstrated, that these vesicle-like structures are derived from segments of HMGR

  7. Vanadium and ascorbate effects on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol and tissue minerals in guinea pigs fed low-chromium diets.

    PubMed

    Seaborn, C D; Mitchell, E D; Stoecker, B J

    Vanadium has been reported to affect numerous physiological processes; however, a demonstration that vanadium deficiency consistently impairs biological function is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if the activity of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis, is affected by dietary supplementation of vanadate and/or chronic ascorbic acid deficiency. To determine if vanadium and/or ascorbic acid affected mineral metabolism, tissue minerals also were analyzed. Weanling male guinea pigs were assigned randomly to groups of 10 in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The dietary variables were ascorbate, 0.5 or 10 mg/day, and vanadium < 0.01 microgram or 0.5 microgram/g diet as NH4VO3 in a low Cr diet containing < 0.07 microgram Cr/g diet. After 21 weeks on this diet, guinea pigs receiving more ascorbate had lower liver weight/body weight ratios and increased bone copper. Testes weight/body weight ratios, hepatic glycogen and bone copper decreased while hepatic lipids, fecal bile acids, plasma cortisol and bone calcium and magnesium were increased by vanadium supplementation. An interaction between vanadium and ascorbate affected cholesterol excretion in feces, hepatic iron, plasma cholesterol concentration and the activity of HMG CoA reductase. This study provides evidence of increased bone mineral concentrations with vanadium supplementation and of an interaction between vanadium and ascorbate which affected cholesterol metabolism.

  8. Effect of polyphenols on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Saori; Kojima, Yuko; Sekino, Koichi; Yamato, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    When carbohydrate metabolism is impaired, fatty acid metabolism is activated. Excess acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) is generated from fatty acids by β-oxidation and is used for the formation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) and subsequently for acetoacetate. High levels of secreted ketone bodies (acetoacetate and 3β-hydroxybutyrate) lower the pH of blood and urine, resulting in ketoacidosis. HMG-CoA lyase in hepatic cells is a rate-limiting enzyme catalyzing the cleavage of HMG-CoA to acetoacetate, and thus inhibition of this enzyme results in reduced acetoacetate production, in other words, impaired ketoacidosis. Inhibition of HMG-CoA lyase activity possibly prevents ketoacidosis and should be the therapeutic target. Polyphenols are common and abundant dietary constituents with beneficial effects on human health. We examined the inhibitory effects of dietary polyphenols on HMG-CoA lyase activity in cellular extracts of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Of the nine representative dietary polyphenols tested, (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and gallic acid (GA) effectively inhibited HMG-CoA lyase activity. Lineweaver-Burk analysis revealed that EGC and EGCG are likely to be mixed-type noncompetitive inhibitors. Pyrogallol with the gallyl structure also inhibited HMG-CoA lyase activity, suggesting that the gallyl moiety of polyphenols is important for the inhibition of HMG-CoA lyase activity.

  9. Expressions of the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes are stimulated by recombinant platelet-derived growth factor isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, M.; Emmons, L.R.; Perruchoud, A. ); Block, L.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The plausible role that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has in the localized pathophysiological changes that occur in the arterial wall during development of atherosclerotic lesions led the authors to investigate the influence of recombinant (r)PDGF isomers -AA, -AB, and -BB on the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG0CoA) reductase ((S)-mevalonate:NAD{sup +} oxidoreductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.88) genes. In addition, they clarified the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in expression of the two genes in human skin fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells. The various rPDGF isoforms are distinct in their ability to activate transcription of both genes: (i) both rPDGF-AA and -BB stimulate transcription of the LDL-R gene; in contrast, rPDGF-BB but not -AA, activates transcription of the HMG-CoA reductase gene; (ii) all recombinant isoforms of PDGF activate transcription of the c-fos gene; (iii) while rPDGF-dependent transcription of the lDL-R gene occurs independently of PKC, transcription of the HMG-CoA reductase gene appears to involve the action of that enzyme.

  10. In vitro myotoxicity of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, pravastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin, using neonatal rat skeletal myocytes.

    PubMed

    Masters, B A; Palmoski, M J; Flint, O P; Gregg, R E; Wang-Iverson, D; Durham, S K

    1995-03-01

    Pravastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin, drugs which lower cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, have been linked to skeletal myopathies in humans and rats. The myotoxicity of these three drugs was compared, after 48 hr exposure, in cultures of primary neonatal rat skeletal myotubes. Measurements included HMG CoA reductase activity ([14C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol), indicators of membrane damage (CPK, LDH, and AST), cell viability (mitochondrial dehydrogenase metabolism of MTT), protein synthesis ([3H]leucine incorporation), and energy status (ATP). All three drugs inhibited cholesterol synthesis to the same extent in rat hepatocytes (IC50s approximately 0.07 microM). Lovastatin- and simvastatin-induced inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in myotubes was unchanged compared to that of hepatocytes, but pravastatin was 85-fold less potent (IC50 = 5.9 microM). Protein synthesis and ATP levels were the most sensitive indicators of toxicity. Pravastatin (IC50 = 759 microM) was > 100-fold less inhibitory of protein synthesis than lovastatin (IC50 = 5.4 microM) or simvastatin (IC50 = 1.9 microM). Addition of mevalonic acid (the immediate product of the HMG CoA reductase reaction), as 100 microM mevalonic acid lactone, reversed the toxicity of all three drugs. Removal of serum for 24-72 hr did not alter the toxicity of any of the drugs compared to cultures containing 10% serum, suggesting that differences in protein binding did not account for the differences in toxicity of the drugs. These results indicate that pravastatin is less myotoxic than lovastatin or simvastatin in this in vitro system using neonatal rat skeletal muscle cells, and this differential toxicity is correlated with the selective decrease in inhibition of HMG CoA reductase by pravastatin in nonhepatic tissues.

  11. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  12. Molecular cloning of mevalonate pathway genes from Taraxacum brevicorniculatum and functional characterisation of the key enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    van Deenen, Nicole; Bachmann, Anne-Lena; Schmidt, Thomas; Schaller, Hubert; Sand, Jennifer; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Taraxacum brevicorniculatum is known to produce high quality rubber. The biosynthesis of rubber is dependent on isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) precursors derived from the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. The cDNA sequences of seven MVA pathway genes from latex of T. brevicorniculatum were isolated, including three cDNA sequences encoding for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductases (TbHMGR1-3). Expression analyses indicate an important role of TbHMGR1 as well as for the HMG-CoA synthase (TbHMGS), the diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase and the mevalonate kinase in the provision of precursors for rubber biosynthesis. The amino acid sequences of the TbHMGRs show the typical motifs described for plant HMGRs such as two transmembrane domains and a catalytic domain containing two HMG-CoA and two NADP(H) binding sites. The functionality of the HMGRs was demonstrated by complementation assay using an IPP auxotroph mutant of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the transient expression of the catalytic domains of TbHMGR1 and TbHMGR2 in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in a strong accumulation of sterol precursors, one of the major groups of pathway end-products.

  13. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  14. Identification of a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene highly expressed in the root tissue of Taraxacum kok-saghyz

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kazak dandelion (Taraxacum kok-saghyz, Tk) is a rubber-producing plant currently being investigated as a source of natural rubber for industrial applications. Like many other isoprenoids, rubber is a downstream product of the mevalonate pathway. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) en...

  15. Thermodynamic and Structure Guided Design of Statin Based Inhibitors of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Bills, Elizabeth; Bolton, Gary; Bratton, Larry D.; Caspers, Nicole L.; Dunbar, James B.; Harris, Melissa S.; Hutchings, Richard H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Larsen, Scott D.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2008-10-02

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, are effective at lowering mortality levels associated with cardiovascular disease; however, 2--7% of patients may experience statin-induced myalgia that limits compliance with a treatment regimen. High resolution crystal structures, thermodynamic binding parameters, and biochemical data were used to design statin inhibitors with improved HMGR affinity and therapeutic index relative to statin-induced myalgia. These studies facilitated the identification of imidazole 1 as a potent (IC{sub 50} = 7.9 nM) inhibitor with excellent hepatoselectivity (>1000-fold) and good in vivo efficacy. The binding of 1 to HMGR was found to be enthalpically driven with a {Delta}H of -17.7 kcal/M. Additionally, a second novel series of bicyclic pyrrole-based inhibitors was identified that induced order in a protein flap of HMGR. Similar ordering was detected in a substrate complex, but has not been reported in previous statin inhibitor complexes with HMGR.

  16. Charaterization of bumarsin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme reductase inhibitor from Mesobuthus martensii Karsch venom.

    PubMed

    Chai, S C; Armugam, A; Strong, P N; Jeyaseelan, K

    2012-09-01

    Scorpion venoms are rich sources of bioactive peptides and are widely known for their ion channel inhibiting properties. We have isolated, cloned and characterized a venom protein (Bumarsin) from the Chinese scorpion, Mesobuthus martensii Karsch. Bumarsin cDNA encodes a 8132 Da, 72 amino acid mature protein that most probably exists in its native form as a Cys-bridged homodimer. We have identified this novel protein to be an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity. 0.6 μM of Bumarsin inhibits 32% of the HMG-CoA reductase activity, in comparison to 10 μM simvastatin which only inhibits 35% of the activity. RT-PCR and SELDI-TOF mass spectrometric studies demonstrate that bumarsin regulates the expression of both genes and proteins involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Our results suggest that bumarsin may provide a model for the design of novel drugs that can be used to modulate cholesterol homeostasis.

  17. Robinetinidol-flavone attenuates cholesterol synthesis in hepatoma cells via inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hai; Chao, Yu; Li, Ke; Li, Junxiang; Gong, Weihong; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Robinetinidol-(4β,2')-tetrahydroxy-flavone (RBF) is an oligomeric condensed polyphenol that has been shown to exhibit anti-obesity effects in mice. However, little is know regarding its effect on cholesterol synthesis. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effect of RBF on cholesterol synthesis. It was determined that RBF decreased serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats by 25.9 and 50.8%, respectively (P<0.001). These results strengthen evidence for the hypothesis that RBF exerts anti-atherogenic effects in vivo. Furthermore, RBF decreased cholesterol synthesis by 72%, when measured using a 3 h period of radiolabeled acetate incorporation into cholesterol, but not when using radiolabelled mevalonate, suggesting that RBF-mediated inhibition occurred largely at or above the level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzymeA (HMG-CoA) reductase. The mechanism by which RBF inactivates HMG-CoA reductase may be attributed to the induction of phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-kinase, since these results showed that RBF increased phosphorylation of AMP-kinase and HMG-CoA reductase by 2.1- and 3.2-fold, respectively, within 30 min of addition. These results suggest that RBF may be a potential therapeutic agent for hypercholesteremia.

  18. Thermodynamic and structure guided design of statin based inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Ronald W; Bills, Elizabeth; Bolton, Gary; Bratton, Larry D; Caspers, Nicole L; Dunbar, James B; Harris, Melissa S; Hutchings, Richard H; Kennedy, Robert M; Larsen, Scott D; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2008-07-10

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, are effective at lowering mortality levels associated with cardiovascular disease; however, 2-7% of patients may experience statin-induced myalgia that limits compliance with a treatment regimen. High resolution crystal structures, thermodynamic binding parameters, and biochemical data were used to design statin inhibitors with improved HMGR affinity and therapeutic index relative to statin-induced myalgia. These studies facilitated the identification of imidazole 1 as a potent (IC 50 = 7.9 nM) inhibitor with excellent hepatoselectivity (>1000-fold) and good in vivo efficacy. The binding of 1 to HMGR was found to be enthalpically driven with a Delta H of -17.7 kcal/M. Additionally, a second novel series of bicyclic pyrrole-based inhibitors was identified that induced order in a protein flap of HMGR. Similar ordering was detected in a substrate complex, but has not been reported in previous statin inhibitor complexes with HMGR.

  19. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology via Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Luessi, Felix; Bendix, Ivo; Paterka, Magdalena; Prozorovski, Timour; Treue, Denise; Luenstedt, Sarah; Herz, Josephine; Siffrin, Volker; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Zipp, Frauke; Waiczies, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The maturation status of dendritic cells determines whether interacting T cells are activated or if they become tolerant. Previously we could induce T cell tolerance by applying a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (HMGCRI) atorvastatin, which also modulates MHC class II expression and has therapeutic potential in autoimmune disease. Here, we aimed at elucidating the impact of this therapeutic strategy on T cell differentiation as a consequence of alterations in dendritic cell function. We investigated the effect of HMGCRI during differentiation of peripheral human monocytes and murine bone marrow precursors to immature DC in vitro and assessed their phenotype. To examine the stimulatory and tolerogenic capacity of these modulated immature dendritic cells, we measured proliferation and suppressive function of CD4+ T cells after stimulation with the modulated immature dendritic cells. We found that an HMGCRI, atorvastatin, prevents dendrite formation during the generation of immature dendritic cells. The modulated immature dendritic cells had a diminished capacity to take up and present antigen as well as to induce an immune response. Of note, the consequence was an increased capacity to differentiate naïve T cells towards a suppressor phenotype that is less sensitive to proinflammatory stimuli and can effectively inhibit the proliferation of T effector cells in vitro. Thus, manipulation of antigen-presenting cells by HMGCRI contributes to an attenuated immune response as shown by promotion of T cells with suppressive capacities. PMID:25013913

  20. Induction mechanism of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Katsuyoshi; Uritani, Ikuzo; Oba, Kazuko

    2003-05-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, EC1.1.1.34), the key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, was purified from microsomes of potato tuber tissue, and a polyclonal antibody and two monoclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme were prepared. HMGR protein content was measured by immunotitration and radioimmunoassay using these antibodies. HMGR activity was very low in the fresh tissues of both potato tuber and sweet potato root. The activity in potato tuber was increased by cutting and further by additional fungal infection of the cut tissues. In sweet potato root tissue, the activity was scarcely increased after cutting alone, but was markedly increased by additional fungal infection or chemical treatment. The HMGR protein contents in both fresh potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues were also very low, and increased markedly in response to cutting and fungal infection. From these results, we proposed a hypothesis on the induction mechanism of HMGR after cutting and fungal infection in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

  1. Brain and Optic System Pathology in Hypocholesterolemic Dogs Treated with a Competitive Inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Berry, P. H.; MacDonald, J. S.; Alberts, A. W.; Molon-Noblot, S.; Chen, J. S.; Lo, C.-Y. L.; Greenspan, M. D.; Allen, H.; Durand-Cavagna, G.; Jensen, R.; Bailly, Y.; Delort, P.; Duprat, P.

    1988-01-01

    The cholesterol lowering compound lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34 HMG CoA reductase), was given in nine separate experiments to normocholesterolemic dogs at rates up to 180 times the maximum therapeutic dose in man (1 mg/kg/day). Mean serum total cholesterol concentrations were reduced as much as 88% below normal. Clinical evidence of neurotoxicity occurred in up to 37% of animals given 180 mg/kg/day lovastatin for 11 or more days, especially in one laboratory where the dosing regime resulted in higher concentrations of plasma drug levels. Dogs receiving 60 mg/kg/day or less never exhibited neurologic signs. The central nervous system (CNS) of affected dogs exhibited endothelial degeneration and hemorrhagic encephalopathy. Focal extravasation of horseradish peroxidase occurred frequently (6/8) in the retrolaminar optic nerve of asymptomatic or clinically affected dogs given 180 mg/kg/day lovastatin, with endothelial degeneration and discrete optic nerve degenerative lesions interpreted as ischemic. The association between the degree of hypocholesterolemia and occurrence of clinical signs was not exact. Total brain cholesterol was similar in treated and control dogs. Hypocholesterolemic dogs had proportionally lowered serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol, but oral supplementation of this vitamin did not prevent the neurologic syndrome. Endothelial degeneration in the CNS and optic nerve may have reflected in vitro morphologic effects of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors due to extreme inhibition of nonsterol isoprene synthesis. Retinogeniculate axonal (Wallerianlike) degeneration occurred in ≥12% of dogs given 60 mg/kg/day or more lovastatin, with central chromatolysis of occasional retinal ganglion cells. These neuroaxonal changes may have been secondary to vascular effects, but superimposed direct neurotoxic action at the high dosage levels of lovastatin could not be excluded. There was no

  2. Multilevel Control of Arabidopsis 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase by Protein Phosphatase 2A[W

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Ferrero, Sergi; Closa, Marta; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso

    2011-01-01

    Plants synthesize a myriad of isoprenoid products that are required both for essential constitutive processes and for adaptive responses to the environment. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) catalyzes a key regulatory step of the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is modulated by many endogenous and external stimuli. In spite of that, no protein factor interacting with and regulating plant HMGR in vivo has been described so far. Here, we report the identification of two B′′ regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), designated B′′α and B′′β, that interact with HMGR1S and HMGR1L, the major isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana HMGR. B′′α and B′′β are Ca2+ binding proteins of the EF-hand type. We show that HMGR transcript, protein, and activity levels are modulated by PP2A in Arabidopsis. When seedlings are transferred to salt-containing medium, B′′α and PP2A mediate the decrease and subsequent increase of HMGR activity, which results from a steady rise of HMGR1-encoding transcript levels and an initial sharper reduction of HMGR protein level. In unchallenged plants, PP2A is a posttranslational negative regulator of HMGR activity with the participation of B′′β. Our data indicate that PP2A exerts multilevel control on HMGR through the five-member B′′ protein family during normal development and in response to a variety of stress conditions. PMID:21478440

  3. Metabolism and drug interactions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors in transplant patients: are the statins mechanistically similar?

    PubMed

    Christians, U; Jacobsen, W; Floren, L C

    1998-10-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) inhibitors are the most effective drugs to lower cholesterol in transplant patients. However, immunosuppressants and several other drugs used after organ transplantation are cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A, EC 1.14.14.1) substrates. Pharmacokinetic interaction with some of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, specifically lovastatin and simvastatin, leads to an increased incidence of muscle skeletal toxicity in transplant patients. It is our objective to review the role of drug metabolism and drug interactions of lovastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, and cerivastatin. In the treatment of transplant patients, from a drug interaction perspective, pravastatin, which is not significantly metabolized by CYP enzymes, and fluvastatin, presumably a CYP2C9 substrate, compare favorably with the other statins for which the major metabolic pathways are catalyzed by CYP3A.

  4. Tissue-selective acute effects of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase on cholesterol biosynthesis in lens.

    PubMed

    Mosley, S T; Kalinowski, S S; Schafer, B L; Tanaka, R D

    1989-09-01

    Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the key enzyme that regulates cholesterol synthesis, lower serum cholesterol by increasing the activity of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in the liver. In rat liver slices, the dose-response curves for inhibition of [14C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol were similar for the active acid forms of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin. The calculated IC50 values were approximately 20-50 nM for all three drugs. Interest in possible extrahepatic effects of reductase inhibitors is based on recent findings that some inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, lovastatin and simvastatin, can cause cataracts in dogs at high doses. To evaluate the effects of these drugs on cholesterol synthesis in the lens, we developed a facile, reproducible ex vivo assay using lenses from weanling rats explanted to tissue culture medium. [14C]Acetate incorporation into cholesterol was proportional to time and to the number of lenses in the incubation and was completely eliminated by high concentrations of inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase. At the same time, incorporation into free fatty acids was not inhibited. In marked contrast to the liver, the dose-response curve for pravastatin in lens was shifted two orders of magnitude to the right of the curves for lovastatin acid and simvastatin acid. The calculated IC50 values were 4.5 +/- 0.7 nM, 5.2 +/- 1.5 nM, and 469 +/- 42 nM for lovastatin acid, simvastatin acid, and pravastatin, respectively. Thus, while equally active in the liver, pravastatin was 100-fold less inhibitory in the lens compared to lovastatin and simvastatin. Similar selectivity was observed with rabbit lens. Following oral dosing, ex vivo inhibition of [14C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol in rat liver was similar for lovastatin and pravastatin, but cholesterol synthesis in lens was inhibited by lovastatin by as much as 70%. This inhibition was dose-dependent and no inhibition in lens was

  5. Regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase expression by Zingiber officinale in the liver of high-fat diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nammi, Srinivas; Kim, Moon S; Gavande, Navnath S; Li, George Q; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2010-05-01

    Zingiber officinale has been used to control lipid disorders and reported to possess remarkable cholesterol-lowering activity in experimental hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the effect of a characterized and standardized extract of Zingiber officinale on the hepatic lipid levels as well as on the hepatic mRNA and protein expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was investigated in a high-fat diet-fed rat model. Rats were treated with an ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale (400 mg/kg) extract along with a high-fat diet for 6 weeks. The extract of Zingiber officinale significantly decreased hepatic triglyceride and tended to decrease hepatic cholesterol levels when administered over 6 weeks to the rats fed a high-fat diet. We found that in parallel, the extract up-regulated both LDL receptor mRNA and protein level and down-regulated HMG-CoA reductase protein expression in the liver of these rats. The metabolic control of body lipid homeostasis is in part due to enhanced cholesterol biosynthesis and reduced expression of LDL receptor sites following long-term consumption of high-fat diets. The present results show restoration of transcriptional and post-transcriptional changes in low-density lipoprotein and HMG CoA reductase by Zingiber officinale administration with a high-fat diet and provide a rational explanation for the effect of ginger in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia.

  6. On the inhibitor effects of bergamot juice flavonoids binding to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme.

    PubMed

    Leopoldini, Monica; Malaj, Naim; Toscano, Marirosa; Sindona, Giovanni; Russo, Nino

    2010-10-13

    Density functional theory was applied to study the binding mode of new flavonoids as possible inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), an enzyme that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of HMGCoA to mevalonate, the committed step in the biosynthesis of sterols. The investigated flavonoid conjugates brutieridin and melitidin were recently quantified in the bergamot fruit extracts and identified to be structural analogues of statins, lipids concentration lowering drugs that inhibit HMGR. Computations allowed us to perform a detailed analysis of the geometrical and electronic features affecting the binding of these compounds, as well as that of the excellent simvastatin drug, to the active site of the enzyme and to give better insight into the inhibition process.

  7. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are required by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  8. Contribution of Accelerated Degradation to Feedback Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Cholesterol Metabolism in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonghwan; Hartman, Isamu Z; Calhoun, Leona N; Garland, Kristina; Young, Gennipher A; Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey; Xu, Fang; Engelking, Luke; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2016-06-24

    Accumulation of sterols in endoplasmic reticulum membranes stimulates the ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in synthesis of cholesterol. This ubiquitination marks HMGCR for proteasome-mediated degradation and constitutes one of several mechanisms for feedback control of cholesterol synthesis. Mechanisms for sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGCR have been elucidated through the study of cultured mammalian cells. However, the extent to which these reactions modulate HMGCR and contribute to control of cholesterol metabolism in whole animals is unknown. Here, we examine transgenic mice expressing in the liver the membrane domain of HMGCR (HMGCR (TM1-8)), a region necessary and sufficient for sterol-accelerated degradation, and knock-in mice in which endogenous HMGCR harbors mutations that prevent sterol-induced ubiquitination. Characterization of transgenic mice revealed that HMGCR (TM1-8) is appropriately regulated in the liver of mice fed a high cholesterol diet or chow diet supplemented with the HMGCR inhibitor lovastatin. Ubiquitination-resistant HMGCR protein accumulates in the liver and other tissues disproportionately to its mRNA, indicating that sterol-accelerated degradation significantly contributes to feedback regulation of HMGCR in vivo Results of these studies demonstrate that HMGCR is subjected to sterol-accelerated degradation in the liver through mechanisms similar to those established in cultured cells. Moreover, these studies designate sterol-accelerated degradation of HMGCR as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease.

  9. Identification of new flavonol O-glycosides from indigo (Polygonum tinctorium Lour) leaves and their inhibitory activity against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideto; Tokuyama, Shota; Ishihara, Tomoe; Ogawa, Satoshi; Yokota, Kazushige

    2015-04-10

    Indigo plant (Polygonum tinctorium Lour) has been utilized as a medicinal plant with a variety of biological activities. We have recently detected higher levels of flavonoids in indigo leaves. This study was undertaken to conduct the simultaneous analysis of those flavonoids using total extracts from indigo leaves by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry(E) (UPLC-ESI-TOF/MS(E)). The analysis by UPLC-ESI-TOF/MS(E) allowed us to determine 11 peaks of flavonoid species. The chemical structures of these compounds were identified as flavonol O-glycosides with different types of aglycones by the combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods. The predominant compounds were flavonol O-glycosides with 3,5,4'-trihydroxy-6,7-methylenedioxyflavone as an aglycone. Of these, three compounds were elucidated as new compounds. All the isolated flavonol O-glycosides exhibited the inhibitory activity against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in a dose-dependent manner with different potencies. Taken together, our results suggest the potential usefulness of the major flavonol O-glycosides from indigo leaves in controlling cholesterol biosynthesis.

  10. Fluvastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, scavenges free radicals and inhibits lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Hoshi, K; Ichihara, K

    1998-11-13

    We investigated the effect of fluvastatin sodium (fluvastatin) and pravastatin, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, on the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances both in vivo and in vitro in rat liver microsomes and on active oxygen species. Oral administration of fluvastatin at low doses (3.13 and 6.25 mg/kg) inhibited the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in rat liver microsomes, but high doses (12.5 and 25 mg/kg) did not change the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Fluvastatin at any dose used had no effect on the content of cytochrome P-450 and the activity of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase. In in vitro experiments, concentrations of fluvastatin ranging from 1 x 10(-6) - 1 x 10(-4) M markedly inhibited NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation in liver microsomes, but pravastatin weakly inhibited lipid peroxidation. The order of magnitude of inhibition of each drug on in vitro lipid peroxidation was butylated hydroxytoluene > probucol > or = fluvastatin > pravastatin. Moreover, fluvastatin chemically scavenged active oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anion generated by the Fenton reaction and by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, respectively, but pravastatin showed no scavenging of superoxide anion. These results indicate that the suppression of in vivo and in vitro lipid peroxidation in liver microsomes may be, at least in part, due to the scavenging by fluvastatin of free radicals.

  11. Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis ex vivo and in vivo by fluvastatin, a new inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Itoh, S; Hoshi, K; Ichihara, K

    1995-03-15

    The inhibitory effect of fluvastatin sodium (fluvastatin), a new type of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) coenzyme A inhibitor, on de novo cholesterol synthesis was investigated and compared with that of pravastatin. Fluvastatin at a concentration of 12.5 mg/kg inhibited sterol synthesis ex vivo from [14C]acetate in rat liver and ileum by 97-99% with respect to the control, while the inhibition in kidney was 55%. The inhibition by fluvastatin in the liver and ileum persisted for approximately 9 h after administration. Significant differences between fluvastatin also had an inhibitory effect on cholesterol synthesis in vivo in various tissues of rats given [14C]acetate intraperitoneally. Sterol synthesis in the liver, ileum and kidney was inhibited by over 95% 3 h after administration of 6.25 mg/kg of fluvastatin. Significant differences between fluvastatin and pravastatin were found in the liver and ileum. Fluvastatin was more potent than pravastatin in inhibiting both ex vivo and in vivo sterol synthesis in the ileum (but not in kidney) and liver.

  12. Fluvastatin, a new inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, suppresses very low-density lipoprotein secretion in puromycin aminonucleoside-nephrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Moritomo, Y; Hirano, T; Ebara, T; Kurokawa, M; Naito, H; Furukawa, S; Nagano, S

    1994-01-01

    The effects of fluvastatin, a new inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, on the hyperlipidemia associated with nephrosis were studied. Nephrotic rats, induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of puromycin aminonucleoside (100 mg/kg body weight), had significantly higher plasma triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol and apoprotein (apo) B concentrations than controls. Fluvastatin was administrated as a 0.01% solution in drinking water for 14 days to either normal control or nephrotic rats. Concentrations of TG and apo B in plasma, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) in nephrosis were completely normalized by the treatment with fluvastatin, but concentrations of cholesterol in plasma and each lipoprotein fraction were not altered by the treatment. The ratio of apo E to C in VLDL was significantly decreased in nephrotic rats, but the fluvastatin treatment increased this ratio. TG secretion rate estimated by the Triton WR1339 method was significantly increased in nephrotic rats, but was normalized by fluvastatin. Percent composition of TG in newly secreted VLDL particles in post-Triton plasma was not decreased by fluvastatin treatment, suggesting that the number of newly secreted VLDL particles was reduced by the treatment. Postheparin plasma lipolytic activities were not affected by the fluvastatin treatment. These results demonstrate that fluvastatin can effectively ameliorate the high concentration of VLDL by suppressing the hepatic secretion in nephrotic rats, and suggest that an inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis suppresses VLDL secretion from the liver.

  13. (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a product of the mva operon of Pseudomonas mevalonii, is regulated at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y L; Beach, M J; Rodwell, V W

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 505-base-pair (bp) segment of DNA situated upstream of mvaA, the structural gene for (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) of Pseudomonas mevalonii. The DNA segment that we characterized includes the promoter region for the mva operon. Nuclease S1 mapping and primer extension analysis showed that mvaA is the promoter-proximal gene of the mva operon. Transcription initiates at -56 bp relative to the first A (+1) of the translation start site. Transcription in vivo was induced by mevalonate. Structural features of the mva promoter region include an 80-bp A + T-rich region, and -12, -24 consensus sequences that resemble sequences of sigma 54 promoters in enteric organisms. The relative amplitudes of catalytic activity, enzyme protein, and mvaA mRNA are consistent with a model of regulation of this operon at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:2477360

  14. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductases from fungi: a proposal as a therapeutic target and as a study model.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Pavón, Dulce; Sánchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Ibarra, José Antonio; Tamariz, Joaquín; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-Co-A into mevalonate. This step is the limiting point for the synthesis of cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. We describe in this article the genome organization of HMGR coding genes and those deduced from different fungi, recount the evidence showing statins as HMGR inhibitors for ergosterol synthesis and its effect in yeast viability, and propose fungal HMGR (HMGRf) as a model to study the use of pharmaceutical compounds to inhibit cholesterol and ergosterol synthesis. Bibliographical search and bioinformatic analyses were performed and discussed. HMGRfs belong to the class I with a high homology in the catalytic region. The sterol biosynthetic pathway in humans and fungi share many enzymes in the initial steps (such as the HMGR enzyme), but in the last steps enzymes are different rendering the two final products: cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. With regards to inhibitors such as statins and other compounds, these affect also fungal viability. Since HMGR from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Ustilago maydis are very similar to the human HMGR in the catalytic regions, we propose that fungal enzymes can be used to test inhibitors for a potential use in humans. We consider that HMGRf is a good therapeutic target to design and test new antifungal compounds. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  15. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase from hazel (Corylus avellana L. Gasaway).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yechun; Guo, Binhui; Zhang, Fei; Yao, Hongyan; Miao, Zhiqi; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-11-30

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR; EC1.1.1.34) catalyzes the first committed step of isoprenoids biosynthesis in MVA pathway. Here we report for the first time the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA encoding HMGR (designated as CgHMGR, GenBank accession number EF206343) from hazel (Corylus avellana L. Gasaway), a taxol-producing plant species. The full-length cDNA of CgHMGR was 2064 bp containing a 1704-bp ORF encoding 567 amino acids. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the deduced CgHMGR had extensive homology with other plant HMGRs and contained two transmembrane domains and a catalytic domain. The predicted 3-D model of CgHMGR had a typical spatial structure of HMGRs. Southern blot analysis indicated that CgHMGR belonged to a small gene family. Expression analysis revealed that CgHMGR expressed high in roots, and low in leaves and stems, and the expression of CgHMGR could be up-regulated by methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The functional color assay in Escherichia coli showed that CgHMGR could accelerate the biosynthesis of beta-carotene, indicating that CgHMGR encoded a functional protein. The cloning, characterization and functional analysis of CgHMGR gene will enable us to further understand the role of CgHMGR involved in taxol biosynthetic pathway in C. avellana at molecular level.

  16. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and application of statins as a novel effective therapeutic approach against Acanthamoeba infections.

    PubMed

    Martín-Navarro, Carmen María; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Machin, Rubén P; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; García-Castellano, José Manuel; de Fuentes, Isabel; Loftus, Brendan; Maciver, Sutherland K; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic pathogen in humans, whose infections most commonly manifest as Acanthamoeba keratitis or, more rarely, granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Although there are many therapeutic options for the treatment of Acanthamoeba, they are generally lengthy and/or have limited efficacy. Therefore, there is a requirement for the identification, validation, and development of novel therapeutic targets against these pathogens. Recently, RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely used for these validation purposes and has proven to be a powerful tool for Acanthamoeba therapeutics. Ergosterol is one of the major sterols in the membrane of Acanthamoeba. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, one of the precursors for the production of cholesterol in humans and ergosterol in plants, fungi, and protozoa. Statins are compounds which inhibit this enzyme and so are promising as chemotherapeutics. In order to validate whether this enzyme could be an interesting therapeutic target in Acanthamoeba, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against HMG-CoA were developed and used to evaluate the effects induced by the inhibition of Acanthamoeba HMG-CoA. It was found that HMG-CoA is a potential drug target in these pathogenic free-living amoebae, and various statins were evaluated in vitro against three clinical strains of Acanthamoeba by using a colorimetric assay, showing important activities against the tested strains. We conclude that the targeting of HMG-CoA and Acanthamoeba treatment using statins is a novel powerful treatment option against Acanthamoeba species in human disease.

  17. Diurnal variation in the fraction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the active form in the mammary gland of the lactating rat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R A; Middleton, B; West, D W

    1986-01-01

    'Expressed' and 'total' activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) were measured in freeze-clamped samples of mammary glands from lactating rats at intervals throughout the 24 h light/dark cycle. 'Expressed' activities were measured in microsomal fractions isolated and assayed in the presence of 100 mM-KF. 'Total' activities were determined in microsomal preparations from the same homogenates but washed free of KF and incubated with exogenously added sheep liver phosphoprotein phosphatase before assay. Both 'expressed' and 'total' activities of HMG-CoA reductase underwent a diurnal cycle, which had a major peak 6 h into the light phase and a nadir 15 h later, i.e. 9 h into the dark period. Both activities showed a secondary peak of activity (around 68% of the maximum activity) at the time of changeover from dark to light, with a trough in the value of the 'expressed' activity that was close to the nadir value. 'Expressed' activity was lower than 'total' at all time points, indicating the presence of enzyme molecules inactivated by covalent phosphorylation. Nevertheless the 'expressed'/'total' activity ratio was comparatively constant and varied only between 43% and 75%. Immunotitration of enzyme activity, with antiserum raised in sheep against purified rat liver HMG-CoA reductase, confirmed the presence of both active and inactive forms of the enzyme and indicated that at the peak and nadir the variation in 'expressed' HMG-CoA reductase activity resulted from changes in the total number of enzyme molecules rather than from covalent modification. The sample obtained after 3 h of the light phase exhibited an anomalously low 'total' HMG-CoA reductase activity, which could be increased when Cl- replaced F- in the homogenization medium. The result suggests that at that time the activity of the enzyme could be regulated by mechanisms other than covalent phosphorylation or degradation. PMID:3814075

  18. Ketanserin, an antidepressant, exerts its antileishmanial action via inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) enzyme of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushma; Dinesh, Neeradi; Kaur, Preet Kamal; Shamiulla, Baigadda

    2014-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major health problems existing globally. The current chemotherapy for leishmaniasis presents several drawbacks like toxicity and increased resistance to existing drugs, and hence, there is a necessity to look out for the novel drug targets and new chemical entities. Current trend in drug discovery arena is the "repurposing" of old drugs for the treatment of diseases. In the present study, an antidepressant, ketanserin, was found lethal to both Leishmania donovani promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes with no apparent toxicity to the cells. Ketanserin killed promastigotes and amastigotes with an IC50 value of 37 μM and 28 μM respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Ketanserin was found to inhibit L. donovani recombinant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) enzyme with an IC50 value of 43 μM. Ketanserin treated promastigotes were exogenously supplemented with sterols like ergosterol and cholesterol to rescue cell death. Ergosterol could recover the inhibition partially, whereas cholesterol supplementation completely failed to rescue the inhibited parasites. Further, HMGR-overexpressing parasites were generated by transfecting Leishmania promastigotes with an episomal pspα hygroα-HMGR construct. Wild-type and HMGR overexpressors of L. donovani were used to study the effect and mode of action of this inhibitor. The HMGR overexpressors showed twofold resistance to ketanserin. These observations suggest that the lethal effect of ketanserin is due to inhibition of HMGR, the rate-limiting enzyme of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Since targeting of the sterol biosynthetic pathway enzymes may be useful therapeutically, the present study may have implications in treatment of leishmaniasis.

  19. Synthesis, biological profile, and quantitative structure-activity relationship of a series of novel 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sit, S Y; Parker, R A; Motoc, I; Han, W; Balasubramanian, N; Catt, J D; Brown, P J; Harte, W E; Thompson, M D; Wright, J J

    1990-11-01

    A series of 9,9-bis(4-fluorophenyl)-3,5-dihydroxy-8-(alkyltetrazol-5-yl)- 6,8-nonadienoic acid derivatives 1 were synthesized and found to inhibit competitively the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. The analogues having 1N-methyltetrazol-5-yl attached to the C8-position (3a, 4a, R1 = R2 = F) are the most active in suppressing cholesterol biosynthesis in both in vitro and in vivo models: the IC50 for the chiral form of 3a is 19 nM, Ki = 4.3 x 10(-9)M when Km for HMG-CoA is 28 x 10(-6) M;1 the ED50 (oral) value corresponding to the lactone derivative (4a, BMY 22089) is approximately 0.1 mg/kg. Further, BMY 21950 is nearly 2 orders of magnitude more active in parenchymal heptaocytes, from which most of the serum cholesterol originates, than in other cell preparations (such as spleen, testes, ileum, adrenal, and ocular lens epithelial cells; Table III). This apparent tissue specificity may be highly beneficial since the blocking of cholesterol biosynthesis in other vital organs could eventually lead to undesirable side effects. In addition to the chemical synthesis and biological evaluation, a theoretical study aimed at relating the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory potency to the three-dimensional structure of the inhibitors was undertaken. With a combination of molecular mapping and 3D-QSAR techniques, it was possible to determine a logical candidate for the conformation of the bound inhibitor and to quantitatively relate inhibitory potency to the shape and size of both the binding site and the C8-substituent.

  20. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. PMID:26015445

  1. Immune-mediated myopathy related to anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase antibodies as an emerging cause of necrotizing myopathy induced by statins.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Clément; Beaufrére, Anne Marie; Boyer, Olivier; Drouot, Laurent; Soubrier, Martin; Tournadre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) associated with statin use and anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody is a new and emerging entity that supports a link between statin use and IMNM and raises the questions of distinct clinical phenotypes and treatment strategy. We describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a patient and discuss the spectrum of IMNM and statin-induced myopathies. A 65-year-old man was suffering from proximal muscle weakness and elevated CK levels, following exposure to statin therapy. The symptoms worsened despite discontinuation of the drug. At that point, no myositis-specific or -associated antibodies were detected. Malignancy screening did not reveal abnormalities. Muscle biopsy demonstrated a predominantly necrotizing myopathy with minimal lymphocytic infiltrates, MHC class I expression in necrotic muscle fibers, and complement deposition on scattered non-necrotic muscle fibers. Muscle protein analysis by western blot was normal. The patient did not improve with steroid and methotrexate and required monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Muscle strength gradually improved, CK levels normalized and IVIG were stopped 1 year later. Screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies, not available at the time of presentation, was highly positive. Identification of anti-HMGCR antibodies in statin-exposed patients with myopathy appears to be helpful both for differential diagnosis and for treatment strategy. In patients who did not improve after discontinuation of the statin treatment, a muscle biopsy should be performed as well as screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies. Patients with this disorder require aggressive immunosuppressive treatment.

  2. Immunological evidence for eight spans in the membrane domain of 3- hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase: implications for enzyme degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have raised two monospecific antibodies against synthetic peptides derived from the membrane domain of the ER glycoprotein 3-hydroxy-3- methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. This domain, which was proposed to span the ER membrane seven times (Liscum, L., J. Finer- Moore, R. M. Stroud, K. L. Luskey, M. S. Brown, and J. L. Goldstein. 1985. J. Biol. Chem. 260:522-538), plays a critical role in the regulated degradation of the enzyme in the ER in response to sterols. The antibodies stain the ER of cells and immunoprecipitate HMG-CoA reductase and HMGal, a chimeric protein composed of the membrane domain of the reductase fused to Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, the degradation of which is also accelerated by sterols. We show that the sequence Arg224 through Leu242 of HMG-CoA reductase (peptide G) faces the cytoplasm both in cultured cells and in rat liver, whereas the sequence Thr284 through Glu302 (peptide H) faces the lumen of the ER. This indicates that a sequence between peptide G and peptide H spans the membrane of the ER. Moreover, by epitope tagging with peptide H, we show that the loop segment connecting membrane spans 3 and 4 is sequestered in the lumen of the ER. These results demonstrate that the membrane domain of HMG-CoA reductase spans the ER eight times and are inconsistent with the seven membrane spans topological model. The approximate boundaries of the proposed additional transmembrane segment are between Lys248 and Asp276. Replacement of this 7th span in HMGal with the first transmembrane helix of bacteriorhodopsin abolishes the sterol-enhanced degradation of the protein, indicating its role in the regulated turnover of HMG-CoA reductase within the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:1374417

  3. Differential induction and suppression of potato 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes in response to Phytophthora infestans and to its elicitor arachidonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, D; Ward, B L; Bostock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Induction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is essential for the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid phytoalexins and steroid derivatives in Solanaceous plants following stresses imposed by wounding and pathogen infection. To better understand this complex step in stress-responsive isoprenoid synthesis, we isolated three classes of cDNAS encoding HMGR (hmg1, hmg2, and hmg3) from a potato tuber library using a probe derived from an Arabidopsis HMGR cDNA. The potato cDNAs had extensive homology in portions of the protein coding regions but had low homology in the 3' untranslated regions. RNA gel blot analyses using gene-specific probes showed that hmg1 was strongly induced in tuber tissue by wounding, but the wound induction was strongly suppressed by treatment of the tissue with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid or by inoculation with an incompatible or compatible race of the fungal pathogen Phytophtora infestans. The hmg2 and hmg3 mRNAs also accumulated in response to wounding, but in contrast to hmg1, these mRNAs were strongly enhanced by arachidonic acid or inoculation. Inoculation with a compatible race of P. infestans resulted in similar patterns in HMGR gene expression of hmg2 and hmg3 except that the magnitude and rate of the changes in mRNA levels were reduced relative to the incompatible interaction. The differential regulation of members of the HMGR gene family may explain in part the previously reported changes in HMGR enzyme activities following wounding and elicitor treatment. The suppression of hmg1 and the enhancement of hmg2 and hmg3 transcript levels following elicitor treatment or inoculation with the incompatible race parallel the suppression in steroid and stimulation of sesquiterpenoid accumulations observed in earlier investigations. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that there are discrete organizational channels for sterol and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in potato and other Solanaceous species. PMID

  4. Human carotid atherosclerotic lesion protein components decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages through 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase regulation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Rosenblat, Mira; Vaya, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of cholesterol-loaded macrophages, which are turned into foam cells, the hallmark of early atherogenesis. As part of ongoing research on the interactions among human carotid lesion components and blood elements, the effect of plaque homogenate on macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate was examined. Human carotid plaques were ground, extracted with phosphate-buffered saline (homogenate), and then added to the macrophage medium. This extract decreased macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate up to 50% in a dose-dependent manner. Cholesterol or lipoproteins were separated from the homogenate and added to the MQ medium. Unlike the homogenate, neither free cholesterol nor the lipoproteins were able to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis rate under the above experimental concentration, suggesting that the homogenate-induced cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition in our experimental system was not owing to the feedback inhibition of cholesterol. Furthermore, the homogenate remaining after lipoprotein removal (lipoprotein-deficient homogenate) also decreased cholesterol biosynthesis rate, whereas boiled homogenate or phospholipids extracted from the homogenate decreased macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate only partially. Finally, cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition was achieved only upon using the precursor [(3)H]acetate, but not [(14)C]mevalonate, suggesting that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoA Reductase), the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, is involved in the above antiatherogenic effect of the homogenate, whereas the treatment with homogenate decreased HMGCoA Reductase mRNA. Proteins and phospholipids from human carotid lesion homogenate decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages secondary to HMGCoA Reductase feedback regulation. Such an effect may delay foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression.

  5. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles; Campos, Narciso

    2015-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells.

  6. Statins and myotoxic effects associated with anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase autoantibodies: an observational study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yurika; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Murata, Ken-ya; Kurashige, Takashi; Ikawa, Masamichi; Asahi, Masaru; Konishi, Hirofumi; Mitsuma, Satsuki; Kawabata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    Statins have a variety of myotoxic effects and can trigger the development of inflammatory myopathies or myasthenia gravis (MG) mediated by immunomodulatory properties. Autoantibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) have been identified in patients with statin-associated myopathy. The purpose of the present study is to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of anti-HMGCR antibodies and to elucidate the clinical significance of anti-HMGCR antibodies in Japanese patients with inflammatory myopathies or MG. We enrolled 75 patients with inflammatory myopathies, who were all negative for anti-signal recognition particle and anti-aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase antibodies. They were referred to Keio University and National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry between October 2010 and September 2012. We also studied 251 patients with MG who were followed at the MG Clinic at Keio University Hospital. Anti-HMGCR antibodies were detected by ELISA. We investigated demographic, clinical, radiological, and histological findings associated with anti-HMGCR antibodies. We established the anti-HMGCR ELISA with the recombinant protein. Protein immunoprecipitation detected autoantigens corresponding to HMGCR. Immunohistochemistry using muscle biopsy specimens revealed regenerating muscle fibers clearly stained by polyclonal anti-HMGCR antibodies and patients' serum. Anti-HMGCR autoantibodies were specifically detected in 8 patients with necrotizing myopathy. The seropositivity rate in the necrotizing myopathy patients was significantly higher than those in the patients with other histological diagnoses of inflammatory myopathies (31% vs 2%, P = 0.001). Statins were administered in only 3 of the 8 anti-HMGCR-positive patients. Myopathy associated with anti-HMGCR antibodies showed mild limb weakness and favorable response to immunotherapy. All 8 patients exhibited increased signal intensities on short T1 inversion recovery of muscle MRI. Of

  7. Cholesterol-lowering effect of NK-104, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, in guinea pig model of hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Yamazaki, H; Suzuki, H; Tamaki, T; Sato, F; Kitahara, M; Saito, Y

    2001-01-01

    Although benefits of statins have been demonstrated even in normolipidemic patients at high risk, the main target of statin therapy is the hypercholesterolemic patient. The aim of this study was to examine the hypocholesterolemic effect of NK-104 ((+)-monocalcium bis((3R,5S,6S)-7-[2-cyclopropyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-quinolyl]- 3,5-dihydroxy-6-heptenoate), CAS 147526-32-7), a potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, and its mechanism of action in hypercholesterolemic animals. In guinea pigs fed a diet containing 15% (w/w) fat rich in laurate for 6 weeks, the liver cholesterol content was markedly increased and plasma total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and LDL-apoB were elevated 4.8, 5.2 and 1.7 times, respectively, compared with normal diet fed animals. These changes were maintained by reduced LDL clearance in the presence of markedly cholesterol-enriched LDL in the plasma. In this model, the LDL-C reduction rates by 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg of NK-104 orally administered for 2 weeks (from week 4 to week 6), were 11, 27 and 32%, respectively, from controls, being similar in normal guinea pigs previously examined. Those for 3 and 10 mg/kg of atorvastatin (CAS 134523-00-5) were 25 and 39%, respectively. Thus about 10 times higher doses of atorvastatin were required than of NK-104 to cause a similar cholesterol-lowering effect. This reduction of plasma cholesterol was accompanied by an improvement of LDL clearance (24 and 47% increase in fractional catabolic rate by 1 mg/kg of NK-104 and 10 mg/kg of atorvastatin, respectively) and LDL composition. In conclusion, in guinea pig hypercholesterolemia caused by high-laurate diet, NK-104 and atorvastatin lowered plasma cholesterol levels with an improvement of LDL composition and with an increase in LDL clearance, presumably through reduction of the liver cholesterol content, although hepatic cholesterol synthesis might have been markedly suppressed in this model.

  8. Crystal structures of two bacterial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyases suggest a common catalytic mechanism among a family of TIM barrel metalloenzymes cleaving carbon-carbon bonds.

    PubMed

    Forouhar, Farhad; Hussain, Munif; Farid, Ramy; Benach, Jordi; Abashidze, Mariam; Edstrom, William C; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Miziorko, Henry M; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John F

    2006-03-17

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase catalyzes the terminal steps in ketone body generation and leucine degradation. Mutations in this enzyme cause a human autosomal recessive disorder called primary metabolic aciduria, which typically kills victims because of an inability to tolerate hypoglycemia. Here we present crystal structures of the HMG-CoA lyases from Bacillus subtilis and Brucella melitensis at 2.7 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively. These enzymes share greater than 45% sequence identity with the human orthologue. Although the enzyme has the anticipated triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold, the catalytic center contains a divalent cation-binding site formed by a cluster of invariant residues that cap the core of the barrel, contrary to the predictions of homology models. Surprisingly, the residues forming this cation-binding site and most of their interaction partners are shared with three other TIM barrel enzymes that catalyze diverse carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions believed to proceed through enolate intermediates (4-hydroxy-2-ketovalerate aldolase, 2-isopropylmalate synthase, and transcarboxylase 5S). We propose the name "DRE-TIM metallolyases" for this newly identified enzyme family likely to employ a common catalytic reaction mechanism involving an invariant Asp-Arg-Glu (DRE) triplet. The Asp ligates the divalent cation, while the Arg probably stabilizes charge accumulation in the enolate intermediate, and the Glu maintains the precise structural alignment of the Asp and Arg. We propose a detailed model for the catalytic reaction mechanism of HMG-CoA lyase based on the examination of previously reported product complexes of other DRE-TIM metallolyases and induced fit substrate docking studies conducted using the crystal structure of human HMG-CoA lyase (reported in the accompanying paper by Fu, et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7526-7532). Our model is consistent with extensive mutagenesis results and can

  9. Crystal Structures of Two Bacterial 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Lyases Suggest a Common Catalytic Mechanism among a Family of TIM Barrel Metalloenzymes Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Hussain, M.; Farid, R.; Benach, J.; Abashidze, M.; Edstrom, W.; Vorobiev, S.; Montelione, G.; Hunt, J.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase catalyzes the terminal steps in ketone body generation and leucine degradation. Mutations in this enzyme cause a human autosomal recessive disorder called primary metabolic aciduria, which typically kills victims because of an inability to tolerate hypoglycemia. Here we present crystal structures of the HMG-CoA lyases from Bacillus subtilis and Brucella melitensis at 2.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These enzymes share greater than 45% sequence identity with the human orthologue. Although the enzyme has the anticipated triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold, the catalytic center contains a divalent cation-binding site formed by a cluster of invariant residues that cap the core of the barrel, contrary to the predictions of homology models. Surprisingly, the residues forming this cation-binding site and most of their interaction partners are shared with three other TIM barrel enzymes that catalyze diverse carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions believed to proceed through enolate intermediates (4-hydroxy-2-ketovalerate aldolase, 2-isopropylmalate synthase, and transcarboxylase 5S). We propose the name 'DRE-TIM metallolyases' for this newly identified enzyme family likely to employ a common catalytic reaction mechanism involving an invariant Asp-Arg-Glu (DRE) triplet. The Asp ligates the divalent cation, while the Arg probably stabilizes charge accumulation in the enolate intermediate, and the Glu maintains the precise structural alignment of the Asp and Arg. We propose a detailed model for the catalytic reaction mechanism of HMG-CoA lyase based on the examination of previously reported product complexes of other DRE-TIM metallolyases and induced fit substrate docking studies conducted using the crystal structure of human HMG-CoA lyase (reported in the accompanying paper by Fu, et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7526-7532). Our model is consistent with extensive mutagenesis results and

  10. Enhancement of sterol synthesis by the monoterpene perillyl alcohol is unaffected by competitive 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Branch, S K; Broitman, S A

    1999-06-01

    Monoterpenes such as limonene and perillyl alcohol (PA) are currently under investigation for their chemotherapeutic properties which have been tied to their ability to affect protein isoprenylation. Because PA affects the synthesis of isoprenoids, such as ubiquinone, and cholesterol is the end product of the synthetic pathway from which this isoprenoid pathway branches, we investigated the effects of this compound upon cholesterol metabolism in the colonic adenocarcinoma cell line SW480. PA (1 mM) inhibited incorporation of 14C-mevalonate into 21-26 kDa proteins by 25% in SW480 cells. Cholesterol (CH) biosynthesis was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 14C-acetate and 14C-mevalonate into 27-carbon-sterols. Cells treated with PA (1 mM) exhibited a fourfold increase in the incorporation of 14C-acetate but not 14C-mevalonate into cholesterol. Mevinolin (lovastatin), an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA(HMG-CoA) reductase, at 2 microM concentration, inhibited CH synthesis from 14C-acetate by 80%. Surprisingly, concurrent addition of mevinolin and PA did not significantly alter the stimulatory effects of PA. As observed differences in 14C-acetate and 14C-mevalonate precursor labeling could indicate PA affects early pathway events, the effects of this monoterpene on HMG-CoA reductase activity were evaluated. Unexpectedly, 1 mM PA did not stimulate activity of this enzyme. Consistent with its action as a reversibly bound inhibitor, in washed microsomes, 2 microM mevinolin pretreatment increased reductase protein expression causing a 12.7 (+/- 2.4)-fold compensatory HMG-CoA reductase activity increase; concurrent treatment with 1 mM PA attenuated this to a 5.3 (+/- 0.03)-fold increase. Gas chromatographic analysis confirmed CH was the major lipid present in the measured thin-layer chromatography spot. Since 14C-acetate incorporation into free fatty acid and phospholipid pools was not significantly affected by PA treatment, nonspecific changes in whole

  11. Involvement of de Novo Protein Synthesis, Protein Kinase, Extracellular Ca2+, and Lipoxygenase in Arachidonic Acid Induction of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Genes and Isoprenoid Accumulation in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed Central

    Choi, D.; Bostock, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    A series of inhibitors were tested to determine the participation of de novo protein synthesis, protein kinase activity, extracellular Ca2+, and lipoxygenase activity in arachidonic acid elicitation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene expression and sesquiterpene phytoalexin biosynthesis in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Kennebec). Gene-specific probes were used to discriminate effects on the expression of two HMGR genes (hmg1 and hmg2) that respond differentially in tuber tissue following wounding or elicitor treatment. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide completely blocked arachidonate-induced hypersensitive necrosis and browning, including HMGR gene induction and phytoalexin accumulation. This suggests that proteins necessary for coupling arachidonic acid reception to HMGR mRNA accumulation are either rapidly turned over or not present constitutively and are induced following elicitor treatment. Staurosporin, a potent inhibitor of protein kinases, and ethyleneglycol-bis([beta]-aminoethyl ether)-N,N[prime]-tetraacetic acid, a Ca2+ chelator, inhibited arachidonate-induction of hmg2 gene expression and phytoalexin accumulation but did not inhibit the wound-induced expression of hmg1. However, staurosporin inhibited arachidonate's suppression of hmg1 gene expression. Eicosatetraynoic acid, a lipoxygenase inhibitor that suppresses elicitor-induced phytoalexin accumulation, also inhibited arachidonate's suppression of hmg1 and induction of hmg2. The results indicate that arachidonate's suppression of hmg1 and activation of hmg2 depend on a common intermediate or set of intermediates whose generation is sensitive to the inhibitors tested. PMID:12232162

  12. Modulation of hepatic apolipoprotein B, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor mRNA and plasma lipoprotein concentrations by defined dietary fats. Comparison of trimyristin, tripalmitin, tristearin and triolein.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A J; Billett, M A; Salter, A M; Mangiapane, E H; Bruce, J S; Anderton, K L; Marenah, C B; Lawson, N; White, D A

    1995-01-01

    Different dietary fatty acids exert specific effects on plasma lipids but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Hamsters were fed on low-cholesterol diets containing triacylglycerols enriched in specific saturated fatty acids, and effects on plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipoprotein metabolism were measured. Trimyristin and tripalmitin caused significant rises in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which were accompanied by significant reductions in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Tripalmitin also increased hepatic expression of the apolipoprotein B gene, implying an increased production of LDL via very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and decreased removal of LDL in animals fed this fat. Hepatic levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA did not vary significantly between the groups. Compared with triolein, tristearin had little effect on hepatic gene expression or total plasma cholesterol. However, it caused a marked decrease in VLDL cholesterol and a rise in LDL cholesterol such that overall it appeared to be neutral. Lipid analysis suggested a rapid desaturation of much of the dietary stearate. The differential changes in plasma lipids and hepatic mRNA levels induced by specific dietary fats suggests a role for fatty acids or a metabolite thereof in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:7575449

  13. Novel synthetic inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity that inhibit tumor cell proliferation and are structurally unrelated to existing statins.

    PubMed

    Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Crow, Kyle R; Buszek, Keith R; Brown, Neil; Ellappan, Sampathkumar; Gao, Ge; Luo, Diheng; Minatoya, Machiko; Lushington, Gerald H

    2009-11-01

    Pilot-scale libraries of eight-membered medium ring lactams (MRLs) and related tricyclic compounds (either seven-membered lactams, thiolactams or amines) were screened for their ability to inhibit the catalytic activity of human recombinant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in vitro. A dozen of the synthetic compounds mimic the inhibition of purified HMG-CoA reductase activity caused by pravastatin, fluvastatin and sodium salts of lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin in this cell-free assay, suggesting direct interaction with the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis. Moreover, several MRLs inhibit the metabolic activity of L1210 tumor cells in vitro to a greater degree than fluvastatin, lovastatin, mevastatin and simvastatin, whereas pravastatin is inactive. Although the correlation between the concentration-dependent inhibitions of HMG-CoA reductase activity over 10 min in the cell-free assay and L1210 tumor cell proliferation over 4 days in culture is unclear, some bioactive MRLs elicit interesting combinations of statin-like (IC50: 7.4-8.0 microM) and anti-tumor (IC50: 1.4-2.3 microM) activities. The HMG-CoA reductase-inhibiting activities of pravastatin and an MRL persist in the presence of increasing concentrations of NADPH. But increasing concentrations of HMG-CoA block the HMG-CoA reductase-inhibiting activity of pravastatin without altering that of an MRL, suggesting that MRLs and existing statins may have different mechanisms of enzyme interaction and inhibition. When tested together, suboptimal concentrations of synthetic MRLs and existing statins have additive inhibitory effects on HMG-CoA reductase activity. Preliminary molecular docking studies with MRL-based inhibitors indicate that these ligands fit sterically well into the HMG-CoA reductase statin-binding receptor model and, in contrast to mevastatin, may occupy a narrow channel housing the pyridinium moiety on NADP+.

  14. Expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, p-hydroxybenzoate-m-geranyltransferase and genes of phenylpropanoid pathway exhibits positive correlation with shikonins content in arnebia [Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnston

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) and p-hydroxybenzoate (PHB) are the basic precursors involved in shikonins biosynthesis. GPP is derived from mevalonate (MVA) and/or 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway(s), depending upon the metabolite and the plant system under consideration. PHB, however, is synthesized by only phenylpropanoid (PP) pathway. GPP and PHB are central moieties to yield shikonins through the synthesis of m-geranyl-p-hydroxybenzoate (GHB). Enzyme p-hydroxybenzoate-m-geranyltransferase (PGT) catalyses the coupling of GPP and PHB to yield GHB. The present research was carried out in shikonins yielding plant arnebia [Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnston], wherein no molecular work has been reported so far. The objective of the work was to identify the preferred GPP synthesizing pathway for shikonins biosynthesis, and to determine the regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of GPP, PHB and GHB. Results A cell suspension culture-based, low and high shikonins production systems were developed to facilitate pathway identification and finding the regulatory gene. Studies with mevinolin and fosmidomycin, inhibitors of MVA and MEP pathway, respectively suggested MVA as a preferred route of GPP supply for shikonins biosynthesis in arnebia. Accordingly, genes of MVA pathway (eight genes), PP pathway (three genes), and GHB biosynthesis were cloned. Expression studies showed down-regulation of all the genes in response to mevinolin treatment, whereas gene expression was not influenced by fosmidomycin. Expression of all the twelve genes vis-à-vis shikonins content in low and high shikonins production system, over a period of twelve days at frequent intervals, identified critical genes of shikonins biosynthesis in arnebia. Conclusion A positive correlation between shikonins content and expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (AeHMGR) and AePGT suggested critical role played by these genes in shikonins biosynthesis. Higher

  15. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Luo, Xue-Gang; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun; Pan, Li-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  16. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nemazanyy, Ivan . E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T. . E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  17. Mechanistic insight with HBCH2CoA as a probe to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shrestha, Ruben; Buckley, Rachael M; Jewell, Jamie; Bossmann, Stefan H; Stubbe, JoAnne; Li, Ping

    2014-08-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1-2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [(3)H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [(3)H]-sTCoA ([(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([(3)H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([(3)H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [(3)H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation.

  18. Circadian variation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in swine liver and ileum.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D H; Kim, D N; Lee, K T; Reiner, J M; Thomas, W A

    1981-07-01

    The temporal variation of HMG-CoA reductase activity in the liver and intestine of swine was investigated. The thin-layer chromatographic method widely used in the assay of the reductase was successfully applied to the porcine enzymes. Parallel circadian rhythms were demonstrated in both hepatic and ileal reductases from mash-fed animals. Peak activity occurred approximately 6 hr after feeding, 2.7-fold over the basal level in the liver, and 1.6-fold in the ileum. A milk-cholesterol diet caused a marked depression of both rhythms (90% in liver, 50% in ileum); however, the hourly variation in activity persisted in both organs. Cholestyramine was found to elevate hepatic activity (2.7-fold throughout the rhythm) without affecting that of the intestine. Clofibrate had no effect on either enzyme at any time during the cycle despite a 34% reduction in serum cholesterol concentrations.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... processed normally, a buildup of chemical byproducts called organic acids can result in metabolic acidosis. A shortage ... UK) FOD (Fatty Oxidation Disorders) Family Support Group Organic Acidemia Association Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) ...

  20. Geranylgeraniol suppresses the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells and the level of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Nicolle V.; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Katuru, Rajasekhar; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.; Morris, Lindsey L.; Michon, Renee; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Mo, Huanbiao

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, provides essential intermediates for the prenylation of nuclear lamins and Ras and dolichol-mediated glycosylation of growth factor receptors. The diterpene geranylgeraniol downregulates the level of HMG CoA reductase and suppresses the growth of human liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, colon, stomach, and blood tumors. We evaluated the growth-suppressive activity of geranylgeraniol in human prostate carcinoma cells. Geranylgeraniol induced dose-dependent suppression of the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells (IC50 = 80 ±18 μmol/L, n =5) following 72-h incubations in 96-well plates. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in cyclin D1 protein. Geranylgeraniol-induced apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis, fluorescence microscopy following acridine orange and ethidium bromide dual staining, and caspase-3 activation. Geranylgeraniol-induced viability suppression was accompanied by concentration-dependent decrease in the level of HMG CoA reductase protein. As a nonsterol molecule that downregulates HMG CoA reductase in the presence of sterols, geranylgeraniol may have potential in the chemoprevention and/or therapy of human prostate cancer. PMID:24006306

  1. Differential effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on the development of myopathy in young rats.

    PubMed

    Reijneveld, J C; Koot, R W; Bredman, J J; Joles, J A; Bär, P R

    1996-06-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), cholesterol-lowering drugs that have not been approved for use in children and adolescents, may cause myopathy as a side effect. We compared the effects of three statins (simva-, prava- and lovastatin) in young rats to determine whether skeletal muscle of young animals is more susceptible than that of adults. We also evaluated whether the type of statin (lipophilic versus hydrophilic) determines the degree of muscle damage. Administration via chow of simvastatin (15 mg/kg of body weight/d) and lovastatin (43-55 mg/kg of body weight/d), both lipophilic, caused stunted growth, high creatine kinase (CK) activity in plasma, and severe myopathy. Statin doses that caused damage were much lower for young rats than for adults. Pravastatin (8-55 mg/kg of body weight/d), a hydrophilic drug, caused none of these symptoms. Histologic analysis of hind paw muscles of simvastatin-and lovastatin-treated rats showed abundant signs of damage (hypercontraction, fiber necrosis) in the extensor digitorum longus, correlating with the symptoms noted above. No cellular infiltrates were seen at the onset, pointing to a noninflammatory myopathy. Pravastatin-treated rats never showed signs of myopathy. Impaired DNA synthesis may explain why muscle toxicity is seen at lower doses in young, rapidly developing rats than in adult animals. The differences in muscle damage between the statins may be attributed to differences in lipophilicity and thus in tissue selectivity. Our results can be important when considering drug therapy in young patients with inherited lipoprotein disorders.

  2. Involvement of tristetraprolin in transcriptional activation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, Gene C.; Edelman, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, Patricia A.

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin blocks transcription of HMGR in vivo in rat liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin inhibits insulin activation of HMGR transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin acts to rapidly increase tristetraprolin in liver nuclear extracts. -- Abstract: Several AU-rich RNA binding element (ARE) proteins were investigated for their possible effects on transcription of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) in normal rats. Using in vivo electroporation, four different siRNAs to each ARE protein were introduced together with HMGR promoter (-325 to +20) luciferase construct and compared to saline controls. All four siRNAs to tristetraprolin (TTP) completely eliminated transcription from the HMGR promoter construct. Since insulin acts to rapidly increase hepatic HMGR transcription, the effect of TTP siRNA on induction by insulin was tested. The 3-fold stimulation by insulin was eliminated by this treatment. In comparison, siRNA to AU RNA binding protein/enoyl coenzyme A hydratase (AUH) had no effect. These findings indicate a role for TTP in the insulin-mediated activation of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  3. Effects of Statins on 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Inhibition Beyond Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis and exert beneficial effects in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. However, the overall benefits observed with statins appear to occur much earlier and to be greater than what might be expected from changes in lipid levels alone, suggesting effects beyond cholesterol lowering. Indeed, recent studies indicate that some of the cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins involve improving endothelial function, enhancing the stability of atherosclerotic plaques, decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation, and inhibiting the thrombogenic response. Many of these pleiotropic effects are mediated by inhibition of isoprenoids, which serve as lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules. In particular, inhibition of the small guanosine triphosphate–binding proteins Rho, Ras, and Rac, whose proper membrane localization and function are dependent on isoprenylation, may play an important role in mediating the pleiotropic effects of statins. PMID:16126020

  4. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination.

  5. Beneficial effects of pitavastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme a reductase inhibitor, on cardiac function in ischemic and nonischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Teruhiko; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tomaru, Takanobu; Toyo-Oka, Teruhiko

    2008-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have recently been reported to improve cardiac function, and decrease the incidence of heart failure (HF) in hyperlipidemic patients. However, evidence for statin treatment in patients with HF remains a subject of debate. Thus, a study was initiated to examine the effects of pitavastatin on cardiac function evaluated by echocardiographic findings and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in patients with HF. Twenty-three patients with HF were treated with pitavastatin 1-2 mg/day in addition to standard therapy for 7.5 +/- 3.8 months. Left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) and left ventricular end-systolic dimension (LVDs) were determined by echocardiography. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was calculated using Teichholz's formula. Serum lipid and plasma BNP levels were also measured. During the follow-up period, LVEF was increased from 42 +/- 11 to 48 +/- 13% (P = 0.002). LVDs was reduced from 43 +/- 10 to 40 +/- 10 mm (P < 0.001), while there was no change in LVDd. E/A (n = 10) and deceleration time (n = 7), obtained in some patients, did not change significantly (0.89 +/- 0.33 to 0.77 +/- 0.17%, and 215 +/- 46 to 227 +/- 72 msec, respectively). In addition, the plasma BNP level was moderately, but significantly decreased from 94 +/- 78 to 70 +/- 56 pg/mL (P = 0.005). In subgroup analysis, LVEF was improved in both patients with ischemic and nonischemic HF. There was no significant correlation between the percent change in serum total cholesterol and the percent change in LVEF by pitavastatin treatment. Serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides decreased by 21%, 30%, and 15%, respectively, and HDL-cholesterol increased by 12%. Pitavastatin improved cardiac function in patients with HF, which generally worsens with time. The results suggest that pitavastatin may be beneficial for treatment of HF.

  6. The effect of compactin, a potent inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase activity, on cholesterogenesis and serum cholesterol levels in rats and chicks.

    PubMed

    Fears, R; Richards, D H; Ferres, H

    1980-04-01

    Compactin, [7-(1,2,6,7,8,8a-hexahydro-2-methyl-8-(2-methylbutyrylox)naphthyl)-3-hydroxyheptan-5-olide], a potent competitive inhibitor of the rate-determining step in cholesterol biosynthesis, was used to study the influence of changes in cholesterogenesis on serum cholesterol levels. Up to 3 h after a single oral dose (20 or 50 mg/kg) or after the last of a series of daily oral doses (50 mg/kg for 7 or 28 days) to young, male normolipidaemic rats, compactin consistently inhibited cholesterogenesis measured using 3H20 in liver, ileum and other extrahepatic tissues without affecting fatty acid synthesis. Compactin did not reduce serum or tissue cholesterol nor affect the serum concentration of other lipids nor the ratio between lipoprotein classes. A diurnal variation in the effect of compactin on cholesterogenesis was observed. For example, by 12--20 h after dosing, cholesterogenesis at all sites was increased above the comparable control value, indicating the induction of enzyme synthesis and overall there was little effect on the mass of cholesterol synthesized per day. Similar results were obtained using male chicks. Inhibition of cholesterogenesis by compactin was also observed in cholestyramine-treated rats, in which cholesterol turnover was markedly increased, and even in cholesterol-fed rats, in which cholesterogenesis already was repressed. In neither case, however, was inhibition of cholesterogenesis accompanied by a hypocholesterolaemic effect. It is concluded that a more persistent suppression of cholesterogenesis, than that observed with compactin in the rat, may be required in order to affect serum cholesterol concentrations.

  7. Inhibition of hepatic S-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and in vivo rates of lipogenesis by a mixture of pure cyclic monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Middleton, B; Hui, K P

    1982-09-15

    A proprietary mixture of pure cyclic monoterpenes (Rowachol) inhibited hepatic HMGCoA reductase by 50-60% when measured 17 hr after the oral administration of a single dose to rats. The extent of this inhibition was independent of the normal activity range of HMGCoA reductase within its diurnal cycle and the same inhibition (65%) was found in 24 hr starved animals where the control reductase activity was less than 20% that of normal fed rats. De novo sterol and fatty acid synthesis in intact, fed rats was measured by incorporation of 3H from injected H2O. In rats treated with Rowachol the rate of sterol synthesis in vivo was inhibited 52% in liver and 44% in testis with no significant effects in other tissues. The synthesis of non sterol (isoprenoid) compounds in testis was unaffected and the inhibition of sterol synthesis in this tissue probably reflects decreased acquisition of newly synthesized material from liver rather than any effect on the endogenous process. In the same animals the rate of fatty acid synthesis was inhibited 55% in liver. These effects were associated with a significant depletion of liver glycogen which may account for the reduction in rate of fatty acid synthesis. We conclude that the reported cholelitholytic action of monoterpenes is associated with the physiological inhibition of hepatic sterol synthesis mediated by decrease HMGCoA reductase activity.

  8. Application of modified Lineweaver-Burk plots to studies of kinetics and regulation of radish 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Bach, T J; Lichtenthaler, H K

    1984-06-06

    We propose the use of modified Lineweaver-Burk plots for the correct evaluation of Michaelis-Menten parameters in radioactive enzyme assays. A correction factor X for the translation of 1/S0 into 1/S is directly derived from the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation without the need of complicated calculations. In practice, this approach is favorably combined with an isotope dilution method which enhances the reliability of measurements at low substrate concentrations. The usefulness of the theoretical and practical approach is demonstrated in investigations of HMG-CoA reductase present in membrane fractions isolated from radish seedlings. The enzyme in the two main membrane fractions obtained by centrifugation at 16000 X g ( P16000 ) and at 105000 X g ( P105000 ) appears to be independently regulated by phytochrome and by phytohormones. Whereas active phytochrome decreases the apparent V of HMG-CoA reductase in the P105000 without affecting the Km, it increases the apparent Km in the P16000 . Kinetin treatment also results in a higher apparent Km of the enzyme in the P16000 fraction. Gibberellic acid and indoleacetic acid did not exhibit such a clear effect.

  9. Influence of DMBA-induced mammary cancer on the liver CPT I, mit HMG-CoA synthase and PPARalpha mRNA expression in rats fed a low or high corn oil diet.

    PubMed

    Moral, Raquel; Solanas, Montserrat; Manzanares, Eva Mónica; Haro, Diego; Escrich, Eduard

    2004-08-01

    Hepatic mitochondrial outer membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMG-CoA synthase) enzymes play a key role in regulation of fatty acid oxidation and in ketogenic pathways, respectively. Their expression are regulated by fatty acids mainly by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). To investigate possible mechanisms through which cancer alters the lipid metabolism, we analyzed by Northern blot, the mRNA relative abundance of these proteins in liver from healthy and DMBA-induced mammary tumor-bearing rats fed a low or high corn oil diet. Serum levels of lipids, body weight and mass were also determined. Whereas mRNA steady-state levels of CPT I and mit HMG-CoA synthase were unaffected by the presence of the extra-hepatic tumor, the cancer state seemed to modify the regulation of the expression of these genes by high fat diet. We hypothesize that putative changes in PPARalpha mRNA levels could have contributed to such alterations. These results, together with changes in serum lipid profiles, body weight and mass, indicate fat mobilization and non-enhanced oxidation rates despite a high-fat feeding. This effect of the cancer state could be related to tumor aggressiveness and suggest a preferential redirection of long-chain fatty acids into energetic and specific pathways of the cancer cells.

  10. COAs: Behind the Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birke, Szifra

    1993-01-01

    Provides information on alcoholism and codependency to help teachers identify and respond to children of alcoholics (COAs). Discusses characteristics of alcoholic homes and problems encountered by children and adult COAs. Examines survival "masks" of COAs, including hero, rebel, adjustor, clown, and caretaker. Lists organizational,…

  11. Protective effects of a squalene synthase inhibitor, lapaquistat acetate (TAK-475), on statin-induced myotoxicity in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Eiichiro; Anayama, Hisashi; Hamajyo, Hitomi; Nagai, Hirofumi; Hirakata, Masao; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2007-08-15

    High-dose statin treatment has been recommended as a primary strategy for aggressive reduction of LDL cholesterol levels and protection against coronary artery disease. The effectiveness of high-dose statins may be limited by their potential for myotoxic side effects. There is currently little known about the molecular mechanisms of statin-induced myotoxicity. Previously we showed that T-91485, an active metabolite of the squalene synthase inhibitor lapaquistat acetate (lapaquistat: a previous name is TAK-475), attenuated statin-induced cytotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells [Nishimoto, T., Tozawa, R., Amano, Y., Wada, T., Imura, Y., Sugiyama, Y., 2003a. Comparing myotoxic effects of squalene synthase inhibitor, T-91485, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A. Biochem. Pharmacol. 66, 2133-2139]. In the current study, we investigated the effects of lapaquistat administration on statin-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Guinea pigs were treated with either high-dose cerivastatin (1 mg/kg) or cerivastatin together with lapaquistat (30 mg/kg) for 14 days. Treatment with cerivastatin alone decreased plasma cholesterol levels by 45% and increased creatine kinase (CK) levels by more than 10-fold (a marker of myotoxicity). The plasma CK levels positively correlated with the severity of skeletal muscle lesions as assessed by histopathology. Co-administration of lapaquistat almost completely prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity. Administration of mevalonolactone (100 mg/kg b.i.d.) prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity, confirming that this effect is directly related to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. These results strongly suggest that cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity is due to depletion of mevalonate derived isoprenoids. In addition, squalene synthase inhibition could potentially be used clinically to prevent statin-induced myopathy.

  12. Suppressed production of methyl farnesoid hormones yields developmental defects and lethality in Drosophila larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-unresolved question in the developmental biology of Drosophila melanogaster has been whether methyl farnesoid hormones secreted by the ring gland are necessary for larval maturation and metamorphosis. In this study, we have used RNAi techniques to inhibit 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reduct...

  13. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves endothelial dysfunction in spontaneous hypertensive rats via down-regulation of caveolin-1 and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jung-Won; Choi, Dong-Ju; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Oh, Buyng-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Caveolin-1 regulates nitric oxide (NO) signaling by modulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The purpose of this study was to examine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves impaired endothelial function of the aorta in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to determine the underlying mechanisms involved. Eight-week-old male SHR were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=11) or a rosuvastatin group (ROS, n=12), rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) administered for eight weeks. Abdominal aortic rings were prepared and responses to acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-4) M) were determined in vitro. To evaluate the potential role of NO and caveolin-1, we examined the plasma activity of NOx, eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and expression of caveolin-1. The relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced in ROS compared to CON. Expression of eNOS RNA was unchanged, whereas NOx level and phosphorylated-eNOS at serine-1177 was increased accompanied with depressed level of caveolin-1 in ROS. We conclude that 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor can improve impaired endothelial dysfunction in SHR, and its underlying mechanisms are associated with increased NO production. Furthermore, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor can activate the eNOS by phosphorylation related to decreased caveolin-1 abundance. These results imply the therapeutic strategies for the high blood pressure-associated endothelial dysfunction through modifying caveolin status.

  14. In vitro and in vivo biotransformation of simvastatin, an inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Vickers, S; Duncan, C A; Vyas, K P; Kari, P H; Arison, B; Prakash, S R; Ramjit, H G; Pitzenberger, S M; Stokker, G; Duggan, D E

    1990-01-01

    Simvastatin (SV), an analog of lovastatin, is the lactone form of 1', 2', 6', 7', 8', 8a'-hexahydro-3,5-dihydroxy-2', 6'-dimethyl-8' (2", 2"-dimethyl-1"-oxobutoxy)-1'-naphthalene-heptanoic acid (SVA) which lowers plasma cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. SV but not its corresponding hydroxy acid form SVA underwent microsomal metabolism. Major in vitro metabolites were 6'-OH-SV (I) and 3"-OH-SV (III) formed by allylic and aliphatic hydroxylation, respectively, and 6'-exomethylene-SV (IV) formed by dehydrogenation. In rats, dogs, and humans, biliary excretion is the major route of elimination. Biliary metabolites (as both hydroxy acids and lactones) also included 6'-CH2OH-SV (V) and 6'-COOH-SV (VI) in both of which the 6'-chiral center had been inverted. High levels of esterase in rodent plasma favored the formation of SVA from SV. The formation of 1', 2', 6', 7', 8', 8a'-hexahydro-2', 6'-dimethyl-8'-(2",2"-dimethyl-1-oxobutoxy)-1'-naphthalene-pentano ic acid (VII) only in rodents represented a species difference in the metabolism of SV. It is proposed that VII is formed by beta-oxidation pathways of fatty acid intermediary metabolism. Several metabolites resulting from microsomal oxidation (after subsequent conversion from lactones to hydroxy acids) are effective inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and may contribute to the cholesterol lowering effect of SV. Qualitatively, the metabolism of SV closely resembles that of lovastatin.

  15. Influence of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on ubiquinone levels in rat skeletal muscle and heart: relationship to cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity for cholesterol synthesis in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mahomi; Aoki, Taro; Morikawa, Shigeru; Maejima, Takashi; Sato, Fumiyasu; Sawanobori, Kimio; Kitahara, Masaki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Saito, Yasushi

    2006-12-01

    Although statins are prescribed as relatively safe and effective drugs for hypercholesterolemic patients, it has been reported that a significant side effect, myopathy, occurs infrequently during medication. Moreover, because statins decrease cardiac ubiquinone levels, the risk of cardiac dysfunction has been suggested. This study sought to evaluate and compare the cytotoxicity of statins (cerivastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin and pravastatin) in cultured human skeletal muscle cells (HSkMCs) and the effects on ubiquinone levels in statin-treated rat skeletal muscle and heart. Cerivastatin, the most potent inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, showed the strongest cytotoxicity (over 10-fold) among the statins examined, while the effects of the others were in a similar range. In rat experiments, neither pitavastatin nor cerivastatin decreased ubiquinone levels in skeletal muscle, but both dose-dependently lowered ubiquinone levels in the heart. As the rates of reduction by pitavastatin (9.6% at 30 mg/kg) and cerivastatin (9.7% at 0.3 mg/kg) were almost equal, it was estimated that cerivastatin reduced ubiquinone levels in the rat heart approximately 100-fold more strongly than pitavastatin, based on the effective doses. We found that cerivastatin showed the most potent cytotoxicity in HSkMCs and strongly lowered ubiquinone levels in the rat heart.

  16. Statins in therapy: understanding their hydrophilicity, lipophilicity, binding to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, ability to cross the blood brain barrier and metabolic stability based on electrostatic molecular orbital studies.

    PubMed

    Fong, Clifford W

    2014-10-06

    The atomic electrostatic potentials calculated by the CHELPG method have been shown to be sensitive indicators of the gas phase and solution properties of the statins. Solvation free energies in water, n-octanol and n-octane have been determined using the SMD solvent model. The percentage hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity (or lipophilicity) of the statins in solution have been determined using (a) the differences in solvation free energies between n-octanol and n-octane as a measure of hydrophilicity, and the solvation energy in octane as a measure of hydrophobicity (b) the sum of the atomic electrostatic charges on the hydrogen bonding and polar bonding nuclei of the common pharmacophore combined with a solvent measure of hydrophobicity, and (c) using the buried surface areas after statin binding to HMGCR to calculate the hydrophobicity of the bound statins. The data suggests that clinical definitions of statins as either "hydrophilic" or "lipophilic" based on experimental partition coefficients are misleading. An estimate of the binding energy between rosuvastatin and HMGCR has been made using: (a) a coulombic electrostatic interaction model, (b) the calculated desolvation and resolvation of the statin in water, and (c) the first shell transfer solvation energy as a proxy for the restructuring of the water molecules immediately adjacent to the active binding site of HMGCR prior to binding. Desolvation and resolvation of the statins before and after binding to HMGCR are major determinants of the energetics of the binding process. An analysis of the amphiphilic nature of lovastatin anion, acid and lactone and fluvastatin anion and their abilities to cross the blood brain barrier has indicated that this process may be dominated by desolvation and resolvation effects, rather than the statin molecular size or statin-lipid interactions within the bilayer. The ionization energy and electron affinity of the statins are sensitive physical indicators of the ease that the various statins can undergo endogenous oxidative metabolism. The absolute chemical hardness is also an indicator of the stability of the statins, and may be a useful indicator for drug design.

  17. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Kishta, Sara Sobhy; Kishta, Sobhy Ahmed; El-Shenawy, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  18. Subcellular localization and regulation of coenzyme A synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Nemazanyy, Ivan; Panasyuk, Ganna; Valovka, Taras; Fenton, Tim; Rebholz, Heike; Wang, Mong-Lien; Foxon, Richard; Lyzogubov, Valeriy; Usenko, Vasylij; Kyyamova, Ramziya; Gorbenko, Olena; Matsuka, Genadiy; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T

    2003-12-12

    CoA synthase mediates the last two steps in the sequence of enzymatic reactions, leading to CoA biosynthesis. We have recently identified cDNA for CoA synthase and demonstrated that it encodes a bifunctional enzyme possessing 4'-phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase and dephospho-CoA kinase activities. Molecular cloning of CoA synthase provided us with necessary tools to study subcellular localization and the regulation of this bifunctional enzyme. Transient expression studies and confocal microscopy allowed us to demonstrate that full-length CoA synthase is associated with the mitochondria, whereas the removal of the N-terminal region relocates the enzyme to the cytosol. In addition, we showed that the N-terminal sequence of CoA synthase (amino acids 1-29) exhibits a hydrophobic profile and targets green fluorescent protein exclusively to mitochondria. Further analysis, involving subcellular fractionation and limited proteolysis, indicated that CoA synthase is localized on the mitochondrial outer membrane. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, which are the main components of the mitochondrial outer membrane, are potent activators of both enzymatic activities of CoA synthase in vitro. Taken together, these data provide the evidence that the final stages of CoA biosynthesis take place on mitochondria and the activity of CoA synthase is regulated by phospholipids.

  19. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA Synthase 1 Shows Increased Plant Growth, Pod Size and Seed Yield

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  20. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Finn P.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA. PMID:27573844

  1. A Combination of Flaxseed Oil and Astaxanthin Improves Hepatic Lipid Accumulation and Reduces Oxidative Stress in High Fat-Diet Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiqu; Rong, Shuang; Gao, Hui; Chen, Chang; Yang, Wei; Deng, Qianchun; Huang, Qingde; Xiao, Lingyun; Huang, Fenghong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress are crucial pathophysiological mechanisms for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Thus, we examined the effect of a combination of flaxseed oil (FO) and astaxanthin (ASX) on hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fat diet. ASX was dissolved in flaxseed oil (1 g/kg; FO + ASX). Animals were fed diets containing 20% fat, where the source was lard, or 75% lard and 25% FO + ASX, or 50% lard and 50% FO + ASX, or FO + ASX, for 10 weeks. Substitution of lard with FO + ASX reduced steatosis and reduced hepatic triacylglycerol and cholesterol. The combination of FO and ASX significantly decreased hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase but increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor expression. FO + ASX significantly suppressed fatty acid synthase and acetyl CoA carboxylase but induced carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 and acyl CoA oxidase expression. FO + ASX also significantly elevated hepatic SOD, CAT and GPx activity and GSH, and markedly reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation. Thus, FO and ASX may reduce NAFLD by reversing hepatic steatosis and reducing lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:28335388

  2. Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hee; Gwon, So Young; Ahn, Jiyun; Jung, Chang Hwa; Ha, Tae Youl

    2013-07-01

    Rice has many health-beneficial components for ameliorating obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the effect of cooked rice as a useful carbohydrate source has not been investigated yet; so we hypothesized that cooked rice may have hypolipidemic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cooked rice on hyperlipidemia and on the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Golden Syrian hamsters were divided into 2 groups and fed a high-fat (15%, wt/wt)/cholesterol (0.5%, wt/wt) diet supplemented with either corn starch (HFD, 54.5% wt/wt) or cooked rice (HFD-CR, 54.5% wt/wt) as the main carbohydrate source for 8 weeks. In the HFD-CR group, the triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in the serum and liver were decreased, and the total lipid, total cholesterol, and bile acid levels in the feces were increased, compared with the HFD group. In the cooked-rice group, the messenger RNA and protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase were significantly downregulated; and the messenger RNA and protein levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase were upregulated. Furthermore, the expressions of lipogenic genes such as sterol response element binding protein-1, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 were downregulated, whereas the β-oxidation related genes (carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, acyl CoA oxidase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) were upregulated, in the cooked-rice group. Our results suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of cooked rice is partially mediated by the regulation of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, which results in the suppression of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis and the enhancement of cholesterol excretion and fatty acid β-oxidation.

  3. Potential of tocotrienols in the prevention and therapy of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xia, Weiming; Mo, Huanbiao

    2016-05-01

    Currently there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease (AD); clinical trials are underway to reduce amyloid generation and deposition, a neuropathological hallmark in brains of AD patients. While genetic factors and neuroinflammation contribute significantly to AD pathogenesis, whether increased cholesterol level is a causative factor or a result of AD is equivocal. Prenylation of proteins regulating neuronal functions requires mevalonate-derived farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The observation that the levels of FPP and GGPP, but not that of cholesterol, are elevated in AD patients is consistent with the finding that statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, reduce FPP and GGPP levels and amyloid β protein production in preclinical studies. Retrospective studies show inverse correlations between incidence of AD and the intake and serum levels of the HMG CoA reductase-suppressive tocotrienols; tocopherols show mixed results. Tocotrienols, but not tocopherols, block the processing and nuclear localization of sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, the transcriptional factor for HMG CoA reductase and FPP synthase, and enhance the degradation of HMG CoA reductase. Consequently, tocotrienols deplete the pool of FPP and GGPP and potentially blunt prenylation-dependent AD pathogenesis. The antiinflammatory activity of tocotrienols further contributes to their protection against AD. The mevalonate- and inflammation-suppressive activities of tocotrienols may represent those of an estimated 23,000 mevalonate-derived plant secondary metabolites called isoprenoids, many of which are neuroprotective. Tocotrienol-containing plant foods and tocotrienol derivatives and formulations with enhanced bioavailability may offer a novel approach in AD prevention and treatment.

  4. Developmental changes in ketogenic enzyme gene expression during sheep rumen development.

    PubMed

    Lane, M A; Baldwin, R L; Jesse, B W

    2002-06-01

    Ketogenesis is the conversion of acetyl-CoA to the ketone bodies acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA). In hepatic ketogenesis, which occurs during fasting in both nonruminant and ruminant animals, the source of acetyl-CoA is the mitochondrial oxidation of predominantly long-chain fatty acids. In the mature, fed ruminant animal, the ruminal epithelium is also capable of producing ketone bodies. In this case, the source of acetyl-CoA is the mitochondrial oxidation of butyrate produced by the microbial fermentation of feed. The purposes of this study were to determine ontogenic and dietary effects on ketogenic enzyme gene expression in developing lamb ruminal epithelium. Twenty-seven conventionally reared lambs and twenty-seven milk-fed lambs were slaughtered between 1 and 84 d of age. Six additional milk-fed lambs were weaned (the fed group) or maintained on milk replacer with a volatile fatty acid gavage (the VFA group) until 84 d of age. At slaughter, total RNA was extracted from samples of ruminal epithelium. The expression of the genes encoding acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, the first enzyme in the ketogenic pathway, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the ketogenic pathway in nonruminant liver, were examined. Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase mRNA concentrations increased with age independent of diet. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase mRNA levels in ruminal epithelium obtained from milk-fed lambs were low before 42 d of age, but a marked increase occurred by 42 d of age. At 84 d of age, there were no differences in acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase expression due to diet. The pattern of the expression of these genes, in particular, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, parallels the rate of production of BHBA by rumen epithelial cells isolated from the same lambs, which increased to conventionally reared adult levels at 42 d of age and did not

  5. COA7 (C1orf163/RESA1) mutations associated with mitochondrial leukoencephalopathy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Lyons, Anabel; Ardissone, Anna; Reyes, Aurelio; Robinson, Alan J; Moroni, Isabella; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background Assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (COX, complex IV, cIV), the terminal component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is assisted by several factors, most of which are conserved from yeast to humans. However, some of them, including COA7, are found in humans but not in yeast. COA7 is a 231aa-long mitochondrial protein present in animals, containing five Sel1-like tetratricopeptide repeat sequences, which are likely to interact with partner proteins. Methods Whole exome sequencing was carried out on a 19 year old woman, affected by early onset, progressive severe ataxia and peripheral neuropathy, mild cognitive impairment and a cavitating leukodystrophy of the brain with spinal cord hypotrophy. Biochemical analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory chain revealed the presence of isolated deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity in skin fibroblasts and skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization studies were carried out in isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts from immortalized control human fibroblasts. Results We found compound heterozygous mutations in COA7: a paternal c.410A>G, p.Y137C, and a maternal c.287+1G>T variants. Lentiviral-mediated expression of recombinant wild-type COA7 cDNA in the patient fibroblasts led to the recovery of the defect in COX activity and restoration of normal COX amount. In mitochondrial localization experiments, COA7 behaved as the soluble matrix protein Citrate Synthase. Conclusions We report here the first patient carrying pathogenic mutations of COA7, causative of isolated COX deficiency and progressive neurological impairment. We also show that COA7 is a soluble protein localized to the matrix, rather than in the intermembrane space as previously suggested. PMID:27683825

  6. Reduced fat mass in rats fed a high oleic acid-rich safflower oil diet is associated with changes in expression of hepatic PPARalpha and adipose SREBP-1c-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Ching; Huang, Ching-Jang

    2006-07-01

    PPARs and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREPB-1c) are fatty acid-regulated transcription factors that control lipid metabolism at the level of gene expression. This study compared a high oleic acid-rich safflower oil (ORSO) diet and a high-butter diet for their effect on adipose mass and expressions of genes regulated by PPAR and SREPB-1c in rats. Four groups of Wistar rats were fed 30S (30% ORSO), 5S (5% ORSO), 30B (29% butter + 1% ORSO), or 5B (4% butter plus 1% ORSO) diets for 15 wk. Compared with the 30B group, the 30S group had less retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RWAT) mass and lower mRNA expressions of lipoprotein lipase, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and SREBP-1c in the RWAT, higher mRNA expressions of acyl CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1A, fatty acid binding protein, and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in the liver (P < 0.05). The 18:2(n-6) and 20:4(n-6) contents in the liver and RWAT of the 30S group were >2 fold those of the 30B group (P < 0.05). These results suggested that the smaller RWAT mass in rats fed the high-ORSO diet might be related to the higher tissue 18:2(n-6) and 20:4(n-6). This in turn could upregulate the expressions of fatty acid catabolic genes through the activation of PPARalpha in the liver and downregulate the expressions of lipid storage and lipogenic gene through the suppression of SREBP-1c in the RWAT.

  7. Research Finds Link Between Statin Use and Progressive Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... guesses" led them to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), an enzyme in the body ... Rosen LA. Autoantibodies against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in patients with statin-associated autoimmune ...

  8. Cholesterol biosynthesis regulation and protein changes in rat liver following treatment with fluvastatin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, S; Gatlin, C L; Lennon, J J; McGrath, A M; Seonarain, M D; Makusky, A J; Aponte, A M; Esquer-Blasco, R; Anderson, N L

    2001-03-31

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is a key regulator in cholesterol biosynthesis and HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have become a widely prescribed family of lipid lowering agents. Cholesterol synthesis occurs predominantly in liver which is the target organ of statins. We studied the effects of fluvastatin (Lescol), a member of the statin family, on hepatic protein regulation. Male F344 rats treated with 0.8 mg/kg per day fluvastatin or 24 mg/kg per day fluvastatin for 7 days showed treatment-related changes in 58 liver proteins (P<0.005). Major effects were evident in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway including the induction of enzymes upstream and downstream of the target enzyme HMG CoA reductase. Treatment also triggered alterations in key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and was associated with changes in a heterogeneous set of cellular stress proteins involved in cytoskeletal structure, calcium homeostasis and protease activity. The latter set of protein alterations indicates that hepatotoxicity is associated with high-dose treatment. Based on the results it is suggested that HMG-CoA synthase and isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase may be explored as alternative drug targets and that the induction levels of these enzymes may serve as a measure of potency of individual statin drugs. It is proposed that efficacy and cellular stress markers discovered in this study may be used in a high throughput screen (HTS) assay format to compare efficiently and accurately the therapeutic windows of different members of the statin family.

  9. Targeted disruption of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 promotes diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elaine; Dubois, Marie-Julie; Leung, Nelly; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Turbide, Claire; Avramoglu, Rita Kohen; DeMarte, Luisa; Elchebly, Mounib; Streichert, Thomas; Lévy, Emile; Beauchemin, Nicole; Marette, André

    2009-08-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CC1) is a cell adhesion molecule within the Ig superfamily. The Tyr-phosphorylated isoform of CC1 (CC1-L) plays an important metabolic role in the regulation of hepatic insulin clearance. In this report, we show that CC1-deficient (Cc1(-/-)) mice are prone to hepatic steatosis, as revealed by significantly elevated hepatic triglyceride and both total and esterified cholesterol levels compared with age-matched wild-type controls. Cc1(-/-) mice were also predisposed to lipid-induced hepatic steatosis and dysfunction as indicated by their greater susceptibility to store lipids and express elevated levels of enzymatic markers of liver damage after chronic feeding of a high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis in the Cc1(-/-) mice was linked to a significant increase in the expression of key lipogenic (fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase) and cholesterol synthetic (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase) enzymes under the control of sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1c and -2 transcription factors. Cc1(-/-) mice also exhibited impaired insulin clearance, glucose intolerance, liver insulin resistance, and elevated hepatic expression of the key gluconeogenic transcriptional activators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 and Forkhead box O1. Lack of CC1 also exacerbated both glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat feeding, but insulin clearance was not further deteriorated in the high-fat-fed Cc1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, our data indicate that CC1 is a key regulator of hepatic lipogenesis and that Cc1(-/-) mice are predisposed to liver steatosis, leading to hepatic insulin resistance and liver damage, particularly when chronically exposed to dietary fat.

  10. Juxtamembranous aspartic acid in Insig-1 and Insig-2 is required for cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi; Lee, Joon No; Brown, Michael S.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Ye, Jin

    2006-01-01

    Insig-1 and Insig-2 are closely related proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that mediate feedback control of cholesterol synthesis by sterol-dependent binding to the following two membrane proteins: the escort protein Scap, thus preventing proteolytic processing of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins; and the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, thus inducing the ubiquitination and ER-associated degradation of the enzyme. Here, we report that the conserved Asp-205 in Insig-1, which abuts the fourth transmembrane helix at the cytosolic side of the ER membrane, is essential for its dual function. When Asp-205 was mutated to alanine, the mutant Insig-1 lost the ability to bind to Scap and, thus, was unable to suppress the cleavage of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins. The mutant Insig-1 was ineffective also in accelerating sterol-stimulated degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase. Alanine substitution of the corresponding aspartic acid in Insig-2 produced the same dual defects. These studies identify a single amino acid residue that is crucial for the function of Insig proteins in regulating cholesterol homeostasis in mammalian cells. PMID:16606821

  11. Polyester synthases: natural catalysts for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolyesters composed of hydroxy fatty acids, which represent a complex class of storage polyesters. They are synthesized by a wide range of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as by some Archaea, and are deposited as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions. Polyester synthases are the key enzymes of polyester biosynthesis and catalyse the conversion of (R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters to polyesters with the concomitant release of CoA. These soluble enzymes turn into amphipathic enzymes upon covalent catalysis of polyester-chain formation. A self-assembly process is initiated resulting in the formation of insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions with a phospholipid monolayer and covalently attached polyester synthases at the surface. Surface-attached polyester synthases show a marked increase in enzyme activity. These polyester synthases have only recently been biochemically characterized. An overview of these recent findings is provided. At present, 59 polyester synthase structural genes from 45 different bacteria have been cloned and the nucleotide sequences have been obtained. The multiple alignment of the primary structures of these polyester synthases show an overall identity of 8-96% with only eight strictly conserved amino acid residues. Polyester synthases can been assigned to four classes based on their substrate specificity and subunit composition. The current knowledge on the organization of the polyester synthase genes, and other genes encoding proteins related to PHA metabolism, is compiled. In addition, the primary structures of the 59 PHA synthases are aligned and analysed with respect to highly conserved amino acids, and biochemical features of polyester synthases are described. The proposed catalytic mechanism based on similarities to alpha/beta-hydrolases and mutational analysis is discussed. Different threading algorithms suggest that polyester synthases belong to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily, with

  12. Transcriptome and gene expression analysis in cold-acclimated guayule (Parthenium argentatum) rubber-producing tissue.

    PubMed

    Ponciano, Grisel; McMahan, Colleen M; Xie, Wenshuang; Lazo, Gerard R; Coffelt, Terry A; Collins-Silva, Jillian; Nural-Taban, Aise; Gollery, Martin; Shintani, David K; Whalen, Maureen C

    2012-07-01

    Natural rubber biosynthesis in guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is associated with moderately cold night temperatures. To begin to dissect the molecular events triggered by cold temperatures that govern rubber synthesis induction in guayule, the transcriptome of bark tissue, where rubber is produced, was investigated. A total of 11,748 quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. The vast majority of ESTs encoded proteins that are similar to stress-related proteins, whereas those encoding rubber biosynthesis-related proteins comprised just over one percent of the ESTs. Sequence information derived from the ESTs was used to design primers for quantitative analysis of the expression of genes that encode selected enzymes and proteins with potential impact on rubber biosynthesis in field-grown guayule plants, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, small rubber particle protein, allene oxide synthase, and cis-prenyl transferase. Gene expression was studied for field-grown plants during the normal course of seasonal variation in temperature (monthly average maximum 41.7 °C to minimum 0 °C, from November 2005 through March 2007) and rubber transferase enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Levels of gene expression did not correlate with air temperatures nor with rubber transferase activity. Interestingly, a sudden increase in night temperature 10 days before harvest took place in advance of the highest CPT gene expression level.

  13. Global Hawk Pacific (GloPac) COA and Mission Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Mark; Hall, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the science objectives of the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in the Pacific region, shows examp le flight tracks, the satellite under-flight requirement, the flight planning, and the agencies coordination of the airspace required for the Certificate of Authorization (COA).

  14. Coordinated gene expression for pheromone biosynthesis in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, Christopher I.; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    In several pine bark beetle species, phloem feeding induces aggregation pheromone production to coordinate a mass attack on the host tree. Male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), produce the monoterpenoid pheromone component ipsdienol de novo via the mevalonate pathway in the anterior midgut upon feeding. To understand how pheromone production is regulated in this tissue, we used quantitative real-time PCR to examine feeding-induced changes in gene expression of seven mevalonate pathway genes: acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate 5-diphosphate decarboxylase, isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase, geranyl-diphosphate synthase (GPPS), and farnesyl-diphosphate synthase (FPPS). In males, expression of all these genes significantly increased upon feeding. In females, the expression of the early mevalonate pathway genes (up to and including the isomerase) increased significantly, but the expression of the later genes (GPPS and FPPS) was unaffected or decreased upon feeding. Thus, feeding coordinately regulates expression of the mevalonate pathway genes necessary for pheromone biosynthesis in male, but not female, midguts. Furthermore, basal mRNA levels were 5- to 41-fold more abundant in male midguts compared to female midguts. This is the first report of coordinated regulation of mevalonate pathway genes in an invertebrate model consistent with their sex-specific role in de novo pheromone biosynthesis.

  15. Volatiles Emitted at Different Flowering Stages of Jasminum sambac and Expression of Genes Related to α-Farnesene Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Lyu, Shiheng; Chen, Dan; Lin, Yi; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Guixin; Ye, Naixing

    2017-03-29

    Fresh jasmine flowers have been used to make jasmine teas in China, but there has been no complete information about volatile organic compound emissions in relation to flower developmental stages and no science-based knowledge about which floral stage should be used for the infusion. This study monitored volatile organic compounds emitted from living flowers of Jasminum sambac (L.) Ait. 'Bifoliatum' at five developmental stages and also from excised flowers. Among the compounds identified, α-farnesene, linalool, and benzyl acetate were most abundant. Since α-farnesene is synthesized through the Mevalonate pathway, four genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, and terpene synthase were isolated. Their expression patterns in living flowers at the five stages and in excised flowers coincided with the emission patterns of α-farnesene. Application of lovastatin, a HMGR inhibitor, significantly reduced the expression of the genes and greatly decreased the emission of α-farnesene. The sweet scent was diminished from lovastatin-treated flowers as well. These results indicate that α-farnesene is an important compound emitted from jasmine flowers, and its emission patterns suggest that flowers at the opening stage or flower buds 8 h after excision should be used for the infusion of tea leaves.

  16. Synthesis and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic CoAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Ashokaan, N.; Masud, J.; Pariti, A.; Nath, M.

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic CoAs nanoparticles and elongated nanostructures with high blocking temperature, (TB), via hot-injection precipitation and solvothermal methods. Cobalt arsenides constitute an important family of magnetically active solids that find a variety of applications ranging from magnetic semiconductors to biomedical imaging. While the higher temperature hot-injection precipitation technique (300 °C) yields pure CoAs nanostructures, the lower temperature solvothermal method (200 °C) yields a mixture of CoAs nanoparticles along with other Co-based impurity phases. The synthesis in all these cases involved usage of triphenylarsine ((C6H5)3As) as the As precursor which reacts with solid Co2(CO)8 by ligand displacement to yield a single source precursor. The surfactant, hexadecylamine (HDA) further assists in controlling the morphology of the nanostructures. HDA also provides a basic medium and molten flux-like conditions for the redox chemistry to occur between Co and As at elevated temperatures. The influence of the length of reaction time was investigated by studying the evolution of product morphology over time. It was observed that while spontaneous nucleation at higher temperature followed by controlled growth led to the predominant formation of short nanorods, with longer reaction time, the nanorods were further converted to nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles obtained, was mostly in the range of 10-15 nm. The key finding of this work is exceptionally high coercivity in CoAs nanostructures for the first time. Coercivity observed was as high as 0.1 T (1000 Oe) at 2 K. These kinds of magnetic nanostructures find multiple applications in spintronics, whereas the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are viable for use in magnetic storage, ferrofluids and as contrast enhancing agents in MRI.

  17. Genome-wide RNAi analysis reveals that simultaneous inhibition of specific mevalonate pathway genes potentiates tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mullen, Peter J; Goard, Carolyn A; Ericson, Elke; Sharma, Piyush; Kalkat, Manpreet; Yu, Rosemary; Pong, Janice T; Brown, Kevin R; Hart, Traver; Gebbia, Marinella; Lang, Karl S; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Moffat, Jason; Penn, Linda Z

    2015-09-29

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is often dysregulated or overexpressed in many cancers suggesting tumor dependency on this classic metabolic pathway. Statins, which target the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), are promising agents currently being evaluated in clinical trials for anti-cancer efficacy. To uncover novel targets that potentiate statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down, we carried out a pooled genome-wide short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen. Genes of the MVA pathway were amongst the top-scoring targets, including sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPS1). Each gene was independently validated and shown to significantly sensitize A549 cells to statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down. SREBP2 knockdown in lung and breast cancer cells completely abrogated the fluvastatin-induced upregulation of sterol-responsive genes HMGCR and HMGCS1. Knockdown of SREBP2 alone did not affect three-dimensional growth of lung and breast cancer cells, yet in combination with fluvastatin cell growth was disrupted. Taken together, these results show that directly targeting multiple levels of the MVA pathway, including blocking the sterol-feedback loop initiated by statin treatment, is an effective and targetable anti-tumor strategy.

  18. Genome-wide RNAi analysis reveals that simultaneous inhibition of specific mevalonate pathway genes potentiates tumor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Mullen, Peter J.; Goard, Carolyn A.; Ericson, Elke; Sharma, Piyush; Kalkat, Manpreet; Yu, Rosemary; Pong, Janice T.; Brown, Kevin R.; Hart, Traver; Gebbia, Marinella; Lang, Karl S.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Moffat, Jason; Penn, Linda Z.

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is often dysregulated or overexpressed in many cancers suggesting tumor dependency on this classic metabolic pathway. Statins, which target the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), are promising agents currently being evaluated in clinical trials for anti-cancer efficacy. To uncover novel targets that potentiate statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down, we carried out a pooled genome-wide short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen. Genes of the MVA pathway were amongst the top-scoring targets, including sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPS1). Each gene was independently validated and shown to significantly sensitize A549 cells to statin-induced apoptosis when knocked down. SREBP2 knockdown in lung and breast cancer cells completely abrogated the fluvastatin-induced upregulation of sterol-responsive genes HMGCR and HMGCS1. Knockdown of SREBP2 alone did not affect three-dimensional growth of lung and breast cancer cells, yet in combination with fluvastatin cell growth was disrupted. Taken together, these results show that directly targeting multiple levels of the MVA pathway, including blocking the sterol-feedback loop initiated by statin treatment, is an effective and targetable anti-tumor strategy. PMID:26353928

  19. Isolated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) granules are complex bacterial organelles catalyzing formation of PHB from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and degradation of PHB to acetyl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Keiichi; Saito, Terumi; Gebauer, Birgit; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) granules isolated in native form (nPHB granules) from Ralstonia eutropha catalyzed formation of PHB from (14)C-labeled acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) in the presence of NADPH and concomitantly released CoA, revealing that PHB biosynthetic proteins (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, acetoacetyl-CoA reductase, and PHB synthase) are present and active in isolated nPHB granules in vitro. nPHB granules also catalyzed thiolytic cleavage of PHB in the presence of added CoA, resulting in synthesis of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA (3HB-CoA) from PHB. Synthesis of 3HB-CoA was also shown by incubation of artificial (protein-free) PHB with CoA and PhaZa1, confirming that PhaZa1 is a PHB depolymerase catalyzing the thiolysis reaction. Acetyl-CoA was the major product detectable after incubation of nPHB granules in the presence of NAD(+), indicating that downstream mobilizing enzyme activities were also present and active in isolated nPHB granules. We propose that intracellular concentrations of key metabolites (CoA, acetyl-CoA, 3HB-CoA, NAD(+)/NADH) determine whether a cell accumulates or degrades PHB. Since the degradation product of PHB is 3HB-CoA, the cells do not waste energy by synthesis and degradation of PHB. Thus, our results explain the frequent finding of simultaneous synthesis and breakdown of PHB.

  20. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms.

  1. Differential HMG-CoA lyase expression in human tissues provides clues about 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Puisac, Beatriz; Arnedo, María; Casale, Cesar H.; Ribate, María Pilar; Castiella, Tomás; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Ribes, Antonia; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Casals, Nuria; Hegardt, Fausto G.

    2010-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL). This mitochondrial enzyme catalyzes the common final step of leucine degradation and ketogenesis. Acute symptoms include vomiting, seizures and lethargy, accompanied by metabolic acidosis and hypoketotic hypoglycaemia. Such organs as the liver, brain, pancreas, and heart can also be involved. However, the pathophysiology of this disease is only partially understood. We measured mRNA levels, protein expression and enzyme activity of human HMG-CoA lyase from liver, kidney, pancreas, testis, heart, skeletal muscle, and brain. Surprisingly, the pancreas is, after the liver, the tissue with most HL activity. However, in heart and adult brain, HL activity was not detected in the mitochondrial fraction. These findings contribute to our understanding of the enzyme function and the consequences of its deficiency and suggest the need for assessment of pancreatic damage in these patients. PMID:20532825

  2. Induction of fatty acid synthesis by pravastatin sodium in rat liver and primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, T; Tsujita, Y; Shimotsu, H

    1997-06-11

    We examined the effect of pravastatin sodium (pravastatin), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, on fatty acid synthesis in rat liver. The repeated administration of pravastatin to rats at 250 mg/kg for 7 days led to a 2.8-fold increase in fatty acid synthesis in the liver. The diurnal change of fatty acid synthesis was not affected by the treatment. Hepatic fatty acid synthase activity was increased 3.2-fold, while acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity was not changed by the repeated administration of pravastatin. In rat hepatocytes, the incubation with 2 microg/ml pravastatin for 24 h increased fatty acid synthase activity 1.5-fold, as well as HMG-CoA reductase activity 2.8-fold. These results suggest that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors might increase fatty acid synthesis in vivo through the induction of hepatic fatty acid synthase.

  3. Mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase in fasted and alloxan diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Lopez, C.R.; Allred, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured biotinyl proteins will bind (/sup 14/C)methyl avidin which remains bound through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The method has been used to demonstrate the presence of two high molecular weight subunit forms of acetyl CoA carboxylase in rat liver cytoplasm, both of which are precipitated by antibody to purifed rat liver acetyl CoA carboxylase prepared from sheep serum. Rat liver mitochondria contained five distinct biotinyl protein subunits, the two largest of which have been identified as acetyl CoA carboxylase subunits on the basis of precipitation by anti-acetyl CoA carboxylase antibody. The small quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase associated with rat liver microsomes could be attributed to cytoplasmic contamination. The binding of radioactive avidin is sufficiently tight to use as a measure of the quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase. The quantity and activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme was reduced in fasted and in alloxan diabetic rats compared to that in fed controls but the quantity of the enzyme associated with isolated mitochondria was not reduced. The results indicate that there is a mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase.

  4. Mitochondrial disease genes COA6, COX6B and SCO2 have overlapping roles in COX2 biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Pratt, Anthony T.; Soma, Shivatheja; Theriault, Sarah G.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a complex process facilitated by several assembly factors. Pathogenic mutations were recently reported in one such assembly factor, COA6, and our previous work linked Coa6 function to mitochondrial copper metabolism and expression of Cox2, a copper-containing subunit of CcO. However, the precise role of Coa6 in Cox2 biogenesis remained unknown. Here we show that yeast Coa6 is an orthologue of human COA6, and like Cox2, is regulated by copper availability, further implicating it in copper delivery to Cox2. In order to place Coa6 in the Cox2 copper delivery pathway, we performed a comprehensive genetic epistasis analysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that simultaneous deletion of Coa6 and Sco2, a mitochondrial copper metallochaperone, or Coa6 and Cox12/COX6B, a structural subunit of CcO, completely abrogates Cox2 biogenesis. Unlike Coa6 deficient cells, copper supplementation fails to rescue Cox2 levels of these double mutants. Overexpression of Cox12 or Sco proteins partially rescues the coa6Δ phenotype, suggesting their overlapping but non-redundant roles in copper delivery to Cox2. These genetic data are strongly corroborated by biochemical studies demonstrating physical interactions between Coa6, Cox2, Cox12 and Sco proteins. Furthermore, we show that patient mutations in Coa6 disrupt Coa6–Cox2 interaction, providing the biochemical basis for disease pathogenesis. Taken together, these results place COA6 in the copper delivery pathway to CcO and, surprisingly, link it to a previously unidentified function of CcO subunit Cox12 in Cox2 biogenesis. PMID:26669719

  5. ACBP and cholesterol differentially alter fatty acyl CoA utilization by microsomal ACAT.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hsu; Zhou, Minglong; McIntosh, Avery; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2003-01-01

    Microsomal acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is stimulated in vitro and/or in intact cells by proteins that bind and transfer both substrates, cholesterol, and fatty acyl CoA. To resolve the role of fatty acyl CoA binding independent of cholesterol binding/transfer, a protein that exclusively binds fatty acyl CoA (acyl CoA binding protein, ACBP) was compared. ACBP contains an endoplasmic reticulum retention motif and significantly colocalized with acyl-CoA cholesteryl acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and endoplasmic reticulum markers in L-cell fibroblasts and hepatoma cells, respectively. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT was stimulated in the order: ACBP > sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) > liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP). Stimulation was in the same order as the relative affinities of the proteins for fatty acyl CoA. In contrast, in the absence of exogenous cholesterol, these proteins inhibited microsomal ACAT, but in the same order: ACBP > SCP-2 > L-FABP. The extracellular protein BSA stimulated microsomal ACAT regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous cholesterol. Thus, ACBP was the most potent intracellular fatty acyl CoA binding protein in differentially modulating the activity of microsomal ACAT to form cholesteryl esters independent of cholesterol binding/transfer ability.

  6. Mutations in COA6 cause cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Baertling, Fabian; A M van den Brand, Mariel; Hertecant, Jozef L; Al-Shamsi, Aisha; P van den Heuvel, Lambert; Distelmaier, Felix; Mayatepek, Ertan; Smeitink, Jan A; Nijtmans, Leo G J; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2015-01-01

    COA6/C1ORF31 is involved in cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) biogenesis. We present a new pathogenic COA6 variant detected in a patient with neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and isolated complex IV deficiency. For the first time, clinical details about a COA6-deficient patient are given and patient fibroblasts are functionally characterized: COA6 protein is undetectable and steady-state levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates. Using pulse-chase experiments, we demonstrate an increased turnover of mitochondrial encoded complex IV subunits. Although monomeric complex IV is decreased in patient fibroblasts, the CI/CIII2 /CIVn -supercomplexes remain unaffected. Copper supplementation shows a partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. We conclude that COA6 is required for complex IV subunit stability. Furthermore, the proposed role in the copper delivery pathway to complex IV subunits is substantiated and a therapeutic lead for COA6-deficient patients is provided.

  7. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, BR; Frias, JA; Wackett, LP; Wilmot, CM

    2012-05-22

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acylcoenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short beta-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117 beta) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly, Glu117

  8. Hepatic gene expression involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in transition cows: effects of fat mobilization during early lactation in relation to milk performance and metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Weber, C; Hametner, C; Tuchscherer, A; Losand, B; Kanitz, E; Otten, W; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Becker, F; Kanitz, W; Hammon, H M

    2013-09-01

    Insufficient feed intake during early lactation results in elevated body fat mobilization to meet energy demands for milk production. Hepatic energy metabolism is involved by increasing endogenous glucose production and hepatic glucose output for milk synthesis and by adaptation of postcalving fuel oxidation. Given that cows differ in their degree of fat mobilization around parturition, indicated by variable total liver fat concentration (LFC), the study investigated the influence of peripartum fat mobilization on hepatic gene expression involved in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, and cholesterol synthesis, as well as transcriptional factors referring to energy metabolism. German Holstein cows were grouped according to mean total LFC on d 1, 14, and 28 after parturition as low [<200mg of total fat/g of dry matter (DM); n=10], medium (200-300 mg of total fat/g of DM; n=10), and high (>300 mg of total fat/g of DM; n=7), indicating fat mobilization during early lactation. Cows were fed total mixed rations ad libitum and held under equal conditions. Liver biopsies were taken at d 56 and 15 before and d 1, 14, 28, and 49 after parturition to measure mRNA abundances of pyruvate carboxylase (PC); phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase; glucose-6-phosphatase; propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase α; carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1A (CPT1A); acyl-CoA synthetase, long chain 1 (ASCL1); acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain; 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 1 and 2; sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1; and peroxisome proliferator-activated factor α. Total LFC postpartum differed greatly among cows, and the mRNA abundance of most enzymes and transcription factors changed with time during the experimental period. Abundance of PC mRNA increased at parturition to a greater extent in high- and medium-LFC groups than in the low-LFC group. Significant LFC × time interactions for ACSL1 and CPT1A during the experimental period indicated variable

  9. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Frias, Janice A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2012-10-25

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short {beta}-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117{beta}) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly

  10. Efficacy of statins on sirtuin 1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression: the role of sirtuin 1 gene variants in human coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ulkan; Gok, Ozlem; Elibol-Can, Birsen; Uysal, Omer; Bacaksiz, Ahmet

    2015-04-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and are used to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) due to their pleiotropic effects. Recently, greater focus has been placed on the role of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in cardiovascular disease research. However, insufficient data exist on the relationships between statins, SIRT1 protein levels, and SIRT1 gene variants. In the present study, we investigated the effects of statins, atorvastatin and rosuvastatin, in CAD patients by analysing the associations between SIRT1 gene variants, rs7069102C>G and rs2273773C>T, and SIRT1/endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) expression, as well as total antioxidant and oxidant status, and the oxidative stress index. SIRT1 expression was significantly higher, and eNOS expression was significantly lower in CAD patients when compared with controls. Statin treatment reduced SIRT1 expression and increased eNOS expression, similar to the levels found in the control population, independent from the studied SIRT1 gene variants. Oxidative stress parameters were significantly increased in CAD patients, and were decreased by statin treatment, demonstrating the antioxidative effects of statins on atherosclerosis. These results indicate that statin treatment could produce its protective effect on cardiovascular disease through the inhibition of SIRT1 expression. This is the first study reporting on the effect of statins, specifically atorvastatin and rosuvastatin, on SIRT1 expression in CAD patients.

  11. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Camilla C.; Dallabona, Cristina; Lazzaretti, Mirca; Dusi, Sabrina; Tosi, Elena; Tiranti, Valeria; Goffrini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases. PMID:28357284

  12. Acetyl CoA carboxylase inactivation and meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa S; Downs, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    In mouse oocytes, meiotic induction by pharmacological activation of PRKA (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase; formerly known as AMPK) or by hormones depends on stimulation of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). PRKA stimulates FAO by phosphorylating and inactivating acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACAC; formerly ACC), leading to decreased malonyl CoA levels and augmenting fatty-acid transport into mitochondria. We investigated a role for ACAC inactivation in meiotic resumption by testing the effect of two ACAC inhibitors, CP-640186 and Soraphen A, on mouse oocytes maintained in meiotic arrest in vitro. These inhibitors significantly stimulated the resumption of meiosis in arrested cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes, denuded oocytes, and follicle-enclosed oocytes. This stimulation was accompanied by an increase in FAO. Etomoxir, a malonyl CoA analogue, prevented meiotic resumption as well as the increase in FAO induced by ACAC inhibition. Citrate, an ACAC activator, and CBM-301106, an inhibitor of malonyl CoA decarboxylase, which converts malonyl CoA to acetyl CoA, suppressed both meiotic induction and FAO induced by follicle-stimulating hormone, presumably by maintaining elevated malonyl CoA levels. Mouse oocyte-cumulus cell complexes contain both isoforms of ACAC (ACACA and ACACB); when wild-type and Acacb(-/-) oocytes characteristics were compared, we found that these single-knockout oocytes showed a significantly higher FAO level and a reduced ability to maintain meiotic arrest, resulting in higher rates of germinal vesicle breakdown. Collectively, these data support the model that ACAC inactivation contributes to the maturation-promoting activity of PRKA through stimulation of FAO.

  13. Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by squalene synthase inhibitors does not induce myotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flint, O P; Masters, B A; Gregg, R E; Durham, S K

    1997-07-01

    The cholesterol-lowering HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (HMGRI), pravastatin and lovastatin, have been associated with skeletal myopathy in humans and in rats. In a previous in vitro study, HMGRI-induced changes in neonatal rat skeletal muscle cells were characterized by reversible inhibition of protein synthesis and loss of differentiated myotubes at concentrations markedly lower than those inducing enzyme leakage. Myotoxicity was determined to be directly related to inhibition of HMG CoA reductase, since mevalonate, the immediate product of HMG CoA reductase metabolism, abrogated the drug-induced changes. Farnesol, geranylgeraniol, and squalene are metabolites of mevalonate. Squalene, formed from farnesol by squalene synthase, is the first metabolite solely committed to cholesterol synthesis. In contrast, geranylgeraniol, formed by the addition of an isoprene group to farnesol, is the first metabolite uncommitted to cholesterol synthesis. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in HMGRI-induced in vitro myotoxicity. HMGRI-treated neonatal rat skeletal muscle cultures were supplemented with farnesol and geranylgeraniol, and in another study, muscle cultures were exposed to two squalene synthase inhibitors (SSI), BMS-187745 and its prodrug ester, BMS-188494. Endpoints evaluated for both studies included protein synthesis ([3H]leucine incorporation), total cellular protein (a measure of cell loss), intra- and extracellular lactate dehydrogenase activity (a measure of membrane integrity), cholesterol biosynthesis ([14C]acetate incorporation), and morphology. HMG CoA reductase inhibitor-induced morphologic changes and inhibition of protein synthesis were significantly ameliorated by supplementation with farnesol and geranylgeraniol. In contrast to HMGRI-induced in vitro myotoxicity, SSI induced an irreversible, minimal cytotoxicity at close to maximum soluble concentrations. These results indicate that

  14. Structural and docking studies of Leucaena leucocephala Cinnamoyl CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Kumar, Vikash; Kabra, Ashish; Phogat, Navneet; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-03-01

    Lignin, a major constituent of plant call wall, is a phenolic heteropolymer. It plays a major role in the development of plants and their defense mechanism against pathogens. Therefore Lignin biosynthesis is one of the critical metabolic pathways. In lignin biosynthesis, the Cinnamoyl CoA reductase is a key enzyme which catalyzes the first step in the pathway. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase provides the substrates which represent the main transitional molecules of lignin biosynthesis pathway, exhibits a high in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl CoA. In present study, the three-dimensional model of cinnamoyl CoA reductase was constructed based on the crystal structure of Grape Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase. Furthermore, the docking studies were performed to understand the substrate interactions to the active site of CCR. It showed that residues ARG51, ASN52, ASP54 and ASN58 were involved in substrate binding. We also suggest that residue ARG51 in CCR is the determinant residue in competitive inhibition of other substrates. This structural and docking information have prospective implications to understand the mechanism of CCR enzymatic reaction with feruloyl CoA, however the approach will be applicable in prediction of substrates and engineering 3D structures of other enzymes as well.

  15. Effect of Selenium-Enriched Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Extracts, Obtained by Pressurized Water Extraction, on the Expression of Cholesterol Homeostasis Related Genes by Low-Density Array.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Marín, Francisco Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Culinary-medicinal mushrooms are able to lower blood cholesterol levels in animal models by different mechanisms. They might impair the endogenous cholesterol synthesis and exogenous cholesterol absorption during digestion. Mushroom extracts, obtained using pressurized water extractions (PWE) from Agaricus bisporus basidiomes, supplemented or not supplemented with selenium, were applied to HepG2 cell cultures to study the expression of 19 genes related to cholesterol homeostasis by low-density arrays (LDA). Only the PWE fractions obtained at 25°C showed 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity. Besides the enzymatic inhibition, PWE extracts may downregulate some of the key genes involved in the cholesterol homeostasis, such as the squalene synthase gene (FDFT1), since its mRNA expression falls by one third of its initial value. In summary, A. bisporus extracts may also modulate biological cholesterol levels by molecular mechanisms further than the enzymatic way previously reported.

  16. Regulation of Isoprenoid Pheromone Biosynthesis in Bumblebee Males.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Darina; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Žáček, Petr; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva

    2016-02-02

    Males of the closely related species Bombus terrestris and Bombus lucorum attract conspecific females by completely different marking pheromones. MP of B. terrestris and B. lucorum pheromones contain mainly isoprenoid (ISP) compounds and fatty acid derivatives, respectively. Here, we studied the regulation of ISP biosynthesis in both bumblebees. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (AACT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) transcripts are abundant in the B. terrestris labial gland. Maximal abundance of these transcripts correlated well with AACT enzymatic activity detected in the LG extracts. In contrast, transcript abundances of AACT, HMGR, and FPPS in B. lucorum were low, and AACT activity was not detected in LGs. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation plays a key role in the control of ISP biosynthetic gene expression and ISP pheromone biosynthesis in bumblebee males.

  17. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017coa as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tan, Hanjie; Li, Wenxiong; Zhang, Tianmeng; Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zesheng; Song, Hao; Mo, Jun; Wang, Yuanhao; Zhou, Ziheng; Meng, Xianmin; Qian, Shenban; Jia, Junjun; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-840 nm) of SN 2017coa,discovered by Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS), on UT Mar.31.49 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  18. Benzophenone synthase and chalcone synthase from Hypericum androsaemum cell cultures: cDNA cloning, functional expression, and site-directed mutagenesis of two polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benye; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Schmidt, Werner; Beerhues, Ludger

    2003-06-01

    Benzophenone derivatives, such as polyprenylated benzoylphloroglucinols and xanthones, are biologically active secondary metabolites. The formation of their C13 skeleton is catalyzed by benzophenone synthase (BPS; EC 2.3.1.151) that has been cloned from cell cultures of Hypericum androsaemum. BPS is a novel member of the superfamily of plant polyketide synthases (PKSs), also termed type III PKSs, with 53-63% amino acid sequence identity. Heterologously expressed BPS was a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 42.8 kDa. Its preferred starter substrate was benzoyl-CoA that was stepwise condensed with three malonyl-CoAs to give 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone. BPS did not accept activated cinnamic acids as starter molecules. In contrast, recombinant chalcone synthase (CHS; EC 2.3.1.74) from the same cell cultures preferentially used 4-coumaroyl-CoA and also converted CoA esters of benzoic acids. The enzyme shared 60.1% amino acid sequence identity with BPS. In a phylogenetic tree, the two PKSs occurred in different clusters. One cluster was formed by CHSs including the one from H. androsaemum. BPS grouped together with the PKSs that functionally differ from CHS. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids shaping the initiation/elongation cavity of CHS yielded a triple mutant (L263M/F265Y/S338G) that preferred benzoyl-CoA over 4-coumaroyl-CoA.

  19. Response of the cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance in dairy cows depends on the lactational stage.

    PubMed

    Gross, Josef J; Kessler, Evelyne C; Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation.

  20. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  1. Domain analysis of 3 Keto Acyl-CoA synthase for structural variations in Vitis vinifera and Oryza brachyantha using comparative modelling.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Mamta; Pandey, Neetesh; Qamar, Naseha; Singh, Brijendra; Shukla, Akanksha

    2015-03-01

    The long chain fatty acids incorporated into plant lipids are derived from the iterative addition of C2 units which is provided by malonyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA after interactions with 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), found in several plants. This study provides functional characterization of three 3 ketoacyl CoA synthase like proteins in Vitis vinifera (one) and Oryza brachyantha (two proteins). Sequence analysis reveals that protein of Oryza brachyantha shows 96% similarity to a hypothetical protein in Sorghum bicolor; total 11 homologs were predicted in Sorghum bicolor. Conserved domain prediction confirm the presence of FAE1/Type III polyketide synthase-like protein, Thiolase-like, subgroup; Thiolase-like and 3-Oxoacyl-ACP synthase III, C-terminal and chalcone synthase like domain but very long chain 3-keto acyl CoA domain is absent. All three proteins were found to have Chalcone and stilbene synthases C terminal domain which is similar to domain of thiolase and β keto acyl synthase. Its N terminal domain is absent in J3M9Z7 protein of Oryza brachyantha and F6HH63 protein of Vitis vinifera. Differences in N-terminal domain is responsible for distinguish activity. The J3MF16 protein of Oryza brachyantha contains N terminal domain and C terminal domain and characterized using annotation of these domains. Domains Gcs (streptomyces coelicolor) and Chalcone-stilbene synthases (KAS) in 2-pyrone synthase (Gerbera hybrid) and chalcone synthase 2 (Medicago sativa) were found to be present in three proteins. This similarity points toward anthocyanin biosynthetic process. Similarity to chalcone synthase 2 reveals its possible role in Naringenine and Chalcone synthase like activity. In 3 keto acyl CoA synthase of Oryza brachyantha. Active site residues C-240, H-407, N-447 are present in J3MF16 protein that are common in these three protein at different positions. Structural variations among dimer interface, product binding site, malonyl-CoA binding sites, were predicted in

  2. Aminoacyl-coenzyme A synthesis catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Jekel, Peter A; Wijma, Hein J; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Janssen, Dick B

    2011-03-23

    Coenzyme A ligases play an important role in metabolism by catalyzing the activation of carboxylic acids. In this study we describe the synthesis of aminoacyl-coenzyme As (CoAs) catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The enzyme accepted medium-chain length fatty acids as the best substrates, but the proteinogenic amino acids L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine, as well as the non-proteinogenic amino acids D-phenylalanine, D-tyrosine and (R)- and (S)-β-phenylalanine were also accepted. Of these amino acids, the highest activity was found for (R)-β-phenylalanine, forming (R)-β-phenylalanyl-CoA. Homology modeling suggested that alanine 312 is part of the active site cavity, and mutagenesis (A312G) yielded a variant that has an enhanced catalytic efficiency with β-phenylalanines and D-α-phenylalanine.

  3. Mosaic Conservation Opportunity Areas - Liberal Model (ECO_RES.COA_MOSAIC33)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The COA_Mosaic33 layer designates areas with potential for forest/grassland mosaic conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest/grassland mosaic land cover patches that are at least 75 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER roads files

  4. Mosaic Conservation Opportunity Areas - Conservativel Model (ECO_RES.COA_MOSAIC66)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The COA_Mosaic66 layer designates areas with potential for forest/grassland mosaic conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest/grassland land cover patches that area at least 395 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER road files.

  5. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of /sup 14/C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production.

  6. Germline deletion of pantothenate kinases 1 and 2 reveals the key roles for CoA in postnatal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rehg, Jerold E; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) phosphorylates pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and controls the overall rate of coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. Pank1 gene deletion in mice results in a metabolic phenotype where fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis are impaired in the fasted state, leading to mild hypoglycemia. Inactivating mutations in the human PANK2 gene lead to childhood neurodegeneration, but Pank2 gene inactivation in mice does not elicit a phenotype indicative of the neuromuscular symptoms or brain iron accumulation that accompany the human disease. Pank1/Pank2 double knockout (dKO) mice were derived to determine if the mild phenotypes of the single knockout mice are due to the ability of the two isoforms to compensate for each other in CoA biosynthesis. Postnatal development was severely affected in the dKO mice. The dKO pups developed progressively severe hypoglycemia and hyperketonemia by postnatal day 10 leading to death by day 17. Hyperketonemia arose from impaired whole-body ketone utilization illustrating the requirement for CoA in energy generation from ketones. dKO pups had reduced CoA and decreased fatty acid oxidation coupled with triglyceride accumulation in liver. dKO hepatocytes could not maintain the NADH levels compared to wild-type hepatocytes. These results revealed an important link between CoA and NADH levels, which was reflected by deficiencies in hepatic oleate synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The data indicate that PanK1 and PanK2 can compensate for each other to supply tissue CoA, but PanK1 is more important to CoA levels in liver whereas PanK2 contributes more to CoA synthesis in the brain.

  7. Copper supplementation restores cytochrome c oxidase assembly defect in a mitochondrial disease model of COA6 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Timbalia, Shrishiv A.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain biogenesis is orchestrated by hundreds of assembly factors, many of which are yet to be discovered. Using an integrative approach based on clues from evolutionary history, protein localization and human genetics, we have identified a conserved mitochondrial protein, C1orf31/COA6, and shown its requirement for respiratory complex IV biogenesis in yeast, zebrafish and human cells. A recent next-generation sequencing study reported potential pathogenic mutations within the evolutionarily conserved Cx9CxnCx10C motif of COA6, implicating it in mitochondrial disease biology. Using yeast coa6Δ cells, we show that conserved residues in the motif, including the residue mutated in a patient with mitochondrial disease, are essential for COA6 function, thus confirming the pathogenicity of the patient mutation. Furthermore, we show that zebrafish embryos with zfcoa6 knockdown display reduced heart rate and cardiac developmental defects, recapitulating the observed pathology in the human mitochondrial disease patient who died of neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The specific requirement of Coa6 for respiratory complex IV biogenesis, its intramitochondrial localization and the presence of the Cx9CxnCx10C motif suggested a role in mitochondrial copper metabolism. In support of this, we show that exogenous copper supplementation completely rescues respiratory and complex IV assembly defects in yeast coa6Δ cells. Taken together, our results establish an evolutionarily conserved role of Coa6 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the COA6 mutation in the human mitochondrial disease patient. PMID:24549041

  8. Cooperation between COA6 and SCO2 in COX2 maturation during cytochrome c oxidase assembly links two mitochondrial cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Bareth, Bettina; Dudek, Jan; Juris, Lisa; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wissel, Mirjam; Leary, Scot C; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2015-06-02

    Three mitochondria-encoded subunits form the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. COX1 and COX2 contain heme and copper redox centers, which are integrated during assembly of the enzyme. Defects in this process lead to an enzyme deficiency and manifest as mitochondrial disorders in humans. Here we demonstrate that COA6 is specifically required for COX2 biogenesis. Absence of COA6 leads to fast turnover of newly synthesized COX2 and a concomitant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase levels. COA6 interacts transiently with the copper-containing catalytic domain of newly synthesized COX2. Interestingly, similar to the copper metallochaperone SCO2, loss of COA6 causes cardiomyopathy in humans. We show that COA6 and SCO2 interact and that corresponding pathogenic mutations in each protein affect complex formation. Our analyses define COA6 as a constituent of the mitochondrial copper relay system, linking defects in COX2 metallation to cardiac cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

  9. Validation of CoaBC as a Bactericidal Target in the Coenzyme A Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on its own ability to biosynthesize coenzyme A to meet the needs of the myriad enzymatic reactions that depend on this cofactor for activity. As such, the essential pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis pathways have attracted attention as targets for tuberculosis drug development. To identify the optimal step for coenzyme A pathway disruption in M. tuberculosis, we constructed and characterized a panel of conditional knockdown mutants in coenzyme A pathway genes. Here, we report that silencing of coaBC was bactericidal in vitro, whereas silencing of panB, panC, or coaE was bacteriostatic over the same time course. Silencing of coaBC was likewise bactericidal in vivo, whether initiated at infection or during either the acute or chronic stages of infection, confirming that CoaBC is required for M. tuberculosis to grow and persist in mice and arguing against significant CoaBC bypass via transport and assimilation of host-derived pantetheine in this animal model. These results provide convincing genetic validation of CoaBC as a new bactericidal drug target. PMID:27676316

  10. SIRT4 coordinates the balance between lipid synthesis and catabolism by repressing malonyl CoA decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Saha, Asish K.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Davies, Michael; Koves, Timothy R.; Dephoure, Noah; Fischer, Frank; Boanca, Gina; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Lovitch, Scott B.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Steegborn, Clemens; Gygi, Steven P.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lipid metabolism is tightly controlled by the nutritional state of the organism. Nutrient-rich conditions increase lipogenesis whereas nutrient deprivation promotes fat oxidation. In this study, we identify the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT4, as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis. SIRT4 is active in nutrient-replete conditions to repress fatty acid oxidation while promoting lipid anabolism. SIRT4 deacetylates and inhibits malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), an enzyme that produces acetyl CoA from malonyl CoA. Malonyl CoA provides the carbon skeleton for lipogenesis and also inhibits fat oxidation. Mice lacking SIRT4 display elevated MCD activity and decreased malonyl CoA in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Consequently, SIRT4 KO mice display deregulated lipid metabolism leading to increased exercise tolerance and protection against diet-induced obesity. In sum, this work elucidates SIRT4 as an important regulator of lipid homeostasis, identifies MCD as a novel SIRT4 target, and deepens our understanding of the malonyl CoA regulatory axis. PMID:23746352

  11. Subcellular relocalization of a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase by a suppressor mutation alleviates a respiration deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Harington, A; Schwarz, E; Slonimski, P P; Herbert, C J

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated an extragenic suppressor, FAM1-1, which is able to restore respiratory growth to a deletion of the CEM1 gene (mitochondrial beta-keto-acyl synthase). The sequence of the suppressor strongly suggests that it encodes a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (fatty-acyl-CoA synthetase). We have also cloned and sequenced the wild-type FAM1 gene, which is devoid of suppressor activity. The comparison of the two sequences shows that the suppressor mutation is an A-->T transversion, which creates a new initiation codon and adds 18 amino acids to the N-terminus of the protein. This extension has all the characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence, whilst the N-terminus of the wild-type protein has none of these characteristics. In vitro mitochondrial import experiments show that the N-terminal half of the suppressor protein, but not of the wild-type, is transported into mitochondria. Thus, we hypothesize that the suppressor acts by changing the subcellular localization of the protein and relocating at least some of the enzyme from the cytosol to the mitochondria. These results support the hypothesis that some form of fatty acid synthesis, specific for the mitochondria, is essential for the function of the organelle. Images PMID:7988550

  12. A Chemo-Enzymatic Road Map to the Synthesis of CoA Esters.

    PubMed

    Peter, Dominik M; Vögeli, Bastian; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J

    2016-04-20

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a ubiquitous cofactor present in every known organism. The thioesters of CoA are core intermediates in many metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle, fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism, including polyketide biosynthesis. Synthesis of CoA-thioesters is vital for the study of CoA-dependent enzymes and pathways, but also as standards for metabolomics studies. In this work we systematically tested five chemo-enzymatic methods for the synthesis of the three most abundant acyl-CoA thioester classes in biology; saturated acyl-CoAs, α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoAs (i.e., enoyl-CoA derivatives), and α-carboxylated acyl-CoAs (i.e., malonyl-CoA derivatives). Additionally we report on the substrate promiscuity of three newly described acyl-CoA dehydrogenases that allow the simple conversion of acyl-CoAs into enoyl-CoAs. With these five methods, we synthesized 26 different CoA-thioesters with a yield of 40% or higher. The CoA esters produced range from short- to long-chain, include branched and α,β-unsaturated representatives as well as other functional groups. Based on our results we provide a general guideline to the optimal synthesis method of a given CoA-thioester in respect to its functional group(s) and the commercial availability of the precursor molecule. The proposed synthetic routes can be performed in small scale and do not require special chemical equipment, making them convenient also for biological laboratories.

  13. The first plant type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes formation of aromatic heptaketide.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ikuro; Utsumi, Yoriko; Oguro, Satoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2004-03-26

    A cDNA encoding a novel plant type III polyketide synthase (PKS) was cloned from rhubarb (Rheum palmatum). A recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli accepted acetyl-CoA as a starter, carried out six successive condensations with malonyl-CoA and subsequent cyclization to yield an aromatic heptaketide, aloesone. The enzyme shares 60% amino acid sequence identity with chalcone synthases (CHSs), and maintains almost identical CoA binding site and catalytic residues conserved in the CHS superfamily enzymes. Further, homology modeling predicted that the 43-kDa protein has the same overall fold as CHS. This provides new insights into the catalytic functions of type III PKSs, and suggests further involvement in the biosynthesis of plant polyketides.

  14. 5-AMINOLEVULINATE SYNTHASE: CATALYSIS OF THE FIRST STEP OF HEME BIOSYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, G. A.; Ferreira, G. C.

    2010-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase is a homodimeric pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the first step of the heme biosynthetic pathway in animals, fungi, and the α-subclass of the photosynthetic purple bacteria. The reaction cycle involves condensation of glycine with succinyl-coenzyme A to yield 5-aminolevulinate, carbon dioxide, and CoA. Mutations in the human erythroid-specific aminolevulinate synthase gene are associated with the erythropoietic disorder X-linked sideroblastic anemia. Recent kinetic and crystallographic data have facilitated an unprecedented understanding of how this important enzyme produces 5-aminolevulinate, and suggest possible directions for future research that may lead to treatments not only for X-linked sideroblastic anemia, but also other diseases. PMID:19268008

  15. Statin-like principles of bergamot fruit (Citrus bergamia): isolation of 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl flavonoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Di Donna, Leonardo; De Luca, Giuseppina; Mazzotti, Fabio; Napoli, Anna; Salerno, Raffaele; Taverna, Domenico; Sindona, Giovanni

    2009-07-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl neohesperidosides of hesperetin (brutieridin, 1) and naringenin (melitidin, 2) were isolated and detected from the fruits of bergamot (Citrus bergamia). The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  16. The Role of Coa2 in Hemylation of Yeast Cox1 Revealed by Its Genetic Interaction with Cox10 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, Megan; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Pierrel, Fabien; Winge, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) assembly factor Coa2 are impaired in Cox1 maturation and exhibit a rapid degradation of newly synthesized Cox1. The respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells is suppressed either by the presence of a mutant allele of the Cox10 farnesyl transferase involved in heme a biosynthesis or through impaired proteolysis by the disruption of the mitochondrial Oma1 protease. Cox10 with an N196K substitution functions as a robust gain-of-function suppressor of the respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells but lacks suppressor activity for two other CcO assembly mutant strains, the coa1Δ and shy1Δ mutants. The suppressor activity of N196K mutant Cox10 is dependent on its catalytic function and the presence of Cox15, the second enzyme involved in heme a biosynthesis. Varying the substitution at Asn196 reveals a correlation between the suppressor activity and the stabilization of the high-mass homo-oligomeric Cox10 complex. We postulate that the mutant Cox10 complex has enhanced efficiency in the addition of heme a to Cox1. Coa2 appears to impart stability to the oligomeric wild-type Cox10 complex involved in Cox1 hemylation. PMID:19841065

  17. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2009-04-28

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  18. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2005-09-13

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  19. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2004-07-20

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.sub..alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.sub..beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyurvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.sub..alpha. pPDH, E1.sub..beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  20. Insulin Signaling Regulates Fatty Acid Catabolism at the Level of CoA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Ruskeepää, Anna-Liisa; Aye, Cho Cho; Carson, Brian P.; Mora, Silvia; Orešič, Matej; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2012-01-01

    The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG) catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS). We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:22275878

  1. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  2. Enzyme Activities of the Ceramide Synthases CERS2–6 Are Regulated by Phosphorylation in the C-terminal Region*

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Takayuki; Hirayama, Taisuke; Kihara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide and complex sphingolipids regulate important cellular functions including cell growth, apoptosis, and signaling. Dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism leads to pathological consequences such as sphingolipidoses and insulin resistance. Ceramides in mammals vary greatly in their acyl-chain composition: six different ceramide synthase isozymes (CERS1–6) that exhibit distinct substrate specificity and tissue distribution account for this diversity. In the present study, we demonstrated that CERS2–6 were phosphorylated at the cytoplasmic C-terminal regions. Most of the phosphorylated residues conformed to a consensus motif for phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 (CK2), and treatment of cells with the CK2-specific inhibitor CX-4945 lowered the phosphorylation levels of CERS2, -4, -5, and -6. Phosphorylation of CERS2 was especially important for its catalytic activity, acting mainly by increasing its Vmax value. Phosphorylation modestly increased the catalytic activities of CERS4 and -5 and mildly increased those of CERS3 and -6. Dephosphorylation of endogenous ceramide synthases in the mouse brain led to severely reduced activity toward the Cers2 substrates C22:0/C24:0-CoAs and modestly reduced activity toward the Cers5/6 substrate C16:0-CoA. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of ceramide synthases may be a key regulatory point in the control of the distribution and levels of sphingolipids of various acyl-chain lengths. PMID:26887952

  3. A key role of PGC-1α transcriptional coactivator in production of VEGF by a novel angiogenic agent COA-Cl in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Junsuke; Okamoto, Ryuji; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Karita, Sakiko; Nakai, Kozo; Kubota, Yasuo; Takata, Maki; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Konishi, Ryoji; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-03-01

    We previously demonstrated a potent angiogenic effect of a newly developed adenosine-like agent namedCOA-Cl.COA-Cl exerted tube forming activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). We therefore explored whether and howCOA-Cl modulates gene expression and protein secretion ofVEGF, a master regulator of angiogenesis, inNHDFRT-PCRandELISArevealed thatCOA-Cl upregulatedVEGF mRNAexpression and protein secretion inNHDFHIF1α(hypoxia-inducible factor 1α), a transcription factor, andPGC-1α(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γcoactivator-1α), a transcriptional coactivator, are known to positively regulate theVEGFgene. Immunoblot andRT-PCRanalyses revealed thatCOA-Cl markedly upregulated the expression ofPGC-1αprotein andmRNACOA-Cl had no effect on the expression ofHIF1αprotein andmRNAin both hypoxia and normoxia. SilencingPGC-1αgene, but notHIF1αgene, by small interferingRNAattenuated the ability ofCOA-Cl to promoteVEGFsecretion. When an N-terminal fragment ofPGC-1αwas cotransfected with its partner transcription factorERRα(estrogen-related receptor-α) inCOS-7 cells,COA-Cl upregulated the expression of the endogenousVEGF mRNA However,COA-Cl had no effect on the expression ofVEGF, whenHIF1αwas transfected.COA-Cl inducesVEGFgene expression and protein secretion in fibroblasts. The transcriptional coactivatorPGC-1α, in concert withERRα, plays a key role in theCOA-Cl-inducedVEGFproduction.COA-Cl-induced activation ofPGC-1α-ERRα-VEGFpathway has a potential as a novel means for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  4. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulated mechanisms of glucosamine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, M.A.; Pledger, W.J. )

    1987-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) treatment of density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells results in increased ({sup 3}H)glucosamine (GlcN) incorporation into cellular material. The enhanced GlcN incorporation is not due to a preferential increase in proteoglycan synthesis as measured by ({sup 35}S)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} incorporation. Approximately 50% of the GlcN incorporated in PDGF or platelet-poor plasma (PPP)-treated cultures enters N-linked glycoproteins. Addition of dolichol-phosphate (dolichol-P), a required intermediate in N-linked glycosylation, did not alter ({sup 3}H)GlcN incorporation in PDGF-treated cells but did increase incorporation in PPP-treated cultures to a level comparable to that observed for PDGF-treated cultures. PDGF-treated cultures contained twofold greater quantities of ({sup 3}H)GlcN dolichol intermediates and lipid-free glycoprotein. Over a 12-h time course 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) activity was similar in cultures treated with PDGF or PPP. Results of these studies reveal that enhanced protein glycosylation in response to PDGF treatment is not the result of a direct effect on HMG CoA reductase.

  5. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  6. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  7. Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT): human cDNA cloning, human chromosomal mapping to 5p13, and mutation detection in a SCOT-deficient patient.

    PubMed Central

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Fukao, T.; Song, X. Q.; Duncan, A. M.; Chen, H. S.; Robert, M. F.; Pérez-Cerdá, C.; Ugarte, M.; Chartrand, C.; Vobecky, S.; Kondo, N.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT; E.C.2.8.3.5) mediates the rate-determining step of ketolysis in extrahepatic tissues, the esterification of acetoacetate to CoA for use in energy production. Hereditary SCOT deficiency in humans causes episodes of severe ketoacidosis. We obtained human-heart SCOT cDNA clones spanning the entire 1,560-nt coding sequence. Sequence alignment of the human SCOT peptides with other known CoA transferases revealed several conserved regions of potential functional importance. A single approximately 3.2-kb SCOT mRNA is present in human tissues (heart > leukocytes >> fibroblasts), but no signal is detectable in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. We mapped the human SCOT locus (OXCT) to the cytogenetic band 5p13 by in situ hybridization. From fibroblasts of a patient with hereditary SCOT deficiency, we amplified and cloned cDNA fragments containing the entire SCOT coding sequence. We found a homozygous C-to-G transversion at nt 848, which changes the Ser 283 codon to a stop codon. This mutation (S283X) is incompatible with normal enzyme function and represents the first documentation of a pathogenic mutation in SCOT deficiency. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:8751852

  8. Discovery of Tumor-Specific Irreversible Inhibitors of Stearoyl CoA Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C.; Gonzales, Stephen S.; Winterton, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; McKnight, John S.; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Hanson, Jordan M.; Cross, Bethany; Owen, Amy E.; Duan, Yingli; Moreno, Jose R.; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Posner, Bruce A.; Williams, Noelle S.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic to the same four of 12 human lung cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) inhibitors. SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease. However, SCD is essential to sebocytes, and accordingly SCD inhibitors cause skin toxicity. Mouse sebocytes were unable to activate the benzothiazoles or oxalamides into SCD inhibitors, providing a therapeutic window for inhibiting SCD in vivo. We thus offer a strategy to target SCD in cancer by taking advantage of high CYP expression in a subset of tumors. PMID:26829472

  9. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  10. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, E.; Calkins, M.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Optical spectra (range 350-760nm) of the supernova candidates ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa (ATel #9081) and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6 (ATel #9056) were obtained on UT 2016 June 3 with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+ FAST).

  11. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in Morris Hepatoma 7777 mitochondria and its sensitivity to malonyl CoA inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Woldegiorgis, G.; Shrago, E.

    1986-05-01

    Earlier reports in the literature have indicated no detectable Carnitine Palymitoyl Transferase (CPT) activity in homogenates prepared from Morris Hepatoma 7777. In its study CPT activity in isolated mitochondria (mito) was measured by butanol extraction of the (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl carnitine formed as outlined by Bremer et al. Contrary to the earlier work where no appreciable activity of CPT was observed the authors find significant levels of CPT (2.6 nMol/min/mg protein) in isolated mito from Morris Hepatoma 7777 (MH 7777). The level of CPT activity observed in MH 7777 mito was, however, 36% lower compared to the host liver CPT activity (4.1 nMol/min/mg protein). The enzyme in MH 7777 mito showed 83% inhibition in the presence of 10 ..mu..M malonyl CoA, in agreement with the degree of sensitivity observed with the host liver isolated mito. On freeze thawing host mito, total CPT activity increased and the sensitivity of the enzyme to malonyl CoA decreased. Frozen thawed MH 7777 mito showed a similar response to malonyl CoA but no change in the total CPT level was observed. The authors results establish for the first time the presence of a malonyl CoA sensitive CPT in MH 7777 mito, which may have slightly different properties from normal due to the membrane environment of the enzyme.

  12. OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

  13. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  14. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  15. Model simulations of cooking organic aerosol (COA) over the UK using estimates of emissions based on measurements at two sites in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ots, Riinu; Vieno, Massimo; Allan, James D.; Reis, Stefan; Nemitz, Eiko; Young, Dominique E.; Coe, Hugh; Di Marco, Chiara; Detournay, Anais; Mackenzie, Ian A.; Green, David C.; Heal, Mathew R.

    2016-11-01

    Cooking organic aerosol (COA) is currently not included in European emission inventories. However, recent positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements have suggested important contributions of COA in several European cities. In this study, emissions of COA were estimated for the UK, based on hourly AMS measurements of COA made at two sites in London (a kerbside site in central London and an urban background site in a residential area close to central London) for the full calendar year of 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign. Iteration of COA emissions estimates and subsequent evaluation and sensitivity experiments were conducted with the EMEP4UK atmospheric chemistry transport modelling system with a horizontal resolution of 5 km × 5 km. The spatial distribution of these emissions was based on workday population density derived from the 2011 census data. The estimated UK annual COA emission was 7.4 Gg per year, which is an almost 10 % addition to the officially reported UK national total anthropogenic emissions of PM2.5 (82 Gg in 2012), corresponding to 320 mg person-1 day-1 on average. Weekday and weekend diurnal variation in COA emissions were also based on the AMS measurements. Modelled concentrations of COA were then independently evaluated against AMS-derived COA measurements from another city and time period (Manchester, January-February 2007), as well as with COA estimated by a chemical mass balance model of measurements for a 2-week period at the Harwell rural site (˜ 80 km west of central London). The modelled annual average contribution of COA to ambient particulate matter (PM) in central London was between 1 and 2 µg m-3 (˜ 20 % of total measured OA1) and between 0.5 and 0.7 µg m-3 in other major cities in England (Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds). It was also shown that cities smaller than London can have a central hotspot of population density of smaller

  16. Structural and biochemical characterisation of Archaeoglobus fulgidus esterase reveals a bound CoA molecule in the vicinity of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Christopher; Finnigan, William; Isupov, Michail N.; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W. M.; van der Oost, John; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxyl esterase, AF-Est2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been cloned, over-expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically and structurally characterized. The enzyme has high activity towards short- to medium-chain p-nitrophenyl carboxylic esters with optimal activity towards the valerate ester. The AF-Est2 has good solvent and pH stability and is very thermostable, showing no loss of activity after incubation for 30 min at 80 °C. The 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of AF-Est2 reveals Coenzyme A (CoA) bound in the vicinity of the active site. Despite the presence of CoA bound to the AF-Est2 this enzyme has no CoA thioesterase activity. The pantetheine group of CoA partially obstructs the active site alcohol pocket suggesting that this ligand has a role in regulation of the enzyme activity. A comparison with closely related α/β hydrolase fold enzyme structures shows that the AF-Est2 has unique structural features that allow CoA binding. A comparison of the structure of AF-Est2 with the human carboxyl esterase 1, which has CoA thioesterase activity, reveals that CoA is bound to different parts of the core domain in these two enzymes and approaches the active site from opposite directions. PMID:27160974

  17. Mammalian ceramide synthases.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michal; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-05-01

    In mammals, ceramide, a key intermediate in sphingolipid metabolism and an important signaling molecule, is synthesized by a family of six ceramide synthases (CerS), each of which synthesizes ceramides with distinct acyl chain lengths. There are a number of common biochemical features between the CerS, such as their catalytic mechanism, and their structure and intracellular localization. Different CerS also display remarkable differences in their biological properties, with each of them playing distinct roles in processes as diverse as cancer and tumor suppression, in the response to chemotherapeutic drugs, in apoptosis, and in neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase III (mtFabH) assay: principles and method.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sarbjot; Reynolds, Kevin A

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is one of the relatively newer targets in antibacterial drug discovery. The presence of distinct fatty acid synthases (FAS) in mammals and bacteria and the fact that most bacterial FAS enzymes are essential for viability make this a very attractive antimicrobial drug target. The enzyme beta-ketoacyl ACP synthase (KASIII or FabH) is the key enzyme that initiates fatty acid biosynthesis in a type II dissociated FAS. This enzyme catalyzes the condensation of acyl CoA and malonyl ACP (acyl carrier protein) to form a beta-ketoacyl ACP product, which is further processed to form mature fatty acids that are involved in various essential cellular processes and structures like phospholipid biosynthesis, cell wall formation, etc. Herein we describe a new assay for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis FabH (mtFabH) enzyme involved in a key initiation step in the synthesis of mycolic acids, which are an integral component of the cell wall. The assay eliminates the need for the cumbersome washing steps or specialty scintillation proximity assay beads and the preparation of acyl carrier proteins required in other assay formats. This discontinuous assay involves the reduction of radiolabled long-chain beta-ketoacyl CoA product to its dihydroxy derivative, which partitions into a nonpolar phase for quantitation, while the reduced radiolabeled substrate derivative remains in the aqueous phase.

  20. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein.

  1. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-Ming; Wilson, Ella V; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens.

  2. Real-Time Decision Support for Course of Action/Enemy Course of Action (COA/ECOA) Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    used. 3. A domain ontology must be given. Based on these assumptions, we propose the CAFSIN solution, standing for COA Analysis based on Fuzzified...the Pentagon” and “DoD” are wired together as the same word and are represented as a single node). 2. Polysemy : words with different meanings in the...Given an ontology with these requirements satisfied, a standard hashing function may be used to directly identify a specific node in the ontology

  3. Biochemical characterization of recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-07-01

    Recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) protein from Leucaena leucocephala was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain and purified to apparent homogeneity. Optimum pH for forward and reverse reaction was found to be 6.5 and 7.8 respectively. The enzyme was most stable around pH 6.5 at 25°C for 90 min. The enzyme showed Kcat/Km for feruloyl, caffeoyl, sinapoyl, coumaroyl CoA, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde as 4.6, 2.4, 2.3, 1.7, 1.9 and 1.2 (×10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), respectively, indicating affinity of enzyme for feruloyl CoA over other substrates and preference of reduction reaction over oxidation. Activation energy, Ea for various substrates was found to be in the range of 20-50 kJ/mol. Involvement of probable carboxylate ion, histidine, lysine or tyrosine at the active site of enzyme was predicted by pH activity profile. SAXS studies of protein showed radius 3.04 nm and volume 49.25 nm(3) with oblate ellipsoid shape. Finally, metal ion inhibition studies revealed that Ll-CCRH1 is a metal independent enzyme.

  4. Correlation of ATP citrate lyase and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Naoko; Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Usuma, Jermnak; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2013-11-21

    The correlation of ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum was investigated using an inhibitor (precocene II) and an enhancer (cobalt chloride) of trichothecene production by changing carbon sources in liquid medium. When precocene II (30 µM) was added to inhibit trichothecene production in a trichothecene high-production medium containing sucrose, ACL expression was reduced and ACL mRNA level as well as acetyl CoA amount in the fungal cells were reduced to the levels observed in a trichothecene trace-production medium containing glucose or fructose. The ACL mRNA level was greatly increased by addition of cobalt chloride in the trichothecene high-production medium, but not in the trichothecene trace-production medium. Levels were reduced to those level in the trichothecene trace-production medium by addition of precocene II (300 µM) together with cobalt chloride. These results suggest that ACL expression is activated in the presence of sucrose and that acetyl CoA produced by the increased ALC level may be used for trichothecene production in the fungus. These findings also suggest that sucrose is important for the action of cobalt chloride in activating trichothecene production and that precocene II may affect a step down-stream of the target of cobalt chloride.

  5. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  6. A type III polyketide synthase from Wachendorfia thyrsiflora and its role in diarylheptanoid and phenylphenalenone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brand, S; Hölscher, D; Schierhorn, A; Svatos, A; Schröder, J; Schneider, B

    2006-07-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) related type III plant polyketide synthases (PKSs) are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of diarylheptanoids (e.g. curcumin and polycyclic phenylphenalenones), but no such activity has been reported. Root cultures from Wachendorfia thyrsiflora (Haemodoraceae) are a suitable source to search for such enzymes because they synthesize large amounts of phenylphenalenones, but no other products that are known to require CHSs or related enzymes (e.g. flavonoids or stilbenes). A homology-based RT-PCR strategy led to the identification of cDNAs for a type III PKS sharing only approximately 60% identity with typical CHSs. It was named WtPKS1 (W. thyrsiflora polyketide synthase 1). The purified recombinant protein accepted a large variety of aromatic and aliphatic starter CoA esters, including phenylpropionyl- and side-chain unsaturated phenylpropanoid-CoAs. The simplest model for the initial reaction in diarylheptanoid biosynthesis predicts a phenylpropanoid-CoA as starter and a single condensation reaction to a diketide. Benzalacetones, the expected release products, were observed only with unsaturated phenylpropanoid-CoAs, and the best results were obtained with 4-coumaroyl-CoA (80% of the products). With all other substrates, WtPKS1 performed two condensation reactions and released pyrones. We propose that WtPKS1 catalyses the first step in diarylheptanoid biosynthesis and that the observed pyrones are derailment products in the absence of downstream processing proteins.

  7. Possible mechanisms underlying statin-induced skeletal muscle toxicity in L6 fibroblasts and in rats.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Mai; Takaguri, Akira; Kano, Seiichiro; Kaneta, Shigeru; Ichihara, Kazuo; Satoh, Kumi

    2009-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are safe and well-tolerated therapeutic drugs. However, they occasionally induce myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Here, we investigated the mechanism of statin-induced myotoxicity in L6 fibroblasts and in rats in vivo. L6 fibroblasts were differentiated and then treated with pravastatin, simvastatin, or fluvastatin for 72 h. Hydrophobic simvastatin and fluvastatin decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner via apoptosis characterized by typical nuclear fragmentation and condensation and caspase-3 activation. Both hydrophobic statins transferred RhoA localization from the cell membrane to the cytosol. These changes induced by both hydrophobic statins were completely abolished by the co-application of geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP). Y27632, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, mimicked the hydrophobic statin-induced apoptosis. Hydrophilic pravastatin did not affect the viability of the cells. Fluvastatin was continuously infused (2.08 mg/kg at an infusion rate of 0.5 mL/h) into the right internal jugular vein of the rats in vivo for 72 h. Fluvastatin infusion significantly elevated the plasma CPK level and transferred RhoA localization in the skeletal muscle from the cell membrane to the cytosol. In conclusion, RhoA dysfunction due to loss of lipid modification with GGPP is involved in the mechanisms of statin-induced skeletal muscle toxicity.

  8. A role for the mevalonate pathway in early plant symbiotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Chabaud, Mireille; Genre, Andrea; Balloon, Allison J.; Maeda, Junko; Forshey, Kari; den Os, Désirée; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Coon, Joshua J.; Barker, David G.; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi produce signals that are perceived by host legume receptors at the plasma membrane and trigger sustained oscillations of the nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spiking), which in turn leads to gene expression and downstream symbiotic responses. The activation of Ca2+ spiking requires the plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase Does not Make Infections 2 (DMI2) as well as the nuclear cation channel DMI1. A key enzyme regulating the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reductase 1 (HMGR1), interacts with DMI2 and is required for the legume–rhizobium symbiosis. Here, we show that HMGR1 is required to initiate Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in Medicago truncatula roots in response to rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal signals. Furthermore, MVA, the direct product of HMGR1 activity, is sufficient to induce nuclear-associated Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in both wild-type plants and dmi2 mutants, but interestingly not in dmi1 mutants. Finally, MVA induced Ca2+ spiking in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells expressing DMI1. This demonstrates that the nuclear cation channel DMI1 is sufficient to support MVA-induced Ca2+ spiking in this heterologous system. PMID:26199419

  9. Mechanisms of acetohydroxyacid synthases.

    PubMed

    Chipman, David M; Duggleby, Ronald G; Tittmann, Kai

    2005-10-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthases are thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent biosynthetic enzymes found in all autotrophic organisms. Over the past 4-5 years, their mechanisms have been clarified and illuminated by protein crystallography, engineered mutagenesis and detailed single-step kinetic analysis. Pairs of catalytic subunits form an intimate dimer containing two active sites, each of which lies across a dimer interface and involves both monomers. The ThDP adducts of pyruvate, acetaldehyde and the product acetohydroxyacids can be detected quantitatively after rapid quenching. Determination of the distribution of intermediates by NMR then makes it possible to calculate individual forward unimolecular rate constants. The enzyme is the target of several herbicides and structures of inhibitor-enzyme complexes explain the herbicide-enzyme interaction.

  10. Peroxisomal Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases and evolution of cytosolic paralogues in embryophytes.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Simon; Vidoudez, Charles; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Delessert, Syndie; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Poirier, Yves

    2008-12-01

    Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase (ECI) is an enzyme that participates in the degradation of unsaturated fatty acids through the beta-oxidation cycle. Three genes encoding Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases and named AtECI1, AtECI2 and AtECI3 have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. When expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all three ECI proteins were targeted to the peroxisomes and enabled the yeast Deltaeci1 mutant to degrade 10Z-heptadecenoic acid, demonstrating Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase activity in vivo. Fusion proteins between yellow fluorescent protein and AtECI1 or AtECI2 were targeted to the peroxisomes in onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis root cells, but a similar fusion protein with AtECI3 remained in the cytosol for both tissues. AtECI3 targeting to peroxisomes in S. cerevisiae was dependent on yeast PEX5, while expression of Arabidopsis PEX5 in yeast failed to target AtECI3 to peroxisomes. AtECI2 and AtECI3 are tandem duplicated genes and show a high level of amino acid conservation, except at the C-terminus; AtECI2 ends with the well conserved peroxisome targeting signal 1 (PTS1) terminal tripeptide PKL, while AtECI3 possesses a divergent HNL terminal tripeptide. Evolutionary analysis of ECI genes in plants revealed several independent duplication events, with duplications occurring in rice and Medicago truncatula, generating homologues with divergent C-termini and no recognizable PTS1. All plant ECI genes analyzed, including AtECI3, are under negative purifying selection, implying functionality of the cytosolic AtECI3. Analysis of the mammalian and fungal genomes failed to identify cytosolic variants of the Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase, indicating that evolution of cytosolic Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases is restricted to the plant kingdom.

  11. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  12. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis.

    PubMed

    Healey, Gareth D; Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies.

  13. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G.; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  14. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase partitions metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kumar, Ritesh; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan M; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Shasany, Ajit K

    2013-08-01

    Biosynthesis of eugenol shares its initial steps with that of lignin, involving conversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to their corresponding coenzyme A (CoA) esters by 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs). In this investigation, a 4CL (OS4CL) was identified from glandular trichome-rich tissue of Ocimum sanctum with high sequence similarity to an isoform (OB4CL_ctg4) from Ocimum basilicum. The levels of OS4CL and OB4CL_ctg4-like transcripts were highest in O. sanctum trichome, followed by leaf, stem and root. The eugenol content in leaf essential oil was positively correlated with the expression of OS4CL in the leaf at different developmental stages. Recombinant OS4CL showed the highest activity with p-coumaric acid, followed by ferulic, caffeic and trans-cinnamic acids. Transient RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of OS4CL in O. sanctum leaves caused a reduction in leaf eugenol content and trichome transcript level, with a considerable increase in endogenous p-coumaric, ferulic, trans-cinnamic and caffeic acids. A significant reduction in the expression levels was observed for OB4CL_ctg4-related transcripts in suppressed trichome compared with transcripts similar to the other four isoforms (OB4CL_ctg1, 2, 3 and 5). Sinapic acid and lignin content were also unaffected in RNAi suppressed leaf samples. Transient expression of OS4CL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts was associated with the cytosol. These results indicate metabolite channeling of intermediates towards eugenol by a specific 4CL and is the first report demonstrating the involvement of 4CL in creation of virtual compartments through substrate utilization and committing metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis at an early stage of the pathway.

  15. Phosphanilic Acid Inhibits Dihydropteroate Synthase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    dihydropteroate synthases of P. aeruginosa and E . coli were about equally susceptible to inhibition by PA. These results suggest that cells of P. aeruginosa...are more permeable to PA than cells of E . coli . Although a weak inhibitor, PA acted on dihydropteroate synthase in the same manner as the sulfonamides...with which PA is structurally related. Inhibition of E . coli by PA in a basal salts-glucose medium was prevented by p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA). However

  16. The putative elaiophylin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces sp. DSM4137 is adjacent to genes encoding adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl CoA mutase and to genes for synthesis of cobalamin.

    PubMed

    Haydock, Stephen F; Mironenko, Tatiana; Ghoorahoo, Haroun I; Leadlay, Peter F

    2004-09-30

    A type I PKS gene probe obtained from RAPB of the rapamycin producer Streptomyces hygroscopicus, strongly hybridised to 92 out of 1120 cosmids from a genomic library of the elaiophylin-producing strain Streptomyces sp. DSM4137. Partial cosmid sequencing suggested the presence of 10 separate sequences encoding type I PKS genes. One entire DNA sequence was obtained and found exactly to match the gene organisation expected for the biosynthesis of the unusual macrodiolide polyketide elaiophylin. The putative elaiophylin gene cluster contains five large open-reading frames encoding typical modular polyketide synthases, which together catalyse the synthesis of the octaketide monomer of elaiophylin. Other genes were identified that would be required for provision of the ethylmalonate extender unit, for the synthesis and attachment of 2-deoxy-L-fucose and in regulation, or in export of the product. Immediately adjacent to the putative elaiophylin biosynthetic gene cluster is a 30-kbp region containing the gene for adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl CoA mutase and also genes involved in the biosynthesis of the cobalamin cofactor. Analysis of the latter gene set confirms the view that cbiD of the anaerobic pathway and cobF in the aerobic pathway catalyse the same methylation of precorrin-5. The proximity of these genes to the putative elaiophylin gene cluster can best be rationalised if in this organism succinyl-CoA is a significant source of the methylmalonate units for complex polyketide biosynthesis.

  17. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  18. Bacterial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Crane, Brian R; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Patel, Bhumit A

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are multidomain metalloproteins first identified in mammals as being responsible for the synthesis of the wide-spread signaling and protective agent nitric oxide (NO). Over the past 10 years, prokaryotic proteins that are homologous to animal NOSs have been identified and characterized, both in terms of enzymology and biological function. Despite some interesting differences in cofactor utilization and redox partners, the bacterial enzymes are in many ways similar to their mammalian NOS (mNOS) counterparts and, as such, have provided insight into the structural and catalytic properties of the NOS family. In particular, spectroscopic studies of thermostable bacterial NOSs have revealed key oxyheme intermediates involved in the oxidation of substrate L-arginine (Arg) to product NO. The biological functions of some bacterial NOSs have only more recently come to light. These studies disclose new roles for NO in biology, such as taking part in toxin biosynthesis, protection against oxidative stress, and regulation of recovery from radiation damage.

  19. Discovery of tumor-specific irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic at low nanomolar concentrations to the same 4 of 12 human lung cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD). SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease.

  20. Cholesterol metabolism and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A; Cerda, S; Wilkinson, J

    1993-01-01

    While epidemiologic and concordant experimental data indicate a direct relationship between dietary fat (and presumably caloric) intake and the development of colon cancer, the effect of dietary cholesterol on this disease is still not clear. However, there appears to be a developing literature concerning an inverse relationship between serum and plasma cholesterol levels, and the risk for colon cancer. Findings that low serum cholesterol levels are apparent as early as ten years prior to the detection of colon cancer implies that sub clinical disease is probably not involved initially in this process. The possibility of low serum cholesterol as a bio-marker was considered in epidemiologic studies which focused upon obese men with lower than normal serum cholesterol levels who were found to be at increased risk to colon cancer. While the relationship between low serum cholesterol and colonic or intestinal cholesterol metabolism is presently not understood, current genetic studies provide a promising though as yet unexplored potential association. Alterations which occur during the developmental progression of colonic cancer include changes in chromosome 5, which also carries two genes vital to the biosynthesis and regulation of systemic and cellular cholesterol metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA R). Regulation of cholesterol metabolism in intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro varies from that seen in normal fibroblasts or hepatocytes in terms of exogenous sources of cholesterol and how these sources regulate internal synthesis. Colonic cancer cells have been used to assess small bowel enterocyte cholesterol metabolism, which has been possible because of their ability to differentiate in culture, however information regarding true colonic enterocyte cholesterol metabolism is relatively scarce. Colonic cancer cells have been shown to possess a diminished or nonexistent ability to use

  1. Enhancement of ganoderic acid production by constitutively expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; He, Yi-Long; Zhang, De-Huai; Yue, Tong-Hui; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Li, Na; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-06-10

    The Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was expressed in Ganoderma lucidum to enhance antitumor ganoderic acid (GA) production. The effects of VHb expression on the accumulation of GAs and lanosterol (intermediate) and the transcription of GA biosynthesis genes were also investigated. In VHb-expressing G. lucidum, the maximum concentrations of four individual GAs (GA-S, GA-T, GA-Mk and GA-Me) were 19.1±1.8, 34.6±2.1, 191.5±13.1 and 45.2±2.8μg/100mg dry weight, respectively, which were 1.4-, 2.2, 1.9- and 2.0-fold higher than those obtained in the wild-type strain. Moreover, the maximum lanosterol concentration in the strain expressing VHb was 1.28-fold lower than that in the wild-type strain. The transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase genes were up-regulated by 1.6-, 1.5-, and 1.6-fold, respectively, in the strain expressing VHb. This work is beneficial in developing an efficient fermentation process for the hyperproduction of GAs.

  2. Potato steroidal glycoalkaloid levels and the expression of key isoprenoid metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Krits, Pinchas; Fogelman, Edna; Ginzberg, Idit

    2007-12-01

    The potato steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) are toxic secondary metabolites, and their total content in tubers should not exceed 20 mg/100 g fresh weight. The two major SGA in cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) are alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine. SGA biosynthetic genes and the genetic factors that control their expression have not yet been determined. In the present study, potato genotypes exhibiting different levels of SGA content showed an association between high SGA levels in their leaves and tubers and high expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 (hmg1) and squalene synthase 1 (pss1), genes of the mevalonic/isoprenoid pathway. Transcripts of other key enzymes of branches of the isoprenoid pathway, vetispiradiene/sesquiterpene synthase (pvs1) and sterol C24-methyltransferase type1 (smt1), were undetectable or exhibited stable expression regardless of SGA content, respectively, suggesting facilitated precursor flow to the SGA biosynthetic branch. The transcript ratio of solanidine glucosyltransferase (sgt2) to solanidine galactosyltransferase (sgt1) was correlated to the documented chaconine-to-solanine ratio in the tested genotypes. Significantly higher expression of hmg1, pss1, smt1, sgt1 and sgt2 was monitored in the tuber phelloderm than in the parenchyma of the tuber's flesh, targeting the former as the main SGA-producing tissue in the tuber, in agreement with the known high SGA content in the layers directly under the tuber skin.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ down-regulation mediates the inhibitory effect of d-δ-tocotrienol on the differentiation of murine 3T3-F442A preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Sheida; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Shen, Chwan-Li; Mo, Huanbiao

    2016-12-01

    Tocotrienols accelerate the degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of mevalonate; the latter is essential for preadipocyte differentiation. Tocotrienols also down-regulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a key regulator of adipocyte differentiation. We hypothesized that mevalonate deprivation and PPARγ down-regulation mediate d-δ-tocotrienol-induced inhibition of adipocyte differentiation. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of d-δ-tocotrienol on 3T3-F442A preadipocyte differentiation and the involvement of PPARγ and mevalonate. Murine 3T3-F442A preadipocytes were incubated with d-δ-tocotrienol (2.5-10 μmol/L) for 8 days. AdipoRed assay and Oil Red O staining showed that d-δ-tocotrienol dose-dependently reduced the intracellular triglyceride content. Concomitantly, d-δ-tocotrienol dose-dependently inhibited glucose uptake by 3T3-F442A cells and the expression of GLUT4, HMG CoA reductase, and p-Akt proteins. The effects of d-δ-tocotrienol on intracellular triglyceride content and glucose uptake were attenuated by rosiglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, but not supplemental mevalonate (100 μmol/L). In contrast, mevalonate, but not rosiglitazone, reversed the effects of lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase shown to inhibit adipocyte differentiation via mevalonate deprivation. Trypan blue staining revealed no changes in cell viability after a 48-hour incubation of 3T3-F442A cells with d-δ-tocotrienol (0-80 μmol/L), suggesting that the adipogenesis-suppressive activity of d-δ-tocotrienol was independent of cytotoxicity. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the antiadipogenic effect of d-δ-tocotrienol via PPARγ down-regulation.

  4. Screening, identification, and characterization of mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA).

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Janani; Bhat, Jyothi; Solapure, Suresh M; Sandesh, Jatheendranath; Sarkar, Debasmita; Aishwarya, Sundaram; Mukherjee, Kakoli; Datta, Santanu; Malolanarasimhan, Krishnan; Bandodkar, Balachandra; Das, Kaveri S

    2012-03-01

    The authors describe the discovery of anti-mycobacterial compounds through identifying mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA). Target-driven drug discovery technologies often work with purified enzymes, and inhibitors thus discovered may not optimally inhibit the form of the target enzyme predominant in the bacterial cell or may not be available at the desired concentration. Therefore, in addition to addressing entry or efflux issues, inhibitors with diverse mechanisms of inhibition (MoI) could be prioritized before hit-to-lead optimization. The authors describe a high-throughput assay based on protein thermal melting to screen large numbers of compounds for hits with diverse MoI. Following high-throughput screening for Mtb CoaA enzyme inhibitors, a concentration-dependent increase in protein thermal stability was used to identify true binders, and the degree of enhancement or reduction in thermal stability in the presence of substrate was used to classify inhibitors as competitive or non/uncompetitive. The thermal shift-based MoI assay could be adapted to screen hundreds of compounds in a single experiment as compared to traditional biochemical approaches for MoI determination. This MoI was confirmed through mechanistic studies that estimated K(ie) and K(ies) for representative compounds and through nuclear magnetic resonance-based ligand displacement assays.

  5. C75 is converted to C75-CoA in the hypothalamus, where it inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and decreases food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Mera, Paula; Bentebibel, Assia; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Cordente, Antonio G; Gurunathan, Chandrashekaran; Sebastián, David; Vázquez, Irene; Herrero, Laura; Ariza, Xavier; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Asins, Guillermina; Serra, Dolors; García, Jordi; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2009-03-15

    Central nervous system administration of C75 produces hypophagia and weight loss in rodents identifying C75 as a potential drug against obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism underlying this effect is unknown. Here we show that C75-CoA is generated chemically, in vitro and in vivo from C75 and that it is a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltranferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting step of fatty-acid oxidation. Three-D docking and kinetic analysis support the inhibitory effect of C75-CoA on CPT1. Central nervous system administration of C75 in rats led to C75-CoA production, inhibition of CPT1 and lower body weight and food intake. Our results suggest that inhibition of CPT1, and thus increased availability of fatty acids in the hypothalamus, contribute to the pharmacological mechanism of C75 to decrease food intake.

  6. CoaTx-II, a new dimeric Lys49 phospholipase A2 from Crotalus oreganus abyssus snake venom with bactericidal potential: Insights into its structure and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R; Lancellotti, M; Soares, A M; Calderon, L A; Ramírez, D; González, W; Marangoni, S; Da Silva, S L

    2016-09-15

    Snake venoms are rich and intriguing sources of biologically-active molecules that act on target cells, modulating a diversity of physiological functions and presenting promising pharmacological applications. Lys49 phospholipase A2 is one of the multifunctional proteins present in these complex secretions and, although catalytically inactive, has a variety of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antibacterial, inflammatory, antifungal activities. Herein, a Lys49 phospholipase A2, denominated CoaTx-II from Crotalus oreganus abyssus, was purified and structurally and pharmacologically characterized. CoaTx-II was isolated with a high degree of purity by a combination of two chromatographic steps; molecular exclusion and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This toxin is dimeric with a mass of 13868.2 Da (monomeric form), as determined by mass spectrometry. CoaTx-II is rich in Arg and Lys residues and displays high identity with other Lys49 PLA2 homologues, which have high isoelectric points. The structural model of dimeric CoaTx-II shows that the toxin is non-covalently stabilized. Despite its enzymatic inactivity, in vivo CoaTx-II caused local muscular damage, characterized by increased plasma creatine kinase and confirmed by histological alterations, in addition to an inflammatory activity, as demonstrated by mice paw edema induction and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 elevation. CoaTx-II also presents antibacterial activity against gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 31NM, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and positive (Staphyloccocus aureus BEC9393 and Rib1) bacteria. Therefore, data show that this newly purified toxin plays a central role in mediating the degenerative events associated with envenomation, in addition to demonstrating antibacterial properties, with potential for use in the development of strategies for antivenom therapy and combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  7. Cross sections for production of the CO(A 1 Pi)-(X 1 Sigma) fourth positive band system and O(3 S) by photodissociation of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentieu, E. P.; Mentall, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The CO(A 1 Pi) cross sections reported here, along with previously determined electron impact results, establish the basis for calculating CO fourth positive system volume emission rates in the Martian dayglow. Calculated volume emission rates in turn determine relative distribution of photon vs. electron impact as mechanisms for producing CO(A 1 Pi) in the Mars atmosphere. The smallness of the O(1304) cross section confirms previous indirect evidence that photodissociative excitation of CO2 is not an important source of O(3 S) in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  8. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  9. Rutin inhibits oleic acid induced lipid accumulation via reducing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Hsueh-Chun; Yang, Mon-Yuan; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2011-03-01

    Excessive lipid accumulation within liver has been proposed to cause obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Rutin, a common dietary flavonoid that is consumed in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages, has various biological functions, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. However, a hypolipidemic effect of rutin on fatty liver disease has not been reported. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on reducing lipid accumulation in hepatic cells. Hepatocytes were treated with oleic acid (OA) containing with or without rutin to observe the lipid accumulation by Nile red stain. The result showed rutin suppressed OA-induced lipid accumulation and increased adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in hepatocytes. The expression of critical molecule involved in lipid synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1 (SREBP-1), was attenuated in rutin-treated cells. Moreover, long-term incubation of rutin inhibited the transcriptions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-coenzyme carboxylase (ACC). Besides, we also found out the antioxidative effect of rutin by increasing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α and antioxidative enzymes. Taken together, our findings suggest rutin could attenuate lipid accumulation by decreasing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocyte.

  10. Simvastatin induces insulin resistance in L6 skeletal muscle myotubes by suppressing insulin signaling, GLUT4 expression and GSK-3β phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yaluri, Nagendra; Modi, Shalem; Kokkola, Tarja

    2016-11-11

    Simvastatin is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Recent data indicates that simvastatin increases the risk of new-onset diabetes by impairing both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. However, systematic evaluation of mechanistic pathways is lacking. We aimed to explore the effects of simvastatin on glucose uptake and underlying mechanisms using L6 skeletal muscle myotubes. We performed our experiments at basal and insulin-stimulated conditions, at normal (5.5 mM) and high (16.7 mM) glucose. We showed that simvastatin inhibited glucose uptake at all conditions. We also found out that pravastatin, another widely used statin with different physicochemical properties, did not inhibit glucose uptake. The effect of simvastatin was reversed with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not with farnesyl pyrophosphate, implying that reduced protein geranylgeranylation has a role in simvastatin-induced insulin resistance. Simvastatin also decreased phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), and downregulated GLUT4. In conclusion, our data indicate that simvastatin decreased both basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through inhibiting the critical steps in IR/IRS-1/AKT signaling cascade, and by hindering GLUT4 function and normal regulation of glycogen synthesis, contributing to insulin resistance.

  11. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum.

  12. Lipidomic-based investigation into the regulatory effect of Schisandrin B on palmitic acid level in non-alcoholic steatotic livers.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Niu, Xuyan; Dai, Wenlin; Tong, Tiejun; Chao, Xiaojuan; Su, Tao; Chan, Chi Leung; Lee, Kim Chung; Fu, Xiuqiong; Yi, Hua; Yu, Hua; Li, Ting; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Pan, Si-Yuan; Lu, Aiping; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2015-03-13

    Schisandrin B (SchB) is one of the most abundant bioactive dibenzocyclooctadiene derivatives found in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of SchB on non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD). In lipidomic study, ingenuity pathway analysis highlighted palmitate biosynthesis metabolic pathway in the liver samples of SchB-treated high-fat-diet-fed mice. Further experiments showed that the SchB treatment reduced expression and activity of fatty acid synthase, expressions of hepatic mature sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and hepatic level of palmitic acid which is known to promote progression of steatosis to steatohepatitis. Furthermore, the treatment also reduced hepatic fibrosis, activated nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 which is known to attenuate the progression of NASH-related fibrosis. Interestingly, in fasting mice, a single high-dose SchB induced transient lipolysis and increased the expressions of adipose triglyceride lipase and phospho-hormone sensitive lipase. The treatment also increased plasma cholesterol levels and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, reduced the hepatic low-density-lipoprotein receptor expression in these mice. Our data not only suggest SchB is a potential therapeutic agent for NAFLD, but also provided important information for a safe consumption of SchB because SchB overdosed under fasting condition will have adverse effects on lipid metabolism.

  13. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Newgard, Christopher B; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S; Gibson, Bradford W; Verdin, Eric

    2013-12-03

    Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1,190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5(-/-) animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2.

  14. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet-B and methyl jasmonate on tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong Hui; Zheng, Li Ping; Tian, Hao; Wang, Jian Wen

    2016-06-01

    Tanshinones are major bioactive diterpenoids of Salvia miltiorrhiza roots used for the treatment of cardiocerebral diseases. To develop effective elicitation and bioprocess strategies for the enhanced production of tanshinones, ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation were applied alone or in combination respectively in S. miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures. Our results showed 40-min UV-B irradiation at 40μW/cm(2) stimulated tanshinone production without any suppression of root growth, suggesting a new effective elicitor to S. miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures for tanshinone production. Moreover, the combined treatment of UV-B irradiation and MeJA exhibited synergistic effects on the expression levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (SmHMGR) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (SmGGPPS) genes in the tanshinone biosynthetic pathway. When hairy roots of 18-day-old cultures were exposed to the combined elicitation for 9days, the maximum production of tanshinone reached to 28.21mg/L, a 4.9-fold increase over the control. The combined elicitation of UV-B and MeJA was firstly used to stimulate the production of biologically important secondary metabolites in hairy root cultures.

  15. Microbial modulation of bacoside A biosynthetic pathway and systemic defense mechanism in Bacopa monnieri under Meloidogyne incognita stress

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rupali; Singh, Akanksha; Srivastava, Madhumita; Singh, Vivek; Gupta, M. M.; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Plant-associated beneficial microbes have been explored to fulfill the imperative function for plant health. However, their impact on the host secondary metabolite production and nematode disease management remains elusive. Our present work has shown that chitinolytic microbes viz., Chitiniphilus sp. MTN22 and Streptomyces sp. MTN14 singly as well as in combination modulated the biosynthetic pathway of bacoside A and systemic defense mechanism against Meloidogyne incognita in Bacopa monnieri. Interestingly, expression of bacoside biosynthetic pathway genes (3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, and squalene synthase) were upregulated in plants treated with the microbial combination in the presence as well as in absence of M. incognita stress. These microbes not only augmented bacoside A production (1.5 fold) but also strengthened host resistance via enhancement in chlorophyll a, defense enzymes and phenolic compounds like gallic acid, syringic acid, ferulic acid and cinnamic acid. Furthermore, elevated lignification and callose deposition in the microbial combination treated plants corroborate well with the above findings. Overall, the results provide novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of priming by beneficial microbes and underscore their capacity to trigger bacoside A production in B. monnieri under biotic stress. PMID:28157221

  16. Protection against osteoporosis by statins is linked to a reduction of oxidative stress and restoration of nitric oxide formation in aged and ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong; Shi, Zhen-Guo; Yu, Yong-Sheng; Hu, Jing; Wang, Ru; Luan, Zhi-Peng; Guo, Dai-Hong

    2012-01-15

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, have been used as a cholesterol-lowering drug to treat hyperlipidemia clinically. In recent years, accumulating evidence indicates the possible beneficial effect of statins on osteoporosis. The aim of present study was to investigate whether protection against osteoporosis by statins is linked to a reduction of oxidative stress and restoration of nitric oxide (NO) formation in aged and ovariectomized rats. The aged and ovariectomized rats were used as two models of osteoporosis for evaluation of the effect of simvastatin. It was found that simvastatin abated oxidative stress, increased NO production, subsequently attenuating osteoporosis in two models. In the in vitro studies, the protective effects against H(2)O(2)-induced cell injury were examined in the MG-63 human osteoblastic cells. It was found that simvastatin ameliorated H(2)O(2)-induced cell loss and cell apoptosis and increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in osteoblastic cells. Simvastatin abated oxidative stress through enhancing catalase, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and suppressing NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, simvastatin raised nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and eNOS expression at basal condition; inhibited NOS activity and iNOS expression when treated with H(2)O(2). In conclusion, protection against osteoporosis by statins is linked to a reduction of oxidative stress and restoration of NO formation in aged and ovariectomized rats.

  17. Activation of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase is associated with elevated ketone body levels in the elasmobranch Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Treberg, Jason R; Crockett, Elizabeth L; Driedzic, William R

    2006-01-01

    Elasmobranch fishes are an ancient group of vertebrates that have unusual lipid metabolism whereby storage lipids are mobilized from the liver for peripheral oxidation largely as ketone bodies rather than as nonesterified fatty acids under normal conditions. This reliance on ketones, even when feeding, implies that elasmobranchs are chronically ketogenic. Compared to specimens sampled within 2 d of capture (recently captured), spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias that were held for 16-33 d without apparent feeding displayed a 4.5-fold increase in plasma concentration of d- beta -hydroxybutyrate (from 0.71 to 3.2 mM) and were considered ketotic. Overt activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 in liver mitochondria from ketotic dogfish was characterized by an increased apparent maximal activity, a trend of increasing affinity (reduced apparent K(m); P=0.09) for l-carnitine, and desensitization to the inhibitor malonyl-CoA relative to recently captured animals. Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (ACoAT) activity in isolated liver mitochondria was also markedly increased in the ketotic dogfish compared to recently captured fish, whereas no difference in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase activity was found between these groups, suggesting that ACoAT plays a more important role in the activation of ketogenesis in spiny dogfish than in mammals and birds.

  18. Hypolipidemic activity of okra is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of cholesterol degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Chen, Gu; Ren, Dandan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the hypolipidemic activity of okra; therefore, we investigated the hypolipidemic activity of okra and its interaction with gene expression of several key components involved in lipid homeostasis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups and fed with hyperlipidemic diet or two hyperlipidemic diets supplemented with 1% or 2% okra powder for eight weeks. Results demonstrated that okra dose-dependently decreased serum and hepatic total cholesterol and triglyceride, and enhanced fecal excretion of bile acids. Gene expression analysis revealed that okra upregulated cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression, downregulated expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), with no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1A). It was suggested that hypolipidemic activity of okra was mediated most likely by upregulation of cholesterol degradation through CYP7A1 and by inhibition of lipogenesis through SREBP1c and FAS. Okra raw and fractionated polysaccharide showed strong bile acid binding capacity in vitro, which may contribute to the hypolipidemic activity observed. In conclusion, okra has potential application in the management of hyperlipidemia and its associated metabolic disorders.

  19. Utilization of digital differential display to identify differentially expressed genes related to rumen development.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haga, Satoshi; So, KyoungHa; Yamauchi, Eri; Nakano, Miwa; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Choi, Kichoon; Katoh, Kazuo; Roh, Sang-Gun

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes associated with the development of the rumen epithelium by screening for candidate genes by digital differential display (DDD) in silico. Using DDD in NCBI's UniGene database, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene expression profiles were analyzed in rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum and other tissues in cattle. One hundred and ten candidate genes with high expression in the rumen were derived from a library of all tissues. The expression levels of 11 genes in all candidate genes were analyzed in the rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum of nine Japanese Black male calves (5-week-old pre-weaning: n = 3; 15-week-old weaned calves: n = 6). Among the 11 genes, only 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1-like (AKR1C1), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) showed significant changes in the levels of gene expression in the rumen between the pre- and post-weaning of calves. These results indicate that DDD analysis in silico can be useful for screening candidate genes related to rumen development, and that the changes in expression levels of three genes in the rumen may have been caused by weaning, aging or both.

  20. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis in adult Blattella germanica requires nuclear receptors Seven-up and FTZ-F1

    PubMed Central

    Borras-Castells, Ferran; Nieva, Claudia; Maestro, José L.; Maestro, Oscar; Belles, Xavier; Martín, David

    2017-01-01

    In insects, the transition from juvenile development to the adult stage is controlled by juvenile hormone (JH) synthesized from the corpora allata (CA) glands. Whereas a JH-free period during the last juvenile instar triggers metamorphosis and the end of the growth period, the reappearance of this hormone after the imaginal molt marks the onset of reproductive adulthood. Despite the importance of such transition, the regulatory mechanism that controls it remains mostly unknown. Here, using the hemimetabolous insect Blattella germanica, we show that nuclear hormone receptors Seven-up-B (BgSvp-B) and Fushi tarazu-factor 1 (BgFTZ-F1) have essential roles in the tissue- and stage-specific activation of adult CA JH-biosynthetic activity. Both factors are highly expressed in adult CA cells. Moreover, RNAi-knockdown of either BgSvp-B or BgFTZ-F1 results in adult animals with a complete block in two critical JH-dependent reproductive processes, vitellogenesis and oogenesis. We show that this reproductive blockage is the result of a dramatic impairment of JH biosynthesis, due to the CA-specific reduction in the expression of two key JH biosynthetic enzymes, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase-1 (BgHMG-S1) and HMG-reductase (BgHMG-R). Our findings provide insights into the regulatory mechanisms underlying the specific changes in the CA gland necessary for the proper transition to adulthood. PMID:28074850

  1. Effects of gibberellic acid on primary terpenoids and delta-tetrahydrocannabinol in Cannabis sativa at flowering stage.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Hakimeh; Asrar, Zahra; Mehrabani, Mitra

    2009-06-01

    Plants synthesize an astonishing diversity of isoprenoids, some of which play essential roles in photosynthesis, respiration, and the regulation of growth and development. Two independent pathways for the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors coexist within the plant cell: the cytosolic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway and the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. However, little is known about the effects of plant hormones on the regulation of these pathways. In the present study we investigated the effect of gibberellic acid (GA(3)) on changes in the amounts of many produced terpenoids and the activity of the key enzymes, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), in these pathways. Our results showed GA(3) caused a decrease in DXS activity in both sexes that it was accompanied by a decrease in chlorophylls, carotenoids and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) contents and an increase in alpha-tocopherol content. The treated plants with GA(3) showed an increase in HMGR activity. This increase in HMGR activity was followed by accumulation of stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol in male and female plants and campestrol in male plants. The pattern of the changes in the amounts of sterols was exactly similar to the changes in the HMGR activity. These data suggest that GA(3) can probably influence the MEP and MVA pathways oppositely, with stimulatory and inhibitory effects on the produced primary terpenoids in MVA and DXS pathways, respectively.

  2. Regulation of hypothalamic neuronal sensing and food intake by ketone bodies and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Miziorko, Henri M; Levin, Barry E

    2014-04-01

    Metabolic sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) alter their activity when ambient levels of metabolic substrates, such as glucose and fatty acids (FA), change. To assess the relationship between a high-fat diet (HFD; 60%) intake on feeding and serum and VMH FA levels, rats were trained to eat a low-fat diet (LFD; 13.5%) or an HFD in 3 h/day and were monitored with VMH FA microdialysis. Despite having higher serum levels, HFD rats had lower VMH FA levels but ate less from 3 to 6 h of refeeding than did LFD rats. However, VMH β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) and VMH-to-serum β-OHB ratio levels were higher in HFD rats during the first 1 h of refeeding, suggesting that VMH astrocyte ketone production mediated their reduced intake. In fact, using calcium imaging in dissociated VMH neurons showed that ketone bodies overrode normal FA sensing, primarily by exciting neurons that were activated or inhibited by oleic acid. Importantly, bilateral inhibition of VMH ketone production with a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase inhibitor reversed the 3- to 6-h HFD-induced inhibition of intake but had no effect in LFD-fed rats. These data suggest that a restricted HFD intake regimen inhibits caloric intake as a consequence of FA-induced VMH ketone body production by astrocytes.

  3. Fruiting body of Niuchangchih (Antrodia camphorata) protects livers against chronic alcohol consumption damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Yuan-Yen; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Kang, Wen-Yu; Lin, Yi-Ling; Chang, Hsien-Chang; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2010-03-24

    An alcoholic fatty liver disease was induced by drinking water containing 20% (w/w) alcohol. Therapeutic groups were orally administrated dosages of 0.25 g silymarin/kg body weight (BW) and a low dosage of Niuchangchih (Antrodia camphorata) (0.025 g/kg BW) and a high dosage of Niuchangchih (0.1 g/kg BW) per day. Niuchangchih, especially at the high dosage, not only showed a hypercholesterolemic effect (p < 0.05) but also reduced (p < 0.05) hepatic lipids in alcohol-fed rats. Those beneficial effects could be partially attributed to higher (p < 0.05) fecal cholesterol and bile acid outputs, as well as downregulations (p < 0.05) of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and malic enzyme gene expressions; meanwhile, there was an upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated alpha gene expression. Besides, Niuchangchih also enhanced (p < 0.05) the liver glutathione, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the liver malondialdehyde content, which also partially contributed to the lowered (p < 0.05) serum aspartate aminotransferase levels and no observed lesion in the histological examination of alcohol-fed rats.

  4. Momilactone B Inhibits Ketosis In Vitro by Regulating the ANGPTL3-LPL Pathway and Inhibiting HMGCS2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Young; S P, Nipin; Darvin, Pramod; Joung, Youn Hee; Byun, Hyo Joo; Do, Chang Hee; Park, Kyung Do; Park, Mi Na; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Yang, Young Mok

    2016-11-22

    Ketogenesis is the production of ketone bodies, which provide energy when the body lacks glucose. Under ketogenic conditions, the body switches from primarily carbohydrate to fat metabolism to maintain energy balance. However, accumulation of high levels of ketone bodies in the blood results in ketosis. Treating ketosis with natural substances is preferable, because they are unlikely to cause side-effects. Momilactone B is an active compound isolated from Korean rice. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that momilactone B could inhibit ketosis. We constructed an in vitro ketosis model by glucose starvation. We used this model to test the anti-ketosis effects of momilactone B. A primary target for treating ketosis is angiopoietin-like-3 (ANGPTL3), which modulates lipoprotein metabolism by inhibiting lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a multifunctional enzyme that breaks down stored fat to produce triglycerides. We showed that momilactone B could regulate the ANGPTL3-LPL pathway. However, a strong anti-ketosis candidate drug should also inhibit ketogenesis. Ketogenesis can be suppressed by inhibiting the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase-2 (HMGCS2), a mitochondrial enzyme that converts acetyl-CoA to ketone bodies. We found that momilactone B suppressed the expression of HMGCS2 through the increased expression of STAT5b. We also elucidated the relationship of STAT5b to ANGPTL3 and LPL expression.

  5. Juvenile hormone biosynthesis in adult Blattella germanica requires nuclear receptors Seven-up and FTZ-F1.

    PubMed

    Borras-Castells, Ferran; Nieva, Claudia; Maestro, José L; Maestro, Oscar; Belles, Xavier; Martín, David

    2017-01-11

    In insects, the transition from juvenile development to the adult stage is controlled by juvenile hormone (JH) synthesized from the corpora allata (CA) glands. Whereas a JH-free period during the last juvenile instar triggers metamorphosis and the end of the growth period, the reappearance of this hormone after the imaginal molt marks the onset of reproductive adulthood. Despite the importance of such transition, the regulatory mechanism that controls it remains mostly unknown. Here, using the hemimetabolous insect Blattella germanica, we show that nuclear hormone receptors Seven-up-B (BgSvp-B) and Fushi tarazu-factor 1 (BgFTZ-F1) have essential roles in the tissue- and stage-specific activation of adult CA JH-biosynthetic activity. Both factors are highly expressed in adult CA cells. Moreover, RNAi-knockdown of either BgSvp-B or BgFTZ-F1 results in adult animals with a complete block in two critical JH-dependent reproductive processes, vitellogenesis and oogenesis. We show that this reproductive blockage is the result of a dramatic impairment of JH biosynthesis, due to the CA-specific reduction in the expression of two key JH biosynthetic enzymes, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase-1 (BgHMG-S1) and HMG-reductase (BgHMG-R). Our findings provide insights into the regulatory mechanisms underlying the specific changes in the CA gland necessary for the proper transition to adulthood.

  6. Microbial modulation of bacoside A biosynthetic pathway and systemic defense mechanism in Bacopa monnieri under Meloidogyne incognita stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupali; Singh, Akanksha; Srivastava, Madhumita; Singh, Vivek; Gupta, M M; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-02-03

    Plant-associated beneficial microbes have been explored to fulfill the imperative function for plant health. However, their impact on the host secondary metabolite production and nematode disease management remains elusive. Our present work has shown that chitinolytic microbes viz., Chitiniphilus sp. MTN22 and Streptomyces sp. MTN14 singly as well as in combination modulated the biosynthetic pathway of bacoside A and systemic defense mechanism against Meloidogyne incognita in Bacopa monnieri. Interestingly, expression of bacoside biosynthetic pathway genes (3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, and squalene synthase) were upregulated in plants treated with the microbial combination in the presence as well as in absence of M. incognita stress. These microbes not only augmented bacoside A production (1.5 fold) but also strengthened host resistance via enhancement in chlorophyll a, defense enzymes and phenolic compounds like gallic acid, syringic acid, ferulic acid and cinnamic acid. Furthermore, elevated lignification and callose deposition in the microbial combination treated plants corroborate well with the above findings. Overall, the results provide novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of priming by beneficial microbes and underscore their capacity to trigger bacoside A production in B. monnieri under biotic stress.

  7. Lipidomic-based investigation into the regulatory effect of Schisandrin B on palmitic acid level in non-alcoholic steatotic livers

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Niu, Xuyan; Dai, Wenlin; Tong, Tiejun; Chao, Xiaojuan; Su, Tao; Chan, Chi Leung; Lee, Kim Chung; Fu, Xiuqiong; Yi, Hua; Yu, Hua; Li, Ting; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Pan, Si-Yuan; Lu, Aiping; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Schisandrin B (SchB) is one of the most abundant bioactive dibenzocyclooctadiene derivatives found in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of SchB on non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD). In lipidomic study, ingenuity pathway analysis highlighted palmitate biosynthesis metabolic pathway in the liver samples of SchB-treated high-fat-diet-fed mice. Further experiments showed that the SchB treatment reduced expression and activity of fatty acid synthase, expressions of hepatic mature sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and hepatic level of palmitic acid which is known to promote progression of steatosis to steatohepatitis. Furthermore, the treatment also reduced hepatic fibrosis, activated nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 which is known to attenuate the progression of NASH-related fibrosis. Interestingly, in fasting mice, a single high-dose SchB induced transient lipolysis and increased the expressions of adipose triglyceride lipase and phospho-hormone sensitive lipase. The treatment also increased plasma cholesterol levels and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, reduced the hepatic low-density-lipoprotein receptor expression in these mice. Our data not only suggest SchB is a potential therapeutic agent for NAFLD, but also provided important information for a safe consumption of SchB because SchB overdosed under fasting condition will have adverse effects on lipid metabolism. PMID:25766252

  8. Identification of genes responsive to low intensity pulsed ultrasound in a human leukemia cell line Molt-4.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Ando, Hidetaka; Takasaki, Ichiro; Feril, Loreto B; Zhao, Qing-Li; Ogawa, Ryohei; Kudo, Nobuki; Tachibana, Katsuro; Kondo, Takashi

    2007-02-08

    We examined the gene expression of human leukemia Molt-4 cells treated with non-thermal low intensity pulsed ultrasound. Six hours after 0.3W/cm(2) pulsed ultrasound treatment, apoptosis (24+/-3.3%, mean+/-SD) with minimal cell lysis was observed. Of approximately 16,600 genes analyzed, BCL2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 1 (DNAJB1), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1B (HSPA1B), and heat shock 70 kDa protein 6 (HSPA6) showed increased levels of expression while isopentenyl-diphosphate delta isomerase (IDI1) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1) showed decreased levels in the cells 3h after the ultrasound treatment. The expression levels of these six genes were confirmed by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DNA microarray analysis of genes that are differentially expressed in response to apoptosis induced by non-thermal low intensity pulsed ultrasound in human leukemia cells. The present results will provide a basis for further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of effects of not only low intensity pulsed ultrasound but also that of mechanical shear stress in the cells.

  9. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder mirror dynamics using the center of curvature optical assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, 18 segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  10. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  11. Ralstonia solanacearum RSp0194 Encodes a Novel 3-Keto-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ya-Hui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Li, Feng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis (FAS), a primary metabolic pathway, is essential for survival of bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum, a β-proteobacteria member, causes a bacterial wilt affecting more than 200 plant species, including many economically important plants. However, thus far, the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of R. solanacearum has not been well studied. In this study, we characterized two forms of 3-keto-ACP synthase III, RsFabH and RsFabW, in R. solanacearum. RsFabH, the homologue of Escherichia coli FabH, encoded by the chromosomal RSc1050 gene, catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with malonyl-ACP in the initiation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in vitro. The RsfabH mutant lost de novo fatty acid synthetic ability, and grows in medium containing free fatty acids. RsFabW, a homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA3286, encoded by a megaplasmid gene, RSp0194, condenses acyl-CoA (C2-CoA to C10-CoA) with malonyl-ACP to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro. Although the RsfabW mutant was viable, RsfabW was responsible for RsfabH mutant growth on medium containing free fatty acids. Our results also showed that RsFabW could condense acyl-ACP (C4-ACP to C8-ACP) with malonyl-ACP, to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro, which implies that RsFabW plays a special role in fatty acid synthesis of R. solanacearum. All of these data confirm that R. solanacearum not only utilizes acetyl-CoA, but also, utilizes medium-chain acyl-CoAs or acyl-ACPs as primers to initiate fatty acid synthesis.

  12. Linear magnetoelectric effect as a signature of long-range collinear antiferromagnetic ordering in the frustrated spinel CoA l2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghara, Somnath; Ter-Oganessian, N. V.; Sundaresan, A.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state of the frustrated A -site magnetic spinel CoA l2O4 has been a controversial issue whether it is a collinear antiferromagnetic ordering or a spiral spin-liquid state, as the ratio of the two competing interactions J2/J1 lies close to the boundary between these two ground states. Here we address the magnetic ground state in CoA l2O4 with different amounts of C o2 +/A l3 + site disorder from the study of magnetoelectric effect and Monte Carlo simulations. CoA l2O4 with low site disorder exhibits a linear magnetoelectric effect below the magnetic ordering temperature. With increasing disorder, the magnetoelectric effect is suppressed and the sample with 14 % disorder exhibits a spin glass behavior without the magnetoelectric effect. Monte Carlo simulations support the experimental findings and suggest that the site disorder suppresses long-range antiferromagnetic order and induces a spin glass state. Since the linear magnetoelectric effect requires a long-range magnetic ordering, we suggest that the ground state of CoA l2O4 with low site disorder is a collinear antiferromagnet.

  13. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  14. Trapping of intermediates with substrate analog HBOCoA in the polymerizations catalyzed by class III polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Cao, Ruikai; Shrestha, Ruben; Ward, Christina; Katz, Benjamin B; Fischer, Christopher J; Tomich, John M; Li, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHB polymers that are considered as an ideal alternative to petroleum-based plastics. To provide strong evidence for the preferred mechanistic model involving covalent and noncovalent intermediates, a substrate analog HBOCoA was synthesized chemoenzymatically. Substitution of sulfur in the native substrate HBCoA with an oxygen in HBOCoA enabled detection of (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-6) intermediates when the polymerization was catalyzed by wild-type (wt-)PhaECAv at 5.84 h(-1). This extremely slow rate is due to thermodynamically unfavorable steps that involve the formation of enzyme-bound PHB species (thioesters) from corresponding CoA oxoesters. Synthesized standards (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-3) were found to undergo both reacylation and hydrolysis catalyzed by the synthase. Distribution of the hydrolysis products highlights the importance of the penultimate ester group as previously suggested. Importantly, the reaction between primed synthase [(3)H]-sT-PhaECAv and HBOCoA yielded [(3)H]-sTet-O-CoA at a rate constant faster than 17.4 s(-1), which represents the first example that a substrate analog undergoes PHB chain elongation at a rate close to that of the native substrate (65.0 s(-1)). Therefore, for the first time with a wt-synthase, strong evidence was obtained to support our favored PHB chain elongation model.

  15. Antihyperlipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of C-phycocyanin in Golden Syrian Hamsters Fed with a Hypercholesterolemic Diet.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Hsieh, Yao-Yuan; Lai, Ching-Hsiu; Chang, Chi-Chen; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia and oxidation play major roles upon cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). C-phycocyanin (CPC), the major component in blue-green algae, possesses antiinflammatory and radical scavenging properties. Herein we aimed to investigate the effect of CPC upon lipid metabolism and its antioxidant effects. Golden Syrian hamsters were randomly assigned to five groups: (1) control; (2) 0.2% cholesterol; (3) 0.2% cholesterol+ 1% lopid; (4) 0.2% cholesterol+ 0.25% CPC; and (5) 0.2% cholesterol+ 1.25% CPC. All animals were sacrificed after 8-week feeding. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) were examined. The diene conjugation in the Cu(2+)-mediated oxidation of LDL was measured. The protein levels of several antioxidative enzymes including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutases (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) of liver were assayed. HepG2 cells were cultured in medium containing various concentrations of CPC (0, 1, 15, and 30 μM). The mRNA concentrations of LDL receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, SOD-1 and GPx of HepG2 cells in each group were analyzed. CPC was effective in lowering serum cholesterol, total cholesterol (TC), TG, LDL, GOT, and GPT. CPC was found to decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) equivalents and delay the diene conjugation in the Cu(2+)-mediated oxidation of LDL. CPC increase the enzyme expressions of CAT, SOD, and GPx. CPC concentrations were positively correlated with the mRNA level of LDL receptor while the mRNA levels of HMG CoA reductase, SOD-1, and GPx in HepG2 cells were not affected. The lipid-lowering and antioxidation effects of CPC suggest its roles in prevention of CVD and atherosclerotic formation.

  16. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals that AICAR Affects Glycerolipid, Ceramide and Nucleotide Synthesis Pathways in INS-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    ElAzzouny, Mahmoud A; Evans, Charles R; Burant, Charles F; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    AMPK regulates many metabolic pathways including fatty acid and glucose metabolism, both of which are closely associated with insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Insulin secretion is regulated by metabolic coupling factors such as ATP/ADP ratio and other metabolites generated by the metabolism of nutrients such as glucose, fatty acid and amino acids. However, the connection between AMPK activation and insulin secretion in β-cells has not yet been fully elucidated at a metabolic level. To study the effect of AMPK activation on glucose stimulated insulin secretion, we applied the pharmacological activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) to an INS-1 (832/13) β-cell line. We measured the change in 66 metabolites in the presence or absence of AICAR using different stable isotopic labeled nutrients to probe selected pathways. AMPK activation by AICAR increased basal insulin secretion and reduced the glucose stimulation index. Although ATP/ADP ratios were not strongly affected by AICAR, several other metabolites and pathways important for insulin secretion were affected by AICAR treatment including long-chain CoAs, malonyl-CoA, 3-hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl CoA, diacylglycerol, and farnesyl pyrophosphate. Tracer studies using 13C-glucose revealed lower glucose flux in the purine and pyrimidine pathway and in the glycerolipid synthesis pathway. Untargeted metabolomics revealed reduction in ceramides caused by AICAR that may explain the beneficial role of AMPK in protecting β-cells from lipotoxicity. Taken together, the results provide an overall picture of the metabolic changes associated with AICAR treatment and how it modulates insulin secretion and β-cell survival.

  17. SIRT3 Deacetylates Ceramide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Novgorodov, Sergei A.; Riley, Christopher L.; Keffler, Jarryd A.; Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark S.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Lombard, David B.; Gudz, Tatyana I.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports the role of mitochondrial ceramide accumulation as a cause of mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after stroke. Herein, we report that SIRT3 regulates mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis via deacetylation of ceramide synthase (CerS) 1, 2, and 6. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that CerS1, CerS2, and CerS6, but not CerS4, are associated with SIRT3 in cerebral mitochondria. Furthermore, CerS1, -2, and -6 are hyperacetylated in the mitochondria of SIRT3-null mice, and SIRT3 directly deacetylates the ceramide synthases in a NAD+-dependent manner that increases enzyme activity. Investigation of the SIRT3 role in mitochondrial response to brain ischemia/reperfusion (IR) showed that SIRT3-mediated deacetylation of ceramide synthases increased enzyme activity and ceramide accumulation after IR. Functional studies demonstrated that absence of SIRT3 rescued the IR-induced blockade of the electron transport chain at the level of complex III, attenuated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, and decreased reactive oxygen species generation and protein carbonyls in mitochondria. Importantly, Sirt3 gene ablation reduced the brain injury after IR. These data support the hypothesis that IR triggers SIRT3-dependent deacetylation of ceramide synthases and the elevation of ceramide, which could inhibit complex III, leading to increased reactive oxygen species generation and brain injury. The results of these studies highlight a novel mechanism of SIRT3 involvement in modulating mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis and suggest an important role of SIRT3 in mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after experimental stroke. PMID:26620563

  18. Acetohydroxyacid synthases: evolution, structure, and function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yadi; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-10-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase, a thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme, can condense either two pyruvate molecules to form acetolactate for synthesizing L-valine and L-leucine or pyruvate with 2-ketobutyrate to form acetohydroxybutyrate for synthesizing L-isoleucine. Because the key reaction catalyzed by acetohydroxyacid synthase in the biosynthetic pathways of branched-chain amino acids exists in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria, but not in animals, acetohydroxyacid synthase becomes a potential target for developing novel herbicides and antimicrobial compounds. In this article, the evolution, structure, and catalytic mechanism of acetohydroxyacid synthase are summarized.

  19. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  20. Regulation of rat liver hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by a new class of noncompetitive inhibitors. Effects of dichloroacetate and related carboxylic acids on enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Stacpoole, P W; Harwood, H J; Varnado, C E

    1983-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) markedly reduces circulating cholesterol levels in animals and in patients with combined hyperlipoproteinemia or homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). To investigate the mechanism of its cholesterol-lowering action, we studied the effects of DCA and its hepatic metabolites, glyoxylate and oxalate, on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) obtained from livers of healthy, reverse light-cycled rats. Oral administration of DCA for 4 d decreased HMG CoA reductase activity 46% at a dose of 50 mg/kg per d, and 82% at a dose of 100 mg/kg per d. A 24% decrease in reductase activity was observed as early as 1 h after a single dose of 50 mg/kg DCA. The inhibitory effect of the drug was due to a fall in both expressed enzyme activity and the total number of reductase molecules present. DCA also decreased reductase activity when added to suspensions of isolated hepatocytes. With chronic administration, DCA inhibited 3H2O incorporation into cholesterol by 38% and into triglycerides by 52%. When liver microsomes were incubated with DCA, the pattern of inhibition of reductase activity was noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (inhibition constant [Ki] 11.8 mM) and NADPH (Ki 11.6 mM). Inhibition by glyoxylate was also noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (Ki 1.2 mM) and NADPH (Ki 2.7 mM). Oxalate inhibited enzyme activity only at nonsaturating concentrations of NADPH (Ki 5.6 mM). Monochloroacetate, glycollate, and ethylene glycol, all of which can form glyoxylate, also inhibited reductase activity. Using solubilized and 60-fold purified HMG CoA reductase, we found that the inhibitory effect of glyoxylate was reversible. Furthermore, the inhibition by glyoxylate was an effect exerted on the reductase itself, rather than on its regulatory enzymes, reductase kinase and reductase phosphatase. We conclude that the cholesterol-lowering effect of DCA is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of endogenous cholesterol

  1. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1.

  2. Downregulation of Caffeic Acid 3-O-Methyltransferase and Caffeoyl CoA 3-O-Methyltransferase in Transgenic Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dianjing; Chen, Fang; Inoue, Kentaro; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic alfalfa plants were generated harboring caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCOMT) cDNA sequences under control of the bean phenylalanine ammonia-lyase PAL2 promoter. Strong downregulation of COMT resulted in decreased lignin content, a reduction in total guaiacyl (G) lignin units, a near total loss of syringyl (S) units in monomeric and dimeric lignin degradation products, and appearance of low levels of 5-hydroxy guaiacyl units and a novel dimer. No soluble monolignol precursors accumulated. In contrast, strong downregulation of CCOMT led to reduced lignin levels, a reduction in G units without reduction in S units, and increases in β-5 linked dimers of G units. Accumulation of soluble caffeic acid β-d-glucoside occurred only in CCOMT downregulated plants. The results suggest that CCOMT does not significantly contribute to the 3-O-methylation step in S lignin biosynthesis in alfalfa and that there is redundancy with respect to the 3-O-methylation reaction of G lignin biosynthesis. COMT is unlikely to catalyze the in vivo methylation of caffeic acid during lignin biosynthesis. PMID:11158530

  3. Impact of single-dose nandrolone decanoate on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gårevik, N; Börjesson, A; Choong, E; Ekström, L; Lehtihet, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to study the effect and time profile of a single dose of nandrolone decanoate (ND) on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase [3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR)] in healthy men. Eleven healthy male participants aged 29-46 years were given a single dose of 150 mg ND as an intramuscular dose of Deca Durabol®, Organon. Blood samples for sex hormones, lipids and HMGCR mRNA analysis were collected prior to ND administration day 0, 4 and 14. A significant suppression of luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was seen after 4 days. Total testosterone and bioavailable testosterone level decreased significantly throughout the observed study period. A small but significant decrease in sexual hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was seen after 4 days but not after 14 days. Total serum (S)-cholesterol and plasma (P)-apolipoprotein B (ApoB) increased significantly after 14 days. In 80% of the individuals, the HMGCR mRNA level was increased 4 days after the ND administration. Our results show that a single dose of 150 mg ND increases (1) HMGCR mRNA expression, (2) total S-cholesterol and (3) P-ApoB level. The long-term consequences on cardiovascular risk that may appear in users remain to be elucidated.

  4. Replacement of the catalytic nucleophile cysteine-296 by serine in class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mediated synthesis of a new polyester: identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Amro A; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    The class II PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) synthases [PHA(MCL) synthases (medium-chain-length PHA synthases)] are mainly found in pseudomonads and catalyse synthesis of PHA(MCL)s using CoA thioesters of medium-chain-length 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C6-C14) as a substrate. Only recently PHA(MCL) synthases from Pseudomonas oleovorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were purified and in vitro activity was achieved. A threading model of the P. aeruginosa PHA(MCL) synthase PhaC1 was developed based on the homology to the epoxide hydrolase (1ek1) from mouse which belongs to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily. The putative catalytic residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 were replaced by site-specific mutagenesis. In contrast to class I and III PHA synthases, the replacement of His-480, which aligns with the conserved base catalyst of the alpha/beta-hydrolases, with Gln did not affect in vivo enzyme activity and only slightly in vitro enzyme activity. The second conserved histidine His-453 was then replaced by Gln, and the modified enzyme showed only 24% of wild-type in vivo activity, which indicated that His-453 might functionally replace His-480 in class II PHA synthases. Replacement of the postulated catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 by Ser only reduced in vivo enzyme activity to 30% of wild-type enzyme activity and drastically changed substrate specificity. Moreover, the C296S mutation turned the enzyme sensitive towards PMSF inhibition. The replacement of Asp-452 by Asn, which is supposed to be required as general base catalyst for elongation reaction, did abolish enzyme activity as was found for the respective amino acid residue of class I and III enzymes. In the threading model residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 reside in the core structure with the putative catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 localized at the highly conserved gamma-turns of the alpha/beta-hydrolases. Inhibitor studies indicated that catalytic histidines reside in the active site. The conserved

  5. Signal-on CoA-dependent electrochemical biosensor for highly sensitive and label-free detection of Citrate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Chen, Hongjun; Li, Yong; Wang, Huixia; Nie, Zhou; Hu, Yufang; Yao, Shouzhou

    2016-12-01

    We report here a label-free and sensitive electrochemical method for probing Citrate synthase (CS) activity based on detailed investigations into the nucleic acid-mimicking coordination polymer (CP) formed from the coenzyme A (CoA)-Ag(I) repeat units. Our biosensing approach provides an especial and significant detection mechanism: CS can catalyze the essential condensation reaction between acetyl-coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) to form citrate and CoA; then, in the presence of Ag(I), CoA-Ag(I) CP can be in situ formed because of the strong complexation ability of thiol groups of CoA toward Ag(I). The generated CoA-Ag(I) CP attaches to graphene-modified glassy carbon electrode surface by multiple adenine bases deriving from CoA and acting as the side groups along the polymeric backbone, which displays efficient H2O2-electrocatalyzing activity. More importantly, by using the formed polymer as signal output, the process is implemented to quantitatively analyze the activity of CS. Under the optimal conditions, CS with a detection limit as low as 0.00165U/µL could be sensitively probed with a wide linear range from 0.0033 to 0.264U/µL. Furthermore, with the character of label-free detection, high sensitivity and excellent selectivity, this strategy offers a convenient and specific method for CS activity detection and relevant inhibitors screening, which holds a promising potential in the practical application of CS-based biochemical research, disease diagnosis and drug discovery.

  6. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J

    2012-06-01

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT-encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T-DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol-localized, mevalonate-derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  7. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  8. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time.

  9. Structures and energetics of models for the active site of acetyl-coenzyme a synthase: role of distal and proximal metals in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Webster, Charles Edwin; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y; Lindahl, Paul A; Hall, Michael B

    2004-03-24

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (ACS/CODH) is a bifunctional enzyme that generates CO from carbon dioxide in the C-cluster of the beta subunit and synthesizes acetyl-CoA from carbon monoxide (CO), CoA, and CH3+ at the active site of the A-cluster in the alpha subunit. On the basis of density functional calculations, we predict that methylation of Nip occurs first, and CO then adds to the NipII-CH3 species to form the intermediate, NipII(CO)(CH3), in which Nip deligates one of its SNid bonds. The CO-insertion/CH3-migration occurs on one metal, the proximal Ni, forming the trigonal planar NipII-acetyl intermediate. The thiolate can bind to NipII and reductively eliminate the thioester. Our calculations disfavor the unprecedented bimetallic CO-insertion/CH3-migration. Ni in the proximal site produces a better catalyst than does Cu.

  10. Biosynthesis of curcuminoids and gingerols in turmeric (Curcuma longa) and ginger (Zingiber officinale): identification of curcuminoid synthase and hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA thioesterases.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Ahumada, Maria del Carmen; Timmermann, Barbara N; Gang, David R

    2006-09-01

    Members of the Zingiberaceae such as turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) and ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) accumulate at high levels in their rhizomes important pharmacologically active metabolites that appear to be derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. In ginger, these compounds are the gingerols; in turmeric these are the curcuminoids. Despite their importance, little is known about the biosynthesis of these compounds. This investigation describes the identification of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the production of these bioactive natural products. Assays for enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway identified the corresponding enzyme activities in protein crude extracts from leaf, shoot and rhizome tissues from ginger and turmeric. These enzymes included phenylalanine ammonia lyase, polyketide synthases, p-coumaroyl shikimate transferase, p-coumaroyl quinate transferase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, and caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, which were evaluated because of their potential roles in controlling production of certain classes of gingerols and curcuminoids. All crude extracts possessed activity for all of these enzymes, with the exception of polyketide synthases. The results of polyketide synthase assays showed detectable curcuminoid synthase activity in the extracts from turmeric with the highest activity found in extracts from leaves. However, no gingerol synthase activity could be identified. This result was explained by the identification of thioesterase activities that cleaved phenylpropanoid pathway CoA esters, and which were found to be present at high levels in all tissues, especially in ginger tissues. These activities may shunt phenylpropanoid pathway intermediates away from the production of curcuminoids and gingerols, thereby potentially playing a regulatory role in the biosynthesis of these compounds.

  11. Substrate specificity of THCA-CoA oxidases from rat liver light mitochondrial fractions on dehydrogenation of 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid CoA thioester.

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, S; Goto, T; Mano, N; Goto, J

    1998-11-01

    The substrate specificity of rat liver peroxisomal 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoyl-CoA (THCA-CoA) oxidases, which catalyze the dehydrogenation of 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid (THCA) CoA thioester, having an asymmetric center at C-25, to form (24E)-3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholest-24-enoic acid (delta 24-THCA) CoA thioester, was studied. The stable isotope labeled substrates, [3,7,12-18O3]-(25R)- and (25S)-THCA CoA thioesters were synthesized by an exchange reaction of carbonyl oxygens on a steroid nucleus of 3,7,12-trioxo-5 beta-cholestanoic acid, followed by metal hydride reduction and condensation reaction with CoA. After incubation of a mixture of unlabeled (25R)- and 18O-labeled (25S)-THCA CoA thioester, or vice versa, with hepatic peroxisomal THCA-CoA oxidases, biotransformed delta 24-THCA was determined by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The delta 24-THCA was derived only from (25S)-THCA CoA thioester, indicating that the 25S epimer of THCA is a preferential substrate on dehydrogenation by THCA-CoA oxidases.

  12. {alpha}-Lipoic acid prevents lipotoxic cardiomyopathy in acyl CoA-synthase transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young; Naseem, R. Haris; Park, Byung-Hyun; Garry, Daniel J.; Richardson, James A.; Schaffer, Jean E.; Unger, Roger H. . E-mail: roger.unger@utsouthwestern.edu

    2006-05-26

    {alpha}-Lipoic acid ({alpha}-LA) mimics the hypothalamic actions of leptin on food intake, energy expenditure, and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To determine if, like leptin, {alpha}-LA protects against cardiac lipotoxicity, {alpha}-LA was fed to transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of the acyl CoA synthase (ACS) gene. Untreated ACS-transgenic mice died prematurely with increased triacylglycerol content and dilated cardiomyopathy, impaired systolic function and myofiber disorganization, apoptosis, and interstitial fibrosis on microscopy. In {alpha}-LA-treated ACS-transgenic mice heart size, echocardiogram and TG content were normal. Plasma TG fell 50%, hepatic-activated phospho-AMPK rose 6-fold, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c declined 50%, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} cofactor-1{alpha} mRNA rose 4-fold. Since food restriction did not prevent lipotoxicity, we conclude that {alpha}-LA treatment, like hyperleptinemia, protects the heart of ACS-transgenic mice from lipotoxicity.

  13. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a novel chalcone synthase cDNA from Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yongzhen; Shen, Guo-An; Liu, Chenghong; Liu, Xiaojun; Tan, Feng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2004-08-01

    A chalcone synthase (CHS) gene was cloned from Ginkgo biloba for the first time and it was also the first cloned gene involved in flavonoids metabolic pathway in G. biloba. The full-length cDNA of G. biloba CHS (designated as Gbchs) was 1608bp with poly(A) tailing and it contained a 1173bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 391 amino acid protein. Gbchs was found to have extensive homology with those of other plant chs genes via multiple alignments. The active sites of the CoA binding, coumaroyl pocket and cyclization pocket in CHS protein of Medicago sativa were also found in GbCHS. Molecular modeling of GbCHS indicated that the three-dimensional structure of GbCHS strongly resembled that of M. sativa (MsCHS2), implying GbCHS may have similar functions with MsCHS2. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that GbCHS had closer relationship with CHSs from gymnosperm plants than from other plants. Gbchs is a useful tool to study the regulation of flavonoids metabolism in G. biloba.

  14. Characterization of a bifunctional glyoxylate cycle enzyme, malate synthase/isocitrate lyase, of Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masami; Nishimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle is a modified form of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which enables organisms to synthesize carbohydrates from C2 compounds. In the protozoan Euglena gracilis, the key enzyme activities of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), are conferred by a single bifunctional protein named glyoxylate cycle enzyme (Euglena gracilis glyoxylate cycle enzyme [EgGCE]). We analyzed the enzymatic properties of recombinant EgGCE to determine the functions of its different domains. The 62-kDa N-terminal domain of EgGCE was sufficient to provide the MS activity as expected from an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence. In contrast, expression of the 67-kDa C-terminal domain of EgGCE failed to yield ICL activity even though this domain was structurally similar to ICL family enzymes. Analyses of truncation mutants suggested that the N-terminal residues of EgGCE are critical for both the ICL and MS activities. The ICL activity of EgGCE increased in the presence of micro-molar concentrations of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA also increased the activity in a mutant type EgGCE with a mutation at the acetyl-CoA binding site in the MS domain of EgGCE. This suggests that acetyl-CoA regulates the ICL reaction by binding to a site other than the catalytic center of the MS reaction.

  15. Unequal synthesis and differential degradation of propionyl CoA carboxylase subunits in cells from normal and propionic acidemia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ohura, T; Kraus, J P; Rosenberg, L E

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized further the molecular basis of human inherited propionyl CoA carboxylase deficiency by measuring steady state levels of the mRNAs coding for the enzyme's two protein subunits (alpha and beta) and by estimating initial synthesis and steady state levels of the protein subunits in skin fibroblasts from controls and affected patients. We studied cell lines from both major complementation groups (pccA and pccBC) corresponding, respectively, to defects in the carboxylase's alpha and beta subunits. Analysis of pccA lines revealed the absence of alpha chain mRNA in three and an abnormally small alpha-mRNA in a fourth. Despite the presence of normal beta-mRNA in each of these pccA lines, there was complete absence of both alpha and beta protein subunits under steady state conditions, even though new synthesis and mitochondrial import of beta precursors was normal. Results in nine pccBC lines revealed normal alpha mRNA in each, while the amounts of beta-mRNA were distinctly reduced in every case. Correspondingly, alpha protein subunits were present in normal amounts at steady-state, but beta subunits were uniformly decreased. In addition, in six of the nine beta deficient cell lines, partially degraded beta-subunits were observed. To help interpret these results, synthesis and stability of carboxylase subunits were studied in intact HeLa cells using a pulse-chase protocol. Whereas alpha chains were stable over the four hour interval studied, beta chains--initially synthesized in large excess over alpha chains--were degraded rapidly reaching equivalence with alpha chains after two hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2741949

  16. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  17. Involvement of S1P1 receptor pathway in angiogenic effects of a novel adenosine-like nucleic acid analog COA-Cl in cultured human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Junsuke; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Kubota, Yasuo; Shoji, Kazuyo; Maruyama, Tokumi; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Takuwa, Yoh; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Katanosaka, Yuki; Mohri, Satoshi; Naruse, Keiji; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Ryuji; Hirano, Katsuya; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Takata, Maki; Konishi, Ryoji; Tsukamoto, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    COA-Cl (2Cl-C.OXT-A) is a recently developed adenosine-like nucleic acid analog that promotes angiogenesis via the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases ERK1/2. Endothelial S1P1 receptor plays indispensable roles in developmental angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the functions of S1P1 in COA-Cl-induced angiogenic responses. Antagonists for S1P1, W146, and VPC23019, substantially but still partly inhibited the effects of COA-Cl with regard to ERK1/2 activation and tube formation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Antagonists for adenosine A1 receptor and purinergic P2Y1 receptor were without effect. Genetic knockdown of S1P1 with siRNA, but not that of S1P3, attenuated COA-Cl-elicited ERK1/2 responses. The signaling properties of COA-Cl showed significant similarities to those of sphingosine 1-phosphate, an endogenous S1P1 ligand, in that both induced responses sensitive to pertussis toxin (Gα i/o inhibitor), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA-AM), (calcium chelator), and PP2 (c-Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor). COA-Cl elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, a substrate of c-Src, in HUVEC. COA-Cl displaced [3H]S1P in a radioligand-binding competition assay in chem-1 cells overexpressing S1P1. However, COA-Cl activated ERK1/2 in CHO-K1 cells that lack functional S1P1 receptor, suggesting the presence of additional yet-to-be-defined COA-Cl target in these cells. The results thus suggest the major contribution of S1P1 in the angiogenic effects of COA-Cl. However, other mechanism such as that seen in CHO-K1 cells may also be partly involved. Collectively, these findings may lead to refinement of the design of this nucleic acid analog and ultimately to development of small molecule-based therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:25505610

  18. Metabolic and developmental effects resulting from deletion of the citA gene encoding citrate synthase in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Murray, Sandra L; Hynes, Michael J

    2010-04-01

    Citrate synthase is a central activity in carbon metabolism. It is required for the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, respiration, and the glyoxylate cycle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana, there are mitochondrial and peroxisomal isoforms encoded by separate genes, while in Aspergillus nidulans, a single gene, citA, encodes a protein with predicted mitochondrial and peroxisomal targeting sequences (PTS). Deletion of citA results in poor growth on glucose but not on derepressing carbon sources, including those requiring the glyoxylate cycle. Growth on glucose is restored by a mutation in the creA carbon catabolite repressor gene. Methylcitrate synthase, required for propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism, has previously been shown to have citrate synthase activity. We have been unable to construct the mcsADelta citADelta double mutant, and the expression of mcsA is subject to CreA-mediated carbon repression. Therefore, McsA can substitute for the loss of CitA activity. Deletion of citA does not affect conidiation or sexual development but results in delayed conidial germination as well as a complete loss of ascospores in fruiting bodies, which can be attributed to loss of meiosis. These defects are suppressed by the creA204 mutation, indicating that McsA activity can substitute for the loss of CitA. A mutation of the putative PTS1-encoding sequence in citA had no effect on carbon source utilization or development but did result in slower colony extension arising from single conidia or ascospores. CitA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) studies showed mitochondrial localization in conidia, ascospores, and hyphae. Peroxisomal localization was not detected. However, a very low and variable detection of punctate GFP fluorescence was sometimes observed in conidia germinated for 5 h when the mitochondrial targeting sequence was deleted.

  19. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors decrease angiotensin II-induced vascular fibrosis: role of RhoA/ROCK and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Rupérez, Mónica; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Esteban, Vanesa; Carvajal, Gisselle; Plaza, Juan José; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2007-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) present beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to cardiovascular damage through the production of profibrotic factors, such as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Our aim was to investigate whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors could modulate Ang II responses, evaluating CTGF expression and the mechanisms underlying this process. In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) atorvastatin and simvastatin inhibited Ang II-induced CTGF production. The inhibitory effect of statins on CTGF upregulation was reversed by mevalonate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, suggesting that RhoA inhibition could be involved in this process. In VSMCs, statins inhibited Ang II-induced Rho membrane localization and activation. In these cells Ang II regulated CTGF via RhoA/Rho kinase activation, as shown by inhibition of Rho with C3 exoenzyme, RhoA dominant-negative overexpression, and Rho kinase inhibition. Furthermore, activation of p38MAPK and JNK, and redox process were also involved in Ang II-mediated CTGF upregulation, and were downregulated by statins. In rats infused with Ang II (100 ng/kg per minute) for 2 weeks, treatment with atorvastatin (5 mg/kg per day) diminished aortic CTGF and Rho activation without blood pressure modification. Rho kinase inhibition decreased CTGF upregulation in rat aorta, mimicking statin effect. CTGF is a vascular fibrosis mediator. Statins diminished extracellular matrix (ECM) overexpression caused by Ang II in vivo and in vitro. In summary, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors inhibit several intracellular signaling systems activated by Ang II (RhoA/Rho kinase and MAPK pathways and redox process) involved in the regulation of CTGF. Our results may explain, at least in part, some beneficial effects of statins in cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Effect of dietary n-3 fatty acids supplementation on fatty acid metabolism in atorvastatin-administered SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr rats, a metabolic syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Abdullah; Hashimoto, Michio; Katakura, Masanori; Tanabe, Yoko; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Hossain, Shahdat; Shido, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    The effects of cholesterol-lowering statins, which substantially benefit future cardiovascular events, on fatty acid metabolism have remained largely obscured. In this study, we investigated the effects of atorvastatin on fatty acid metabolism together with the effects of TAK-085 containing highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ethyl ester on atorvastatin-induced n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid lowering in SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr (SHRcp) rats, as a metabolic syndrome model. Supplementation with 10mg/kg body weight/day of atorvastatin for 17 weeks significantly decreased plasma total cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Atorvastatin alone caused a subtle change in fatty acid composition particularly of EPA and DHA in the plasma, liver or erythrocyte membranes. However, the TAK-085 consistently increased both the levels of EPA and DHA in the plasma, liver and erythrocyte membranes. After confirming the reduction of plasma total cholesterol, 300mg/kg body weight/day of TAK-085 was continuously administered for another 6 weeks. Supplementation with TAK-085 did not decrease plasma total cholesterol but significantly increased the EPA and DHA levels in both the plasma and liver compared with rats administered atorvastatin only. Supplementation with atorvastatin alone significantly decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, Δ5- and Δ6-desaturases, elongase-5, and stearoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase-2 levels and increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA expression in the liver compared with control rats. TAK-085 supplementation significantly increased stearoyl-CoA desaturase-2 mRNA expression. These results suggest that long-term supplementation with atorvastatin decreases the EPA and DHA levels by inhibiting the desaturation and elongation of n-3 fatty acid metabolism, while TAK-085 supplementation effectively replenishes this effect in SHRcp rat liver.

  1. Regulation of hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression by dietary psyllium in the hamster.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J D; Cuthbert, J A; Spady, D K

    1994-01-01

    Soluble fiber consistently lowers plasma total and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations in humans and various animal models including the hamster; however, the mechanism of this effect remains incompletely defined. We performed studies to determine the activity of dietary psyllium on hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase and LDL receptor expression in the hamster. In animals fed a cholesterol-free semisynthetic diet containing 7.5% cellulose (avicel) as a fiber source, substitution of psyllium for avicel increased hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA levels by 3-4-fold. Comparable effects on 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression were observed with 1% cholestyramine. Psyllium also increased hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA in animals fed a diet enriched with cholesterol and triglyceride. Activation of 7 alpha-hydroxylase was associated with an increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis that was apparently not fully compensatory since the cholesterol content of the liver declined. Although dietary psyllium did not increase hepatic LDL receptor expression in animals fed the cholesterol-free, very-low-fat diet, it did increase (or at least restore) receptor expression that had been downregulated by dietary cholesterol and triglyceride. Thus, 7.5% dietary psyllium produced effects on hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase and LDL metabolism that were similar to those of 1% cholestyramine. Induction of hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity by dietary psyllium may account, in large part, for the hypocholesterolemic effect of this soluble fiber. Images PMID:8182140

  2. Statin-induced proinflammatory response in mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells through the activation of caspase-1 and IL-18 secretion in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Coward, William R; Marei, Ayman; Yang, AiLi; Vasa-Nicotera, Mariuca M; Chow, Sek C

    2006-05-01

    Statins, which inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, have been shown recently to promote proinflammatory responses. We show in this study that both atorvastatin and simvastatin induced proinflammatory responses in mitogen-activated PBMCs by increasing the number of T cells secreting IFN-gamma. This is abolished by the presence of mevalonate, suggesting that statins act specifically by blocking the mevalonate pathway for cholesterol synthesis to promote the proinflammatory response. Both statins at low concentrations induced a dose-dependent increase in the number of IFN-gamma-secreting T cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs, whereas at higher concentrations the effect was abolished. The proinflammatory effect of statins was not seen in purified T cells per se activated with mitogen. However, conditioned medium derived from statin-treated PBMCs enhanced the number of IFN-gamma-secreting cells in activated purified T cells. This effect was not blocked by mevalonate, but was abolished by neutralizing Abs to IL-18 and IL-12. Similarly, the up-regulation of IFN-gamma-secreting T cells in PBMCs costimulated with statins and mitogens was blocked by the neutralizing anti-IL-18 and anti-IL-12. We showed that simvastatin stimulates the secretion of IL-18 and IL-1beta in monocytes. Active caspase-1, which is required for the processing and secretion of IL-18 and IL-1beta, was activated in simvastatin-treated monocytes. This was blocked by mevalonate and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp (OMe) fluoromethylketone. Taken together, the proinflammatory response mediated by statins in activated PBMCs is mediated mainly via the activation of caspase-1 and IL-18 secretion in the monocytes and to a lesser extent by IL-12.

  3. Prickly pear (Opuntia sp.) pectin alters hepatic cholesterol metabolism without affecting cholesterol absorption in guinea pigs fed a hypercholesterolemic diet.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M L; Lin, E C; Trejo, A; McNamara, D J

    1994-06-01

    Prickly pear pectin intake decreases plasma LDL concentrations by increasing hepatic apolipoprotein B/E receptor expression in guinea pigs fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. To investigate whether prickly pear pectin has an effect on cholesterol absorption and on enzymes responsible for hepatic cholesterol homeostasis, guinea pigs were fed one of three semipurified diets, each containing 15 g lard/100 g diet: 1) the lard-basal diet with no added cholesterol or prickly pear pectin (LB diet); 2) the LB diet with 0.25 g added cholesterol/100 g diet (LC diet); or 3) the LC diet containing 2.5 g prickly pear pectin/100 g diet, added at the expense of cellulose (LC-P diet). Animals fed the LB diet had the lowest plasma LDL and hepatic cholesterol concentrations, followed by animals fed the LC-P diet (P < 0.001). Hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activity was highest in the group fed the LB diet, with similar values for animals in the other two groups. A positive correlation existed between plasma LDL cholesterol concentration and hepatic acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activity (r = 0.87, P < 0.001). Cholesterol absorption was not different among the three dietary groups. These results indicate that the decreased plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations of animals fed prickly pear pectin are not explained by differences in cholesterol absorption but rather are due to mechanisms that alter hepatic cholesterol homeostasis, resulting in lower plasma LDL concentrations.

  4. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites.

  5. A clinical trial of lovastatin for modification of biomarkers associated with breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Shaveta; Schwartz, Erich J; Jensen, Kristin; Lipson, Jafi; Alli, Elizabeth; McPherson, Lisa; Fernandez, Adrian M; Sharma, Vandana B; Staton, Ashley; Mills, Meredith A; Schackmann, Elizabeth A; Telli, Melinda L; Kardashian, Ani; Ford, James M; Kurian, Allison W

    2013-11-01

    Pre-clinical and epidemiologic studies provide rationale for evaluating lipophilic statins for breast cancer prevention. We conducted a single-arm, biomarker modulation trial of lovastatin among women with increased risk of breast cancer. Eligibility criteria included a deleterious germline mutation in BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, or TP53; lifetime breast cancer risk of ≥20 % as estimated by the Claus model; or personal history of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer. Participants received 40 mg of lovastatin orally twice daily for 6 months. We evaluated the following biomarkers before and after lovastatin use: breast duct cytology (primary endpoint), serum lipids, C-reactive protein, insulin-like growth factor-1, IGF binding protein-3, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase genotype, and mammographic density. Thirty women were enrolled, and 26 (86.7 %) completed the study. For the primary endpoint of changes in breast duct cytology sampled by random periareolar fine needle aspiration, most participants [57.7 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 38.9-74.5 %] showed no change after lovastatin; 19.2 % (CI 8.1-38.3 %) had a favorable change in cytology, 7.7 % (95 % CI 1.0-25.3 %) had an unfavorable change, and 15.4 % (95 % CI 5.5-34.2 %) had equivocal results due to acellular specimens, usually after lovastatin. No significant changes were observed in secondary biomarker endpoints. The study was generally well-tolerated: 4 (13.3 %) participants did not complete the study, and one (3.8 %) required a dose reduction. This trial was technically feasible, but demonstrated no significant biomarker modulation; contributing factors may include insufficient sample size, drug dose and/or duration. The results are inconclusive and do not exclude a favorable effect on breast cancer risk.

  6. Metabolic cross-talk between pathways of terpenoid backbone biosynthesis in spike lavender.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Arrillaga, Isabel

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in developing spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med) was analyzed using specific inhibitors and on the basis of (13)C-labeling experiments. The presence of mevinolin (MEV), an inhibitor of the MVA pathway, at concentrations higher than 0.5 μM significantly reduced plant development, but not the synthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids. On the other hand, fosmidomycin (FSM), an inhibitor of the MEP pathway, at concentrations higher than 20 μM blocked the synthesis of chlorophyll, carotenoids and essential oils, and significantly reduced stem development. Notably, 1.2 mM MVA could recover the phenotype of MEV-treated plants, including the normal growth and development of roots, and could partially restore the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments and, to a lesser extent, of the essential oils in plantlets treated with FSM. Spike lavender shoot apices were also used in (13)C-labeling experiments, where the plantlets were grown in the presence of [U-(13)C6]glucose. GC-MS-analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. However, on the basis of the isotopologue profiles, a minor contribution of the MVA pathway was evident that was increased in transgenic spike lavender plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first enzyme of the MVA pathway. Together, these findings provide evidence for a transport of MVA-derived precursors from the cytosol to the plastids in leaves of spike lavender.

  7. Essential Role of TGF-β/Smad Pathway on Statin Dependent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Sánchez-Galán, Eva; Santamaría, Beatriz; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luís Miguel; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Background The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins) exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-β/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. Methodology In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-β. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-β receptor type II (TRII), and increased TGF-β synthesis and TGF-β/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-β induced apoptosis and increased TGF-β-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-β/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. Conclusions Statins enhance TGF-β/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-β/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs. PMID:19088845

  8. Maternal dietary betaine supplementation modifies hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes via epigenetic mechanisms in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Cai, Demin; Jia, Yimin; Lu, Jingyu; Yuan, Mengjie; Sui, Shiyan; Song, Haogang; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-11-14

    To elucidate the effects of maternal dietary betaine supplementation on hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes in newborn piglets and the involved epigenetic mechanisms, we fed gestational sows with control or betaine-supplemented diets (3 g/kg) throughout pregnancy. Neonatal piglets born to betaine-supplemented sows had higher serum methionine concentration and hepatic content of betaine, which was associated with significantly up-regulated hepatic expression of glycine N-methyltransferase. Prenatal betaine exposure increased hepatic cholesterol content and modified the hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes in neonatal piglets. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 was down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) was down-regulated at the mRNA level, but up-regulated at the protein level, in betaine-exposed piglets. The transcriptional repression of HMGCR was associated with CpG island hypermethylation and higher repressive histone mark H3K27me3 (histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation) on the promoter, whereas increased HMGCR protein content was associated with significantly decreased expression of miR-497. Furthermore, LDL receptor was significantly down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets, which was associated with promoter CpG hypermethylation. In addition, the expression of cholesterol-27α-hydroxylase (CYP27α1) was up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, while the expression of cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7α1) was increased at the mRNA level, but unchanged at the protein level associated with increased expression of miR-181. These results indicate that maternal betaine supplementation increases hepatic cholesterol content in neonatal piglets through epigenetic regulations of cholesterol metabolic genes, which involve alterations in DNA and histone methylation and in the expression of microRNA targeting these genes.

  9. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  10. Asbestos induces nitric oxide synthesis in mesothelioma cells via Rho signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Riganti, Chiara; Orecchia, Sara; Silvagno, Francesca; Pescarmona, Gianpiero; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Gazzano, Elena; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Ghigo, Dario; Bosia, Amalia

    2007-06-01

    We have observed that in three human malignant mesothelioma cell lines, crocidolite asbestos induced the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) by inhibiting the RhoA signaling pathway. The incubation with crocidolite decreased the level of GTP-bound RhoA and the activity of Rho-dependent kinase, and induced the activation of Akt/PKB and IkBalpha kinase, leading to the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. The effects of crocidolite fibers on NF-kappaB activation and NO synthesis were mimicked by Y27632 (an inhibitor of the Rho-dependent kinases) and toxin B (an inhibitor of RhoA GTPase activity), while they were reverted by mevalonic acid, the product of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase. Furthermore, crocidolite, similarly to mevastatin, inhibited the synthesis of cholesterol and ubiquinone and the prenylation of RhoA: these effects were prevented in the presence of mevalonic acid. This suggests that crocidolite fibers might inhibit the synthesis of isoprenoid molecules at the level of the HMGCoA reductase reaction or of an upstream step, thus impairing the prenylation and subsequent activation of RhoA. Akt can stimulate NO synthesis via a double mechanism: it can activate the inducible NO synthase via the NF-kappaB pathway and the endothelial NO synthase via a direct phosphorylation. Our results suggest that crocidolite increases the NO levels in mesothelioma cells by modulating both NO synthase isoforms.

  11. COA User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, B.; Pautz, J.; Sellers, C.

    1999-01-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has one of the largest and most complete collections of information on crude oil composition that is available to the public. The computer program that manages this database of crude oil analyses has recently been rewritten to allow easier access to this information. This report describes how the new system can be accessed and how the information contained in the Crude Oil Analysis Data Bank can be obtained.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Amish infantile epilepsy syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) ...

  13. Chitin synthase inhibitors as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Preeti M; Tupe, Santosh G; Deshpande, Mukund V

    2013-02-01

    Increased risk of fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients, emerging fungal pathogens, limited repertoire of antifungal drugs and resistance development against the drugs demands for development of new and effective antifungal agents. With greater knowledge of fungal metabolism efforts are being made to inhibit specific enzymes involved in different biochemical pathways for the development of antifungal drugs. Chitin synthase is one such promising target as it is absent in plants and mammals. Nikkomycin Z, a chitin synthase inhibitor is under clinical development. Chitin synthesis in fungi, chitin synthase as a target for antifungal agent development, different chitin synthase inhibitors isolated from natural sources, randomly synthesized and modified from nikkomycin and polyoxin are discussed in this review.

  14. Terpene synthases from Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Judith K.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis (Cannabis sativa) plants produce and accumulate a terpene-rich resin in glandular trichomes, which are abundant on the surface of the female inflorescence. Bouquets of different monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes are important components of cannabis resin as they define some of the unique organoleptic properties and may also influence medicinal qualities of different cannabis strains and varieties. Transcriptome analysis of trichomes of the cannabis hemp variety ‘Finola’ revealed sequences of all stages of terpene biosynthesis. Nine cannabis terpene synthases (CsTPS) were identified in subfamilies TPS-a and TPS-b. Functional characterization identified mono- and sesqui-TPS, whose products collectively comprise most of the terpenes of ‘Finola’ resin, including major compounds such as β-myrcene, (E)-β-ocimene, (-)-limonene, (+)-α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, and α-humulene. Transcripts associated with terpene biosynthesis are highly expressed in trichomes compared to non-resin producing tissues. Knowledge of the CsTPS gene family may offer opportunities for selection and improvement of terpene profiles of interest in different cannabis strains and varieties. PMID:28355238

  15. Inhibitors of specific ceramide synthases.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Hartmann, Daniela; Fuchs, Sina; Birod, Kerstin; Ferreiròs, Nerea; Schreiber, Yannick; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine; Stark, Holger

    2012-02-01

    Ceramide synthases (CerSs) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of ceramides and display a group of at least six different isoenzymes (CerS1-6). Ceramides itself are bioactive molecules. Ceramides with different N-acyl side chains (C(14:0)-Cer - C(26:0)-Cer) possess distinct roles in cell signaling. Therefore, the selective inhibition of specific CerSs which are responsible for the formation of a specific ceramide holds promise for a number of new clinical treatment strategies, e.g., cancer. Here, we identified four of hitherto unknown functional inhibitors of CerSs derived from the FTY720 (Fingolimod) lead structure and showed their inhibitory effectiveness by two in vitro CerS activity assays. Additionally, we tested the substances in two cell lines (HCT-116 and HeLa) with different ceramide patterns. In summary, the in vitro activity assays revealed out that ST1058 and ST1074 preferentially inhibit CerS2 and CerS4, while ST1072 inhibits most potently CerS4 and CerS6. Importantly, ST1060 inhibits predominately CerS2. First structure-activity relationships and the potential biological impact of these compounds are discussed.

  16. Malate synthase a membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Turley, R.B.; Hermerath, C.A.; Carrapico, F.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is generally regarded as a peripheral membrane protein, and believed by some to be ontogenetically associated with ER. However, immuno- and cyto-chemical in situ localizations show MS throughout the matrix of cotton (and cucumber) glyoxysomes, not specifically near their boundary membranes, nor in ER. Only a maximum of 50% MS can be solubilized from cotton glyoxysomes with 1% Triton X-100, 2mM Zwittergen 14, or 10mM DOC +/- salts. Cotton MS does not incorporate /sup 3/H-glucosamine in vivo, nor does it react with Con A on columns or blots. Cotton MS banded with ER in sucrose gradients (20-40%) in Tricine after 3h, but not after 22h in Tricine or Hepes, or after 3h in Hepes or K-phosphate. Collectively the authors data are inconsistent with physiologically meaningful MS-membrane associations in ER or glyoxysomes. It appears that experimentally-induced aggregates of MS migrate in ER gradients and occur in isolated glyoxysomes. These data indicate that ER is not involved in synthesis or modification of cottonseed MS prior to its import into the glyoxysomal matrix.

  17. Steady state fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1) and its active site mutants.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching and time resolved fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1), a multitryptophan protein from Leucaena leucocephala and 10 different active site mutants were carried out to investigate tryptophan environment. The enzyme showed highest affinity for feruloyl CoA (K(a)  = 3.72 × 10(5) M(-1)) over other CoA esters and cinnamaldehydes, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Quenching of the fluorescence by acrylamide for wild type and active site mutants was collisional with almost 100% of the tryptophan fluorescence accessible under native condition and remained same after denaturation of protein with 6 M GdnHCl. In wild type Ll-CCRH1, the extent of quenching achieved with iodide (f(a) = 1.0) was significantly higher than cesium ions (f(a) = 0.33) suggesting more density of positive charge around surface of trp conformers under native conditions. Denaturation of wild type protein with 6 M GdnHCl led to significant increase in the quenching with cesium (f(a) = 0.54), whereas quenching with iodide ion was decreased (f(a) = 0.78), indicating reorientation of charge density around trp from positive to negative and heterogeneity in trp environment. The Stern-Volmer plots for wild type and mutants Ll-CCRH1 under native and denatured conditions, with cesium ion yielded biphasic quenching profiles. The extent of quenching for cesium and iodide ions under native and denatured conditions observed in active site mutants was significantly different from wild type Ll-CCRH1 under the same conditions. Thus, single substitution type mutations of active site residues showed heterogeneity in tryptophan microenvironment and differential degree of conformation of protein under native or denatured conditions.

  18. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  19. RNAi inhibition of feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase reduces scopoletin biosynthesis and post-harvest physiological deterioration in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage roots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Zainuddin, Ima M; Vanderschuren, Herve; Doughty, James; Beeching, John R

    2017-03-18

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major world crop, whose storage roots provide food for over 800 million throughout the humid tropics. Despite many advantages as a crop, the development of cassava is seriously constrained by the rapid post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of its roots that occurs within 24-72 h of harvest, rendering the roots unpalatable and unmarketable. PPD limits cassava's marketing possibilities in countries that are undergoing increased development and urbanisation due to growing distances between farms and consumers. The inevitable wounding of the roots caused by harvesting triggers an oxidative burst that spreads throughout the cassava root, together with the accumulation of secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, of which the coumarin scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) is the most abundant. Scopoletin oxidation yields a blue-black colour, which suggests its involvement in the discoloration observed during PPD. Feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase is a controlling enzyme in the biosynthesis of scopoletin. The cassava genome contains a seven membered family of feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase genes, four of which are expressed in the storage root and, of these, three were capable of functionally complementing Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants in this gene. A RNA interference construct, designed to a highly conserved region of these genes, was used to transform cassava, where it significantly reduced feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase gene expression, scopoletin accumulation and PPD symptom development. Collectively, our results provide evidence that scopoletin plays a major functional role in the development of PPD symptoms, rather than merely paralleling symptom development in the cassava storage root.

  20. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present.

  1. [Autoimmune myopathy associated with statin use].

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, Unn; Mygland, Åse

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that statins can have a toxic effect on musculature, but less widely known that they can also trigger progressive autoimmune myopathy. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy is characterised by proximal muscle weakness, antibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in serum, and necrosis without lymphocytic infiltration on muscle biopsy.

  2. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  3. Molecular cloning and differential expressions of two cDNA encoding Type III polyketide synthase in different tissues of Curcuma longa L.

    PubMed

    Resmi, M S; Soniya, E V

    2012-01-10

    Type III polyketide synthase family of enzymes play an important role in the biosynthesis of flavonoids and a variety of plant polyphenols by condensing multiple acetyl units derived from malonyl Co-A to thioester linked starter molecules covalently bound in the PKS active site. Turmeric (Curucma longa L.) through diverse metabolic pathways produces a large number of metabolites, of which curcuminoids had gained much attention due to its immense pharmaceutical value. Recent identification of multiple curcuminoid synthases from turmeric lead us to look for additional Type III PKS from this plant. The current study describes the occurrence of a multigene family of Type III PKS enzymes in C. longa by RT-PCR based genomic screening. We have also isolated two new Type III PKS, ClPKS9 and ClPKS10 using homology based RT-PCR and data mining. The comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two PKSs belong to different groups with only 56% sequence similarity at their amino acid level. ClPKS9 shows all possible sequence requirements for a typical chalcone synthase whereas ClPKS10 shows promising variation at amino acid level and high similarity to reported curcuminoid synthases. ClPKS9 and ClPKS10 exhibited distinct tissue specific expression pattern in C. longa with the ClPKS9 transcript abundant in shoot and rhizome than leaves whereas ClPKS10 transcript was found to be high in leaf and very low in rhizome and root. Therefore it was concluded that ClPKS9 and ClPKS10 may have divergent function in planta, with possible role in typical chalcone forming reaction and curcuminoid scaffold biosynthetic pathway respectively.

  4. Can HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (“statins”) slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration? The Age-Related Maculopathy Statin Study (ARMSS)

    PubMed Central

    Guymer, Robyn H; Dimitrov, Peter N; Varsamidis, Mary; Lim, Lyndell L; Baird, Paul N; Vingrys, Algis J; Robman, Luba

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is responsible for the majority of visual impairment in the Western world. The role of cholesterol-lowering medications, HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors or statins, in reducing the risk of AMD or of delaying its progression has not been fully investigated. A 3-year prospective randomized controlled trial of 40 mg simvastatin per day compared to placebo in subjects at high risk of AMD progression is described. This paper outlines the primary aims of the Age-Related Maculopathy Statin Study (ARMSS), and the methodology involved. Standardized clinical grading of macular photographs and comparison of serial macular digital photographs, using the International grading scheme, form the basis for assessment of primary study outcomes. In addition, macular function is assessed at each visit with detailed psychophysical measurements of rod and cone function. Information collected in this study will assist in the assessment of the potential value of HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (statins) in reducing the risk of AMD progression. PMID:18982929

  5. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  6. Nicotiana benthamiana as a Production Platform for Artemisinin Precursors

    PubMed Central

    van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.; Cankar, Katarina; Nogueira, Marilise; Bosch, Dirk; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Beekwilder, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Background Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration. The first committed precursor of artemisinin, amorpha-4,11-diene, was produced upon infiltration of a construct containing amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, accompanied by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Amorpha-4,11-diene was detected both in extracts and in the headspace of the N. benthamiana leaves. When the amorphadiene oxidase CYP71AV1 was co-infiltrated with the amorphadiene-synthesizing construct, the amorpha-4,11-diene levels strongly decreased, suggesting it was oxidized. Surprisingly, no anticipated oxidation products, such as artemisinic acid, were detected upon GC-MS analysis. However, analysis of leaf extracts with a non-targeted metabolomics approach, using LC-QTOF-MS, revealed the presence of another compound, which was identified as artemisinic acid-12-β-diglucoside. This compound accumulated to 39.5 mg.kg−1 fwt. Apparently the product of the heterologous pathway that was introduced, artemisinic acid, is further metabolized efficiently by glycosyl transferases that are endogenous to N. benthamiana. Conclusion/Significance This work shows that agroinfiltration of N. bentamiana can be used as a model to study the production of sesquiterpenoid pharmaceutical compounds. The interaction between the ectopically introduced pathway and the endogenous metabolism of the plant is discussed. PMID:21151979

  7. Biosynthesis of the Allylmalonyl-CoA Extender Unit for the FK506 Polyketide Synthase (PKS) Proceeds Through a Dedicated PKS and Facilitates the Mutasynthesis of Novel Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Mo, SangJoon; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Jong Hyun; Park, Je Won; Basnet, Devi B.; Ban, Yeon Hee; Yoo, Young Ji; Chen, Shu-wei; Park, Sung Ryeol; Choi, Eun Ae; Kim, Eunji; Jin, Ying-Yu; Lee, Sung-Kwon; Park, Ju Yeol; Liu, Yuan; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Keum Soon; Kim, Sang Jun; Kim, Dooil; Park, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sang-gi; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Suh, Joo-Won; Moore, Bradley S.; Lim, Si-Kyu; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2011-01-01

    The allyl moiety of the immunosuppressive agent FK506 is structurally unique amongst polyketides and critical for its potent biological activity. Here, we detail the biosynthetic pathway to allylmalonyl-coenzyme A (CoA), from which the FK506 allyl group is derived, based on a comprehensive chemical, biochemical and genetic interrogation of three FK506 gene clusters. A discrete polyketide synthase (PKS) with noncanonical domain architecture presumably in coordination with the fatty acid synthase pathway of the host catalyzes a multi-step enzymatic reaction to allylmalonyl-CoA via trans-2-pentenyl-acyl carrier protein. Characterization of this discrete pathway facilitated the engineered biosynthesis of novel allyl group-modified FK506 analogs, namely 36-fluoro-FK520 and 36-methyl-FK506, the latter of which exhibits improved neurite outgrowth activity. This unique feature of FK506 biosynthesis, in which a dedicated PKS provides an atypical extender unit for the main modular PKS, illuminates a new strategy for the combinatorial biosynthesis of designer macrolide scaffolds as well as FK506 analogs. PMID:21175203

  8. Identification of novel sesterterpene/triterpene synthase from Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tsutomu; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Kashima, Shoji; Murata, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Nakano, Chiaki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2013-05-10

    Basic enzyme: The tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue from the alkalophilic Bacillus clausii catalyses conversions of a geranylfarnesyl diphosphate and a hexaprenyl diphosphate into novel head-to-tail acyclic sesterterpene and triterpene. Tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologues represent a new family of terpene synthases that form not only sesquarterpene but also sesterterpene and triterpene.

  9. A mycothiol synthase mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis produces novel thiols and has an altered thiol redox status.

    PubMed

    Newton, Gerald L; Ta, Philong; Fahey, Robert C

    2005-11-01

    Mycobacteria and other actinomycetes do not produce glutathione but make mycothiol (MSH; AcCys-GlcN-Ins) that has functions similar to those of glutathione and is essential for growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycothiol synthase (MshD) catalyzes N acetylation of Cys-GlcN-Ins to produce MSH in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155, and Cys-GlcN-Ins is maintained at a low level. The mycothiol synthase mutant, the mshD::Tn5 mutant, produces high levels of Cys-GlcN-Ins along with two novel thiols, N-formyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins and N-succinyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins, and a small amount of MSH. The nonenzymatic reaction of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) with Cys-GlcN-Ins to produce acyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins is a facile reaction under physiologic conditions, with succinyl-CoA being an order of magnitude more reactive than acetyl-CoA. The uncatalyzed reaction rates are adequate to account for the observed production of N-succinyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins and MSH under physiologic conditions. It was shown that the N-acyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins compounds are maintained in a substantially reduced state in the mutant but that Cys-GlcN-Ins exists in disulfide forms at 5 to 40% at different stages of growth. MSH was able to facilitate reduction of N-succinyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins disulfide through thiol-disulfide exchange, but N-formyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins was ineffective. The oxidized state of Cys-GlcN-Ins in cells appears to result from a high susceptibility to autoxidation and a low capacity of the cell to reduce its disulfide forms. The mutant exhibited no enhanced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, or cumene hydroperoxide relative to the parent strain, suggesting that the most abundant thiol, N-formyl-Cys-GlcN-Ins, functions as a substitute for MSH.

  10. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-05-26

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  11. Lessons from 455 Fusarium polyketide synthases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, polyketide synthases (PKSs) synthesize a structurally diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs) with a range of biological activities. The most studied SMs are toxic to animals and/or plants, alter plant growth, have beneficial pharmaceutical activities, and/or are brightly colored pigm...

  12. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-29

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  13. Comparative glandular trichome transcriptome based gene characterization reveals reasons for differential (-)-menthol biosynthesis in Mentha species.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Md Qussen; Qamar, Nida; Yadav, Pallavi; Kulkarni, Pallavi; Kumar, Ajay; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2017-02-11

    The genes involved in menthol biosynthesis are reported earlier in Mentha × piperita. But the information on these genes is not available in Mentha arvensis. To bridge the gap in knowledge on differential biosynthesis of monoterpenes leading to compositional variation in the essential oil of these species, a comparative transcriptome analysis of the glandular trichome was carried out. In addition to the MVA and MEP pathway genes, about 210 and 196 different terpene synthases (TPS) transcripts were identified from annotation in M. arvensis and M. × piperita, respectively, and correlated to several monoterpenes present in the essential oil. Six isoforms of (-)-menthol dehydrogenases (MD), the last enzyme of the menthol biosynthetic pathway, were identified, cloned and characterized from the transcriptome data (3 from each species). Varied expression levels and differential enzyme kinetics of these isoforms indicated the nature and composition of the product, as these isoforms generate both (-)-menthol and (+)-neomenthol from (-)-menthone and converts (-)-menthol to (-)-menthone in the reverse reaction, and hence together determine the quantity of (-)-menthol in the essential oil in these two species. Several genes for high value minor monoterpenes could also be identified from the transcriptome data. Abbreviations - AACT, acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase; CMK, 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase; DGE, digital gene expression; DXR, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase; DXS, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase; FPPS, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase; GC, gas chromatography; GPPS, geranyl pyrophosphate synthase; GT, glandular trichome; HDR, 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase; HDS, (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl-diphosphate synthase; HMGR, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase; HMGS, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase; IDI, isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase; IPD, isopiperitenol dehydrogenase; IPI

  14. Cloning and expression of zebrafish genes encoding the heme synthesis enzymes uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO).

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Ryuki; Dawid, Igor B; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2007-02-01

    Heme is synthesized from glycine and succinyl CoA by eight heme synthesis enzymes. Although genetic defects in any of these enzymes are known to cause severe human blood diseases, their developmental expression in mammals is unknown. In this paper, we report two zebrafish heme synthesis enzymes, uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) that are well conserved in comparison to their human counterparts. Both UROS and PPO formed pairs of bilateral stripes in the lateral plate mesoderm at the 15-somite stage. At 24 h post-fertilization (hpf), UROS and PPO were predominantly expressed in the intermediate cell mass (ICM) that is the major site of primitive hematopoiesis. The expression of UROS and PPO was drastically suppressed in the bloodless mutants cloche and vlad tepes/gata 1 from 15-somite to 24hpf stages, indicating that both cloche and vlad tepes/gata 1 are required for the induction and maintenance of UROS and PPO expression in the ICM.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA coding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary CoA reductase involved in glycyrrhizic acid biosynthesis in Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Qiao-Xian; Xi, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hong-Hao; Liu, Chun-Sheng

    2013-05-01

    The roots of Glycyrrhiza uralensis are widely used in Chinese medicine for their action of clearing heat, detoxicating, relieving cough, dispelling sputum and tonifying spleen and stomach. The reason why Glycyrrhiza uralensis has potent and significant actions is that it contains various active secondary metabolites, especially glycyrrhizic acid. In the present study, we cloned the cDNA coding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary CoA reductase (HMGR) involved in glycyrrhizic acid biosynthesis in Glycyrrhiza uralensis. The corresponding cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins. Recombinant HMGR exhibited catalysis activity in reduction of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA) just as HMGR isolated from other species. Because HMGR gene is very important in the biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid in Glycyrrhiza uralensis, this work is significant for further studies concerned with strengthening the efficacy of Glycyrrhiza uralensis by means of increasing glycyrrhizic acid content and exploring the biosynthesis of glycyrrhizic acid in vitro.

  16. Mycobacteria Encode Active and Inactive Classes of TesB Fatty-Acyl CoA Thioesterases Revealed through Structural and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Bythrow, Glennon V; Aragao, David; Germain, Gabrielle A; Quadri, Luis E N; Forwood, Jade K

    2017-03-14

    Mycobacteria contain a large number of highly divergent species and exhibit unusual lipid metabolism profiles, believed to play important roles in immune invasion. Thioesterases modulate lipid metabolism through the hydrolysis of activated fatty-acyl CoAs; multiple copies are present in mycobacteria, yet many remain uncharacterized. Here, we undertake a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of a TesB thioesterase from Mycobacterium avium (MaTesB). Structural superposition with other TesB thioesterases reveals that the Asp active site residue, highly conserved across a wide range of TesB thioesterases, is mutated to Ala. Consistent with these structural data, the wild-type enzyme failed to hydrolyze an extensive range of acyl-CoA substrates. Mutation of this residue to an active Asp residue restored activity against a range of medium-chain length fatty-acyl CoA substrates. Interestingly, this Ala mutation is highly conserved across a wide range of Mycobacterium species but not found in any other bacteria or organism. Our structural homology analysis revealed that at least one other TesB acyl-CoA thioesterase also contains an Ala residue at the active site, while two other Mycobacterium TesB thioesterases harbor an Asp residue at the active site. The inactive TesBs display a common quaternary structure that is distinct from that of the active TesB thioesterases. Investigation of the effect of expression of either the catalytically active or inactive MaTesB in Mycobacterium smegmatis exposed, to the best of our knowledge, the first genotype-phenotype association implicating a mycobacterial tesB gene. This is the first report that mycobacteria encode active and inactive forms of thioesterases, the latter of which appear to be unique to mycobacteria.

  17. The Mechanisms Underlying the Hypolipidaemic Effects of Grifola frondosa in the Liver of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yinrun; Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Li, Xiangmin; Hu, Huiping; Li, Liangqiu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa and its regulation mechanism involved in lipid metabolism in liver of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The body weights and serum lipid levels of control rats, of hyperlipidaemic rats, and of hyperlipidaemic rats treated with oral G. frondosa were determined. mRNA expression and concentration of key lipid metabolism enzymes were investigated. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were markedly decreased in hyperlipidaemic rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were significantly down-regulated, while expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) was significantly up-regulated in the livers of treated rats compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. The concentrations of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to identify 20 proteins differentially expressed in livers of rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats. Of these 20 proteins, seven proteins were down-regulated, and 13 proteins were up-regulated. These findings indicate that the hypolipidaemic effects of G. frondosa reflected its modulation of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, absorption, and catabolic pathways. G. frondosa may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects by inhibiting LDL oxidation through down-regulation and up-regulating proteins expression in the liver of rats. Therefore, G. frondosa may produce both hypolipidaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, and potentially

  18. PPARα-dependent cholesterol/testosterone disruption in Leydig cells mediates 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-induced testicular toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukiko; Tanaka, Naoki; Ichikawa, Motoki; Kamijo, Yuji; Sugiyama, Eiko; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2016-12-01

    It was reported that 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a commonly used herbicide and a possible endocrine disruptor, can disturb spermatogenesis, but the precise mechanism is not understood. Since 2,4-D is a weak peroxisome proliferator in hepatocytes and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is also expressed in Leydig cells, this study aimed to investigate the link between PPARα and 2,4-D-mediated testicular dysfunction. 2,4-D (130 mg/kg/day) was administered to wild-type and Ppara-null mice for 2 weeks, and the alterations in testis and testosterone/cholesterol metabolism in Leydig cells were examined. Treatment with 2,4-D markedly decreased testicular testosterone in wild-type mice, leading to degeneration of spermatocytes and Sertoli cells. The 2,4-D decreased cholesterol levels in Leydig cells of wild-type mice through down-regulating the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase 1 and reductase, involved in de novo cholesterogenesis. However, the mRNAs encoding the important proteins involved in testosterone synthesis were unchanged by 2,4-D except for CYP17A1, indicating that exhausted cholesterol levels in the cells is a main reason for reduced testicular testosterone. Additionally, pregnancy rate and the number of pups between 2,4-D-treated wild-type male mice and untreated female mice were significantly lower compared with those between untreated couples. These phenomena were not observed in 2,4-D-treated Ppara-null males. Collectively, these results suggest a critical role for PPARα in 2,4-D-induced testicular toxicity due to disruption of cholesterol/testosterone homeostasis in Leydig cells. This study yields novel insights into the possible mechanism of testicular dysfunction and male infertility caused by 2,4-D.

  19. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis increase hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Lopez, D

    1996-01-15

    Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis are believed to lower serum cholesterol levels by enhancing the removal of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by increasing hepatic LDL receptor function. Thus, the effects of several different inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis were examined for their effects on the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats. We found that administration of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase such as lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and rivastatin resulted in increased hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Surprisingly, these agents failed to increase levels of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in rat liver even when the dose and length of treatment were increased. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused even greater increases in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels, but did not increase levels of immunoreactive protein. Further investigation revealed that the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was increased in rats given inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The greatest increase in the rate of degradation was seen in animals treated with zaragozic acid A which caused the largest increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. In contrast, hepatic LDL receptor protein was stabilized in cholesterol-fed rats. It appears that increased potential for LDL receptor protein synthesis, reflected in increased mRNA levels, is offset by a corresponding increase in the rate of receptor protein degradation resulting in constant steady-state levels of hepatic LDL receptor protein. These findings are suggestive of increased cycling of the hepatic LDL receptor. This postulated mechanism can provide for enhanced hepatic uptake of lipoproteins without increasing steady-state levels of LDL receptor protein.

  20. High doses of atorvastatin and simvastatin induce key enzymes involved in VLDL production.

    PubMed

    Roglans, Núria; Verd, Joan C; Peris, Cristina; Alegret, Marta; Vázquez, Manuel; Adzet, Tomás; Díaz, Cristina; Hernández, Gonzalo; Laguna, Juan C; Sánchez, Rosa M

    2002-05-01

    Treatments with high doses of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors may induce the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-target genes, causing different effects from those attributed to the reduction of hepatic cholesterol content. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high doses of statins on the key enzymes involved in VLDL production in normolipidemic rats. To examine whether the effects caused by statin treatment are a consequence of HMG-CoA reductase inhibition, we tested the effect of atorvastatin on these enzymes in mevalonate-fed rats. Atorvastatin and simvastatin enhanced not only HMG-CoA reductase but also the expression of the SREBP-2 gene itself. As a result of the overexpression of SREBP-2 caused by the statin treatment, genes regulated basically by SREBP-1, as FA synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, were also induced and their mRNA levels increased. DAG acyltransferase and microsomal TG transfer protein mRNA levels as well as phosphatidate phosphohydrolase activity were increased by both statins. Simvastatin raised liver cholesterol content, ACAT mRNA levels, and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase activity, whereas it reduced liver DAG and phospholipid content. Mevalonate feeding reversed all changes induced by the atorvastatin treatment. These results show that treatment with high doses of statins induces key enzymes controlling rat liver lipid synthesis and VLDL assembly, probably as a result of SREBP-2 overexpression. Despite the induction of the key enzymes involved in VLDL production, both statins markedly reduced plasma TG levels, suggesting that different mechanisms may be involved in the hypotriglyceridemic effect of statins at high or low doses.

  1. UV-B and UV-C pre-treatments induce physiological changes and artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L. - an antimalarial plant.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rashmi; Meena, Ram Prasad; Smita, Shachi Shuchi; Shukla, Aparna; Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Pandey-Rai, Shashi

    2011-12-02

    Present study was undertaken to investigate if short-term UV-B (4.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1)) and UV-C (5.7 kJ m(-2) day(-1)), pre-treatments can induce artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua. Twenty-one day old Artemisia seedlings were subjected to short-term (14 days) UV pre-treatment in an environmentally controlled growth chamber and then transplanted to the field under natural conditions. Treatment of A. annua with artificial UV-B and UV-C radiation not only altered the growth responses, biomass, pigment content and antioxidant enzyme activity but enhanced the secondary metabolites (artemisinin and flavonoid) content at all developmental stages as compared to non-irradiated plants. The extent of oxidative damage was measured in terms of the activities of enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase. Reinforcement in the antioxidative defense system seems to be a positive response of plants in ameliorating the negative effects of UV-B and UV-C radiations. While the carotenoid content was elevated, the chlorophyll content decreased under UV-B and UV-C pre-treatments. The reverse transcription PCR analysis of the genes associated in artemisinin/isoprenoid biosynthesis like 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR) and amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS) genes at different growth stages revealed UV induced significant over-expression of the above protein genes. UV-B and UV-C pre-treatments, led to an increase in the concentrations of artemisinin at full bloom stage by 10.5% and 15.7% than that of the control respectively. Thus, the result of our study suggests that short term UV-B pre-treatment of seedlings in greenhouse prior to transplantation into the field enhances artemisinin production with lesser yield related damages as compared to UV-C radiation in A. annua.

  2. Is targeting eNOS a key mechanistic insight of cardiovascular defensive potentials of statins?

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Kathuria, Sonam; Taneja, Gaurav; Kalra, Sanjeev; Mahadevan, Nanjaian

    2012-01-01

    Statins are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidemia and associated cardiovascular abnormalities including atherosclerosis, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Needless to mention, statins have cholesterol-lowering effects by means of inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis. Besides cholesterol-lowering effects, statins possess pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-platelet and anti-fibrotic properties, which may additionally play imperative roles in statins-mediated cardiovascular protection. However, the precise mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular defensive potential of statins have not completely been elucidated. Intriguingly, a considerable number of studies demonstrated the potential modulatory role of statins on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), a key enzyme involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function by generating endothelium-derived relaxing factor (often represented 'nitric oxide'). Worthy of note is that vascular generation of nitric oxide has beneficial anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and vasodilatory actions. The upregulation of eNOS by statins is mediated through inhibition of synthesis of isoprenoids and subsequent prevention of isoprenylation of small GTPase Rho, whereas statin-induced activation of eNOS is mediated through activation of phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signals. Additionally, statins enhance eNOS activation by abrogating caveolin-1 expression in vascular endothelium. In light of this view-point, we suggest in this review that eNOS upregulation and activation, in part, could play a fundamental role in the cardiovascular defensive potential of statins. The eNOS modulatory role of statins may have an imperative influence on the functional regulation of cardiovascular system and may offer new perspectives for the better use of statins in ameliorating cardiovascular disorders.

  3. Polyphenol-rich black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) extract regulates the expression of genes critical for intestinal cholesterol flux in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Youngki; Wegner, Casey J; Bolling, Bradley W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-09-01

    Black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) is a rich source of polyphenols. The hypolipidemic effects of polyphenol-rich black chokeberry extract (CBE) have been reported, but underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. We investigated the effect of CBE on the expression of genes involved in intestinal lipid metabolism. Caco-2 cells were incubated with 50 or 100 μg/ml of CBE for 24 h for quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction analysis. Expression of genes for cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and sterol regulatory element binding protein 2), apical cholesterol uptake (Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 and scavenger receptor class B Type 1) and basolateral cholesterol efflux [ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)] was significantly decreased by CBE compared with control. Western blot analysis confirmed that CBE inhibited expression of these proteins. In contrast, CBE markedly induced mRNA and/or protein levels of ABCG5 and ABCG8 that mediate apical cholesterol efflux to the intestinal lumen. Furthermore, CBE significantly increased mRNA and protein levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, and cellular LDL uptake. Expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and lipoprotein assembly, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, fatty acid synthase and acyl-CoA oxidase 1, was significantly decreased by CBE in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, CBE significantly increased sirtuin 1, 3 and 5 mRNA levels, while it decreased SIRT-2. Our data suggest that hypolipidemic effects of CBE may be attributed, at least in part, to increased apical efflux of LDL-derived cholesterol and to decreased chylomicron formation in the intestine; and specific isoforms of SIRT may play an important role in this process.

  4. Proteome analysis of the large and the small rubber particles of Hevea brasiliensis using 2D-DIGE.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qiulan; Xia, Kecan; Dai, Longjun; Kang, Guijuan; Li, Yu; Nie, Zhiyi; Duan, Cuifang; Zeng, Rizhong

    2012-11-01

    The rubber particle is a specialized organelle in which natural rubber is synthesised and stored in the laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree). It has been demonstrated that the small rubber particles (SRPs) has higher rubber biosynthesis ratio than the large rubber particles (LRPs), but the underlying molecular mechanism still remains unknown. In this study, LRPs and SRPs were firstly separated from the fresh latex using differential centrifugation, and two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF was then applied to investigate the proteomic alterations associated with the changed rubber biosynthesis capacity between LRPs and SRPs. A total of 53 spots corresponding to 22 gene products, were significantly altered with the |ratio|≥2.0 and T value ≤0.05, among which 15 proteins were up-regulated and 7 were down-regulated in the SRPs compared with the LRPs. The 15 up-regulated proteins in the SRPs included small rubber particle protein (SRPP), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS), phospholipase D alpha (PLD α), ethylene response factor 2, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A isoform IV (eIF 5A-4), 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein (HSC 70), several unknown proteins, etc., whereas the 7 up-regulated proteins in the LRPs were rubber elongation factor (REF, 19.6kDa), ASR-like protein 1, REF-like stress-related protein 1, a putative phosphoglyceride transfer family protein, β-1,3-glucanase, a putative retroelement, and a hypothetical protein. Since several proteins related to rubber biosynthesis were differentially expressed between LRPs and SRPs, the comparative proteome data may provide useful insights into understanding the mechanism involved in rubber biosynthesis and latex coagulation in H. brasiliensis.

  5. Renal mass reduction results in accumulation of lipids and dysregulation of lipid regulatory proteins in the remnant kidney.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Moradi, Hamid; Yuan, Jun; Norris, Keith; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2009-06-01

    A significant reduction of renal mass results in proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial injury, culminating in end-stage chronic renal failure (CRF). The accumulation of lipids in the kidney can cause renal disease. Uptake of oxidized lipoproteins via scavenger receptors, reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids via the megalin-cubilin complex, and increased glucose load per nephron can promote lipid accumulation in glomerular, tubular, and interstitial cells in CRF. Cellular lipid homeostasis is regulated by lipid influx, synthesis, catabolism, and efflux. We examined lipid-regulatory factors in the remnant kidney of rats 11 wk after nephrectomy (CRF) or sham operation. CRF resulted in azotemia, proteinuria, lipid accumulation in the kidney, upregulation of megalin, cubilin, mediators of lipid influx (scavenger receptor class A and lectin-like oxidized receptor-1), lipid efflux (liver X receptor alpha/beta and ATP-binding cassette transporter), and fatty acid biosynthesis (carbohydrate-response element binding protein, fatty acid synthase, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase). However, factors involved in cholesterol biosynthesis (sterol regulatory element binding protein, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, SCAP, Insig-1, and Insig-2) and fatty acid oxidation (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, acyl-CoA oxidase, and liver-type fatty acid binding protein) were reduced in the remnant kidney. Thus CRF results in heavy lipid accumulation in the remnant kidney, which is mediated by upregulation of pathways involved in tubular reabsorption of filtered protein-bound lipids, influx of oxidized lipoproteins and synthesis of fatty acids, and downregulation of pathways involved in fatty acid catabolism.

  6. Seasonal proteomic changes reveal molecular adaptations to preserve and replenish liver proteins during ground squirrel hibernation.

    PubMed

    Epperson, L Elaine; Rose, James C; Carey, Hannah V; Martin, Sandra L

    2010-02-01

    Hibernators are unique among mammals in their ability to survive extended periods of time with core body temperatures near freezing and with dramatically reduced heart, respiratory, and metabolic rates in a state known as torpor. To gain insight into the molecular events underlying this remarkable physiological phenotype, we applied a proteomic screening approach to identify liver proteins that differ between the summer active (SA) and the entrance (Ent) phase of winter hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels. The relative abundance of 1,600 protein spots separated on two-dimensional gels was quantitatively determined using fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, and 74 unique proteins exhibiting significant differences between the two states were identified using liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Proteins elevated in Ent hibernators included liver fatty acid-binding protein, fatty acid transporter, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, which support the known metabolic fuel switch to lipid and ketone body utilization in winter. Several proteins involved in protein stability and protein folding were also elevated in the Ent phase, consistent with previous findings. In contrast to transcript screening results, there was a surprising increase in the abundance of proteins involved in protein synthesis during Ent hibernation, including several initiation and elongation factors. This finding, coupled with decreased abundance of numerous proteins involved in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, supports the intriguing hypothesis that the mechanism of protein preservation and resynthesis is used by hibernating ground squirrels to help avoid nitrogen toxicity and ensure preservation of essential amino acids throughout the long winter fast.

  7. Effect of the difference in vehicles on gene expression in the rat liver--analysis of the control data in the Toxicogenomics Project Database.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Kayoko; Mizukawa, Yumiko; Morishita, Katsumi; Okuyama, Manabu; Kasahara, Toshihiko; Toritsuka, Naoki; Miyagishima, Toshikazu; Nagao, Taku; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2006-05-08

    The Toxicogenomics Project is a 5-year collaborative project by the Japanese government and pharmaceutical companies in 2002. Its aim is to construct a large-scale toxicology database of 150 compounds orally administered to rats. The test consists of a single administration test (3, 6, 9 and 24 h) and a repeated administration test (3, 7, 14 and 28 days), and the conventional toxicology data together with the gene expression data in liver as analyzed by using Affymetrix GeneChip are being accumulated. In the project, either methylcellulose or corn oil is employed as vehicle. We examined whether the vehicle itself affects the analysis of gene expression and found that corn oil alone affected the food consumption and biochemical parameters mainly related to lipid metabolism, and this accompanied typical changes in the gene expression. Most of the genes modulated by corn oil were related to cholesterol or fatty acid metabolism (e.g., CYP7A1, CYP8B1, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase, squalene epoxidase, angiopoietin-like protein 4, fatty acid synthase, fatty acid binding proteins), suggesting that the response was physiologic to the oil intake. Many of the lipid-related genes showed circadian rhythm within a day, but the expression pattern of general clock genes (e.g., period 2, arylhydrocarbon nuclear receptor translocator-like, D site albumin promoter binding protein) were unaffected by corn oil, suggesting that the effects are specific for lipid metabolism. These results would be useful for usage of the database especially when drugs with different vehicle control are compared.

  8. Antrodia cinnamomea Prevents Obesity, Dyslipidemia, and the Derived Fatty Liver via Regulating AMPK and SREBP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Huei; Yang, Mon-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Sun; Yu, Chieh-Chou; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2017-01-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea (AC), a protogenic fungus that only grows on the heartwood of endemic Cinnamomum kanehirae Hayata in Taiwan, is used to treat a variety of illness including liver disease. However, little is known about the benefit of AC against obesity and the related hepatic disorder. Using high-fat-diet (HFD) feed mice, we aimed to investigate whether the extract of AC (ACE) could reduce excessive weight, body fat, and serum lipids and prevent the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD). C57BL/6 mice were divided into five groups fed with different diets: control, HFD, and HFD with 0.5%, 1%, or 2% of ACE, respectively. After 10 weeks the animals were sacrificed, with serum and liver collected. HFD-induced elevation of body weight gain, body fat deposition, and serum free fatty acid (FFA), triacylglycerol (TGs), total cholesterol, and ratio of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C)/HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), were significantly restored by ACE. ACE reduced aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and hepatic lipid deposits increased by HFD. ACE increased p-AMP activated protein kinase (pAMPK) but decreased Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (AGPAT), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase. The chemical analysis reveals ACE is full of triterpenes, the most abundant of which is Antcin K, followed by sulphurenic acid, eburicoic acid, antcin C, dehydrosulphurenic acid, antcin B, and propanoic acid. In conclusion, ACE should be used to prevent obesity and derived fatty liver. The applicability of ACE on NAFLD deserves further investigation.

  9. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management.

  10. Anti-Obesity Effect of Bombus ignitus Queen Glycosaminoglycans in Rats on a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Ban Ji; Kim, Ha Jeong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Park, Kun-Koo

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of functional insect glycosaminoglycan (GAG) on obesity caused a high fat diet has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, insect glycosaminoglycans derived from Isaria sinclairii, Bombus ignitus (a type of bumblebee) queen, and Gryllus bimaculatus were purified and investigated as a potential functional food. 14-week old male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. There were five groups that received daily intraperitoneal administration of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control), GbG (GAG from Gryllus bimaculatus) 10 mg/kg, ISG (GAG from Isaria sinclairii) 10 mg/kg, IQG (GAG from Bombus ignites) 10 mg/kg, or Pravastatin (2 mg/kg). All treatments were performed for one month. IQG produced a potential anti-inflammatory effect with the inhibition of c-reactive protein and sero-biochemical parameters of phospholipids and free fatty acids indicative of an anti-hyperlipidemic effect. Abdominal and epididymidal fat weight were reduced in conjunction with a mild increase in body weight. The level of laminin in HMVEC-C cells or fibronectin in HFD rat hepatocytes was significantly affected by these GAG treatments, which regulated adipogenesis and adipocyte function. Compared to the control rats, IQG-treated rats displayed up-regulation of 87 genes (test:control ratio >2.0) including fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, with the down-regulation of 47 genes including the uridine diphosphate (UDP) glycosyltransferase 2 families, polypeptidase B, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. The data suggest that IQG could potentially prevent or treat fatty liver or hyperlipidemia. PMID:28327528

  11. The Crystal Structure of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae Provides Insights into Mechanisms of Catalysis and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-07

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes.

  12. Kinetics of CO Insertion and Acetyl Group Transfer Steps, and a Model of the Acetyl-CoA Synthase Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiangshi; Surovtsev, Ivan V.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA synthase/carbon monoxide dehydrogenase is a Ni-Fe-S-containing enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO, CoA and a methyl group. The methyl group is transferred onto the enzyme from a corrinoid-iron-sulfur protein (CoFeSP). The kinetics of two steps within the catalytic mechanism were studied using the stopped-flow method, including the insertion of CO into a putative Ni2+-CH3 bond and the transfer of the resulting acetyl group to CoA. Neither step had been studied previously. Reactions were monitored indirectly, starting with the methylated intermediate form of the enzyme. Resulting traces were analyzed by constructing a simple kinetic model describing the catalytic mechanism under reducing conditions. Besides methyl group transfer, CO insertion, and acetyl group transfer, fitting to experimental traces required the inclusion of an inhibitory step in which CO reversibly bound to the form of the enzyme obtained immediately after product release. Global simulation of the reported datasets afforded a consistent set of kinetic parameters. The equilibrium constant for the overall synthesis of acetyl-CoA was estimated and compared to the product of the individual equilibrium constants. Simulations obtained with the model recapitulated the essential behavior of the enzyme, in terms of the variation of activity with [CO], and the time-dependent decay of the NiFeC EPR signal upon reaction with CoFeSP. Under standard assay conditions, the model suggests that the vast majority of active enzyme molecules in a population should be in the methylated form, suggesting that the subsequent catalytic step, namely CO insertion, is rate limiting. This conclusion is further supported by a sensitivity analysis showing that the rate is most sensitively affected by a change in the rate-coefficient associated with the CO insertion step. PMID:16967985

  13. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  14. Polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and thymidylate synthase (TYMS) in multiple myeloma risk.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carmen S P; Ortega, Manoela M; Ozelo, Margareth C; Araujo, Renato C; De Souza, Cármino A; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M; Costa, Fernando F

    2008-03-01

    We tested whether the polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene, MTHFR C677T and A1298C, the methionine synthase gene, MTR A2756G, the methionine synthase reductase gene, MTRR A66G, and the thymidylate synthase gene, TYMS 2R-->3R, involved in folate and methionine metabolism, altered the risk for multiple myeloma (MM). Genomic DNA from 123MM patients and 188 controls was analysed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion for the polymorphism analyses. The frequency of the MTR 2756 AG plus GG genotype was higher in patients than in controls (39.8% versus 23.4%, P=0.001). Individual carriers of the variant allele G had a 2.31 (95% CI: 1.38-3.87)-fold increased risk for MM compared with others. In contrast, similar frequencies of the MTHFR, the MTRR and the TYMS genotypes were seen in patients and controls. These results suggest, for the first time, a role for the MTR A2756G polymorphism in MM risk in our country, but should be confirmed by large-scale epidemiological studies with patients and controls age matched.

  15. Caffeine synthase and related methyltransferases in plants.

    PubMed

    Misako, Kato; Kouichi, Mizuno

    2004-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a purine alkaloid present in high concentrations in tea and coffee and it is also found in a number of beverages such as coca cola. It is necessary to elucidate the caffeine biosynthetic pathway and to clone the genes related to the production of caffeine not only to determine the metabolism of the purine alkaloid but also to control the content of caffeine in tea and coffee. The available data support the operation of a xanthosine-->7-methylxanthosine-->7-methylxanthine-->theobromine-->caffeine pathway as the major route to caffeine. Since the caffeine biosynthetic pathway contains three S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation steps, N-methyltransferases play important roles. This review focuses on the enzymes and genes involved in the methylation of purine ring. Caffeine synthase, the SAM-dependent methyltransferase involved in the last two steps of caffeine biosynthesis, was originally purified from young tea leaves (Camellia sinensis). The isolated cDNA, termed TCS1, consists of 1,483 base pairs and encodes a protein of 369 amino acids. Subsequently, the homologous genes that encode caffeine biosynthetic enzymes from coffee (Coffea arabica) were isolated. The recombinant proteins are classified into the three types on the basis of their substrate specificity i.e. 7-methylxanthosine synthase, theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase. The predicted amino acid sequences of caffeine biosynthetic enzymes derived from C. arabica exhibit more than 80% homology with those of the clones and but show only 40% homology with TCS1 derived from C. sinensis. In addition, they share 40% homology with the amino acid sequences of salicylic carboxyl methyltransferase, benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase and jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase which belong to a family of motif B' methyltransferases which are novel plant methyltransferases with motif B' instead of motif B as the conserved region.

  16. Chrysanthemyl Diphosphate Synthase Operates in Planta as a Bifunctional Enzyme with Chrysanthemol Synthase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1′-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12–0.16 μg h−1 g−1 fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  17. Structure of a modular polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Whicher, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Douglas A.; Hale, Wendi A.; Chemler, Joseph A.; Congdon, Grady R.; Narayan, Alison R.; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyketide natural products constitute a broad class of compounds with diverse structural features and biological activities. Their biosynthetic machinery, represented by type I polyketide synthases, has an architecture in which successive modules catalyze two-carbon linear extensions and keto group processing reactions on intermediates covalently tethered to carrier domains. We employed electron cryo-microscopy to visualize a full-length module and determine sub-nanometer resolution 3D reconstructions that revealed an unexpectedly different architecture compared to the homologous dimeric mammalian fatty acid synthase. A single reaction chamber provides access to all catalytic sites for the intra-module carrier domain. In contrast, the carrier from the preceding module uses a separate entrance outside the reaction chamber to deliver the upstream polyketide intermediate for subsequent extension and modification. This study reveals for the first time the structural basis for both intra-module and inter-module substrate transfer in polyketide synthases, and establishes a new model for molecular dissection of these multifunctional enzyme systems. PMID:24965652

  18. Threonine Synthase of Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746

    PubMed Central

    Giovanelli, John; Veluthambi, K.; Thompson, Gregory A.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Datko, Anne H.

    1984-01-01

    Threonine synthase (TS) was purified approximately 40-fold from Lemna paucicostata, and some of its properties determined by use of a sensitive and specific assay. During the course of its purification, TS was separated from cystathionine γ-synthase, establishing the separate identity of these enzymes. Compared to cystathionine γ-synthase, TS is relatively insensitive to irreversible inhibition by propargylglycine (both in vitro and in vivo) and to gabaculine, vinylglycine, or cysteine in vitro. TS is highly specific for O-phospho-l-homoserine (OPH) and water (hydroxyl ion). Nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ion is restricted to carbon-3 of OPH and proceeds sterospecifically to form threonine rather than allo-threonine. The Km for OPH, determined at saturating S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), is 2.2 to 6.9 micromolar, two orders of magnitude less than values reported for TS from other plant tissues. AdoMet markedly stimulates the enzyme in a reversible and cooperative manner, consistent with its proposed role in regulation of methionine biosynthesis. Cysteine (1 millimolar) caused a slight (26%) reversible inhibition of the enzyme. Activities of TS isolated from Lemna were inversely related to the methionine nutrition of the plants. Down-regulation of TS by methionine may help to limit the overproduction of threonine that could result from allosteric stimulation of the enzyme by AdoMet. No evidence was obtained for feedback inhibition, repression, or covalent modification of TS by threonine and/or isoleucine. PMID:16663833

  19. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  20. Progress towards clinically useful aldosterone synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the high degree of similarity between aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) and cortisol synthase (CYP11B1), the design of selective inhibitors of one or the other of these two enzymes was, at one time, thought to be impossible. Through development of novel enzyme screening assays and significant medicinal chemistry efforts, highly potent inhibitors of CYP11B2 have been identified with selectivities approaching 1000-fold between the two enzymes. Many of these molecules also possess selectivity against other steroidogenic cytochromes P450 (e.g. CYP17A1 and CYP19A1) as well as hepatic drug metabolizing P450s. Though not as well developed or explored, inhibitors of CYP11B1, with selectivities approaching 50-fold, have also been identified. The therapeutic benefits of affecting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been well established with the therapeutically useful angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Data regarding the additional benefits of an aldosterone synthase inhibitor (ASi) are beginning to emerge from animal models and human clinical trials. Despite great promise and much progress, additional challenges still exist in the path towards development of a therapeutically useful ASi.

  1. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  2. Mutational analysis of a monoterpene synthase reaction: altered catalysis through directed mutagenesis of (-)-pinene synthase from Abies grandis.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, David C; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-07-15

    Two monoterpene synthases, (-)-pinene synthase and (-)-camphene synthase, from grand fir (Abies grandis) produce different product mixtures despite having highly homologous amino acid sequences and, presumably, very similar three-dimensional structures. The major product of (-)-camphene synthase, (-)-camphene, and the major products of (-)-pinene synthase, (-)-alpha-pinene, and (-)-beta-pinene, arise through distinct mechanistic variations of the electrophilic reaction cascade that is common to terpenoid synthases. Structural modeling followed by directed mutagenesis in (-)-pinene synthase was used to replace selected amino acid residues with the corresponding residues from (-)-camphene synthase in an effort to identify the amino acids responsible for the catalytic differences. This approach produced an enzyme in which more than half of the product was channeled through an alternative pathway. It was also shown that several (-)-pinene synthase to (-)-camphene synthase amino acid substitutions were necessary before catalysis was significantly altered. The data support a model in which the collective action of many key amino acids, located both in and distant from the active site pocket, regulate the course of the electrophilic reaction cascade.

  3. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  4. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  5. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  6. Cellulose synthase interacting protein: a new factor in cellulose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Somerville, Chris

    2010-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities.

  7. Abiotic stress induces change in Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) protein abundance and lignin deposition in developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sameer; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Arafat, Yasir Ali; Gupta, Sushim K; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-04-01

    Aboitic stress such as drought and salinity are class of major threats, which plants undergo through their lifetime. Lignin deposition is one of the responses to such abiotic stresses. The gene encoding Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis, which has been shown to be over-expressed under stress conditions. In the present study, developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala (Vernacular name: Subabul, White popinac) were treated with 1 % mannitol and 200 mM NaCl to mimic drought and salinity stress conditions, respectively. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) based expression pattern of CCR protein was monitored coupled with Phlorogucinol/HCl activity staining of lignin in transverse sections of developing L. leucocephala seedlings under stress. Our result suggests a differential lignification pattern in developing root and stem under stress conditions. Increase in lignification was observed in mannitol treated stems and corresponding CCR protein accumulation was also higher than control and salt stress treated samples. On the contrary CCR protein was lower in NaCl treated stems and corresponding lignin deposition was also low. Developing root tissue showed a high level of CCR content and lignin deposition than stem samples under all conditions tested. Overall result suggested that lignin accumulation was not affected much in case of developing root however developing stems were significantly affected under drought and salinity stress condition.

  8. Effect of various eicosanoid products of arachidonic acid on the acyl CoA: Cholesterol acyl transferase activity in three different mammalian cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, P.El.

    1988-01-01

    Acylcoenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes cholesterol ester synthesis intracellularly and has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. An in vitro assay has been adapted for determining ACAT activity from rat FU5AH hepatoma, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and rat thoracic aortic smooth muscle (RSM) cells. Formation of {sup 14}C-labelled cholesteryl oleate at 0 to 60 min {plus minus} cholesterol was determined; in the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT activity was approximately linear and surpassed the plateau observed in ACAT activity without cholesterol. Increasing exogenous cholesterol concentration, the amount of oleoyl CoA or the amount of microsomal protein produced a corresponding increase in ACAT activity, while ester formation was slightly increased by decreasing the ratio of Triton WR-1339 to cholesterol. Both the thromboxane A{sub 2} (TxA{sub 2}) mimic, U-44069, and the inflammatory lipoxygenase product, LTB{sub 4}, decreased optimal in vitro microsomal ACAT activity from RSM, but not form FU5AH, while CHO ACAT activity was suppressed by LTB{sub r} only. PGI{sub 2}, PGE{sub 2} and PGF{sub 2{alpha}} had minimal effects for each cell type.

  9. Sudden unexpected infant death (SUDI) in a newborn due to medium chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency with an unusual severe genotype

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Medium chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD) is the most common inborn error of fatty acid oxidation. This condition may lead to cellular energy shortage and cause severe clinical events such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye syndrome and sudden death. MCAD deficiency usually presents around three to six months of life, following catabolic stress as intercurrent infections or prolonged fasting, whilst neonatal-onset of the disease is quite rare. We report the case of an apparently healthy newborn who suddenly died at the third day of life, in which the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency was possible through peri-mortem blood-spot acylcarnitine analysis that showed very high concentrations of octanoylcarnitine. Genetic analysis at the ACADM locus confirmed the biochemical findings by demonstrating the presence in homozygosity of the frame-shift c.244dup1 (p.Trp82LeufsX23) mutation, a severe genotype that may explain the unusual and very early fatal outcome in this newborn. This report confirms that inborn errors of fatty acid oxidation represent one of the genetic causes of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy (SUDI) and underlines the importance to include systematically specific metabolic screening in any neonatal unexpected death. PMID:23095120

  10. Engineering Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii for enhanced propionic acid fermentation: effects of overexpressing propionyl-CoA:Succinate CoA transferase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Ammar, Ehab M; Zhang, An; Wang, Liqun; Lin, Meng; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii naturally forms propionic acid as the main fermentation product with acetate and succinate as two major by-products. In this study, overexpressing the native propionyl-CoA:succinate CoA transferase (CoAT) in P. shermanii was investigated to evaluate its effects on propionic acid fermentation with glucose, glycerol, and their mixtures as carbon source. In general, the mutant produced more propionic acid, with up to 10% increase in yield (0.62 vs. 0.56g/g) and 46% increase in productivity (0.41 vs. 0.28g/Lh), depending on the fermentation conditions. The mutant also produced less acetate and succinate, with the ratios of propionate to acetate (P/A) and succinate (P/S) in the final product increased 50% and 23%, respectively, in the co-fermentation of glucose/glycerol. Metabolic flux analysis elucidated that CoAT overexpression diverted more carbon fluxes toward propionic acid, resulting in higher propionic acid purity and a preference for glycerol over glucose as carbon source.

  11. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G.; Köllner, Tobias G.

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene–producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon–intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors. PMID:26936952

  12. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle.

    PubMed

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G; Köllner, Tobias G

    2016-03-15

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene-producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon-intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors.

  13. Inhibitory Effect on In Vitro LDL Oxidation and HMG Co-A Reductase Activity of the Liquid-Liquid Partitioned Fractions of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Persoon (Lion's Mane Mushroom)

    PubMed Central

    Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly suggested as the key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Mushrooms have been implicated in having preventive effects against chronic diseases due especially to their antioxidant properties. In this study, in vitro inhibitory effect of Hericium erinaceus on LDL oxidation and the activity of the cholesterol biosynthetic key enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase, was evaluated using five liquid-liquid solvent fractions consisting of methanol : dichloromethane (M : DCM), hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), and aqueous residue (AQ). The hexane fraction showed the highest inhibition of oxidation of human LDL as reflected by the increased lag time (100 mins) for the formation of conjugated diene (CD) at 1 µg/mL and decreased production (68.28%, IC50 0.73 mg/mL) of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1 mg/mL. It also mostly inhibited (59.91%) the activity of the HMG Co-A reductase at 10 mg/mL. The GC-MS profiling of the hexane fraction identified the presence of myconutrients: inter alia, ergosterol and linoleic acid. Thus, hexane fraction of Hericium erinaceus was found to be the most potent in vitro inhibitor of both LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity having therapeutic potential for the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated vascular diseases. PMID:24959591

  14. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthase by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    When microsomes of sheep or bovine seminal vesicles are incubated with [acetyl-3H]aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid), 200 Ci/mol, we observe acetylation of a single protein, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein has a molecular weight of 85,000 and corresponds to a similar acetylated protein found in the particulate fraction of aspirin-treated human platelets. The aspirin-mediated acetylation reaction proceeds with the same time course and at the same concentration as does the inhibition of prostaglandin synthase (cyclo-oxygenase) (EC 1.14.99.1; 8,11,14-eicosatrienoate, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase) by the drug. At 100 muM aspirin, 50% inhibition of prostaglandin synthase and 50% of maximal acetylation are observed after 15 min at 37 degrees. Furthermore, the substrate for cyclo-oxygenase, arachidonic acid, inhibits protein acetylation by aspirin at concentrations (50% inhibition at 10-30 muM) which correlate with the Michaelis constant of arachidonic acid as a substrate for cyclooxygenase. Arachidonic acid analogues and indomethacin inhibit the acetylation reaction in proportion to their effectiveness as cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. The results suggest that aspirin acts as an active-site acetylating agent for the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. This action of aspirin may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet action. PMID:810797

  15. Activities and regulation of peptidoglycan synthases.

    PubMed

    Egan, Alexander J F; Biboy, Jacob; van't Veer, Inge; Breukink, Eefjan; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-10-05

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component in the cell wall of nearly all bacteria, forming a continuous, mesh-like structure, called the sacculus, around the cytoplasmic membrane to protect the cell from bursting by its turgor. Although PG synthases, the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied for 70 years, useful in vitro assays for measuring their activities were established only recently, and these provided the first insights into the regulation of these enzymes. Here, we review the current knowledge on the glycosyltransferase and transpeptidase activities of PG synthases. We provide new data showing that the bifunctional PBP1A and PBP1B from Escherichia coli are active upon reconstitution into the membrane environment of proteoliposomes, and that these enzymes also exhibit DD-carboxypeptidase activity in certain conditions. Both novel features are relevant for their functioning within the cell. We also review recent data on the impact of protein-protein interactions and other factors on the activities of PBPs. As an example, we demonstrate a synergistic effect of multiple protein-protein interactions on the glycosyltransferase activity of PBP1B, by its cognate lipoprotein activator LpoB and the essential cell division protein FtsN.

  16. Argininosuccinate synthase: at the center of arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haines, Ricci J; Pendleton, Laura C; Eichler, Duane C

    2011-01-01

    The levels of L-arginine, a cationic, semi-essential amino acid, are often controlled within a cell at the level of local availability through biosynthesis. The importance of this temporal and spatial control of cellular L-arginine is highlighted by the tissue specific roles of argininosuccinate synthase (argininosuccinate synthetase) (EC 6.3.4.5), as the rate-limiting step in the conversion of L-citrulline to L-arginine. Since its discovery, the function of argininosuccinate synthase has been linked almost exclusively to hepatic urea production despite the fact that alternative pathways involving argininosuccinate synthase were defined, such as its role in providing arginine for creatine and for polyamine biosynthesis. However, it was the discovery of nitric oxide that meaningfully extended our understanding of the metabolic importance of non-hepatic argininosuccinate synthase. Indeed, our knowledge of the number of tissues that manage distinct pools of arginine under the control of argininosuccinate synthase has expanded significantly.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase Assays.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel; Frane, Nicole D; Brecht, Ryan M; Keeler, Jesse; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing is cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinate attacks on their hosts by inducing virulent gene expression, biofilm production, and other cellular functions, including antibiotic resistance. AHL synthase enzymes synthesize N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, commonly referred to as autoinducers, to facilitate quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. Studying the synthases, however, has proven to be a difficult road. Two assays, including a radiolabeled assay and a colorimetric (DCPIP) assay are well-documented in literature to study AHL synthases. In this paper, we describe additional methods that include an HPLC-based, C-S bond cleavage and coupled assays to investigate this class of enzymes. In addition, we compare and contrast each assay for both acyl-CoA- and acyl-ACP-utilizing synthases. The expanded toolkit described in this study should facilitate mechanistic studies on quorum sensing signal synthases and expedite discovery of antivirulent compounds.

  18. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5′-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  19. Functional Contribution of Chorismate Synthase, Anthranilate Synthase, and Chorismate Mutase to Penetration Resistance in Barley-Powdery Mildew Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant processes resulting from primary or secondary metabolism have been hypothesized to contribute to defense against microbial attack. Barley chorismate synthase (HvCS), anthranilate synthase alpha subunit 2 (HvASa2) and chorismate mutase 1 (HvCM1) occupy pivotal branch-points downstream of the s...

  20. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage.

    PubMed

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Komur, Baran; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders.

  1. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  2. HMG CoA reductase inhibitor-induced myotoxicity: pravastatin and lovastatin inhibit the geranylgeranylation of low-molecular-weight proteins in neonatal rat muscle cell culture.

    PubMed

    Flint, O P; Masters, B A; Gregg, R E; Durham, S K

    1997-07-01

    In previous studies, inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (HMGRI) was associated with myotoxicity in cultures of neonatal rat skeletal myotubes, and rhabdomyolysis in rats, rabbits, and humans in vivo. In vitro myotoxicity was directly related to HMGRI-induced depletion of mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol, since supplementation with these intermediate metabolites abrogated the toxicity. Both farnesol and geranylgeraniol are required for the posttranslational modification, or isoprenylation, of essential regulatory proteins in mammalian cells. The objective of the present study was to measure changes in protein isoprenylation in cultured neonatal rat skeletal muscle cells exposed for 24 hr to increasing concentrations of pravastatin or lovastatin. Proteins were labeled with [3H]mevalonate, [3H]farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), or [3H]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), and then separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by scintillation counting and densitometry of autoradiographs. Mevalonate and FPP labeling of the majority of proteins increased in a concentration-dependent manner, even at concentrations greater than 2 microM lovastatin and 25 microM pravastatin that completely inhibited cholesterol synthesis. In contrast, mevalonate and FPP labeling of three protein bands with molecular weights of 26.6, 27.7, and 28.9 kDa was markedly inhibited at concentrations higher than 1 microM lovastatin and 400 microM pravastatin, which inhibited protein synthesis and disrupted myotube morphology after longer exposures in a previous study. In contrast, these proteins were equally well labeled by GGPP at all HMGRI concentrations tested, suggesting that isoprenylation of the 26.9-, 27.8-, and 28.9-kDa proteins requires geranylgeraniol. The results of this study indicate that HMGRI-induced myotoxicity is most likely related to reduced posttranslational modification of specific regulatory proteins by geranylgeraniol.

  3. Down-regulation of Leucaena leucocephala cinnamoyl CoA reductase (LlCCR) gene induces significant changes in phenotype, soluble phenolic pools and lignin in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Prashant, S; Srilakshmi Sunita, M; Pramod, S; Gupta, Ranadheer K; Anil Kumar, S; Rao Karumanchi, S; Rawal, S K; Kavi Kishor, P B

    2011-12-01

    cDNA and genomic clones of cinnamoyl CoA reductase measuring 1011 and 2992 bp were isolated from a leguminous pulpwood tree Leucaena leucocephala, named as LlCCR. The cDNA exhibited 80-85% homology both at the nucleotide and amino acid levels with other known sequences. The genomic sequence contained five exons and four introns. Sense and antisense constructs of LlCCR were introduced in tobacco plants to up and down-regulate this key enzyme of lignification. The primary transformants showed a good correlation between CCR transcript levels and its activity. Most of the CCR down-regulated lines displayed stunted growth and development, wrinkled leaves and delayed senescence. These lines accumulated unusual phenolics like ferulic and sinapic acids in cell wall. Histochemical staining suggested reduction in aldehyde units and increased syringyl over guaiacyl (S/G) ratio of lignin. Anatomical studies showed thin walled, elongated xylem fibres, collapsed vessels with drastic reduction of secondary xylem. The transmission electron microscopic studies revealed modification of ultrastructure and topochemical distribution of wall polysaccharides and lignin in the xylem fibres. CCR down-regulated lines showed increased thickness of secondary wall layers and poor lignification of S2 and S3 wall layers. The severely down-regulated line AS17 exhibited 24.7% reduction of Klason lignin with an increase of 15% holocellulose content. Contrarily, the CCR up-regulated lines exhibited robust growth, development and significant increase in lignin content. The altered lignin profiles observed in transgenic tobacco lines support a role for CCR down-regulation in improving wood properties of L. leucocephala exclusively used in the pulp and paper industry of India.

  4. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2012-03-31

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT‐encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T‐DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol‐localized, mevalonate‐derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  5. Conversion of anthranilate synthase into isochorismate synthase: implications for the evolution of chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Plach, Maximilian G; Löffler, Patrick; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2015-09-14

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes play a vital role in the biosynthesis of metabolites in plants as well as free-living and infectious microorganisms. Among these enzymes are the homologous primary metabolic anthranilate synthase (AS) and secondary metabolic isochorismate synthase (ICS). Both catalyze mechanistically related reactions by using ammonia and water as nucleophiles, respectively. We report that the nucleophile specificity of AS can be extended from ammonia to water by just two amino acid exchanges in a channel leading to the active site. The observed ICS/AS bifunctionality demonstrates that a secondary metabolic enzyme can readily evolve from a primary metabolic enzyme without requiring an initial gene duplication event. In a general sense, these findings add to our understanding how nature has used the structurally predetermined features of enzyme superfamilies to evolve new reactions.

  6. Identification of cystathionine γ-synthase and threonine synthase from Cicer arietinum and Lens culinaris.

    PubMed

    Morneau, Dominique J K; Jaworski, Allison F; Aitken, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    In plants, cystathionine γ-synthase (CGS) and threonine synthase (TS) compete for the branch-point metabolite O-phospho-L-homoserine. These enzymes are potential targets for metabolic engineering studies, aiming to alter the flux through the competing methionine and threonine biosynthetic pathways, with the goal of increasing methionine production. Although CGS and TS have been characterized in the model organisms Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, little information is available on these enzymes in other, particularly plant, species. The functional CGS and TS coding sequences from the grain legumes Cicer arietinum (chickpea) and Lens culinaris (lentil) identified in this study share approximately 80% amino acid sequence identity with the corresponding sequences from Glycine max. At least 7 active-site residues of grain legume CGS and TS are conserved in the model bacterial enzymes, including the catalytic base. Putative processing sites that remove the targeting sequence and result in functional TS were identified in the target species.

  7. Ligand binding at the A-cluster in full-length or truncated acetyl-CoA synthase studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schrapers, Peer; Ilina, Julia; Gregg, Christina M.; Mebs, Stefan; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria integrate CO2 reduction and acetyl coenzyme-A (CoA) synthesis in the Wood-Ljungdal pathway. The acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) active site is a [4Fe4S]-[NiNi] complex (A-cluster). The dinickel site structure (with proximal, p, and distal, d, ions) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in ACS variants comprising all three protein domains or only the C-terminal domain with the A-cluster. Both variants showed two square-planar Ni(II) sites and an OH- bound at Ni(II)p in oxidized enzyme and a H2O at Ni(I)p in reduced enzyme; a Ni(I)p-CO species was induced by CO incubation and a Ni(II)-CH3- species with an additional water ligand by a methyl group donor. These findings render a direct effect of the N-terminal and middle domains on the A-cluster structure unlikely. PMID:28178309

  8. Ligand binding at the A-cluster in full-length or truncated acetyl-CoA synthase studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schrapers, Peer; Ilina, Julia; Gregg, Christina M; Mebs, Stefan; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dau, Holger; Dobbek, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria integrate CO2 reduction and acetyl coenzyme-A (CoA) synthesis in the Wood-Ljungdal pathway. The acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) active site is a [4Fe4S]-[NiNi] complex (A-cluster). The dinickel site structure (with proximal, p, and distal, d, ions) was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in ACS variants comprising all three protein domains or only the C-terminal domain with the A-cluster. Both variants showed two square-planar Ni(II) sites and an OH- bound at Ni(II)p in oxidized enzyme and a H2O at Ni(I)p in reduced enzyme; a Ni(I)p-CO species was induced by CO incubation and a Ni(II)-CH3- species with an additional water ligand by a methyl group donor. These findings render a direct effect of the N-terminal and middle domains on the A-cluster structure unlikely.

  9. Key enzymes for biosynthesis of neutral lipid storage compounds in prokaryotes: properties, function and occurrence of wax ester synthases/acyl-CoA: diacylglycerol acyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Wältermann, Marc; Stöveken, Tim; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) and wax esters (WEs) are beside polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) important storage lipids in some groups of prokaryotes. Accumulation of these lipids occurs in cells when they are cultivated under conditions of unbalanced growth in the presence of high concentrations of a suitable carbon source, which can be used for fatty acid and storage lipid biosyntheses. The key enzymes, which mediate both WE and TAG formations from long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) as acyl donor and long-chain fatty alcohols or diacylglycerols as respective acyl acceptors in bacteria, are WE synthases/acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferases (WS/DGATs). The WS/DGATs identified so far represent rather unspecific enzymes with broad spectra of possible substrates; this makes them interesting for many biotechnological applications. This review traces the molecular structure and biochemical properties including the probable regions responsible for acyltransferase properties, enzymatic activity and substrate specifities. The phylogenetic relationships based on amino acid sequence similarities of this unique class of enzymes were revealed. Furthermore, recent advances in understanding the physiological functions of WS/DGATs in their natural hosts including pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis were discussed.

  10. Novel domain arrangement in the crystal structure of a truncated acetyl-CoA synthase fromMoorella thermoacetica†‡

    PubMed Central

    Volbeda, Anne; Darnault, Claudine; Tan, Xiangshi; Lindahl, Paul A.; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Ni-dependent Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and CO dehydrogenase (CODH) constitute the central enzyme complex of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetyl-CoA formation. The crystal structure of a recombinant bacterial ACS lacking the N-terminal domain that interacts with CODH shows a large reorganization of the remaining two globular domains, producing a narrow cleft of suitable size, shape and nature to bind CoA. Sequence comparisons with homologous archaeal enzymes that naturally lack the N-terminal domain show that many amino acids lining this cleft are conserved. Besides the typical [4Fe-4S] center, the A-cluster contains only one proximal metal ion that, according to anomalous scattering data, is most likely Cu or Zn. Incorporation of a functional Ni2Fe4S4 A-cluster would require only minor structural rearrangements. Using available structures, a plausible model of the interaction between CODH and the smaller ACS in archaeal multi-enzyme complexes is presented, along with a discussion of evolutionary relationships of the archaeal and bacterial enzymes. PMID:19650626

  11. Heterologous expression in Saccharopolyspora erythraea of a pentaketide synthase derived from the spinosyn polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christine J; Timoney, Máire C; Sheridan, Rose M; Kendrew, Steven G; Wilkinson, Barrie; Staunton, James C; Leadlay, Peter F

    2003-12-07

    A truncated version of the spinosyn polyketide synthase comprising the loading module and the first four extension modules fused to the erythromycin thioesterase domain was expressed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A novel pentaketide lactone product was isolated, identifying cryptic steps of spinosyn biosynthesis and indicating the potential of this approach for the biosynthetic engineering of spinosyn analogues. A pathway for the formation of the tetracyclic spinosyn aglycone is proposed.

  12. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  13. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Sridhar, Arun; Györke, Sandor; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two NOS isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of NOS 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for NOS in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of NOS activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed. PMID:22536189

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T.C. Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T.; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S.; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO) - a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  16. A Single Amino Acid Substitution Converts Benzophenone Synthase into Phenylpyrone Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Klundt, Tim; Bocola, Marco; Lütge, Maren; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    Benzophenone metabolism provides a number of plant natural products with fascinating chemical structures and intriguing pharmacological activities. Formation of the carbon skeleton of benzophenone derivatives from benzoyl-CoA and three molecules of malonyl-CoA is catalyzed by benzophenone synthase (BPS), a member of the superfamily of type III polyketide synthases. A point mutation in the active site cavity (T135L) transformed BPS into a functional phenylpyrone synthase (PPS). The dramatic change in both substrate and product specificities of BPS was rationalized by homology modeling. The mutation may open a new pocket that accommodates the phenyl moiety of the triketide intermediate but limits polyketide elongation to two reactions, resulting in phenylpyrone formation. 3-Hydroxybenzoyl-CoA is the second best starter molecule for BPS but a poor substrate for PPS. The aryl moiety of the triketide intermediate may be trapped in the new pocket by hydrogen bond formation with the backbone, thereby acting as an inhibitor. PPS is a promising biotechnological tool for manipulating benzoate-primed biosynthetic pathways to produce novel compounds. PMID:19710020

  17. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  18. Enhanced gastric nitric oxide synthase activity in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Karmeli, F; Eliakim, R; Stalnikowicz, R; Ackerman, Z; Amir, G; Stamler, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide, the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may have a role in tissue injury through its oxidative metabolism. Nitric oxide may have a role in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the association between gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and peptic disease. In this study, calcium independent nitric oxide synthase activity was detected in human gastric mucosa suggesting expression of the inducible isoform. In 17 duodenal ulcer patients gastric antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity was found to be two and 1.5-fold respectively higher than its activity in the antrum and fundus of 14 normal subjects (p < 0.05). H pylori was detected in the antrum of 15 of 17 duodenal ulcer patients and only in 7 of 14 of the control subjects. Antral nitric oxide synthase activity in H pylori positive duodenal ulcer patients was twofold higher than in H pylori positive normal subjects (p < 0.05). In duodenal ulcer patients antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity resumed normal values after induction of ulcer healing with ranitidine. Eradication of H pylori did not further affect gastric nitric oxide synthase activity. These findings suggest that in duodenal ulcer patients stimulated gastric mucosal nitric oxide synthase activity, though independent of the H pylori state, may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:7525417

  19. Purification and Characterization of Chorismate Synthase from Euglena gracilis 1

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Andreas; van Afferden, Manfred; Windhofer, Volker; Bülow, Sven; Abel, Gernot; Schmid, Jürg; Amrhein, Nikolaus

    1991-01-01

    Chorismate synthase was purified 1200-fold from Euglena gracilis. The molecular mass of the native enzyme is in the range of 110 to 138 kilodaltons as judged by gel filtration. The molecular mass of the subunit was determined to be 41.7 kilodaltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified chorismate synthase is associated with an NADPH-dependent flavin mononucleotide reductase that provides in vivo the reduced flavin necessary for catalytic activity. In vitro, flavin reduction can be mediated by either dithionite or light. The enzyme obtained from E. gracilis was compared with chorismate synthases purified from a higher plant (Corydalis sempervirens), a bacterium (Escherichia coli), and a fungus (Neurospora crassa). These four chorismate synthases were found to be very similar in terms of cofactor specificity, kinetic properties, isoelectric points, and pH optima. All four enzymes react with polyclonal antisera directed against chorismate synthases from C. sempervirens and E. coli. The closely associated flavin mononucleotide reductase that is present in chorismate synthase preparations from E. gracilis and N. crassa is the main difference between those synthases and the monofunctional enzymes from C. sempervirens and E. coli. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668543

  20. Regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M A; Homann, M J; Bae-Lee, M S; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells resulted in a reduction of membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) activity in cell extracts. The reduction of activity did not occur when inositol was absent from the growth medium. Under the growth conditions where a reduction of enzyme activity occurred, there was a corresponding qualitative reduction of enzyme subunit as determined by immunoblotting with antiserum raised against purified phosphatidylserine synthase. Water-soluble phospholipid precursors did not effect purified phosphatidylserine synthase activity. Phosphatidylserine synthase (activity and enzyme subunit) was not regulated by the availability of water-soluble phospholipid precursors in S. cerevisiae VAL2C(YEp CHO1) and the opi1 mutant. VAL2C(YEp CHO1) is a plasmid-bearing strain that over produces phosphatidylserine synthase activity, and the opi1 mutant is an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant. The results of this study suggest that the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase by the availability of phospholipid precursors occurs at the level of enzyme formation and not at the enzyme activity level. Furthermore, the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase is coupled to inositol synthesis. Images PMID:3023284

  1. Subcellular localization of the homocitrate synthase in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, O; Casqueiro, J; Steidl, S; Gutiérrez, S; Brakhage, A; Martín, J F

    2002-01-01

    There are conflicting reports regarding the cellular localization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and filamentous fungi of homocitrate synthase, the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway. The homocitrate synthase (HS) gene (lys1) of Penicillium chrysogenum was disrupted in three transformants (HS(-)) of the Wis 54-1255 pyrG strain. The three mutants named HS1(-), HS2(-) and HS3(-) all lacked homocitrate synthase activity and showed lysine auxotrophy, indicating that there is a single gene for homocitrate synthase in P. chrysogenum. The lys1 ORF was fused in frame to the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. Homocitrate synthase-deficient mutants transformed with a plasmid containing the lys1-GFP fusion recovered prototrophy and showed similar levels of homocitrate synthase activity to the parental strain Wis 54-1255, indicating that the hybrid protein retains the biological function of wild-type homocitrate synthase. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the HS-GFP fusion protein is maintained intact and does not release the GFP moiety. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of the transformants showed that homocitrate synthase was mainly located in the cytoplasm in P. chrysogenum; in S. cerevisiae the enzyme is targeted to the nucleus. The control nuclear protein StuA was properly targeted to the nucleus when the StuA (targeting domain)-GFP hybrid protein was expressed in P. chrysogenum. The difference in localization of homocitrate synthase between P. chrysogenum and S. cerevisiae suggests that this protein may play a regulatory function, in addition to its catalytic function, in S. cerevisiae but not in P. chrysogenum.

  2. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase in CAM plants.

    PubMed

    Zafra, M F; Segovia, J L; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1981-12-01

    Citrate synthase wa studied for the first time in peroxisomes and mitochondria of crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Cellular organelles were isolated from Agave americana leaves by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and characterized by the use of catalase and cytochrome oxidase as marker enzymes, respectively. 48,000 X g centrifugation caused the breakdown of the cellular organelles. The presence of a glyoxylate cycle enzyme (citrate synthase) and a glycollate pathway enzyme (catalase) in the same organelles, besides the absence of another glyoxalate cycle enzyme (malate synthase) is reported for the first time, suggesting that peroxisomal and glyoxysomal proteins are synthesized at the same time and housed in he same organelle.

  3. Geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from Methanosarcina mazei: Different role, different evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2010-02-26

    The gene of (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase that is responsible for the biosynthesis of methanophenazine, an electron carrier utilized for methanogenesis, was cloned from a methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Goe1. The properties of the recombinant enzyme and the results of phylogenetic analysis suggest that the enzyme is closely related to (all-E) prenyl diphosphate synthases that are responsible for the biosynthesis of respiratory quinones, rather than to the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, including (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from a thermophilic archaeon.

  4. O-Nucleoside, S-Nucleoside, and N-Nucleoside Probes of Lumazine Synthase and Riboflavin Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Arindam; Zhao, Yujie; Lv, Wei; Bacher, Adelbert; Illarionov, Boris; Fischer, Markus; Cushman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Lumazine synthase catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of riboflavin, while riboflavin synthase catalyzes the last step. O-Nucleoside, S-nucleoside and N-nucleoside analogues of hypothetical lumazine biosynthetic intermediates have been synthesized in order to obtain structure and mechanism probes of these two enzymes, as well as inhibitors of potential value as antibiotics. Methods were devised for the selective cleavage of benzyl protecting groups in the presence of other easily reduced functionality by controlled hydrogenolysis over Lindlar catalyst. The deprotection reaction was performed in the presence of other reactive functionality including nitro groups, alkenes, and halogens. The target compounds were tested as inhibitors of lumazine synthase and riboflavin synthase obtained from a variety of microorganisms. In general, the S-nucleosides and N-nucleosides were more potent than the corresponding O-nucleosides as lumazine synthase and riboflavin synthase inhibitors, while the C-nucleosides were the least potent. A series of molecular dynamics simulations followed by free energy calculations using the Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (MM-PBSA) method were carried out in order to rationalize the results of ligand binding to lumazine synthase, and the results provide insight into the dynamics of ligand binding as well as the molecular forces stabilizing the intermediates in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. PMID:22780198

  5. Representing COA with Probabilistic Ontologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    in utility measures, may be combined with probabilities (RUSSEL; NORVIG , 2002). Ontologies have been proposed as a tool to better express a domain...all non mentioned literals are unknown (RUSSEL; NORVIG , 2002) and must be described in the context nodes. Thus, all available information should be...Information Systems: Meeting the Challenge of the Knowledge Era. : Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996. 183 p. RUSSEL, S.; NORVIG , P. Artificial

  6. First evidence of C- and O-glycosyl flavone in blood orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) juice and their influence on antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Davide; Bellocco, Ersilia; Leuzzi, Ugo; Gattuso, Giuseppe

    2014-04-15

    RP-LC-DAD-ESI-MS-MS separation/identification protocol has been employed for the identification and characterisation of nine C- and O-glycosyl flavonoids in Moro (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) juice grown in Southern Italy. For the first time we reported the presence of five C-glycosyl flavones (lucenin-2, vicenin-2, stellarin-2, lucenin-2 4'-methyl ether and scoparin), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl glycosyl flavonol (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl glycosyl quercetin) and a flavone O-glycosides (chrysoeriol 7-O-neoesperidoside). Moreover, the influence of the identified C- and O-glycosyl flavonoids on the total antioxidant activity of crude juice has been evaluated on the basis of its ability to scavenge DPPH•, OH• and ABTS•+ radicals and to reduce iron.

  7. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas A.; O'Keeffe, Kayleigh R.; D'Aquila, Theresa; Yan, Qing Wu; Griffin, John D.; Killion, Elizabeth A.; Salter, Deanna M.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Greenberg, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ACSL isoforms. In vitro studies have suggested a role for ACSL5 in triglyceride synthesis; however, we have limited understanding of the in vivo actions of this ACSL isoform. Methods To elucidate the in vivo actions of ACSL5 we generated a line of mice in which ACSL5 expression was ablated in all tissues (ACSL5−/−). Results Ablation of ACSL5 reduced ACSL activity by ∼80% in jejunal mucosa, ∼50% in liver, and ∼37% in brown adipose tissue lysates. Body composition studies revealed that ACSL5−/−, as compared to control ACSL5loxP/loxP, mice had significantly reduced fat mass and adipose fat pad weights. Indirect calorimetry studies demonstrated that ACSL5−/− had increased metabolic rates, and in the dark phase, increased respiratory quotient. In ACSL5−/− mice, fasting glucose and serum triglyceride were reduced; and insulin sensitivity was improved during an insulin tolerance test. Both hepatic mRNA (∼16-fold) and serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) (∼13-fold) were increased in ACSL5−/− as compared to ACSL5loxP/loxP. Consistent with increased FGF21 serum levels, uncoupling protein-1 gene (Ucp1) and PPAR-gamma coactivator 1-alpha gene (Pgc1α) transcript levels were increased in gonadal adipose tissue. To further evaluate ACSL5 function in intestine, mice were gavaged with an olive oil bolus; and the rate of triglyceride appearance in serum was found to be delayed in ACSL5−/− mice as compared to control mice. Conclusions In summary, ACSL5−/− mice have increased hepatic and serum FGF21 levels, reduced adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure and delayed triglyceride absorption. These studies

  8. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F; Kady, Ismail O

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase.

  9. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  10. Rare structural variants of human and murine uroporphyrinogen I synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.; Carter, M.L.C.

    1980-05-01

    An isoelectric focusing method for detection of structural variants of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthase (porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8) in mammalian tissues has been developed. Mouse and human erythrocytes contain one or two major isozymes of uroporphyrinogen I synthase, respectively. Other tissues contain a set of more acidic isozymes that are encoded by the same structural gene as the erythrocyte isozymes. Mouse populations studied with this method were monomorphic for uroporphyrinogen I synthase, with the exception of one feral mouse population. The pedigree of a human family with a rare structural variant is consistent with autosomal linkage of the structural gene. This system provides a convenient isozyme marker for genetic studies and will facilitate determination of the chromosomal location of the uroporphyrinogen I synthase locus.

  11. Biosynthesis of riboflavin: an unusual riboflavin synthase of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, S; Korn, S; Lottspeich, F; Bacher, A

    1997-01-01

    Riboflavin synthase was purified by a factor of about 1,500 from cell extract of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. The enzyme had a specific activity of about 2,700 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, which is relatively low compared to those of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Amino acid sequences obtained after proteolytic cleavage had no similarity with known riboflavin synthases. The gene coding for riboflavin synthase (designated ribC) was subsequently cloned by marker rescue with a ribC mutant of Escherichia coli. The ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum specifies a protein of 153 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence agrees with the information gleaned from Edman degradation of the isolated protein and shows 67% identity with the sequence predicted for the unannotated reading frame MJ1184 of Methanococcus jannaschii. The ribC gene is adjacent to a cluster of four genes with similarity to the genes cbiMNQO of Salmonella typhimurium, which form part of the cob operon (this operon contains most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin B12). The amino acid sequence predicted by the ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum shows no similarity whatsoever to the sequences of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Most notably, the M. thermoautotrophicum protein does not show the internal sequence homology characteristic of eubacterial and yeast riboflavin synthases. The protein of M. thermoautotrophicum can be expressed efficiently in a recombinant E. coli strain. The specific activity of the purified, recombinant protein is 1,900 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C. In contrast to riboflavin synthases from eubacteria and fungi, the methanobacterial enzyme has an absolute requirement for magnesium ions. The 5' phosphate of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine does not act as a substrate. The findings suggest that riboflavin synthase has evolved independently in eubacteria and methanobacteria. PMID:9139911

  12. Alendronate is a specific, nanomolar inhibitor of farnesyl diphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, J D; Bostedor, R G; Masarachia, P J; Reszka, A A; Rodan, G

    2000-01-01

    Alendronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption used for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. Recent findings suggest that alendronate and other N-containing bisphosphonates inhibit the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway and interfere with protein prenylation, as a result of reduced geranylgeranyl diphosphate levels. This study identified farnesyl disphosphate synthase as the mevalonate pathway enzyme inhibited by bisphosphonates. HPLC analysis of products from a liver cytosolic extract narrowed the potential targets for alendronate inhibition (IC(50) = 1700 nM) to isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Recombinant human farnesyl diphosphate synthase was inhibited by alendronate with an IC(50) of 460 nM (following 15 min preincubation). Alendronate did not inhibit isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase or GGPP synthase, partially purified from liver cytosol. Recombinant farnesyl diphosphate synthase was also inhibited by pamidronate (IC(50) = 500 nM) and risedronate (IC(50) = 3.9 nM), negligibly by etidronate (IC50 = 80 microM), and not at all by clodronate. In osteoclasts, alendronate inhibited the incorporation of [(3)H]mevalonolactone into proteins of 18-25 kDa and into nonsaponifiable lipids, including sterols. These findings (i) identify farnesyl diphosphate synthase as the selective target of alendronate in the mevalonate pathway, (ii) show that this enzyme is inhibited by other N-containing bisphosphonates, such as risendronate, but not by clodronate, supporting a different mechanism of action for different bisphosphonates, and (iii) document in purified osteoclasts alendronate inhibition of prenylation and sterol biosynthesis.

  13. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  14. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  15. Concerted versus Stepwise Mechanism in Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) catalyzes the intracellular de novo formation of thymidylate (a DNA building block) in most living organisms, making it a common target for chemotherapeutic and antibiotic drugs. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the rate-limiting hydride transfer step in TSase catalysis: a stepwise mechanism in which the hydride transfer precedes the cleavage of the covalent bond between the enzymatic cysteine and the product and a mechanism where both happen concertedly. Striking similarities between the enzyme-bound enolate intermediates formed in the initial and final step of the reaction supported the first mechanism, while QM/MM calculations favored the concerted mechanism. Here, we experimentally test these two possibilities using secondary kinetic isotope effect (KIE), mutagenesis study, and primary KIEs. The findings support the concerted mechanism and demonstrate the critical role of an active site arginine in substrate binding, activation of enzymatic nucleophile, and the hydride transfer studied here. The elucidation of this reduction/substitution sheds light on the critical catalytic step in TSase and may aid future drug or biomimetic catalyst design. PMID:24949852

  16. Nitric oxide synthase in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    López-Figueroa, M O; Møller, M

    1996-10-01

    The recent discovery of nitric oxide (NO) as a biological messenger molecule with unique characteristics has opened a new field in pineal research. This free radical gas is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from L-arginine. The activation of adrenoreceptors in the membrane of the pinealocytes mediates the increase in NO through a mechanism that involves G proteins. In the pinealocyte, NO stimulates guanylyl cyclase resulting in an increased intracellular content of cGMP. The role of cGMP in pineal metabolism, however, is still enigmatic. Using enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, the presence of NOS has been confirmed in the pineal gland of some species. In the rat and especially in the sheep, NOS is located in nerve fibres innervating the gland. These nerve fibres also contain the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), and are probably of parasympathetic origin. In cell cultures and tissue sections NOS immunoreactivity has been shown to be present in pinealocytes of the rat and bovine but not in the sheep. Finally, NOS is also present in the endothelial cells of the blood vessels of the pineal gland. Accordingly, in the mammalian pineal gland, NO is synthesized in both presynaptic nerve fibers and pinealocytes, as well as in blood vessels. However, the anatomical location of NO synthesis varies considerably among species. NO released in the pineal gland, might influence both the pineal metabolism and the blood flow of the gland.

  17. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  18. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in the myocard.

    PubMed

    Buchwalow, I B; Schulze, W; Karczewski, P; Kostic, M M; Wallukat, G; Morwinski, R; Krause, E G; Müller, J; Paul, M; Slezak, J; Luft, F C; Haller, H

    2001-01-01

    Recognition of significance of nitric oxide synthases (NOS) in cardiovascular regulations has led to intensive research and development of therapies focused on NOS as potential therapeutic targets. However, the NOS isoform profile of cardiac tissue and subcellular localization of NOS isoforms remain a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of an inducible NOS isoform (NOS2) in cardiomyocytes. Employing a novel immunocytochemical technique of a catalyzed reporter deposition system with tyramide and electron microscopical immunocytochemistry complemented with Western blotting and RT-PCR, we detected NOS2 both in rat neonatal and adult cultured cardiomyocytes and in the normal myocard of adult rats as well as in the human myocard of patients with dilative cardiomyopathy. NOS2 was targeted predominantly to a particulate component of the cardiomyocyte--along contractile fibers, in the plasma membrane including T-tubules, as well as in the nuclear envelope, mitochondria and Golgi complex. Our results point to an involvement of NOS2 in maintaining cardiac homeostasis and contradict to the notion that NOS2 is expressed in cardiac tissue only in response to various physiological and pathogenic factors. NOS2 targeting to mitochondria and contractile fibers suggests a relationship of NO with contractile function and energy production in the cardiac muscle.

  20. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism.

  1. Structures of human constitutive nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiying; Jamal, Joumana; Plaza, Carla; Pineda, Stephanie Hai; Chreifi, Georges; Jing, Qing; Cinelli, Maris A.; Silverman, Richard B.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals produce three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS): neuronal NOS (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The overproduction of NO by nNOS is associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders; therefore, a desirable therapeutic goal is the design of drugs that target nNOS but not the other isoforms. Crystallography, coupled with computational approaches and medicinal chemistry, has played a critical role in developing highly selective nNOS inhibitors that exhibit exceptional neuroprotective properties. For historic reasons, crystallography has focused on rat nNOS and bovine eNOS because these were available in high quality; thus, their structures have been used in structure–activity–relationship studies. Although these constitutive NOSs share more than 90% sequence identity across mammalian species for each NOS isoform, inhibitor-binding studies revealed that subtle differences near the heme active site in the same NOS isoform across species still impact enzyme–inhibitor interactions. Therefore, structures of the human constitutive NOSs are indispensible. Here, the first structure of human neuronal NOS at 2.03 Å resolution is reported and a different crystal form of human endothelial NOS is reported at 1.73 Å resolution. PMID:25286850

  2. Structure of Leishmania major cysteine synthase

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Paul K.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Ramos, Tania; Müller, Sylke; Coombs, Graham H.; Hunter, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine biosynthesis is a potential target for drug development against parasitic Leishmania species; these protozoa are responsible for a range of serious diseases. To improve understanding of this aspect of Leishmania biology, a crystallographic and biochemical study of L. major cysteine synthase has been undertaken, seeking to understand its structure, enzyme activity and modes of inhibition. Active enzyme was purified, assayed and crystallized in an orthorhombic form with a dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data extending to 1.8 Å resolution were measured and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. A fragment of γ-poly-d-glutamic acid, a constituent of the crystallization mixture, was bound in the enzyme active site. Although a d-­glutamate tetrapeptide had insignificant inhibitory activity, the enzyme was competitively inhibited (K i = 4 µM) by DYVI, a peptide based on the C-­terminus of the partner serine acetyltransferase with which the enzyme forms a complex. The structure surprisingly revealed that the cofactor pyridoxal phosphate had been lost during crystallization. PMID:22750854

  3. Anthranilate synthase subunit organization in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Carminatti, C A; Oliveira, I L; Recouvreux, D O S; Antônio, R V; Porto, L M

    2008-09-16

    Tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid used for protein synthesis and cellular growth. Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 uses two tryptophan molecules to synthesize violacein, a secondary metabolite of pharmacological interest. The genome analysis of this bacterium revealed that the genes trpA-F and pabA-B encode the enzymes of the tryptophan pathway in which the first reaction is the conversion of chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase (AS), an enzyme complex. In the present study, the organization and structure of AS protein subunits from C. violaceum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools available on the Web. We showed by calculating molecular masses that AS in C. violaceum is composed of alpha (TrpE) and beta (PabA) subunits. This is in agreement with values determined experimentally. Catalytic and regulatory sites of the AS subunits were identified. The TrpE and PabA subunits contribute to the catalytic site while the TrpE subunit is involved in the allosteric site. Protein models for the TrpE and PabA subunits were built by restraint-based homology modeling using AS enzyme, chains A and B, from Salmonella typhimurium (PDB ID 1I1Q).

  4. Identifying statin-associated autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Albayda, Jemima; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Statins up-regulate expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis and the major target of autoantibodies in statin-associated immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. As muscle cells regenerate, they express high levels of HMGCR, which may sustain the immune response even after statin therapy is stopped. Awareness of this entity will help physicians who prescribe statins to take action to limit the associated morbidity.

  5. Effect of chronologic age on induction of cystathionine synthase, uroporphyrinogen I synthase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gartler, S M; Hornung, S K; Motulsky, A G

    1981-01-01

    The activities of cystathionine synthase [L-serine hydro-lyase (adding homocysteine), EC 4.2.1.22], uroporphyrinogen I synthase [porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8], and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49) have been measured in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes of young and old human subjects. A significant decrease in activity with age was observed for cystathionine synthase and uroporphyrinogen I synthase but not for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. These changes could not be related to declining phytohemagglutinin response with aging. Age-related decreases in activity of some enzymes may be relevant for an understanding of the biology of aging. False assignment of heterozygosity, and even homozygosity, for certain genetic disorders, such as homocystinuria, may result when low enzyme levels are detected in the lymphocytes of older people. PMID:6940198

  6. Genetic Construction of Truncated and Chimeric Metalloproteins Derived from the Alpha Subunit of Acetyl-CoA Synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Huay-Keng Loke; Xiangshi Tan; Paul A. Lindahl

    2002-06-28

    In this study, a genetics-based method is used to truncate acetyl-coenzyme A synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum (ACS), an alpha2beta2 tetrameric 310 kda bifunctional enzyme. ACS catalyzes the reversible reduction of CO2 to CO and the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO (or CO2 in the presence of low-potential reductants), CoA, and a methyl group bound to a corrinoid-iron sulfur protein (CoFeSP). ACS contains 7 metal-sulfur clusters of 4 different types called A, B, C, and D. The B, C, and D clusters are located in the 72 kda beta subunit while the A-cluster, a Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster that serves as the active site for acetyl-CoA synthase activity, is located in the 82 kda alpha subunit. The extent to which the essential properties of the cluster, including catalytic, redox, spectroscopic, and substrate-binding properties, were retained as ACS was progressively truncated was determined. Acetyl-CoA synthase catalytic activity remained when the entire alpha subunit was removed, as long as CO, rather than CO2 and a low-potential reductant, was used as a substrate. Truncating an {approx} 30 kda region from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit yielded a 49 kda protein that lacked catalytic activity but exhibited A-cluster-like spectroscopic, redox, and CO binding properties. Further truncation afforded a 23 kda protein that lacked recognizable A-cluster properties except for UV-vis spectra typical of [Fe4S4]2+ clusters. Two chimeric proteins were constructed by fusing the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum to genes encoding the 49 kda and 82 kda fragments of the alpha subunit. The chimeric proteins exhibited EPR signals that were not the simple sum of the signals from the separate proteins, suggesting magnetic interactions between clusters. This study highlights the potential for using genetics to simplify the study of complex multi-centered metalloenzymes and to generate new complex metalloenzymes with interesting properties.

  7. Functional analysis of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SS) in sugarcane (Saccharum) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Verma, A K; Upadhyay, S K; Verma, P C; Solomon, S; Singh, S B

    2011-03-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) and sucrose synthase (SS; EC 2.4.1.13) are key enzymes in the synthesis and breakdown of sucrose in sugarcane. The activities of internodal SPS and SS, as well as transcript expression were determined using semi-quantitative RT-PCR at different developmental stages of high and low sucrose accumulating sugarcane cultivars. SPS activity and transcript expression was higher in mature internodes compared with immature internodes in all the studied cultivars. However, high sugar cultivars showed increased transcript expression and enzyme activity of SPS compared to low sugar cultivars at all developmental stages. SS activity was higher in immature internodes than in mature internodes in all cultivars; SS transcript expression showed a similar pattern. Our studies demonstrate that SPS activity was positively correlated with sucrose and negatively correlated with hexose sugars. However, SS activity was negatively correlated with sucrose and positively correlated with hexose sugars. The present study opens the possibility for improvement of sugarcane cultivars by increasing expression of the respective enzymes using transgene technology.

  8. Cloning and characterization of squalene synthase and cycloartenol synthase from Siraitia grosvenorii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huan; Tang, Qi; Mo, Changming; Bai, Longhua; Tu, Dongping; Ma, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    Mogrosides and steroid saponins are tetracyclic triterpenoids found in Siraitia grosvenorii. Squalene synthase (SQS) and cycloartenol synthase (CAS) are key enzymes in triterpenoid and steroid biosynthesis. In this study, full-length cDNAs of SgSQS and SgCAS were cloned by a rapid amplification of cDNA-ends with polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR) approach. The SgSQS cDNA has a 1254 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 417 amino acids, and the SgCAS cDNA contains a 2298 bp ORF encoding 765 amino acids. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the deduced SgSQS protein has two transmembrane regions in the C-terminal. Both SgSQS and SgCAS have significantly higher levels in fruits than in other tissues, suggesting that steroids and mogrosides are competitors for the same precursors in fruits. Combined in silico prediction and subcellular localization, experiments in tobacco indicated that SgSQS was probably in the cytoplasm or on the cytoskeleton, and SgCAS was likely located in the nucleus or cytosol. These results will provide a foundation for further study of SgSQS and SgCAS gene functions in S. grosvenorii, and may facilitate improvements in mogroside content in fruit by regulating gene expression.

  9. Binding modes of zaragozic acid A to human squalene synthase and staphylococcal dehydrosqualene synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-05-25

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr(248) in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors.

  10. Identification of a Dolabellane Type Diterpene Synthase and other Root-Expressed Diterpene Synthases in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Jia, Meirong; Huh, Jung-Hyun; Muchlinski, Andrew; Peters, Reuben J.; Tholl, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana maintains a complex metabolism for the production of secondary or specialized metabolites. Such metabolites include volatile and semivolatile terpenes, which have been associated with direct and indirect defensive activities in flowers and leaves. In comparison, the structural diversity and function of terpenes in Arabidopsis roots has remained largely unexplored despite a substantial number of root-expressed genes in the Arabidopsis terpene synthase (TPS) gene family. We show that five root-expressed TPSs of an expanded subfamily-a type clade in the Arabidopsis TPS family function as class I diterpene synthases that predominantly convert geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to different semi-volatile diterpene products, which are in part detectable at low levels in the ecotypes Columbia (Col) and Cape Verde Island (Cvi). The enzyme TPS20 produces a macrocyclic dolabellane diterpene alcohol and a dolabellane-related diterpene olefin named dolathaliatriene with a so far unknown C6-C11 bicyclic scaffold besides several minor olefin products. The TPS20 compounds occur in all tissues of Cvi but are absent in the Col ecotype because of deletion and substitution mutations in the Col TPS20 sequence. The primary TPS20 diterpene products retard the growth of the root rot pathogen Pythium irregulare but only at concentrations exceeding those in planta. Together, our results demonstrate that divergence and pseudogenization in the Arabidopsis TPS gene family allow for structural plasticity in diterpene profiles of above- and belowground tissues. PMID:27933080

  11. The rice ent-KAURENE SYNTHASE LIKE 2 encodes a functional ent-beyerene synthase.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Daisuke; Ito, Akira; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Imai, Ryozo

    2015-05-08

    The rice genome contains a family of kaurene synthase-like (OsKSL) genes that are responsible for the biosynthesis of various diterpenoids, including gibberellins and phytoalexins. While many OsKSL genes have been functionally characterized, the functionality of OsKSL2 is still unclear and it has been proposed to be a pseudogene. Here, we found that OsKSL2 is drastically induced in roots by methyl jasmonate treatment and we successfully isolated a full-length cDNA for OsKSL2. Sequence analysis of the OsKSL2 cDNA revealed that the open reading frame of OsKSL2 is mispredicted in the two major rice genome databases, IRGSP-RAP and MSU-RGAP. In vitro conversion assay indicated that recombinant OsKSL2 catalyzes the cyclization of ent-CDP into ent-beyerene as a major and ent-kaurene as a minor product. ent-Beyerene is an antimicrobial compound and OsKSL2 is induced by methyl jasmonate; these data suggest that OsKSL2 is a functional ent-beyerene synthase that is involved in defense mechanisms in rice roots.

  12. Modulation of ceramide synthase activity via dimerization.

    PubMed

    Laviad, Elad L; Kelly, Samuel; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H

    2012-06-15

    Ceramide, the backbone of all sphingolipids, is synthesized by a family of ceramide synthases (CerS) that each use acyl-CoAs of defined chain length for N-acylation of the sphingoid long chain base. CerS mRNA expression and enzymatic activity do not always correlate with the sphingolipid acyl chain composition of a particular tissue, suggesting post-translational mechanism(s) of regulation of CerS activity. We now demonstrate that CerS activity can be modulated by dimer formation. Under suitable conditions, high M(r) CerS complexes can be detected by Western blotting, and various CerS co-immunoprecipitate. CerS5 activity is inhibited in a dominant-negative fashion by co-expression with catalytically inactive CerS5, and CerS2 activity is enhanced by co-expression with a catalytically active form of CerS5 or CerS6. In a constitutive heterodimer comprising CerS5 and CerS2, the activity of CerS2 depends on the catalytic activity of CerS5. Finally, CerS dimers are formed upon rapid stimulation of ceramide synthesis by curcumin. Together, these data demonstrate that ceramide synthesis can be regulated by the formation of CerS dimers and suggest a novel way to generate the acyl chain composition of ceramide (and downstream sphingolipids), which may depend on the interaction of CerS with each other.

  13. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  14. Tertiary model of a plant cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda; Haigler, Candace H.; Kubicki, James D.; Zimmer, Jochen; Bonetta, Dario; DeBolt, Seth; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D atomistic model of a plant cellulose synthase (CESA) has remained elusive despite over forty years of experimental effort. Here, we report a computationally predicted 3D structure of 506 amino acids of cotton CESA within the cytosolic region. Comparison of the predicted plant CESA structure with the solved structure of a bacterial cellulose-synthesizing protein validates the overall fold of the modeled glycosyltransferase (GT) domain. The coaligned plant and bacterial GT domains share a six-stranded β-sheet, five α-helices, and conserved motifs similar to those required for catalysis in other GT-2 glycosyltransferases. Extending beyond the cross-kingdom similarities related to cellulose polymerization, the predicted structure of cotton CESA reveals that plant-specific modules (plant-conserved region and class-specific region) fold into distinct subdomains on the periphery of the catalytic region. Computational results support the importance of the plant-conserved region and/or class-specific region in CESA oligomerization to form the multimeric cellulose–synthesis complexes that are characteristic of plants. Relatively high sequence conservation between plant CESAs allowed mapping of known mutations and two previously undescribed mutations that perturb cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana to their analogous positions in the modeled structure. Most of these mutation sites are near the predicted catalytic region, and the confluence of other mutation sites supports the existence of previously undefined functional nodes within the catalytic core of CESA. Overall, the predicted tertiary structure provides a platform for the biochemical engineering of plant CESAs. PMID:23592721

  15. Nitric oxide synthase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Xu, K Y; Huso, D L; Dawson, T M; Bredt, D S; Becker, L C

    1999-01-19

    NO. is a free radical that modulates heart function and metabolism. We report that a neuronal-type NO synthase (NOS) is located on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles and that endogenous NO. produced by SR-associated NOS inhibits SR Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+-dependent biochemical conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline was observed from isolated rabbit cardiac SR vesicles in the presence of NOS substrates and cofactors. Endogenous NO. was generated from the vesicles and detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping measurements. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated labeling of cardiac SR vesicles by using anti-neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not anti-endothelial NOS (eNOS) or anti-inducible NOS (iNOS) antibodies, whereas skeletal muscle SR vesicles had no nNOS immunoreactivity. The nNOS immunoreactivity also displayed a pattern consistent with SR localization in confocal micrographs of sections of human myocardium. Western blotting demonstrated that cardiac SR NOS is larger than brain NOS (160 vs. 155 kDa). No immunodetection was observed in cardiac SR vesicles from nNOS knockout mice or with an anti-nNOS mu antibody, suggesting the possibility of a new nNOS-type isoform. 45Ca uptake by cardiac SR vesicles, catalyzed by Ca2+-ATPase, was inhibited by NO. produced endogenously from cardiac SR NOS, and 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS inhibitor, completely prevented this inhibition. These results suggest that a cardiac muscle nNOS isoform is located on SR of cardiac myocytes, where it may respond to intracellular Ca2+ concentration and modulate SR Ca2+ ion active transport in the heart.

  16. Nitric oxide synthase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai Y.; Huso, David L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Bredt, David S.; Becker, Lewis C.

    1999-01-01

    NO⋅ is a free radical that modulates heart function and metabolism. We report that a neuronal-type NO synthase (NOS) is located on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane vesicles and that endogenous NO⋅ produced by SR-associated NOS inhibits SR Ca2+ uptake. Ca2+-dependent biochemical conversion of l-arginine to l-citrulline was observed from isolated rabbit cardiac SR vesicles in the presence of NOS substrates and cofactors. Endogenous NO⋅ was generated from the vesicles and detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping measurements. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated labeling of cardiac SR vesicles by using anti-neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not anti-endothelial NOS (eNOS) or anti-inducible NOS (iNOS) antibodies, whereas skeletal muscle SR vesicles had no nNOS immunoreactivity. The nNOS immunoreactivity also displayed a pattern consistent with SR localization in confocal micrographs of sections of human myocardium. Western blotting demonstrated that cardiac SR NOS is larger than brain NOS (160 vs. 155 kDa). No immunodetection was observed in cardiac SR vesicles from nNOS knockout mice or with an anti-nNOSμ antibody, suggesting the possibility of a new nNOS-type isoform. 45Ca uptake by cardiac SR vesicles, catalyzed by Ca2+-ATPase, was inhibited by NO⋅ produced endogenously from cardiac SR NOS, and 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS inhibitor, completely prevented this inhibition. These results suggest that a cardiac muscle nNOS isoform is located on SR of cardiac myocytes, where it may respond to intracellular Ca2+ concentration and modulate SR Ca2+ ion active transport in the heart. PMID:9892689

  17. In vivo enzyme immobilization by use of engineered polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2006-03-01

    This study demonstrated that engineered polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases can be employed as molecular tools to covalently immobilize enzymes at the PHA granule surface. The beta-galactosidase was fused to the N terminus of the class II PHA synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The open reading frame was confirmed to encode the complete fusion protein by T7 promoter-dependent overexpression. Restoration of PHA biosynthesis in the PHA-negative mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed a PHA synthase function of the fusion protein. PHA granules were isolated and showed beta-galactosidase activity. PHA granule attached proteins were analyzed and confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Surprisingly, the beta-galactosidase-PHA synthase fusion protein was detectable at a high copy number at the PHA granule, compared with PHA synthase alone, which was barely detectable at PHA granules. Localization of the beta-galactosidase at the PHA granule surface was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies. Treatment of these beta-galactosidase-PHA granules with urea suggested a covalent binding of the beta-galactosidase-PHA synthase to the PHA granule. The immobilized beta-galactosidase was enzymologically characterized, suggesting a Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. A Km of 630 microM and a Vmax of 17.6 nmol/min for orthonitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside as a substrate was obtained. The immobilized beta-galactosidase was stable for at least several months under various storage conditions. This study demonstrated that protein engineering of PHA synthase enables the manufacture of PHA granules with covalently attached enzymes, suggesting an application in recycling of biocatalysts, such as in fine-chemical production.

  18. Expression and characterization of glycogen synthase kinase-3 mutants and their effect on glycogen synthase activity in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, H; Argast, G M; Foord, O; Fischer, E H; Krebs, E G

    1996-01-01

    In these studies we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT) GSK-3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) and its mutants, and examined their physiological effect on glycogen synthase activity. The GSK-3 mutants included mutation at serine-9 either to alanine (S9A) or glutamic acid (S9E) and an inactive mutant, K85,86MA. Expression of WT and the various mutants in a cell-free system indicated that S9A and S9E exhibit increased kinase activity as compared with WT. Subsequently, 293 cells were transiently transfected with WT GSK-3 and mutants. Cells expressing the S9A mutant exhibited higher kinase activity (2.6-fold of control cells) as compared with cells expressing WT and S9E (1.8- and 2.0-fold, respectively, of control cells). Combined, these results suggest serine-9 as a key regulatory site of GSK-3 inactivation, and indicate that glutamic acid cannot mimic the function of the phosphorylated residue. The GSK-3-expressing cell system enabled us to examine whether GSK-3 can induce changes in the endogenous glycogen synthase activity. A decrease in glycogen synthase activity (50%) was observed in cells expressing the S9A mutant. Similarly, glycogen synthase activity was suppressed in cells expressing WT and the S9E mutant (20-30%, respectively). These studies indicate that activation of GSK-3 is sufficient to inhibit glycogen synthase in intact cells, and provide evidence supporting a physiological role for GSK-3 in regulating glycogen synthase and glycogen metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816781

  19. Insulin stimulation of glycogen synthase in cultured human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, H; Howard, B V; Kosmakos, F C; Fields, R M; Craig, J W; Bennett, P H; Larner, J

    1980-10-01

    The effect of insulin on glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts has been studied. As little as 2 X 10(-10) M insulin increased the glycogen synthase / activity without changing the total activity. Stimulation occurred within 5 min and became maximal in 30 min. A half-maximal increase of / activity was achieved at 3 X 10(-9) M insulin. Glucose starvation increased the magnitude of response of glycogen synthase to insulin but did not change the insulin concentration necessary to give a half-maximal stimulation. Glucose increased the basal level of / activity in human diploid fibroblasts; the effect of insulin was additive. During in vitro senescence the total glycogen synthase activity declined, but the concentration of insulin that produced a half-maximal stimulation remained unchanged. These data indicate that regulation of glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts is responsive to physiologic insulin levels and that the system provides a useful model for the in vitro study of insulin sensitivity.

  20. Heterologous expression of an active chitin synthase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Lugo, Holjes; Sánchez-Arreguín, Alejandro; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2016-12-01

    Chitin synthases are highly important enzymes in nature, where they synthesize structural components in species belonging to different eukaryotic kingdoms, including kingdom Fungi. Unfortunately, their structure and the molecular mechanism of synthesis of their microfibrilar product remain largely unknown, probably because no fungal active chitin synthases have been isolated, possibly due to their extreme hydrophobicity. In this study we have turned to the heterologous expression of the transcript from a small chitin synthase of Rhizopus oryzae (RO3G_00942, Chs1) in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was active, but accumulated mostly in inclusion bodies. High concentrations of arginine or urea solubilized the enzyme, but their dilution led to its denaturation and precipitation. Nevertheless, use of urea permitted the purification of small amounts of the enzyme. The properties of Chs1 (Km, optimum temperature and pH, effect of GlcNAc) were abnormal, probably because it lacks the hydrophobic transmembrane regions characteristic of chitin synthases. The product of the enzyme showed that, contrasting with chitin made by membrane-bound Chs's and chitosomes, was only partially in the form of short microfibrils of low crystallinity. This approach may lead to future developments to obtain active chitin synthases that permit understanding their molecular mechanism of activity, and microfibril assembly.

  1. ATP synthases: cellular nanomotors characterized by LILBID mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jan; Sokolova, Lucie; Preiss, Laura; Hicks, David B.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Morgner, Nina; Wittig, Ilka; Schägger, Hermann; Meier, Thomas; Brutschy, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes is still a methodological challenge due to hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the species and the fact that all subunits are bound non-covalently together. The present study with the novel laser induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) reports on the determination of the subunit composition of the F1Fo-ATP synthase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, that of both bovine heart and, for the first time, of human heart mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthases. Under selected buffer conditions the mass of the intact F1Fo-ATP synthase of B. pseudofirmus OF4 could be measured, allowing the analysis of complex subunit stoichiometry. The agreement with theoretical masses derived from sequence databases is very good. A comparison of the ATP synthase subunit composition of 5 different ATPases reveals differences in the complexity of eukaryotic and bacterial ATP synthases. However, whereas the overall construction of eukaryotic enzymes is more complex than the bacterial ones, functionally important subunits are conserved among all ATPases. PMID:20820587

  2. Identification of two distinct Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, S; Sonenshein, A L

    1994-08-01

    Two distinct Bacillus subtilis genes (citA and citZ) were found to encode citrate synthase isozymes that catalyze the first step of the Krebs cycle. The citA gene was cloned by genetic complementation of an Escherichia coli citrate synthase mutant strain (W620) and was in a monocistronic transcriptional unit. A divergently transcribed gene, citR, could encode a protein with strong similarity to the bacterial LysR family of regulatory proteins. A null mutation in citA had little effect on citrate synthase enzyme activity or sporulation. The residual citrate synthase activity was purified from a citA null mutant strain, and the partial amino acid sequence for the purified protein (CitZ) was determined. The citZ gene was cloned from B. subtilis chromosomal DNA by using a PCR-generated probe synthesized with oligonucleotide primers derived from the partial amino acid sequence of purified CitZ. The citZ gene proved to be the first gene in a tricistronic cluster that also included citC (coding for isocitrate dehydrogenase) and citH (coding for malate dehydrogenase). A mutation in citZ caused a substantial loss of citrate synthase enzyme activity, glutamate auxotrophy, and a defect in sporulation.

  3. Diversity of sesquiterpene synthases in the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Sean; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Fungi are a rich source of bioactive secondary metabolites and mushroom-forming fungi (Agaricomycetes) are especially known for the synthesis of numerous bioactive and often cytotoxic sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolites. Compared to the large number of sesquiterpene synthases identified in plants, less than a handful of unique sesquiterpene synthases have been described from fungi. Here we describe the functional characterization of six sesquiterpene synthases (Cop1 to Cop6) and two terpene oxidizing cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cox1 and Cox2) from Coprinus cinereus. The genes were cloned and, except for cop5, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cop1 and Cop2 each synthesize germacrene A as the major product. Cop3 was identified as a α-muurolene synthase, an enzyme that has not been described previously, while Cop4 synthesizes δ-cadinene as its major product. Cop6 was originally annotated as a trichodiene synthase homolog, but instead was found to catalyze highly specific the synthesis of α-cuprenene. Co-expression of cop6 and the two monooxygenase genes next to it yields oxygenated α-cuprenene derivatives, including cuparophenol, suggesting that these genes encode the enzymes for the biosynthesis of antimicrobial quinone sesquiterpenoids (known as lagopodins) that were previously isolated from C. cinereus and other Coprinus species. PMID:19400802

  4. Diversity of sesquiterpene synthases in the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    PubMed

    Agger, Sean; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2009-06-01

    Fungi are a rich source of bioactive secondary metabolites, and mushroom-forming fungi (Agaricomycetes) are especially known for the synthesis of numerous bioactive and often cytotoxic sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolites. Compared with the large number of sesquiterpene synthases identified in plants, less than a handful of unique sesquiterpene synthases have been described from fungi. Here we describe the functional characterization of six sesquiterpene synthases (Cop1 to Cop6) and two terpene-oxidizing cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (Cox1 and Cox2) from Coprinus cinereus. The genes were cloned and, except for cop5, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cop1 and Cop2 each synthesize germacrene A as the major product. Cop3 was identified as an alpha-muurolene synthase, an enzyme that has not been described previously, while Cop4 synthesizes delta-cadinene as its major product. Cop6 was originally annotated as a trichodiene synthase homologue but instead was found to catalyse the highly specific synthesis of alpha-cuprenene. Coexpression of cop6 and the two monooxygenase genes next to it yields oxygenated alpha-cuprenene derivatives, including cuparophenol, suggesting that these genes encode the enzymes for the biosynthesis of antimicrobial quinone sesquiterpenoids (known as lagopodins) that were previously isolated from C. cinereus and other Coprinus species.

  5. Methionine synthase and thymidylate synthase gene polymorphisms and colorectal adenoma risk: the self defense forces study.

    PubMed

    Yoshimitsu, Shinichiro; Morita, Makiko; Hamachi, Tadamichi; Tabata, Shinji; Abe, Hiroshi; Tajima, Osamu; Uezono, Kousaku; Ohnaka, Keizo; Kono, Suminori

    2012-10-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated associations of functional genetic polymorphisms of methionine synthase (MTR), MTR reductase (MTRR), and thymidylate synthase (TS) with colorectal adenomas. The study subjects were 455 cases of colorectal adenomas and 1052 controls with no polyp at colonoscopy. Genotypes were determined for MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G and two polymorphisms in the TS gene, 28-bp tandem repeat polymorphism in the promoter enhancer region (TSER) and 6-bp deletion polymorphism at position 1494 in the 3' untranslated region (TS 1494del6). We also examined the alcohol-genotype and gene-gene interactions on adenoma risk. The GG genotype of MTR A2756G was associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas; odds ratios for AG and GG versus AA genotype were 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.78-1.26) and 1.72 (1.04-2.82), respectively. The increase in the risk associated with MTR 2756GG genotype was evident in men with high alcohol consumption (≥30 mL/d), but not in those with low alcohol consumption (interaction P = 0.03). Men who were homozygous for the TSER double-repeat allele had a slightly decreased risk of colorectal adenomas as compared with those homozygous for the TSER triple-repeat allele. Neither MTRR A66G nor TS 1494del6 was associated with colorectal adenomas. There was no measurable interaction either between MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G or between TSER and TS 1494del6. MTR A2756G appears to be associated with colorectal adenoma risk differently according to alcohol consumption. The MTR-catalyzed reaction may play an important role in the development of colorectal adenomas.

  6. Bornyl-diphosphate synthase from Lavandula angustifolia: A major monoterpene synthase involved in essential oil quality.

    PubMed

    Despinasse, Yolande; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Antonczak, Serge; Moja, Sandrine; Bony, Aurélie; Nicolè, Florence; Baudino, Sylvie; Magnard, Jean-Louis; Jullien, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Lavender essential oils (EOs) of higher quality are produced by a few Lavandula angustifolia cultivars and mainly used in the perfume industry. Undesirable compounds such as camphor and borneol are also synthesized by lavender leading to a depreciated EO. Here, we report the cloning of bornyl diphosphate synthase of lavender (LaBPPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the production of bornyl diphosphate (BPP) and then by-products such as borneol or camphor, from an EST library. Compared to the BPPS of Salvia officinalis, the functional characterization of LaBPPS showed several differences in amino acid sequence, and the distribution of catalyzed products. Molecular modeling of the enzyme's active site suggests that the carbocation intermediates are more stable in LaBPPS than in SoBPPS leading probably to a lower efficiency of LaBPPS to convert GPP into BPP. Quantitative RT-PCR performed from leaves and flowers at different development stages of L. angustifolia samples show a clear correlation between transcript level of LaBPPS and accumulation of borneol/camphor, suggesting that LaBPPS is mainly responsible of in vivo biosynthesis of borneol/camphor in fine lavender. A phylogenetic analysis of terpene synthases (TPS) pointed out the basal position of LaBPPS in the TPSb clade, suggesting that LaBPPS could be an ancestor of others lavender TPSb. Finally, borneol could be one of the first monoterpenes to be synthesized in the Lavandula subgenus. Knowledge gained from these experiments will facilitate future studies to improve the lavender oils through metabolic engineering or plant breeding. Accession numbers: LaBPPS: KM015221.

  7. Kinetic characteristics of nitric oxide synthase from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, R G; Palacios, M; Palmer, R M; Moncada, S

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rate of synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and guanylate cyclase stimulation was used to characterize the kinetics of the NO synthase from rat forebrain and of some inhibitors of this enzyme. The NO synthase had an absolute requirement for L-arginine and NADPH and did not require any other cofactors. The enzyme had a Vmax. of 42 pmol of NO formed.min-1.mg of protein-1 and a Km for L-arginine of 8.4 microM. Three analogues of L-arginine, namely NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, NG-nitro-L-arginine and NG-iminoethyl-L-ornithine inhibited the brain NO synthase. All three compounds were competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with Ki values of 0.7, 0.4 and 1.2 microM respectively. PMID:1695842

  8. Properties of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana.

    PubMed

    Segovia, J L; Zafra, M F; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1982-09-01

    Adenine nucleotides were tested as effectors of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana leaves in the presence of different concentrations of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate substrates. ATP inhibited both enzyme activities but with a different inhibition profile. 1.0-7.5 mM ADP did not inhibit the peroxisomal citrate synthase in the presence of high substrate concentrations, while the mitochondrial enzyme was strongly inhibited by 1.0 mM ADP in the same conditions. Likewise, a different pattern was obtained with AMP on both peroxisomal and mitochondrial activities. The rate of citrate formation as function of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate concentration was also studied in both fractions. Maximal velocity was highest in the peroxisomal fraction, whether acetyl-CoA or oxalacetate were the variable substrates. These differences indicate that peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthases seem to be two different isoenzymes.

  9. Synthase-dependent exopolysaccharide secretion in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, J.C.; Howell, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis and export of bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides is known to occur through several distinct mechanisms. Recent advances in the biochemistry and structural biology of several proteins in synthase-dependent polysaccharide secretion systems have identified key conserved components of this pathway in Gram-negative bacteria. These components include an inner-membrane-embedded polysaccharide synthase, a periplasmic tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing scaffold protein, and an outer-membrane β-barrel porin. There is also increasing evidence that many synthase-dependent systems are post-translationally regulated by the bacterial second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Here, we compare these core proteins in the context of the alginate, cellulose, and poly-β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) secretion systems. PMID:23117123

  10. The hyaluronate synthase from a eukaryotic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Klewes, L; Turley, E A; Prehm, P

    1993-01-01

    The hyaluronate synthase complex was identified in plasma membranes from B6 cells. It contained two subunits of molecular masses 52 kDa and 60 kDa which bound the precursor UDP-GlcA in digitonin solution and partitioned into the aqueous phase, together with nascent hyaluronate upon Triton X-114 phase separation. The 52 kDa protein cross-reacted with poly- and monoclonal antibodies raised against the streptococcal hyaluronate synthase and the 60 kDa protein was recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against a hyaluronate receptor. The 52 kDa protein was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography with monoclonal anti-hyaluronate synthase. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8457208

  11. SbnG, a Citrate Synthase in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kobylarz, Marek J.; Grigg, Jason C.; Sheldon, Jessica R.; Heinrichs, David E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2014-01-01

    In response to iron deprivation, Staphylococcus aureus produces staphyloferrin B, a citrate-containing siderophore that delivers iron back to the cell. This bacterium also possesses a second citrate synthase, SbnG, that is necessary for supplying citrate to the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic pathway. We present the structure of SbnG bound to the inhibitor calcium and an active site variant in complex with oxaloacetate. The overall fold of SbnG is structurally distinct from TCA cycle citrate synthases yet similar to metal-dependent class II aldolases. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that SbnG forms a separate clade with homologs from other siderophore biosynthetic gene clusters and is representative of a metal-independent subgroup in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily. A structural superposition of the SbnG active site to TCA cycle citrate synthases and site-directed mutagenesis suggests a case for convergent evolution toward a conserved catalytic mechanism for citrate production. PMID:25336653

  12. Utility of Aspergillus niger citrate synthase promoter for heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kashyap; Punekar, Narayan S

    2011-09-10

    Citrate synthase is a central player in the acidogenic metabolism of Aspergillus niger. The 5' upstream sequence (0.9kb DNA) of citrate synthase gene (citA) from A. niger NCIM 565 was analyzed and its promoter function demonstrated through the heterologous expression of two proteins. The cloned citrate synthase promoter (PcitA) sequence was able to express bar coding sequence thereby conferring phosphinothricin resistance. This sequence was further analyzed by systematic deletions to define an effective but compact functional promoter. The PcitA driven egfp expression showed that PcitA was active in all differentiation cell-stages of A. niger. EGFP expression was highest on non-repressible carbon sources like acetate and glycerol. Mycelial EGFP levels increased during acidogenic growth suggesting that PcitA is functional throughout this cultivation. A. niger PcitA is the first Krebs cycle gene promoter used to express heterologous proteins in filamentous fungi.

  13. Allosteric regulation of glycogen synthase in liver. A physiological dilemma.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, F Q; Gannon, M C

    1993-06-25

    Glycogen synthase catalyzes the transfer of the glucosyl moiety from UDP-glucose to the terminal branch of the glycogen molecule and is considered to be the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis. However, under ideal assay conditions, i.e. 37 degrees C with saturating concentrations of UDP-glucose and the activator, glucose-6-P, the maximal catalytic activity of glycogen synthase was only 78% of the in vivo glycogen synthetic rate. Using concentrations of UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P likely to be present in vivo, the rate was only approximately 30%. This prompted us to reassess a possible role of allosteric effectors on synthase activity. Glycogen synthase was assayed at 37 degrees C using dilute, pH 7.0, buffered extracts, initial rate conditions, and UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P concentrations, which approximate those calculated to be present in total liver cell water. Several allosteric effectors were tested. Magnesium and AMP had little effect on activity. Pi, ADP, ATP, and UTP inhibited activity. When a combination of effectors were added at concentrations approximating those present in cell water, synthase activity could account for only 2% of the glycogen synthetic rate. Thus, although allosteric effectors are likely to be playing a major role in regulating synthase enzymic activity in liver cells, to date, a metabolite that can stimulate activity and/or overcome nucleotide inhibition has yet to be identified. If such a metabolite cannot be identified, an additional or alternative pathway for glycogen synthesis must be considered.

  14. Brucella spp. lumazine synthase: a novel antigen delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Toledo, Andrea; Cruz, Carmen; Rosas, Gabriela; Meneses, Gabriela; Laplagne, Diego; Ainciart, Natalia; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Fragoso, Gladis; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2005-04-15

    Lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) was evaluated as a protein carrier to improve antigen delivery of KETc1, one of the peptides of the anti-cysticercosis vaccine. KETc1 becomes antigenic, preserved its immunogenicity and its protective capacity when expressed as a recombinant chimeric protein using Brucella spp. lumazine synthase. KETc1 and BLS-KETc1 were not MHC H-2(d), H-2(k) nor H-2(b) haplotype-restricted albeit KETc1 is preferentially presented in the H-2(b) haplotype. These findings support that BLS is a potent new delivery system for the improvement of subunit vaccines.

  15. Molecular aspects of beta-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) catalysis.

    PubMed

    von Wettstein-Knowles, P; Olsen, J; Arnvig Mcguire, K; Larsen, S

    2000-12-01

    Crystal structure data for Escherichia coli beta-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) I with C(10) and C(12) fatty acid substrates bound in conjunction with results from mutagenizing residues in the active site leads to a model for catalysis. Differences from and similarities to the other Claisen enzymes carrying out decarboxylations reveal two catalytic mechanisms, one for KAS I and KAS II, the other for KAS III and chalcone synthase. A comparison of the structures of KAS I and KAS II does not reveal the basis of chain-length specificity. The structures of the Arabidopsis thaliana KAS family are compared.

  16. Engineered biosynthesis of plant polyketides: manipulation of chalcone synthase.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ikuro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2006-02-02

    [reaction: see text]. Chalcone synthase (CHS) is a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase catalyzing condensation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA with three molecules of malonyl-CoA. Surprisingly, it was demonstrated that S338V mutant of Scutellaria baicalensis CHS produced octaketides SEK4/SEK4b from eight molecules of malonyl-CoA. Further, the octaketides-forming activity was dramatically increased in a CHS triple mutant (T197G/G256L/S338T). The functional conversion is based on the simple steric modulation of a chemically inert residue lining the active-site cavity.

  17. Efficacy of Oral Curcuminoid Fraction from Curcuma xanthorrhiza and Curcuminoid Cider in High-cholesterol Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mauren, Flavia Maria; Yanti; Lay, Bibiana Widiati

    2016-01-01

    -related genes inducing formation of atherosclerosisCurcuminoid and its cider may offer cardioprotective effect for preventing hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis Abbreviations Used: ROS: Reactive oxygen species, NO: Nitric oxide, NOS: NO synthase, NADPH: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, CD44: Cluster of differentiation 44, ICAM-1: Intercellular adhesion molecule 1, iNOS: inducible NOS, LOX-1: lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1, HMG-CoA: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A, 5-HMF: 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, HCD: High-cholesterol diet PMID:27365981

  18. Unraveling Cholesterol Catabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ChsE4-ChsE5 α2β2 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Initiates β-Oxidation of 3-Oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of host cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an important factor for both its virulence and pathogenesis, although how and why cholesterol metabolism is required is not fully understood. Mtb uses a unique set of catabolic enzymes that are homologous to those required for classical β-oxidation of fatty acids but are specific for steroid-derived substrates. Here, we identify and assign the substrate specificities of two of these enzymes, ChsE4-ChsE5 (Rv3504-Rv3505) and ChsE3 (Rv3573c), that carry out cholesterol side chain oxidation in Mtb. Steady-state assays demonstrate that ChsE4-ChsE5 preferentially catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA in the first cycle of cholesterol side chain β-oxidation that ultimately yields propionyl-CoA, whereas ChsE3 specifically catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA in the second cycle of β-oxidation that generates acetyl-CoA. However, ChsE4-ChsE5 can catalyze the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA as well as 3-oxo-4-pregnene-20-carboxyl-CoA. The functional redundancy of ChsE4-ChsE5 explains the in vivo phenotype of the igr knockout strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the loss of ChsE1-ChsE2 can be compensated for by ChsE4-ChsE5 during the chronic phase of infection. The X-ray crystallographic structure of ChsE4-ChsE5 was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å and represents the first high-resolution structure of a heterotetrameric acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD). Unlike typical homotetrameric ACADs that bind four flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors, ChsE4-ChsE5 binds one FAD at each dimer interface, resulting in only two substrate-binding sites rather than the classical four active sites. A comparison of the ChsE4-ChsE5 substrate-binding site to those of known mammalian ACADs reveals an enlarged binding cavity that accommodates steroid substrates and highlights novel prospects for designing inhibitors against the committed β-oxidation step in the first

  19. Analysis of the cercosporin polyketide synthase CTB1 reveals a new fungal thioesterase function

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Adam G.; Vagstad, Anna L.; Belecki, Katherine; Scheerer, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    The polyketide synthase CTB1 is demonstrated to catalyze pyrone formation thereby expanding the known biosynthetic repertoire of thioesterase domains in iterative, non-reducing polyketide synthases. PMID:23108075

  20. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Belkheir, Asma K; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents.

  1. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Belkheir, Asma K.; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents. PMID:27446151

  2. Enzymatic proof for the identity of the S-sulfocysteine synthase and cysteine synthase B of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T; Iwahashi, H; Eguchi, Y

    1984-01-01

    S-Sulfocysteine synthase was isolated from Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 to homogeneous form with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of this enzyme was determined to be ca. 55,000. The enzyme consisted of two identically sized subunits, and it contained one pyridoxal phosphate per subunit. The enzyme catalyzed the biosynthesis of cysteine or S-methylcysteine from sulfide or methanethiol and O-acetylserine, respectively, in addition to the formation of S-sulfocysteine from thiosulfate and O-acetylserine. The enzyme is identical to cysteine synthase B. The intracellular level of this enzyme was regulated by lesser extents of the same factors as those effective for cysteine synthase A. Images PMID:6373737

  3. The Remarkable Character of Porphobilinogen Synthase.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Eileen K

    2016-11-15

    Porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS), also known as 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase, is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of all tetrapyrroles, which function in respiration, photosynthesis, and methanogenesis. Throughout evolution, PBGS adapted to a diversity of cellular niches and evolved to use an unusual variety of metal ions both for catalytic function and to control protein multimerization. With regard to the active site, some PBGSs require Zn(2+); a subset of those, including human PBGS, contain a constellation of cysteine residues that acts as a sink for the environmental toxin Pb(2+). PBGSs that do not require the soft metal ion Zn(2+) at the active site instead are suspected of using the hard metal Mg(2+). The most unexpected property of the PBGS family of enzymes is a dissociative allosteric mechanism that utilizes an equilibrium of architecturally and functionally distinct protein assemblies. The high-activity assembly is an octamer in which intersubunit interactions modulate active-site lid motion. This octamer can dissociate to dimer, the dimer can undergo a hinge twist, and the twisted dimer can assemble to a low-activity hexamer. The hexamer does not have the intersubunit interactions required to stabilize a closed conformation of the active site lid. PBGS active site chemistry benefits from a closed lid because porphobilinogen biosynthesis includes Schiff base formation, which requires deprotonated lysine amino groups. N-terminal and C-terminal sequence extensions dictate whether a specific species of PBGS can sample the hexameric assembly. The bulk of species (nearly all except animals and yeasts) use Mg(2+) as an allosteric activator. Mg(2+) functions allosterically by binding to an intersubunit interface that is present in the octamer but absent in the hexamer. This conformational selection allosteric mechanism is purported to be essential to avoid the untimely accumulation of phototoxic chlorophyll precursors in plants. For those PBGSs that do

  4. Characterization of spermidine synthase and spermine synthase--The polyamine-synthetic enzymes that induce early flowering in Gentiana triflora.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tomohiro; Fujita, Kohei; Tasaki, Keisuke; Higuchi, Atsumi; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2015-08-07

    Polyamines are essential for several living processes in plants. However, regulatory mechanisms of polyamines in herbaceous perennial are almost unknown. Here, we identified homologs of two Arabidopsis polyamine-synthetic enzymes, spermidine synthase (SPDS) and spermine synthase (SPMS) denoted as GtSPDS and GtSPMS, from the gentian plant, Gentiana triflora. Our results showed that recombinant proteins of GtSPDS and GtSPMS possessed SPDS and SPMS activities, respectively. The expression levels of GtSPDS and GtSPMS increased transiently during vegetative to reproductive growth phase and overexpression of the genes hastened flowering, suggesting that these genes are involved in flowering induction in gentian plants.

  5. Inhibition of M. tuberculosis β-ketoacyl CoA reductase FabG4 (Rv0242c) by triazole linked polyphenol-aminobenzene hybrids: comparison with the corresponding gallate counterparts.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Deb Ranjan; Senapati, Kalyan; Biswas, Rupam; Das, Amit K; Basak, Amit

    2015-03-15

    Herein we report six novel triazole linked polyphenol-aminobenzene hybrids (3-8) as inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis FabG4 (Rv0242c), a less explored β-ketoacyl CoA reductase that has immense potential to be the future anti-tuberculosis drug target due to its possible involvement in drug resistance and latent infection. Novel triazole linked polyphenol-aminobenzene hybrids have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against FabG4. All of them inhibit FabG4 at low micromolar concentrations. In silico docking study has been carried out to explain the experimental findings. A comparative study of these new inhibitors with previously reported gallate counterparts leads to structure-activity relations (SAR) of substituent linked to N-1 of triazole ring.

  6. The polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, methionine synthase, methionine synthase reductase, and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results.

  7. The Polymorphisms in Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase, Methionine Synthase, Methionine Synthase Reductase, and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daijun; Mei, Qiang; Luo, Han; Tang, Bo; Yu, Peiwu

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism may modulate the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but data from published studies are conflicting. The current meta-analysis was performed to address a more accurate estimation. A total of 41 (17,552 cases and 26,238 controls), 24(8,263 cases and 12,033 controls), 12(3,758 cases and 5,646 controls), and 13 (5,511 cases and 7,265 controls) studies were finally included for the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1289C, methione synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G, methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC, respectively. The data showed that the MTHFR 677T allele was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (OR = 0.93, 95%CI 0.90-0.96), while the MTRR 66G allele was significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.01-1.18). Sub-group analysis by ethnicity revealed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC in Asians (OR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.72-0.89) and Caucasians (OR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.76-0.93) in recessive genetic model, while the MTRR 66GG genotype was found to significantly increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.03-1.36). No significant association was found between MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms and the risk of CRC. Cumulative meta-analysis showed no particular time trend existed in the summary estimate. Probability of publication bias was low across all comparisons illustrated by the funnel plots and Egger's test. Collectively, this meta-analysis suggested that MTHFR 677T allele might provide protection against CRC in worldwide populations, while MTRR 66G allele might increase the risk of CRC in Caucasians. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies were needed to confirm these results. PMID:22719222

  8. Isoelectric focusing of wound-induced tomato ACC synthase

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.A.; Kende, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Several techniques of electrofocusing have been used to determine whether 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase isolated from wounded tomato pericarp tissue exists in different isoforms, each with its characteristic isoelectric point (pI). The pI of the native enzyme was found to be 6.0 {plus minus} 0.2. When radiolabeled, denatured ACC synthase was electrofocused by non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis (NEpHGE), the enzyme separated into four discernible spots which, upon reaching equilibrium, ranged in pI from 6.6 to 6.9. Immunopurified ACC synthase from four tomato cultivars (Duke, Cornell, Mountain Pride and Pik Red) migrated in each case as a 50-kDa protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). We propose that native ACC synthase in extracts of tomato pericarp tissue exists in one single form and that the charge heterogeneities observed upon electrofocusing of denatured enzyme result from modifications of preexisting protein.

  9. Substituted 2-aminopyridines as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, W K; Caldwell, C G; Chen, P; Durette, P L; Esser, C K; Lanza, T J; Kopka, I E; Guthikonda, R; Shah, S K; MacCoss, M; Chabin, R M; Fletcher, D; Grant, S K; Green, B G; Humes, J L; Kelly, T M; Luell, S; Meurer, R; Moore, V; Pacholok, S G; Pavia, T; Williams, H R; Wong, K K

    2000-09-04

    A series of substituted 2-aminopyridines was prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of human nitric oxide synthases (NOS). 4,6-Disubstitution enhanced both potency and specificity for the inducible NOS with the most potent compound having an IC50 of 28 nM.

  10. Mammalian fatty acid synthase: closure on a textbook mechanism?

    PubMed

    Leadlay, Peter; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2003-02-01

    Mammalian fatty acid synthase is a classic example of a chain-building multienzyme. A cornerstone of its mechanism has been the obligatory collaboration of two identical subunits, with fatty acyl intermediates transferring between them. Now, fresh evidence has upset this view.

  11. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Eric J N; Piel, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans-AT polyketide synthases, a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that represents one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. The article includes 609 references and covers the literature from 2009 through June 2015.

  12. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn

    2010-07-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans-AT polyketide synthases, a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that have recently been recognized as one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. 436 references are cited.

  13. Insight into Biochemical Characterization of Plant Sesquiterpene Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Manczak, Tom; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    A fast and reproducible protocol was established for enzymatic characterization of plant sesquiterpene synthases that can incorporate radioactivity in their products. The method utilizes the 96-well format in conjunction with cluster tubes and enables processing of >200 samples a day. Along with reduced reagent usage, it allows further reduction in the use of radioactive isotopes and flammable organic solvents. The sesquiterpene synthases previously characterized were expressed in yeast, and the plant-derived Thapsia garganica kunzeaol synthase TgTPS2 was tested in this method. KM for TgTPS2 was found to be 0.55 μM; the turnover number, kcat, was found to be 0.29 s−1, kcat for TgTPS2 is in agreement with that of terpene synthases of other plants, and kcat/KM was found to be 0.53 s−1 μM−1 for TgTPS2. The kinetic parameters were in agreement with previously published data. PMID:27721652

  14. Genetics Home Reference: N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of reactions that occurs in liver cells. This cycle processes excess nitrogen, generated when protein is used by the body, to make a compound called urea that is excreted by the kidneys. The ... cycle. In people with N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency , N- ...

  15. Mg deficiency results in modulation of serum lipids, glutathione, and NO synthase isozyme activation in cardiovascular tissues: relevance to de novo synthesis of ceramide, serum Mg and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilank C; Liu, Jian-Ping; Iqbal, Jahangir; Hussain, Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Yan; Zheng, Tao; Li, Wenyan; Sica, Anthony C; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2011-01-01

    The present work tested the hypothesis that short-term (S-T) dietary deficiency of magnesium (Mg) (21 days) in rats would: 1) result in reduction in serum(s) sphingomyelin (SM) and changes in several blood lipids, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) concomitant with elevations in s cholesterol (chol), s LDL+VLDL and trigycerides (TG), as well as reduction in the PC/cholesterol ratio; 2) lead to oxidative stress, characterized by reductions in glutathione (glut) content in the various chambers of the heart and activation of e-NOS and n-NOS in the atria, ventricles and aortic smooth muscle (ASM); 3) produce early cardiac damage characterized by leakage of creatine kinase (CK) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); and 4) demonstrate that these pathophysiological changes are a result of profound reductions in s ionized Mg (Mg(2+)) and activation of the SM-ceramide pathway. In addition, we hypothesized that: 1) exposure of primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to low extracellular Mg(2+) would lead to de novo synthesis of ceramide and activation of NO synthase with reduction in glut, both of which would be attenuated by inhibition of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and serine palmitoyl CoA transferase (SPT); and 2) low levels of Mg(2+)added to the drinking water would either prevent or ameliorate these manifestations. Our data indicate that S-T Mg deficiency resulted in reductions in s Mg(2+), SM, PC, HDL-C and the PC/chol ratio concomitant with decreases in tissue levels of glut, leakage of cardiac CK and LDH, as well as activation of e-NOS and n-NOS in all chambers of the heart and ASM. The greater the reduction in s Mg(2+), the greater the effects on all parameters analyzed; very significant correlations to levels of s SM and Mg(2+) were found with all of the serum and tissue biochemical -molecular analytes measured. Our experiments also showed that VSMCs exposed to low Mg(2+)resulted in activation of NO synthase, loss of glut and de novo

  16. Mechanism-oriented redesign of an isomaltulose synthase to an isomelezitose synthase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Görl, Julian; Timm, Malte; Seibel, Jürgen

    2012-01-02

    An isomelezitose synthase was redesigned out of the sucrose isomerase from Protaminobacter rubrum for the synthesis of isomelezitose (6-O(F)-glucosylsucrose), a potential nutraceutical. The variants F297A, F297P, R333K, F321A_F319A and E428D catalyze the formation of isomelezitose in up to 70 % yield.

  17. Identifying the catalytic components of cellulose synthase and the maize mixed-linkage beta-glucan synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas C Carpita

    2009-04-20

    Five specific objectives of this project are to develop strategies to identify the genes that encode the catalytic components of "mixed-linkage" (1→3),(1→4)-beta-D-glucans in grasses, to determine the protein components of the synthase complex, and determine the biochemical mechanism of synthesis. We have used proteomic approaches to define intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of Golgi membranes that are associated with polysaccharide synthesis and trafficking. We were successful in producing recombinant catalytic domains of cellulose synthase genes and discovered that they dimerize upon concentration, indicating that two CesA proteins form the catalytic unit. We characterized a brittle stalk2 mutant as a defect in a COBRA-like protein that results in compromised lignin-cellulose interactions that decrease tissue flexibility. We used virus-induced gene silencing of barley cell wall polysaccharide synthesis by BSMV in an attempt to silence specific members of the cellulose synthase-like gene family. However, we unexpectedly found that regardless of the specificity of the target gene, whole gene interaction networks were silenced. We discovered the cause to be an antisense transcript of the cellulose synthase gene initiated small interfering RNAs that spread silencing to related genes.

  18. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa stem vascular tissue by a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: sucrose synthase construct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important role of sucrose synthase (SUS, EC 2.4.1.13) in plants is to provide UDP-glucose needed for cellulose synthesis in cell walls. We examined if over-expressing SUS in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) would increase cellulose content of stem cell walls. Alfalfa plants were transformed with two ...

  19. Isolation and functional characterization of a τ-cadinol synthase, a new sesquiterpene synthase from Lavandula angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Frédéric; Moja, Sandrine; Bony, Aurélie; Legrand, Sylvain; Petit, Cécile; Benabdelkader, Tarek; Poirot, Kévin; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Guitton, Yann; Nicolè, Florence; Baudino, Sylvie; Magnard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we characterize three sTPSs: a germacrene D (LaGERDS), a (E)-β-caryophyllene (LaCARS) and a τ-cadinol synthase (LaCADS). τ-cadinol synthase is reported here for the first time and its activity was studied in several biological models including transiently or stably transformed tobacco species. Three dimensional structure models of LaCADS and Ocimum basilicum γ-cadinene synthase were built by homology modeling using the template structure of Gossypium arboreum δ-cadinene synthase. The depiction of their active site organization provides evidence of the global influence of the enzymes on the formation of τ-cadinol: instead of a unique amino-acid, the electrostatic properties and solvent accessibility of the whole active site in LaCADS may explain the stabilization of the cadinyl cation intermediate. Quantitative PCR performed from leaves and inflorescences showed two patterns of expression. LaGERDS and LaCARS were mainly expressed during early stages of flower development and, at these stages, transcript levels paralleled the accumulation of the corresponding terpene products (germacrene D and (E)-β-caryophyllene). By contrast, the expression level of LaCADS was constant in leaves and flowers. Phylogenetic analysis provided informative results on potential duplication process leading to sTPS diversification in lavender.

  20. Mechanism of Germacradien-4-ol Synthase-Controlled Water Capture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The sesquiterpene synthase germacradiene-4-ol synthase (GdolS) from Streptomyces citricolor is one of only a few known high-fidelity terpene synthases that convert farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) into a single hydroxylated product. Crystals of unliganded GdolS-E248A diffracted to 1.50 Å and revealed a typical class 1 sesquiterpene synthase fold with the active site in an open conformation. The metal binding motifs were identified as D80DQFD and N218DVRSFAQE. Some bound water molecules were evident in the X-ray crystal structure, but none were obviously positioned to quench a putative final carbocation intermediate. Incubations in H218O generated labeled product, confirming that the alcohol functionality arises from nucleophilic capture of the final carbocation by water originating from solution. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues from both within the metal binding motifs and without identified by sequence alignment with aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus generated mostly functional germacradien-4-ol synthases. Only GdolS-N218Q generated radically different products (∼50% germacrene A), but no direct evidence of the mechanism of incorporation of water into the active site was obtained. Fluorinated FDP analogues 2F-FDP and 15,15,15-F3-FDP were potent noncompetitive inhibitors of GdolS. 12,13-DiF-FDP generated 12,13-(E)-β-farnesene upon being incubated with GdolS, suggesting stepwise formation of the germacryl cation during the catalytic cycle. Incubation of GdolS with [1-2H2]FDP and (R)-[1-2H]FDP demonstrated that following germacryl cation formation a [1,3]-hydride shift generates the final carbocation prior to nucleophilic capture. The stereochemistry of this shift is not defined, and the deuteron in the final product was scrambled. Because no clear candidate residue for binding of a nucleophilic water molecule in the active site and no significant perturbation of product distribution from the replacement of active site residues were

  1. Kinetic mechanism of rabbit muscle glycogen synthase I.

    PubMed

    Gold, A M

    1980-08-05

    The kinetic mechanism of rabbit muscle glycogen synthase I was investigated by determining isotope-exchange rates at chemical equilibrium between uridine diphosphoglucose (UDPG) and glycogen and between UDPG and uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP). The rates were followed simultaneously by use of UDPG labeled with 14C in the glucose moiety and with 3H in the uracil group. They were found to be independent of the concentrations of glycogen and the UDPG-UDP pair, averaging 6 X 10(-9) mol min-1 mg-1, with a ratio of UDPG-glycogen exchange to UDPG-UDP exchange of 0.85-0.95. The conclusion is that glycogen synthase has a rapid equilibrium random bi bi mechanism. The previously reported slow activation of glycogen-free synthase in the presence of glycogen was examined kinetically. The activation rate appears to be independent of glycogen concentration over a wide range, while the maximum activation is related to the third or fourth root of the glycogen concentration. This suggest that the slow bimolecular reaction mechanism proposed for human polymorphonuclear leucocyte glycogen synthase I [Sølling, H., & Esmann, V. (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 81, 129] does not apply to rabbit muscle synthase I. The rate of exchange of glycogen molecules in the complex between glycogen and rabbit muscle synthase I under conditions where the enzyme is catalytically active was estimated by a novel method. The enzyme-glycogen complex was treated with [glucose-14C]UDPG and glycogen of different molecular weight. The distribution of isotope between the two forms of glycogen was determined after their separation by agarose gel chromatography. A rate constant of 0.3 min-1 was estimated for the exchange. It can be calculated, on the basis of the specific activity of the enzyme (20 mumol min-1 mg-1) and its action pattern, that hundreds of individual chains in the glycogen molecule must be available to the enzyme during the average lifetime of the complex. A mechanism is proposed for this process.

  2. Ectopic expression of ceramide synthase 2 in neurons suppresses neurodegeneration induced by ceramide synthase 1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Spassieva, Stefka D.; Ji, Xiaojie; Liu, Ye; Gable, Kenneth; Bielawski, Jacek; Dunn, Teresa M.; Bieberich, Erhard; Zhao, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids exhibit extreme functional and chemical diversity that is in part determined by their hydrophobic moiety, ceramide. In mammals, the fatty acyl chain length variation of ceramides is determined by six (dihydro)ceramide synthase (CerS) isoforms. Previously, we and others showed that mutations in the major neuron-specific CerS1, which synthesizes 18-carbon fatty acyl (C18) ceramide, cause elevation of long-chain base (LCB) substrates and decrease in C18 ceramide and derivatives in the brain, leading to neurodegeneration in mice and myoclonus epilepsy with dementia in humans. Whether LCB elevation or C18 ceramide reduction leads to neurodegeneration is unclear. Here, we ectopically expressed CerS2, a nonneuronal CerS producing C22–C24 ceramides, in neurons of Cers1-deficient mice. Surprisingly, the Cers1 mutant pathology was almost completely suppressed. Because CerS2 cannot replenish C18 ceramide, the rescue is likely a result of LCB reduction. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that only LCBs, the substrates common for all of the CerS isoforms, but not ceramides and complex sphingolipids, were restored to the wild-type levels in the Cers2-rescued Cers1 mutant mouse brains. Furthermore, LCBs induced neurite fragmentation in cultured neurons at concentrations corresponding to the elevated levels in the CerS1-deficient brain. The strong association of LCB levels with neuronal survival both in vivo and in vitro suggests high-level accumulation of LCBs is a possible underlying cause of the CerS1 deficiency-induced neuronal death. PMID:27162368

  3. Deficiency of sphingomyelin synthase-1 but not sphingomyelin synthase-2 causes hearing impairments in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei-Hong; Takemoto, Makoto; Watanabe, Ken; Luo, Huan; Nishimura, Masataka; Yano, Masato; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi; Song, Wen-Jie

    2012-08-15

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a sphingolipid reported to function as a structural component of plasma membranes and to participate in signal transduction. The role of SM metabolism in the process of hearing remains controversial. Here, we examined the role of SM synthase (SMS), which is subcategorized into the family members SMS1 and SMS2, in auditory function. Measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) revealed hearing impairment in SMS1−/− mice in a low frequency range (4–16 kHz). As a possible mechanism of this impairment, we found that the stria vascularis (SV) in these mice exhibited atrophy and disorganized marginal cells. Consequently, SMS1−/− mice exhibited significantly smaller endocochlear potentials (EPs). As a possible mechanism for EP reduction, we found altered expression patterns and a reduced level of KCNQ1 channel protein in the SV of SMS1−/− mice. These mice also exhibited reduced levels of distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Quantitative comparison of the SV atrophy, KCNQ1 expression, and outer hair cell density at the cochlear apical and basal turns revealed no location dependence, but more macrophage invasion into the SV was observed in the apical region than the basal region, suggesting a role of cochlear location-dependent oxidative stress in producing the frequency dependence of hearing loss in SMS1−/− mice. Elevated ABR thresholds, decreased EPs, and abnormal KCNQ1 expression patterns in SMS1−/− mice were all found to be progressive with age. Mice lacking SMS2, however, exhibited neither detectable hearing loss nor changes in their EPs. Taken together, our results suggest that hearing impairments occur in SMS1−/− but not SMS2−/− mice. Defects in the SV with subsequent reductions in EPs together with hair cell dysfunction may account, at least partially, for hearing impairments in SMS1−/− mice.

  4. Alterations of interneurons of the gerbil hippocampus after transient cerebral ischemia: effect of pitavastatin.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Toshiki; Hayakawa, Natsumi; Tounai, Hiroko; Sakuma, Mio; Kato, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2005-11-01

    We investigated the immunohistochemical alterations of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons in the hippocampus after transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils in comparison with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-expressing interneurons. We also examined the effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor pitavastatin against the damage of neurons and interneurons in the hippocampus after cerebral ischemia. Severe neuronal damage was observed in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons 5 and 14 days after ischemia. The PV immunoreactivity was unchanged up to 2 days after ischemia. At 5 and 14 days after ischemia, in contrast, a conspicuous reduction of PV immunoreactivity was observed in interneurons of the hippocampal CA1 sector. Furthermore, a significant decrease of PV immunoreactivity was found in interneurons of the hippocampal CA3 sector. No damage of nNOS-immunopositive interneurons was detected in the gerbil hippocampus up to 1 day after ischemia. Thereafter, a decrease of nNOS immunoreactive interneurons was found in the hippocampal CA1 sector up to 14 days after ischemia. Pitavastatin significantly prevented the neuronal cell loss in the hippocampal CA1 sector 5 days after ischemia. Our immunohistochemical study also showed that pitavastatin prevented significant decrease of PV- and nNOS-positive interneurons in the hippocampus after ischemia. Double-labeled immunostainings showed that PV immunoreactivity was not found in nNOS-immunopositive interneurons of the brain. The present study demonstrates that cerebral ischemia can cause a loss of both PV- and nNOS-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector. Our findings also show that the damage to nNOS-immunopositive interneurons may precede the neuronal cell loss in the hippocampal CA1 sector after ischemia and nNOS-positive interneurons may play some role in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemic diseases. Furthermore, our present study indicates that pitavastatin can

  5. Effects of isobutyrate supplementation in pre- and post-weaned dairy calves diet on growth performance, rumen development, blood metabolites and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Liu, Q; Zhang, Y L; Pei, C X; Zhang, S L; Guo, G; Huo, W J; Yang, W Z; Wang, H

    2016-11-08

    RNA for growth hormone (GH) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 1 in rumen mucosa increased linearly (P<0.05) for pre- and post-weaned calves with increasing isobutyrate supplementation. Blood concentrations of glucose, acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, GH and IGF-1 increased linearly (P<0.05) for pre- and post-weaned calves, whereas blood concentration of insulin decreased linearly with increasing isobutyrate supplementation. The present results indicated that isobutyrate promoted growth of calves by improving rumen development and its ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner.

  6. Quercetin activates AMP-activated protein kinase by reducing PP2C expression protecting old mouse brain against high cholesterol-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Shan, Qun; Zheng, Zi-Hui; Liu, Chan-Min; Wang, Yong-Jian

    2010-10-01

    It is known that a high-cholesterol diet induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and beta-amyloid (Abeta) accumulation in mouse brain, resulting in neurodegenerative changes. Quercetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to possess numerous biological activities beneficial to health. Our previous studies have demonstrated that quercetin protects mouse brain against D-galactose-induced oxidative damage. Against this background, we evaluated the effect of quercetin on high-cholesterol-induced neurotoxicity in old mice and explored its potential mechanism. Our results showed that oral administration of quercetin significantly improved the behavioural performance of high-cholesterol-fed old mice in both a step-through test and the Morris water maze task. This is at least in part caused by decreasing ROS and protein carbonyl levels and restoring Cu--Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, quercetin also significantly activated the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via down-regulation of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), which reduced the integral optical density (IOD) of activated microglia cells and CD11b expression, down-regulated iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, and decreased IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha expression in the brains of high-cholesterol-fed old mice through the suppression of NF-kappaB p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, AMPK activation significantly increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation and reduced fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression in the brains of high-cholesterol-fed old mice, which reduced cholesterol levels, down-regulated cholesterol 24-hydroxylase (CYP46A1) and beta-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression, decreased eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) phosphorylation, and lowered Abeta deposits. However, the neuroprotective effect of quercetin was weakened by intraperitoneal

  7. Nonsterol Isoprenoids Activate Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor in an Isoform-Selective Manner in Primary Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rondini, Elizabeth A.; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that accumulation of nonsterol isoprenoids following treatment with the squalene synthase inhibitor, squalestatin 1 (SQ1) markedly induced cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B1 mRNA and reporter activity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes, which was dependent on activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether isoprenoids likewise activate murine CAR (mCAR) or one or more isoforms of human CAR (hCAR) produced by alternative splicing (SPTV, hCAR2; APYLT, hCAR3). We found that SQ1 significantly induced Cyp2b10 mRNA (∼3.5-fold) in primary hepatocytes isolated from both CAR–wild-type and humanized CAR transgenic mice, whereas the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin had no effect. In the absence of CAR, basal Cyp2b10 mRNA levels were reduced by 28-fold and the effect of SQ1 on Cyp2b10 induction was attenuated. Cotransfection with an expression plasmid for hCAR1, but not hCAR2 or hCAR3, mediated SQ1-induced CYP2B1 and CYP2B6 reporter activation in hepatocytes isolated from CAR-knockout mice. This effect was also observed following treatment with the isoprenoid trans,trans-farnesol. The direct agonist CITCO increased interaction of hCAR1, hCAR2, and hCAR3 with steroid receptor coactivator-1. However, no significant effect on coactivator recruitment was observed with SQ1, suggesting an indirect activation mechanism. Further results from an in vitro ligand binding assay demonstrated that neither farnesol nor other isoprenoids are direct ligands for hCAR1. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that SQ1 activates CYP2B transcriptional responses through farnesol metabolism in an hCAR1-dependent manner. Further, this effect probably occurs through an indirect mechanism. PMID:26798158

  8. Statins attenuate the development of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to urban particulate matter (PM{sub 10})

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Hiraiwa, Kunihiko; Cheng, Jui Chih; Bai, Ni; Vincent, Renaud; Francis, Gordon A.; Sin, Don D.; Van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (particles less than 10 μm or PM{sub 10}) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have well-established anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of statins on the adverse functional and morphological changes in blood vessels induced by PM{sub 10}. New Zealand White rabbits fed with a high fat diet were subjected to balloon injury to their abdominal aorta followed by PM{sub 10}/saline exposure for 4 weeks ± lovastatin (5 mg/kg/day) treatment. PM{sub 10} exposure accelerated balloon catheter induced plaque formation and increased intimal macrophages and lipid accumulation while lovastatin attenuated these changes and promoted smooth muscle cell recruitment into plaques. PM{sub 10} impaired vascular acetylcholine (Ach) responses and increased vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine as assessed by wire myograph. Supplementation of nitric oxide improved the impaired Ach responses. PM{sub 10} increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood vessels and increased the plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Incubation with specific inhibitors for iNOS, COX-2 or ET-1 in the myograph chambers significantly improved the impaired vascular function. Lovastatin decreased the expression of these mediators in atherosclerotic lesions and improved endothelial dysfunction. However, lovastatin was unable to reduce blood lipid levels to the baseline level in rabbits exposed to PM{sub 10}. Taken together, statins protect against PM{sub 10}-induced cardiovascular disease by reducing atherosclerosis and improving endothelial function via their anti-inflammatory properties. - Highlights: • Coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) accelerated balloon injury-induced plaque formation. • Lovastatin decreased intimal

  9. Anti-inflammatory effect of simvastatin in an experimental model of spinal cord trauma: involvement of PPAR-α

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Statins such as simvastatin are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase used in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition to their cholesterol-lowering activities, statins exert pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects, which might contribute to their beneficial effects on lipid-unrelated inflammatory diseases. Recently it has been demonstrated that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α mediates anti-inflammatory effects of simvastatin in vivo models of acute inflammation. Moreover, previous results suggest that PPAR-α plays a role in control of secondary inflammatory process associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods With the aim to characterize the role of PPAR-α in simvastatin activity, we tested the efficacy of simvastatin (10 mg/kg dissolved in saline i.p. 1 h and 6 h after the trauma) in an experimental model of SCI induced in mice by extradural compression of the spinal cord (T6-T7 level) using an aneurysm clip with a closing force of 24 g via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy, and comparing mice lacking PPAR-α (PPAR-α KO) with wild type (WT) mice. In order to elucidate whether the effects of simvastatin are due to activation of the PPAR-α, we also investigated the effect of a PPAR-α antagonist, GW6471 (1 mg/kg administered i.p. 30 min prior treatment with simvastatin) on the protective effects of on simvastatin. Results Results indicate that simvastatin activity is weakened in PPAR-α KO mice, as compared to WT controls. In particular, simvastatin was less effective in PPAR-α KO, compared to WT mice, as evaluated by inhibition of the degree of spinal cord inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, nitrotyrosine formation, pro-inflammmatory cytokine expression, nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation, inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and apoptosis. In addition we demonstrated that GW6471 significantly antagonized the effect of the statin and thus abolished the

  10. Effects of ruminal doses of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch on ruminal fermentation and expression of genes in ruminal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oba, M; Mewis, J L; Zhining, Z

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate effects of a ruminal dose of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch on ruminal fermentation and expression of genes in ruminal epithelial cells. Six ruminally cannulated nonlactating nonpregnant Holstein cows (body weight=725±69.6kg) were assigned to treatments in a 3×3 Latin square design with 7-d periods; 1d for data and sample collection followed by a 6-d washout period. Cows were fed a diet containing whole-crop barley silage and dry ground corn, and dietary neutral detergent fiber and crude protein contents were 41.8 and 13.2% [dry matter (DM) basis], respectively. Treatment was a pulse-dose of sucrose, lactose, and corn starch (3.0, 3.0, and 2.85kg of DM, respectively; providing similar amounts of hexose across the treatments) through the ruminal cannulas. All treatments were given with alfalfa silage (1.75kg DM) to prevent acute rumen acidosis. Rumen pH was continuously monitored, and rumen fluid was sampled at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180min after the dose. In addition, ruminal papillae were sampled from the ventral sac at 180min after the dose. Ruminal dosing with sucrose and lactose, compared with corn starch, increased ruminal total volatile fatty acid concentration and molar proportion of butyrate from 60 to 180min after the dose, and expression of genes for sodium hydrogen exchanger isoforms 1 and 2, and ATPase isoform 1 in ruminal epithelial cells. Ruminal dosing with sucrose, compared with lactose and corn starch, decreased rumen pH from 120 to 180min after the dose and molar proportion of acetate in ruminal fluid from 60 to 150min after the dose, and increased molar proportion of propionate in ruminal fluid from 60 to 150min, and expression of genes involved in butyrate metabolism (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase isoform 1) and anion exchange across ruminal apical cell membrane (putative anion transporter isoform 1). These results suggest that replacing dietary starch with sugars may affect ruminal

  11. Structure of isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Domagalski, M J; Tkaczuk, K L; Chruszcz, M; Skarina, T; Onopriyenko, O; Cymborowski, M; Grabowski, M; Savchenko, A; Minor, W

    2013-09-01

    The isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis is essential for the biosynthesis of the siderophore bacillibactin by this pathogenic bacterium. The structure of the selenomethionine-substituted protein was determined to 2.4 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. B. anthracis DhbC bears the strongest resemblance to the Escherichia coli isochorismate synthase EntC, which is involved in the biosynthesis of another siderophore, namely enterobactin. Both proteins adopt the characteristic fold of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of various products, including siderophores, menaquinone and tryptophan. The conservation of the active-site residues, as well as their spatial arrangement, suggests that these enzymes share a common Mg(2+)-dependent catalytic mechanism.

  12. Defining the Product Chemical Space of Monoterpenoid Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Boxue; Poulter, C. Dale; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases create diverse carbon skeletons by catalyzing complex carbocation rearrangements, making them particularly challenging for enzyme function prediction. To begin to address this challenge, we have developed a computational approach for the systematic enumeration of terpenoid carbocations. Application of this approach allows us to systematically define a nearly complete chemical space for the potential carbon skeletons of products from monoterpenoid synthases. Specifically, 18758 carbocations were generated, which we cluster into 74 cyclic skeletons. Five of the 74 skeletons are found in known natural products; some of the others are plausible for new functions, either in nature or engineered. This work systematizes the description of function for this class of enzymes, and provides a basis for predicting functions of uncharacterized enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first computational study to explore the complete product chemical space of this important class of enzymes. PMID:27517297

  13. Structure of isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, M. J.; Tkaczuk, K. L.; Chruszcz, M.; Skarina, T.; Onopriyenko, O.; Cymborowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Savchenko, A.; Minor, W.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate synthase DhbC from Bacillus anthracis is essential for the biosynthesis of the siderophore bacillibactin by this pathogenic bacterium. The structure of the selenomethionine-substituted protein was determined to 2.4 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. B. anthracis DhbC bears the strongest resemblance to the Escherichia coli isochorismate synthase EntC, which is involved in the biosynthesis of another siderophore, namely enterobactin. Both proteins adopt the characteristic fold of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, which are involved in the biosynthesis of various products, including siderophores, menaquinone and tryptophan. The conservation of the active-site residues, as well as their spatial arrangement, suggests that these enzymes share a common Mg2+-dependent catalytic mechanism. PMID:23989140

  14. Use of linalool synthase in genetic engineering of scent production

    DOEpatents

    Pichersky, Eran

    1998-01-01

    A purified S-linalool synthase polypeptide from Clarkia breweri is disclosed as is the recombinant polypeptide and nucleic acid sequences encoding the polypeptide. Also disclosed are antibodies immunoreactive with the purified peptide and with recombinant versions of the polypeptide. Methods of using the nucleic acid sequences, as well as methods of enhancing the smell and the flavor of plants expressing the nucleic acid sequences are also disclosed.

  15. Isolation and characterization of terpene synthases in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Qing; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Ruan, Ju-Xin; Hu, Wen-Li; Mao, Yin-Bo; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Ling-Jian

    2013-12-01

    Cotton plants accumulate gossypol and related sesquiterpene aldehydes, which function as phytoalexins against pathogens and feeding deterrents to herbivorous insects. However, to date little is known about the biosynthesis of volatile terpenes in this crop. Herein is reported that 5 monoterpenes and 11 sesquiterpenes from extracts of a glanded cotton cultivar, Gossypium hirsutum cv. CCRI12, were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). By EST data mining combined with Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE), full-length cDNAs of three terpene synthases (TPSs), GhTPS1, GhTPS2 and GhTPS3 were isolated. By in vitro assays of the recombinant proteins, it was found that GhTPS1 and GhTPS2 are sesquiterpene synthases: the former converted farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) into β-caryophyllene and α-humulene in a ratio of 2:1, whereas the latter produced several sesquiterpenes with guaia-1(10),11-diene as the major product. By contrast, GhTPS3 is a monoterpene synthase, which produced α-pinene, β-pinene, β-phellandrene and trace amounts of other monoterpenes from geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP). The TPS activities were also supported by Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) in the cotton plant. GhTPS1 and GhTPS3 were highly expressed in the cotton plant overall, whereas GhTPS2 was expressed only in leaves. When stimulated by mechanical wounding, Verticillium dahliae (Vde) elicitor or methyl jasmonate (MeJA), production of terpenes and expression of the corresponding synthase genes were induced. These data demonstrate that the three genes account for the biosynthesis of volatile terpenes of cotton, at least of this Upland cotton.

  16. Use of linalool synthase in genetic engineering of scent production

    DOEpatents

    Pichersky, E.

    1998-12-15

    A purified S-linalool synthase polypeptide from Clarkia breweri is disclosed as is the recombinant polypeptide and nucleic acid sequences encoding the polypeptide. Also disclosed are antibodies immunoreactive with the purified peptide and with recombinant versions of the polypeptide. Methods of using the nucleic acid sequences, as well as methods of enhancing the smell and the flavor of plants expressing the nucleic acid sequences are also disclosed. 5 figs.

  17. Piriformospora indica requires kaurene synthase activity for successful plant colonization.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Chen, Xi; Ma, Chaoyang; Wu, Hongqing; Qi, Shuting

    2016-05-01

    Ent-kaurene (KS) synthases and ent-kaurene-like (KSL) synthases are involved in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins and/or gibberellins which play a role in plant immunity and development. The relationship between expression of five synthase genes (HvKSL1, HvKS2, HvKS4, HvKS5, HvKSL4) and plant colonization by the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica was assessed in barley (Hordeum vulgare). The KS gene family is differently up-regulated at 1, 3 and 7 day after P. indica inoculation. By comparison, the HvKSL4 gene expression pattern is more significantly affected by UV irradiation and P. indica colonization. The characterizations of two silencing lines (HvKSL1-RNAi, HvKSL4-RNAi) also were analyzed. HvKSL1-RNAi and HvKSL4-RNAi lines in the first generation lead to less dark green leaves and slower plant development. Further, reduced spikelet fertility in progenies of RNAi plants heterozygous for HvKSL1 were observed, but not for HvKSL4. T2 generation of HvKSL1-RNAi line showed semi-dwarf phenotype while the wild type phenotype could be restored by applying GA3. Silencing of HvKSL4 and HvKSL1 resulted in reduced colonization by P. indica especially in the HvKSL1-RNAi line. These results probably suggest the presence of two ent-KS synthase in barley, one (HvKSL1) that participates in the biosynthesis of GAs and another (HvKSL4) that is involved in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins.

  18. Screening for latent acute intermittent porphyria: the value of measuring both leucocyte delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase and erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen-1-synthase activities.

    PubMed Central

    McColl, K E; Moore, M R; Thompson, G G; Goldberg, A

    1982-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder of haem biosynthesis characterised by reduced activity of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen-1-(URO) synthase and compensatory increased activity of the rate controlling enzyme delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) synthase. Subjects with the disorder should be identified as they are at risk of developing severe porphyric attacks if exposed to a variety of drugs or chemicals. We have assessed the value of measuring the activities of ALA synthase and URO synthase in peripheral blood cells as a means of identifying latent cases in affected families. In AIP subjects, ALA synthase activity was increased and URO synthase decreased compared to controls, through there was considerable overlap between the two groups when either enzyme was examined alone. When both enzymes were examined together, all but one of the 19 AIP patients had both increased ALA synthase activity (greater than 250 nmol ALA/g protein/h) and reduced URO synthase activity (less than 25.1 nmol URO/l RBC/h), whereas none of the 62 controls showed this enzyme pattern. Examination of 35 asymptomatic first degree blood relatives of AIP patients showed that 17 (49%) had the porphyric enzyme pattern with no sex bias. The combined study of these two enzymes permits accurate detection of latent cases of AIP and confirms its autosomal dominant inheritance. PMID:7120315

  19. Iterative Polyketide Biosynthesis by Modular Polyketide Synthases in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haotong; Du, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Modular polyketide synthases (type I PKSs) in bacteria are responsible for synthesizing a significant percentage of bioactive natural products. This group of synthases has a characteristic modular organization, and each module within a PKS carries out one cycle of polyketide chain elongation; thus each module is “non-iterative” in function. It was possible to predict the basic structure of a polyketide product from the module organization of the PKSs, since there generally existed a co-linearity between the number of modules and the number of chain elongations. However, more and more bacterial modular PKSs fail to conform to the “canonical rules”, and a particularly noteworthy group of non-canonical PKSs is the bacterial iterative type I PKSs. This review covers recent examples of iteratively-used modular PKSs in bacteria. These non-canonical PKSs give rise to a large array of natural products with impressive structural diversity. The molecular mechanism behind the iterations is often unclear, presenting a new challenge to the rational engineering of these PKSs with the goal of generating new natural products. Structural elucidation of these synthase complexes and better understanding of potential PKS-PKS interactions as well as PKS-substrate recognition may provide new prospects and insp