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Sample records for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coa synthase

  1. Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase: a control enzyme in ketogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hegardt, F G

    1999-01-01

    Cytosolic and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthases were first recognized as different chemical entities in 1975, when they were purified and characterized by Lane's group. Since then, the two enzymes have been studied extensively, one as a control site of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and the other as an important control site of ketogenesis. This review describes some key developments over the last 25 years that have led to our current understanding of the physiology of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the HMG-CoA pathway and in ketogenesis in the liver and small intestine of suckling animals. The enzyme is regulated by two systems: succinylation and desuccinylation in the short term, and transcriptional regulation in the long term. Both control mechanisms are influenced by nutritional and hormonal factors, which explains the incidence of ketogenesis in diabetes and starvation, during intense lipolysis, and in the foetal-neonatal and suckling-weaning transitions. The DNA-binding properties of the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor and other transcription factors on the nuclear-receptor-responsive element of the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter have revealed how ketogenesis can be regulated by fatty acids. Finally, the expression of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the gonads and the correction of auxotrophy for mevalonate in cells deficient in cytosolic HMG-CoA synthase suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme may play a role in cholesterogenesis in gonadal and other tissues. PMID:10051425

  2. Enterococcus faecalis 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, an enzyme of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherlin, Autumn; Hedl, Matija; Sanchez-Neri, Barbara; Burgner, John W; Stauffacher, Cynthia V; Rodwell, Victor W

    2002-08-01

    Biosynthesis of the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) proceeds via two distinct pathways. Sequence comparisons and microbiological data suggest that multidrug-resistant strains of gram-positive cocci employ exclusively the mevalonate pathway for IPP biosynthesis. Bacterial mevalonate pathway enzymes therefore offer potential targets for development of active site-directed inhibitors for use as antibiotics. We used the PCR and Enterococcus faecalis genomic DNA to isolate the mvaS gene that encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, the second enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. mvaS was expressed in Escherichia coli from a pET28 vector with an attached N-terminal histidine tag. The expressed enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-agarose to apparent homogeneity and a specific activity of 10 micromol/min/mg. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that the enzyme is a dimer (mass, 83.9 kDa; s(20,w), 5.3). Optimal activity occurred in 2.0 mM MgCl(2) at 37(o)C. The DeltaH(a) was 6,000 cal. The pH activity profile, optimum activity at pH 9.8, yielded a pK(a) of 8.8 for a dissociating group, presumably Glu78. The stoichiometry per monomer of acetyl-CoA binding was 1.2 +/- 0.2 and that of covalent acetylation was 0.60 +/- 0.02. The K(m) for the hydrolysis of acetyl-CoA was 10 microM. Coupled conversion of acetyl-CoA to mevalonate was demonstrated by using HMG-CoA synthase and acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase/HMG-CoA reductase from E. faecalis. PMID:12107122

  3. Atypical expression of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in subcutaneous adipose tissue of male rats.

    PubMed

    Thumelin, S; Kohl, C; Girard, J; Pégorier, J P

    1999-06-01

    The mRNAs encoding mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (mtHMG-CoA synthase), the rate limiting enzyme in ketone body production, are highly expressed in subcutaneous (SC) and, to a lesser extent, in peri-epididymal (PE) rat adipose tissues. This atypical mtHMG-CoA synthase gene expression is dependent on the age (from 9 weeks of age) and sex (higher in male than in female) of the rats. In contrast, the expression of mtHMG-CoA synthase in SC adipose deposit is independent of the nutritional state (fed versus starved) or of the thermic environment (24 degrees C versus 4 degrees C). The expression of mtHMG-CoA synthase is suppressed in SC fat pads of castrated male rats whereas treatment of castrated rats with testosterone restores a normal level of expression. Moreover, testosterone injection induces the expression mtHMG-CoA synthase in SC adipose tissue of age-matched females. The presence of the mtHMG-CoA synthase immunoreactive protein confers to mitochondria isolated from SC adipose deposits, the capacity to produce ketone bodies at a rate similar to that found in liver mitochondria (SC = 13.7 +/- 0.7, liver = 16.4 +/- 1.4 nmol/min/mg prot). mtHMG-CoA synthase is expressed in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) whatever the adipose deposit considered. While acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is only expressed in mature adipocytes, the other lipogenic enzymes, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and citrate cleavage enzyme (CCE), are expressed both in SVF cells and mature adipocytes. The expression of lipogenic enzyme genes is markedly reduced in adipocytes but not in SVF cells isolated from 48-h starved male rats. When SVF is subfractionated, mtHMG-CoA synthase mRNAs are mainly recovered in two fractions containing poorly digested structures such as microcapillaries whereas the lowest expression is found in the pre-adipocyte fraction. Interestingly, FAS and CCE mRNAs co-segregate with mtHMG-CoA synthase mRNA. The possible physiological relevance of such

  4. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species. PMID:17714440

  5. Regulation of the expression of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene. Its role in the control of ketogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Casals, N; Roca, N; Guerrero, M; Gil-Gómez, G; Ayté, J; Ciudad, C J; Hegardt, F G

    1992-01-01

    We have explored the role of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase in regulating ketogenesis. We had previously cloned the cDNA for mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and have now studied the regulation in vivo of the expression of this gene in rat liver. The amount of processed mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase mRNA is rapidly changed in response to cyclic AMP, insulin, dexamethasone and refeeding, and is greatly increased by starvation, fat feeding and diabetes. We conclude that one point of ketogenic control is exercised at the level of genetic expression of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:1348927

  6. Isolation of pig mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene promoter: characterization of a peroxisome proliferator-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, J A; Mallolas, J; Nicot, C; Bofarull, J; Rodríguez, J C; Hegardt, F G; Haro, D; Marrero, P F

    1999-01-01

    Low expression of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase gene during development correlates with an unusually low hepatic ketogenic capacity and lack of hyperketonaemia in piglets. Here we report the isolation and characterization of the 5' end of the pig mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene. The 581 bp region proximal to the transcription start site permits transcription of a reporter gene, confirming the function of the promoter. The pig mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter is trans-activated by the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and a functional response element for PPAR (PPRE) has been localized in the promoter region. Pig PPRE is constituted by an imperfect direct repeat (DR-1) and a downstream sequence, both of which are needed to confer PPAR-sensitivity to a thymidine kinase promoter and to form complexes with PPAR.retinoid X receptor heterodimers. A role of PPAR trans-activation in starvation-associated induction of gene expression is suggested. PMID:9882632

  7. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Cloning, Expression Profiling and Functional Analysis of CnHMGS, a Gene Encoding 3-hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Synthase from Chamaemelum nobile.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng; Chen, Qiangwen; Tao, Tingting; Lei, Jing; Zhang, Weiwei; Liao, Yongling; Chang, Jie; Li, Xingxiang

    2016-01-01

    Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L.) is renowned for its production of essential oils, which major components are sesquiterpenoids. As the important enzyme in the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase (HMGS) catalyze the crucial step in the mevalonate pathway in plants. To isolate and identify the functional genes involved in the sesquiterpene biosynthesis of C. nobile L., a HMGS gene designated as CnHMGS (GenBank Accession No. KU529969) was cloned from C. nobile. The cDNA sequence of CnHMGS contained a 1377 bp open reading frame encoding a 458-amino-acid protein. The sequence of the CnHMGS protein was highly homologous to those of HMGS proteins from other plant species. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that CnHMGS clustered with the HMGS of Asteraceae in the dicotyledon clade. Further functional complementation of CnHMGS in the mutant yeast strain YSC6274 lacking HMGS activity demonstrated that the cloned CnHMGS cDNA encodes a functional HMGS. Transcript profile analysis indicated that CnHMGS was preferentially expressed in flowers and roots of C. nobile. The expression of CnHMGS could be upregulated by exogenous elicitors, including methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid, suggesting that CnHMGS was elicitor-responsive. The characterization and expression analysis of CnHMGS is helpful to understand the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid in C. nobile at the molecular level and also provides molecular wealth for the biotechnological improvement of this important medicinal plant. PMID:27005600

  9. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors up-regulate transforming growth factor-β signaling in cultured heart cells via inhibition of geranylgeranylation of RhoA GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ho-Jin; Galper, Jonas B.

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling has been shown to play a role in cardiac development as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Prior studies have suggested a relationship between cholesterol metabolism and TGFβ signaling. Here we demonstrate that induction of the cholesterol metabolic pathway by growth of embryonic chicken atrial cells in medium supplemented with lipoprotein-depleted serum coordinately decreased the expression of the TGFβ type II receptor (TGFβRII), TGFβ1, and TGFβ signaling as measured by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter activity. Inhibition of the cholesterol metabolic pathway by the hydrophobic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMGCoA) reductase inhibitors, simvastatin and atorvastatin, reversed the effect of lipoprotein-depleted serum and up-regulated TGFβRII expression, whereas the hydrophilic HMGCoA reductase inhibitor, pravastatin, had no effect. Simvastatin stimulated the expression of TGFβRII, TGFβ1, and PAI-1 at the level of transcription. Experiments using specific inhibitors of different branches of the cholesterol metabolic pathway demonstrated that simvastatin exerted its effect on TGFβ signaling by inhibition of the geranylgeranylation pathway. C3 exotoxin, which specifically inactivates geranylgeranylated Rho GTPases, mimicked the effect of simvastatin on PAI-1 promoter activity. Cotransfection of cells with a PAI-1 promoter-reporter and a dominant-negative RhoA mutant increased PAI-1 promoter activity, whereas cotransfection with a dominant-active RhoA mutant decreased PAI-1 promoter activity. These data support the conclusion that TGFβ signaling is regulated by RhoA GTPase and demonstrate a relationship between cholesterol metabolism and TGFβ signaling. Our data suggest that in patients treated with HMGCoA reductase inhibitors, these agents may exert effects independent of cholesterol lowering on TGFβ signaling in the heart. PMID:10500210

  10. Increased accumulation of the cardio-cerebrovascular disease treatment drug tanshinone in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots by the enzymes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Luo, Xiuqin; Ju, Guanhua; Yu, Xiaohong; Hao, Xiaolong; Huang, Qiang; Xiao, Jianbo; Cui, Lijie; Kai, Guoyin

    2014-09-01

    Tanshinone is widely used for treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases with increasing demand. Herein, key enzyme genes SmHMGR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase) and SmDXR (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase) involved in the tanshinone biosynthetic pathway were introduced into Salvia miltiorrhiza (Sm) hairy roots to enhance tanshinone production. Over-expression of SmHMGR or SmDXR in hairy root lines can significantly enhance the yield of tanshinone. Transgenic hairy root lines co-expressing HMGR and DXR (HD lines) produced evidently higher levels of total tanshinone (TT) compared with the control and single gene transformed lines. The highest tanshinone production was observed in HD42 with the concentration of 3.25 mg g(-1) DW. Furthermore, the transgenic hairy roots showed higher antioxidant activity than control. In addition, transgenic hairy root harboring HMGR and DXR (HD42) exhibited higher tanshinone content after elicitation by yeast extract and/or Ag(+) than before. Tanshinone can be significantly enhanced to 5.858, 6.716, and 4.426 mg g(-1) DW by YE, Ag(+), and YE-Ag(+) treatment compared with non-induced HD42, respectively. The content of cryptotanshinone and dihydrotanshinone was effectively elevated upon elicitor treatments, whereas there was no obvious promotion effect for the other two compounds tanshinone I and tanshinone IIA. Our results provide a useful strategy to improve tanshinone content as well as other natural active products by combination of genetic engineering with elicitors. PMID:24913677

  11. Chicken ovalbumin upstream-promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) could act as a transcriptional activator or repressor of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, J C; Ortiz, J A; Hegardt, F G; Haro, D

    1997-01-01

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream-promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) has a dual effect on the regulation of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase gene. COUP-TF could act as a transcriptional activator or repressor of this gene through different DNA sequences. COUP-TF induces expression of a reporter gene linked to the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene promoter in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but represses it in a Leydig tumour cell line (R2C); in both these cell lines the expression of the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene mimics that of liver and testis. The activation is promoted by a fragment of the gene from coordinates -62 to +28, which contains a GC box and a TATA box, and where no COUP-TF binding site was observed by in vitro DNA binding studies. On the other hand, the COUP-TF inhibitory effect is mainly due to repression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-dependent activation of the gene, interacting with the region from -104 to -92. To our knowledge this work represents the second example of a target gene for COUP-TF I that could be either activated or repressed by the action of this receptor through different DNA sequences of the same gene. PMID:9291136

  12. Inhibition of squalene synthase but not squalene cyclase prevents mevalonate-mediated suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase synthesis at a posttranscriptional level.

    PubMed

    Peffley, D M; Gayen, A K

    1997-01-15

    Previously, we found that mevalonate-derived products together with an oxysterol regulated reductase synthesis at a posttranscriptional level. To determine which products were responsible for this regulation, either the squalene synthase inhibitor zaragozic acid A or the squalene cyclase inhibitor 4,4,10-beta-trimethyl-trans-decal-3beta-ol (TMD) was added to lovastatin-treated Syrian hamster cells in conjunction with mevalonate. Mevalonate alone decreased reductase synthesis 50% compared with lovastatin-treated cells. In contrast, when both zaragozic acid A and mevalonate were added to lovastatin-treated cells, there was no change in reductase synthesis. With either treatment, reductase mRNA levels did not change compared with lovastatin-treated cells. When both 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevalonate were added to lovastatin-treated cells, reductase synthesis and mRNA levels were decreased 95 and 50%, respectively. The 10-fold difference between changes in reductase synthesis and mRNA levels under these conditions reflects a specific effect of mevalonate-derived isoprenoids on reductase synthesis at the translational level. In contrast, coincubation of cells with mevalonate plus 25-hydroxycholesterol in the presence of zaragozic acid decreased reductase synthesis and mRNA levels 60 and 50%, respectively, compared with lovastatin-treated cells. Moreover, degradation of reductase was increased approximately 7-fold in cells treated with mevalonate alone but only 3-fold in cells treated with mevalonate and zaragozic acid A. These results indicate that isoprenoid products between mevalonate and squalene affect reductase at a posttranslational level by increasing degradation but do not regulate reductase synthesis at a posttranscriptional level. In contrast, when both TMD and mevalonate were added to lovastatin-treated cells, reductase synthesis was decreased approximately 50% with no corresponding decrease in reductase mRNA levels, similar to mevalonate only. Reductase

  13. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase activity in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Angelin, B

    1988-01-01

    The lipoprotein-mediated regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-(HMG-) CoA reductase in cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages has been investigated. In contrast to what has been reported for other cells, HMG-CoA reductase activity is not suppressed by normal serum or by normal low density lipoproteins (LDL) from humans or dogs. Suppression of reductase activity occurred when cells were cultured in the presence of beta-migrating very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) or LDL from hypercholesterolaemic dogs, or LDL modified by acetoacetylation. Human beta-VLDL from an atypical type III hyperlipoproteinaemic patient was also effective, as was apolipoprotein (apo) E-containing high density lipoproteins (HDL) from cholesterol-fed dogs (apo-E HDLc). The results indicate that cholesterol biosynthesis in mouse peritoneal macrophages is regulated by lipoprotein cholesterol entering via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Normal LDL were not effective because of the poor binding and uptake of these lipoproteins by the apo-B, E (LDL) receptor. Only beta-VLDL, apo-E HDLc, and hypercholesterolaemic LDL were avidly taken up by this receptor and were able to suppress HMG-CoA reductase. Acetoacetylated LDL were internalized via the acetyl-LDL (scavenger) receptor. Thus, mouse macrophages differ from human fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells in their physiological regulation of cholesterogenesis. PMID:3202831

  14. Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Human Fibroblasts by Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael S.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1973-01-01

    The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34), the rate-limiting enzyme of hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis, is suppressed in human fibroblasts cultured in the presence of serum. This enzyme activity increases by more than 10-fold after the removal of serum from the medium. The rise in enzyme activity requires de novo protein synthesis and is not accompanied by changes in the activities of several other cellular enzymes. The factor responsible for the suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in cultured fibroblasts is present in the sera of at least four mammalian species, and in human serum it is found in the low-density lipoproteins. Human high-density lipoproteins, very low-density lipoproteins from chicken egg yolk, and the fraction of human serum containing no lipoproteins do not suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. PMID:4352976

  15. Controlling Cholesterol Synthesis beyond 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase (HMGCR)*

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Laura J.; Brown, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) is the target of the statins, important drugs that lower blood cholesterol levels and treat cardiovascular disease. Consequently, the regulation of HMGCR has been investigated in detail. However, this enzyme acts very early in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, with ∼20 subsequent enzymes needed to produce cholesterol. How they are regulated is largely unexplored territory, but there is growing evidence that enzymes beyond HMGCR serve as flux-controlling points. Here, we introduce some of the known regulatory mechanisms affecting enzymes beyond HMGCR and highlight the need to further investigate their control. PMID:23696639

  16. 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase: a new biomarker of fish exposure to water pollution.

    PubMed

    Pallottini, Valentina; Scalici, Massimiliano; Gibertini, Giancarlo; Marino, Maria; Trentalance, Anna

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a new putative biomarker in Salmo trutta exposed to water pollution. Variations in the levels of hepatic 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR), the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, were compared to heat shock protein 70 and hypoxia inducible factor α, biomarkers of pollution exposure and lowered O₂, respectively. The results confirm that HMG-CoAR levels increase in polluted water irrespective of water temperature or O₂ content, indicating that HMG-CoAR could be used as a specific biomarker for water pollution. PMID:20835703

  17. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway mediates the regulated degradation of mammalian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Ravid, T; Doolman, R; Avner, R; Harats, D; Roitelman, J

    2000-11-17

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the key regulatory enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is rapidly degraded in mammalian cells supplemented with sterols or MVA. This accelerated turnover was blocked by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN), MG-132, and lactacystin, and to a lesser extent by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-methional (ALLM), indicating the involvement of the 26 S proteasome. Proteasome inhibition led to enhanced accumulation of high molecular weight polyubiquitin conjugates of HMGR and of HMGal, a chimera between the membrane domain of HMGR and beta-galactosidase. Importantly, increased amounts of polyubiquitinated HMGR and HMGal were observed upon treating cells with sterols or MVA. Cycloheximide inhibited the sterol-stimulated degradation of HMGR concomitantly with a marked reduction in polyubiquitination of the enzyme. Inhibition of squalene synthase with zaragozic acid blocked the MVA- but not sterol-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGR. Thus, similar to yeast, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the metabolically regulated turnover of mammalian HMGR. Yet, the data indicate divergence between yeast and mammals and suggest distinct roles for sterol and nonsterol metabolic signals in the regulated ubiquitination and degradation of mammalian HMGR. PMID:10964918

  18. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase modulator: toward age- and sex-personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Pallottini, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis maintenance is regulated by a cellular feedback system that senses cholesterol amount in cellular membranes. 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) plays a pivotal role in cholesterol metabolism as it is the key rate-limiting enzyme of its biosynthetic pathway; its inhibition provokes a feedback response capable of reducing plasma cholesterol content. HMGR inhibition is a keystone in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease and, therefore, statins (HMGR inhibitors) are widely prescribed even though they may sometimes induce side effects. These drugs are prescribed indifferently to both man and women even if there are several well-known differences in cholesterol metabolism depending on the gender and the age. Thus, gender-related differences in cholesterol metabolism should be taken into account to identify new targets for customized pharmacological treatments for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26135220

  19. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase reduce receptor-mediated endocytosis in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, James E; Davidson, Robert G; McTaggart, Fergus; Orton, Terry C; Scott, Robert C; Smith, Graham J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-09-01

    Renal proximal tubule cells are responsible for the reabsorption of proteins that are present in the tubular lumen. This occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that has a requirement for some GTP-binding proteins. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase used for the therapeutic reduction of cholesterol-containing plasma lipoproteins. However, they can also reduce intracellular levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates that are derived from the product of the enzyme, mevalonate, and are required for the prenylation and normal function of GTP-binding proteins. The hypothesis that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in renal proximal tubule cells could reduce receptor mediated-endocytosis was therefore tested. Five different statins inhibited the uptake of FITC-labeled albumin by the proximal tubule-derived opossum kidney cell line in a dose-dependent manner and in the absence of cytotoxicity. The reduction in albumin uptake was related to the degree of inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. Simvastatin (e.g., statin) inhibited receptor-mediated endocytosis of both FITC-albumin and FITC-beta(2)-microglobulin to similar extents but without altering the binding of albumin to the cell surface. The effect on albumin endocytosis was prevented by mevalonate and by the isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by cholesterol. Finally, evidence that the inhibitory effect of statins on endocytosis of proteins may be caused by reduced prenylation and thereby decreased function of one or more GTP-binding proteins is provided. These data establish the possibility in principle that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins in proximal tubule cells may reduce tubular protein reabsorption. PMID:15339975

  20. Metabolically Regulated Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, Gil S.; Avner, Rachel; Harats, Dror; Roitelman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mevalonate pathway, is ubiquitylated and degraded by the 26 S proteasome when mevalonate-derived metabolites accumulate, representing a case of metabolically regulated endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we studied which mevalonate-derived metabolites signal for HMGR degradation and the ERAD step(s) in which these metabolites are required. In HMGR-deficient UT-2 cells that stably express HMGal, a chimeric protein between β-galactosidase and the membrane region of HMGR, which is necessary and sufficient for the regulated ERAD, we tested inhibitors specific to different steps in the mevalonate pathway. We found that metabolites downstream of farnesyl pyrophosphate but upstream to lanosterol were highly effective in initiating ubiquitylation, dislocation, and degradation of HMGal. Similar results were observed for endogenous HMGR in cells that express this protein. Ubiquitylation, dislocation, and proteasomal degradation of HMGal were severely hampered when production of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate was inhibited. Importantly, inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation markedly attenuated ubiquitylation and dislocation, implicating for the first time a geranylgeranylated protein(s) in the metabolically regulated ERAD of HMGR. PMID:21778231

  1. The Role of the 3-Hydroxy 3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Cytosolic Domain in Karmellae Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Profant, Deborah A.; Roberts, Christopher J.; Koning, Ann J.; Wright, Robin L.

    1999-01-01

    In all cells examined, specific endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane arrays are induced in response to increased levels of the ER membrane protein 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. In yeast, expression of Hmg1p, one of two yeast HMG-CoA reductase isozymes, induces assembly of nuclear-associated ER stacks called karmellae. Understanding the features of HMG-CoA reductase that signal karmellae biogenesis would provide useful insights into the regulation of membrane biogenesis. The HMG-CoA reductase protein consists of two domains, a multitopic membrane domain and a cytosolic catalytic domain. Previous studies had indicated that the HMG-CoA reductase membrane domain was exclusively responsible for generation of ER membrane proliferations. Surprisingly, we discovered that this conclusion was incorrect: sequences at the carboxyl terminus of HMG-CoA reductase can profoundly affect karmellae biogenesis. Specifically, truncations of Hmg1p that removed or shortened the carboxyl terminus were unable to induce karmellae assembly. This result indicated that the membrane domain of Hmg1p was not sufficient to signal for karmellae assembly. Using β-galactosidase fusions, we demonstrated that the carboxyl terminus was unlikely to simply serve as an oligomerization domain. Our working hypothesis is that a truncated or misfolded cytosolic domain prevents proper signaling for karmellae by interfering with the required tertiary structure of the membrane domain. PMID:10512876

  2. [3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase deficiency as a cause of severe neurological damage].

    PubMed

    Dodelson de Kremer, R; Kelley, R I; Depetris de Boldini, C; Paschini de Capra, A; Corbella, L; Givogri, I; Giner de Ayala, A; Albarenque, M

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the first Argentine case of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria, a genetic defect of ketogenesis and leucine catabolism step. At the age of 4 months, the patient presented a life-threatening episode of hypoglucemia, metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia resembling Reye syndrome. The lack of urinary ketone bodies, normal levels of plasma aminoacids and normal urinary excretion of p-hydroxyphenolic acids, led us to look for a ketogenic defect. An abnormal profile of urinary organic acids detected by thin layer chromatography and later characterized and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Figs. 1, 2; Table 1), showed a marked increase in the acidic metabolites typical of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric, 3-methylglutaconic, 3-methylglutaric and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acids. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A lyase was absent in white cell pellets and between 2-5% of the control values in skin fibroblasts (Table 2). Treatment of the disorder, mainly restricted leucine or low-protein diet and addition of L-carnitine had no significant effect on the severe neurological injuries present since the first illness. MRI of the brain, at the age of 1 year and 8 months, showed images in T1 suggestive of marked cerebral atrophy and in T2 hyperintensive images predominating in the right frontal and posterior parietal areas and of the punctiform lesions in the basal ganglia, particularly in the heads of both caudate nuclei.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1302289

  3. Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase1

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; González, Víctor M.; Castel, Susanna; Trelease, Richard N.; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Arró, Montserrat; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso; Ferrer, Albert; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Plants produce diverse isoprenoids, which are synthesized in plastids, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the nonorganellar cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate, a rate-limiting step in the cytoplasmic pathway. Several branches of the pathway lead to the synthesis of structurally and functionally varied, yet essential, isoprenoids. Several HMGR isoforms have been identified in all plants examined. Studies based on gene expression and on fractionation of enzyme activity suggested that subcellular compartmentalization of HMGR is an important intracellular channeling mechanism for the production of the specific classes of isoprenoids. Plant HMGR has been shown previously to insert in vitro into the membrane of microsomal vesicles, but the final in vivo subcellular localization(s) remains controversial. To address the latter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, we conducted a multipronged microscopy and cell fractionation approach that included imaging of chimeric HMGR green fluorescent protein localizations in transiently transformed cell leaves, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in wild-type and stably transformed seedlings, immunogold electron microscopy examinations of endogenous HMGR in seedling cotyledons, and sucrose density gradient analyses of HMGR-containing organelles. Taken together, the results reveal that endogenous Arabidopsis HMGR is localized at steady state within ER as expected, but surprisingly also predominantly within spherical, vesicular structures that range from 0.2- to 0.6-μm diameter, located in the cytoplasm and within the central vacuole in differentiated cotyledon cells. The N-terminal region, including the transmembrane domain of HMGR, was found to be necessary and sufficient for directing HMGR to ER and the spherical structures. It is believed, although not directly demonstrated, that these vesicle-like structures are derived from segments of HMGR

  4. Mevalonic acid-dependent degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Correll, C C; Edwards, P A

    1994-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is subject to rapid degradation when cells are incubated with sterols or mevalonic acid (MVA). It has been shown that this rapid degradation is dependent upon both a sterol and another MVA-derived metabolite (Nakanishi, M., Goldstein, J. L., and Brown, M. S. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 8929-8937). In the current study, inhibitors of the isoprene biosynthetic pathway were used to define further this mevalonic acid derivative involved in the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. The accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase in met-18b-2 cells, which is induced by the addition of MVA, was inhibited by the presence of the squalene synthase inhibitor, zaragozic acid/squalestatin, or the squalene epoxidase inhibitor, NB-598. Accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was observed when NB-598-treated cells were incubated with both MVA and sterols. In contrast, the addition of MVA and sterols to zaragozic acid/squalestatin-treated cells did not result in rapid enzyme degradation. This MVA- and sterol-dependent degradation of HMG-CoA reductase persisted in cells permeabilized with reduced streptolysin O. Finally, the selective degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was also observed in rat hepatic microsomes incubated in vitro in the absence of ATP and cytosol. We conclude that the MVA-derived component that is required for the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase is derived from farnesyl disphosphate and/or squalene in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. We propose that this component has a permissive effect and does not, by itself, induce the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. We also conclude that the degradation of HMG-CoA occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, and, once the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase has been initiated by MVA and sterols, all necessary components for the continued degradation of HMG-CoA reductase reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8276863

  5. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  6. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  7. Identification of a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene highly expressed in the root tissue of Taraxacum kok-saghyz

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kazak dandelion (Taraxacum kok-saghyz, Tk) is a rubber-producing plant currently being investigated as a source of natural rubber for industrial applications. Like many other isoprenoids, rubber is a downstream product of the mevalonate pathway. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) en...

  8. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase by mevinolin in familial hypercholesterolemia heterozygotes: effects on cholesterol balance.

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, S M; Bilheimer, D W

    1984-01-01

    Patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) have a deficiency of receptors for plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) that impairs removal of LDL from plasma. In these patients, mevinolin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase [mevalonate:NAD+ oxidoreductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.88], increases receptors for LDL and decreases LDL concentrations. To determine whether mevinolin also causes severe decreases in total body synthesis of cholesterol, fecal excretions of neutral steroids and acidic steroids were determined in five FH heterozygotes before and during treatment with mevinolin. The drug produced an average decrease in plasma total cholesterol of 23% and in LDL cholesterol of 24%. Mevinolin caused a significant decrease in the output of neutral and acidic steroids in three patients, but it caused no alterations in two others. Changes in fecal output of steroids did not correlate with the degree of lowering of the patients' LDL-cholesterol level. In none of the patients did the output of fecal steroids fall below the values seen in normal subjects studied under similar conditions. One patient had a previous ileal exclusion operation and had a massive output of acidic steroids in the control period; mevinolin therapy caused a slight decrease in excretion of acidic steroids, but the output was still markedly above normal. We conclude that the LDL lowering action of mevinolin does not appear to require a severe decrease in cholesterol synthesis that might lead to depletion of vital body stores of cholesterol. PMID:6371816

  9. Thermodynamic and Structure Guided Design of Statin Based Inhibitors of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Bills, Elizabeth; Bolton, Gary; Bratton, Larry D.; Caspers, Nicole L.; Dunbar, James B.; Harris, Melissa S.; Hutchings, Richard H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Larsen, Scott D.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2008-10-02

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, are effective at lowering mortality levels associated with cardiovascular disease; however, 2--7% of patients may experience statin-induced myalgia that limits compliance with a treatment regimen. High resolution crystal structures, thermodynamic binding parameters, and biochemical data were used to design statin inhibitors with improved HMGR affinity and therapeutic index relative to statin-induced myalgia. These studies facilitated the identification of imidazole 1 as a potent (IC{sub 50} = 7.9 nM) inhibitor with excellent hepatoselectivity (>1000-fold) and good in vivo efficacy. The binding of 1 to HMGR was found to be enthalpically driven with a {Delta}H of -17.7 kcal/M. Additionally, a second novel series of bicyclic pyrrole-based inhibitors was identified that induced order in a protein flap of HMGR. Similar ordering was detected in a substrate complex, but has not been reported in previous statin inhibitor complexes with HMGR.

  10. Dual Targeting of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Histone Deacetylase as a Therapy for Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tzu-Tang; Lin, Yi-Ting; Chen, Wen-Shu; Luo, Ping; Lin, Yu-Chin; Shun, Chia-Tung; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Jhih-Bin; Chen, Nai-Wei; Fang, Jim-Min; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Yang, Kai-Chien; Chang, Li-Chun; Tai, Kang-Yu; Liang, Jin-Tung; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2016-08-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGR) inhibitors decreasing serum cholesterol and have shown promise in cancer prevention. In this study, we demonstrated the oncogenic role of HMGR in colorectal cancer (CRC) by disclosing increased HMGR activity in CRC patients and its enhancement of anti-apoptosis and stemness. Our previous studies showed that statins containing carboxylic acid chains possessed activity against histone deacetylases (HDACs), and strengthened their anti-HDAC activity through designing HMGR-HDAC dual inhibitors, JMF compounds. These compounds exerted anti-cancer effect in CRC cells as well as in AOM-DSS and Apc(Min/+) CRC mouse models. JMF mostly regulated the genes related to apoptosis and inflammation through genome-wide ChIP-on-chip analysis, and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) predicted their respective regulation by NR3C1 and NF-κB. Furthermore, JMF inhibited metastasis, angiogenesis and cancer stemness, and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in CRC mouse models. Dual HMGR-HDAC inhibitor could be a potential treatment for CRC. PMID:27448759

  11. Differential activation of potato 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes by wounding and pathogen challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Park, H; Lacy, G H; Cramer, C L

    1991-01-01

    Potato genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) were expressed in response to pathogen, elicitor, and wounding. HMGR catalyzes the rate-limiting step in isoprenoid biosynthesis leading to accumulation of phytoalexins and steroid glycoalkaloids. Wounding caused increases in HMGR mRNA levels. A rapid and transient peak occurred 30 minutes after wounding, followed by a slower peak at 14 hours; both were correlated with increased enzyme activity. Induction of HMGR mRNA by the soft rot pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp carotovora or arachidonic acid began 8 hours after challenge and continued through 22 hours. Potato HMGR is encoded by a gene family. An HMGR gene-specific probe was used to demonstrate that one isogene of the HMGR family is pathogen activated and is distinct from isogene(s) that are wound activated. This provides evidence that defense-related increases in HMGR activity are due to mRNA level increases and that HMGR isogenes are activated differentially by wounding or pathogen challenge. PMID:1840919

  12. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology via Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Luessi, Felix; Bendix, Ivo; Paterka, Magdalena; Prozorovski, Timour; Treue, Denise; Luenstedt, Sarah; Herz, Josephine; Siffrin, Volker; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Zipp, Frauke; Waiczies, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The maturation status of dendritic cells determines whether interacting T cells are activated or if they become tolerant. Previously we could induce T cell tolerance by applying a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (HMGCRI) atorvastatin, which also modulates MHC class II expression and has therapeutic potential in autoimmune disease. Here, we aimed at elucidating the impact of this therapeutic strategy on T cell differentiation as a consequence of alterations in dendritic cell function. We investigated the effect of HMGCRI during differentiation of peripheral human monocytes and murine bone marrow precursors to immature DC in vitro and assessed their phenotype. To examine the stimulatory and tolerogenic capacity of these modulated immature dendritic cells, we measured proliferation and suppressive function of CD4+ T cells after stimulation with the modulated immature dendritic cells. We found that an HMGCRI, atorvastatin, prevents dendrite formation during the generation of immature dendritic cells. The modulated immature dendritic cells had a diminished capacity to take up and present antigen as well as to induce an immune response. Of note, the consequence was an increased capacity to differentiate naïve T cells towards a suppressor phenotype that is less sensitive to proinflammatory stimuli and can effectively inhibit the proliferation of T effector cells in vitro. Thus, manipulation of antigen-presenting cells by HMGCRI contributes to an attenuated immune response as shown by promotion of T cells with suppressive capacities. PMID:25013913

  13. Metabolism and drug interactions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors in transplant patients: are the statins mechanistically similar?

    PubMed

    Christians, U; Jacobsen, W; Floren, L C

    1998-10-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) inhibitors are the most effective drugs to lower cholesterol in transplant patients. However, immunosuppressants and several other drugs used after organ transplantation are cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A, EC 1.14.14.1) substrates. Pharmacokinetic interaction with some of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, specifically lovastatin and simvastatin, leads to an increased incidence of muscle skeletal toxicity in transplant patients. It is our objective to review the role of drug metabolism and drug interactions of lovastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, and cerivastatin. In the treatment of transplant patients, from a drug interaction perspective, pravastatin, which is not significantly metabolized by CYP enzymes, and fluvastatin, presumably a CYP2C9 substrate, compare favorably with the other statins for which the major metabolic pathways are catalyzed by CYP3A. PMID:9804052

  14. Inhibition of geranylgeranylation mediates the effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitors on microglia.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel; Liu, Jihua; Yao, Yueqin; Fu, Lawrence; Brucher, Fernando; Lynch, Gary

    2004-11-12

    Inflammatory responses involving microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, are thought to contribute importantly to the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. The present study tested whether the mevalonate-isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway, which affects inflammation in many types of tissues, tonically regulates microglial activation. This question takes on added significance given the potential use of statins, drugs that block the rate-limiting step (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase)) in mevalonate and cholesterol synthesis, in AD treatment. Both mevastatin and simvastatin caused a concentration- and time-dependent activation of microglia in cultured rat hippocampal slices. This response consisted of a transformation of the cells from a typical resting configuration to an amoeboid, macrophage-like morphology, increased expression of a macrophage antigen, and up-regulation of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Evidence for proliferation was also obtained. Statin-induced microglial changes were blocked by mevalonate but not by cholesterol, indicating that they were probably due to suppression of isoprenoid synthesis. In accord with this, the statin effects were absent in slices co-incubated with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, a mevalonate product that provides for the prenylation of Rho GTPases. Finally, PD98089, a compound that blocks activation of extracellularly regulated kinases1/2, suppressed statin-induced up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha but had little effect on microglial transformation. These results suggest that 1) the mevalonate-isoprenoid pathway is involved in regulating microglial morphology and in controlling expression of certain cytokines and 2) statins have the potential for enhancing a component of AD with uncertain relationships to other features of the disease. PMID:15364922

  15. Delineation of myotoxicity induced by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Julia; Weigl, Lukas; Werner, Martin; Szegedi, Csaba; Hohenegger, Martin

    2005-09-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used and well tolerated cholesterol-lowering drugs. In rare cases, side effects occur in skeletal muscle, including myositis or even rhabdomyolysis. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood that lead to these muscle-specific side effects. Here, we show that statins cause apoptosis in differentiated human skeletal muscle cells. The prototypical representative of statins, simvastatin, triggered sustained intracellular Ca(2+) transients, leading to calpain activation. Intracellular chelation of Ca(2+) completely abrogated cell death. Moreover, ryanodine also completely prevented the simvastatin-induced calpain activation. Nevertheless, an activation of the ryanodine receptor by simvastatin could not be observed. Downstream of the calpain activation simvastatin led to a translocation of Bax to mitochondria in a caspase 8-independent manner. Consecutive activation of caspase 9 and 3 execute apoptotic cell death that was in part reversed by the coadministration of mevalonic acid. Conversely, the simvastatin-induced activation of calpain was not prevented by mevalonic acid. These data delineate the signaling cascade that leads to muscle injury caused by statins. Our observations also have implications for improving the safety of this important medication and explain to some extent why physical exercise aggravates skeletal muscle side effects. PMID:15914674

  16. On the inhibitor effects of bergamot juice flavonoids binding to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme.

    PubMed

    Leopoldini, Monica; Malaj, Naim; Toscano, Marirosa; Sindona, Giovanni; Russo, Nino

    2010-10-13

    Density functional theory was applied to study the binding mode of new flavonoids as possible inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), an enzyme that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of HMGCoA to mevalonate, the committed step in the biosynthesis of sterols. The investigated flavonoid conjugates brutieridin and melitidin were recently quantified in the bergamot fruit extracts and identified to be structural analogues of statins, lipids concentration lowering drugs that inhibit HMGR. Computations allowed us to perform a detailed analysis of the geometrical and electronic features affecting the binding of these compounds, as well as that of the excellent simvastatin drug, to the active site of the enzyme and to give better insight into the inhibition process. PMID:20843083

  17. Regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase expression by Zingiber officinale in the liver of high-fat diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nammi, Srinivas; Kim, Moon S; Gavande, Navnath S; Li, George Q; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2010-05-01

    Zingiber officinale has been used to control lipid disorders and reported to possess remarkable cholesterol-lowering activity in experimental hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the effect of a characterized and standardized extract of Zingiber officinale on the hepatic lipid levels as well as on the hepatic mRNA and protein expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was investigated in a high-fat diet-fed rat model. Rats were treated with an ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale (400 mg/kg) extract along with a high-fat diet for 6 weeks. The extract of Zingiber officinale significantly decreased hepatic triglyceride and tended to decrease hepatic cholesterol levels when administered over 6 weeks to the rats fed a high-fat diet. We found that in parallel, the extract up-regulated both LDL receptor mRNA and protein level and down-regulated HMG-CoA reductase protein expression in the liver of these rats. The metabolic control of body lipid homeostasis is in part due to enhanced cholesterol biosynthesis and reduced expression of LDL receptor sites following long-term consumption of high-fat diets. The present results show restoration of transcriptional and post-transcriptional changes in low-density lipoprotein and HMG CoA reductase by Zingiber officinale administration with a high-fat diet and provide a rational explanation for the effect of ginger in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia. PMID:20002065

  18. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are required by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  19. Effects of acid and lactone forms of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on the induction of MDR1 expression and function in LS180 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Daisuke; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Okamura, Noboru; Kokudai, Makiko; Inui, Naoki; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hirai, Midori; Okumura, Katsuhiko; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki

    2009-05-12

    In the present study, the ability of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), also known as statins, to regulate the gene expression and function of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein) and differences between their acid and lactone forms were examined in human intestinal epithelial LS180 cells. Some statins had the potential to induce the expression of mRNAs for MDR1 and/or CYP3A in either form. The change in the mRNA expression of MDR1 was accompanied by a change in the CsA-dependent intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123. Simvastatin lactone, but not the acid form, exhibited a strong inductive effect on the mRNA expression of MDR1 and CYP3A in a dose-dependent manner. Sulforaphane significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 and CYP3A mRNAs induced by atorvastatin lactone, lovastatin acid, and lovastatin lactone, comparable to the control level, and moderately inhibited that by cerivastatin acid, fluvastatin acid and simvastatin lactone. In the case of pitavastatin acid, sulforaphane had no significant effect on the expression of MDR1 mRNA.These results suggested that some statins could induce MDR1 and CYP3A gene expression and these inductive effects differed between the lactone and active hydroxy acid forms, and that PXR-mediated regulation was rarely associated with the mRNA inducibility by pitavastatin acid, unlike that by other statins. PMID:19429419

  20. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in rainbow trout: effects of fasting and statin drugs on activities and mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie; Chen, Xi; Moon, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    Human pharmaceuticals including statin drugs are found in effluents post-waste water treatment plant. In order to establish whether statin drugs could affect an aquatic species, we initially characterized in the rainbow trout the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase or HMGCoAR which is the mammalian target of statin drugs. Two HMGCoAR transcripts (-1 and -2) were isolated to trout tissues and given their prevalence in liver and brain, these two tissues were used in activity assays. HMGCoAR activities were 87.2 and 66.0 pmol/min/mg protein for liver microsomes and whole brain homogenates. Liver activities were affected by conditions promoting phosphorylation but not by a 14 day fast; brain activities were differentially altered by fasting and re-feeding. Even though activities were altered by fasting, HMGCoAR-1 (but not -2) mRNA was reduced by fasting in both the liver and hypothalamus/pituitary. Both statin drugs (cerivastatin and atorvastatin) significantly decreased HMGCoAR activities in vitro and cerivastatin when injected significantly decreased hepatic but not brain activities; some changes in mRNA levels were noted. These studies demonstrate that at the concentrations of statins used in this study, effects on HMGCoAR activities and transcripts occur. Such changes could affect cholesterol content and may alter cholesterol dynamics in this species. PMID:18280795

  1. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductases from fungi: a proposal as a therapeutic target and as a study model.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Pavón, Dulce; Sánchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Ibarra, José Antonio; Tamariz, Joaquín; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-Co-A into mevalonate. This step is the limiting point for the synthesis of cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. We describe in this article the genome organization of HMGR coding genes and those deduced from different fungi, recount the evidence showing statins as HMGR inhibitors for ergosterol synthesis and its effect in yeast viability, and propose fungal HMGR (HMGRf) as a model to study the use of pharmaceutical compounds to inhibit cholesterol and ergosterol synthesis. Bibliographical search and bioinformatic analyses were performed and discussed. HMGRfs belong to the class I with a high homology in the catalytic region. The sterol biosynthetic pathway in humans and fungi share many enzymes in the initial steps (such as the HMGR enzyme), but in the last steps enzymes are different rendering the two final products: cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. With regards to inhibitors such as statins and other compounds, these affect also fungal viability. Since HMGR from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Ustilago maydis are very similar to the human HMGR in the catalytic regions, we propose that fungal enzymes can be used to test inhibitors for a potential use in humans. We consider that HMGRf is a good therapeutic target to design and test new antifungal compounds. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270073

  2. Flavonoids from the buds of Rosa damascena inhibit the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme a reductase and angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Hyungjae; Kim, Dae-Ok; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Young-Eon; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2010-01-27

    Rosa damascena has been manufactured as various food products, including tea, in Korea. A new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->4)-beta-D-xylopyranoside, named roxyloside A was isolated from the buds of this plant, along with four known compounds, isoquercitrin, afzelin, cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside, and quercetin gentiobioside. The chemical structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses, including FAB-MS, UV, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, DEPT, and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). All the isolated compounds except cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside exhibited high levels of inhibitory activity against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase with IC(50) values ranging from 47.1 to 80.6 microM. Cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside significantly suppressed angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, with an IC(50) value of 138.8 microM, while the other four compounds were ineffective. These results indicate that R. damascena and its flavonoids may be effective to improve the cardiovascular system. PMID:20038104

  3. Contribution of Accelerated Degradation to Feedback Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Cholesterol Metabolism in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonghwan; Hartman, Isamu Z; Calhoun, Leona N; Garland, Kristina; Young, Gennipher A; Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey; Xu, Fang; Engelking, Luke; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2016-06-24

    Accumulation of sterols in endoplasmic reticulum membranes stimulates the ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in synthesis of cholesterol. This ubiquitination marks HMGCR for proteasome-mediated degradation and constitutes one of several mechanisms for feedback control of cholesterol synthesis. Mechanisms for sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGCR have been elucidated through the study of cultured mammalian cells. However, the extent to which these reactions modulate HMGCR and contribute to control of cholesterol metabolism in whole animals is unknown. Here, we examine transgenic mice expressing in the liver the membrane domain of HMGCR (HMGCR (TM1-8)), a region necessary and sufficient for sterol-accelerated degradation, and knock-in mice in which endogenous HMGCR harbors mutations that prevent sterol-induced ubiquitination. Characterization of transgenic mice revealed that HMGCR (TM1-8) is appropriately regulated in the liver of mice fed a high cholesterol diet or chow diet supplemented with the HMGCR inhibitor lovastatin. Ubiquitination-resistant HMGCR protein accumulates in the liver and other tissues disproportionately to its mRNA, indicating that sterol-accelerated degradation significantly contributes to feedback regulation of HMGCR in vivo Results of these studies demonstrate that HMGCR is subjected to sterol-accelerated degradation in the liver through mechanisms similar to those established in cultured cells. Moreover, these studies designate sterol-accelerated degradation of HMGCR as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease. PMID:27129778

  4. (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a product of the mva operon of Pseudomonas mevalonii, is regulated at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y L; Beach, M J; Rodwell, V W

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 505-base-pair (bp) segment of DNA situated upstream of mvaA, the structural gene for (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) of Pseudomonas mevalonii. The DNA segment that we characterized includes the promoter region for the mva operon. Nuclease S1 mapping and primer extension analysis showed that mvaA is the promoter-proximal gene of the mva operon. Transcription initiates at -56 bp relative to the first A (+1) of the translation start site. Transcription in vivo was induced by mevalonate. Structural features of the mva promoter region include an 80-bp A + T-rich region, and -12, -24 consensus sequences that resemble sequences of sigma 54 promoters in enteric organisms. The relative amplitudes of catalytic activity, enzyme protein, and mvaA mRNA are consistent with a model of regulation of this operon at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:2477360

  5. Species-specific expansion and molecular evolution of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene family in plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Wei; Wei, Hengling; He, Qiuling; Chen, Jinhong; Zhang, Baohong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2014-01-01

    The terpene compounds represent the largest and most diverse class of plant secondary metabolites which are important in plant growth and development. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) is one of the key enzymes contributed to terpene biosynthesis. To better understand the basic characteristics and evolutionary history of the HMGR gene family in plants, a genome-wide analysis of HMGR genes from 20 representative species was carried out. A total of 56 HMGR genes in the 14 land plant genomes were identified, but no genes were found in all 6 algal genomes. The gene structure and protein architecture of all plant HMGR genes were highly conserved. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the plant HMGRs were derived from one ancestor gene and finally developed into four distinct groups, two in the monocot plants and two in dicot plants. Species-specific gene duplications, caused mainly by segmental duplication, led to the limited expansion of HMGR genes in Zea mays, Gossypium raimondii, Populus trichocarpa and Glycine max after the species diverged. The analysis of Ka/Ks ratios and expression profiles indicated that functional divergence after the gene duplications was restricted. The results suggested that the function and evolution of HMGR gene family were dramatically conserved throughout the plant kingdom. PMID:24722776

  6. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterol and triterpene in hairy root cultures of Platycodon grandiflorum by overexpression of Panax ginseng 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Kyoung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Yeon Bok; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Soo-Un; Park, Sang Un

    2013-02-27

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mevalonate pathway. To elucidate the functions of HMGR in triterpene biosynthesis, Platycodon grandiflorum was transformed with a construct expressing Panax ginseng HMGR (PgHMGR). We used PCR analysis to select transformed hairy root lines and selected six lines for further investigation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed higher expression levels of HMGR and total platycoside levels (1.5-2.5-fold increase) in transgenic lines than in controls. Phytosterols levels were also 1.1-1.6-fold higher in transgenic lines than in controls. Among these lines, line T7 produced the highest level of total platycosides (1.60 ± 0.2 mg g(-1) dry weight) and α-spinasterol (1.78 ± 0.16 mg g(-1) dry weight). These results suggest that metabolic engineering of P. grandiflorum by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation may enhance production of phytosterols and triterpenoids. PMID:23298228

  7. Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Identification of a Defect in the Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity Associated with Overproduction of Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    1973-01-01

    The homozygous form of the autosomal dominant disorder, familial hypercholesterolemia, is characterized by the presence in children of profound hypercholesterolemia, cutaneous planar xanthomas, and rapidly progressive coronary vascular disease that usually results in death before age 30 years. Cultured skin fibroblasts from three unrelated subjects with this disorder showed 40- to 60-fold higher activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34), the rate-controlling enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis, when compared with fibroblasts of seven control subjects. Enhanced enzyme activity resulted from a complete absence of normal feedback suppression by low-density lipoproteins, which led to a marked overproduction of cholesterol by the mutant cells. The demonstration of apparently identical kinetic properties of the reductase activity of control and mutant cells, coupled with the evidence that this enzyme is normally regulated not by allosteric effectors but by alterations in enzyme synthesis and degradation, suggests that the primary genetic abnormality does not involve the structural gene for the enzyme itself, but a hitherto unidentified gene whose product is necessary for mediation of feedback control by lipoproteins. The fibroblasts of two obligate heterozygotes, the parents of one of the homozygotes, showed a pattern of enzyme regulation intermediate between that of controls and homozygotes. PMID:4355366

  8. Regulation of synthesis and degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase by low density lipoprotein and 25-hydroxycholesterol in UT-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Faust, J R; Luskey, K L; Chin, D J; Goldstein, J L; Brown, M S

    1982-01-01

    UT-1 cells are a clone of Chinese hamster ovary cells that were selected to grow in the presence of compactin, a competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase [mevalonate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.34]. These cells have 100- to 1,000-fold more immunoprecipitable reductase than normal. The enzyme activity is rapidly decreased when low density lipoprotein (LDL) or 25-hydroxycholesterol is added to the culture medium. In this current study, a quantitative immunoprecipitation assay was used to determine whether LDL and 25-hydroxycholesterol inhibit the synthesis or stimulate the degradation of reductase in UT-1 cells. Each of these agents inhibited the incorporation of [35S]methionine into immunoprecipitable reductase by more than 98%. Pulse-chase experiments showed that reductase was degraded with a half-life of 10-13 hr in UT-1 cells and that the rate of degradation of preformed enzyme was increased 3-fold by the addition of either LDL or 25-hydroxycholesterol. We conclude that the predominant mechanism by which LDL and 25-hydroxycholesterol decrease reductase activity in UT-1 cells is a profound suppression of synthesis of the enzyme. Images PMID:6957860

  9. The effects of the 3-hydroxy, 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor pravastatin on bile composition and nucleation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Smit, J W; van Erpecum, K J; Renooij, W; Stolk, M F; Edgar, P; Doornewaard, H; Vanberge-Henegouwen, G P

    1995-06-01

    3-hydroxy,3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors reduce biliary cholesterol saturation index (CSI) in duodenal bile in hypercholesterolemic patients and might be useful for gallstone dissolution. However, preliminary data suggest that these drugs are not effective in this respect. We therefore studied 33 patients with radiolucent gallstones in an opacifying gallbladder who were scheduled for elective cholecystectomy. Patients were treated with 40 mg pravastatin day-1 or placebo during the 3 weeks before surgery. Six patients could not be evaluated. Baseline characteristics (age, sex, body mass index, serum cholesterol, and the solitary/multiple gallstone ratio) were similar in both groups. Serum cholesterol fell by 39% in the pravastatin group (P < .001) and remained unchanged in the placebo group. Biliary cholesterol (9.5 +/- 1.3 vs. 14.3 +/- 1.5 mmol/L, P = .026), and phospholipid concentrations (24.8 +/- 3.9 vs. 36.7 +/- 3.9 mmol/L, P = .043) were lower in the pravastatin group. Although bile salt concentrations were lower in the pravastatin group (114 +/- 21 vs. 152 +/- 15 mmol/L), this difference was not significant. CSI was not different between both groups (142 +/- 27% [pravastatin] vs. 113 +/- 6% [placebo], P = NS). Cholesterol crystals were present in fresh bile in 7 of 13 patients in the pravastatin group and in 11 of 14 controls (P = NS). Nucleation time was comparable between the 2 groups (13 +/- 3 vs. 9 +/- 3 days, P = NS). Bile salt species and molecular species of phospholipids determined with high-performance liquid chromatography did not differ either between both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7768495

  10. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. PMID:26015445

  11. Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate Is a Potent Regulator of HRD-dependent 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Degradation in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Renee M.; Tran, Peter N.; Hampton, Randolph Y.

    2009-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase (HMGR), the rate-limiting enzymes of sterol synthesis, undergoes feedback-regulated endoplasmic reticulum degradation in both mammals and yeast. The yeast Hmg2p isozyme is subject to ubiquitin-mediated endoplasmic reticulum degradation by the HRD pathway. We had previously shown that alterations in cellular levels of the 15-carbon sterol pathway intermediate farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) cause increased Hmg2p ubiquitination and degradation. We now present evidence that the FPP-derived, 20-carbon molecule geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) is a potent endogenous regulator of Hmg2p degradation. This work was launched by the unexpected observation that GGPP addition directly to living yeast cultures caused high potency and specific stimulation of Hmg2p degradation. This effect of GGPP was not recapitulated by FPP, GGOH, or related isoprenoids. GGPP-caused Hmg2p degradation met all the criteria for the previously characterized endogenous signal. The action of added GGPP did not require production of endogenous sterol molecules, indicating that it did not act by causing the build-up of an endogenous pathway signal. Manipulation of endogenous GGPP by several means showed that naturally made GGPP controls Hmg2p stability. Analysis of the action of GGPP indicated that the molecule works upstream of retrotranslocation and can directly alter the structure of Hmg2p. We propose that GGPP is the FPP-derived regulator of Hmg2p ubiquitination. Intriguingly, the sterol-dependent degradation of mammalian HMGR is similarly stimulated by the addition of GGOH to intact cells, implying that a dependence on 20-carbon geranylgeranyl signals may be a common conserved feature of HMGR regulation that may lead to highly specific therapeutic approaches for modulation of HMGR. PMID:19776008

  12. Redox homeostasis is compromised in vivo by the metabolites accumulating in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency in rat cerebral cortex and liver.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, M S; Seminotti, B; Amaral, A U; Fernandes, C G; Gasparotto, J; Moreira, J C F; Gelain, D P; Wajner, M; Leipnitz, G

    2013-12-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HL) deficiency is a disorder biochemically characterized by the predominant accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarate (HMG), 3-methylglutarate (MGA), 3-methylglutaconate and 3-hydroxyisovalerate in tissues and biological fluids of the affected patients. Neurological symptoms and hepatopathy are commonly found in HL deficiency, especially during metabolic crises. Since the mechanisms of tissue damage in this disorder are not well understood, in the present study we evaluated the ex vivo effects of acute administration of HMG and MGA on important parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and liver from young rats. In vivo administration of HMG and MGA provoked an increase of carbonyl and carboxy-methyl-lysine formation in cerebral cortex, but not in liver, indicating that these metabolites induce protein oxidative damage in the brain. We also verified that HMG and MGA significantly decreased glutathione concentrations in both cerebral cortex and liver, implying a reduction of antioxidant defenses. Furthermore, HMG and MGA increased 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin oxidation, but did not alter nitrate and nitrite content in cerebral cortex and liver, indicating that HMG and MGA effects are mainly mediated by reactive oxygen species. HMG and MGA also increased the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in cerebral cortex and liver, whereas MGA decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in cerebral cortex. Our present data showing a disruption of redox homeostasis in cerebral cortex and liver caused by in vivo administration of HMG and MGA suggest that this pathomechanism may possibly contribute to the brain and liver abnormalities observed in HL-deficient patients. PMID:24127998

  13. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles; Campos, Narciso

    2015-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. PMID:26015445

  14. Metabolic Control of Avocado Fruit Growth (Isoprenoid Growth Regulators and the Reaction Catalyzed by 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase).

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, A. K.; Moore-Gordon, C. S.; Bertling, I.; Wolstenholme, B. N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of isoprenoid growth regulators on avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit growth and mesocarp 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity was investigated during the course of fruit ontogeny. Both normal and small-fruit phenotypes were used to probe the interaction between the end products of isoprenoid biosynthesis and the activity of HMGR in the metabolic control of avocado fruit growth. Kinetic analysis of the changes in both cell number and size revealed that growth was limited by cell number in phenotypically small fruit. In small fruit a 70% reduction in microsomal HMGR activity was associated with an increased mesocarp abscisic acid (ABA) concentration. Application of mevastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMGR, reduced the growth of normal fruit and increased mesocarp ABA concentration. These effects were reversed by co-treatment of fruit with mevalonic acid lactone, isopentenyladenine, or N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N-phenylurea, but were not significantly affected by either gibberellic acid or stigmasterol. However, stigmasterol appeared to partially restore fruit growth when co-injected with mevastatin in either phase II or III of fruit growth. In vivo application of ABA reduced fruit growth and mesocarp HMGR activity and accelerated fruit abscission, effects that were reversed by co-treatment with isopentenyladenine. Together, these observations indicate that ABA accumulation down-regulates mesocarp HMGR activity and fruit growth, and that in situ cytokinin biosynthesis modulates these effects during phase I of fruit ontogeny, whereas both cytokinins and sterols seem to perform this function during the later phases. PMID:12223724

  15. Diurnal variation in the fraction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the active form in the mammary gland of the lactating rat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R A; Middleton, B; West, D W

    1986-01-01

    'Expressed' and 'total' activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) were measured in freeze-clamped samples of mammary glands from lactating rats at intervals throughout the 24 h light/dark cycle. 'Expressed' activities were measured in microsomal fractions isolated and assayed in the presence of 100 mM-KF. 'Total' activities were determined in microsomal preparations from the same homogenates but washed free of KF and incubated with exogenously added sheep liver phosphoprotein phosphatase before assay. Both 'expressed' and 'total' activities of HMG-CoA reductase underwent a diurnal cycle, which had a major peak 6 h into the light phase and a nadir 15 h later, i.e. 9 h into the dark period. Both activities showed a secondary peak of activity (around 68% of the maximum activity) at the time of changeover from dark to light, with a trough in the value of the 'expressed' activity that was close to the nadir value. 'Expressed' activity was lower than 'total' at all time points, indicating the presence of enzyme molecules inactivated by covalent phosphorylation. Nevertheless the 'expressed'/'total' activity ratio was comparatively constant and varied only between 43% and 75%. Immunotitration of enzyme activity, with antiserum raised in sheep against purified rat liver HMG-CoA reductase, confirmed the presence of both active and inactive forms of the enzyme and indicated that at the peak and nadir the variation in 'expressed' HMG-CoA reductase activity resulted from changes in the total number of enzyme molecules rather than from covalent modification. The sample obtained after 3 h of the light phase exhibited an anomalously low 'total' HMG-CoA reductase activity, which could be increased when Cl- replaced F- in the homogenization medium. The result suggests that at that time the activity of the enzyme could be regulated by mechanisms other than covalent phosphorylation or degradation. PMID:3814075

  16. Rapid proteasomal elimination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase by interferon-γ in primary macrophages requires endogenous 25-hydroxycholesterol synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongjin; Talbot, Simon; Robertson, Kevin A.; Watterson, Steven; Forster, Thorsten; Roy, Douglas; Ghazal, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play a central role in immunity and emerging evidence suggests that IFN-signalling coordinately regulates sterol biosynthesis in macrophages, via Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP) dependent and independent pathways. However, the precise mechanisms and kinetic steps by which IFN controls sterol biosynthesis are as yet not fully understood. Here, we elucidate the molecular circuitry governing how IFN controls the first regulated step in the mevalonate-sterol pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), through the synthesis of 25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) from cholesterol by the IFN-inducible Cholesterol-25-Hydroxylase (CH25H). We show for the first 30-min of IFN stimulation of macrophages the rate of de novo synthesis of the Ch25h transcript is markedly increased but by 120-min becomes transcriptionally curtailed, coincident with induction of the Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) repressor. We demonstrate ATF3 induction by Toll-like receptors is strictly dependent on IFN-signalling. While the SREBP-pathway dependent rates of de novo transcription of Hmgcr are relatively unchanged in the first 90-min of IFN treatment, we find HMGCR enzyme levels undergo a rapid proteasomal-mediated degradation, defining a previously unappreciated SREBP-independent mechanism for IFN-action. These events precede a sustained marked reduction in Hmgcr RNA levels involving SREBP-dependent mechanisms. We demonstrate that HMGCR proteasomal-degradation by IFN strictly requires the synthesis of endogenous 25-HC and functionally couples HMGCR to CH25H to coordinately suppress sterol biosynthesis. In conclusion, we quantitatively delineate proteomic and transcriptional levels of IFN-mediated control of HMGCR, the primary enzymatic step of the mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis pathway, providing a foundational framework for mathematically modelling the therapeutic outcome of immune-metabolic pathways. PMID:25759117

  17. Functional Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Encoding Genes in Triterpene Saponin-Producing Ginseng1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Ok Ran; Oh, Ji Yeon; Jang, Moon-Gi; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenosides are glycosylated triterpenes that are considered to be important pharmaceutically active components of the ginseng (Panax ginseng ‘Meyer’) plant, which is known as an adaptogenic herb. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the biosynthesis of triterpene saponin through the mevalonate pathway in ginseng remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the role of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) concerning ginsenoside biosynthesis. Through analysis of full-length complementary DNA, two forms of ginseng HMGR (PgHMGR1 and PgHMGR2) were identified as showing high sequence identity. The steady-state mRNA expression patterns of PgHMGR1 and PgHMGR2 are relatively low in seed, leaf, stem, and flower, but stronger in the petiole of seedling and root. The transcripts of PgHMGR1 were relatively constant in 3- and 6-year-old ginseng roots. However, PgHMGR2 was increased five times in the 6-year-old ginseng roots compared with the 3-year-old ginseng roots, which indicates that HMGRs have constant and specific roles in the accumulation of ginsenosides in roots. Competitive inhibition of HMGR by mevinolin caused a significant reduction of total ginsenoside in ginseng adventitious roots. Moreover, continuous dark exposure for 2 to 3 d increased the total ginsenosides content in 3-year-old ginseng after the dark-induced activity of PgHMGR1. These results suggest that PgHMGR1 is associated with the dark-dependent promotion of ginsenoside biosynthesis. We also observed that the PgHMGR1 can complement Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hmgr1-1 and that the overexpression of PgHMGR1 enhanced the production of sterols and triterpenes in Arabidopsis and ginseng. Overall, this finding suggests that ginseng HMGRs play a regulatory role in triterpene ginsenoside biosynthesis. PMID:24569845

  18. Crystal Structure of the HMG-CoA Synthase MvaS from the Gram-Negative Bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Bock, Tobias; Kasten, Janin; Müller, Rolf; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2016-07-01

    A critical step in bacterial isoprenoid production is the synthesis of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) catalyzed by HMG-CoA synthase (HMGCS). In myxobacteria, this enzyme is also involved in a recently discovered alternative and acetyl-CoA-dependent isovaleryl CoA biosynthesis pathway. Here we present crystal structures of MvaS, the HMGCS from Myxococcus xanthus, in complex with CoA and acetylated active site Cys115, with the second substrate acetoacetyl CoA and with the product of the condensation reaction, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA. With these structures, we show that MvaS uses the common HMGCS enzymatic mechanism and provide evidence that dimerization plays a role in the formation and stability of the active site. Overall, MvaS shows features typical of the eukaryotic HMGCS and exhibits differences from homologues from Gram-positive bacteria. This study provides insights into myxobacterial alternative isovaleryl CoA biosynthesis and thereby extends the toolbox for the biotechnological production of renewable fuel and chemicals. PMID:27124816

  19. Crystal Structures of Two Bacterial 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Lyases Suggest a Common Catalytic Mechanism among a Family of TIM Barrel Metalloenzymes Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Hussain, M.; Farid, R.; Benach, J.; Abashidze, M.; Edstrom, W.; Vorobiev, S.; Montelione, G.; Hunt, J.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase catalyzes the terminal steps in ketone body generation and leucine degradation. Mutations in this enzyme cause a human autosomal recessive disorder called primary metabolic aciduria, which typically kills victims because of an inability to tolerate hypoglycemia. Here we present crystal structures of the HMG-CoA lyases from Bacillus subtilis and Brucella melitensis at 2.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These enzymes share greater than 45% sequence identity with the human orthologue. Although the enzyme has the anticipated triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold, the catalytic center contains a divalent cation-binding site formed by a cluster of invariant residues that cap the core of the barrel, contrary to the predictions of homology models. Surprisingly, the residues forming this cation-binding site and most of their interaction partners are shared with three other TIM barrel enzymes that catalyze diverse carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions believed to proceed through enolate intermediates (4-hydroxy-2-ketovalerate aldolase, 2-isopropylmalate synthase, and transcarboxylase 5S). We propose the name 'DRE-TIM metallolyases' for this newly identified enzyme family likely to employ a common catalytic reaction mechanism involving an invariant Asp-Arg-Glu (DRE) triplet. The Asp ligates the divalent cation, while the Arg probably stabilizes charge accumulation in the enolate intermediate, and the Glu maintains the precise structural alignment of the Asp and Arg. We propose a detailed model for the catalytic reaction mechanism of HMG-CoA lyase based on the examination of previously reported product complexes of other DRE-TIM metallolyases and induced fit substrate docking studies conducted using the crystal structure of human HMG-CoA lyase (reported in the accompanying paper by Fu, et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7526-7532). Our model is consistent with extensive mutagenesis results and

  20. Avian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase: sensitivity of enzyme activity to thiol/disulfide exchange and identification of proximal reactive cysteines.

    PubMed Central

    Hruz, P. W.; Miziorko, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Catalysis by purified avian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase is critically dependent on the reduction state of the enzyme, with less than 1% of optimal activity being observed with the air-oxidized enzyme. The enzyme is irreversibly inactivated by sulfhydryl-directed reagents with the rate of this inactivation being highly dependent upon the redox state of a critical cysteine. Methylation of reduced avian lyase with 1 mM 4-methylnitrobenzene sulfonate results in rapid inactivation of the enzyme with a k(inact) of 0.178 min-1. The oxidized enzyme is inactivated at a sixfold slower rate (k(inact) = 0.028 min-1). Inactivation of the enzyme with the reactive substrate analog 2-butynoyl-CoA shows a similar dependence upon the enzyme's redox state, with a sevenfold difference in k(inact) observed with oxidized vs. reduced forms of the enzyme. Chemical cross-linking of the reduced enzyme with stoichiometric amounts of the bifunctional reagents 1,3-dibromo-2-propanone (DBP) or N,N'-ortho-phenylene-dimaleimide (PDM) coincides with rapid inactivation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of enzyme treated with bifunctional reagent reveals a band of twice the molecular weight of the lyase monomer, indicating that an intersubunit cross-link has been formed. Differential labeling of native and cross-linked protein with [1-14C]iodoacetate has identified as the primary cross-linking target a cysteine within the sequence VSQAACR, which maps at the carboxy-terminus of the cDNA-deduced sequence of the avian enzyme (Mitchell, G.A., et al., 1991, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 49, 101). In contrast, bacterial HMG-CoA lyase, which contains no corresponding cysteine, is not cross-linked by comparable treatment with bifunctional reagent. These results provide evidence for a potential regulatory mechanism for the eukaryotic enzyme via thiol/disulfide exchange and identify a cysteinyl residue with the reactivity and juxtaposition required for participation in disulfide

  1. Overproduction of a Mr 92,000 protomer of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in compactin-resistant C100 cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardeman, Edna C.; Jenke, Hans-Stephan; Simoni, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a cell line, designated C100, that displays a 100-fold increase in the major regulatory enzyme of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase [HMG-CoA; mevalonate:NADP+ oxido-reductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.34]. Immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled enzyme from C100 microsomal membranes prepared in the presence of the protease inhibitors phenyl-methylsulfonyl fluoride and leupeptin revealed two up regulated proteins: a major band of Mr 92,000 and a minor band of Mr 63,000. We conclude that the Mr 92,000 protein is probably the intact form of HMG-CoA reductase protomer based on the following criteria. (i) It is a highly up regulated microsomal membrane protein that coincides with the increase in HMG-CoA reductase specific activity in this cell line. (ii) It is recognized by a specific HMG-CoA reductase antiserum under a variety of stringencies. (iii) Isolation and solubilization of [35S]methionine-labeled C100 microsomal membranes in the absence of protease inhibitors resulted in the disappearance of the Mr 92,000 protein and the appearance of two proteins of Mr 52,000 and 38,000. (iv) Analysis of cells labeled for 30 min with [35S]methionine, well under the half-life of HMG-CoA reductase, revealed only the Mr 92,000 protein to be present in total cell extract. (v) The previously reported single immunoprecipitation polypeptide for HMG-CoA reductase of Mr 62,000 [Chin, D. J., Luskey, K. L., Anderson, R. G. W., Faust, J. R., Goldstein, J. L. & Brown, M. S. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 1185-1189] can be isolated and appears to be the result of both proteolysis and sample preparation for NaDodSO4 gel electrophoresis. Analysis of C100 cells labeled with [35S]methionine for 24 hr indicates that the predominant steady-state form of the enzyme is the Mr 92,000, rather than the Mr 63,000, protein, further suggesting that the two proteins do not have a classical precursor-product relationship. Images

  2. Control of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Activity in Cultured Human Fibroblasts by Very Low Density Lipoproteins of Subjects with Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Gianturco, Sandra H.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Jackson, Richard L.; Patsch, Josef R.; Sybers, Harley D.; Taunton, O. David; Yeshurun, Daniel L.; Smith, Louis C.

    1978-01-01

    Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human normolipemic plasma, and the VLDL, the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and LDL from patients with Type III hyperlipoproteinemic plasma were tested for their abilities to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in cultured human fibroblasts from normal subjects and a Type III patient. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in the fibroblasts of a patient with Type III hyperlipoproteinemia appears to be normal. VLDL from normal subjects, isolated by angle head ultracentrifugation (d < 1.006) or by gel filtration on BioGel A-5m, were about 5 times less effective than LDL in suppressing HMG-CoA reductase activity, based on protein content, in agreement with previous reports with normal fibroblasts. Zonal centrifugation of normal VLDL isolated by both methods showed that the VLDL contained IDL. Normal VLDL from the angle head rotor, refractionated by the zonal method, had little, if any, ability to suppress the HMG-CoA reductase activity in either normal or Type III fibroblasts. VLDL, IDL, and LDL fractionated by zonal ultracentrifugation from Type III plasma gave half-maximum inhibition at 0.2-0.5 μg of protein/ml, indistinguishable from the suppression caused by normal LDL. Type III VLDL did not suppress HMG-CoA reductase in mutant LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. Zonally isolated VLDL obtained from one Type IV and one Type V patient gave half-maximal suppression at 5 and 0.5 μg of protein/ml, respectively. Molecular diameters and apoprotein compositions of the zonally isolated normal and Type III VLDL were similar; the major difference in composition was that Type III VLDL contained more cholesteryl esters and less triglyceride than did normal VLDL. The compositions and diameters of the Type IV and Type V VLDL were similar to normal VLDL. These findings show that the basic defect in Type III hyperlipoproteinemia is qualitatively

  3. Role of 26S proteasome and HRD genes in the degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, an integral endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, R Y; Gardner, R G; Rine, J

    1996-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-R), a key enzyme of sterol synthesis, is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In both humans and yeast, HMG-R is degraded at or in the ER. The degradation of HMG-R is regulated as part of feedback control of the mevalonate pathway. Neither the mechanism of degradation nor the nature of the signals that couple the degradation of HMG-R to the mevalonate pathway is known. We have launched a genetic analysis of the degradation of HMG-R in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a selection for mutants that are deficient in the degradation of Hmg2p, an HMG-R isozyme. The underlying genes are called HRD (pronounced "herd"), for HMG-CoA reductase degradation. So far we have discovered mutants in three genes: HRD1, HRD2, and HRD3. The sequence of the HRD2 gene is homologous to the p97 activator of the 26S proteasome. This p97 protein, also called TRAP-2, has been proposed to be a component of the mature 26S proteasome. The hrd2-1 mutant had numerous pleiotropic phenotypes expected for cells with a compromised proteasome, and these phenotypes were complemented by the human TRAP-2/p97 coding region. In contrast, HRD1 and HRD3 genes encoded previously unknown proteins predicted to be membrane bound. The Hrd3p protein was homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-1 protein, a negative regulator of at least two different membrane proteins, and contained an HRD3 motif shared with several other proteins. Hrd1p had no full-length homologues, but contained an H2 ring finger motif. These data suggested a model of ER protein degradation in which the Hrd1p and Hrd3p proteins conspire to deliver HMG-R to the 26S proteasome. Moreover, our results lend in vivo support to the proposed role of the p97/TRAP-2/Hrd2p protein as a functionally important component of the 26S proteasome. Because the HRD genes were required for the degradation of both regulated and unregulated substrates of ER degradation, the HRD genes are the

  4. The SUD1 Gene Encodes a Putative E3 Ubiquitin Ligase and Is a Positive Regulator of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Doblas, Verónica G.; Amorim-Silva, Vítor; Posé, David; Rosado, Abel; Esteban, Alicia; Arró, Montserrat; Azevedo, Herlander; Bombarely, Aureliano; Borsani, Omar; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Ferrer, Albert; Tavares, Rui M.; Botella, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme catalyzes the major rate-limiting step of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway from which sterols and other isoprenoids are synthesized. In contrast with our extensive knowledge of the regulation of HMGR in yeast and animals, little is known about this process in plants. To identify regulatory components of the MVA pathway in plants, we performed a genetic screen for second-site suppressor mutations of the Arabidopsis thaliana highly drought-sensitive drought hypersensitive2 (dry2) mutant that shows decreased squalene epoxidase activity. We show that mutations in SUPPRESSOR OF DRY2 DEFECTS1 (SUD1) gene recover most developmental defects in dry2 through changes in HMGR activity. SUD1 encodes a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows sequence and structural similarity to yeast Degradation of α factor (Doα10) and human TEB4, components of the endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation C (ERAD-C) pathway. While in yeast and animals, the alternative ERAD-L/ERAD-M pathway regulates HMGR activity by controlling protein stability, SUD1 regulates HMGR activity without apparent changes in protein content. These results highlight similarities, as well as important mechanistic differences, among the components involved in HMGR regulation in plants, yeast, and animals. PMID:23404890

  5. Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and identification of a heterozygous Alu-associated deletion and a uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 in two patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    AOYAMA, YUKA; YAMAMOTO, TOSHIYUKI; SAKAGUCHI, NAOMI; ISHIGE, MIKA; TANAKA, TOJU; ICHIHARA, TOMOKO; OHARA, KATSUAKI; KOUZAN, HIROKO; KINOSADA, YASUTOMI; FUKAO, TOSHIYUKI

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMGCL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the leucine catabolic pathway and ketone body synthesis, and is clinically characterized by metabolic crises with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. In the present study, we initially used PCR with genomic followed by direct sequencing to investigate the molecular genetic basis of HMGCL deficiency in two patients clinically diagnosed with the condition. Although we identified a mutation in each patient, the inheritance patterns of these mutations were not consistent with disease causation. Therefore, we investigated HMGCL using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to determine the copy numbers of all exons. A heterozygous deletion that included exons 2–4 was identified in one of the patients. MLPA revealed that the other patient had two copies for all HMGCL exons. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 1 was confirmed in this patient by microarray analysis. These findings indicate that MLPA is useful for the identification of genomic aberrations and mutations other than small-scale nucleotide alterations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMGCL deficiency caused by uniparental disomy. PMID:25872961

  6. Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and identification of a heterozygous Alu-associated deletion and a uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 in two patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Naomi; Ishige, Mika; Tanaka, Toju; Ichihara, Tomoko; Ohara, Katsuaki; Kouzan, Hiroko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMGCL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the leucine catabolic pathway and ketone body synthesis, and is clinically characterized by metabolic crises with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. In the present study, we initially used PCR with genomic followed by direct sequencing to investigate the molecular genetic basis of HMGCL deficiency in two patients clinically diagnosed with the condition. Although we identified a mutation in each patient, the inheritance patterns of these mutations were not consistent with disease causation. Therefore, we investigated HMGCL using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to determine the copy numbers of all exons. A heterozygous deletion that included exons 2-4 was identified in one of the patients. MLPA revealed that the other patient had two copies for all HMGCL exons. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 1 was confirmed in this patient by microarray analysis. These findings indicate that MLPA is useful for the identification of genomic aberrations and mutations other than small-scale nucleotide alterations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMGCL deficiency caused by uniparental disomy. PMID:25872961

  7. Divergence in cholesterol biosynthetic rates and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity as a consequence of granulocyte versus monocyte-macrophage differentiation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yachnin, S; Toub, D B; Mannickarottu, V

    1984-01-01

    Addition of dimethyl sulfoxide or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to HL-60 cell cultures induces granulocytic or monocyte-macrophage differentiation, respectively, in HL-60 cells. Dimethyl sulfoxide-induced granulocyte differentiation in HL-60 cells is associated with a decrease in cellular 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase activity and with a decrease in the incorporation of [14C]acetate and mevalonate into products of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. PMA-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation in HL-60 cells is associated with a rapid and profound fall in cell proliferation but nonetheless is accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in cellular HMG-CoA reductase activity and [14C]acetate incorporation into the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. In addition, PMA induces an increase in [14C]mevalonate incorporation into cholesterol and its precursors, suggesting that post-HMG-CoA reductase events in cholesterol biosynthesis are also enhanced. Mature peripheral blood human monocytes possess an active cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, whereas mature human granulocytes are almost entirely lacking in the ability to synthesize post-squalene products. Our results with HL-60 cells indicate that this divergence in sterol-synthesizing ability between two cell lineages, which normally also derive from a common stem cell, can be observed as an early event in the differentiation process. PMID:6583685

  8. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic alterations of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors: drug-drug interactions and interindividual differences in transporter and metabolic enzyme functions.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Yoshihisa; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2006-10-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Their efficacy in preventing cardiovascular events has been shown by a large number of clinical trials. However, myotoxic side effects, sometimes severe, including myopathy or rhabdomyolysis, are associated with the use of statins. In some cases, such toxicity is associated with pharmacokinetic alterations. In this review, the pharmacokinetic aspects and physicochemical properties of statins are reviewed in order to understand the mechanism governing their pharmacokinetic alterations. Among the statins, simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin are metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) while fluvastatin is metabolized by CYP2C9. Cerivastatin is subjected to 2 metabolic pathways mediated by CYP2C8 and 3A4. Pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin undergo little metabolism. Their plasma clearances are governed by the transporters involved in the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion. Also for other statins, which are orally administered as open acid forms (i.e. fluvastatin, cerivastatin and atorvastatin), hepatic uptake transporter(s) play important roles in their clearances. Based on such information, pharmacokinetic alterations of statins can be predicted following coadministration of other drugs or in patients with lowered activities in drug metabolism and/or transport. We also present a quantitative analysis of the effect of some factors on the pharmacokinetics of statins based on a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. To avoid a pharmacokinetic alteration, we need to have information about the metabolizing enzyme(s) and transporter(s) involved in the pharmacokinetics of statins and, along with such information, model-based prediction is also useful. PMID:16714062

  10. In vivo experimental evidence that the major metabolites accumulating in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency induce oxidative stress in striatum of developing rats: a potential pathophysiological mechanism of striatal damage in this disorder.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; da Rosa, Mateus Struecker; Seminotti, Bianca; Pierozan, Paula; Martell, Rafael Wolter; Lagranha, Valeska Lizzi; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-06-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HL) deficiency is a genetic disorder biochemically characterized by predominant accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG) and 3-methylglutaric (MGA) acids in tissues and biological fluids of affected individuals. Clinically, the patients present neurological symptoms and basal ganglia injury, whose pathomechanisms are partially understood. In the present study, we investigated the ex vivo effects of intrastriatal administration of HMG and MGA on important parameters of oxidative stress in striatum of developing rats. Our results demonstrate that HMG and MGA induce lipid and protein oxidative damage. HMG and MGA also increased 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein oxidation, whereas only HMG elicited nitric oxide production, indicating a role for reactive oxygen (HMG and MGA) and nitrogen (HMG) species in these effects. Regarding the enzymatic antioxidant defenses, both organic acids decreased reduced glutathione concentrations and the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase and increased glutathione peroxidase activity. HMG also provoked an increase of catalase activity and a diminution of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. We finally observed that antioxidants fully prevented or attenuated HMG-induced alterations of the oxidative stress parameters, further indicating the participation of reactive species in these effects. We also observed that MK-801, a non-competitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, prevented some of these effects, indicating the involvement of the NMDA receptor in HMG effects. The present data provide solid evidence that oxidative stress is induced in vivo by HMG and MGA in rat striatum and it is presumed that this pathomechanism may explain, at least in part, the cerebral alterations observed in HL deficiency. PMID:23611578

  11. Role of lipoprotein-X in the pathogenesis of cholestatic hypercholesterolemia. Uptake of lipoprotein-X and its effect on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and chylomicron remnant removal in human fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Walli, A K; Seidel, D

    1984-01-01

    Cholestasis is accompanied by the appearance of lipoprotein-X (LP-X) in plasma. This lipoprotein has a high content of unesterified cholesterol and phospholipids and appears to be ineffective in suppressing the enhanced hepatic cholesterogenesis of cholestasis. Its role as a possible causative factor for cholestatic hypercholesterolemia was investigated. When 125I-LP-X was injected into rats, it disappeared rapidly from the circulation. Calculated on the basis of gram wet weight, spleen took up more LP-X than liver. Prior ligation of the bile duct reduced the uptake in spleen. Experiments with isolated perfused rat liver showed that nonparenchymal cells (NPC) took up over eightfold more 125I-LP-X than hepatic parenchymal cells (PC). Incubation of PC, NPC, human lymphocyte suspensions, or fibroblast cultures with LP-X showed that NPC bound more LP-X than PC or fibroblasts. Lymphocytes took up 20-fold more LP-X than PC and the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was depressed by LP-X. Lymphocytes isolated from cholestatic patients showed low activity of this enzyme. The activity was increased by LP-X in isolated perfused livers, but suppressed in isolated microsomes. LP-X competitively inhibited the uptake of chylomicron remnants in isolated perfused livers and hepatocytes. In contrast, degradation of LDL by perfused livers, which were isolated from ethinyl estradiol-treated rats or human fibroblast cultures, remained unchanged in the presence of LP-X. The results indicate that cholesterol transported by LP-X is mainly taken up by the cells of the reticuloendothelial system. It increases the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and suppresses remnant uptake, thus emphasizing a major role of LP-X in cholestatic hypercholesterolemia. Images PMID:6470142

  12. Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, potentiate the anti-angiogenic effects of bevacizumab by suppressing angiopoietin2, BiP, and Hsp90α in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S J; Lee, I; Lee, J; Park, C; Kang, W K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are commonly prescribed because of their therapeutic and preventive effects on cardiovascular diseases. Even though they have been occasionally reported to have antitumour activity, it is unknown whether statins have anti-angiogenic effect in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: A total of 11 human CRC cell lines were used to test the effects of bevacizumab, statins, and bevacizumab plus statins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) viability and invasion in vitro. To determine the molecular mechanism of statins as anti-angiogenic agents, we performed an angiogenesis antibody array and proteomics analysis and confirmed the results using immunoblot assay, HUVEC invasion rescue assay, and siRNA assay. The antitumoural effects of bevacizumab and statins were evaluated in xenograft models. Results: A conventional dose of statins (simvastatin 0.2 μM, lovastatin 0.4 μM, atorvastatin 0.1 μM, and pravastatin 0.4 μM) in combination with bevacizumab directly reduced the cell viability, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. The culture media of the CRC cells treated with bevacizumab or statins were also found to inhibit HUVEC invasion by suppressing angiogenic mediators, such as angiopoietin2, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and Hsp90α. The combined treatment with bevacizumab and simvastatin significantly reduced the growth and metastases of xenograft tumours compared with treatment with bevacizumab alone. Conclusions: The addition of simvastatin at a dose used in patients with cardiovascular diseases (40–80 mg once daily) may potentiate the anti-angiogenic effects of bevacizumab on CRC by suppressing angiopoietin2, BiP, and Hsp90α in cancer cells. A clinical trial of simvastatin in combination with bevacizumab in patients with CRC is needed. PMID:24945998

  13. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Luo, Xue-Gang; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun; Pan, Li-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  14. The regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, cholesterol esterification and the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptors in cultured monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, B L; Patel, D D; Soutar, A K

    1983-01-01

    Human blood monocytes cultured in medium containing 20% whole serum showed the greatest activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and [14C]acetate incorporation into non-saponifiable lipids around the 7th day after seeding, the period of greatest growth. Although there was enough low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the medium to saturate the LDL receptors that were expressed by normal cells at that time, HMG-CoA reductase activity and acetate incorporation were as high in normal cells as in cells from familial-hypercholesterolaemic (FH) patients. Both the addition of extra LDL, which interacted with the cells by non-saturable processes, and receptor-mediated uptake of acetylated LDL significantly reduced reductase activity and increased incorporation of [14C]oleate into cholesteryl esters in normal cells and cells from FH patients ('FH cells'), and reduced the expression of LDL receptors in normal cells. Pre-incubation for 20h in lipoprotein-deficient medium apparently increased the number of LDL receptors expressed by normal cells but reduced the activity of HMG-CoA reductase in both normal and FH cells. During subsequent incubations the same rate of degradation of acetylated LDL and of non-saturable degradation of LDL by FH cells was associated with the same reduction in HMG-CoA reductase activity, although LDL produced a much smaller stimulation of oleate incorporation into cholesteryl esters. In normal cells pre-incubated without lipoproteins, receptor-mediated uptake of LDL could abolish reductase activity and the expression of LDL receptors. The results suggested that in these cells, receptor-mediated uptake of LDL might have a greater effect on reductase activity and LDL receptors than the equivalent uptake of acetylated LDL. It is proposed that endogenous synthesis is an important source of cholesterol for growth of normal cells, and that the site at which cholesterol is deposited in the cells may determine the nature and extent of the

  15. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nemazanyy, Ivan . E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T. . E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  16. Mechanistic Insight with HBCH2CoA as a Probe to Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Synthases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1–2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [3H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([3H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [3H]-sTCoA ([3H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([3H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([3H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [3H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([3H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [3H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation. PMID:24896226

  17. Intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action in lepidopteran insects: inhibition of sex pheromone production by compactin, an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, R; Matsumoto, S; Kim, G H; Uchiumi, K; Kurihara, M; Shono, T; Mitsui, T

    1995-06-27

    Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) regulates sex pheromone production in the pheromone glands of many species of female moths. In order to probe the biochemical steps as well as underlying mechanisms regulated by PBAN, we have tested the effect of chemicals on sex pheromone production by using an in vitro assay. Among the chemicals we tested here, compactin, a specific 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitor, clearly inhibited the pheromone biosynthesis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura. Since the activation of HMG CoA reductase occurs by dephosphorylation mediated by a specific phosphatase and the biochemical step regulated by PBAN in bombykol biosynthesis is similar to the one catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase in cholesterol biosynthesis, the present results support the idea that phosphoprotein phosphatase has a significant role to regulate bombykol production in the intracellular transduction of PBAN action in B. mori. PMID:7480881

  18. Analysis of autoantibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase using different technologies.

    PubMed

    Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto; Benveniste, Olivier; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Shikhman, Alexander; Boyer, Olivier; Fowler, Richard; Mammen, Andrew; Phillips, Joe; Mahler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic tests are needed to aid in the diagnosis of necrotizing myopathies associated with statin use. This study aimed to compare different technologies for the detection of anti-HMGCR antibodies and analyze the clinical phenotype and autoantibody profile of the patients. Twenty samples from myositis patients positive for anti-HMGCR antibodies using a research addressable laser bead assay and 20 negative controls were tested for autoantibodies to HMGCR: QUANTA Lite HMGCR ELISA and QUANTA Flash HMGCR CIA. All patients were also tested for antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens and myositis related antibodies. To verify the specificity of the ELISA, 824 controls were tested. All three assays showed qualitative agreements of 100% and levels of anti-HMGCR antibodies showed significant correlation: Spearman's rho > 0.8. The mean age of the anti-HMGCR antibody positive patients was 54.4 years, 16/20 were females, and 18/20 had necrotizing myopathy (two patients were not diagnosed). Nine out of 20 anti-HMGCR positive patients were on statin. All patients with anti-HMGCR antibodies were negative for all other autoantibodies tested. Testing various controls showed high specificity (99.3%). Anti-HMGCR antibodies are not always associated with the use of statin and appear to be the exclusive autoantibody specificity in patients with statin associated myopathies. PMID:24741598

  19. Analysis of Autoantibodies to 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A Reductase Using Different Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Musset, Lucile; Miyara, Makoto; Benveniste, Olivier; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Boyer, Olivier; Fowler, Richard; Phillips, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic tests are needed to aid in the diagnosis of necrotizing myopathies associated with statin use. This study aimed to compare different technologies for the detection of anti-HMGCR antibodies and analyze the clinical phenotype and autoantibody profile of the patients. Twenty samples from myositis patients positive for anti-HMGCR antibodies using a research addressable laser bead assay and 20 negative controls were tested for autoantibodies to HMGCR: QUANTA Lite HMGCR ELISA and QUANTA Flash HMGCR CIA. All patients were also tested for antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens and myositis related antibodies. To verify the specificity of the ELISA, 824 controls were tested. All three assays showed qualitative agreements of 100% and levels of anti-HMGCR antibodies showed significant correlation: Spearman's rho > 0.8. The mean age of the anti-HMGCR antibody positive patients was 54.4 years, 16/20 were females, and 18/20 had necrotizing myopathy (two patients were not diagnosed). Nine out of 20 anti-HMGCR positive patients were on statin. All patients with anti-HMGCR antibodies were negative for all other autoantibodies tested. Testing various controls showed high specificity (99.3%). Anti-HMGCR antibodies are not always associated with the use of statin and appear to be the exclusive autoantibody specificity in patients with statin associated myopathies. PMID:24741598

  20. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... body cannot process a particular protein building block ( amino acid ) called leucine. Additionally, the disorder prevents the body ... Specifically, it is responsible for processing leucine, an amino acid that is part of many proteins. HMG-CoA ...

  1. The management of pregnancy and delivery in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pipitone, Angela; Raval, Donna B; Duis, Jessica; Vernon, Hilary; Martin, Regina; Hamosh, Ada; Valle, David; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2016-06-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG)-CoA lyase is required for ketogenesis and leucine degradation. Patients with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency typically present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis, which can be fatal if untreated. The patient is a 28-year-old female with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency who presented at 4 weeks gestation for prenatal care. Protein intake as well as carnitine supplementation were gradually increased to support maternal and fetal demands up to 65 g per day for protein and 80 mg/kg/day for carnitine. Fetal growth was appropriate. At 36 5/7 weeks, she presented with spontaneous rupture of membranes. Twice maintenance 10% glucose-containing intravenous fluids were initiated. During labor, vomiting and metabolic acidosis developed. Delivery was by cesarean. Preeclampsia developed postpartum. The patient recovered well and was discharged home on postpartum day 5. Stress of pregnancy and labor and delivery can lead to metabolic decompensation in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency. Patients should be monitored closely by a biochemical geneticist, dietitian, and high-risk obstetrician at a tertiary care center during their pregnancy. Fasting should be avoided. Intravenous 10% glucose-containing fluids should be provided to prevent catabolism and metabolic decompensation during labor and delivery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26997609

  2. Oligomerization of heme o synthase in cytochrome oxidase biogenesis is mediated by cytochrome oxidase assembly factor Coa2.

    PubMed

    Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kim, Hyung; Watts, Talina; Perez-Martinez, Xochitl; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-08-01

    The synthesis of the heme a cofactor used in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is dependent on the sequential action of heme o synthase (Cox10) and heme a synthase (Cox15). The active state of Cox10 appears to be a homo-oligomeric complex, and formation of this complex is dependent on the newly synthesized CcO subunit Cox1 and the presence of an early Cox1 assembly intermediate. Cox10 multimerization is triggered by progression of Cox1 from the early assembly intermediate to downstream intermediates. The CcO assembly factor Coa2 appears important in coupling the presence of newly synthesized Cox1 to Cox10 oligomerization. Cells lacking Coa2 are impaired in Cox10 complex formation as well as the formation of a high mass Cox15 complex. Increasing Cox1 synthesis in coa2Δ cells restores respiratory function if Cox10 protein levels are elevated. The C-terminal segment of Cox1 is important in triggering Cox10 oligomerization. Expression of the C-terminal 54 residues of Cox1 appended to a heterologous matrix protein leads to efficient Cox10 complex formation in coa2Δ cells, but it fails to induce Cox15 complex formation. The state of Cox10 was evaluated in mutants, which predispose human patients to CcO deficiency and the neurological disorder Leigh syndrome. The presence of the D336V mutation in the yeast Cox10 backbone results in a catalytically inactive enzyme that is fully competent to oligomerize. Thus, Cox10 oligomerization and catalytic activation are separate processes and can be uncoupled. PMID:22669974

  3. Mechanism of action and biological profile of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors. A new therapeutic alternative.

    PubMed

    Slater, E E; MacDonald, J S

    1988-01-01

    Lovastatin (MK-803, mevinolin) and simvastatin (MK-733, synvinolin), 2 highly potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been heralded as breakthrough therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. This paper discusses the biochemical attributes of these HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, their structures and inhibitory properties in a variety of biological systems and presents the rationale for their therapeutic use. Not only do lovastatin and simvastatin potently inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis; they also can result in the induction of hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, thus increasing the catabolism of LDL-cholesterol. Lovastatin and simvastatin are the first HMG CoA reductase inhibitors to receive regulatory agency approval for marketed use. Their safety profiles are reviewed and 2 aspects of this evaluation are stressed. First, the objective in the clinical use of these inhibitors is to normalise plasma cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. This contrasts with the profound reductions in cholesterol obtained when normocholesterolaemic animals are treated by the high doses of these drugs required for toxicological assessment. Second, both lovastatin and simvastatin are administered as prodrugs in their lactone forms. As lactones, they readily undergo first-pass metabolism, hepatic sequestration and hydrolysis to the active form. Consequently, lovastatin and simvastatin achieve lower plasma drug levels than do other HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in clinical development. Low plasma levels have been established as an important determinant of safety in the use of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in both animal and human studies. PMID:3076125

  4. Enzymatic synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) with CoA recycling using polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase and acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yasuharu; Murakami, Fumikazu; Tajima, Kenji; Munekata, Masanobu

    2005-05-01

    We succeeded in developing a novel method for in vitro poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3 HB-co-4 HB)] synthesis with CoA recycling using polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase and an acyl-CoA synthetase. Using this method, the monomer compositions in P(3 HB-co-4 HB)s could be controlled strictly by the ratios of the monomers in the reaction mixtures. PMID:16233824

  5. Involvement of tristetraprolin in transcriptional activation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, Gene C.; Edelman, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, Patricia A.

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin blocks transcription of HMGR in vivo in rat liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin inhibits insulin activation of HMGR transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin acts to rapidly increase tristetraprolin in liver nuclear extracts. -- Abstract: Several AU-rich RNA binding element (ARE) proteins were investigated for their possible effects on transcription of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) in normal rats. Using in vivo electroporation, four different siRNAs to each ARE protein were introduced together with HMGR promoter (-325 to +20) luciferase construct and compared to saline controls. All four siRNAs to tristetraprolin (TTP) completely eliminated transcription from the HMGR promoter construct. Since insulin acts to rapidly increase hepatic HMGR transcription, the effect of TTP siRNA on induction by insulin was tested. The 3-fold stimulation by insulin was eliminated by this treatment. In comparison, siRNA to AU RNA binding protein/enoyl coenzyme A hydratase (AUH) had no effect. These findings indicate a role for TTP in the insulin-mediated activation of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  6. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor simvastatin reduces thrombolytic-induced intracerebral hemorrhage in embolized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, Paul A; Han, Moon Ku

    2009-12-15

    Statins were designed as cholesterol-lowering drugs for the prevention of coronary artery disease. It is estimated that there are currently 33.5 million U.S. patients on chronic statin treatment regimens. Recently, statins have been shown to have pleiotropic including anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we assessed the pharmacological effects of simvastatin administered alone and in combination with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) on measures of ischemia and hemorrhage in large clot embolized New Zealand white rabbits. For these studies, simvastatin (20 mg/kg, SC in DMSO) was administered 24 and 4 h prior to large clot embolization in order to achieve a "loading dose" pretreatment with the drug. In combination studies, tPA (3.3 mg/kg, IV) was administered 1 h following embolization. Intravenous tPA administration significantly increased hemorrhage volume by 175% (p=0.015) and hemorrhage incidence by 60% (p>0.05) compared to control, but did not affect infarct incidence or volume. Simvastatin treatment significantly decreased tPA-induced hemorrhage incidence (p=0.022) and volume (p=0.0001) following embolization. The study suggests that simvastatin treatment blocks or attenuates mechanisms involved in tPA-induced hemorrhage. Based upon our results, patients on simvastatin treatment may have significantly reduced tPA-induced side effects should they require tPA administration following an embolic stroke. PMID:19781532

  7. Isolation and expression of HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA reductase genes in different development stages, tissues and treatments of the Chinese white pine beetle, Dendroctonus armandi (Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiamin; Dai, Lulu; Zhang, Ranran; Li, Zhumei; Pham, Thanh; Chen, Hui

    2015-09-01

    We isolated two full-length cDNAs encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A synthase (HMG-S) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-R) from the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi), and carried out some bioinformatic analysis on the full-length nucleic acid sequences and deduced amino acid sequences. Differential expression of the DaHMG-S and DaHMG-R genes was observed between sexes (emerged adults), and within these significant differences among development stage, tissue distribution, fed on phloem of Pinus armandi and topically applied juvenile hormone (JH) III. Increase of DaHMG-S and DaHMG-R mRNA levels in males suggested that they may play a role in mevalonate pathway. Information from the present study might contribute to understanding the relationship between D. armandi and its semiochemical production. PMID:25983273

  8. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination. PMID:27372278

  9. A novel bisphosphonate inhibitor of squalene synthase combined with a statin or a nitrogenous bisphosphonate in vitro[S

    PubMed Central

    Wasko, Brian M.; Smits, Jacqueline P.; Shull, Larry W.; Wiemer, David F.; Hohl, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Statins and nitrogenous bisphosphonates (NBP) inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A reductase (HMGCR) and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS), respectively, leading to depletion of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) and disruption of protein prenylation. Squalene synthase (SQS) utilizes FPP in the first committed step from the mevalonate pathway toward cholesterol biosynthesis. Herein, we have identified novel bisphosphonates as potent and specific inhibitors of SQS, including the tetrasodium salt of 9-biphenyl-4,8-dimethyl-nona-3,7-dienyl-1,1-bisphosphonic acid (compound 5). Compound 5 reduced cholesterol biosynthesis and lead to a substantial intracellular accumulation of FPP without reducing cell viability in HepG2 cells. At high concentrations, lovastatin and zoledronate impaired protein prenylation and decreased cell viability, which limits their potential use for cholesterol depletion. When combined with lovastatin, compound 5 prevented lovastatin-induced FPP depletion and impairment of protein farnesylation. Compound 5 in combination with the NBP zoledronate completely prevented zoledronate-induced impairment of both protein farnesylation and geranylgeranylation. Cotreatment of cells with compound 5 and either lovastatin or zoledronate was able to significantly prevent the reduction of cell viability caused by lovastatin or zoledronate alone. The combination of an SQS inhibitor with an HMGCR or FDPS inhibitor provides a rational approach for reducing cholesterol synthesis while preventing nonsterol isoprenoid depletion. PMID:21903868

  10. Targeting Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Atrial Fibrillation: Role of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Inhibition with Statins

    PubMed Central

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana Catarina; Reilly, Svetlana; Brandes, Ralf P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a burgeoning health-care problem, and the currently available therapeutic armamentarium is barely efficient. Experimental and clinical evidence implicates inflammation and myocardial oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AF. Recent Advances: Local and systemic inflammation has been found to both precede and follow the new onset of AF, and NOX2-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in human right atrial samples has been independently associated with the occurrence of AF in the postoperative period in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents can prevent atrial electrical remodeling in animal models of atrial tachypacing and the new onset of AF after cardiac surgery, suggesting a causal relationship between inflammation/oxidative stress and the atrial substrate that supports AF. Critical Issues: Statin therapy, by redressing the myocardial nitroso-redox balance and reducing inflammation, has emerged as a potentially effective strategy for the prevention of AF. Evidence indicates that statins prevent AF-induced electrical remodeling in animal models of atrial tachypacing and may reduce the new onset of AF after cardiac surgery. However, whether statins have antiarrhythmic properties in humans has yet to be conclusively demonstrated, as data from randomized controlled trials specifically addressing the relevance of statin therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of AF remain scanty. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the putative antiarrhythmic effects of statins may afford tailoring AF treatment to specific clinical settings and patient's subgroups. Large-scale randomized clinical trials are needed to support the indication of statin therapy solely on the basis of AF prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1268–1285. PMID:23924190

  11. Effect of squalene synthase inhibition on the expression of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes, LDL receptor, and cholesterol 7 alpha hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Keller, R K

    1994-06-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the committed step in the biosynthesis of sterols. Treating rats with zaragozic acid A, a potent inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused marked increases in hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, HMG-CoA reductase, squalene synthase, and LDL receptor mRNA levels. The increase in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA fully accounted for the increases seen in enzyme protein and activity. Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase mRNA and activity were only slightly increased by zaragozic acid A, while cholesterol 7 alpha hydroxylase mRNA levels were decreased substantially. When rats were pretreated with zaragozic acid A, there was no change in mRNA levels for the cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes or cholesterol 7 alpha hydroxylase upon subsequent treatment with mevalonolactone. Under these same conditions, the enzymatic activity of HMG-CoA reductase was also unaffected. Mevalonolactone treatment reduced the zaragozic acid A-mediated increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Feeding cholesterol eliminated the zaragozic acid A-induced increase in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA levels. These results suggest that inhibition of squalene synthase decreases the level of a squalene-derived regulatory product, resulting in altered amounts of several mRNAs and coordinate increases in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA, protein, and activity. The increase in HMG-CoA reductase gene expression was closely related to the degree of inhibition of cholesterol synthesis caused by zaragozic acid A. PMID:7911291

  12. Squalene synthase inhibitors: An update on the search for new antihyperlipidemic and antiatherosclerotic agents.

    PubMed

    Kourounakis, A P; Katselou, M G; Matralis, A N; Ladopoulou, E M; Bavavea, E

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and related heart disease is strongly associated with elevated blood levels of total (and LDL) cholesterol. Due to the widespread incidence as well as severity of this pathological condition, major efforts have been made for the discovery and development of hypocholesteroleamic agents. In the past few decades, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are being extensively used as lipid lowering drugs. These agents act predominantly by inhibiting the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) that is the rate limiting step of cholesterol biosynthesis. Both the success as well as drawbacks of HMGRIs, have led to the investigation and design of inhibitors of other (downstream) enzymes involved in the multistep cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. One such class of agents consists of the squalene sythase inhibitors which act at the first and solely committed step towards the biosynthesis of the cholesterol nucleus. This target is considered not to interfere with the biosynthesis of other biologically important molecules and thus a better side-effect profile is expected for these inhibitors. Several classes of squalene synthase inhibitors (SQSIs), such as substrate or transition-state analogues, zaragozic acids or 2,8- dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane derivatives, dicarboxylic acid and quinuclidine derivatives, 4,1-benzoxazepine as well as substituted morpholine derivatives, have been studied as potent inhibitors of squalene synthase. So far only one benzoxazepine derivative (TAK-475) has been evaluated in advanced clinical trials. In this article we review the up to date research and literature on the therapeutic potential of this relatively new class of compounds, the drug discovery efforts towards the development of active squalene synthase inhibitors, their activity profile and effectiveness, as well as their structure-activity relationships. PMID:21864285

  13. Protective effects of a squalene synthase inhibitor, lapaquistat acetate (TAK-475), on statin-induced myotoxicity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Eiichiro; Anayama, Hisashi; Hamajyo, Hitomi; Nagai, Hirofumi; Hirakata, Masao; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2007-08-15

    High-dose statin treatment has been recommended as a primary strategy for aggressive reduction of LDL cholesterol levels and protection against coronary artery disease. The effectiveness of high-dose statins may be limited by their potential for myotoxic side effects. There is currently little known about the molecular mechanisms of statin-induced myotoxicity. Previously we showed that T-91485, an active metabolite of the squalene synthase inhibitor lapaquistat acetate (lapaquistat: a previous name is TAK-475), attenuated statin-induced cytotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells [Nishimoto, T., Tozawa, R., Amano, Y., Wada, T., Imura, Y., Sugiyama, Y., 2003a. Comparing myotoxic effects of squalene synthase inhibitor, T-91485, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A. Biochem. Pharmacol. 66, 2133-2139]. In the current study, we investigated the effects of lapaquistat administration on statin-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Guinea pigs were treated with either high-dose cerivastatin (1 mg/kg) or cerivastatin together with lapaquistat (30 mg/kg) for 14 days. Treatment with cerivastatin alone decreased plasma cholesterol levels by 45% and increased creatine kinase (CK) levels by more than 10-fold (a marker of myotoxicity). The plasma CK levels positively correlated with the severity of skeletal muscle lesions as assessed by histopathology. Co-administration of lapaquistat almost completely prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity. Administration of mevalonolactone (100 mg/kg b.i.d.) prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity, confirming that this effect is directly related to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. These results strongly suggest that cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity is due to depletion of mevalonate derived isoprenoids. In addition, squalene synthase inhibition could potentially be used clinically to prevent statin-induced myopathy. PMID:17599378

  14. Protective effects of a squalene synthase inhibitor, lapaquistat acetate (TAK-475), on statin-induced myotoxicity in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Eiichiro; Anayama, Hisashi; Hamajyo, Hitomi; Nagai, Hirofumi; Hirakata, Masao; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2007-08-15

    High-dose statin treatment has been recommended as a primary strategy for aggressive reduction of LDL cholesterol levels and protection against coronary artery disease. The effectiveness of high-dose statins may be limited by their potential for myotoxic side effects. There is currently little known about the molecular mechanisms of statin-induced myotoxicity. Previously we showed that T-91485, an active metabolite of the squalene synthase inhibitor lapaquistat acetate (lapaquistat: a previous name is TAK-475), attenuated statin-induced cytotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells [Nishimoto, T., Tozawa, R., Amano, Y., Wada, T., Imura, Y., Sugiyama, Y., 2003a. Comparing myotoxic effects of squalene synthase inhibitor, T-91485, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A. Biochem. Pharmacol. 66, 2133-2139]. In the current study, we investigated the effects of lapaquistat administration on statin-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Guinea pigs were treated with either high-dose cerivastatin (1 mg/kg) or cerivastatin together with lapaquistat (30 mg/kg) for 14 days. Treatment with cerivastatin alone decreased plasma cholesterol levels by 45% and increased creatine kinase (CK) levels by more than 10-fold (a marker of myotoxicity). The plasma CK levels positively correlated with the severity of skeletal muscle lesions as assessed by histopathology. Co-administration of lapaquistat almost completely prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity. Administration of mevalonolactone (100 mg/kg b.i.d.) prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity, confirming that this effect is directly related to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. These results strongly suggest that cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity is due to depletion of mevalonate derived isoprenoids. In addition, squalene synthase inhibition could potentially be used clinically to prevent statin-induced myopathy.

  15. Metabolic biology of 3-methylglutaconic acid-uria: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Su, Betty; Ryan, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past twenty-five years a growing number of distinct syndromes / mutations associated with compromised mitochondrial function have been identified that share a common feature: urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA). In the leucine degradation pathway, carboxylation of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA leads to formation of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA while 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts this metabolite to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG CoA). In “primary” 3MGA-uria, mutations in the hydratase are directly responsible for the accumulation of 3MGA. On the other hand, in all “secondary” 3MGA-urias, no defect in leucine catabolism exists and the metabolic origin of 3MGA is unknown. Herein, a path to 3MGA from mitochondrial acetyl CoA is proposed. The pathway is initiated when syndrome-associated mutations / DNA deletions result in decreased Krebs cycle flux. When this occurs, acetoacetyl CoA thiolase condenses two acetyl CoA into acetoacetyl CoA plus CoASH. Subsequently, HMG CoA synthase 2 converts acetoacetyl CoA and acetyl CoA to HMG CoA. Under syndrome-specific metabolic conditions, 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts HMG CoA into 3-methylglutaconyl CoA in a reverse reaction of the leucine degradation pathway. This metabolite fails to proceed further up the leucine degradation pathway owing to the kinetic properties of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase. Instead, hydrolysis of the CoA moiety of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA generates 3MGA, which appears in urine. If experimentally confirmed, this pathway provides an explanation for the occurrence of 3MGA in multiple disorders associated with compromised mitochondrial function. PMID:24407466

  16. Suppressed production of methyl farnesoid hormones yields developmental defects and lethality in Drosophila larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-unresolved question in the developmental biology of Drosophila melanogaster has been whether methyl farnesoid hormones secreted by the ring gland are necessary for larval maturation and metamorphosis. In this study, we have used RNAi techniques to inhibit 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reduct...

  17. Vanillic acid prevents the deregulation of lipid metabolism, endothelin 1 and up regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in nitric oxide deficient hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subramanian; Prahalathan, Pichavaram; Saravanakumar, Murugesan; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-11-15

    Hypertension is one of the main factors causing cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of vanillic acid against nitric oxide deficient rats. Hypertension was induced in adult male albino rats of Wistar strain, weighing 180-220g, by oral administration of N(ω)-nitro-l arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) 40mg/kg in drinking water for 4 weeks. Vanillic acid was administered orally at a dose of 50mg/kg b.w. Nitric oxide deficient rats showed increased levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and decreased heart nitric oxide metabolites (NOx). A significant increase in the levels of plasma cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in the plasma, liver and kidney and decreased level of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) are observed, whereas there is a decrease in the activities of plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) in nitric oxide deficient rats. l-NAME rats also showed an increase in TC, TG, FFA and PL levels in the liver and kidney tissues. Vanillic acid treatment brought the above parameters towards near normal level. Moreover the down regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and up regulated expression of endothelin 1 (ET1) components was also attenuated by vanillic acid treatment. All the above outcomes were confirmed by the histopathological examination. These results suggest that vanillic acid has enough potential to attenuate hypertension, dyslipidemia and hepatic and renal damage in nitric oxide deficient rats. PMID:25239071

  18. The Sterol-sensing Domain (SSD) Directly Mediates Signal-regulated Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation (ERAD) of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA Reductase Isozyme Hmg2*

    PubMed Central

    Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Pourmand, Deeba; Davis, Talib; Garza, Renee M.; Hampton, Randolph Y.

    2011-01-01

    The sterol-sensing domain (SSD) is a conserved motif in membrane proteins responsible for sterol regulation. Mammalian proteins SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) both possess SSDs required for feedback regulation of sterol-related genes and sterol synthetic rate. Although these two SSD proteins clearly sense sterols, the range of signals detected by this eukaryotic motif is not clear. The yeast HMG-CoA reductase isozyme Hmg2, like its mammalian counterpart, undergoes endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation that is subject to feedback control by the sterol pathway. The primary degradation signal for yeast Hmg2 degradation is the 20-carbon isoprene geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, rather than a sterol. Nevertheless, the Hmg2 protein possesses an SSD, leading us to test its role in feedback control of Hmg2 stability. We mutated highly conserved SSD residues of Hmg2 and evaluated regulated degradation. Our results indicated that the SSD was required for sterol pathway signals to stimulate Hmg2 ER-associated degradation and was employed for detection of both geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate and a secondary oxysterol signal. Our data further indicate that the SSD allows a signal-dependent structural change in Hmg2 that promotes entry into the ER degradation pathway. Thus, the eukaryotic SSD is capable of significant plasticity in signal recognition or response. We propose that the harnessing of cellular quality control pathways to bring about feedback regulation of normal proteins is a unifying theme for the action of all SSDs. PMID:21628456

  19. In vitro biliary clearance of angiotensin II receptor blockers and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes: comparison with in vivo biliary clearance.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koji; Bridges, Arlene S; Yue, Wei; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2008-09-01

    Previous reports have indicated that in vitro biliary clearance (Cl(biliary)) determined in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes correlates well with in vivo Cl(biliary) for limited sets of compounds. This study was designed to estimate the in vitro Cl(biliary) in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRHs) of angiotensin II receptor blockers and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that undergo limited metabolism, to compare the estimated Cl(biliary) values with published in vivo Cl(biliary) data in rats, and to characterize the mechanism(s) of basolateral uptake and canalicular excretion of these drugs in rats. The average biliary excretion index (BEI) and in vitro Cl(biliary) values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin were 15, 19, 43, 45, and 20%, respectively, and 1.7, 3.2, 4.4, 46.1, and 34.6 ml/min/kg, respectively. Cl(biliary) predicted from SCRHs, accounting for plasma unbound fraction, correlated with reported in vivo Cl(biliary) for these drugs. The rank order of Cl(biliary) values predicted from SCRHs was consistent with in vivo Cl(biliary) values. Bromosulfophthalein inhibited the uptake of all drugs. BEI and Cl(biliary) values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin, known multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp) 2 substrates, were reduced in SCRHs from Mrp2-deficient (TR(-)) compared with wild-type (WT) rats. Although Mrp2 plays a minor role in pitavastatin biliary excretion, pitavastatin BEI and Cl(biliary) were reduced in TR(-) compared with WT SCRHs; Bcrp expression in SCRHs from TR(-) rats was decreased. In conclusion, in vitro Cl(biliary) determined in SCRHs can be used to estimate and compare in vivo Cl(biliary) of compounds in rats and to characterize transport proteins responsible for their hepatic uptake and excretion. PMID:18574002

  20. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Kishta, Sara; Ei-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  1. Characterization of a Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase which is able to phosphorylate native and protease cleaved purified hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Z.H.; Stonik, J.A.; Brewer, H.B. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have extensively purified a low molecular weight Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from rat brain cytosol. This kinase (M/sub r/ 120,000) is able to phosphorylate both native and soluble purified HMG-CoA reductase. The concomitant inactivation and phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase was completely dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin. Incubation of phosphorylated /sup 32/P-HMG-CoA reductase was associated with the loss of /sup 32/P-radioactivity and reactivation of inactive enzyme. Maximal phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase involved the introduction of approximately 0.5 mol phosphate/53,000 enzyme fragment. The apparent Km for purified HMG-CoA reductase was .045 mg/ml. Microsomal native HMG-CoA reductase (M/sub r/ 100,000) was also phosphorylated and inactivated following incubation with calmodulin stimulated kinase, calmodulin, Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg-ATP; dephosphorylation (reactivation) was catalyzed by the phosphoprotein phosphatase. The isolation and characterization of the M/sub r/ 120,000 calmodulin-binding enzyme complex provides additional insights into the mechanisms of the Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent regulation of HMG-CoA reductase phosphorylation. Based on these data and the authors previous in vitro and in vivo studies, they now propose that HMG-CoA reductase activity is modulated by three separate kinase systems.

  2. Statins in therapy: understanding their hydrophilicity, lipophilicity, binding to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, ability to cross the blood brain barrier and metabolic stability based on electrostatic molecular orbital studies.

    PubMed

    Fong, Clifford W

    2014-10-01

    The atomic electrostatic potentials calculated by the CHELPG method have been shown to be sensitive indicators of the gas phase and solution properties of the statins. Solvation free energies in water, n-octanol and n-octane have been determined using the SMD solvent model. The percentage hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity (or lipophilicity) of the statins in solution have been determined using (a) the differences in solvation free energies between n-octanol and n-octane as a measure of hydrophilicity, and the solvation energy in octane as a measure of hydrophobicity (b) the sum of the atomic electrostatic charges on the hydrogen bonding and polar bonding nuclei of the common pharmacophore combined with a solvent measure of hydrophobicity, and (c) using the buried surface areas after statin binding to HMGCR to calculate the hydrophobicity of the bound statins. The data suggests that clinical definitions of statins as either "hydrophilic" or "lipophilic" based on experimental partition coefficients are misleading. An estimate of the binding energy between rosuvastatin and HMGCR has been made using: (a) a coulombic electrostatic interaction model, (b) the calculated desolvation and resolvation of the statin in water, and (c) the first shell transfer solvation energy as a proxy for the restructuring of the water molecules immediately adjacent to the active binding site of HMGCR prior to binding. Desolvation and resolvation of the statins before and after binding to HMGCR are major determinants of the energetics of the binding process. An analysis of the amphiphilic nature of lovastatin anion, acid and lactone and fluvastatin anion and their abilities to cross the blood brain barrier has indicated that this process may be dominated by desolvation and resolvation effects, rather than the statin molecular size or statin-lipid interactions within the bilayer. The ionization energy and electron affinity of the statins are sensitive physical indicators of the ease that the various statins can undergo endogenous oxidative metabolism. The absolute chemical hardness is also an indicator of the stability of the statins, and may be a useful indicator for drug design. PMID:25128668

  3. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Kishta, Sara; EI-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness.

  4. Brassica juncea HMG-CoA synthase: localization of mRNA and protein.

    PubMed

    Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Ramalingam, Sathishkumar; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2005-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) synthase (HMGS; EC 2.3.3.10) synthesizes HMG-CoA, a substrate for mevalonate biosynthesis in the isoprenoid pathway. It catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with acetoacetyl-CoA (AcAc-CoA) to yield S-HMG-CoA and HS-CoA. In Brassica juncea (Indian mustard), HMGS is encoded by four isogenes (BjHMGS1-BjHMGS4). We have already enzymatically characterized recombinant BjHMGS1 expressed in Escherichia coli, and have identified its residues that are significant in catalysis. To further study HMGS mRNA expression that is developmentally regulated in flowers and seedlings, we have examined its mRNA distribution by in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed predominant localization of HMGS mRNA in the stigmas and ovules of flower buds and in the piths of seedling hypocotyls. RT-PCR analysis revealed that BjHMGS1 and BjHMGS2 but not BjHMGS3 and BjHMGS4were expressed in floral buds. To investigate the subcellular localization of BjHMGS1, we fused BjHMGS1 translationally in-frame either to the N- or C-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP). BjHMGS1-GFP and GFP-BjHMGS1 fusions were used in particle gun bombardment of onion epidermal cells and tobacco BY-2 cells. The GFP-BjHMGS1 construct was also used in agroinfiltration of tobacco leaves. Both GFP-fusion proteins were observed transiently expressed in the cytosol on confocal microscopy of onion epidermal cells, tobacco BY-2 cells, and agroinfiltrated tobacco leaves. Further, subcellular fractionation of total proteins from transgenic plants expressing GFP-BjHMGS1 derived from Agrobacterium-mediated transformation confirmed that BjHMGS1 is a cytosolic enzyme. We suggest that the presence of BjHMGS isoforms is likely related to the specialization of each in different cellular and metabolic processes rather than to a different intracellular compartmentation of the enzyme. PMID:15770484

  5. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA synthase 1 shows increased plant growth, pod size and seed yield.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  6. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA Synthase 1 Shows Increased Plant Growth, Pod Size and Seed Yield

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  7. Recent NASA Dryden COA Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation concerns the experience that Dryden has had with Certificate of Authorization (COA) in reference to unmanned aerial systems (UAS). It reviews recent Certificate of Authorization UAS's i.e., 2005 Altair NOAA Mission, 2006 Altair Western States Fire Mission, and 2007 Ikhana. The priorities for the safety process is reviewed, as are typical UAS hazards. Slides also review the common COA provisions, best practices and lessons learned, the 2005 NOAA/NASA Science Demonstration Flights and the use of the UAS systems during fire emergencies.

  8. [Phosphoprotein phosphatase nonspecifically hydrolyzes CoA].

    PubMed

    Reziapkin, V I; Moiseenok, A G

    1988-01-01

    CoA hydrolysis was studied by a homogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase (EC 3.1 3.16) preparation from bovine spleen nuclei at pH 5.8. Phosphoprotein phosphatase catalyzed hydrolysis of the CoA 3'-phosphoester bond to form dephospho-CoA and Pi. The Km value for phosphoprotein phosphatase with CoA as substrate was 3.7 mM, the specific activity - 0.26 mmol Pi.min-1.mg-1. Phosphoprotein phosphatase did not essentially catalyze the calcium pantothenate hydrolysis (not more than 2% as compared with the CoA hydrolysis rate). PMID:2849829

  9. γ-Tocotrienol attenuates triglyceride through effect on lipogenic gene expressions in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa 1-6.

    PubMed

    Burdeos, Gregor Carpentero; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Akio; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin E is the generic name for tocopherol (Toc) and tocotrienol (T3), which have saturated and unsaturated side chains, respectively. Such differences allow T3 to be different from Toc in terms of their functions. T3 has been known to attenuate cholesterol (Cho) level by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR). Recent reports also showed the efficacy of T3 in improving triglyceride (TG) profiles in both in vivo and in vitro studies. However the mechanism involved in this biological activity is still unclear and needs to be further investigated. In the present study, we elucidated the effect of γ-T3 on lipid levels and lipogenic gene expressions in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa 1-6. γ-T3 showed attenuation of TG through effect on fatty acid synthase, sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A gene expression in Hepa 1-6. In contrast, the Cho level remained unchanged. These results expanded our previous finding of lipid-lowering effects of T3, especially for TG. Therefore, T3 is a potential lipid-lowering compound candidate with realistic prospects for its use as a therapy for lipid-related diseases in humans. PMID:23727646

  10. Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hee; Gwon, So Young; Ahn, Jiyun; Jung, Chang Hwa; Ha, Tae Youl

    2013-07-01

    Rice has many health-beneficial components for ameliorating obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the effect of cooked rice as a useful carbohydrate source has not been investigated yet; so we hypothesized that cooked rice may have hypolipidemic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cooked rice on hyperlipidemia and on the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Golden Syrian hamsters were divided into 2 groups and fed a high-fat (15%, wt/wt)/cholesterol (0.5%, wt/wt) diet supplemented with either corn starch (HFD, 54.5% wt/wt) or cooked rice (HFD-CR, 54.5% wt/wt) as the main carbohydrate source for 8 weeks. In the HFD-CR group, the triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in the serum and liver were decreased, and the total lipid, total cholesterol, and bile acid levels in the feces were increased, compared with the HFD group. In the cooked-rice group, the messenger RNA and protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase were significantly downregulated; and the messenger RNA and protein levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase were upregulated. Furthermore, the expressions of lipogenic genes such as sterol response element binding protein-1, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 were downregulated, whereas the β-oxidation related genes (carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, acyl CoA oxidase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) were upregulated, in the cooked-rice group. Our results suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of cooked rice is partially mediated by the regulation of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, which results in the suppression of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis and the enhancement of cholesterol excretion and fatty acid β-oxidation. PMID:23827132

  11. Potential of tocotrienols in the prevention and therapy of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xia, Weiming; Mo, Huanbiao

    2016-05-01

    Currently there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease (AD); clinical trials are underway to reduce amyloid generation and deposition, a neuropathological hallmark in brains of AD patients. While genetic factors and neuroinflammation contribute significantly to AD pathogenesis, whether increased cholesterol level is a causative factor or a result of AD is equivocal. Prenylation of proteins regulating neuronal functions requires mevalonate-derived farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The observation that the levels of FPP and GGPP, but not that of cholesterol, are elevated in AD patients is consistent with the finding that statins, competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, reduce FPP and GGPP levels and amyloid β protein production in preclinical studies. Retrospective studies show inverse correlations between incidence of AD and the intake and serum levels of the HMG CoA reductase-suppressive tocotrienols; tocopherols show mixed results. Tocotrienols, but not tocopherols, block the processing and nuclear localization of sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, the transcriptional factor for HMG CoA reductase and FPP synthase, and enhance the degradation of HMG CoA reductase. Consequently, tocotrienols deplete the pool of FPP and GGPP and potentially blunt prenylation-dependent AD pathogenesis. The antiinflammatory activity of tocotrienols further contributes to their protection against AD. The mevalonate- and inflammation-suppressive activities of tocotrienols may represent those of an estimated 23,000 mevalonate-derived plant secondary metabolites called isoprenoids, many of which are neuroprotective. Tocotrienol-containing plant foods and tocotrienol derivatives and formulations with enhanced bioavailability may offer a novel approach in AD prevention and treatment. PMID:27133418

  12. Cholesterol biosynthesis and the pro-apoptotic effects of the p75 nerve growth factor receptor in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chaohua; Mirnics, Zeljka Korade; Portugal, Carmel F; Liang, Ye; Nylander, Karen D; Rudzinski, Marcelo; Zaccaro, Clara; Saragovi, H Uri; Schor, Nina Felice

    2005-10-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS), an enediyne antimitotic agent, induces cell death in both p75NTR neurotrophin receptor (NTR)-positive and p75NTR-negative PC12 cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, p75NTR-positive cells demonstrate a higher susceptibility to NCS-induced cell damage. Furthermore, treatment of p75NTR-positive cells with the p75NTR-specific ligand, MC192, resulted in apoptosis, while treatment of these cells with the TrkA-specific ligand, NGF-mAbNGF30, protected them from NCS-induced death, implying that both the naked and liganded p75NTR receptors have a pro-apoptotic effect on PC12 cells. Microarray studies aimed at examining differential gene expression between p75NTR-positive and p75NTR-negative cells suggested that enzymes of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway are differentially expressed. We therefore tested the hypothesis that altered cholesterol biosynthesis contributes directly to the pro-apoptotic effects of p75NTR in this PC12 cell-NCS model. Subsequent Northern blotting studies confirmed that the expression of p75NTR is associated with the upregulation of cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG CoA reductase), farnesyl-diphosphate synthase, and 7-dehydro-cholesterol reductase. Mevastatin, an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor, converts the apoptosis susceptibility of p75NTR-positive cells to that of p75NTR-negative cells. It does so at concentrations that do not themselves alter cell survival. These studies provide evidence that the pro-apoptotic effects of p75NTR in PC12 cells are related to the upregulation of cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes and consequent increased cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:15967538

  13. Differences among Adult COAs and Adult Non-COAs on Levels of Self-Esteem, Depression, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, David T.; Roberts, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined self-esteem, depression, and anxiety among 60 adult children of alcoholics (COAs) and 143 adult non-COAs. Subjects completed Children of Alcoholics Screening Test, demographic questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Found no significant differences between COAs and…

  14. Unprecedented acetoacetyl-coenzyme A synthesizing enzyme of the thiolase superfamily involved in the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Eiji; Tomita, Takeo; Sawa, Ryuichi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2010-06-22

    Acetoacetyl-CoA is the precursor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA in the mevalonate pathway, which is essential for terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. Acetoacetyl-CoA is also the precursor of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, a polymer belonging to the polyester class produced by microorganisms. The de novo synthesis of acetoacetyl-CoA is usually catalyzed by acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase via a thioester-dependent Claisen condensation reaction between two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Here, we report that nphT7, found in the mevalonate pathway gene cluster from a soil-isolated Streptomyces sp. strain, encodes an unusual acetoacetyl-CoA synthesizing enzyme. The recombinant enzyme overexpressed in Escherichia coli catalyzes a single condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to give acetoacetyl-CoA and CoA. Replacement of malonyl-CoA with malonyl-(acyl carrier protein) resulted in loss of the condensation activity. No acetoacetyl-CoA synthesizing activity was detected through the condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Based on these properties of NphT7, we propose to name this unusual enzyme of the thiolase superfamily acetoacetyl-CoA synthase. Coexpression of nphT7 with the HMG-CoA synthase gene and the HMG-CoA reductase gene in a heterologous host allowed 3.5-fold higher production of mevalonate than when only the HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA reductase genes were expressed. This result suggests that nphT7 can be used to significantly increase the concentration of acetoacetyl-CoA in cells, eventually leading to the production of useful terpenoids and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:20534558

  15. Structure of the human gene encoding sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBF1) and localization of SREBF1 and SREBF2 to chromosomes 17p11.2 and 22q13

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, X.; Wu, J.; Goldstein, J.L.

    1995-02-10

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) and SREBP2 are structurally related proteins that control cholesterol homeostasis by stimulating transcription of sterol-regulated genes, including those encoding the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase. SREBP1 and SREBP2 are 47% identical, and they share a novel structure comprising a transcriptionally active NH{sub 2}-terminal basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) domain followed by a membrane attachment domain. Cleavage by a sterol-regulated protease frees the bHLH-Zip domain from the membrane and allows it to enter the nucleus. SREBP1 exists in several forms, possibly as a result of alternative splicing at both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} ends of the mRNA. The genes for SREBP1 (SREBF1) and SREBP2 (SREBF2) have not been studied. In this paper we describe the cloning and characterization of the human SREBF1 gene. The gene is 26 kb in length and has 22 exons and 20 introns. The 5{prime} and 3{prime} sequences that differ between the two SREBP1 cDNAs are encoded by discrete exons, conforming the hypothesis that they result from alternative splicing. The chromosomal locations of human SREBF1 and SREBF2 were determined by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SREBF1 gene mapped to the proximal short arm of chromosome 17 (17p11.2), and the SREBF2 gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q13). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Inhibitors to Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Synthases: Synthesis, Molecular Docking, and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruikai; Maurmann, Leila; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHAs that are considered as an ideal alternative to nonbiodegradable synthetic plastics. However, study of PhaC has been challenging because the rate of PHA chain elongation is much faster than that of initiation. This difficulty along with lack of a structure has become the main hurdle to understand and engineer PhaCs for economical PHA production. Here we reported the synthesis of two carbadethia CoA analogs, sT-CH2-CoA 26a and sTet-CH2-CoA 26b as well as sT-aldehyde 29 as new PhaC inhibitors. Study of these analogs with PhaECAv revealed that 26a/b and 29 are competitive and mixed inhibitors, respectively. It was observed that CoA moiety and PHA chain extension can increase binding affinity, which is consistent with the docking study. Estimation from Kic of 26a/b predicts that a CoA analog attached with an octameric-HB chain may facilitate the formation of a kinetically well-behaved synthase. PMID:25394180

  17. Inhibitors of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases: synthesis, molecular docking, and implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Chao; Cao, Ruikai; Maurmann, Leila; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHAs that are considered to be ideal alternatives to non-biodegradable synthetic plastics. However, study of PhaCs has been challenging because the rate of PHA chain elongation is much faster than that of initiation. This difficulty, along with lack of a crystal structure, has become the main hurdle to understanding and engineering PhaCs for economical PHA production. Here we report the synthesis of two carbadethia CoA analogues--sT-CH2-CoA (26 a) and sTet-CH2-CoA (26 b)--as well as sT-aldehyde (saturated trimer aldehyde, 29), as new PhaC inhibitors. Study of these analogues with PhaECAv revealed that 26 a/b and 29 are competitive and mixed inhibitors, respectively. Both the CoA moiety and extension of PHA chain will increase binding affinity; this is consistent with our docking study. Estimation of the Kic values of 26 a and 26 b predicts that a CoA analogue incorporating an octameric hydroxybutanoate (HB) chain might facilitate the formation of a kinetically well-behaved synthase. PMID:25394180

  18. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  19. Transcriptome and gene expression analysis in cold-acclimated guayule (Parthenium argentatum) rubber-producing tissue.

    PubMed

    Ponciano, Grisel; McMahan, Colleen M; Xie, Wenshuang; Lazo, Gerard R; Coffelt, Terry A; Collins-Silva, Jillian; Nural-Taban, Aise; Gollery, Martin; Shintani, David K; Whalen, Maureen C

    2012-07-01

    Natural rubber biosynthesis in guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is associated with moderately cold night temperatures. To begin to dissect the molecular events triggered by cold temperatures that govern rubber synthesis induction in guayule, the transcriptome of bark tissue, where rubber is produced, was investigated. A total of 11,748 quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. The vast majority of ESTs encoded proteins that are similar to stress-related proteins, whereas those encoding rubber biosynthesis-related proteins comprised just over one percent of the ESTs. Sequence information derived from the ESTs was used to design primers for quantitative analysis of the expression of genes that encode selected enzymes and proteins with potential impact on rubber biosynthesis in field-grown guayule plants, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, small rubber particle protein, allene oxide synthase, and cis-prenyl transferase. Gene expression was studied for field-grown plants during the normal course of seasonal variation in temperature (monthly average maximum 41.7 °C to minimum 0 °C, from November 2005 through March 2007) and rubber transferase enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Levels of gene expression did not correlate with air temperatures nor with rubber transferase activity. Interestingly, a sudden increase in night temperature 10 days before harvest took place in advance of the highest CPT gene expression level. PMID:22608127

  20. Polyester synthases: natural catalysts for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolyesters composed of hydroxy fatty acids, which represent a complex class of storage polyesters. They are synthesized by a wide range of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as by some Archaea, and are deposited as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions. Polyester synthases are the key enzymes of polyester biosynthesis and catalyse the conversion of (R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters to polyesters with the concomitant release of CoA. These soluble enzymes turn into amphipathic enzymes upon covalent catalysis of polyester-chain formation. A self-assembly process is initiated resulting in the formation of insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions with a phospholipid monolayer and covalently attached polyester synthases at the surface. Surface-attached polyester synthases show a marked increase in enzyme activity. These polyester synthases have only recently been biochemically characterized. An overview of these recent findings is provided. At present, 59 polyester synthase structural genes from 45 different bacteria have been cloned and the nucleotide sequences have been obtained. The multiple alignment of the primary structures of these polyester synthases show an overall identity of 8-96% with only eight strictly conserved amino acid residues. Polyester synthases can been assigned to four classes based on their substrate specificity and subunit composition. The current knowledge on the organization of the polyester synthase genes, and other genes encoding proteins related to PHA metabolism, is compiled. In addition, the primary structures of the 59 PHA synthases are aligned and analysed with respect to highly conserved amino acids, and biochemical features of polyester synthases are described. The proposed catalytic mechanism based on similarities to alpha/beta-hydrolases and mutational analysis is discussed. Different threading algorithms suggest that polyester synthases belong to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily, with

  1. Global Hawk Pacific (GloPac) COA and Mission Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Mark; Hall, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the science objectives of the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in the Pacific region, shows examp le flight tracks, the satellite under-flight requirement, the flight planning, and the agencies coordination of the airspace required for the Certificate of Authorization (COA).

  2. Synthesis and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic CoAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Ashokaan, N.; Masud, J.; Pariti, A.; Nath, M.

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic CoAs nanoparticles and elongated nanostructures with high blocking temperature, (TB), via hot-injection precipitation and solvothermal methods. Cobalt arsenides constitute an important family of magnetically active solids that find a variety of applications ranging from magnetic semiconductors to biomedical imaging. While the higher temperature hot-injection precipitation technique (300 °C) yields pure CoAs nanostructures, the lower temperature solvothermal method (200 °C) yields a mixture of CoAs nanoparticles along with other Co-based impurity phases. The synthesis in all these cases involved usage of triphenylarsine ((C6H5)3As) as the As precursor which reacts with solid Co2(CO)8 by ligand displacement to yield a single source precursor. The surfactant, hexadecylamine (HDA) further assists in controlling the morphology of the nanostructures. HDA also provides a basic medium and molten flux-like conditions for the redox chemistry to occur between Co and As at elevated temperatures. The influence of the length of reaction time was investigated by studying the evolution of product morphology over time. It was observed that while spontaneous nucleation at higher temperature followed by controlled growth led to the predominant formation of short nanorods, with longer reaction time, the nanorods were further converted to nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles obtained, was mostly in the range of 10-15 nm. The key finding of this work is exceptionally high coercivity in CoAs nanostructures for the first time. Coercivity observed was as high as 0.1 T (1000 Oe) at 2 K. These kinds of magnetic nanostructures find multiple applications in spintronics, whereas the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are viable for use in magnetic storage, ferrofluids and as contrast enhancing agents in MRI.

  3. Doping Induced Itinerant Ferromagnetism in CoAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Morosan, Emilia

    2013-03-01

    The magnetism in α-CoAs is dominated by strong spin fluctuations. In this study, we explore the effects of Phosphorus doping in α-CoAs. Phosphorus is isovalent with Arsenic, and the resulting doping introduces disorder and chemical pressure. In CoAs1-xPx, a cross-over from the spin fluctuation-dominated regime to an itinerant ferromagnetic (IFM) state take places around x = 0.04. The IFM state persists up to x <= 0.27. For compositions between x = 0.28 and 0.40, the magnetization data suggests a possible Stoner enhanced state. We acknowledge the support from DOD PECASE.

  4. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms. PMID:25839341

  5. Are statins really wonder drugs?

    PubMed

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Luthra, Shailly; Maroo, Shruti

    2014-12-01

    Statins [3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase], are wonder drugs that have reshaped the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and associated cardiovascular diseases. However, evidence from various studies indicates existence of many statin-induced side effects such as myopathies, rhabdomyolysis, hepatotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, impaired myocardial contractility, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, and erectile dysfunction (ED). Physician awareness of these side effects is reported to be very low even for the adverse effects (AEs) most widely reported by patients. This can lead to incorrect treatment decisions, compromised patient care, and an increase in patient morbidity. Therefore, the aim of this article is to highlight the AEs of statin therapy as well as rational management of these complications to further improve safety of these excellent drugs. PMID:24231094

  6. Pharmacogenetics of Response to Statins

    PubMed Central

    Zineh, Issam

    2016-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are among the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide. On average, statins improve lipid profiles and have been shown to have ancillary beneficial effects on inflammation, platelet activity, and endothelial function. However, variability in drug response exists regardless of the measured phenotype, and genetic variability may be a contributing factor. Recently, there has been an interesting shift in statin pharmacogenetic studies. Novel study designs have been employed and nontraditional candidate genes have been investigated in relation to both lipid and nonlipid responses to statins. This review outlines earlier pharmacogenetic studies and highlights newly published findings that expand on previous work. Furthermore, a framework is provided in which the necessary next steps in research are described, with the ultimate goal of translating pharmacogenetic findings into clinically meaningful changes in patient care. PMID:18241612

  7. The Natural Mentors of Adolescent Children of Alcoholics (COAs): Implications for Preventive Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Meehan, Barbara T.; Heffer, Robert W.; Holladay, Janice J.

    2002-01-01

    Late adolescent children of alcoholics (COAs) were interviewed about their relationship with a natural mentor. Results showed that a typical mentor was a same-sex relative who had been responsible for initiating the mentor-like relationship. Differences in the reported adjustment of COAs with and without natural mentors are considered in light of…

  8. Biochemical characterization and substrate specificity of jojoba fatty acyl-CoA reductase and jojoba wax synthase.

    PubMed

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    Wax esters are used in industry for production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. The only natural source of wax esters is jojoba oil. A much wider variety of industrial wax esters-containing oils can be generated through genetic engineering. Biotechnological production of tailor-made wax esters requires, however, a detailed substrate specificity of fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) and wax synthases (WS), the two enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis. In this study we have successfully characterized the substrate specificity of jojoba FAR and jojoba WS. The genes encoding both enzymes were expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the activity of tested enzymes was confirmed by in vivo studies and in vitro assays using microsomal preparations from transgenic yeast. Jojoba FAR exhibited the highest in vitro activity toward 18:0-CoA followed by 20:1-CoA and 22:1-CoA. The activity toward other 11 tested acyl-CoAs was low or undetectable as with 18:2-CoA and 18:3-CoA. In assays characterizing jojoba WS combinations of 17 fatty alcohols with 14 acyl-CoAs were tested. The enzyme displayed the highest activity toward 14:0-CoA and 16:0-CoA in combination with C16-C20 alcohols as well as toward C18 acyl-CoAs in combination with C12-C16 alcohols. 20:1-CoA was efficiently utilized in combination with most of the tested alcohols. PMID:27297992

  9. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Frias, Janice A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2012-10-25

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short {beta}-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117{beta}) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly

  10. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, BR; Frias, JA; Wackett, LP; Wilmot, CM

    2012-05-22

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acylcoenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short beta-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117 beta) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly, Glu117

  11. Isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive pantothenate kinase (coaA) mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vallari, D S; Rock, C O

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants conditionally defective in the conversion of pantothenate to coenzyme A were isolated and characterized. The gene was designated coaA and localized between argEH and rpoB near min 90 of the chromosome. The coaA15(Ts) mutation caused a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype and temperature-dependent inactivation of pantothenate kinase activity assayed both in vivo and in vitro. At 30 degrees C, coaA15(Ts) extracts contained less than 20% of the wild-type pantothenate kinase activity; the kinase had near normal kinetic constants for the substrates ATP and pantothenate and was inhibited by coenzyme A to the same degree as the wild-type enzyme. These data define the coaA gene as the structural gene for pantothenate kinase. PMID:2824448

  12. Chemistry with an Artificial Primer of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthase Suggests a Mechanism for Chain Termination

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the conversion of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyryl CoA (HBCoA) to PHB, which is deposited as granules in the cytoplasm of microorganisms. The class I PhaC from Caulobacter crescentus (PhaCCc) is a highly soluble protein with a turnover number of 75 s–1 and no lag phase in coenzyme A (CoA) release. Studies with [1-14C]HBCoA and PhaCCc monitored by sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) and autoradiography reveal that the rate of elongation is much faster than the rate of initiation. Priming with the artificial primer [3H]sTCoA and monitoring for CoA release reveal a single CoA/PhaC, suggesting that the protein is uniformly loaded and that the elongation process could be studied. Reaction of sT-PhaCCc with [1-14C]HBCoA revealed that priming with sTCoA increased the uniformity of elongation, allowing distinct polymerization species to be observed by SDS–PAGE and autoradiography. However, in the absence of HBCoA, [3H]sT-PhaC unexpectedly generates [3H]sDCoA with a rate constant of 0.017 s–1. We propose that the [3H]sDCoA forms via attack of CoA on the oxoester of the [3H]sT-PhaC chain, leaving the synthase attached to a single HB unit. Comparison of the relative rate constants of thiolysis by CoA and elongation by PhaCCc, and the size of the PHB polymer generated in vivo, suggests a mechanism for chain termination and reinitiation. PMID:25741756

  13. Effect of Selenium-Enriched Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Extracts, Obtained by Pressurized Water Extraction, on the Expression of Cholesterol Homeostasis Related Genes by Low-Density Array.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Marín, Francisco Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Culinary-medicinal mushrooms are able to lower blood cholesterol levels in animal models by different mechanisms. They might impair the endogenous cholesterol synthesis and exogenous cholesterol absorption during digestion. Mushroom extracts, obtained using pressurized water extractions (PWE) from Agaricus bisporus basidiomes, supplemented or not supplemented with selenium, were applied to HepG2 cell cultures to study the expression of 19 genes related to cholesterol homeostasis by low-density arrays (LDA). Only the PWE fractions obtained at 25°C showed 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity. Besides the enzymatic inhibition, PWE extracts may downregulate some of the key genes involved in the cholesterol homeostasis, such as the squalene synthase gene (FDFT1), since its mRNA expression falls by one third of its initial value. In summary, A. bisporus extracts may also modulate biological cholesterol levels by molecular mechanisms further than the enzymatic way previously reported. PMID:25746616

  14. Regulation of Isoprenoid Pheromone Biosynthesis in Bumblebee Males.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Darina; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Žáček, Petr; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva

    2016-02-01

    Males of the closely related species Bombus terrestris and Bombus lucorum attract conspecific females by completely different marking pheromones. MP of B. terrestris and B. lucorum pheromones contain mainly isoprenoid (ISP) compounds and fatty acid derivatives, respectively. Here, we studied the regulation of ISP biosynthesis in both bumblebees. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (AACT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) transcripts are abundant in the B. terrestris labial gland. Maximal abundance of these transcripts correlated well with AACT enzymatic activity detected in the LG extracts. In contrast, transcript abundances of AACT, HMGR, and FPPS in B. lucorum were low, and AACT activity was not detected in LGs. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation plays a key role in the control of ISP biosynthetic gene expression and ISP pheromone biosynthesis in bumblebee males. PMID:26632352

  15. Long-Chain Acyl CoA Synthetase 4A regulates Smad activity and dorsoventral patterning in the zebrafish embryo

    PubMed Central

    Miyares, Rosa Linda; Stein, Cornelia; Renisch, Björn; Anderson, Jennifer Lynn; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Farber, Steven Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Summary Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) and their metabolites are critical players in cell biology and embryonic development. Here we show that long-chain acyl CoA synthetase 4a (Acsl4a), an LC-PUFA activating enzyme, is essential for proper patterning of the zebrafish dorsoventral axis. Loss of Acsl4a results in dorsalized embryos due to attenuated Bmp signaling. We demonstrate that Acsl4a modulates the activity of Smad transcription factors, the downstream mediators of Bmp signaling. Acsl4a promotes the inhibition of p38 MAPK and the Akt-mediated inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), critical inhibitors of Smad activity. Consequently, introduction of a constitutively active Akt can rescue the dorsalized phenotype of Acsl4a deficient embryos. Our results reveal a critical role for Acsl4a in modulating Bmp-Smad activity and provide a potential avenue for LC-PUFAs to influence a variety of developmental processes. PMID:24332754

  16. CERAMIDE SYNTHASE 1 IS REGULATED BY PROTEASOMAL MEDIATED TURNOVER

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, Priya; Alexander, Hannah; Laviad, Elad L.; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Hannink, Mark; Futerman, Anthony H.; Alexander, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Ceramide is an important bioactive lipid, intimately involved in many cellular functions, including the regulation of cell death, and in cancer and chemotherapy. Ceramide is synthesized de novo from sphinganine and acyl CoA via a family of 6 ceramide synthase enzymes, each having a unique preference for different fatty acyl CoA substrates and a unique tissue distribution. However, little is known regarding the regulation of these important enzymes. In this study we focus on ceramide synthase 1 (CerS1) which is the most structurally and functionally distinct of the enzymes, and describe a regulatory mechanism that specifically controls the level of CerS1 via ubiquitination and proteasome dependent protein turnover. We show that both endogenous and ectopically expressed CerS1 have rapid basal turnover and that diverse stresses including chemotherapeutic drugs, UV light and DTT can induce CerS1 turnover. The turnover requires CerS1 activity and is regulated by the opposing actions of p38 MAP kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). p38 MAP kinase is a positive regulator of turnover, while PKC is a negative regulator of turnover. CerS1 is phosphorylated in vivo and activation of PKC increases the phosphorylation of the protein. This study reveals a novel and highly specific mechanism by which CerS1 protein levels are regulated and which directly impacts ceramide homeostasis. PMID:19393694

  17. Cryogenic Optical Assembly (COA) cooldown analysis for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coladonato, Robert J.; Irish, Sandra M.; Mosier, Carol L.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft, developed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), was successfully launched on November 18, 1989 aboard a Delta expendable launch vehicle. Two of the three instruments for this mission were mounted inside a liquid helium (LHe) dewar which operates at a temperature of 2 K. These two instruments are the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) and the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS). They are mounted to a common Instrument Interface Structure (IIS) and the entire assembly is called the Cryogenic Optical Assembly (COA). As part of the structural verification requirement, it was necessary to show that the entire COA exhibited adequate strength and would be capable of withstanding the launch environment. This requirement presented an unique challenge for COBE because the COA is built and assembled at room temperature (300 K), cooled to 2 K, and then subjected to launch loads. However, strength testing of the entire COA at 2 K could not be done because of facility limitations. Therefore, it was decided to perform the strength verification of the COA by analysis.

  18. Stilbene Synthase and Chalcone Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Rolfs, Claus-Henning; Kindl, Helmut

    1984-01-01

    Cultured cells of Picea excelsa capable of forming stilbenes and flavanoids have been established. Unlike needles of intact plants containing piceatannol (3,3′,4′,5-tetrahydroxystilbene) and stilbene glycosides the cultured cells converted phenylalanine and p-coumaric acid primarily into resveratrol monomethyl ether (3,4′-dihydroxy-5-methoxystilbene) and naringenin. Partially purified enzyme preparations were assayed for chalcone synthase as well as for stilbene synthase activity converting malonyl-CoA plus p-coumaroyl-CoA into 3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol). Although stilbene synthase and chalcone synthase use the same substrates and exhibit similar molecular properties, i.e. molecular weight and subunit molecular weight, they are two different proteins. This difference was demonstrated by gel electrophoresis and by means of monospecific antibodies. PMID:16663649

  19. Response of the Cholesterol Metabolism to a Negative Energy Balance in Dairy Cows Depends on the Lactational Stage

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation. PMID:26034989

  20. Response of the cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance in dairy cows depends on the lactational stage.

    PubMed

    Gross, Josef J; Kessler, Evelyne C; Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation. PMID:26034989

  1. Cellulose synthase interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities. PMID:21150290

  2. EXPRESSION OF TURKEY TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND ACYL COA OXIDASE IN DIFFERENT TISSUES AND GENETIC POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several transcription factors are involved in regulating lipid metabolism in various animal tissues. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma and PPAR alpha regulate both lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Gene fragments for PPAR gamma, PPAR alpha, and acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) have b...

  3. The COA360: a tool for assessing the cultural competency of healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    LaVeist, Thomas A; Relosa, Rachel; Sawaya, Nadia

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Census Bureau projects that by 2050, non-Hispanic whites will be in the numerical minority. This rapid diversification requires healthcare organizations to pay closer attention to cross-cultural issues if they are to meet the healthcare needs of the nation and continue to maintain a high standard of care. Although scorecards and benchmarking are widely used to gauge healthcare organizations' performance in various areas, these tools have been underused in relation to cultural preparedness or initiatives. The likely reason for this is the lack of a validated tool specifically designed to examine cultural competency. Existing validated cultural competency instruments evaluate individuals, not organizations. In this article, we discuss a study to validate the Cultural Competency Organizational Assessment--360 or the COA360, an instrument designed to appraise a healthcare organization's cultural competence. The Office of Minority Health and the Joint Commission have each developed standards for measuring the cultural competency of organizations. The COA360 is designed to assess adherence to both of these sets of standards. For this validation study, we enlisted a panel of national experts. The panel rated each dimension of the COA360, and the combination of items for each of the scale's 14 dimensions was rated above 4.13 (on 5-point scale). Our conclusion points to the validity of the COA360. As such, it is a valuable tool not only for assessing a healthcare organization's cultural readiness but also for benchmarking its progress in addressing cultural and diversity issues. PMID:18720687

  4. Soraphen A, an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase activity, interferes with fatty acid elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises; Olson, L. Karl

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC1 & ACC2) generates malonyl CoA, a substrate for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and an inhibitor of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). Malonyl CoA is also a substrate for microsomal fatty acid elongation, an important pathway for saturated (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis. Despite the interest in ACC as a target for obesity and cancer therapy, little attention has been given to the role ACC plays in long chain fatty acid synthesis. This report examines the effect of pharmacological inhibition of ACC on DNL & palmitate (16:0) and linoleate (18:2,n-6) metabolism in HepG2 and LnCap cells. The ACC inhibitor, soraphen A, lowers cellular malonyl CoA, attenuates DNL and the formation of fatty acid elongation products derived from exogenous fatty acids, i.e., 16:0 & 18:2,n-6; IC50 ~ 5 nM. Elevated expression of fatty acid elongases (Elovl5, Elovl6) or desaturases (FADS1, FADS2) failed to override the soraphen A effect on SFA, MUFA or PUFA synthesis. Inhibition of fatty acid elongation leads to the accumulation of 16- and 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acids derived from 16:0 and 18:2,n-6, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of ACC activity will not only attenuate DNL and induce FAO, but will also attenuate the synthesis of very long chain saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:21184748

  5. LAP6/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A and LAP5/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE B encode hydroxyalkyl α-pyrone synthases required for pollen development and sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Soo; Grienenberger, Etienne; Lallemand, Benjamin; Colpitts, Che C; Kim, Sun Young; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Krahn, Daniel; Kaiser, Markus; Kombrink, Erich; Heitz, Thierry; Suh, Dae-Yeon; Legrand, Michel; Douglas, Carl J

    2010-12-01

    Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the condensation of malonyl-CoA units with various CoA ester starter molecules to generate a diverse array of natural products. The fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are key intermediates in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the major constituent of exine in the outer pollen wall. By coexpression analysis, we identified two Arabidopsis PKS genes, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB (also known as LAP6 and LAP5, respectively) that are tightly coexpressed with ACOS5. Recombinant PKSA and PKSB proteins generated tri-and tetraketide α-pyrone compounds in vitro from a broad range of potential ACOS5-generated fatty acyl-CoA starter substrates by condensation with malonyl-CoA. Furthermore, substrate preference profile and kinetic analyses strongly suggested that in planta substrates for both enzymes are midchain- and ω-hydroxylated fatty acyl-CoAs (e.g., 12-hydroxyoctadecanoyl-CoA and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoyl-CoA), which are the products of sequential actions of anther-specific fatty acid hydroxylases and acyl-CoA synthetase. PKSA and PKSB are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the PKS genes displayed pollen exine layer defects, and a double pksa pksb mutant was completely male sterile, with no apparent exine. These results show that hydroxylated α-pyrone polyketide compounds generated by the sequential action of ACOS5 and PKSA/B are potential and previously unknown sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193570

  6. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  7. Intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action in the silkworm, Bombyx mori: involvement of acyl CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, R; Matsumoto, S

    1996-03-01

    In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, production of the sex pheromone bombykol is regulated by a neurohormone termed PBAN. We have detected the activity of acyl CoA reductase in the pheromone gland of B. mori by using palmitoyl CoA as a substrate. The acyl CoA reductase requires NADPH, but not NADH, as a proton dono. When the pheromone gland was incubated with the PBAN fragment peptide TKYFSPRLamide, palmitoyl CoA was incorporated and converted into the corresponding C16 alcohols. Radio HPLC analysis revealed that these C16 alcohols were hexadecan-1-ol (81.2%), (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol (12.3%), and (E, Z)-10, 12-hexadecadien-1-ol (= bombykol, 6.5%). The production of C16 alcohols in the pheromone gland was inhibited by the known bombykol biosynthesis inhibitors EDTA, LaCl3, W-7, trifluoperazine, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, NaF and compactin. By contrast, when the pheromone gland homogenate was incubated in the presence of palmitoyl CoA and NADPH, production of C16 alcohols was affected by compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine, but not by EDTA, LaCl3, p-nitrophenyl phosphate and NaF. These results indicate that compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine directly suppress the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase, whereas EDTA, LaCl3, pNPP, and NaF inhibit bombykol production by affecting other biochemical steps in the signal transduction of PBAN action. The present results also imply that PBAN regulates the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase and that palmitoyl CoA could be used as a substrate of the acyl CoA reductase that regulates bombykol biosynthesis. PMID:8900596

  8. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of /sup 14/C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production.

  9. The Antibiotic CJ-15,801 is an Antimetabolite which Hijacks and then Inhibits CoA Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    van der Westhuyzen, Renier; Hammons, Justin C.; Meier, Jordan L.; Dahesh, Samira; Moolman, Wessel J. A.; Pelly, Stephen C.; Nizet, Victor; Burkart, Michael D.; Strauss, Erick

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The natural product CJ-15,801 is an inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus, but not other bacteria. Its close structural resemblance to pantothenic acid, the vitamin precursor of coenzyme A (CoA), and its Michael acceptor moiety suggest that it irreversibly inhibits an enzyme involved in CoA biosynthesis or utilization. However, its mode of action and the basis for its specificity have not been elucidated to date. We demonstrate that CJ-15,801 is transformed by the uniquely selective S. aureus pantothenate kinase, the first CoA biosynthetic enzyme, into a substrate for the next enzyme, phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase, which is inhibited through formation of a tight-binding structural mimic of its native reaction intermediate. These findings reveal CJ-15,801 as a vitamin biosynthetic pathway antimetabolite with a mechanism similar to that of the sulfonamide antibiotics, and highlight CoA biosynthesis as a viable antimicrobial drug target. PMID:22633408

  10. Copper supplementation restores cytochrome c oxidase assembly defect in a mitochondrial disease model of COA6 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Timbalia, Shrishiv A.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain biogenesis is orchestrated by hundreds of assembly factors, many of which are yet to be discovered. Using an integrative approach based on clues from evolutionary history, protein localization and human genetics, we have identified a conserved mitochondrial protein, C1orf31/COA6, and shown its requirement for respiratory complex IV biogenesis in yeast, zebrafish and human cells. A recent next-generation sequencing study reported potential pathogenic mutations within the evolutionarily conserved Cx9CxnCx10C motif of COA6, implicating it in mitochondrial disease biology. Using yeast coa6Δ cells, we show that conserved residues in the motif, including the residue mutated in a patient with mitochondrial disease, are essential for COA6 function, thus confirming the pathogenicity of the patient mutation. Furthermore, we show that zebrafish embryos with zfcoa6 knockdown display reduced heart rate and cardiac developmental defects, recapitulating the observed pathology in the human mitochondrial disease patient who died of neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The specific requirement of Coa6 for respiratory complex IV biogenesis, its intramitochondrial localization and the presence of the Cx9CxnCx10C motif suggested a role in mitochondrial copper metabolism. In support of this, we show that exogenous copper supplementation completely rescues respiratory and complex IV assembly defects in yeast coa6Δ cells. Taken together, our results establish an evolutionarily conserved role of Coa6 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the COA6 mutation in the human mitochondrial disease patient. PMID:24549041

  11. Cooperation between COA6 and SCO2 in COX2 maturation during cytochrome c oxidase assembly links two mitochondrial cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Bareth, Bettina; Dudek, Jan; Juris, Lisa; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wissel, Mirjam; Leary, Scot C; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Three mitochondria-encoded subunits form the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. COX1 and COX2 contain heme and copper redox centers, which are integrated during assembly of the enzyme. Defects in this process lead to an enzyme deficiency and manifest as mitochondrial disorders in humans. Here we demonstrate that COA6 is specifically required for COX2 biogenesis. Absence of COA6 leads to fast turnover of newly synthesized COX2 and a concomitant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase levels. COA6 interacts transiently with the copper-containing catalytic domain of newly synthesized COX2. Interestingly, similar to the copper metallochaperone SCO2, loss of COA6 causes cardiomyopathy in humans. We show that COA6 and SCO2 interact and that corresponding pathogenic mutations in each protein affect complex formation. Our analyses define COA6 as a constituent of the mitochondrial copper relay system, linking defects in COX2 metallation to cardiac cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. PMID:25959673

  12. hCOA3 Stabilizes Cytochrome c Oxidase 1 (COX1) and Promotes Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly in Human Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Paula; Peralta, Susana; Cruz-Bermudez, Alberto; Echevarría, Lucía; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni; Fernandez-Moreno, Miguel A.; Garesse, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) or complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain plays a fundamental role in energy production of aerobic cells. In humans, COX deficiency is the most frequent cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Human COX is composed of 13 subunits of dual genetic origin, whose assembly requires an increasing number of nuclear-encoded accessory proteins known as assembly factors. Here, we have identified and characterized human CCDC56, an 11.7-kDa mitochondrial transmembrane protein, as a new factor essential for COX biogenesis. CCDC56 shares sequence similarity with the yeast COX assembly factor Coa3 and was termed hCOA3. hCOA3-silenced cells display a severe COX functional alteration owing to a decreased stability of newly synthesized COX1 and an impairment in the holoenzyme assembly process. We show that hCOA3 physically interacts with both the mitochondrial translation machinery and COX structural subunits. We conclude that hCOA3 stabilizes COX1 co-translationally and promotes its assembly with COX partner subunits. Finally, our results identify hCOA3 as a new candidate when screening for genes responsible for mitochondrial diseases associated with COX deficiency. PMID:23362268

  13. Statin-like principles of bergamot fruit (Citrus bergamia): isolation of 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl flavonoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Di Donna, Leonardo; De Luca, Giuseppina; Mazzotti, Fabio; Napoli, Anna; Salerno, Raffaele; Taverna, Domenico; Sindona, Giovanni

    2009-07-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl neohesperidosides of hesperetin (brutieridin, 1) and naringenin (melitidin, 2) were isolated and detected from the fruits of bergamot (Citrus bergamia). The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods. PMID:19572741

  14. Producing aglycons of ginsenosides in bakers' yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhubo; Wang, Beibei; Liu, Yi; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Xianan; Liu, Tao; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenosides are the primary bioactive components of ginseng, which is a popular medicinal plant that exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. Protopanaxadiol, protopanaxatriol and oleanolic acid are three basic aglycons of ginsenosides. Producing aglycons of ginsenosides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was realized in this work and provides an alternative route compared to traditional extraction methods. Synthetic pathways of these three aglycons were constructed in S. cerevisiae by introducing β-amyrin synthase, oleanolic acid synthase, dammarenediol-II synthase, protopanaxadiol synthase, protopanaxatriol synthase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from different plants. In addition, a truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, squalene synthase and 2,3-oxidosqualene synthase genes were overexpressed to increase the precursor supply for improving aglycon production. Strain GY-1 was obtained, which produced 17.2 mg/L protopanaxadiol, 15.9 mg/L protopanaxatriol and 21.4 mg/L oleanolic acid. The yeast strains engineered in this work can serve as the basis for creating an alternative way for producing ginsenosides in place of extractions from plant sources. PMID:24424342

  15. Subcellular relocalization of a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase by a suppressor mutation alleviates a respiration deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Harington, A; Schwarz, E; Slonimski, P P; Herbert, C J

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated an extragenic suppressor, FAM1-1, which is able to restore respiratory growth to a deletion of the CEM1 gene (mitochondrial beta-keto-acyl synthase). The sequence of the suppressor strongly suggests that it encodes a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (fatty-acyl-CoA synthetase). We have also cloned and sequenced the wild-type FAM1 gene, which is devoid of suppressor activity. The comparison of the two sequences shows that the suppressor mutation is an A-->T transversion, which creates a new initiation codon and adds 18 amino acids to the N-terminus of the protein. This extension has all the characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence, whilst the N-terminus of the wild-type protein has none of these characteristics. In vitro mitochondrial import experiments show that the N-terminal half of the suppressor protein, but not of the wild-type, is transported into mitochondria. Thus, we hypothesize that the suppressor acts by changing the subcellular localization of the protein and relocating at least some of the enzyme from the cytosol to the mitochondria. These results support the hypothesis that some form of fatty acid synthesis, specific for the mitochondria, is essential for the function of the organelle. Images PMID:7988550

  16. Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases from Gram-Negative, Gram-Positive, and Atypical Bacterial Species: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Kelly A.; Peery, Robert B.; Zhao, Genshi

    2006-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the transfer of the 4′-phosphopantetheine moiety from coenzyme A (CoA) onto a serine residue of apo-ACP, resulting in the conversion of apo-ACP to the functional holo-ACP. The holo form of bacterial ACP plays an essential role in mediating the transfer of acyl fatty acid intermediates during the biosynthesis of fatty acids and phospholipids. AcpS is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we have purified and characterized the AcpS enzymes from Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which exemplify gram-negative, gram-positive, and atypical bacteria, respectively. Our gel filtration column chromatography and cross-linking studies demonstrate that the AcpS enzyme from M. pneumoniae, like E. coli enzyme, exhibits a homodimeric structure, but the enzyme from S. pneumoniae exhibits a trimeric structure. Our biochemical studies show that the AcpS enzymes from M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae can utilize both short- and long-chain acyl CoA derivatives but prefer long-chain CoA derivatives as substrates. On the other hand, the AcpS enzyme from E. coli can utilize short-chain CoA derivatives but not the long-chain CoA derivatives tested. Finally, our biochemical studies show that M. pneumoniae AcpS is kinetically a very sluggish enzyme compared with those from E. coli and S. pneumoniae. Together, the results of these studies show that the AcpS enzymes from different bacterial species exhibit different native structures and substrate specificities with regard to the utilization of CoA and its derivatives. These findings suggest that AcpS from different microorganisms plays a different role in cellular physiology. PMID:16788183

  17. An Arabidopsis callose synthase.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2002-08-01

    Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially complements a yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase mutant. AtGsl5 is developmentally expressed at highest levels in flowers, consistent with flowers having high beta-1,3-glucan synthase activities for deposition of callose in pollen. A role for AtGsl5 in callose synthesis is also indicated by AtGsl5 expression in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant. PMID:12081364

  18. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulated mechanisms of glucosamine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, M.A.; Pledger, W.J. )

    1987-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) treatment of density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells results in increased ({sup 3}H)glucosamine (GlcN) incorporation into cellular material. The enhanced GlcN incorporation is not due to a preferential increase in proteoglycan synthesis as measured by ({sup 35}S)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} incorporation. Approximately 50% of the GlcN incorporated in PDGF or platelet-poor plasma (PPP)-treated cultures enters N-linked glycoproteins. Addition of dolichol-phosphate (dolichol-P), a required intermediate in N-linked glycosylation, did not alter ({sup 3}H)GlcN incorporation in PDGF-treated cells but did increase incorporation in PPP-treated cultures to a level comparable to that observed for PDGF-treated cultures. PDGF-treated cultures contained twofold greater quantities of ({sup 3}H)GlcN dolichol intermediates and lipid-free glycoprotein. Over a 12-h time course 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) activity was similar in cultures treated with PDGF or PPP. Results of these studies reveal that enhanced protein glycosylation in response to PDGF treatment is not the result of a direct effect on HMG CoA reductase.

  19. The influence of atorvastatin on tendon healing: an experimental study on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Esenkaya, Irfan; Sakarya, Bulent; Unay, Koray; Elmali, Nurzat; Aydin, Nasuhi Engin

    2010-06-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The most commonly used antihyperlipidemic drugs are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins), of which atorvastatin is one of the most widely used. Little is known about the relationship between tendinopathy and HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) or the effects of atorvastatin use on tendon healing following surgical repair of tendon rupture. We hypothesized that atorvastatin negatively affects this healing process. The Achilles tendons of 16 New Zealand rabbits were ruptured surgically and repaired with sutures. Eight of the rabbits were given oral atorvastatin. The other 8 served as a surgical control group. Six weeks postoperatively, all the rabbits were sacrificed, and the repaired tendons were removed. After standard histological preparation, fibroblastic activity, re-vascularization, collagenization, collagen construction, and inflammatory-cell infiltration were evaluated. On comparing the atorvastatin and surgical control groups, we observed no difference in fibroblastic activity. Although it did not reach statistical significance in our study, a difference was noted in revascularization, collagenization, and inflammatory cell infiltration; and a statistical difference was observed in collagen construction. Doubt remains about the adverse effect of atorvastatin use during tendon healing. Further investigations in animal and human models are needed on the effects of tendon healing when atorvastatin is administered for a longer time frame prior to the injury. PMID:20806777

  20. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  1. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  2. An energy-conserving pyruvate-to-acetate pathway in Entamoeba histolytica. Pyruvate synthase and a new acetate thiokinase.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R E; Warren, L G; Susskind, B; Lo, H S

    1977-01-25

    Under anaerobic conditions, cells of Entamoeba histolytica grown with bacteria produce H2 and acetate while cells grown axenically produce neither. Aerobically, acetate is produced and O2 is consumed by amebae from either type of cells. Centrifuged extracts, 2.4 x 106 x g x min, from both types of cells contain pyruvate synthase (EC 1.2.7.1) and an acetate thiokinase which, together, form a system capable of converting pyruvate to acetate. Pyruvate synthase catalyzes the reaction: pyruvate + CoA leads to CO2 + acetyl-CoA + 2E. Electron acceptors which function with this enzyme are FAD, FMN, riboflavin, ferredoxin, and methyl viologen, but not NAD or NADP. The amebal acetate thiokinase catalyzes the reaction acetyl-CoA + ADP + Pi leads to acetate + ATP + CoA. For this apparently new enzyme we suggest the trivial name acetyl-CoA-synthetase (ADP-forming). Extracts from axenic amebae do not contain hydrogenase, but extracts from cells grown with bacteria do. It is postulated that in bacteria-grown amebae electrons generated at the pyruvate synthase step are utilized anaerobically to produce H2 via the hydrogenase and that the acetyl-CoA is converted to acetate in an energy-conserving step catalyzed by amebal acetyl-CoA synthetase. Aerobically, cells grown under either regimen may utilize the energy-conserving pyruvate-to-acetate pathway since O2 then serves as the ultimate electron acceptor. PMID:13076

  3. A Chemo-Enzymatic Road Map to the Synthesis of CoA Esters.

    PubMed

    Peter, Dominik M; Vögeli, Bastian; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a ubiquitous cofactor present in every known organism. The thioesters of CoA are core intermediates in many metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle, fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism, including polyketide biosynthesis. Synthesis of CoA-thioesters is vital for the study of CoA-dependent enzymes and pathways, but also as standards for metabolomics studies. In this work we systematically tested five chemo-enzymatic methods for the synthesis of the three most abundant acyl-CoA thioester classes in biology; saturated acyl-CoAs, α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoAs (i.e., enoyl-CoA derivatives), and α-carboxylated acyl-CoAs (i.e., malonyl-CoA derivatives). Additionally we report on the substrate promiscuity of three newly described acyl-CoA dehydrogenases that allow the simple conversion of acyl-CoAs into enoyl-CoAs. With these five methods, we synthesized 26 different CoA-thioesters with a yield of 40% or higher. The CoA esters produced range from short- to long-chain, include branched and α,β-unsaturated representatives as well as other functional groups. Based on our results we provide a general guideline to the optimal synthesis method of a given CoA-thioester in respect to its functional group(s) and the commercial availability of the precursor molecule. The proposed synthetic routes can be performed in small scale and do not require special chemical equipment, making them convenient also for biological laboratories. PMID:27104508

  4. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2009-04-28

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  5. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2004-07-20

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.sub..alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.sub..beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyurvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.sub..alpha. pPDH, E1.sub..beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  6. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2005-09-13

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  7. A Clinical Study to Validate the Pupil Rescaling Technique by using COAS Shack Hartmann Aberrometer.

    PubMed

    Kalikivayi, V; Kannan, K; Ganesan, A R

    2015-01-01

    In any optical system, optical aberrations of the imaging system affect the image quality. The human eye is also like an optical system which has optical aberrations influencing the quality of the retinal image. When pupil size exceeds 3 mm, ocular aberrations increase and play a major role on retinal image degradation. Pupil diameter is made constant in commercially available aberrometers by mathematically rescaling it. The aim of this study is to validate the pupil rescaling technique by using COAS (Complete Ophthalmic Analysis System)Shack Hartmann Aberrometer. Five subjects were recruited for this study. The measurements were taken over a moderately large pupil of 5mm in normal room illumination to allow for natural pupil dilation. The analyses diameter is fixed at 5 mm in COAS which means it rescales the aberration data to 5 mm if the pupil diameter recorded was more than 5 mm at the time of measurement. Ocular aberrations for natural and rescaled pupil sizes were analyzed. Estimation of ocular aberrations showed there was no statistical significance between natural pupil and rescaled pupil diameter. PMID:25996727

  8. Flexible DAQ card for detector systems utilizing the CoaXPress communication standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neue, G.; Hejtmánek, M.; Marčišovský, M.; Voleš, P.

    2015-04-01

    This work concerns the design and construction of a flexible FPGA based data acquisition system aimed for particle detectors. The interface card as presented was designed for large area detectors with millions of individual readout channels. Flexibility was achieved by partitioning the design into multiple PCBs, creating a set of modular blocks, allowing the creation of a wide variety of configurations by simply stacking functional PCBs together. This way the user can easily toggle the polarity of the high voltage bias supply or switch the downstream interface from CoaXPress to PCIe or stream directly HDMI. We addressed the issues of data throughput, data buffering, bias voltage generation, trigger timing and fine tuning of the whole readout chain enabling a smooth data transmission. On the current prototype, we have wire-bonded a MediPix2 MXR quad and connected it to a XILINX FPGA. For the downstream interface, we implemented the CoaXPress communication protocol, which enables us to stream data at 3.125 Gbps to a standard PC.

  9. Purification, gene cloning, and characterization of γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from Agrobacterium sp. 525a.

    PubMed

    Fujimitsu, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Takubo, Sayaka; Fukui, Akiko; Okada, Kazuma; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The report is the first of purification, overproduction, and characterization of a unique γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from soil-isolated Agrobacterium sp. 525a. The primary structure of the enzyme shares 70-95% identity with those of ATP-dependent microbial acyl-CoA synthetases of the Rhizobiaceae family. As distinctive characteristics of the enzyme of this study, ADP was released in the catalytic reaction process, whereas many acyl CoA synthetases are annotated as an AMP-forming enzyme. The apparent Km values for γ-butyrobetaine, CoA, and ATP were, respectively, 0.69, 0.02, and 0.24 mM. PMID:27125317

  10. Association between the enterotoxin production and presence of Coa, Nuc genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various sources, in Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    Moghassem Hamidi, R; Hosseinzadeh, S; Shekarforoush, S. S.; Poormontaseri, M; Derakhshandeh, A

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to identify the frequency of coagulase (Coa) and thermonuclease (Nuc) genes and Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (Sea) production among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various sources in Shiraz. Moreover, the correlation between the Sea gene and coagulase and thermonuclease enzymes is also considered. A total of 100 S. aureus were isolated from various sources including 40 humans, 30 animals and 30 food samples by the routine biochemical tests. The frequency of Coa, Nuc and Sea genes was evaluated by PCR assay. Correlation among those genes was finally evaluated by statistical analysis. The PCR results showed that the prevalence of Coa, Nuc and Sea genes was 91%, 100% and 14%, respectively. The evaluation of the enterotoxin production indicated that 78.6% of the Sea gene was expressed. The presence of enterotoxin A was not necessarily correlated to the production of toxin. As a final conclusion to detect the enterotoxigenic strains, both genotypic and phenotypic methods are highly recommended. PMID:27175208

  11. Substrate recognition by β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases.

    PubMed

    Borgaro, Janine G; Chang, Andrew; Machutta, Carl A; Zhang, Xujie; Tonge, Peter J

    2011-12-13

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes catalyze Claisen condensation reactions in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. These reactions follow a ping-pong mechanism in which a donor substrate acylates the active site cysteine residue after which the acyl group is condensed with the malonyl-ACP acceptor substrate to form a β-ketoacyl-ACP. In the priming KASIII enzymes the donor substrate is an acyl-CoA while in the elongating KASI and KASII enzymes the donor is an acyl-ACP. Although the KASIII enzyme in Escherichia coli (ecFabH) is essential, the corresponding enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtFabH) is not, suggesting that the KASI or II enzyme in M. tuberculosis (KasA or KasB, respectively) must be able to accept a CoA donor substrate. Since KasA is essential, the substrate specificity of this KASI enzyme has been explored using substrates based on phosphopantetheine, CoA, ACP, and AcpM peptide mimics. This analysis has been extended to the KASI and KASII enzymes from E. coli (ecFabB and ecFabF) where we show that a 14-residue malonyl-phosphopantetheine peptide can efficiently replace malonyl-ecACP as the acceptor substrate in the ecFabF reaction. While ecFabF is able to catalyze the condensation reaction when CoA is the carrier for both substrates, the KASI enzymes ecFabB and KasA have an absolute requirement for an ACP substrate as the acyl donor. Provided that this requirement is met, variation in the acceptor carrier substrate has little impact on the k(cat)/K(m) for the KASI reaction. For the KASI enzymes we propose that the binding of ecACP (AcpM) results in a conformational change that leads to an open form of the enzyme to which the malonyl acceptor substrate binds. Finally, the substrate inhibition observed when palmitoyl-CoA is the donor substrate for the KasA reaction has implications for the importance of mtFabH in the mycobacterial FASII pathway. PMID:22017312

  12. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  13. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  14. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  15. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Markham, Jonathan E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  16. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  17. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  18. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 2 Is Dispensable for CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Eun; Walsh, Matthew C.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; James, David E.; Wherry, E. John; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of T cells is closely associated with dynamic changes in nutrient and energy metabolism. However, the extent to which specific metabolic pathways and molecular components are determinative of CD8+ T cell fate remains unclear. It has been previously established in various tissues that acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by inhibiting carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), a rate-limiting enzyme of FAO in mitochondria. Here, we explore the cell-intrinsic role of ACC2 in T cell immunity in response to infections. We report here that ACC2 deficiency results in a marginal increase of cellular FAO in CD8+ T cells, but does not appear to influence antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses during infection with listeria or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. These results suggest that ACC2 is dispensable for CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:26367121

  19. Discovery of Tumor-Specific Irreversible Inhibitors of Stearoyl CoA Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C.; Gonzales, Stephen S.; Winterton, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; McKnight, John S.; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Hanson, Jordan M.; Cross, Bethany; Owen, Amy E.; Duan, Yingli; Moreno, Jose R.; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Posner, Bruce A.; Williams, Noelle S.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic to the same four of 12 human lung cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) inhibitors. SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease. However, SCD is essential to sebocytes, and accordingly SCD inhibitors cause skin toxicity. Mouse sebocytes were unable to activate the benzothiazoles or oxalamides into SCD inhibitors, providing a therapeutic window for inhibiting SCD in vivo. We thus offer a strategy to target SCD in cancer by taking advantage of high CYP expression in a subset of tumors. PMID:26829472

  20. OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

  1. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, E.; Calkins, M.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Optical spectra (range 350-760nm) of the supernova candidates ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa (ATel #9081) and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6 (ATel #9056) were obtained on UT 2016 June 3 with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+ FAST).

  2. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  3. Toxicity of Carboxylic Acid-Containing Drugs: The Role of Acyl Migration and CoA Conjugation Investigated.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Hokkanen, Juho; Aatsinki, Sanna-Mari; Mattila, Sampo; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-12-21

    Many carboxylic acid-containing drugs are associated with idiosyncratic drug toxicity (IDT), which may be caused by reactive acyl glucuronide metabolites. The rate of acyl migration has been earlier suggested as a predictor of acyl glucuronide reactivity. Additionally, acyl Coenzyme A (CoA) conjugates are known to be reactive. Here, 13 drugs with a carboxylic acid moiety were incubated with human liver microsomes to produce acyl glucuronide conjugates for the determination of acyl glucuronide half-lives by acyl migration and with HepaRG cells to monitor the formation of acyl CoA conjugates, their further conjugate metabolites, and trans-acylation products with glutathione. Additionally, in vitro cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity experiments were performed with HepaRG cells to compare the predictability of toxicity. Clearly, longer acyl glucuronide half-lives were observed for safe drugs compared to drugs that can cause IDT. Correlation between half-lives and toxicity classification increased when "relative half-lives," taking into account the formation of isomeric AG-forms due to acyl migration and eliminating the effect of hydrolysis, were used instead of plain disappearance of the initial 1-O-β-AG-form. Correlation was improved further when a daily dose of the drug was taken into account. CoA and related conjugates were detected primarily for the drugs that have the capability to cause IDT, although some exceptions to this were observed. Cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity did not correlate to drug safety. On the basis of the results, the short relative half-life of the acyl glucuronide (high acyl migration rate), high daily dose and detection of acyl CoA conjugates, or further metabolites derived from acyl CoA together seem to indicate that carboxylic acid-containing drugs have a higher probability to cause drug-induced liver injury (DILI). PMID:26558897

  4. Possible mechanisms underlying statin-induced skeletal muscle toxicity in L6 fibroblasts and in rats.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Mai; Takaguri, Akira; Kano, Seiichiro; Kaneta, Shigeru; Ichihara, Kazuo; Satoh, Kumi

    2009-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are safe and well-tolerated therapeutic drugs. However, they occasionally induce myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Here, we investigated the mechanism of statin-induced myotoxicity in L6 fibroblasts and in rats in vivo. L6 fibroblasts were differentiated and then treated with pravastatin, simvastatin, or fluvastatin for 72 h. Hydrophobic simvastatin and fluvastatin decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner via apoptosis characterized by typical nuclear fragmentation and condensation and caspase-3 activation. Both hydrophobic statins transferred RhoA localization from the cell membrane to the cytosol. These changes induced by both hydrophobic statins were completely abolished by the co-application of geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP). Y27632, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, mimicked the hydrophobic statin-induced apoptosis. Hydrophilic pravastatin did not affect the viability of the cells. Fluvastatin was continuously infused (2.08 mg/kg at an infusion rate of 0.5 mL/h) into the right internal jugular vein of the rats in vivo for 72 h. Fluvastatin infusion significantly elevated the plasma CPK level and transferred RhoA localization in the skeletal muscle from the cell membrane to the cytosol. In conclusion, RhoA dysfunction due to loss of lipid modification with GGPP is involved in the mechanisms of statin-induced skeletal muscle toxicity. PMID:19129682

  5. A role for the mevalonate pathway in early plant symbiotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Chabaud, Mireille; Genre, Andrea; Balloon, Allison J.; Maeda, Junko; Forshey, Kari; den Os, Désirée; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Coon, Joshua J.; Barker, David G.; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi produce signals that are perceived by host legume receptors at the plasma membrane and trigger sustained oscillations of the nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spiking), which in turn leads to gene expression and downstream symbiotic responses. The activation of Ca2+ spiking requires the plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase Does not Make Infections 2 (DMI2) as well as the nuclear cation channel DMI1. A key enzyme regulating the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reductase 1 (HMGR1), interacts with DMI2 and is required for the legume–rhizobium symbiosis. Here, we show that HMGR1 is required to initiate Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in Medicago truncatula roots in response to rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal signals. Furthermore, MVA, the direct product of HMGR1 activity, is sufficient to induce nuclear-associated Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in both wild-type plants and dmi2 mutants, but interestingly not in dmi1 mutants. Finally, MVA induced Ca2+ spiking in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells expressing DMI1. This demonstrates that the nuclear cation channel DMI1 is sufficient to support MVA-induced Ca2+ spiking in this heterologous system. PMID:26199419

  6. Protective effects of coenzyme q(10) on decreased oxidative stress resistance induced by simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Kettawan, Aikkarach; Takahashi, Takayuki; Kongkachuichai, Ratchanee; Charoenkiatkul, Somsri; Kishi, Takeo; Okamoto, Tadashi

    2007-05-01

    The effects of simvastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), on oxidative stress resistance and the protective effects of coenzyme Q (CoQ) were investigated. When simvastatin was administered orally to mice, the levels of oxidized and reduced CoQ(9) and CoQ(10) in serum, liver, and heart, decreased significantly when compared to those of control. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances induced by Fe(2+)-ascorbate in liver and heart mitochondria also increased significantly with simvastatin. Furthermore, cultured cardiac myocytes treated with simvastatin exhibited less resistance to oxidative stress, decreased time to the cessation of spontaneous beating in response to H(2)O(2) addition, and decreased responsiveness to electrical field stimulation. These results suggested that oral administration of simvastatin suppresses the biosynthesis of CoQ, which shares the same biosynthesis pathway as cholesterol up to farnesyl pyrophosphate, thus compromising the physiological function of reduced CoQ, which possesses antioxidant activity. However, these undesirable effects induced by simvastatin were alleviated by coadministering CoQ(10) with simvastatin to mice. Simvastatin also reduced the activity of NADPH-CoQ reductase, a biological enzyme that converts oxidized CoQ to the corresponding reduced CoQ, while CoQ(10) administration improved it. These findings may also support the efficacy of coadministering CoQ(10) with statins. PMID:18398496

  7. Contribution of the WHHL rabbit, an animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia, to elucidation of the anti-atherosclerotic effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi; Koike, Tomonari; Ito, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    This year marks the 40th year since the discovery of a mutant rabbit showing spontaneous hyperlipidemia, which is the proband of the Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit strain, an animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia, and the first statin, a general term for inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, a rate limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. Nowadays, statins are the primary drug of choice for treating cardiovascular disease. Although several reviews have described clinical trials and in vitro studies of statins, the anti-atherosclerotic effects of statins on animal models have not been comprehensively reviewed. This review summarized the contribution of WHHL rabbits to elucidating the anti-atherosclerotic effects of statins in vivo. Studies using WHHL rabbits verified that statins suppress plaque destabilization by reducing unstable components (foam cells derived from macrophages, foam cell debris, and extracellular lipid accumulation), preventing smooth muscle cell reductions, and increasing the collagen content of plaques. In addition, the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue factor are decreased in intimal macrophages by statin treatment. Lipid-lowering effects of statins alter plaque biology by reducing the proliferation and activation of macrophages, a prominent source of the molecules responsible for plaque instability and thrombogenicity. Although statins remain the standard treatment for cardiovascular disease, new therapeutics are eagerly awaited. WHHL rabbits will continue to contribute to the development of therapeutics. PMID:24125408

  8. Regulation of mevalonate synthesis in rat mammary glands by dietary n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    El-Sohemy, A; Archer, M C

    1997-09-01

    It is well established that dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PU-FAs) enhance rat mammary tumor development whereas n-3 PUFAs inhibit it, yet the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate a mechanism by which n-3 and n-6 PUFAs could modulate mammary carcinogenesis. Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets containing either menhaden (n-3) or safflower oil (n-6) in a 7% fat diet for 1 week. In comparison to the n-6 diet, the n-3 diet significantly reduced the activity and levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase in mammary glands, thereby suppressing the formation of mevalonate. In addition to being essential for cholesterol biosynthesis, mevalonate is also required for DNA synthesis and may be involved in malignant transformation. Serum cholesterol was lower in the n-3 group than in the n-6 group (1.91 +/- 0.18 versus 2.61 +/- 0.37 mM; P < 0.01). Extrahepatic tissues meet most of their cholesterol requirements from circulating cholesterol, and the internalized cholesterol down-regulates HMG-CoA reductase. Thus, the concomitant decrease in serum cholesterol and mammary gland HMG-CoA reductase levels suggests that changes in circulating cholesterol levels do not solely determine the activity of extrahepatic reductase. We conclude that the mevalonate pathway may be a mechanism through which different types of dietary fat modulate breast cancer development. PMID:9288773

  9. Structural and biochemical characterisation of Archaeoglobus fulgidus esterase reveals a bound CoA molecule in the vicinity of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Christopher; Finnigan, William; Isupov, Michail N.; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W. M.; van der Oost, John; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxyl esterase, AF-Est2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been cloned, over-expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically and structurally characterized. The enzyme has high activity towards short- to medium-chain p-nitrophenyl carboxylic esters with optimal activity towards the valerate ester. The AF-Est2 has good solvent and pH stability and is very thermostable, showing no loss of activity after incubation for 30 min at 80 °C. The 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of AF-Est2 reveals Coenzyme A (CoA) bound in the vicinity of the active site. Despite the presence of CoA bound to the AF-Est2 this enzyme has no CoA thioesterase activity. The pantetheine group of CoA partially obstructs the active site alcohol pocket suggesting that this ligand has a role in regulation of the enzyme activity. A comparison with closely related α/β hydrolase fold enzyme structures shows that the AF-Est2 has unique structural features that allow CoA binding. A comparison of the structure of AF-Est2 with the human carboxyl esterase 1, which has CoA thioesterase activity, reveals that CoA is bound to different parts of the core domain in these two enzymes and approaches the active site from opposite directions. PMID:27160974

  10. The YTA7 gene is involved in the regulation of the isoprenoid pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuranda, Klaudia; Grabinska, Kariona; Berges, Thierry; Karst, Francis; Leberre, Veronique; Sokol, Serguei; François, Jean; Palamarczyk, Grazyna

    2009-05-01

    The isoprenoid pathway in yeasts is important not only for sterol biosynthesis but also for the production of nonsterol molecules, deriving from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), implicated in N-glycosylation and biosynthesis of heme and ubiquinones. FPP formed from mevalonate in a reaction catalyzed by FPP synthase (Erg20p). In order to investigate the regulation of Erg20p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we searched for its protein partners using a two-hybrid screen, and identified five interacting proteins, among them Yta7p. Subsequently, we showed that Yta7p was a membrane-associated protein localized both to the nucleus and to the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletion of YTA7 affected the enzymatic activity of cis-prenyltransferase (the enzyme that utilizes FPP for dolichol biosynthesis) and the cellular levels of isoprenoid compounds. Additionally, it rendered cells hypersensitive to lovastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) that acts upstream of FPP synthase in the isoprenoid pathway. While HMGR is encoded by two genes, HMG1 and HMG2, only HMG2 overexpression was able to restore growth of the yta7Delta cells in the presence of lovastatin. Moreover, the expression level of the S. cerevisiae YTA7 gene was altered upon impairment of the isoprenoid pathway not only by lovastatin but also by zaragozic acid, an inhibitor of squalene synthase. Altogether, these results provide substantial evidence of Yta7p involvement in the regulation of isoprenoid biosynthesis. PMID:19416104

  11. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G.; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  12. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis.

    PubMed

    Healey, Gareth D; Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  13. Investigation of the Roles of Allosteric Domain Arginine, Aspartate, and Glutamate Residues of Rhizobium etli Pyruvate Carboxylase in Relation to Its Activation by Acetyl CoA.

    PubMed

    Sirithanakorn, Chaiyos; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Attwood, Paul V

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of allosteric activation of pyruvate carboxylase by acetyl CoA is not fully understood. Here we have examined the roles of residues near the acetyl CoA binding site in the allosteric activation of Rhizobium etli pyruvate carboxylase using site-directed mutagenesis. Arg429 was found to be especially important for acetyl CoA binding as substitution with serine resulted in a 100-fold increase in the Ka of acetyl CoA activation and a large decrease in the cooperativity of this activation. Asp420 and Arg424, which do not make direct contact with bound acetyl CoA, were nonetheless found to affect acetyl CoA binding when mutated, probably through changed interactions with another acetyl CoA binding residue, Arg427. Thermodynamic activation parameters for the pyruvate carboxylation reaction were determined from modified Arrhenius plots and showed that acetyl CoA acts to decrease the activation free energy of the reaction by both increasing the activation entropy and decreasing the activation enthalpy. Most importantly, mutations of Asp420, Arg424, and Arg429 enhanced the activity of the enzyme in the absence of acetyl CoA. A main focus of this work was the detailed investigation of how this increase in activity occurred in the R424S mutant. This mutation decreased the activation enthalpy of the pyruvate carboxylation reaction by an amount consistent with removal of a single hydrogen bond. It is postulated that Arg424 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with another residue that stabilizes the asymmetrical conformation of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase tetramer, constraining its interconversion to the symmetrical conformer that is required for catalysis. PMID:27379711

  14. A type III polyketide synthase from Wachendorfia thyrsiflora and its role in diarylheptanoid and phenylphenalenone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brand, S; Hölscher, D; Schierhorn, A; Svatos, A; Schröder, J; Schneider, B

    2006-07-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) related type III plant polyketide synthases (PKSs) are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of diarylheptanoids (e.g. curcumin and polycyclic phenylphenalenones), but no such activity has been reported. Root cultures from Wachendorfia thyrsiflora (Haemodoraceae) are a suitable source to search for such enzymes because they synthesize large amounts of phenylphenalenones, but no other products that are known to require CHSs or related enzymes (e.g. flavonoids or stilbenes). A homology-based RT-PCR strategy led to the identification of cDNAs for a type III PKS sharing only approximately 60% identity with typical CHSs. It was named WtPKS1 (W. thyrsiflora polyketide synthase 1). The purified recombinant protein accepted a large variety of aromatic and aliphatic starter CoA esters, including phenylpropionyl- and side-chain unsaturated phenylpropanoid-CoAs. The simplest model for the initial reaction in diarylheptanoid biosynthesis predicts a phenylpropanoid-CoA as starter and a single condensation reaction to a diketide. Benzalacetones, the expected release products, were observed only with unsaturated phenylpropanoid-CoAs, and the best results were obtained with 4-coumaroyl-CoA (80% of the products). With all other substrates, WtPKS1 performed two condensation reactions and released pyrones. We propose that WtPKS1 catalyses the first step in diarylheptanoid biosynthesis and that the observed pyrones are derailment products in the absence of downstream processing proteins. PMID:16496097

  15. N-acetylglutamate synthase: structure, function and defects.

    PubMed

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Shi, Dashuang; Morizono, Hiroki; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is a unique enzyme cofactor, essential for liver ureagenesis in mammals while it is the first committed substrate for de novo arginine biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants. The enzyme that produces NAG from glutamate and CoA, NAG synthase (NAGS), is allosterically inhibited by arginine in microorganisms and plants and activated in mammals. This transition of the allosteric effect occurred when tetrapods moved from sea to land. The first mammalian NAGS gene (from mouse) was cloned in 2002 and revealed significant differences from the NAGS ortholog in microorganisms. Almost all NAGS genes possess a C-terminus transferase domain in which the catalytic activity resides and an N-terminus kinase domain where arginine binds. The three-dimensional structure of NAGS shows two distinctly folded domains. The kinase domain binds arginine while the acetyltransferase domain contains the catalytic site. NAGS deficiency in humans leads to hyperammonemia and can be primary, due to mutations in the NAGS gene or secondary due to other mitochondrial aberrations that interfere with the normal function of the same enzyme. For either condition, N-carbamylglutamate (NCG), a stable functional analog of NAG, was found to either restore or improve the deficient urea-cycle function. PMID:20303810

  16. N-acetylglutamate synthase: structure, function and defects

    PubMed Central

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Shi, Dashuang; Morizono, Hiroki; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is a unique enzyme cofactor, essential for liver ureagenesis in mammals while it is the first committed substrate for de novo arginine biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants. The enzyme that produces NAG from glutamate and CoA, NAG synthase (NAGS), is allosterically inhibited by arginine in microorganisms and plants and activated in mammals. This transition of the allosteric effect occurred when tetrapods moved from sea to land. The first mammalian NAGS gene (from mouse) was cloned in 2002 and revealed significant differences from the NAGS ortholog in microorganisms. Almost all NAGS genes possess a C-terminus transferase domain in which the catalytic activity resides and an N-terminus kinase domain where arginine binds. The three-dimensional structure of NAGS shows two distinctly folded domains. The kinase domain binds arginine while the acetyltransferase domain contains the catalytic site. NAGS deficiency in humans leads to hyperammonemia and can be primary, due to mutations in the NAGS gene or secondary due to other mitochondrial aberrations that interfere with the normal function of the same enzyme. For either condition, N-carbamylglutamate (NCG), a stable functional analog of NAG, was found to either restore or improve the deficient urea cycle function. PMID:20303810

  17. Open reading frame 3, which is adjacent to the mycocerosic acid synthase gene, is expressed as an acyl coenzyme A synthase in Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, A M; Kolattukudy, P E

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test for expression of a 900-bp open reading frame (ORF), ORF3, located at the 5' end of the mycocerosic acid synthase gene in Mycobacterium bovis BCG and to determine the nature of the ORF3 protein. ORF3 was expressed as a 61-kDa C-terminal fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase in Escherichia coli. Polyclonal rabbit antiserum, prepared against this fusion protein, cross-reacted with a 65-kDa protein in M. bovis BCG crude extracts. Since this protein was larger than that predicted from the nucleotide sequence (32 kDa), ORF3 was resequenced, revealing an ORF of 1,749 bp that encodes a 64.8-kDa protein containing 583 amino acids. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that ORF3 is expressed in M. bovis BCG. The ORF3 product has a high degree of similarity to the acyladenylate family of enzymes. Immunoaffinity absorption chromatography was used to isolate the 65-kDa cross-reacting protein from M. bovis BCG. This purified protein catalyzed coenzyme A (CoA) ester synthesis of n-C10 to n-C18 fatty acids but not mycocerosic acids. ORF3 antibodies severely inhibited acyl-CoA synthase activities of the purified protein and extracts of M. bovis BCG, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and E. coli. They also showed immunological cross-reactivity with proteins in these extracts. Both the ORF3 protein and the acyl-CoA synthase activity were located in the cell cytosol or were loosely associated with the cell membrane. These results indicate that ORF3 encodes an acyl-CoA synthase-like protein. PMID:9098059

  18. Cloning, Expression and Purification of an Acetoacetyl CoA Thiolase from Sunflower Cotyledon

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, James H.; Maina, Anthony; Gomez, Iris D.; Cadet, Melissa; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schiedel, Anke C.

    2009-01-01

    Thiolase I and II coexist as part of the glyoxysomal β-oxidation system in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cotyledons, the only system shown to have both forms. The importance of thiolases can be underscored not only by their ubiquity, but also by their involvement in a wide variety of processes in plants, animals and bacteria. Here we describe the cloning, expression and purification of acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT) in enzymatically active form. Use of the extensive amount of sequence information from the databases facilitated the efficient generation of the gene-specific primers used in the RACE protocols. The recombinant AACT (1233 bp) shares 75% similarity with other plant AACTs. Comparison of specific activity of this recombinant AACT to a previously reported enzyme purified from primary sunflower cotyledon tissue was very similar (263 nkat/mg protein vs 220 nkat/mg protein, respectively). Combining the most pure fractions from the affinity column, the enzyme was purified 88-fold with a 55% yield of the enzymatically active, 47 kDa AACT. PMID:20011134

  19. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein. PMID:24309513

  20. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-ming; Wilson, Ella V.; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens. PMID:23060893

  1. The glcB locus of Rhizobium leguminosarum VF39 encodes an arabinose-inducible malate synthase.

    PubMed

    García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Morales, Alejandro; Baldomá, Laura; Clark, Scott R D; Brom, Susana; Yost, Christopher K; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Aguilar, Juan; Hynes, Michael F

    2002-10-01

    In the course of a study conducted to isolate genes upregulated by plant cell wall sugars, we identified an arabinose-inducible locus from a transcriptional fusion library of Rhizobium leguminosarum VF39, carrying random insertions of the lacZ transposon Tn5B22. Sequence analysis of the locus disrupted by the transposon revealed a high similarity to uncharacterized malate synthase G genes from Sinorhizobium meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Mesorhizobium loti. This enzyme catalyzes the condensation of glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to yield malate and CoA and is thought to be a component of the glyoxylate cycle, which allows microorganisms to grow on two carbon compounds. Enzyme assays showed that a functional malate synthase is encoded in the glcB gene of R. leguminosarum and that its expression is induced by arabinose, glycolate, and glyoxylate. An Escherichia coli aceB glcB mutant, complemented with the R. leguminosarum PCR-amplified gene, recovered malate synthase activity. A very similar genome organization of the loci containing malate synthase and flanking genes was observed in R. leguminosarum, S. meliloti, and A. tumefaciens. Pea plants inoculated with the glcB mutant or the wild-type strain showed no significant differences in nitrogen fixation. This is the first report regarding the characterization of a mutant in one of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes in the rhizobia. PMID:12489782

  2. Enhanced activity of acetyl CoA synthetase adsorbed on smart microgel: an implication for precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi Chandrama; Tripathi, Bijay Prakash; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-01-28

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl CoA) is an essential precursor molecule for synthesis of metabolites such as the polyketide-based drugs (tetracycline, mitharamycin, Zocor, etc.) fats, lipids, and cholesterol. Acetyl CoA synthetase (Acs) is one of the enzymes that catalyzes acetyl CoA synthesis, and this enzyme is essentially employed for continuous supply of the acetyl CoA for the production of these metabolites. To achieve reusable and a more robust entity of the enzyme, we carried out the immobilization of Acs on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgels via adsorption. Cationic PNIPAm-PEI microgel was synthesized by one-step graft copolymerization of NIPAm and N,N-methylene bis-acrylamide (MBA) from PEI. Adsorption studies of Acs on microgel indicated high binding of enzymes, with a maximum binding capacity of 286 μg/mg of microgel for Acs was achieved. The immobilized enzymes showed improved biocatalytic efficiency over free enzymes, beside this, the reaction parameters and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy studies indicated no significant changes in the enzyme structure after immobilization. This thoroughly characterized enzyme bioconjugate was further immobilized on an ultrathin membrane to assess the same reaction in flow through condition. Bioconjugate was covalently immobilized on a thin layer of preformed microgel support upon polyethylene terephthalate (PET) track etched membrane. The prepared membrane was used in a dead end filtration device to monitor the bioconversion efficiency and operational stability of cross-linked bioconjugate. The membrane reactor showed consistent operational stability and maintained >70% of initial activity after 7 consecutive operation cycles. PMID:25561344

  3. [Coa biosynthesis and the structure of its reserve in the liver in mice with diabetes (db/db) after administration of pantothenic acid derivatives].

    PubMed

    Moiseenok, A G; Efimov, A S; Sheĭbak, V M; Obrosova, I G; Gurinovich, V A

    1987-01-01

    In the liver of genetically diabetic mice (db/db) a rise of CoA and alterations in the structure of its moiety (an increase in CoA/short-chain fatty acyl-CoA and CoA/long-chain fatty acyl-CoA ratios) were found being one of the hyperlipogenesis-providing factors. A rise of the content of CoA in diabetes was caused by the activation of its biosynthesis from vitamin-containing precursors; an increase in the deposition of the latter in panthotenate-protein complexes was also noted. Panthetine and 4'-phosphopanthotenate administration to diabetic animals returned to normal the level of total and free CoA and the ratios of separate components in the structure of coenzyme moiety, and the content of CoA precursors (phosphopantheteine and dephospho-CoA) in the liver. PMID:3438267

  4. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  5. Correlation of ATP Citrate Lyase and Acetyl CoA Levels with Trichothecene Production in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Naoko; Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Usuma, Jermnak; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2013-01-01

    Thecorrelation of ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum was investigated using an inhibitor (precocene II) and an enhancer (cobalt chloride) of trichothecene production by changing carbon sources in liquid medium. When precocene II (30 µM) was added to inhibit trichothecene production in a trichothecene high-production medium containing sucrose, ACL expression was reduced and ACL mRNA level as well as acetyl CoA amount in the fungal cells were reduced to the levels observed in a trichothecene trace-production medium containing glucose or fructose. The ACL mRNA level was greatly increased by addition of cobalt chloride in the trichothecene high-production medium, but not in the trichothecene trace-production medium. Levels were reduced to those level in the trichothecene trace-production medium by addition of precocene II (300 µM) together with cobalt chloride. These results suggest that ACL expression is activated in the presence of sucrose and that acetyl CoA produced by the increased ALC level may be used for trichothecene production in the fungus. These findings also suggest that sucrose is important for the action of cobalt chloride in activating trichothecene production and that precocene II may affect a step down-stream of the target of cobalt chloride. PMID:24284828

  6. Thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, P V; Malli, H; Swenson, S

    1999-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a critical enzyme for DNA replication and cell growth because it is the only de novo source of thymine nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. TS is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has been used for cancer treatment for more than 40 years. However, dissatisfaction with the overall activity of 5-FU against the major cancers, and the recognition that TS still remains an attractive target for anticancer drugs because of its central position in the pathway of DNA synthesis, led to a search for new inhibitors of TS structurally analogous to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the second substrate of TS. TS inhibitory antifolates developed to date that are in various stages of clinical evaluation are ZD 1694 and ZD9331 (Astra-Zeneca, London, UK), (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), LY231514 (BW1843U89 (Glaxo-Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC), and AG337 and AG331 (Agouron, La Jolla, CA). Although each of these compounds has TS as its major intracellular site of action, they differ in propensity for polyglutamylation and for transport by the reduced folate carrier. LY231514 also has secondary target enzymes. As a result, each compound is likely to have a different spectrum of antitumor activity and toxicity. This review will summarize the development and properties of this new class of TS inhibitors. PMID:10606255

  7. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  8. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  9. Iridoid biosynthesis in Chrysomelina larvae: Fat body produces early terpenoid precursors.

    PubMed

    Burse, Antje; Schmidt, Axel; Frick, Sindy; Kuhn, Jürgen; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Boland, Wilhelm

    2007-03-01

    Larvae of the Chrysomelina species Phaedon cochleariae and Gastrophysa viridula produce monoterpenoids (iridoids) to defend themselves against predatory attacks by presenting the toxins upon attack as droplets on the top of nine pairs of dorsal glands. Although the conversion of 8-hydroxygeraniol-8-O-beta-d-glucoside into the iridoids in the glandular reservoir has been studied in detail, the synthesis of the glucosidically bound precursor received only limited attention. We compared larvae of the two iridoid producing species with those of Chrysomela populi, a sequestering species producing salicylaldehyde, in terms of the key enzymes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) and isoprenyl diphosphate synthases involved in the biosynthesis of the iridoid precursor. Increased HMGR transcript abundance, high HMGR activity and accumulation of geraniol indicating geranyl diphosphate synthase activity was observed only in the fat body of the iridoid producing larvae in comparison to other larval tissues and to the tested tissues of C. populi. These results correlate with the identification of glucosidically bound 8-hydroxygeraniol in the fat body of the iridoid producers. We suggest that in P. cochleariae and G. viridula glucosidically bound 8-hydroxygeraniol is produced by the fat body and transferred via the hemolymph into the glandular reservoir for further conversion into iridoids. PMID:17296500

  10. The isoprenoid pathway in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad.: cloning and characterisation of the tbhmgr, tbfpps and tbsqs genes.

    PubMed

    Guidi, C; Zeppa, S; Annibalini, G; Pierleoni, R; Guescini, M; Buffalini, M; Zambonelli, A; Stocchi, V

    2006-12-01

    The isoprenoid pathway of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad is investigated to better understand the molecular mechanisms at work, in particular during the maturation of the complex ascomata (the so-called "truffles"). Three T. borchii genes coding for the most important regulatory enzymes of the isoprenoid biosynthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, farnesyl-diphosphate synthase (FPPS) and squalene synthase (SQS), were cloned and characterised. The analyses of their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences led us to identify the typical domains shown in homologous proteins. By using a quantitative real-time PCR the expression pattern of the three genes was analysed in the vegetative phase and during the complex ascoma maturation process, revealing an over-expression in the mature ascomata. The enzymatic activity of the T. borchii 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaril-CoA reductase (HMGR) was investigated with a HPLC method, confirming that the significant isoprenoid biosynthesis in ripe ascomata proceeds not only via a transcriptional activation, but also via an enzyme activity control. These findings imply that isoprenoids play a fundamental role in Tuber ascomata, particularly in the last phases of their maturation, when they could be involved in antifungal or/and antimicrobial processes and contribute to the famous flavour of the truffle ascomata. PMID:16960710

  11. Enhancement of ganoderic acid production by constitutively expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; He, Yi-Long; Zhang, De-Huai; Yue, Tong-Hui; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Li, Na; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-06-10

    The Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was expressed in Ganoderma lucidum to enhance antitumor ganoderic acid (GA) production. The effects of VHb expression on the accumulation of GAs and lanosterol (intermediate) and the transcription of GA biosynthesis genes were also investigated. In VHb-expressing G. lucidum, the maximum concentrations of four individual GAs (GA-S, GA-T, GA-Mk and GA-Me) were 19.1±1.8, 34.6±2.1, 191.5±13.1 and 45.2±2.8μg/100mg dry weight, respectively, which were 1.4-, 2.2, 1.9- and 2.0-fold higher than those obtained in the wild-type strain. Moreover, the maximum lanosterol concentration in the strain expressing VHb was 1.28-fold lower than that in the wild-type strain. The transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase genes were up-regulated by 1.6-, 1.5-, and 1.6-fold, respectively, in the strain expressing VHb. This work is beneficial in developing an efficient fermentation process for the hyperproduction of GAs. PMID:27080449

  12. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase partitions metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kumar, Ritesh; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan M; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Shasany, Ajit K

    2013-08-01

    Biosynthesis of eugenol shares its initial steps with that of lignin, involving conversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to their corresponding coenzyme A (CoA) esters by 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs). In this investigation, a 4CL (OS4CL) was identified from glandular trichome-rich tissue of Ocimum sanctum with high sequence similarity to an isoform (OB4CL_ctg4) from Ocimum basilicum. The levels of OS4CL and OB4CL_ctg4-like transcripts were highest in O. sanctum trichome, followed by leaf, stem and root. The eugenol content in leaf essential oil was positively correlated with the expression of OS4CL in the leaf at different developmental stages. Recombinant OS4CL showed the highest activity with p-coumaric acid, followed by ferulic, caffeic and trans-cinnamic acids. Transient RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of OS4CL in O. sanctum leaves caused a reduction in leaf eugenol content and trichome transcript level, with a considerable increase in endogenous p-coumaric, ferulic, trans-cinnamic and caffeic acids. A significant reduction in the expression levels was observed for OB4CL_ctg4-related transcripts in suppressed trichome compared with transcripts similar to the other four isoforms (OB4CL_ctg1, 2, 3 and 5). Sinapic acid and lignin content were also unaffected in RNAi suppressed leaf samples. Transient expression of OS4CL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts was associated with the cytosol. These results indicate metabolite channeling of intermediates towards eugenol by a specific 4CL and is the first report demonstrating the involvement of 4CL in creation of virtual compartments through substrate utilization and committing metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis at an early stage of the pathway. PMID:23677922

  13. Antagonism of P2Y1-induced vasorelaxation by acyl CoA: a critical role for palmitate and 3′-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Alefishat, E; Alexander, SPH; Ralevic, V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acyl derivatives of CoA have been shown to act as antagonists at human platelet and recombinant P2Y1 receptors, but little is known about their effects in the cardiovascular system. This study evaluated the effect of these endogenous nucleotide derivatives at P2Y1 receptors natively expressed in rat and porcine blood vessels. Experimental Approach Isometric tension recordings were used to evaluate the effects of CoA, acetyl CoA, palmitoyl CoA (PaCoA) and 3′-dephospho-palmitoyl-CoA on concentration relaxation–response curves to ADP and uridine triphosphate (UTP). A FlexStation monitored ADP- and UTP-evoked calcium responses in HEK293 cells. Key Results Acetyl CoA and PaCoA, but not CoA, inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxations to ADP with apparent selectivity for P2Y1 receptors (over P2Y2/4 receptors) in rat thoracic aorta; PaCoA was more potent than acetyl CoA (331-fold vs. fivefold shift of ADP response curve evoked by 10 μM PaCoA and acetyl CoA, respectively); the apparent pA2 value for PaCoA was 6.44. 3′-dephospho-palmitoyl-CoA (10 μM) was significantly less potent than PaCoA (20-fold shift). In porcine mesenteric arteries, PaCoA and the P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500 blocked ADP-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations; in contrast, they were ineffective against ADP-mediated endothelium-independent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries (which does not involve P2Y1 receptors). Calcium responses evoked by ADP activation of endogenous P2Y1 receptors in HEK293 cells were inhibited in the presence of PaCoA, which failed to alter responses to UTP (acting at endogenous P2Y2/4 receptors). Conclusions and Implications Acyl derivatives of CoA can act as endogenous selective antagonists of P2Y1 receptors in blood vessels, and this inhibitory effect critically depends on the palmitate and 3′-ribose phosphate substituents on CoA. PMID:23215951

  14. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... diagnosis or management of GM3 synthase deficiency: American Epilepsy Society: Find a Doctor Clinic for Special Children ( ...

  15. Software interface for high-speed readout of particle detectors based on the CoaXPress communication standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejtmánek, M.; Neue, G.; Voleš, P.

    2015-06-01

    This article is devoted to the software design and development of a high-speed readout application used for interfacing particle detectors via the CoaXPress communication standard. The CoaXPress provides an asymmetric high-speed serial connection over a single coaxial cable. It uses a widely available 75 Ω BNC standard and can operate in various modes with a data throughput ranging from 1.25 Gbps up to 25 Gbps. Moreover, it supports a low speed uplink with a fixed bit rate of 20.833 Mbps, which can be used to control and upload configuration data to the particle detector. The CoaXPress interface is an upcoming standard in medical imaging, therefore its usage promises long-term compatibility and versatility. This work presents an example of how to develop DAQ system for a pixel detector. For this purpose, a flexible DAQ card was developed using the XILINX Spartan 6 FPGA. The DAQ card is connected to the framegrabber FireBird CXP6 Quad, which is plugged in the PCI Express bus of the standard PC. The data transmission was performed between the FPGA and framegrabber card via the standard coaxial cable in communication mode with a bit rate of 3.125 Gbps. Using the Medipix2 Quad pixel detector, the framerate of 100 fps was achieved. The front-end application makes use of the FireBird framegrabber software development kit and is suitable for data acquisition as well as control of the detector through the registers implemented in the FPGA.

  16. Discovery of tumor-specific irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic at low nanomolar concentrations to the same 4 of 12 human lung cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD). SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease.

  17. Mycocerosic acid synthase exemplifies the architecture of reducing polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Dominik A; Jakob, Roman P; Zähringer, Franziska; Maier, Timm

    2016-03-24

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are biosynthetic factories that produce natural products with important biological and pharmacological activities. Their exceptional product diversity is encoded in a modular architecture. Modular PKSs (modPKSs) catalyse reactions colinear to the order of modules in an assembly line, whereas iterative PKSs (iPKSs) use a single module iteratively as exemplified by fungal iPKSs (fiPKSs). However, in some cases non-colinear iterative action is also observed for modPKSs modules and is controlled by the assembly line environment. PKSs feature a structural and functional separation into a condensing and a modifying region as observed for fatty acid synthases. Despite the outstanding relevance of PKSs, the detailed organization of PKSs with complete fully reducing modifying regions remains elusive. Here we report a hybrid crystal structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis mycocerosic acid synthase based on structures of its condensing and modifying regions. Mycocerosic acid synthase is a fully reducing iPKS, closely related to modPKSs, and the prototype of mycobacterial mycocerosic acid synthase-like PKSs. It is involved in the biosynthesis of C20-C28 branched-chain fatty acids, which are important virulence factors of mycobacteria. Our structural data reveal a dimeric linker-based organization of the modifying region and visualize dynamics and conformational coupling in PKSs. On the basis of comparative small-angle X-ray scattering, the observed modifying region architecture may be common also in modPKSs. The linker-based organization provides a rationale for the characteristic variability of PKS modules as a main contributor to product diversity. The comprehensive architectural model enables functional dissection and re-engineering of PKSs. PMID:26976449

  18. Biotin augments acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 gene expression in the hypothalamus, leading to the suppression of food intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Sone, Hideyuki; Kamiyama, Shin; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Fujino, Kaho; Kubo, Shizuka; Miyazawa, Masami; Shirato, Saya; Hiroi, Yuka; Shiozawa, Kota

    2016-07-29

    It is known that biotin prevents the development of diabetes by increasing the functions of pancreatic beta-cells and improving insulin sensitivity in the periphery. However, its anti-obesity effects such as anorectic effects remain to be clarified. Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-dependent enzyme, has two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) and serves to catalyze the reaction of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. In the hypothalamus, ACC2 increases the production of malonyl CoA, which acts as a satiety signal. In this study, we investigated whether biotin increases the gene expression of ACC2 in the hypothalamus and suppresses food intake in mice administered excessive biotin. Food intake was significantly decreased by biotin, but plasma regulators of appetite, including glucose, ghrelin, and leptin, were not affected. On the other hand, biotin notably accumulated in the hypothalamus and enhanced ACC2 gene expression there, but it did not change the gene expression of ACC1, malonyl CoA decarboxylase (a malonyl CoA-degrading enzyme), and AMP-activated protein kinase α-2 (an ACC-inhibitory enzyme). These findings strongly suggest that biotin potentiates the suppression of appetite by upregulating ACC2 gene expression in the hypothalamus. This effect of biotin may contribute to the prevention of diabetes by biotin treatment. PMID:27181349

  19. Broad substrate specificity of phosphotransbutyrylase from Listeria monocytogenes: A potential participant in an alternative pathway for provision of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Sen, Suranjana; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative organism of the serious food-borne disease listeriosis, has a membrane abundant in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs). BCFAs are normally biosynthesized from branched-chain amino acids via the activity of branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (Bkd), and disruption of this pathway results in reduced BCFA content in the membrane. Short branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs) added as media supplements result in incorporation of BCFAs arising from the supplemented BCCAs in the membrane of L. monocytogenes bkd mutant MOR401. High concentrations of the supplements also effect similar changes in the membrane of the wild type organism with intact bkd. Such carboxylic acids clearly act as fatty acid precursors, and there must be an alternative pathway resulting in the formation of their CoA thioester derivatives. Candidates for this are the enzymes phosphotransbutyrylase (Ptb) and butyrate kinase (Buk), the products of the first two genes of the bkd operon. Ptb from L. monocytogenes exhibited broad substrate specificity, a strong preference for branched-chain substrates, a lack of activity with acetyl CoA and hexanoyl CoA, and strict chain length preference (C3-C5). Ptb catalysis involved ternary complex formation. Additionally, Ptb could utilize unnatural branched-chain substrates such as 2-ethylbutyryl CoA, albeit with lower efficiency, consistent with a potential involvement of this enzyme in the conversion of the carboxylic acid additives into CoA primers for BCFA biosynthesis. PMID:27320015

  20. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  1. Fermented Rhus verniciflua Stokes Extract Exerts an Antihepatic Lipogenic Effect in Oleic-Acid-Induced HepG2 Cells via Upregulation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Kim, Joo-Seok; Cho, Sun-Mi; Lee, Seon Ok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-08-19

    Rhus verniciflua Stokes has been used as a traditional medicine and food supplement in Korea. In the present study, fermented R. verniciflua Stokes extract (FRVE), an allergen-free extract of R. verniciflua Stokes fermented with the yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, was assessed for its lipid-lowering potential in an in vitro non-alcoholic fatty liver disease model. FRVE markedly suppressed lipid accumulation and intracellular triglycerides (TGs) in the presence of oleic acid (OA). Additionally, FRVE decreased both mRNA and protein levels of lipid-synthesis- and cholesterol-metabolism-related factors, such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), fatty acid synthase (FAS), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), in OA-induced HepG2 cells. Moreover, FRVE activated low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and fatty acid oxidation-related factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1). Further, the AMPK inhibitor compound C suppressed the increased expression of AMPK phosphorylation induced by FRVE. Phenolics and cosanols in FRVE increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and decreased that of SREBP-1. Taken together, our findings suggest that FRVE has antilipogenic potential in non-alcoholic fatty livers via AMPK upregulation. PMID:26176317

  2. Hypolipidemic activity of okra is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of cholesterol degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Chen, Gu; Ren, Dandan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the hypolipidemic activity of okra; therefore, we investigated the hypolipidemic activity of okra and its interaction with gene expression of several key components involved in lipid homeostasis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups and fed with hyperlipidemic diet or two hyperlipidemic diets supplemented with 1% or 2% okra powder for eight weeks. Results demonstrated that okra dose-dependently decreased serum and hepatic total cholesterol and triglyceride, and enhanced fecal excretion of bile acids. Gene expression analysis revealed that okra upregulated cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression, downregulated expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), with no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1A). It was suggested that hypolipidemic activity of okra was mediated most likely by upregulation of cholesterol degradation through CYP7A1 and by inhibition of lipogenesis through SREBP1c and FAS. Okra raw and fractionated polysaccharide showed strong bile acid binding capacity in vitro, which may contribute to the hypolipidemic activity observed. In conclusion, okra has potential application in the management of hyperlipidemia and its associated metabolic disorders. PMID:23606408

  3. Overexpression of c-myc in diabetic mice restores altered expression of the transcription factor genes that regulate liver metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Riu, Efren; Ferre, Tura; Mas, Alex; Hidalgo, Antonio; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Bosch, Fatima

    2002-01-01

    Overexpression of the c-Myc transcription factor in liver induces glucose uptake and utilization. Here we examined the effects of c- myc overexpression on the expression of hepatocyte-specific transcription factor genes which regulate the expression of genes controlling hepatic metabolism. At 4 months after streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, most diabetic control mice were highly hyperglycaemic and died, whereas in STZ-treated transgenic mice hyperglycaemia was markedly lower, the serum levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate, triacylglycerols and non-esterified fatty acids were normal, and they had greater viability in the absence of insulin. Furthermore, long-term STZ-treated transgenic mice showed similar glucose utilization and storage to healthy controls. This was consistent with the expression of glycolytic genes becoming normalized. In addition, restoration of gene expression of the transcription factor, sterol receptor element binding protein 1c, was observed in the livers of these transgenic mice. Further, in STZ-treated transgenic mice the expression of genes involved in the control of gluconeogenesis (phosphoenolpyruvate carbokykinase), ketogenesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase) and energy metabolism (uncoupling protein 2) had returned to normal. These findings were correlated with decreased expression of genes encoding the transcription factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 3gamma, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and retinoid X receptor. These results indicate that c- myc overexpression may counteract diabetic changes by controlling hepatic glucose metabolism, both directly by altering the expression of metabolic genes and through the expression of key transcription factor genes. PMID:12230428

  4. Genetic changes that correlate with the pine-oil disinfectant-reduced susceptibility mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane-Khadka, R.; Riordan, J.T.; Delgado, A.; Muthaiyan, A.; Reynolds, T.D.; Wilkinson, B.J.; Gustafson, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims To identify factors associated with the Staphylococcus aureus pine-oil disinfectant-reduced-susceptibility (PDRS) mechanism and to describe one possible PDRS model. Methods and Results Comparative genomic sequencing (CGS) and microarray analysis were utilized to detect mutations and transcriptome alterations that occur in a S. aureus PDRS mutant. Mutant analysis, antimicrobial gradient plates, growth studies and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase assays were then performed to confirm the biological consequences of the ‘omics’ alterations detected in a PDRS mutant. CGS uncovered three mutations in a PDRS mutant in a(n): alcohol dehydrogenase (adh), catabolite control protein A (ccpA) and an NADPH-flavin oxidoreductase (frp). These mutations lead to increased growth rates; increased transcription of an NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ddh); and increased flux through the mevalonate pathway. PDRS mutants demonstrated reduced susceptibility to bacitracin and farnesol, and one PDRS mutant displayed upregulation of bacA, a bacitracin-resistance gene. Collectively, this evidence demonstrates altered undecaprenol metabolism in PDRS mutants. Conclusions The PDRS mechanism proposed results from increased catabolic capabilities and increased flux through the mevalonate pathway as well as altered bactoprenol physiology. Significance and Impact of the Study A novel mechanism that bacteria utilize to overcome the killing effects of PD formulations is proposed that is unique from the PDRS mechanism of the enterobacteraciae. PMID:19120644

  5. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet-B and methyl jasmonate on tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong Hui; Zheng, Li Ping; Tian, Hao; Wang, Jian Wen

    2016-06-01

    Tanshinones are major bioactive diterpenoids of Salvia miltiorrhiza roots used for the treatment of cardiocerebral diseases. To develop effective elicitation and bioprocess strategies for the enhanced production of tanshinones, ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation were applied alone or in combination respectively in S. miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures. Our results showed 40-min UV-B irradiation at 40μW/cm(2) stimulated tanshinone production without any suppression of root growth, suggesting a new effective elicitor to S. miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures for tanshinone production. Moreover, the combined treatment of UV-B irradiation and MeJA exhibited synergistic effects on the expression levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (SmHMGR) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (SmGGPPS) genes in the tanshinone biosynthetic pathway. When hairy roots of 18-day-old cultures were exposed to the combined elicitation for 9days, the maximum production of tanshinone reached to 28.21mg/L, a 4.9-fold increase over the control. The combined elicitation of UV-B and MeJA was firstly used to stimulate the production of biologically important secondary metabolites in hairy root cultures. PMID:27043259

  6. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Rardin, Matthew J; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Newgard, Christopher B; Jacobson, Matthew P; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S; Gibson, Bradford W; Verdin, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1,190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5(-/-) animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  7. Fruiting body of Niuchangchih (Antrodia camphorata) protects livers against chronic alcohol consumption damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Yuan-Yen; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Kang, Wen-Yu; Lin, Yi-Ling; Chang, Hsien-Chang; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2010-03-24

    An alcoholic fatty liver disease was induced by drinking water containing 20% (w/w) alcohol. Therapeutic groups were orally administrated dosages of 0.25 g silymarin/kg body weight (BW) and a low dosage of Niuchangchih (Antrodia camphorata) (0.025 g/kg BW) and a high dosage of Niuchangchih (0.1 g/kg BW) per day. Niuchangchih, especially at the high dosage, not only showed a hypercholesterolemic effect (p < 0.05) but also reduced (p < 0.05) hepatic lipids in alcohol-fed rats. Those beneficial effects could be partially attributed to higher (p < 0.05) fecal cholesterol and bile acid outputs, as well as downregulations (p < 0.05) of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and malic enzyme gene expressions; meanwhile, there was an upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated alpha gene expression. Besides, Niuchangchih also enhanced (p < 0.05) the liver glutathione, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the liver malondialdehyde content, which also partially contributed to the lowered (p < 0.05) serum aspartate aminotransferase levels and no observed lesion in the histological examination of alcohol-fed rats. PMID:20192205

  8. Protective effects of Houttuynia cordata aqueous extract in mice consuming a high saturated fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-cheng; Hsu, Pei-chun; Yin, Mei-chin

    2013-02-01

    The protective effects of Houttuynia cordata aqueous extract (HCAE) in mice consuming a high saturated fat diet (HFD) were examined. HCAE, at 0.5, 1, or 2%, was supplied in drinking water for 8 weeks. HCAE was rich in phenolic acids and flavonoids. HCAE intake at 1 and 2% decreased body weight, epididymal fat, insulin resistance, triglyceride and total cholesterol contents in plasma and liver from HFD-treated mice (p < 0.05). HFD enhanced hepatic activity of malic enzyme, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase; and augmented the hepatic level of saturated fatty acids (p < 0.05). HCAE intake at 2% reduced malic enzyme and FAS activities, and lowered saturated fatty acids content in liver (p < 0.05). HCAE suppressed HFD induced oxidative and inflammatory stress in the heart and liver via reducing the malondialdehyde level, retaining glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activity, decreasing tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 production (p < 0.05). These results support that Houttuynia cordata is a potent food against HFD induced obesity, and oxidative and inflammatory injury. PMID:23165792

  9. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25507473

  10. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25423750

  11. Utilization of digital differential display to identify differentially expressed genes related to rumen development.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haga, Satoshi; So, KyoungHa; Yamauchi, Eri; Nakano, Miwa; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Choi, Kichoon; Katoh, Kazuo; Roh, Sang-Gun

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes associated with the development of the rumen epithelium by screening for candidate genes by digital differential display (DDD) in silico. Using DDD in NCBI's UniGene database, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene expression profiles were analyzed in rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum and other tissues in cattle. One hundred and ten candidate genes with high expression in the rumen were derived from a library of all tissues. The expression levels of 11 genes in all candidate genes were analyzed in the rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum of nine Japanese Black male calves (5-week-old pre-weaning: n = 3; 15-week-old weaned calves: n = 6). Among the 11 genes, only 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1-like (AKR1C1), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) showed significant changes in the levels of gene expression in the rumen between the pre- and post-weaning of calves. These results indicate that DDD analysis in silico can be useful for screening candidate genes related to rumen development, and that the changes in expression levels of three genes in the rumen may have been caused by weaning, aging or both. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science. PMID:26388291

  12. Lovastatin, but not orlistat, reduces intestinal polyp volume in an ApcMin/+ mouse model.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Maria; Barone, Michele; Francavilla, Antonio; Tutino, Valeria; Bianco, Giusy; Tafaro, Angela; Minoia, Mario; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Napoli, Anna; Scavo, Maria Principia; Caruso, Maria Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    The statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoAR) and orlistat, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase (FAS), inhibit tumor cell growth by restricting cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis, respectively. We previously demonstrated that an omega (ω)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)- or olive oil-enriched diet reduced the polyp number and volume in ApcMin/+ mice. This phenomenon was associated with a significant inhibition of FAS and HMGCoAR, as well as an increase in the estrogen receptor (ER)β/α ratio. Herein, we evaluated the effect of lovastatin and orlistat on polyp development and ER expression in ApcMin/+ mice, in order to confirm previous data obtained with ω‑3-PUFAs and olive oil. As expected, the use of lovastatin and orlistat significantly reduced HMGCoAR and FAS enzymatic activities and gene expression in colonic tissues, but did not affect the number of intestinal polyps, while there was a statistically significant reduction in polyp volume only in the mouse group treated with lovastatin. In the mice receiving orlistat, we observed a significant increase in cell proliferation in the polyp tissue, as well as enhanced expression of ERα. Moreover, the overexpression of ERα was associated with a statistically significant increase in PES1, Shh and Gli1 protein levels, considered ERα-related molecular targets. PMID:27277576

  13. Lipidomic-based investigation into the regulatory effect of Schisandrin B on palmitic acid level in non-alcoholic steatotic livers

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Niu, Xuyan; Dai, Wenlin; Tong, Tiejun; Chao, Xiaojuan; Su, Tao; Chan, Chi Leung; Lee, Kim Chung; Fu, Xiuqiong; Yi, Hua; Yu, Hua; Li, Ting; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Pan, Si-Yuan; Lu, Aiping; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Schisandrin B (SchB) is one of the most abundant bioactive dibenzocyclooctadiene derivatives found in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic effects of SchB on non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD). In lipidomic study, ingenuity pathway analysis highlighted palmitate biosynthesis metabolic pathway in the liver samples of SchB-treated high-fat-diet-fed mice. Further experiments showed that the SchB treatment reduced expression and activity of fatty acid synthase, expressions of hepatic mature sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α, and hepatic level of palmitic acid which is known to promote progression of steatosis to steatohepatitis. Furthermore, the treatment also reduced hepatic fibrosis, activated nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 which is known to attenuate the progression of NASH-related fibrosis. Interestingly, in fasting mice, a single high-dose SchB induced transient lipolysis and increased the expressions of adipose triglyceride lipase and phospho-hormone sensitive lipase. The treatment also increased plasma cholesterol levels and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity, reduced the hepatic low-density-lipoprotein receptor expression in these mice. Our data not only suggest SchB is a potential therapeutic agent for NAFLD, but also provided important information for a safe consumption of SchB because SchB overdosed under fasting condition will have adverse effects on lipid metabolism. PMID:25766252

  14. SIRT5 regulates the mitochondrial lysine succinylome and metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Rardin, Matthew J.; He, Wenjuan; Nishida, Yuya; Newman, John C.; Carrico, Chris; Danielson, Steven R.; Guo, Ailan; Gut, Philipp; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Li, Biao; Uppala, Radha; Fitch, Mark; Riiff, Timothy; Zhu, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Mulhern, Daniel; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Hellerstein, Marc; Goetzman, Eric S.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Verdin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reversible posttranslational modifications are emerging as critical regulators of mitochondrial proteins and metabolism. Here, we use a label-free quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the lysine succinylome in liver mitochondria and its regulation by the desuccinylase SIRT5. A total of 1190 unique sites were identified as succinylated, and 386 sites across 140 proteins representing several metabolic pathways including β-oxidation and ketogenesis were significantly hypersuccinylated in Sirt5−/− animals. Loss of SIRT5 leads to accumulation of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines and decreased β-hydroxybutyrate production in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that SIRT5 regulates succinylation of the rate-limiting ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2) both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, mutation of hypersuccinylated residues K83 and K310 on HMGCS2 to glutamic acid strongly inhibits enzymatic activity. Taken together, these findings establish SIRT5 as a global regulator of lysine succinylation in mitochondria and present a mechanism for inhibition of ketogenesis through HMGCS2. PMID:24315375

  15. Defective macromolecule biosynthesis and cell-cycle progression in a mammalian cell starved for mevalonate.

    PubMed Central

    Sinensky, M; Logel, J

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of a somatic cell mutant (Mev-1) with a block in one of the mevalonate-biosynthesizing enzymes (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, EC 4.1.3.5) has afforded us the opportunity to test and to extend the hypothesis that a product of mevalonate biosynthesis other than cholesterol is required for cellular proliferation. We present evidence here that both DNA synthesis and protein synthesis are inhibited in this mutant by mevalonate starvation, although RNA synthesis appears to be unaffected. The loss of DNA synthesis and the loss of protein synthesis in this mutant appear to be due to independent processes. DNA synthesis is reversibly inhibited by mevalonate starvation at a unique point in the cell cycle. Resumption of DNA synthesis after readdition of mevalonate exhibits a long lag; the peak of S-phase DNA synthesis occurs approximately 17 hr after mevalonate readdition, suggesting that mevalonate starvation puts cells into a quiescent (G0) state owing to their failure to transit a restriction point. The loss of DNA biosynthesis in the Mev-1 cell is well correlated with the rate of turnover of mevalonate label of certain terpenylated polypeptides. Images PMID:2582409

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of fatty acid amides on the N-oleoylethanolamide-like activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α.

    PubMed

    Takao, Koichi; Noguchi, Kaori; Hashimoto, Yosuke; Shirahata, Akira; Sugita, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A series of fatty acid amides were synthesized and their peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) agonistic activities were evaluated in a normal rat liver cell line, clone 9. The mRNAs of the PPAR-α downstream genes, carnitine-palmitoyltransferase-1 and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as PPAR-α agonistic activities. We prepared nine oleic acid amides. Their PPAR-α agonistic activities were, in decreasing order, N-oleoylhistamine (OLHA), N-oleoylglycine, Oleamide, N-oleoyltyramine, N-oleoylsertonin, and Olvanil. The highest activity was found with OLHA. We prepared and evaluated nine N-acylhistamines (N-acyl-HAs). Of these, OLHA, C16:0-HA, and C18:1Δ(9)-trans-HA showed similar activity. Activity due to the different chain length of the saturated fatty acid peaked at C16:0-HA. The PPAR-α antagonist, GW6471, inhibited the induction of the PPAR-α downstream genes by OLHA and N-oleoylethanolamide (OEA). These data suggest that N-acyl-HAs could be considered new PPAR-α agonists. PMID:25832022

  17. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum. PMID:21127986

  18. CoaTx-II, a new dimeric Lys49 phospholipase A2 from Crotalus oreganus abyssus snake venom with bactericidal potential: Insights into its structure and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R; Lancellotti, M; Soares, A M; Calderon, L A; Ramírez, D; González, W; Marangoni, S; Da Silva, S L

    2016-09-15

    Snake venoms are rich and intriguing sources of biologically-active molecules that act on target cells, modulating a diversity of physiological functions and presenting promising pharmacological applications. Lys49 phospholipase A2 is one of the multifunctional proteins present in these complex secretions and, although catalytically inactive, has a variety of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antibacterial, inflammatory, antifungal activities. Herein, a Lys49 phospholipase A2, denominated CoaTx-II from Crotalus oreganus abyssus, was purified and structurally and pharmacologically characterized. CoaTx-II was isolated with a high degree of purity by a combination of two chromatographic steps; molecular exclusion and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This toxin is dimeric with a mass of 13868.2 Da (monomeric form), as determined by mass spectrometry. CoaTx-II is rich in Arg and Lys residues and displays high identity with other Lys49 PLA2 homologues, which have high isoelectric points. The structural model of dimeric CoaTx-II shows that the toxin is non-covalently stabilized. Despite its enzymatic inactivity, in vivo CoaTx-II caused local muscular damage, characterized by increased plasma creatine kinase and confirmed by histological alterations, in addition to an inflammatory activity, as demonstrated by mice paw edema induction and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 elevation. CoaTx-II also presents antibacterial activity against gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 31NM, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and positive (Staphyloccocus aureus BEC9393 and Rib1) bacteria. Therefore, data show that this newly purified toxin plays a central role in mediating the degenerative events associated with envenomation, in addition to demonstrating antibacterial properties, with potential for use in the development of strategies for antivenom therapy and combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:27530662

  19. Structural comparison between the open and closed forms of citrate synthase from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Eiji; Kawaguchi, Shin-ichi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kouyama, Tsutomu; Murakami, Midori

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of citrate synthase from the thermophilic eubacteria Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtCS) were determined for an open form at 1.5 Å resolution and for closed form at 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. In the absence of ligands TtCS in the open form was crystalized into a tetragonal form with a single subunit in the asymmetric unit. TtCS was also co-crystallized with citrate and coenzyme-A to form an orthorhombic crystal with two homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Citrate and CoA are found in the active site situated between the large domain and the small domain in all subunit whereas the complex shows two distinct closed conformations, the fully closed form and partially closed form. Structural comparisons are performed to describe conformational changes associated with binding of products of TtCS. Upon binding of citrate, basic residues in the active site move toward citrate and make a hydrogen bond network in the active site, inducing a large-scale rotation of the small domain relative to the large domain. CoA is sandwiched between the small and large domains and then the cysteamine tail is inserted into the active site with a cooperative rotation around mainchain dihedrals in the hinge region connecting helices M and N. According to this rotation these helices are extended to close the active site completely. The considerable flexibility and structural rearrangements in the hinge region are crucial for an ordered bibi reaction in catalysis for microbial CSs. PMID:27493854

  20. Different sites of inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by malonyl-CoA, and by acetyl-CoA and CoA, in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Zierz, S; Engel, A G

    1987-01-01

    The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT, EC 2.3.1.21) by malonyl-CoA, acetyl-CoA and free CoA was studied in sonicated skeletal-muscle homogenates from normal human subjects and from five patients with a mutant CPT [Zierz & Engel (1985) Eur. J. Biochem. 149, 207-214]. (1) Malonyl-CoA, acetyl-CoA and CoA were competitive inhibitors of CPT with palmitoyl-CoA. (2) Acetyl-CoA and CoA inhibited normal and mutant CPT to the same degree, whereas malonyl-CoA inhibited mutant CPT more than normal CPT. (3) Triton X-100 abolished the inhibition of normal CPT by malonyl-CoA, but not by acetyl-CoA or CoA. Triton X-100 by itself caused loss of activity of the mutant CPT. (4) In the concentration range 0.1-0.4 mM, the inhibitory effects of any two of the three inhibitors were synergistic. (5) The inhibitory constants (Ki) for acetyl-CoA and CoA were close to 45 microM. The Ki for malonyl-CoA was 200-fold lower, or 0.22 microM. Addition of 40 microM-acetyl-CoA or CoA resulted in a 3-fold increase in the Ki for acetyl-CoA. Addition of 20 microM-CoA resulted in a 3-fold increase in the Ki for acetyl-CoA. (6) The findings indicate that acetyl-CoA and CoA can inhibit CPT at the catalytic site or a nearby site which is different from that at which malonyl-CoA inhibits CPT. (7) The fact that small changes in the concentration of acetyl-CoA and CoA can antagonize the inhibitory effect of malonyl-CoA suggests that these compounds could modulate the inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA. PMID:3663146

  1. Cross sections for production of the CO(A 1 Pi)-(X 1 Sigma) fourth positive band system and O(3 S) by photodissociation of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentieu, E. P.; Mentall, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The CO(A 1 Pi) cross sections reported here, along with previously determined electron impact results, establish the basis for calculating CO fourth positive system volume emission rates in the Martian dayglow. Calculated volume emission rates in turn determine relative distribution of photon vs. electron impact as mechanisms for producing CO(A 1 Pi) in the Mars atmosphere. The smallness of the O(1304) cross section confirms previous indirect evidence that photodissociative excitation of CO2 is not an important source of O(3 S) in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  2. Isoprene synthase genes form a monophyletic clade of acyclic terpene synthases in the TPS-B terpene synthase family.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Gray, Dennis W; Pell, Heather K; Breneman, Steven R; Topper, Lauren

    2013-04-01

    Many plants emit significant amounts of isoprene, which is hypothesized to help leaves tolerate short episodes of high temperature. Isoprene emission is found in all major groups of land plants including mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms; however, within these groups isoprene emission is variable. The patchy distribution of isoprene emission implies an evolutionary pattern characterized by many origins or many losses. To better understand the evolution of isoprene emission, we examine the phylogenetic relationships among isoprene synthase and monoterpene synthase genes in the angiosperms. In this study we identify nine new isoprene synthases within the rosid angiosperms. We also document the capacity of a myrcene synthase in Humulus lupulus to produce isoprene. Isoprene synthases and (E)-β-ocimene synthases form a monophyletic group within the Tps-b clade of terpene synthases. No asterid genes fall within this clade. The chemistry of isoprene synthase and ocimene synthase is similar and likely affects the apparent relationships among Tps-b enzymes. The chronology of rosid evolution suggests a Cretaceous origin followed by many losses of isoprene synthase over the course of evolutionary history. The phylogenetic pattern of Tps-b genes indicates that isoprene emission from non-rosid angiosperms likely arose independently. PMID:23550753

  3. Trapping of intermediates with substrate analog HBOCoA in the polymerizations catalyzed by class III polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Cao, Ruikai; Shrestha, Ruben; Ward, Christina; Katz, Benjamin B; Fischer, Christopher J; Tomich, John M; Li, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHB polymers that are considered as an ideal alternative to petroleum-based plastics. To provide strong evidence for the preferred mechanistic model involving covalent and noncovalent intermediates, a substrate analog HBOCoA was synthesized chemoenzymatically. Substitution of sulfur in the native substrate HBCoA with an oxygen in HBOCoA enabled detection of (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-6) intermediates when the polymerization was catalyzed by wild-type (wt-)PhaECAv at 5.84 h(-1). This extremely slow rate is due to thermodynamically unfavorable steps that involve the formation of enzyme-bound PHB species (thioesters) from corresponding CoA oxoesters. Synthesized standards (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-3) were found to undergo both reacylation and hydrolysis catalyzed by the synthase. Distribution of the hydrolysis products highlights the importance of the penultimate ester group as previously suggested. Importantly, the reaction between primed synthase [(3)H]-sT-PhaECAv and HBOCoA yielded [(3)H]-sTet-O-CoA at a rate constant faster than 17.4 s(-1), which represents the first example that a substrate analog undergoes PHB chain elongation at a rate close to that of the native substrate (65.0 s(-1)). Therefore, for the first time with a wt-synthase, strong evidence was obtained to support our favored PHB chain elongation model. PMID:25686368

  4. Trapping of Intermediates with Substrate Analog HBOCoA in the Polymerizations Catalyzed by Class III Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Synthase from Allochromatium Vinosum

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ruben; Ward, Christina; Katz, Benjamin B.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Tomich, John M.; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHB polymers that are considered as an ideal alternative to petroleum-based plastics. To provide strong evidence for the preferred mechanistic model involving covalent and noncovalent intermediates, a substrate analog HBOCoA was synthesized chemoenzymatically. Substitution of sulfur in the native substrate HBCoA with an oxygen in HBOCoA enabled detection of (HB)nOCoA (n = 2–6) intermediates when the polymerization was catalyzed by wild-type (wt-)PhaECAv at 5.84 hr−1. This extremely slow rate is due to thermodynamically unfavorable steps that involve formation of enzyme-bound PHB species (thioesters) from corresponding CoA oxoesters. Synthesized standards (HB)nOCoA (n = 2–3) were found to undergo both reacylation and hydrolysis catalyzed by the synthase. Distribution of the hydrolysis products highlights the importance of the penultimate ester group as previously suggested. Importantly, the reaction between primed synthase [3H]-sT-PhaECAv and HBOCoA yielded [3H]-sTet-O-CoA at a rate constant faster than 17.4 s−1, which represents the first example that a substrate analog undergoes PHB chain elongation at a rate close to that of the native substrate (65.0 s−1). Therefore, for the first time with a wt-synthase, strong evidence was obtained to support our favored PHB chain elongation model. PMID:25686368

  5. Mevalonate-suppressive dietary isoprenoids for bone health.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huanbiao; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Shah, Anureet; Mo, Warren K; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shen, Chwan-Li

    2012-12-01

    Osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, the balancing acts for optimal bone health, are under the regulation of small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins (GTPases) including Ras, Rac, Rho and Rab. The activities of GTPases require post-translational modification with mevalonate-derived prenyl pyrophosphates. Mevalonate deprivation induced by competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase (e.g., statins) prevents the activation of GTPases, suppresses the expression of the receptor for activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) ligand (RANKL) and activation of NFκB and, consequently, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and induces osteoclast apoptosis. In contrast, statin-mediated inactivation of GTPases enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, vascular epithelial growth factor, and osteocalcin in osteoblasts and induces osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Animal studies show that statins inhibit bone resorption and increase bone formation. The anabolic effect of statins and other mevalonate pathway-suppressive pharmaceuticals resembles the anti-osteoclastogenic and bone-protective activities conferred by dietary isoprenoids, secondary products of plant mevalonate metabolism. The tocotrienols, vitamin E molecules with HMG CoA reductase-suppressive activity, induce mevalonate deprivation and concomitantly suppress the expression of RANKL and cyclooxygenase-2, the production of prostaglandin E2 and the activation of NFκB. Accordingly, tocotrienols inhibit osteoclast differentiation and induce osteoclast apoptosis, impacts reminiscent of those of statins. In vivo studies confirm the bone protective activity of tocotrienols at nontoxic doses. Blends of tocotrienols, statins and isoprenoids widely found in fruits, vegetables, grains, herbs, spices, and essential oils may synergistically suppress osteoclastogenesis while promoting osteoblastogenesis, offering a novel

  6. A liver-specific defect of Acyl-CoA degradation produces hyperammonemia, hypoglycemia and a distinct hepatic Acyl-CoA pattern.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Nicolas; Wu, Jiang Wei; Wang, Shu Pei; Allard, Pierre; Mamer, Orval A; Sweetman, Lawrence; Moser, Ann B; Kratz, Lisa; Alvarez, Fernando; Robitaille, Yves; Lépine, François; Mitchell, Grant A

    2013-01-01

    Most conditions detected by expanded newborn screening result from deficiency of one of the enzymes that degrade acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters in mitochondria. The role of acyl-CoAs in the pathophysiology of these disorders is poorly understood, in part because CoA esters are intracellular and samples are not generally available from human patients. We created a mouse model of one such condition, deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HL), in liver (HLLKO mice). HL catalyses a reaction of ketone body synthesis and of leucine degradation. Chronic HL deficiency and acute crises each produced distinct abnormal liver acyl-CoA patterns, which would not be predictable from levels of urine organic acids and plasma acylcarnitines. In HLLKO hepatocytes, ketogenesis was undetectable. Carboxylation of [2-(14)C] pyruvate diminished following incubation of HLLKO hepatocytes with the leucine metabolite 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC). HLLKO mice also had suppression of the normal hyperglycemic response to a systemic pyruvate load, a measure of gluconeogenesis. Hyperammonemia and hypoglycemia, cardinal features of many inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism, occurred spontaneously in some HLLKO mice and were inducible by administering KIC. KIC loading also increased levels of several leucine-related acyl-CoAs and reduced acetyl-CoA levels. Ultrastructurally, hepatocyte mitochondria of KIC-treated HLLKO mice show marked swelling. KIC-induced hyperammonemia improved following administration of carglumate (N-carbamyl-L-glutamic acid), which substitutes for the product of an acetyl-CoA-dependent reaction essential for urea cycle function, demonstrating an acyl-CoA-related mechanism for this complication. PMID:23861731

  7. A Liver-Specific Defect of Acyl-CoA Degradation Produces Hyperammonemia, Hypoglycemia and a Distinct Hepatic Acyl-CoA Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Nicolas; Wu, Jiang Wei; Wang, Shu Pei; Allard, Pierre; Mamer, Orval A.; Sweetman, Lawrence; Moser, Ann B.; Kratz, Lisa; Alvarez, Fernando; Robitaille, Yves; Lépine, François; Mitchell, Grant A.

    2013-01-01

    Most conditions detected by expanded newborn screening result from deficiency of one of the enzymes that degrade acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters in mitochondria. The role of acyl-CoAs in the pathophysiology of these disorders is poorly understood, in part because CoA esters are intracellular and samples are not generally available from human patients. We created a mouse model of one such condition, deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HL), in liver (HLLKO mice). HL catalyses a reaction of ketone body synthesis and of leucine degradation. Chronic HL deficiency and acute crises each produced distinct abnormal liver acyl-CoA patterns, which would not be predictable from levels of urine organic acids and plasma acylcarnitines. In HLLKO hepatocytes, ketogenesis was undetectable. Carboxylation of [2-14C] pyruvate diminished following incubation of HLLKO hepatocytes with the leucine metabolite 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC). HLLKO mice also had suppression of the normal hyperglycemic response to a systemic pyruvate load, a measure of gluconeogenesis. Hyperammonemia and hypoglycemia, cardinal features of many inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism, occurred spontaneously in some HLLKO mice and were inducible by administering KIC. KIC loading also increased levels of several leucine-related acyl-CoAs and reduced acetyl-CoA levels. Ultrastructurally, hepatocyte mitochondria of KIC-treated HLLKO mice show marked swelling. KIC-induced hyperammonemia improved following administration of carglumate (N-carbamyl-L-glutamic acid), which substitutes for the product of an acetyl-CoA-dependent reaction essential for urea cycle function, demonstrating an acyl-CoA-related mechanism for this complication. PMID:23861731

  8. Classification of fungal chitin synthases.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, A R; Chen-Wu, J L; Momany, M; Young, R; Szaniszlo, P J; Robbins, P W

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of the chitin synthase genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHS1 and CHS2 with the Candida albicans CHS1 gene (UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine:chitin 4-beta-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.16) revealed two small regions of complete amino acid sequence conservation that were used to design PCR primers. Fragments homologous to chitin synthase (approximately 600 base pairs) were amplified from the genomic DNA of 14 fungal species. These fragments were sequenced, and their deduced amino acid sequences were aligned. With the exception of S. cerevisiae CHS1, the sequences fell into three distinct classes, which could represent separate functional groups. Within each class phylogenetic analysis was performed. Although not the major purpose of the investigation, this analysis tends to confirm some relationships consistent with current taxonomic groupings. Images PMID:1731323

  9. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, C.; Hadaway, J.; Olczak, G.; Cosentino, J.; Johnston, J.; Whitman, T.; Connolly, M.; Chaney, D.; Knight, J.; Telfer, R.

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  10. Role of CoA and acetyl-CoA in regulating cardiac fatty acid and glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Abo Alrob, Osama; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) and its derivatives have a critical role in regulating cardiac energy metabolism. This includes a key role as a substrate and product in the energy metabolic pathways, as well as serving as an allosteric regulator of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, the CoA ester malonyl-CoA has an important role in regulating fatty acid oxidation, secondary to inhibiting CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial fatty acid uptake. Alterations in malonyl-CoA synthesis by ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and degradation by MCD (malonyl-CoA decarboxylase) are important contributors to the high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, obesity and diabetes. Additional control of fatty acid oxidation may also occur at the level of acetyl-CoA involvement in acetylation of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes. We find that acetylation of the fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes, LCAD (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and β-HAD (β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) is associated with an increase in activity and fatty acid oxidation in heart from obese mice with heart failure. This is associated with decreased SIRT3 (sirtuin 3) activity, an important mitochondrial deacetylase. In support of this, cardiac SIRT3 deletion increases acetylation of LCAD and β-HAD, and increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation. Acetylation of MCD is also associated with increased activity, decreases malonyl-CoA levels and an increase in fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these data suggest that malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA have an important role in mediating the alterations in fatty acid oxidation seen in heart failure. PMID:25110000

  11. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  12. A functional cellulose synthase from ascidian epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Matthysse, Ann G.; Deschet, Karine; Williams, Melanie; Marry, Mazz; White, Alan R.; Smith, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Among animals, urochordates (e.g., ascidians) are unique in their ability to biosynthesize cellulose. In ascidians cellulose is synthesized in the epidermis and incorporated into a protective coat know as the tunic. A putative cellulose synthase-like gene was first identified in the genome sequences of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. We describe here a cellulose synthase gene from the ascidian Ciona savignyi that is expressed in the epidermis. The predicted C. savignyi cellulose synthase amino acid sequence showed conserved features found in all cellulose synthases, including plants, but was most similar to cellulose synthases from bacteria, fungi, and Dictyostelium discoidium. However, unlike other known cellulose synthases, the predicted C. savignyi polypeptide has a degenerate cellulase-like region near the carboxyl-terminal end. An expression construct carrying the C. savignyi cDNA was found to restore cellulose biosynthesis to a cellulose synthase (CelA) minus mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, showing that the predicted protein has cellulose synthase activity. The lack of cellulose biosynthesis in all other groups of metazoans and the similarity of the C. savignyi cellulose synthase to enzymes from cellulose-producing organisms support the hypothesis that the urochordates acquired the cellulose biosynthetic pathway by horizontal transfer. PMID:14722352

  13. Efficient heterocyclisation by (di)terpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Mafu, S; Potter, K C; Hillwig, M L; Schulte, S; Criswell, J; Peters, R J

    2015-09-11

    While cyclic ether forming terpene synthases are known, the basis for such heterocyclisation is unclear. Here it is reported that numerous (di)terpene synthases, particularly including the ancestral ent-kaurene synthase, efficiently produce isomers of manoyl oxide from the stereochemically appropriate substrate. Accordingly, such heterocyclisation is easily accomplished by terpene synthases. Indeed, the use of single residue changes to induce production of the appropriate substrate in the upstream active site leads to efficient bifunctional enzymes producing isomers of manoyl oxide, representing novel enzymatic activity. PMID:26214384

  14. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  15. Replacement of the catalytic nucleophile cysteine-296 by serine in class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mediated synthesis of a new polyester: identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Amara, Amro A; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-09-01

    The class II PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) synthases [PHA(MCL) synthases (medium-chain-length PHA synthases)] are mainly found in pseudomonads and catalyse synthesis of PHA(MCL)s using CoA thioesters of medium-chain-length 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C6-C14) as a substrate. Only recently PHA(MCL) synthases from Pseudomonas oleovorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were purified and in vitro activity was achieved. A threading model of the P. aeruginosa PHA(MCL) synthase PhaC1 was developed based on the homology to the epoxide hydrolase (1ek1) from mouse which belongs to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily. The putative catalytic residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 were replaced by site-specific mutagenesis. In contrast to class I and III PHA synthases, the replacement of His-480, which aligns with the conserved base catalyst of the alpha/beta-hydrolases, with Gln did not affect in vivo enzyme activity and only slightly in vitro enzyme activity. The second conserved histidine His-453 was then replaced by Gln, and the modified enzyme showed only 24% of wild-type in vivo activity, which indicated that His-453 might functionally replace His-480 in class II PHA synthases. Replacement of the postulated catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 by Ser only reduced in vivo enzyme activity to 30% of wild-type enzyme activity and drastically changed substrate specificity. Moreover, the C296S mutation turned the enzyme sensitive towards PMSF inhibition. The replacement of Asp-452 by Asn, which is supposed to be required as general base catalyst for elongation reaction, did abolish enzyme activity as was found for the respective amino acid residue of class I and III enzymes. In the threading model residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 reside in the core structure with the putative catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 localized at the highly conserved gamma-turns of the alpha/beta-hydrolases. Inhibitor studies indicated that catalytic histidines reside in the active site. The conserved

  16. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time. PMID:24849013

  17. {alpha}-Lipoic acid prevents lipotoxic cardiomyopathy in acyl CoA-synthase transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young; Naseem, R. Haris; Park, Byung-Hyun; Garry, Daniel J.; Richardson, James A.; Schaffer, Jean E.; Unger, Roger H. . E-mail: roger.unger@utsouthwestern.edu

    2006-05-26

    {alpha}-Lipoic acid ({alpha}-LA) mimics the hypothalamic actions of leptin on food intake, energy expenditure, and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To determine if, like leptin, {alpha}-LA protects against cardiac lipotoxicity, {alpha}-LA was fed to transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of the acyl CoA synthase (ACS) gene. Untreated ACS-transgenic mice died prematurely with increased triacylglycerol content and dilated cardiomyopathy, impaired systolic function and myofiber disorganization, apoptosis, and interstitial fibrosis on microscopy. In {alpha}-LA-treated ACS-transgenic mice heart size, echocardiogram and TG content were normal. Plasma TG fell 50%, hepatic-activated phospho-AMPK rose 6-fold, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c declined 50%, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} cofactor-1{alpha} mRNA rose 4-fold. Since food restriction did not prevent lipotoxicity, we conclude that {alpha}-LA treatment, like hyperleptinemia, protects the heart of ACS-transgenic mice from lipotoxicity.

  18. Mechanism of allosteric inhibition of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase by L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2009-02-20

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in l-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by l-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with l-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and l-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of l-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by approximately 10 A and decreases its height by approximately 20A(.) AAK dimers move 5A outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by approximately 4 degrees . The NAT domains rotate approximately 109 degrees relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the l-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity. PMID:19095660

  19. Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase by L-Arginine*

    PubMed Central

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2009-01-01

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in l-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by l-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with l-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and l-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of l-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by ∼10 Å and decreases its height by ∼20Å. AAK dimers move 5Å outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by ∼4°. The NAT domains rotate ∼109° relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the l-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity. PMID:19095660

  20. Characterization of cDNA encoding resveratrol synthase and accumulation of resveratrol in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Yeo, Sun Kyung; Lee, Chanhui; Park, Sang Un

    2013-11-01

    Resveratrol synthase (RS) is the key enzyme for biosynthesis of resveratrol which come from coumaroyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and malonyl-CoA. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a RS gene and accumulation of resveratrol in tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum). FtRS was composed of 1173 bp open reading frame and 390 amino acid residues and had a theoretical molecular weight and isoelectric point value of 43.70 kDa and 6.24, respectively. The FtRS expression levels were examined in sprouts and different organs of two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 (T8) and Hokkai T10 (T10). FtRS transcript levels and resveratrol contents were higher under the dark condition compared with light condition. The expression levels of different organs of T10 was not observed significant variations compared to different organs of T8. Interestingly, resveratrol was detected in the sprouts developmental stages, but no resveratrol could not detect in any other organs of both T8 and T10. Therefore, we suggest that the resveratrol content in tartary buckwheat sprouts may be attributed mainly to the dark condition. The characterization of FtRS will be helpful for better understanding of the resveratrol biosynthesis in tartary buckwheat. PMID:24427944

  1. Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase by L-Arginine

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Li; Jin, Zhongmin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2010-01-07

    N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the first committed step in L-arginine biosynthesis in plants and micro-organisms and is subject to feedback inhibition by L-arginine. This study compares the crystal structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) in the inactive T-state with L-arginine bound and in the active R-state complexed with CoA and L-glutamate. Under all of the conditions examined, the enzyme consists of two stacked trimers. Each monomer has two domains: an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain with an AAK-like fold but lacking kinase activity and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain homologous to other GCN5-related transferases. Binding of L-arginine to the AAK domain induces a global conformational change that increases the diameter of the hexamer by {approx}10 {angstrom} and decreases its height by {approx}20{angstrom}. AAK dimers move 5{angstrom} outward along their 2-fold axes, and their tilt relative to the plane of the hexamer decreases by {approx}4{sup o}. The NAT domains rotate {approx}109{sup o} relative to AAK domains enabling new interdomain interactions. Interactions between AAK and NAT domains on different subunits also change. Local motions of several loops at the L-arginine-binding site enable the protein to close around the bound ligand, whereas several loops at the NAT active site become disordered, markedly reducing enzymatic specific activity.

  2. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  3. Nonthermal rotational distribution of CO/A 1Pi/ fragments produced by dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact. [in Mars atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the rotational profiles of specific bands of the CO fourth-positive group (4PG). The CO 4PG bands were excited by electron impact dissociative excitation of CO2. The results are applicable to analysis of the Mariner observations of the CO 4PG in the dayglow of Mars. The results indicate that dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact leads to CO(A 1Pi) fragments with a rotational distribution that is highly nonthermal. The parent CO2 temperature was about 300 K in the experiment, while the fragment CO(A 1Pi) showed emission band profiles consistent with a rotational temperature greater than about 1500 K. Laboratory measurement of the reduced transmission of the hot bands by thermal CO appears to be the most direct way of determining the column density responsible for the CO(v',0) absorption of Mars.

  4. Inhibition of HMG CoA reductase reveals an unexpected role for cholesterol during PGC migration in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiaxi; Jiang, DeChen; Kurczy, Michael; Nalepka, Jennifer; Dudley, Brian; Merkel, Erin I; Porter, Forbes D; Ewing, Andrew G; Winograd, Nicholas; Burgess, James; Molyneaux, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Background Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the embryonic precursors of the sperm and eggs. Environmental or genetic defects that alter PGC development can impair fertility or cause formation of germ cell tumors. Results We demonstrate a novel role for cholesterol during germ cell migration in mice. Cholesterol was measured in living tissue dissected from mouse embryos and was found to accumulate within the developing gonads as germ cells migrate to colonize these structures. Cholesterol synthesis was blocked in culture by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) resulting in germ cell survival and migration defects. These defects were rescued by co-addition of isoprenoids and cholesterol, but neither compound alone was sufficient. In contrast, loss of the last or penultimate enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis did not alter PGC numbers or position in vivo. However embryos that lack these enzymes do not exhibit cholesterol defects at the stage at which PGCs are migrating. This demonstrates that during gestation, the cholesterol required for PGC migration can be supplied maternally. Conclusion In the mouse, cholesterol is required for PGC survival and motility. It may act cell-autonomously by regulating clustering of growth factor receptors within PGCs or non cell-autonomously by controlling release of growth factors required for PGC guidance and survival. PMID:19117526

  5. Impact of single-dose nandrolone decanoate on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gårevik, N; Börjesson, A; Choong, E; Ekström, L; Lehtihet, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to study the effect and time profile of a single dose of nandrolone decanoate (ND) on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase [3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR)] in healthy men. Eleven healthy male participants aged 29-46 years were given a single dose of 150 mg ND as an intramuscular dose of Deca Durabol®, Organon. Blood samples for sex hormones, lipids and HMGCR mRNA analysis were collected prior to ND administration day 0, 4 and 14. A significant suppression of luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was seen after 4 days. Total testosterone and bioavailable testosterone level decreased significantly throughout the observed study period. A small but significant decrease in sexual hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was seen after 4 days but not after 14 days. Total serum (S)-cholesterol and plasma (P)-apolipoprotein B (ApoB) increased significantly after 14 days. In 80% of the individuals, the HMGCR mRNA level was increased 4 days after the ND administration. Our results show that a single dose of 150 mg ND increases (1) HMGCR mRNA expression, (2) total S-cholesterol and (3) P-ApoB level. The long-term consequences on cardiovascular risk that may appear in users remain to be elucidated. PMID:26370185

  6. The prenyltransferase UBIAD1 is the target of geranylgeraniol in degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Marc M; Elsabrouty, Rania; Seemann, Joachim; Jo, Youngah; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder in humans characterized by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in the cornea. SCD-associated mutations have been identified in the gene encoding UBIAD1, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K2. Here, we show that sterols stimulate binding of UBIAD1 to the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMG CoA reductase, which is subject to sterol-accelerated, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol through an unknown mechanism. Geranylgeraniol inhibits binding of UBIAD1 to reductase, allowing its degradation and promoting transport of UBIAD1 from the ER to the Golgi. CRISPR-CAS9-mediated knockout of UBIAD1 relieves the geranylgeraniol requirement for reductase degradation. SCD-associated mutations in UBIAD1 block its displacement from reductase in the presence of geranylgeraniol, thereby preventing degradation of reductase. The current results identify UBIAD1 as the elusive target of geranylgeraniol in reductase degradation, the inhibition of which may contribute to accumulation of cholesterol in SCD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05560.001 PMID:25742604

  7. Application of reverse-phase HPLC to quantify oligopeptide acetylation eliminates interference from unspecific acetyl CoA hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Evjenth, Rune; Hole, Kristine; Ziegler, Mathias; Lillehaug, Johan R

    2009-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a common modification that plays a central role in several cellular processes. The most widely used methods to study these modifications are either based on the detection of radioactively acetylated oligopetide products or an enzyme-coupled reaction measuring conversion of the acetyl donor acetyl CoA to the product CoASH. Due to several disadvantages of these methods, we designed a new method to study oligopeptide acetylation. Based on reverse phase HPLC we detect both reaction products in a highly robust and reproducible way. The method reported here is also fully compatible with subsequent product analysis, e.g. by mass spectroscopy. The catalytic subunit, hNaa30p, of the human NatC protein N-acetyltransferase complex was used for N-terminal oligopeptide acetylation. We show that unacetylated and acetylated oligopeptides can be efficiently separated and quantified by the HPLC-based analysis. The method is highly reproducible and enables reliable quantification of both substrates and products. It is therefore well-suited to determine kinetic parameters of acetyltransferases. PMID:19660098

  8. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of Malonyl CoA Decarboxylase Does Not Exacerbate Age-Related Insulin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ussher, John R; Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Zhang, Liyan; Mori, Jun; Sidhu, Vaninder K; Fukushima, Arata; Gopal, Keshav; Lopaschuk, David G; Wagg, Cory S; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Dyck, Jason R B; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-07-01

    Aging is associated with the development of chronic diseases such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A reduction in mitochondrial fat oxidation is postulated to be a key factor contributing to the progression of these diseases. Our aim was to investigate the contribution of impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation toward age-related disease. Mice deficient for malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD(-/-)), a mouse model of reduced fat oxidation, were allowed to age while life span and a number of physiological parameters (glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, indirect calorimetry) were assessed. Decreased fat oxidation in MCD(-/-) mice resulted in the accumulation of lipid intermediates in peripheral tissues, but this was not associated with a worsening of age-associated insulin resistance and, conversely, improved longevity. This improvement was associated with reduced oxidative stress and reduced acetylation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2 in muscle but not the liver of MCD(-/-) mice. These findings were recapitulated in aged mice treated with an MCD inhibitor (CBM-3001106), and these mice also demonstrated improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance. Therefore, our results demonstrate that in addition to decreasing fat oxidation, MCD inhibition also has novel effects on protein acetylation. These combined effects protect against age-related metabolic dysfunction, demonstrating that MCD inhibitors may have utility in the battle against chronic disease in the elderly. PMID:27207536

  9. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  10. Statins inhibit insulin-like growth factor action in first trimester placenta by altering insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Karen; Shah, Vinit K; Siddals, Kirk; Gibson, J Martin; Aplin, John D; Westwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes is one of the major healthcare problems of the Western world. Affected individuals are often treated with statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A [HMG CoA] reductase inhibitors) to reduce circulating cholesterol levels and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease; given the evolving demographic profile of these conditions, such drugs are increasingly prescribed to women of reproductive age. We have previously shown that exposure of placental tissue to statins inhibits the action of insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II which are key regulators of trophoblast proliferation and placental development. N-linked glycans in the IGF receptor, IGF1R, influence its presentation at the cell surface. This study aimed to determine whether statins, which are known to affect N-glycosylation, modulate IGF1R function in placenta. Treatment of first trimester villous tissue explants with statins (pravastatin or cerivastatin) or inhibitors of N-glycosylation (tunicamycin, deoxymannojirimycin or castanospermine) altered receptor distribution in trophoblast and attenuated proliferation induced by IGF-I or IGF-II (Ki67; P < 0.05, n = 5). Decreased binding of Phaseolus vulgaris lectin and phytohaemagglutinin to IGF1R immunoprecipitated from treated explants demonstrated reduced levels of complex N-linked glycans. Co-incubation of tissue explants with statins and farnesyl pyrophosphate (which increases the supply of dolichol intermediates), prevented statin-mediated disruption of IGF1R localization and reversed the negative effect on IGF-mediated trophoblast proliferation. These data suggest that statins attenuate IGF actions in the placenta by inhibiting N-linked glycosylation and subsequent expression of mature IGF1R at the placental cell surface. PMID:25304981

  11. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites. PMID:27147449

  12. Simvastatin enhances hippocampal long-term potentiation in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Mans, Robert A.; Chowdhury, Nazma; Cao, Dongfeng; McMahon, Lori L.; Li, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA), the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, and they are widely used to control plasma cholesterol levels and prevent cardiovascular disease. However, emerging evidence indicates that the beneficial effects of statins extend to the central nervous system. Statins have been shown to improve the outcome of stroke and traumatic brain injury, and statin use has been associated with a reduced prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia. However, prospective studies with statins in AD have produced mixed results. Recently, we reported that simvastatin, a widely used statin in humans, enhances learning and memory in non-transgenic mice as well as in transgenic mice with AD-like pathology on a mixed genetic background. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of simvastatin on learning and memory remain elusive. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of acute simvastatin treatment on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular model of learning and memory, in brain slices from C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrate that a prolonged in vitro simvastatin treatment for 2-4 hrs, but not a short-term 20-min exposure, significantly increases the magnitude of LTP at CA3-CA1 synapses without altering basal synaptic transmission or the paired-pulse facilitation ratio in hippocampal slices. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B) is increased significantly in the CA1 region following 2-hour treatment with simvastatin, and that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation suppresses the simvastatin-induced enhancement of LTP. These findings suggest activation of Akt as a molecular pathway for augmented hippocampal LTP by simvastatin treatment, and implicate enhancement of hippocampal LTP as a potential cellular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of simvastatin on cognitive function. PMID

  13. Essential Role of TGF-β/Smad Pathway on Statin Dependent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Sánchez-Galán, Eva; Santamaría, Beatriz; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luís Miguel; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Background The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins) exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-β/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. Methodology In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-β. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-β receptor type II (TRII), and increased TGF-β synthesis and TGF-β/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-β induced apoptosis and increased TGF-β-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-β/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. Conclusions Statins enhance TGF-β/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-β/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs. PMID:19088845

  14. Cyclooxygenase inhibition and rosuvastatin-induced vascular protection in the setting of ischemia-reperfusion: A human in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Wilson; Liuni, Andrew; Zhou, Kangbin; Parker, John D

    2015-08-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase inhibitors have preconditioning effects involving up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. We investigated the effect of selective and non-selective COX inhibition on rosuvastatin-mediated protection against ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced endothelial dysfunction in the human forearm. Healthy volunteers (n=66) were allocated to placebo, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 81mg daily, ASA 325mg daily, celecoxib 200mg twice daily or 400mg ibuprofen four times daily, each administered for 5 to 7days. On the last day of study drug therapy, subjects received a single dose of 40mg rosuvastatin. Twenty-four hours later flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the radial artery was evaluated before and after IR. In the placebo group, FMD was similar before and after IR (8.1±1.0 vs 7.2±0.8%; P=NS) indicating a significant protective effect of rosuvastatin. There was also no effect of IR on FMD in the ASA 81mg group (6.7±0.6 vs 6.1±0.7%; P=NS). In contrast, following IR there was a significant decrease in FMD in the ASA 325mg group (7.2±0.8 vs 3.3±0.7%, P<0.001), the celecoxib group (7.3±1.5 vs 2.6±1.5%, P<0.01) as well as the ibuprofen group (6.8±0.7 vs 2.6±0.8%; P<0.01). Therefore, nonselective COX inhibition with ASA 325mg and ibuprofen completely inhibit the protective effects of rosuvastatin in the setting of IR injury, as does therapy with the specific COX-2 antagonist celecoxib. In contrast, therapy with low dose ASA (81mg daily) does not have such inhibitory effects. PMID:25869511

  15. HMG-CoA lyase (HL) gene: Cloning and characterization of the 5{prime} end of the mouse gene, gene targeting in ES cells, and demonstration of large deletions in three HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme which catalyzes the last step of leucine catabolism and of ketogenesis. Autosomal recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoglycemia and coma. We are interested in the pathophysiology of HL deficiency as a model for both amino acid and fatty acid inborn errors. We have cloned the human and mouse HL genes. In order to analyze the 5{prime} nontranslated region of mouse HL gene, we cloned and sequenced a 1.8 kb fragment containing the 5{prime} extremity including exon 1 and about 1.6 kb of 5{prime} nontranslated sequence. The region surrounding exon 1 is CpG-rich (66.4%). Using the criteria of West, the Observed/Expected ratio for CpG dinucleotides is 0.7 ({ge}0.6 is consistent with a CpG island). We are carrying out primer extension and RNase protection experiments to determine the transcription initiation site. We constructed a gene targeting vector by introducing the neomycin resistance gene into exon 2 of a 7.5 kb genomic subclone of the mouse HL gene. Targeting was performed by electroporating 10 mg linearized vector into 10{sup 7} ES cells and selecting for 12 days with G418. 5/228 colonies (2.2%) had homologous recombination as shown by PCR screening and Southern analysis. We are microinjecting the 5 targeted clones into blastocysts to create an HL-deficient mouse. To date we have obtained two chimeras with contributions of 95% and 55% from 129, by coat color estimates. Three of 27 (11%) of the HL-deficient patients studied were suggested by genomic Southern analysis to be homozygous for large intragenic deletions. We confirmed this and defined the boundaries using exonic PCR.

  16. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  17. Dolichol: A Component of the Cellular Antioxidant Machinery.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Gabriella; Sgarbossa, Antonella; Parentini, Ilaria; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Donati, Alessio; Lenci, Francesco; Bergamini, Ettore

    2016-04-01

    Dolichol, an end product of the mevalonate pathway, has been proposed as a biomarker of aging, but its biological role, not to mention its catabolism, has not been fully understood. UV-B radiation was used to induce oxidative stress in isolated rat hepatocytes by the collagenase method. Effects on dolichol, phospholipid-bound polyunsaturated fatty acids (PL-PUFA) and known lipid soluble antioxidants [coenzyme Q (CoQ) and α-tocopherol] were studied. The increase in oxidative stress was detected by a probe sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Peroxidation of lipids was assessed by measuring the release of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Dolichol, CoQ, and α-tocopherol were assessed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), PL-PUFA by gas-liquid chromatography (GC). UV-B radiation caused an immediate increase in ROS as well as lipid peroxidation and a simultaneous decrease in the levels of dolichol and lipid soluble antioxidants. Decrease in dolichol paralleled changes in CoQ levels and was smaller to that in α-tocopherol. The addition of mevinolin, a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoAR), magnified the loss of dolichol and was associated with an increase in TBARS production. Changes in PL-PUFA were minor. These findings highlight that oxidative stress has very early and similar effects on dolichol and lipid soluble antioxidants. Lower levels of dolichol are associated with enhanced peroxidation of lipids, which suggest that dolichol may have a protective role in the antioxidant machinery of cell membranes and perhaps be a key to understanding some adverse effects of statin therapy. PMID:26968401

  18. Guar gum effects on plasma low-density lipoprotein and hepatic cholesterol metabolism in guinea pigs fed low- and high-cholesterol diets: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M L; Sun, D M; Tosca, M; McNamara, D J

    1995-01-01

    Guinea pigs were fed semipurified diets containing either 0% or 12.5% guar gum (GG) with 0.04% cholesterol or increasing concentrations of GG (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 12.5%) with 0.25% cholesterol (by wt). Compared to the 0% GG diet with 0.04% cholesterol, intake of the 12.5% GG diet with 0.04% cholesterol lowered plasma low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations, the ratio of LDL cholesteryl ester to protein, hepatic cholesterol concentrations, and the activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), and increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase activity and hepatic apo B/E receptor number (P < 0.01). Intake of GG by animals fed 0.25% cholesterol diets resulted in modest effects on hepatic cholesterol pools and plasma LDL concentrations; however, significant negative correlations were found between both plasma LDL cholesterol and hepatic free cholesterol concentrations with the amount of dietary GG (P < 0.05). Hepatic HMG-CoA reductase was suppressed by the 0.25% cholesterol intake, and GG did not reverse this suppression. In contrast, ACAT activity was negatively correlated with the amount of dietary GG (P < 0.05), and GG intake increased the number of hepatic apo B/E receptors at all intakes with the 0.25% cholesterol diets. These results demonstrate that intake of GG significantly alters endogenous cholesterol metabolism by decreasing hepatic cholesterol pools, altering hepatic cholesterol homeostasis, and reducing plasma LDL concentrations. PMID:7825524

  19. Low-density lipoprotein as a potential vehicle for chemotherapeutic agents and radionucleotides in the management of gynecologic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, D.; Ohashi, M.; MacDonald, P.C.; Buchsbaum, H.J.; Simpson, E.R.

    1981-04-15

    Cholesterol metabolism was studied in cells from two established gynecologic cancer cell lines which were maintained in monolayer cultures. The cell lines were derived and established from poorly differentiated epidermoid cervical carcinoma (EC-50) and endometrial adenocarcinoma (AC-258). The specific activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol de novo synthesis, in AC-258 cells (1700 pmoles x mg-1 microsomal protein x min-1) was three times higher than that found in EC-50 cells (550 pmoles x mg-1 microsomal protein x min-1). However, epidermoid cervical cancer cells (EC-50) metabolized low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the major transport vehicle for cholesterol in plasma, at a very high rate (14,000 ng x mg-1 cell protein x 6 hours). This rate is fifteen times greater than the rate observed in fetal adrenal tissue and fifty times greater than the rate observed in nonneoplastic gynecologic tissue, each in organ culture. Both cancer cells (EC-50 and AC-258) in monolayer culture were shown to have specific receptors for LDL. These cancer cells demonstrate no defect in LDL metabolism, and lysosomal degradation of LDL was blocked by chloroquine. From the results of studies of specific binding of LDL in tissues obtained from nude mice it was demonstrated that membrane fractions prepared from EC-50 cells, after propagation in the mice, contained fifteen to thirty times more specific binding capacity for (125I)iodo-LDL than vital organs of the mouse, such as the liver, heart, lung, kidney, or brain. The results of these studies are suggestive that certain tumor cells might have a higher affinity for LDL than normal tissues and cytotoxic drugs or radionucleotides ligated to the LDL macromolecule may be utilized for the specific delivery of these agents.

  20. Metabolic cross-talk between pathways of terpenoid backbone biosynthesis in spike lavender.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Arrillaga, Isabel

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in developing spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med) was analyzed using specific inhibitors and on the basis of (13)C-labeling experiments. The presence of mevinolin (MEV), an inhibitor of the MVA pathway, at concentrations higher than 0.5 μM significantly reduced plant development, but not the synthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids. On the other hand, fosmidomycin (FSM), an inhibitor of the MEP pathway, at concentrations higher than 20 μM blocked the synthesis of chlorophyll, carotenoids and essential oils, and significantly reduced stem development. Notably, 1.2 mM MVA could recover the phenotype of MEV-treated plants, including the normal growth and development of roots, and could partially restore the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments and, to a lesser extent, of the essential oils in plantlets treated with FSM. Spike lavender shoot apices were also used in (13)C-labeling experiments, where the plantlets were grown in the presence of [U-(13)C6]glucose. GC-MS-analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. However, on the basis of the isotopologue profiles, a minor contribution of the MVA pathway was evident that was increased in transgenic spike lavender plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first enzyme of the MVA pathway. Together, these findings provide evidence for a transport of MVA-derived precursors from the cytosol to the plastids in leaves of spike lavender. PMID:26254184

  1. Leucine-684: A conserved residue of an AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AceCS) from Leishmania donovani is involved in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Neelagiri; Tandan, Hitendra; Damre, Mangesh V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Singh, Sushma

    2016-04-15

    AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AMP-AceCS) is a key enzyme which catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl CoA, an important intermediate at the cross roads of various anabolic and catabolic pathways. Multiple sequence alignment of Leishmania donovani AceCS with other organisms revealed the presence of a highly conserved leucine residue at 684 position which is known to be crucial for acetylation by protein acetyl transferases in other organisms. In an attempt to understand the role of leucine residue at 684 position in L. donovani acetyl CoA synthetase (LdAceCS), it was mutated to proline (P) by site directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis of the L684P-LdAceCS mutant revealed approximately two fold increased binding affinity with acetate, whereas fivefold decreased affinity was observed with ATP. There was insignificant change in secondary structure as revealed by CD however, two fold decreased fluorescence intensity was observed at an emission maxima of 340nm. Interestingly, L684P mutation abolished the acetylation of the mutant enzyme indicating the importance of L684 in acetylation of the enzyme. Changes in biochemical parameters of the mutant protein were validated by homology modeling of the wild type and mutant LdAceCS enzyme using Salmonella enterica AceCS crystal structure as template. Our data provides evidence for the role of leucine 684 residue in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation of the AceCS enzyme. PMID:26794803

  2. CRP Is an Activator of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation that Operates via a Mechanism Involving gmhA and waaAE-coaD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Fang, Haihong; Yang, Huiying; Zhang, Yiquan; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2016-01-01

    gmhA encodes a phosphoheptose isomerase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of heptose, a conserved component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GmhA plays an important role in Yersinia pestis biofilm blockage in the flea gut. waaA, waaE, and coaD constitute a three-gene operon waaAE-coaD in Y. pestis. waaA encodes a transferase that is responsible for binding lipid-A to the core oligosaccharide of LPS. WaaA is a key determinant in Y. pestis biofilm formation, and the waaA expression is positively regulated by the two-component regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ. WaaE is involved in LPS modification and is necessary for Y. pestis biofilm production. In this study, the biofilm-related phenotypic assays indicate that the global regulator CRP stimulates Y. pestis biofilm formation in vitro and on nematodes, while it has no regulatory effect on the biosynthesis of the biofilm-signaling molecular 3',5'-cyclic diguanosine monophosphate. Further gene regulation experiments disclose that CRP does not regulate the hms genes at the transcriptional level but directly promotes the gmhA transcription and indirectly activates the waaAE-coaD transcription through directly acting on phoPQ-YPO1632. Thus, it is speculated that CRP-mediated carbon catabolite regulation of Y. pestis biofilm formation depends on the CRP-dependent carbon source metabolic pathways of the biosynthesis, modification, and transportation of biofilm exopolysaccharide. PMID:27014218

  3. [The protective effect of pantothenic acid derivatives and changes in the system of acetyl CoA metabolism in acute ethanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Moiseenok, A G; Dorofeev, B F; Omel'ianchik, S N

    1988-01-01

    Calcium pantothenate (CaP), calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CaPP), pantethine, panthenol, sulfopantetheine and CoA decrease acute toxicity of acetaldehyde in mice. All studied compounds diminish duration of the narcotic action of ethanol--ET (3.5 g/kg intraperitoneally) in mice and rats. In the latter this effect is realized at the expense of "long sleeping" and "middle sleeping" animals. CaP (150 mg/kg subcutaneously) and CaPP (100 mg/kg subcutaneously) prevent hypothermia and a decrease of oxygen consumption in rats induced by ET administration. Combined administration of ET, CaP and CaPP leads to a characteristic increase of acid-soluble CoA fractions in the rat liver and a relative decrease of acetyl CoA synthetase and N-acetyltransferase reactions. The antitoxic effect of preparations of pantothenic acid is not mediated by CoA-dependent reactions of detoxication, but most probably is due to intensification of ET oxidation and perhaps to its elimination from the organism. PMID:2905277

  4. Effects of farnesyl pyrophosphate accumulation on calvarial osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Weivoda, Megan M; Hohl, Raymond J

    2011-08-01

    Statins, drugs commonly used to lower serum cholesterol, have been shown to stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the first step of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway, leading to the depletion of the isoprenoids farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The effects of statins on bone have previously been attributed to the depletion of GGPP, because the addition of exogenous GGPP prevented statin-stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro. However, in a recent report, we demonstrated that the specific depletion of GGPP did not stimulate but, in fact, inhibited osteoblast differentiation. This led us to hypothesize that isoprenoids upstream of GGPP play a role in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation. We demonstrate here that the expression of HMGCR and FPP synthase decreased during primary calvarial osteoblast differentiation, correlating with decreased FPP and GGPP levels during differentiation. Zaragozic acid (ZGA) inhibits the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway enzyme squalene synthase, leading to an accumulation of the squalene synthase substrate FPP. ZGA treatment of calvarial osteoblasts led to a significant increase in intracellular FPP and resulted in inhibition of osteoblast differentiation as measured by osteoblastic gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, and matrix mineralization. Simultaneous HMGCR inhibition prevented the accumulation of FPP and restored osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, specifically inhibiting GGPPS to lower the ZGA-induced increase in GGPP did not restore osteoblast differentiation. The specificity of HMGCR inhibition to restore osteoblast differentiation of ZGA-treated cultures through the reduction in isoprenoid accumulation was confirmed with the addition of exogenous mevalonate. Similar to ZGA treatment, exogenous FPP inhibited the mineralization of primary calvarial osteoblasts

  5. [Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factories for lycopene production].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming-Yu; Liu Yi; Wang, Dong; Lu, Fu-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi; Dai, Zhu-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Li

    2014-10-01

    For microbial production of lycopene, the lycopene synthetic genes from Pantoea agglomerans were integrated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742, to obtain strain ZD-L-000 for production of 0.17 mg · L(-1) lycopene. Improving supplies of isoprenoid precursors was then investigated for increasing lycopene production. Four key genes were chosen to be overexpressed, inclu- ding truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene (tHMG1), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, a mutated global regulatory factor gene (upc2.1), a fusion gene of FPP synthase (ERG20) and endogenous GGPP synthase (BTS1), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway, and GGPP synthase gene (SaGGPS) from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Over-expression of upc2.1 could not improve lycopene production, while over-expression of tHMGI , BTS1-ERG20 and SaGGPS genes led to 2-, 16. 9- and20. 5-fold increase of lycopene production, respectively. In addition, three effective genes, tHMG1, BTS1-ERG20 and SaGGPS, were integrated into rDNA sites of ZD-L-000, resulting in strain ZD-L-201 for production of 13.23 mg · L(-1) lycopene, which was 77-fold higher than that of the parent strain. Finally, two-phase extractive fermentation was performed. The titer of lycopene increased 10-fold to 135.21 mg · L(-1). The engineered yeast strains obtained in this work provided the basis for fermentative production of lycopene. PMID:25751950

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, D; Marino, M H

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is involved in acute and chronic inflammatory events. In view of the complexity associated with the inflammatory response, the dissection of possible mechanisms by which NO modulates this response will be profitable in designing novel and more efficacious NOS inhibitors. In this review we describe the consequences associated with the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and its therapeutic implications. PMID:15991919

  7. Unique animal prenyltransferase with monoterpene synthase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilg, Anna B.; Tittiger, Claus; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2009-06-01

    Monoterpenes are structurally diverse natural compounds that play an essential role in the chemical ecology of a wide array of organisms. A key enzyme in monoterpene biosynthesis is geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS). GPPS is an isoprenyl diphosphate synthase that catalyzes a single electrophilic condensation reaction between dimethylallyl diphosphate (C5) and isopentenyl diphosphate (C5) to produce geranyl diphosphate (GDP; C10). GDP is the universal precursor to all monoterpenes. Subsequently, monoterpene synthases are responsible for the transformation of GDP to a variety of acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic monoterpene products. In pheromone-producing male Ips pini bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), the acyclic monoterpene myrcene is required for the production of the major aggregation pheromone component, ipsdienol. Here, we report monoterpene synthase activity associated with GPPS of I. pini. Enzyme assays were performed on recombinant GPPS to determine the presence of monoterpene synthase activity, and the reaction products were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The functionally expressed recombinant enzyme produced both GDP and myrcene, making GPPS of I. pini a bifunctional enzyme. This unique insect isoprenyl diphosphate synthase possesses the functional plasticity that is characteristic of terpene biosynthetic enzymes of plants, contributing toward the current understanding of product specificity of the isoprenoid pathway.

  8. Ceramide synthases in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Futerman, Anthony H; Casas, Josefina

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism consists of multiple metabolic pathways that converge upon ceramide, one of the key molecules among sphingolipids (SLs). In mammals, ceramide synthesis occurs via N-acylation of sphingoid backbones, dihydrosphingosine (dhSo) or sphingosine (So). The reaction is catalyzed by ceramide synthases (CerS), a family of enzymes with six different isoforms, with each one showing specificity towards a restricted group of acyl-CoAs, thus producing ceramides (Cer) and dihydroceramides (dhCer) with different fatty acid chain lengths. A large body of evidence documents the role of both So and dhSo as bioactive molecules, as well as the involvement of dhCer and Cer in physiological and pathological processes. In particular, the fatty acid composition of Cer has different effects in cell biology and in the onset and progression of different diseases. Therefore, modulation of CerS activity represents an attractive target in biomedical research and in finding new treatment modalities. In this review, we discuss functional, structural and biochemical features of CerS and examine CerS inhibitors that are currently available. PMID:26248326

  9. Mutation analysis of methylmalonyl CoA mutase gene exon 2 in Egyptian families: Identification of 25 novel allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraba, Dina A.; Mohammed, Magdy M.; Zaki, Osama K.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of methylmalonate and cobalamin (cbl; vitamin B12) metabolism. It is an inborn error of organic acid metabolism which commonly results from a defect in the gene encoding the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) apoenzyme. Here we report the results of mutation study of exon 2 of the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MUT) gene, coding MCM residues from 1 to 128, in ten unrelated Egyptian families affected with methylmalonic aciduria. Patients were presented with a wide-anion gap metabolic acidosis. The diagnosis has established by the measurement of C3 (propionylcarnitine) and C3:C2 (propionylcarnitine/acetylcarnitine) in blood by using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS–MS) and was confirmed by the detection of an abnormally elevated level of methylmalonic acid in urine by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and isocratic cation exchange high-performance liquid-chromatography (HPLC). Direct sequencing of gDNA of the MUT gene exon 2 has revealed a total of 26 allelic variants: ten of which were intronic, eight were located upstream to the exon 2 coding region, four were novel modifications predicted to affect the splicing region, three were novel mutations within the coding region: c.15G > A (p.K5K), c.165C > A (p.N55K) and c.7del (p.R3EfsX14), as well as the previously reported mutation c.323G > A (p.R108H). PMID:25750861

  10. The tomato terpene synthase gene family.

    PubMed

    Falara, Vasiliki; Akhtar, Tariq A; Nguyen, Thuong T H; Spyropoulou, Eleni A; Bleeker, Petra M; Schauvinhold, Ines; Matsuba, Yuki; Bonini, Megan E; Schilmiller, Anthony L; Last, Robert L; Schuurink, Robert C; Pichersky, Eran

    2011-10-01

    Compounds of the terpenoid class play numerous roles in the interactions of plants with their environment, such as attracting pollinators and defending the plant against pests. We show here that the genome of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains 44 terpene synthase (TPS) genes, including 29 that are functional or potentially functional. Of these 29 TPS genes, 26 were expressed in at least some organs or tissues of the plant. The enzymatic functions of eight of the TPS proteins were previously reported, and here we report the specific in vitro catalytic activity of 10 additional tomato terpene synthases. Many of the tomato TPS genes are found in clusters, notably on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, and 10. All TPS family clades previously identified in angiosperms are also present in tomato. The largest clade of functional TPS genes found in tomato, with 12 members, is the TPS-a clade, and it appears to encode only sesquiterpene synthases, one of which is localized to the mitochondria, while the rest are likely cytosolic. A few additional sesquiterpene synthases are encoded by TPS-b clade genes. Some of the tomato sesquiterpene synthases use z,z-farnesyl diphosphate in vitro as well, or more efficiently than, the e,e-farnesyl diphosphate substrate. Genes encoding monoterpene synthases are also prevalent, and they fall into three clades: TPS-b, TPS-g, and TPS-e/f. With the exception of two enzymes involved in the synthesis of ent-kaurene, the precursor of gibberellins, no other tomato TPS genes could be demonstrated to encode diterpene synthases so far. PMID:21813655

  11. Terpene synthases are widely distributed in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuuki; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Komatsu, Mamoru; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Omura, Satoshi; Cane, David E.; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Odoriferous terpene metabolites of bacterial origin have been known for many years. In genome-sequenced Streptomycetaceae microorganisms, the vast majority produces the degraded sesquiterpene alcohol geosmin. Two minor groups of bacteria do not produce geosmin, with one of these groups instead producing other sesquiterpene alcohols, whereas members of the remaining group do not produce any detectable terpenoid metabolites. Because bacterial terpene synthases typically show no significant overall sequence similarity to any other known fungal or plant terpene synthases and usually exhibit relatively low levels of mutual sequence similarity with other bacterial synthases, simple correlation of protein sequence data with the structure of the cyclized terpene product has been precluded. We have previously described a powerful search method based on the use of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and protein families database (Pfam) search that has allowed the discovery of monoterpene synthases of bacterial origin. Using an enhanced set of HMM parameters generated using a training set of 140 previously identified bacterial terpene synthase sequences, a Pfam search of 8,759,463 predicted bacterial proteins from public databases and in-house draft genome data has now revealed 262 presumptive terpene synthases. The biochemical function of a considerable number of these presumptive terpene synthase genes could be determined by expression in a specially engineered heterologous Streptomyces host and spectroscopic identification of the resulting terpene products. In addition to a wide variety of terpenes that had been previously reported from fungal or plant sources, we have isolated and determined the complete structures of 13 previously unidentified cyclic sesquiterpenes and diterpenes. PMID:25535391

  12. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. PMID:26315778

  13. Nicotiana benthamiana as a Production Platform for Artemisinin Precursors

    PubMed Central

    van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.; Cankar, Katarina; Nogueira, Marilise; Bosch, Dirk; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Beekwilder, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Background Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration. The first committed precursor of artemisinin, amorpha-4,11-diene, was produced upon infiltration of a construct containing amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, accompanied by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Amorpha-4,11-diene was detected both in extracts and in the headspace of the N. benthamiana leaves. When the amorphadiene oxidase CYP71AV1 was co-infiltrated with the amorphadiene-synthesizing construct, the amorpha-4,11-diene levels strongly decreased, suggesting it was oxidized. Surprisingly, no anticipated oxidation products, such as artemisinic acid, were detected upon GC-MS analysis. However, analysis of leaf extracts with a non-targeted metabolomics approach, using LC-QTOF-MS, revealed the presence of another compound, which was identified as artemisinic acid-12-β-diglucoside. This compound accumulated to 39.5 mg.kg−1 fwt. Apparently the product of the heterologous pathway that was introduced, artemisinic acid, is further metabolized efficiently by glycosyl transferases that are endogenous to N. benthamiana. Conclusion/Significance This work shows that agroinfiltration of N. bentamiana can be used as a model to study the production of sesquiterpenoid pharmaceutical compounds. The interaction between the ectopically introduced pathway and the endogenous metabolism of the plant is discussed. PMID:21151979

  14. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  15. Aromatic Polyketide Synthases (Purification, Characterization, and Antibody Development to Benzalacetone Synthase from Raspberry Fruits).

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, W.; Hrazdina, G.

    1996-01-01

    p-Hydroxyphenylbutan-2-one, the characteristic aroma compound of raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.), is synthesized from p-coumaryl-coenzyme A and malonyl-coenzyme A in a two-step reaction sequence that is catalyzed by benzalacetone synthase and benzalacetone reductase (W. Borejsza-Wysocki and G. Hrazdina [1994] Phytochemistry 35: 623-628). Benzalacetone synthase condenses one malonate with p-coumarate to form the pathway intermediate p-hydroxyphenylbut-3-ene-2-one (p-hydroxybenzalacetone) in a reaction that is similar to those catalyzed by chalcone and stilbene synthases. We have obtained an enzyme preparation from ripe raspberries that was preferentially enriched in benzalacetone synthase (approximately 170-fold) over chalcone synthase (approximately 14-fold) activity. This preparation was used to characterize benzalacetone synthase and to develop polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Benzalacetone synthase showed similarity in its molecular properties to chalcone synthase but differed distinctly in its substrate specificity, response to 2-mercaptoethanol and ethylene glycol, and induction in cell-suspension cultures. The product of the enzyme, p-hydroxybenzalacetone, inhibited mycelial growth of the raspberry pathogen Phytophthora fragariae var rubi at 250 [mu]M. We do not know whether the dual activity in the benzalacetone synthase preparation is the result of a bifunctional enzyme or is caused by contamination with chalcone synthase that was also present. The rapid induction of the enzyme in cell-suspension cultures upon addition of yeast extract and the toxicity of its product, p-hydroxybenzalacetone, to phytopathogenic fungi also suggest that the pathway may be part of a plant defense response. PMID:12226219

  16. Distribution of Callose Synthase, Cellulose Synthase, and Sucrose Synthase in Tobacco Pollen Tube Is Controlled in Dissimilar Ways by Actin Filaments and Microtubules1[W

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Giampiero; Faleri, Claudia; Del Casino, Cecilia; Emons, Anne Mie C.; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Callose and cellulose are fundamental components of the cell wall of pollen tubes and are probably synthesized by distinct enzymes, callose synthase and cellulose synthase, respectively. We examined the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes in relation to the dynamics of actin filaments, microtubules, and the endomembrane system using specific antibodies to highly conserved peptide sequences. The role of the cytoskeleton and membrane flow was investigated using specific inhibitors (latrunculin B, 2,3-butanedione monoxime, taxol, oryzalin, and brefeldin A). Both enzymes are associated with the plasma membrane, but cellulose synthase is present along the entire length of pollen tubes (with a higher concentration at the apex) while callose synthase is located in the apex and in distal regions. In longer pollen tubes, callose synthase accumulates consistently around callose plugs, indicating its involvement in plug synthesis. Actin filaments and endomembrane dynamics are critical for the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase, showing that enzymes are transported through Golgi bodies and/or vesicles moving along actin filaments. Conversely, microtubules appear to be critical in the positioning of callose synthase in distal regions and around callose plugs. In contrast, cellulose synthases are only partially coaligned with cortical microtubules and unrelated to callose plugs. Callose synthase also comigrates with tubulin by Blue Native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Membrane sucrose synthase, which expectedly provides UDP-glucose to callose synthase and cellulose synthase, binds to actin filaments depending on sucrose concentration; its distribution is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system but not on microtubules. PMID:21205616

  17. An investigation into eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    King, Ross D; Lu, Chuan

    2014-08-01

    A common post-transcriptional modification of RNA is the conversion of uridine to its isomer pseudouridine. We investigated the biological significance of eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We conducted a comprehensive statistical analysis on growth data from automated perturbation (gene deletion) experiments, and used bi-logistic curve analysis to characterise the yeast phenotypes. The deletant strains displayed different alteration in growth properties, including in some cases enhanced growth and/or biphasic growth curves not seen in wild-type strains under matched conditions. These results demonstrate that disrupting pseudouridine synthases can have a significant qualitative effect on growth. We further investigated the significance of post-transcriptional pseudouridine modification through investigation of the scientific literature. We found that (1) In Toxoplasma gondii, a pseudouridine synthase gene is critical in cellular differentiation between the two asexual forms: Tachyzoites and bradyzoites; (2) Mutation of pseudouridine synthase genes has also been implicated in human diseases (mitochondrial myopathy and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA); dyskeratosis congenita). Taken together, these results are consistent with pseudouridine synthases having a Gene Ontology function of "biological regulation". PMID:25152040

  18. COA User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, B.; Pautz, J.; Sellers, C.

    1999-01-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has one of the largest and most complete collections of information on crude oil composition that is available to the public. The computer program that manages this database of crude oil analyses has recently been rewritten to allow easier access to this information. This report describes how the new system can be accessed and how the information contained in the Crude Oil Analysis Data Bank can be obtained.

  19. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  20. CRP Is an Activator of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation that Operates via a Mechanism Involving gmhA and waaAE-coaD

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Fang, Haihong; Yang, Huiying; Zhang, Yiquan; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2016-01-01

    gmhA encodes a phosphoheptose isomerase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of heptose, a conserved component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GmhA plays an important role in Yersinia pestis biofilm blockage in the flea gut. waaA, waaE, and coaD constitute a three-gene operon waaAE-coaD in Y. pestis. waaA encodes a transferase that is responsible for binding lipid-A to the core oligosaccharide of LPS. WaaA is a key determinant in Y. pestis biofilm formation, and the waaA expression is positively regulated by the two-component regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ. WaaE is involved in LPS modification and is necessary for Y. pestis biofilm production. In this study, the biofilm-related phenotypic assays indicate that the global regulator CRP stimulates Y. pestis biofilm formation in vitro and on nematodes, while it has no regulatory effect on the biosynthesis of the biofilm-signaling molecular 3′,5′-cyclic diguanosine monophosphate. Further gene regulation experiments disclose that CRP does not regulate the hms genes at the transcriptional level but directly promotes the gmhA transcription and indirectly activates the waaAE-coaD transcription through directly acting on phoPQ-YPO1632. Thus, it is speculated that CRP-mediated carbon catabolite regulation of Y. pestis biofilm formation depends on the CRP-dependent carbon source metabolic pathways of the biosynthesis, modification, and transportation of biofilm exopolysaccharide. PMID:27014218

  1. Cardiac-specific deletion of acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) prevents metabolic remodeling during pressure-overload hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Olson, David P.; Marney, Luke C.; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Synovec, Robert E.; Tian, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO) with increased reliance on glucose are hallmarks of metabolic remodeling that occurs in pathological cardiac hypertrophy and is associated with decreased myocardial energetics and impaired cardiac function. To date, it has not been tested whether prevention of the metabolic switch that occurs during the development of cardiac hypertrophy has unequivocal benefits on cardiac function and energetics. Objectives Since malonyl CoA production via acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid transport, we hypothesized that mice with a cardiac-specific deletion of ACC2 (ACC2H−/−) would maintain cardiac fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and improve function and energetics during the development of pressure-overload hypertrophy. Methods and Results ACC2 deletion led to a significant reduction in cardiac malonyl CoA levels. In isolated perfused heart experiments, left ventricular (LV) function and oxygen consumption were similiar in ACC2H−/− mice despite an ~60% increase in FAO compared to controls (CON). After 8 weeks of pressure-overload via transverse aortic constriction (TAC), ACC2H−/− mice exhibited a substrate utilization profile similar to sham animals while CON-TAC hearts had decreased FAO with increased glycolysis and anaplerosis. Myocardial energetics, assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and cardiac function were maintained in ACC2H−/− after 8 weeks of TAC. Furthermore, ACC2H−/−-TAC demonstrated an attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy with a significant reduction in fibrosis relative to CON-TAC. Conclusions These data suggest that reversion to the fetal metabolic profile in chronic pathological hypertrophy is associated with impaired myocardial function and energetics and maintenance of the inherent cardiac metabolic profile and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:22730442

  2. Chromium downregulates the expression of Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 gene in lipogenic tissues of domestic goats: a potential strategy for meat quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Najafpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Zali, Abolfazl; Moradi-Shahrebabak, Hossein; Mousapour, Hojatollah

    2014-06-15

    Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carboxylation of Acetyl CoA to form Malonyl CoA, the key intermediate metabolite in fatty acid synthesis. In this study, the mRNA expression of the ACC1 gene was evaluated in four different tissues (liver, visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, and longissimus muscle) of the domestic goat (Capra hircus) kids feeding on four different levels of trivalent chromium (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5mg/day) as food supplementation. RT-qPCR technique was used for expression analyses and heat shock protein 90 gene (HSP-90) was considered as reference gene for data normalization. Our results revealed that 1.5mg/day chromium significantly reduced the expression of the ACC1 gene in liver, visceral fat, and subcutaneous fat tissues, but not in longissimus muscles (P<0.05). We measured some phenotypic traits of kid's carcasses to detect their probable correlations with chromium-mediated downregulation of ACC1 expression. Interestingly, changes in ACC1 expression were accompanied with decreased accumulation of fats in adipose tissues such that the subcutaneous fat thickness and heart fat percentage decreased in kids feeding on chromium. By contrast, chromium supplemented kids showed higher percentage of muscles despite the fact that their total body weight did not differ from that of non-supplemented kids. Our study suggests that trivalent chromium alters the direction of energy accumulation towards muscles rather than fats and provides insights into application of chromium supplementation as a useful strategy for improvement of meat quality in domestic animals. PMID:24704275

  3. Chitin synthase homologs in three ectomycorrhizal truffles.

    PubMed

    Lanfranco, L; Garnero, L; Delpero, M; Bonfante, P

    1995-12-01

    Degenerate PCR primers were used to amplify a conserved gene portion coding chitin synthase from genomic DNA of six species of ectomycorrhizal truffles. DNA was extracted from both hypogeous fruitbodies and in vitro growing mycelium of Tuber borchii. A single fragment of about 600 bp was amplified for each species. The amplification products from Tuber magnatum, T. borchii and T. ferrugineum were cloned and sequenced, revealing a high degree of identity (91.5%) at the nucleotide level. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequences these clones were assigned to class II chitin synthase. Southern blot experiments performed on genomic DNA showed that the amplification products derive from a single copy gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of class II chitin synthase genes confirmed the current taxonomic position of the genus Tuber, and suggested a close relationship between T. magnatum and T. uncinatum. PMID:8593947

  4. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present. PMID:16838991

  5. Homology study of two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases from Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Umeda, F; Nishikawa, T; Miyasaka, H; Maeda, I; Kawase, M; Yagi, K

    2001-11-01

    Recently, we have cloned and analyzed two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase genes (phaC1 and phaC2 in the pha cluster) from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. In this report, the deduced amino acid (AA) sequences of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 from P. aureofaciens are compared with those from three other bacterial strains (Pseudomonas sp. 61-3, P. oleovorans and P. aeruginosa) containing the homologous pha cluster. The level of homology of either PHA synthase 1 or PHA synthase 2 was high with each enzyme from these three bacterial strains. Furthermore, multialignment of PHA synthase AA sequences implied that both enzymes of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 were highly conserved in the four strains including P. aureofaciens. PMID:11916262

  6. Cobalamin in inflammation III — glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to NG-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/NG-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the ‘base-off’ dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH4/BH3 radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  7. Cobalamin in inflammation III - glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-09-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the 'base-off' dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH(4)/BH(3) radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  8. Identification of novel sesterterpene/triterpene synthase from Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tsutomu; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Kashima, Shoji; Murata, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Nakano, Chiaki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2013-05-10

    Basic enzyme: The tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue from the alkalophilic Bacillus clausii catalyses conversions of a geranylfarnesyl diphosphate and a hexaprenyl diphosphate into novel head-to-tail acyclic sesterterpene and triterpene. Tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologues represent a new family of terpene synthases that form not only sesquarterpene but also sesterterpene and triterpene. PMID:23554321

  9. Lessons from 455 Fusarium polyketide synthases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, polyketide synthases (PKSs) synthesize a structurally diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs) with a range of biological activities. The most studied SMs are toxic to animals and/or plants, alter plant growth, have beneficial pharmaceutical activities, and/or are brightly colored pigm...

  10. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-29

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  11. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-05-26

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  12. Identification of a starter unit acyl-carrier protein transacylase domain in an iterative type I polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Jason M.; Dancy, Blair C. R.; Hill, Eric A.; Udwary, Daniel W.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Polyketides are a class of natural products that exhibit a wide range of functional and structural diversity. They include antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antifungals, antihypercholesterolemics, and cytotoxins. Polyketide synthases (PKSs) use chemistry similar to fatty acid synthases (FASs), although building block variation and differing extents of reduction of the growing polyketide chain underlie their biosynthetic versatility. In contrast to the well studied sequential modular type I PKSs, less is known about how the iterative type I PKSs carry out and control chain initiation, elongation, folding, and cyclization during polyketide processing. Domain structure analysis of a group of related fungal, nonreducing PKSs has revealed well defined N-terminal domains longer than commonly seen for FASs and modular PKSs. Predicted structure of this domain disclosed a region similar to malonyl-CoA:acyl-carrier protein (ACP) transacylases (MATs). MATs play a key role transferring precursor CoA thioesters from solution onto FASs and PKSs for chain elongation. On the basis of site-directed mutagenesis, radiolabeling, and kinetics experiments carried out with individual domains of the norsolorinic acid PKS, we propose that the N-terminal domain is a starter unit:ACP transacylase (SAT domain) that selects a C6 fatty acid from a dedicated yeast-like FAS and transfers this unit onto the PKS ACP, leading to the production of the aflatoxin precursor, norsolorinic acid. These findings could indicate a much broader role for SAT domains in starter unit selection among nonreducing iterative, fungal PKSs, and they provide a biochemical rationale for the classical acetyl “starter unit effect.” PMID:17071746

  13. BIOGENESIS FACTOR REQUIRED FOR ATP SYNTHASE 3 Facilitates Assembly of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase Complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Duan, Zhikun; Zhang, Jiao; Peng, Lianwei

    2016-06-01

    Thylakoid membrane-localized chloroplast ATP synthases use the proton motive force generated by photosynthetic electron transport to produce ATP from ADP. Although it is well known that the chloroplast ATP synthase is composed of more than 20 proteins with α3β3γ1ε1δ1I1II1III14IV1 stoichiometry, its biogenesis process is currently unclear. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of chloroplast ATP synthase, we performed extensive screening for isolating ATP synthase mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the recently identified bfa3 (biogenesis factors required for ATP synthase 3) mutant, the levels of chloroplast ATP synthase subunits were reduced to approximately 25% of wild-type levels. In vivo labeling analysis showed that assembly of the CF1 component of chloroplast ATP synthase was less efficient in bfa3 than in the wild type, indicating that BFA3 is required for CF1 assembly. BFA3 encodes a chloroplast stromal protein that is conserved in higher plants, green algae, and a few species of other eukaryotic algae, and specifically interacts with the CF1β subunit. The BFA3 binding site was mapped to a region in the catalytic site of CF1β. Several residues highly conserved in eukaryotic CF1β are crucial for the BFA3-CF1β interaction, suggesting a coevolutionary relationship between BFA3 and CF1β. BFA3 appears to function as a molecular chaperone that transiently associates with unassembled CF1β at its catalytic site and facilitates subsequent association with CF1α during assembly of the CF1 subcomplex of chloroplast ATP synthase. PMID:27208269

  14. Structure of the complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase with a bound bisubstrate analog.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-25

    N-Acetyl-L-glutamate synthase catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), the first step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway in lower organisms. In mammals, NAG is an obligate cofactor of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I in the urea cycle. We have previously reported the structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) with various substrates bound. Here we reported the preparation of the bisubstrate analog, CoA-S-acetyl-L-glutamate, the crystal structure of ngNAGS with CoA-NAG bound, and kinetic studies of several active site mutants. The results are consistent with a one-step nucleophilic addition-elimination mechanism with Glu353 as the catalytic base and Ser392 as the catalytic acid. The structure of the ngNAGS-bisubstrate complex together with the previous ngNAGS structures delineates the catalytic reaction path for ngNAGS. PMID:23261468

  15. Structure of the complex of Neisseria gonorrhoeae N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase with a bound bisubstrate analog

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, GENGXIANG; ALLEWELL, NORMA M.; TUCHMAN, MENDEL; SHI, DASHUANG

    2013-01-01

    N -acetyl-L-glutamate synthase catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), the first step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway in lower organisms. In mammals, NAG is an obligate cofactor of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I in the urea cycle. We have previously reported the structures of NAGS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ngNAGS) with various substrates bound. Here we reported the preparation of the bisubstrate analog, CoA-S-acetyl-L-glutamate, the crystal structure of ngNAGS with CoA-NAG bound, and kinetic studies of several active site mutants. The results are consistent with a one-step nucleophilic addition-elimination mechanism with Glu353 as the catalytic base and Ser392 as the catalytic acid. The structure of the ngNAGS-bisubstrate complex together with the previous ngNAGS structures delineates the catalytic reaction path for ngNAGS. PMID:23261468

  16. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Methods Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Results Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Conclusions Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene. PMID:24716800

  17. Keratin 8 absence down-regulates colonocyte HMGCS2 and modulates colonic ketogenesis and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, Terhi O.; Misiorek, Julia O.; Nyström, Joel H.; Fortelius, Lina E.; Habtezion, Aida; Liao, Jian; Asghar, M. Nadeem; Zhang, Haiyan; Azhar, Salman; Omary, M. Bishr; Toivola, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Simple-type epithelial keratins are intermediate filament proteins important for mechanical stability and stress protection. Keratin mutations predispose to human liver disorders, whereas their roles in intestinal diseases are unclear. Absence of keratin 8 (K8) in mice leads to colitis, decreased Na/Cl uptake, protein mistargeting, and longer crypts, suggesting that keratins contribute to intestinal homeostasis. We describe the rate-limiting enzyme of the ketogenic energy metabolism pathway, mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), as a major down-regulated protein in the K8-knockout (K8−/−) colon. K8 absence leads to decreased quantity and activity of HMGCS2, and the down-regulation is not dependent on the inflammatory state, since HMGCS2 is not decreased in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α, a transcriptional activator of HMGCS2, is similarly down-regulated. Ketogenic conditions—starvation or ketogenic diet—increase K8+/+ HMGCS2, whereas this response is blunted in the K8−/− colon. Microbiota-produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), substrates in the colonic ketone body pathway, are increased in stool, which correlates with decreased levels of their main transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Microbial populations, including the main SCFA-butyrate producers in the colon, were not altered in the K8−/−. In summary, the regulation of the SCFA-MCT1-HMGCS2 axis is disrupted in K8−/− colonocytes, suggesting a role for keratins in colonocyte energy metabolism and homeostasis. PMID:25904331

  18. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis increase hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Lopez, D

    1996-01-15

    Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis are believed to lower serum cholesterol levels by enhancing the removal of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by increasing hepatic LDL receptor function. Thus, the effects of several different inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis were examined for their effects on the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats. We found that administration of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase such as lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and rivastatin resulted in increased hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Surprisingly, these agents failed to increase levels of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in rat liver even when the dose and length of treatment were increased. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused even greater increases in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels, but did not increase levels of immunoreactive protein. Further investigation revealed that the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was increased in rats given inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The greatest increase in the rate of degradation was seen in animals treated with zaragozic acid A which caused the largest increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. In contrast, hepatic LDL receptor protein was stabilized in cholesterol-fed rats. It appears that increased potential for LDL receptor protein synthesis, reflected in increased mRNA levels, is offset by a corresponding increase in the rate of receptor protein degradation resulting in constant steady-state levels of hepatic LDL receptor protein. These findings are suggestive of increased cycling of the hepatic LDL receptor. This postulated mechanism can provide for enhanced hepatic uptake of lipoproteins without increasing steady-state levels of LDL receptor protein. PMID:8561503

  19. Farnesyl pyrophosphate regulates adipocyte functions as an endogenous PPARγ agonist

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Kahori; Kim, Young-Il; Kato, Sota; Taimatsu, Aki; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Ebisu, Shogo; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Miyagawa, Hiroh; Murakami, Shigeru; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway produces not only sterols but also non-sterol mevalonate metabolites involved in isoprenoid synthesis. Mevalonate metabolites affect transcriptional and post-transcriptional events that in turn affect various biological processes including energy metabolism. In the present study, we examine whether mevalonate metabolites activate PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ), a ligand-dependent transcription factor playing a central role in adipocyte differentiation. In the luciferase reporter assay using both GAL4 chimaera and full-length PPARγ systems, a mevalonate metabolite, FPP (farnesyl pyrophosphate), which is the precursor of almost all isoprenoids and is positioned at branch points leading to the synthesis of other longer-chain isoprenoids, activated PPARγ in a dose-dependent manner. FPP induced the in vitro binding of a co-activator, SRC-1 (steroid receptor co-activator-1), to GST (glutathione transferase)–PPARγ. Direct binding of FPP to PPARγ was also indicated by docking simulation studies. Moreover, the addition of FPP up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of PPARγ target genes during adipocyte differentiation induction. In the presence of lovastatin, an HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA) reductase inhibitor, both intracellular FPP levels and PPARγ-target gene expressions were decreased. In contrast, the increase in intracellular FPP level after the addition of zaragozic acid, a squalene synthase inhibitor, induced PPARγ-target gene expression. The addition of FPP and zaragozic acid promotes lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. These findings indicated that FPP might function as an endogenous PPARγ agonist and regulate gene expression in adipocytes. PMID:21605082

  20. Nitrogen-bisphosphonates block retinoblastoma phosphorylation and cell growth by inhibiting the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in a keratinocyte model for esophageal irritation.

    PubMed

    Reszka, A A; Halasy-Nagy, J; Rodan, G A

    2001-02-01

    The surprising discovery that nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs) act via inhibition of the mevalonate-to-cholesterol pathway raised the possibility that esophageal irritation by N-BPs is mechanism-based. We used normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) to model N-BP effects on stratified squamous epithelium of the esophagus. The N-BPs alendronate and risedronate inhibited NHEK growth in a dose-dependent manner without inducing apoptosis. N-BPs (30 microM) caused accumulation of cells in S phase and increased binucleation (inhibited cytokinesis). Consistent with N-BP inhibition of isoprenylation, geranylgeraniol or farnesol prevented accumulation in S phase. Binucleation was also induced by the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor lovastatin and by the squalene synthase inhibitor zaragozic acid A and was prevented by adding low-density lipoprotein. At 300 microM, N-BPs reduced expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 2 and cdk4 and enhanced expression of p21(waf1) and p27(kip1) and their binding to cdks with corollary hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma. Lovastatin and zaragozic acid A produced similar effects, except that p21(waf1) expression and binding to cdks was not induced. Growth inhibition, but not binucleation, was also caused by the geranylgeranyl transferase I inhibitor, GGTI-298, which also enhanced cdk2 and cdk4 association with p27(kip1). These findings are consistent with suppression of epithelial cell growth by N-BPs via inhibition of the mevalonate pathway and the consequent reduction in cholesterol synthesis, which blocks cytokinesis, and in geranylgeranylation, which interferes with progression through the cell cycle. PMID:11160853

  1. Farnesol is not the nonsterol regulator mediating degradation of HMG-CoA reductase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Keller, R K; Zhao, Z; Chambers, C; Ness, G C

    1996-04-15

    A recent report, in which cultured tumor cells were used, identified farnesol as the nonsterol mevalonate-derived metabolite required for the accelerated degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (C. C. Correll, L. Ng, and P. A. Edwards, 1994, J. Biol. Chem. 269, 17390-17393). We examined this proposed linkage in animals by measuring hepatic farnesol levels and rates of HMG-CoA reductase degradation under conditions previously shown to alter the stability of the reductase. In normal rats, the hepatic farnesol level, quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography, was 0.10 +/- 0.08 microgram/g and the half-life of HMG-CoA reductase was 2.5 h. Administration of mevalonolactone at 1 g/kg body wt to provide all nonsterol metabolites in addition to cholesterol increased farnesol levels 6-fold without significantly affecting the half-life of the reductase. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, raised hepatic farnesol levels 10-fold and decreased the half-life of HMG-CoA reductase to 0.25 h. However, feeding lovastatin to rats did not lower hepatic farnesol levels despite a marked stabilization of HMB-CoA reductase protein. Moreover, intubation of rats with 500 mg/kg body wt of farnesol failed to decrease the half-life of HMG-CoA reductase protein, alter the levels of enzyme activity, or change of the levels of immunoreactive protein despite an increase of 1000-fold in hepatic farnesol levels. These observations indicate that farnesol per se does not induce accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase in rat liver. PMID:8645011

  2. Farnesyl pyrophosphate regulates adipocyte functions as an endogenous PPARγ agonist.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Kahori; Kim, Young-Il; Kato, Sota; Taimatsu, Aki; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Ebisu, Shogo; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Miyagawa, Hiroh; Murakami, Shigeru; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-08-15

    The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway produces not only sterols but also non-sterol mevalonate metabolites involved in isoprenoid synthesis. Mevalonate metabolites affect transcriptional and post-transcriptional events that in turn affect various biological processes including energy metabolism. In the present study, we examine whether mevalonate metabolites activate PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ), a ligand-dependent transcription factor playing a central role in adipocyte differentiation. In the luciferase reporter assay using both GAL4 chimaera and full-length PPARγ systems, a mevalonate metabolite, FPP (farnesyl pyrophosphate), which is the precursor of almost all isoprenoids and is positioned at branch points leading to the synthesis of other longer-chain isoprenoids, activated PPARγ in a dose-dependent manner. FPP induced the in vitro binding of a co-activator, SRC-1 (steroid receptor co-activator-1), to GST (glutathione transferase)-PPARγ. Direct binding of FPP to PPARγ was also indicated by docking simulation studies. Moreover, the addition of FPP up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of PPARγ target genes during adipocyte differentiation induction. In the presence of lovastatin, an HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA) reductase inhibitor, both intracellular FPP levels and PPARγ-target gene expressions were decreased. In contrast, the increase in intracellular FPP level after the addition of zaragozic acid, a squalene synthase inhibitor, induced PPARγ-target gene expression. The addition of FPP and zaragozic acid promotes lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. These findings indicated that FPP might function as an endogenous PPARγ agonist and regulate gene expression in adipocytes. PMID:21605082

  3. Alterations in cell cholesterol content modulate Ca(2+)-induced tight junction assembly by MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Stankewich, M C; Francis, S A; Vu, Q U; Schneeberger, E E; Lynch, R D

    1996-08-01

    Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), a measure of tight junction (TJ) barrier function, develops more rapidly and reaches higher values after preincubation of MDCK cells for 24 h with 2 microM Lovastatin (lova), an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. While this effect was attributed to a 30% fall in cholesterol (CH), possible effects of lova on the supply of prenyl group precursors could not be excluded. In the current study, strategies were devised to examine effects on TER of agents that simultaneously lower CH and increase the flux of intermediates through the CH biosynthetic pathway. Zaragozic acid, 20 microM, an inhibitor of squalene synthase known to increase the synthesis of isoprenoids and levels of prenylated proteins, lowered cell CH by 30% after 24 h, while accelerating development of TER in the same manner as lova. TER was also enhanced, despite a 23% increase in the rate of [3H]acetate incorporation into CH, when total CH was reduced by 45% during a 2-h incubation with 2 mM methyl beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD), an agent that stimulates CH efflux from cells. The fact that the rate of TER development was diminished when cell CH content was elevated by incubation with a complex of CH and MBCD is further evidence that this sterol modulates development of the epithelial barrier. Cell associated CH derived from the complex was similar to endogenous CH with respect to its accessibility to cholesterol oxidase. Lova's effect on TER was diminished when 5 micrograms/mL of CH was added to the medium during the last 11 h of incubation with lova. PMID:8869884

  4. Protective effect of Codonopsis lanceolata root extract against alcoholic fatty liver in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cho, Keunsook; Kim, Seung-Jin; Park, Sung-Hee; Kim, Sojin; Park, Taesun

    2009-12-01

    Alcohol intake remains the most important cause of fatty liver throughout the world. The current study was undertaken to determine whether dietary supplementation with Codonopsis lanceolata root water extract attenuates the development of alcoholic fatty liver in rats and to elucidate the molecular mechanism for such an effect. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed normal diet (ND), ethanol diet (ED) (36% of total energy from ethanol), or 0.5% C. lanceolata root extract-supplemented ethanol diet (ED+C) for 8 weeks. C. lanceolata root water extract supplemented to rats with chronic alcohol consumption ameliorated the ethanol-induced accumulations of hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride. Chronic alcohol consumption up-regulated the hepatic expression of genes involved in inflammation, fatty acid synthesis, and cholesterol metabolism, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha), sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c, fatty acid synthase, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACC), stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). The ethanol-induced up-regulations of TNFalpha, LXRalpha, SREBP-1c, HMGR, and LDLR genes in the liver were reversed by feeding C. lanceolata root water extract for 8 weeks. Moreover, ethanol-induced decreases in the ratio of phospho-5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) alpha/AMPKalpha and phospho-ACC/ACC protein levels in the liver were significantly restored (135% and 35% increases, respectively, P < .05) by supplementing them with C. lanceolata root water extract. In conclusion, C. lanceolata root water extract appears to be protective against alcoholic fatty liver through the regulation of SREBP-1c, LXRalpha, HMGR, and LDLR genes and by the phosphorylation of AMPKalpha and ACC, which are implicated in lipid metabolism. PMID:20041784

  5. Effects of clofibrate treatment in laying hens.

    PubMed

    König, B; Kluge, H; Haase, K; Brandsch, C; Stangl, G I; Eder, K

    2007-06-01

    Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) has been shown in liver of chicks, but effects of its activation have not yet been investigated. In this study, laying hens were treated with clofibrate, a synthetic PPARalpha agonist, to investigate the effects of PPARalpha activation on liver lipid metabolism. Hens receiving a diet containing 5 g of clofibrate/kg had a lower food intake and higher liver mRNA concentrations of typical PPARalpha target genes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase, bifunctional enzyme, lipoprotein lipase) involved in hepatic mitochondrial and peroxisomal beta-oxidation and plasma triglyceride clearance than control hens that received the same diet without clofibrate (P<0.05). Hens treated with clofibrate also had lower mRNA concentrations of fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, and low-density lipoprotein receptor, proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake, than hens fed the control diet (P<0.05). These changes in clofibrate-treated hens were accompanied by reduced liver triglyceride concentrations, strongly diminished very low density triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations (P<0.05), a disturbed maturation of egg follicles, a complete stop of egg production, and a markedly reduced plasma 17-beta-estradiol concentration (P<0.05). In conclusion, it is shown that clofibrate has complex effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in laying hens that mimic PPARalpha activation in mammals, affect maturation of egg follicles, and lead to a stop of egg production. Because clofibrate treatment strongly reduced food intake in the hens, some of these effects (i.e., egg production) may have been due to a low energy and nutrient intake. PMID:17495091

  6. Mevalonosomes: specific vacuoles containing the mevalonate pathway in Plocamium brasiliense cortical cells (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Paradas, Wladimir Costa; Crespo, Thalita Mendes; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; de Andrade, Leonardo Rodrigues; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Hellio, Claire; Paranhos, Ricardo Rogers; Hill, Lilian Jorge; de Souza, Geysa Marinho; Kelecom, Alphonse Germaine Albert Charles; Da Gama, Bernardo Antônio Perez; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes

    2015-04-01

    This paper has identified, for the first time in a member of the Rhodophyta, a vacuolar organelle containing enzymes that are involved in the mevalonate pathway-an important step in red algal isoprenoid biosynthesis. These organelles were named mevalonosomes (Mev) and were found in the cortical cells (CC) of Plocamium brasiliense, a marine macroalgae that synthesizes several halogenated monoterpenes. P. brasiliense specimens were submitted to a cytochemical analysis of the activity of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we confirmed the presence of HMGS activity within the Mev. Because HMGS is necessary for the biosynthesis of halogenated monoterpenes, we isolated a hexanic fraction (HF) rich in halogenated monoterpenes from P. brasiliense that contained a pentachlorinated monoterpene as a major metabolite. Because terpenes are often related to chemical defense, the antifouling (AF) activity of pentachlorinated monoterpene was tested. We found that the settlement of the mussel Perna perna was reduced by HF treatment (2.25 times less than control; 40% and 90% of fouled surface, respectively; P = 0.001; F9,9 = 1.13). The HF (at 10 μg · mL(-1) ) also inhibited three species of fouling microalgae (Chlorarachnion reptans, Cylindrotheca cloisterium, and Exanthemachrysis gayraliae), while at a higher concentration (50 μg · mL(-1) ), it inhibited the bacteria Halomonas marina, Polaribacter irgensii, Pseudoalteromonas elyakovii, Shewanella putrefaciens, and Vibrio aestuarianus. The AF activity of P. brasiliense halogenated monoterpenes and the localization of HMGS activity inside Mev suggest that this cellular structure found in CC may play a role in thallus protection against biofouling. PMID:26986518

  7. Effect of dietary supplementation of Bacillus subtilis B10 on biochemical and molecular parameters in the serum and liver of high-fat diet-induced obese mice* #

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Kai; Li, Ya-li; Wang, Yang; Wen, Jing; Wu, Hong-zhao; Yu, Dong-you; Li, Wei-fen

    2015-01-01

    While a high-fat diet (HFD) is assumed to be related to fat-mediated oxidative stress decreasing antioxidant enzyme activity, probiotics are believed to have positive effects on the regulation of HFD-induced obesity as well as lipid metabolism, energy homeostasis, and anti-oxidation. Because Bacillus subtilis B10 has beneficial effects on the abnormal lipid metabolism and the oxidative stress in HFD-induced obese mice, ICR mice were randomly assigned into an HFD group and the HFD was supplemented with 0.1% (w/w) Bacillus subtilis B10 (HFD+B10 group). Thereafter, 30-d treatments were run, and then hepatic lipid level and antioxidant status were measured. The expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in the liver was determined by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We found that HFD-induced obese mice treated with B10 showed a decrease in weight gain, serum glucose activity as well as hepatic triglyceride (TG), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) activities. In addition, the gene expressions of antioxidant genes, glutathione reductase (GR), xanthine oxidase (XO), heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), and lipid synthesis gene 3β-hydroxysteroid-∆24 reductase (DHCR24) in the HFD+B10 group were down-regulated, suggesting alleviation of oxidative stress, while the lipolysis gene 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), energy metabolism gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and the gene encoding tumor-suppressor protein p53 were up-regulated. The regulatory and positive effect of dietary supplementation of probiotic B10 suggests that it has a beneficial effect on the homeostasis of the lipid metabolism and on alleviating oxidative stress in HFD-induced obese mice. PMID:26055910

  8. Polyphenol-rich black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) extract regulates the expression of genes critical for intestinal cholesterol flux in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Youngki; Wegner, Casey J; Bolling, Bradley W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-09-01

    Black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) is a rich source of polyphenols. The hypolipidemic effects of polyphenol-rich black chokeberry extract (CBE) have been reported, but underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. We investigated the effect of CBE on the expression of genes involved in intestinal lipid metabolism. Caco-2 cells were incubated with 50 or 100 μg/ml of CBE for 24 h for quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction analysis. Expression of genes for cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and sterol regulatory element binding protein 2), apical cholesterol uptake (Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 and scavenger receptor class B Type 1) and basolateral cholesterol efflux [ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)] was significantly decreased by CBE compared with control. Western blot analysis confirmed that CBE inhibited expression of these proteins. In contrast, CBE markedly induced mRNA and/or protein levels of ABCG5 and ABCG8 that mediate apical cholesterol efflux to the intestinal lumen. Furthermore, CBE significantly increased mRNA and protein levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, and cellular LDL uptake. Expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and lipoprotein assembly, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, fatty acid synthase and acyl-CoA oxidase 1, was significantly decreased by CBE in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, CBE significantly increased sirtuin 1, 3 and 5 mRNA levels, while it decreased SIRT-2. Our data suggest that hypolipidemic effects of CBE may be attributed, at least in part, to increased apical efflux of LDL-derived cholesterol and to decreased chylomicron formation in the intestine; and specific isoforms of SIRT may play an important role in this process. PMID:23517916

  9. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression by Cholesterol Biosynthesis Inhibitors That Reduce (Pravastatin) or Enhance (Squalestatin 1) Nonsterol Isoprenoid Levels in Primary Cultured Mouse and Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Elizabeth A; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia; Cukovic, Daniela; Dombkowski, Alan A; Kocarek, Thomas A

    2016-08-01

    Squalene synthase inhibitors (SSIs), such as squalestatin 1 (SQ1), reduce cholesterol biosynthesis but cause the accumulation of isoprenoids derived from farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), which can modulate the activity of nuclear receptors, including the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). In comparison, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (e.g., pravastatin) inhibit production of both cholesterol and nonsterol isoprenoids. To characterize the effects of isoprenoids on hepatocellular physiology, microarrays were used to compare orthologous gene expression from primary cultured mouse and rat hepatocytes that were treated with either SQ1 or pravastatin. Compared with controls, 47 orthologs were affected by both inhibitors, 90 were affected only by SQ1, and 51 were unique to pravastatin treatment (P < 0.05, ≥1.5-fold change). When the effects of SQ1 and pravastatin were compared directly, 162 orthologs were found to be differentially coregulated between the two treatments. Genes involved in cholesterol and unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis were up-regulated by both inhibitors, consistent with cholesterol depletion; however, the extent of induction was greater in rat than in mouse hepatocytes. SQ1 induced several orthologs associated with microsomal, peroxisomal, and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and repressed orthologs involved in cell cycle regulation. By comparison, pravastatin repressed the expression of orthologs involved in retinol and xenobiotic metabolism. Several of the metabolic genes altered by isoprenoids were inducible by a PPARα agonist, whereas cytochrome P450 isoform 2B was inducible by activators of CAR. Our findings indicate that SSIs uniquely influence cellular lipid metabolism and cell cycle regulation, probably due to FPP catabolism through the farnesol pathway. PMID:27225895

  10. Keratin 8 absence down-regulates colonocyte HMGCS2 and modulates colonic ketogenesis and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Helenius, Terhi O; Misiorek, Julia O; Nyström, Joel H; Fortelius, Lina E; Habtezion, Aida; Liao, Jian; Asghar, M Nadeem; Zhang, Haiyan; Azhar, Salman; Omary, M Bishr; Toivola, Diana M

    2015-06-15

    Simple-type epithelial keratins are intermediate filament proteins important for mechanical stability and stress protection. Keratin mutations predispose to human liver disorders, whereas their roles in intestinal diseases are unclear. Absence of keratin 8 (K8) in mice leads to colitis, decreased Na/Cl uptake, protein mistargeting, and longer crypts, suggesting that keratins contribute to intestinal homeostasis. We describe the rate-limiting enzyme of the ketogenic energy metabolism pathway, mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), as a major down-regulated protein in the K8-knockout (K8(-/-)) colon. K8 absence leads to decreased quantity and activity of HMGCS2, and the down-regulation is not dependent on the inflammatory state, since HMGCS2 is not decreased in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, a transcriptional activator of HMGCS2, is similarly down-regulated. Ketogenic conditions-starvation or ketogenic diet-increase K8(+/+) HMGCS2, whereas this response is blunted in the K8(-/-) colon. Microbiota-produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), substrates in the colonic ketone body pathway, are increased in stool, which correlates with decreased levels of their main transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1). Microbial populations, including the main SCFA-butyrate producers in the colon, were not altered in the K8(-/-). In summary, the regulation of the SCFA-MCT1-HMGCS2 axis is disrupted in K8(-/-) colonocytes, suggesting a role for keratins in colonocyte energy metabolism and homeostasis. PMID:25904331

  11. Disorders of lipid metabolism in nephrotic syndrome: mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome results in hyperlipidemia and profound alterations in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins (very low-density lipoprotein [VLDL], immediate-density lipoprotein [IDL], and low-density lipoprotein [LDL]), lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), and the total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio are increased in nephrotic syndrome. This is accompanied by significant changes in the composition of various lipoproteins including their cholesterol-to-triglyceride, free cholesterol-to-cholesterol ester, and phospholipid-to-protein ratios. These abnormalities are mediated by changes in the expression and activities of the key proteins involved in the biosynthesis, transport, remodeling, and catabolism of lipids and lipoproteins including apoproteins A, B, C, and E; 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase; fatty acid synthase; LDL receptor; lecithin cholesteryl ester acyltransferase; acyl coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase; HDL docking receptor (scavenger receptor class B, type 1 [SR-B1]); HDL endocytic receptor; lipoprotein lipase; and hepatic lipase, among others. The disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in nephrotic syndrome contribute to the development and progression of cardiovascular and kidney disease. In addition, by limiting delivery of lipid fuel to the muscles for generation of energy and to the adipose tissues for storage of energy, changes in lipid metabolism contribute to the reduction of body mass and impaired exercise capacity. This article provides an overview of the mechanisms, consequences, and treatment of lipid disorders in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:27165836

  12. Spatial and temporal regulation of sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Suza, Walter P; Chappell, Joe

    2016-06-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana was used as a model to investigate the spatial and developmental relationship between sterol synthesis rates and sterol content in plants. Stigmasterol levels were approximately twice the level in roots as that found in aerial tissues, while its progenitor sterol sitosterol was the inverse. When incorporation of radiolabeled precursors into sterols was used as measure of in vivo synthesis rates, acetate incorporation was similar across all tissue types, but approximately twofold greater in roots than any other tissue. In contrast, mevalonate incorporation exhibited the greatest differential with the rate of incorporation in roots approximately one-tenth that in apical shoots. Similar to acetate, incorporation of farnesol was higher in roots but remained fairly constant in aerial tissues, suggesting less regulation of the downstream sterol biosynthetic steps. Consistent with the precursor incorporation data, analysis of gene transcript and measurements of putative rate-limiting enzyme activities for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (EC 2.3.3.10) and reductase (EC 1.1.1.34) showed the greatest modulation of levels, while the activity levels for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.3.2) and prenyltransferases (EC 2.5.1.10 and EC 2.5.1.1) also exhibited a strong but moderate correlation with the development age of the aerial tissues of the plants. Overall, the data suggest a multitude of means from transcriptional to posttranslational control affecting sterol biosynthesis and accumulation across an entire plant, and point to some particular control points that might be manipulated using molecular genetic approaches to better probe the role of sterols in plant growth and development. PMID:26671544

  13. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management. PMID:26900108

  14. The Mechanisms Underlying the Hypolipidaemic Effects of Grifola frondosa in the Liver of Rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yinrun; Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Li, Xiangmin; Hu, Huiping; Li, Liangqiu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa and its regulation mechanism involved in lipid metabolism in liver of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The body weights and serum lipid levels of control rats, of hyperlipidaemic rats, and of hyperlipidaemic rats treated with oral G. frondosa were determined. mRNA expression and concentration of key lipid metabolism enzymes were investigated. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were markedly decreased in hyperlipidaemic rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were significantly down-regulated, while expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) was significantly up-regulated in the livers of treated rats compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. The concentrations of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to identify 20 proteins differentially expressed in livers of rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats. Of these 20 proteins, seven proteins were down-regulated, and 13 proteins were up-regulated. These findings indicate that the hypolipidaemic effects of G. frondosa reflected its modulation of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, absorption, and catabolic pathways. G. frondosa may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects by inhibiting LDL oxidation through down-regulation and up-regulating proteins expression in the liver of rats. Therefore, G. frondosa may produce both hypolipidaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, and potentially

  15. Garlic essential oil protects against obesity-triggered nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through modulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Tseng, Hui-Chun; Lin, Shuw-Yuan; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2014-06-25

    This study investigated the protective properties of garlic essential oil (GEO) and its major organosulfur component (diallyl disulfide, DADS) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal or high-fat diet (HFD) with/without GEO (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or DADS (10 and 20 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. GEO and DADS dose-dependently exerted antiobesity and antihyperlipidemic effects by reducing HFD-induced body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, and serum biochemical parameters. Administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg GEO and 20 mg/kg DADS significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, accompanied by elevated antioxidant capacity via inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 expression during NAFLD development. The anti-NAFLD effects of GEO and DADS were mediated through down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, as well as stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. These results demonstrate that GEO and DADS dose-dependently protected obese mice with long-term HFD-induced NAFLD from lipid accumulation, inflammation, and oxidative damage by ameliorating lipid metabolic disorders and oxidative stress. The dose of 20 mg/kg DADS was equally as effective in preventing NAFLD as 50 mg/kg GEO containing the same amount of DADS, which demonstrates that DADS may be the main bioactive component in GEO. PMID:24857364

  16. Possible Role of Intestinal Fatty Acid Oxidation in the Eating-Inhibitory Effect of the PPAR-α Agonist Wy-14643 in High-Fat Diet Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimian Azari, Elnaz; Leitner, Claudia; Jaggi, Thomas; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2013-01-01

    PPAR-α plays a key role in lipid metabolism; it enhances fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and ketogenesis. Pharmacological PPAR-α activation improves insulin sensitivity and reduces food intake, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. We here report that intraperitoneal (IP) administration of the PPAR-α agonist Wy-14643 (40 mg/kg BW) reduced food intake in adult male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD, 49% of the energy) mainly through an increase in the latency to eat after injection, and without inducing a conditioned taste avoidance. Also, IP administered Wy-14643 caused an acute (the first 60 min) decrease in the respiratory quotient (RQ) and an increase in hepatic portal vein β-hydroxybutyrate level (at 35 min) without affecting plasma non-esterified fatty acids. Given the known stimulatory effect of PPAR-α on FAO and ketogenesis, we measured the protein expression level of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT 1A) and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMG-CoAS2), two key enzymes for FAO and ketogenesis, respectively, in liver, duodenum and jejunum. Wy-14643 induced a significant increase in the expression of CPT 1A in the jejunum and duodenum and of HMG-CoAS2 in the jejunum, but neither CPT 1A nor HMG-CoAS2 expression was increased in the liver. The induction of CPT 1A and HMG-CoAS2 expression was associated with a decrease in the lipid droplet content selectively in the jejunum. Our findings indicate that Wy-14643 stimulates FAO and ketogenesis in the intestine, in particular in the jejunum, rather than in the liver, thus supporting the hypothesis that PPAR-α activation inhibits eating by stimulating intestinal FAO. PMID:24069361

  17. Vanadate treatment restores the expression of genes for key enzymes in the glucose and ketone bodies metabolism in the liver of diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Valera, A; Rodriguez-Gil, J E; Bosch, F

    1993-01-01

    Oral administration of vanadate to diabetic streptozotocin-treated rats decreased the high blood glucose and D-3-hydroxybutyrate levels related to diabetes. The increase in the expression of the P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene, the main regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis, was counteracted in the liver and the kidney after vanadate administration to diabetic rats. Vanadate also counteracted the induction in tyrosine aminotransferase gene expression due to diabetes and was able to increase the expression of the glucokinase gene to levels even higher than those found in healthy animals. Similarly, an induction in pyruvate kinase mRNA transcripts was observed in diabetic vanadate-treated rats. These effects were correlated with changes on glucokinase and pyruvate kinase activities. Vanadate treatment caused a decrease in the expression of the liver-specific glucose transporter, GLUT-2. Thus, vanadate was able to restore liver glucose utilization and block glucose production in diabetic rats. The increase in the expression of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCoAS) gene, the key regulatory enzyme in the ketone bodies production pathway, observed in diabetic rats was also blocked by vanadate. Furthermore, a similar pattern in the expression of PEPCK, GLUT-2, HMGCoAS, and the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha genes has been observed. All of these results suggest that the regulation of the expression of genes involved in the glucose and ketone bodies metabolism could be a key step in the normalization process induced by vanadate administration to diabetic rats. Images PMID:8100835

  18. The Mechanisms Underlying the Hypolipidaemic Effects of Grifola frondosa in the Liver of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yinrun; Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Li, Xiangmin; Hu, Huiping; Li, Liangqiu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa and its regulation mechanism involved in lipid metabolism in liver of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The body weights and serum lipid levels of control rats, of hyperlipidaemic rats, and of hyperlipidaemic rats treated with oral G. frondosa were determined. mRNA expression and concentration of key lipid metabolism enzymes were investigated. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were markedly decreased in hyperlipidaemic rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were significantly down-regulated, while expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) was significantly up-regulated in the livers of treated rats compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. The concentrations of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to identify 20 proteins differentially expressed in livers of rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats. Of these 20 proteins, seven proteins were down-regulated, and 13 proteins were up-regulated. These findings indicate that the hypolipidaemic effects of G. frondosa reflected its modulation of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, absorption, and catabolic pathways. G. frondosa may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects by inhibiting LDL oxidation through down-regulation and up-regulating proteins expression in the liver of rats. Therefore, G. frondosa may produce both hypolipidaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, and potentially

  19. Vagal afferents are not necessary for the satiety effect of the gut lipid messenger oleoylethanolamide.

    PubMed

    Azari, Elnaz Karimian; Ramachandran, Deepti; Weibel, Sandra; Arnold, Myrtha; Romano, Adele; Gaetani, Silvana; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2014-07-15

    The endogenous lipid messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) inhibits eating and modulates fat metabolism supposedly through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and vagal sensory fibers. We tested in adult male rats whether OEA stimulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and ketogenesis and whether it increases plasma levels of the satiating gut peptides glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY). We also explored whether OEA still inhibits eating after subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA). We found that intraperitoneally injected OEA (10 mg/kg body wt) reduced (P < 0.05) food intake mainly by increasing meal latency and that this effect was stronger in rats fed a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) than in chow-fed rats. OEA increased (P < 0.05) postprandial plasma nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) in the hepatic portal vein (HPV) and vena cava (VC) 30 min after injection, which was more pronounced in HFD- than in chow-fed rats. OEA also increased the protein expression of the key ketogenetic enzyme, mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, in the jejunum of HFD-fed rats, but not in the liver or duodenum of either diet group. Furthermore, OEA decreased GLP-1 and PYY concentrations (P < 0.05) in the HPV and VC 30 min after administration. Finally, OEA reduced food intake in SDA and sham-operated rats similarly. Our findings indicate that neither intact abdominal vagal afferents nor prandial increases in GLP-1 or PMID:24829501

  20. Resistant starch is more effective than cholestyramine as a lipid-lowering agent in the rat.

    PubMed

    Younes, H; Levrat, M A; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    1995-09-01

    Amylase-resistant starch (RS) represents a substrate for the bacterial flora of the colon, and the question arises as whether RS shares with soluble fibers common mechanisms for their lipid-lowering effects. It is uncertain whether a cholesterol-lowering effect depends basically on an enhanced rate of steroid excretion or whether colonic fermentations also play a role in this effect. In the present study, the effect of RS (25% raw potato starch), of a steroid sequestrant (0.8% cholestyramine), or both were compared on bile acid excretion and lipid metabolism in rats fed semipurified diets. RS diets led to a marked rise in cecal size and the cecal pool of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), as well as SCFA absorption; cholestyramine did not noticeably affect cecal fermentation. Whereas cholestyramine was particularly effective at enhancing bile acid excretion, RS was more effective in lowering plasma cholesterol (-32%) and triglycerides (-29%). The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase was increased fivefold by cholestyramine and twofold by RS. This induction in rats fed RS diets was concomittant to a depressed fatty acid synthase activity. In rats fed the RS diet, there was a lower concentration of cholesterol in all lipoprotein fractions, especially the (d = 1.040-1.080) fraction high-density lipoprotein (HDL1), while those fed cholestyramine had only a significant reduction of HDL1 cholesterol. In contrast to cholestyramine, RS also depressed the concentration of triglycerides in the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8577229

  1. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  2. The Crystal Structure of N-Acetyl-l-glutamate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae Provides Insights into Mechanisms of Catalysis and Regulation*†

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, and Mendel

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylgluta-mate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-Å resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-Å linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100Å, respectively, and a height of 110Å. Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind argi-nine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes. PMID:18184660

  3. The crystal structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae provides insights into mechanisms of catalysis and regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel

    2008-03-14

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes. PMID:18184660

  4. The Crystal Structure of N-Acetyl-L-glutamate Synthase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae Provides Insights into Mechanisms of Catalysis and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Dashuang; Sagar, Vatsala; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-07

    The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain connected through a 10-A linker. The monomers assemble into a hexameric ring that consists of a trimer of dimers with 32-point symmetry, inner and outer ring diameters of 20 and 100A, respectively, and a height of 110A(.) Each AAK domain interacts with the cognate domains of two adjacent monomers across two 2-fold symmetry axes and with the NAT domain from a second monomer of the adjacent dimer in the ring. The catalytic sites are located within the NAT domains. Three active site residues, Arg316, Arg425, and Ser427, anchor N-acetylglutamate in a position at the active site to form hydrogen bond interactions to the main chain nitrogen atoms of Cys356 and Leu314, and hydrophobic interactions to the side chains of Leu313 and Leu314. The mode of binding of acetyl-CoA and CoA is similar to other NAT family proteins. The AAK domain, although catalytically inactive, appears to bind arginine. This is the first reported crystal structure of any NAGS, and it provides insights into the catalytic function and arginine regulation of NAGS enzymes.

  5. The cellulose synthase companion proteins act non-redundantly with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1/POM2 and CELLULOSE SYNTHASE 6

    PubMed Central

    Endler, Anne; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellulose is a cell wall constituent that is essential for plant growth and development, and an important raw material for a range of industrial applications. Cellulose is synthesized at the plasma membrane by massive cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes that track along cortical microtubules in elongating cells of Arabidopsis through the activity of the protein CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 (CSI1). In a recent study we identified another family of proteins that also are associated with the CesA complex and microtubules, and that we named COMPANIONS OF CELLULOSE SYNTHASE (CC). The CC proteins protect the cellulose synthesising capacity of Arabidopsis seedlings during exposure to adverse environmental conditions by enhancing microtubule dynamics. In this paper we provide cell biology and genetic evidence that the CSI1 and the CC proteins fulfil distinct functions during cellulose synthesis. We also show that the CC proteins are necessary to aid cellulose synthesis when components of the CesA complex are impaired. These data indicate that the CC proteins have a broad role in aiding cellulose synthesis during environmental changes and when core complex components are non-functional. PMID:26829351

  6. (R)-citramalate synthase in methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Howell, D M; Xu, H; White, R H

    1999-01-01

    The Methanococcus jannaschii gene MJ1392 was cloned, and its protein product was hyperexpressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting protein was purified and shown to catalyze the condensation of pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A, with the formation of (R)-citramalate. Thus, this gene (cimA) encodes an (R)-citramalate synthase (CimA). This is the first identification of this enzyme, which is likely involved in the biosynthesis of isoleucine. PMID:9864346

  7. Chrysanthemyl Diphosphate Synthase Operates in Planta as a Bifunctional Enzyme with Chrysanthemol Synthase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1′-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12–0.16 μg h−1 g−1 fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  8. Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase operates in planta as a bifunctional enzyme with chrysanthemol synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2014-12-26

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1'-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12-0.16 μg h(-1) g(-1) fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  9. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  10. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. |

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  11. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  12. Thermostable malate synthase of Streptomyces thermovulgaris.

    PubMed

    Goh, L L; Koh, R; Loke, P; Sim, T S

    2003-10-01

    The gene, encoding malate synthase (MS), aceB, was cloned from the thermophilic bacterium Streptomyces thermovulgaris by homology-based PCR. The 1,626-bp cloned fragment encodes a protein consisting of 541 amino acids. S. thermovulgaris malate synthase (stMS) gene was over-expressed in Escherichia coli using a glutathione-S transferase (GST) fusion vector (pGEX-6P-1), purified by affinity chromatography, and subsequently cleaved from its GST fusion partner. The purified stMS was characterized and compared to a mesophilic malate synthase (scMS) from Streptomyces coelicolor. stMS exhibited higher temperature optima (40-60 degrees C) than those of scMS (28-37 degrees C). It was more thermostable and very resistant to the chemical denaturant urea. Amino acid sequence comparison of stMS with four mesophilic streptomycete MSs indicated that they share 70.9-91.4% amino acid identities, with stMS possessing slightly more charged residues (approximately 31%) than its mesophilic counterparts (approximately 28-29%). Seven charged residues (E85, R187, R209, H239, H364, R382 and K520) that were unique to stMS may be selectively and strategically placed to support its peculiar characteristics. PMID:13680388

  13. Structure of a modular polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Whicher, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Douglas A.; Hale, Wendi A.; Chemler, Joseph A.; Congdon, Grady R.; Narayan, Alison R.; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyketide natural products constitute a broad class of compounds with diverse structural features and biological activities. Their biosynthetic machinery, represented by type I polyketide synthases, has an architecture in which successive modules catalyze two-carbon linear extensions and keto group processing reactions on intermediates covalently tethered to carrier domains. We employed electron cryo-microscopy to visualize a full-length module and determine sub-nanometer resolution 3D reconstructions that revealed an unexpectedly different architecture compared to the homologous dimeric mammalian fatty acid synthase. A single reaction chamber provides access to all catalytic sites for the intra-module carrier domain. In contrast, the carrier from the preceding module uses a separate entrance outside the reaction chamber to deliver the upstream polyketide intermediate for subsequent extension and modification. This study reveals for the first time the structural basis for both intra-module and inter-module substrate transfer in polyketide synthases, and establishes a new model for molecular dissection of these multifunctional enzyme systems. PMID:24965652

  14. Genomic organization of plant terpene synthases and molecular evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, S C; Croteau, R B

    2001-01-01

    Terpenoids are the largest, most diverse class of plant natural products and they play numerous functional roles in primary metabolism and in ecological interactions. The first committed step in the formation of the various terpenoid classes is the transformation of the prenyl diphosphate precursors, geranyl diphosphate, farnesyl diphosphate, and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, to the parent structures of each type catalyzed by the respective monoterpene (C(10)), sesquiterpene (C(15)), and diterpene synthases (C(20)). Over 30 cDNAs encoding plant terpenoid synthases involved in primary and secondary metabolism have been cloned and characterized. Here we describe the isolation and analysis of six genomic clones encoding terpene synthases of conifers, [(-)-pinene (C(10)), (-)-limonene (C(10)), (E)-alpha-bisabolene (C(15)), delta-selinene (C(15)), and abietadiene synthase (C(20)) from Abies grandis and taxadiene synthase (C(20)) from Taxus brevifolia], all of which are involved in natural products biosynthesis. Genome organization (intron number, size, placement and phase, and exon size) of these gymnosperm terpene synthases was compared to eight previously characterized angiosperm terpene synthase genes and to six putative terpene synthase genomic sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana. Three distinct classes of terpene synthase genes were discerned, from which assumed patterns of sequential intron loss and the loss of an unusual internal sequence element suggest that the ancestral terpenoid synthase gene resembled a contemporary conifer diterpene synthase gene in containing at least 12 introns and 13 exons of conserved size. A model presented for the evolutionary history of plant terpene synthases suggests that this superfamily of genes responsible for natural products biosynthesis derived from terpene synthase genes involved in primary metabolism by duplication and divergence in structural and functional specialization. This novel molecular evolutionary approach focused

  15. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  16. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  17. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  18. Evolutinoary Consideration on 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh-Hama, Tamiko

    1997-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a universal precursor of tetrapyrrole compounds can be synthesized by two pathways: the C5 (glutamate) pathway and ALA synthase. From the phylogenetic distribution it is shown that distribution of ALA synthase is restricted to the α subclass of purple bacteria in prokaryotes, and further distributed to mitochondria of eukaryotes. The monophyletic origin of bacterial and eukaryotic ALA synthase is shown by sequence analysis of the enzyme. Evolution of ALA synthase in the α subclass of purple bacteria is discussed in relation to the energy-generating and biosynthetic devices in subclasses of this bacteria.

  19. Vitis vinifera terpenoid cyclases: functional identification of two sesquiterpene synthase cDNAs encoding (+)-valencene synthase and (-)-germacrene D synthase and expression of mono- and sesquiterpene synthases in grapevine flowers and berries.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Joost; Bowen, Pat; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-10-01

    Valencene is a volatile sesquiterpene emitted from flowers of grapevine, Vitis vinifera L. A full-length cDNA from the cultivar Gewürztraminer was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and found to encode valencene synthase (VvVal). The two major products formed by recombinant VvVal enzyme activity with farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) as substrate are (+)-valencene and (-)-7-epi-alpha-selinene. Grapevine valencene synthase is closely related to a second sesquiterpene synthase from this species, (-)-germacrene D synthase (VvGerD). VvVal and VvGerD cDNA probes revealed strong signals in Northern hybridizations with RNA isolated from grapevine flower buds. Transcript levels were lower in open pre-anthesis flowers, flowers after anthesis, or at early onset of fruit development. Similar results were obtained using a third probe, (-)-alpha-terpineol synthase, a monoterpenol synthase. Sesquiterpene synthase and monoterpene synthase transcripts were not detected in the mesocarp and exocarp during early stages of fruit development, but transcripts hybridizing with VvVal appeared during late ripening of the berries. Sesquiterpene synthase transcripts were also detected in young seeds. PMID:15464152

  20. Functional Prostacyclin Synthase Promoter Polymorphisms. Impact in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Amber R.; Lu, Xiao; Conklin, David S.; Del Rosario, Mark J.; Lowe, Anita M.; Elos, Mihret T.; Fettig, Lynsey M.; Wong, Randall E.; Hara, Naoko; Cogan, Joy D.; Phillips, John A.; Taylor, Matthew R.; Graham, Brian B.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Loyd, James E.; Geraci, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure, vascular remodeling, and ultimately right ventricular heart failure. PAH can have a genetic component (heritable PAH), most often through mutations of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, and idiopathic and associated forms. Heritable PAH is not completely penetrant within families, with approximately 20% concurrence of inactivating bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 mutations and delayed onset of PAH disease. Because one of the treatment options is using prostacyclin analogs, we hypothesized that prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants associated with increased mRNA expression may play a protective role in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 unaffected carriers. Objectives: To characterize the range of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and assess their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. To determine the distribution of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in PAH, unaffected carriers in heritable PAH families, and control populations. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction approaches were used to genotype prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in more than 300 individuals. Prostacyclin synthase promoter haplotypes’ transcriptional activities were determined with luciferase reporter assays. Measurements and Main Results: We identified a comprehensive set of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and tested their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. We demonstrated differences of prostacyclin synthase promoter activities dependent on their haplotype. Conclusions: Prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants exhibit a range of transcriptional activities. We discovered a significant bias for more active prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in unaffected carriers as compared with affected patients with PAH. PMID:24605778

  1. Molecular characterization of the homo-phytochelatin synthase of soybean Glycine max: relation to phytochelatin synthase.

    PubMed

    Oven, Matjaz; Page, Jonathan E; Zenk, Meinhart H; Kutchan, Toni M

    2002-02-15

    The phytochelatin homologs homo-phytochelatins are heavy metal-binding peptides present in many legumes. To study the biosynthesis of these compounds, we have isolated and functionally expressed a cDNA GmhPCS1 encoding homo-phytochelatin synthase from Glycine max, a plant known to accumulate homo-phytochelatins rather than phytochelatins upon the exposure to heavy metals. The catalytic properties of GmhPCS1 were compared with the phytochelatin synthase AtPCS1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. When assayed only in the presence of glutathione, both enzymes catalyzed phytochelatin formation. GmhPCS1 accepted homoglutathione as the sole substrate for the synthesis of homo-phytochelatins whereas AtPCS1 did not. Homo-phytochelatin synthesis activity of both recombinant enzymes was significantly higher when glutathione was included in the reaction mixture. The incorporation of both glutathione and homoglutathione into homo-phytochelatin, n = 2, was demonstrated using GmhPCS1 and AtPCS1. In addition to bis(glutathionato)-metal complexes, various other metal-thiolates were shown to contribute to the activation of phytochelatin synthase. These complexes were not accepted as substrates by the enzyme, thereby suggesting that a recently proposed model of activation cannot fully explain the catalytic mechanism of phytochelatin synthase (Vatamaniuk, O. K., Mari, S., Lu, Y. P., and Rea, P. A. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 31451-31459). PMID:11706029

  2. Thymidylate synthase gene of herpesvirus ateles.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J; Puchtler, I; Fleckenstein, B

    1988-01-01

    The putative thymidylate synthase (TS) gene of herpesvirus ateles, a T-lymphotropic tumor virus of New World primates, has a single large open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 32.9 kilodaltons. The gene is transcribed into an unspliced 2.4-kilobase mRNA that is abundantly expressed late in virus replication. The AT-rich 5' untranslated leader sequence of TS mRNA in herpesvirus ateles-infected cells is remarkable in length (1,184 nucleotides), containing 29 minicistrons; this may indicate a role in translation regulation. Images PMID:3404583

  3. Engineering of chimeric class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    PubMed

    Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Delamarre, Soazig C; Kim, Young-Rok; Batt, Carl A

    2004-11-01

    PHA synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Using a combinatorial genetic strategy to create unique chimeric class II PHA synthases, we have obtained a number of novel chimeras which display improved catalytic properties. To engineer the chimeric PHA synthases, we constructed a synthetic phaC gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans (phaC1Po) that was devoid of an internal 540-bp fragment. Randomly amplified PCR products (created with primers based on conserved phaC sequences flanking the deleted internal fragment) were generated using genomic DNA isolated from soil and were substituted for the 540-bp internal region. The chimeric genes were expressed in a PHA-negative strain of Ralstonia eutropha, PHB(-)4 (DSM 541). Out of 1,478 recombinant clones screened for PHA production, we obtained five different chimeric phaC1Po genes that produced more PHA than the native phaC1Po. Chimeras S1-71, S4-8, S5-58, S3-69, and S3-44 exhibited 1.3-, 1.4-, 2.0-, 2.1-, and 3.0-fold-increased levels of in vivo activity, respectively. All of the mutants mediated the synthesis of PHAs with a slightly increased molar fraction of 3-hydroxyoctanoate; however, the weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of the PHAs in all cases remained almost the same. Based upon DNA sequence analyses, the various phaC fragments appear to have originated from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The amino acid sequence analyses showed that the chimeric proteins had 17 to 20 amino acid differences from the wild-type phaC1Po, and these differences were clustered in the same positions in the five chimeric clones. A threading model of PhaC1Po, developed based on homology of the enzyme to the Burkholderia glumae lipase, suggested that the amino acid substitutions found in the active chimeras were located mostly on the protein model surface. Thus, our combinatorial genetic engineering strategy proved to be broadly useful for improving the catalytic

  4. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G.; Köllner, Tobias G.

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene–producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon–intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors. PMID:26936952

  5. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle.

    PubMed

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G; Köllner, Tobias G

    2016-03-15

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene-producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon-intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors. PMID:26936952

  6. Torque generation mechanism of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Maric, Sladjana; Scoppa, M.; Cheung, M.

    2010-03-01

    ATP synthase is a rotary motor that produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical currency of life. Our proposed electric field driven torque (EFT) model of FoF1-ATP synthase describes how torque, which scales with the number of c-ring proton binding sites, is generated by the proton motive force (pmf) across the mitochondrial inner membrane. When Fo is coupled to F1, the model predicts a critical pmf to drive ATP production. In order to fully understand how the electric field resulting from the pmf drives the c-ring to rotate, it is important to examine the charge distributions in the protonated c-ring and a-subunit containing the proton channels. Our calculations use a self-consistent field approach based on a refinement of reported structural data. The results reveal changes in pKa for key residues on the a-subunit and c-ring, as well as titration curves and protonation state energy diagrams. Health implications will be briefly discussed.

  7. ATP synthase: a tentative structural model.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, S; Junge, W

    1997-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate at the expense of proton- or sodium-motive force across the respective coupling membrane in Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya. Cation flow through the intrinsic membrane portion of this enzyme (Fo, subunits ab2c9-12) and substrate turnover in the headpiece (F1, subunits alpha3beta3 gammadeltaepsilon) are mechanically coupled by the rotation of subunit gamma in the center of the catalytic hexagon of subunits (alphabeta)3 in F1. ATP synthase is the smallest rotatory engine in nature. With respect to the headpiece alone, it probably operates with three steps. Partial structures of six out of its at least eight different subunits have been published and a 3-dimensional structure is available for the assembly (alphabeta)3gamma. In this article, we review the available structural data and build a tentative topological model of the holoenzyme. The rotor portion is proposed to consist of a wheel of at least nine copies of subunits c, epsilon and a portion of gamma as a spoke, and another portion of gamma as a crankshaft. The stator is made up from a, the transmembrane portion of b2, delta and the catalytic hexagon of (alphabeta)3. As an educated guess, the model may be of heuristic value for ongoing studies on this fascinating electrochemical-to-mechanical-to-chemical transducer. PMID:9323021

  8. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-05-15

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode proteins not directly involved in COX assembly can also cause LS. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC) regulates mRNA stability, polyadenylation and coordinates mitochondrial translation. In humans, mutations in Lrpprc cause the French Canadian type of LS. Despite the finding that LRPPRC deficiency affects the stability of most mitochondrial mRNAs, its pathophysiological effect has mainly been attributed to COX deficiency. Surprisingly, we show here that the impaired mitochondrial respiration and reduced ATP production observed in Lrpprc conditional knockout mouse hearts is caused by an ATP synthase deficiency. Furthermore, the appearance of inactive subassembled ATP synthase complexes causes hyperpolarization and increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Our findings shed important new light on the bioenergetic consequences of the loss of LRPPRC in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:24399447

  9. Activities and regulation of peptidoglycan synthases

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Alexander J. F.; Biboy, Jacob; van't Veer, Inge; Breukink, Eefjan; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component in the cell wall of nearly all bacteria, forming a continuous, mesh-like structure, called the sacculus, around the cytoplasmic membrane to protect the cell from bursting by its turgor. Although PG synthases, the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied for 70 years, useful in vitro assays for measuring their activities were established only recently, and these provided the first insights into the regulation of these enzymes. Here, we review the current knowledge on the glycosyltransferase and transpeptidase activities of PG synthases. We provide new data showing that the bifunctional PBP1A and PBP1B from Escherichia coli are active upon reconstitution into the membrane environment of proteoliposomes, and that these enzymes also exhibit DD-carboxypeptidase activity in certain conditions. Both novel features are relevant for their functioning within the cell. We also review recent data on the impact of protein–protein interactions and other factors on the activities of PBPs. As an example, we demonstrate a synergistic effect of multiple protein–protein interactions on the glycosyltransferase activity of PBP1B, by its cognate lipoprotein activator LpoB and the essential cell division protein FtsN. PMID:26370943

  10. Discovery of DF-461, a Potent Squalene Synthase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new trifluoromethyltriazolobenzoxazepine series of squalene synthase inhibitors. Structure–activity studies and pharmacokinetics optimization on this series led to the identification of compound 23 (DF-461), which exhibited potent squalene synthase inhibitory activity, high hepatic selectivity, excellent rat hepatic cholesterol synthesis inhibitory activity, and plasma lipid lowering efficacy in nonrodent repeated dose studies. PMID:24900587

  11. Probing myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase with multisubstrate adducts

    PubMed Central

    Deranieh, Rania M.; Greenberg, Miriam L.; Le Calvez, Pierre-B.; Mooney, Maura C.; Migaud, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of carbohydrate-nucleotide hybrids, designed to be multisubstrate adducts mimicking myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase first oxidative transition state, is reported. Their ability to inhibit the synthase has been assessed and results have been rationalised computationally to estimate their likely binding mode. PMID:23132282

  12. A propionate CoA-transferase of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with broad substrate specificity catalyzing the CoA thioester formation of various carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Lindenkamp, Nicole; Schürmann, Marc; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated a propionate CoA-transferase (Pct) homologue encoded in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16. The corresponding gene has been cloned into the vector pET-19b to yield a histidine-tagged enzyme which was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). After purification, high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) analyses revealed that the enzyme exhibits a broad substrate specificity for carboxylic acids. The formation of the corresponding CoA-thioesters of acetate using propionyl-CoA as CoA donor, and of propionate, butyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxypropionate, crotonate, acrylate, lactate, succinate and 4-hydroxybutyrate using acetyl-CoA as CoA donor could be shown. According to the substrate specificity, the enzyme can be allocated in the family I of CoA-transferases. The apparent molecular masses as determined by gel filtration and detected by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were 228 and 64 kDa, respectively, and point to a quaternary structure of the native enzyme (α4). The enzyme exhibited similarities in sequence and structure to the well investigated Pct of Clostridium propionicum. It does not contain the typical conserved (S)ENG motif, but the derived motif sequence EXG with glutamate 342 to be, most likely, the catalytic residue. Due to the homo-oligomeric structure and the sequence differences with the subclasses IA-C of family I CoA-transferases, a fourth subclass of family I is proposed, comprising - amongst others - the Pcts of R. eutropha H16 and C. propionicum. A markerless precise-deletion mutant R. eutropha H16∆pct was generated. The growth and accumulation behaviour of this mutant on gluconate, gluconate plus 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP), acetate and propionate was investigated but resulted in no observable phenotype. Both, the wild type and the mutant showed the same growth and storage behaviour with these carbon sources. It is probable that R. eutropha H16 is upregulating

  13. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-07-01

    Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5'-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  14. Crystal Structure of the N-Acetyltransferase Domain of Human N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Synthase in Complex with N-Acetyl-L-Glutamate Provides Insights into Its Catalytic and Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  15. Crystal structure of the N-acetyltransferase domain of human N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase in complex with N-acetyl-L-glutamate provides insights into its catalytic and regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of AcCoA and L-glutamate to CoA and N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), an obligate cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in the urea cycle. NAGS deficiency results in elevated levels of plasma ammonia which is neurotoxic. We report herein the first crystal structure of human NAGS, that of the catalytic N-acetyltransferase (hNAT) domain with N-acetyl-L-glutamate bound at 2.1 Å resolution. Functional studies indicate that the hNAT domain retains catalytic activity in the absence of the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain. Instead, the major functions of the AAK domain appear to be providing a binding site for the allosteric activator, L-arginine, and an N-terminal proline-rich motif that is likely to function in signal transduction to CPS1. Crystalline hNAT forms a dimer similar to the NAT-NAT dimers that form in crystals of bifunctional N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (NAGS/K) from Maricaulis maris and also exists as a dimer in solution. The structure of the NAG binding site, in combination with mutagenesis studies, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism. We also show that native NAGS from human and mouse exists in tetrameric form, similar to those of bifunctional NAGS/K. PMID:23894642

  16. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  17. Light/Dark Profiles of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase, Sucrose Synthase, and Acid Invertase in Leaves of Sugar Beets

    PubMed Central

    Vassey, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The activity of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, and acid invertase was monitored in 1- to 2-month-old sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves. Sugar beet leaves achieve full laminar length in 13 days. Therefore, leaves were harvested at 2-day intervals for 15 days. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity was not detectable for 6 days in the dark-grown leaves. Once activity was measurable, sucrose phosphate synthase activity never exceeded half that observed in the light-grown leaves. After 8 days in the dark, leaves which were illuminated for 30 minutes showed no significant change in sucrose phosphate synthase activity. Leaves illuminated for 24 hours after 8 days in darkness, however, recovered sucrose phosphate synthase activity to 80% of that of normally grown leaves. Sucrose synthase and acid invertase activity in the light-grown leaves both increased for the first 7 days and then decreased as the leaves matured. In contrast, the activity of sucrose synthase oscillated throughout the growth period in the dark-grown leaves. Acid invertase activity in the dark-grown leaves seemed to be the same as the activity found in the light-grown leaves. PMID:16666537

  18. Functional Contribution of Chorismate Synthase, Anthranilate Synthase, and Chorismate Mutase to Penetration Resistance in Barley-Powdery Mildew Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant processes resulting from primary or secondary metabolism have been hypothesized to contribute to defense against microbial attack. Barley chorismate synthase (HvCS), anthranilate synthase alpha subunit 2 (HvASa2) and chorismate mutase 1 (HvCM1) occupy pivotal branch-points downstream of the s...

  19. Hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases in nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Panogeorgou, T; Tserbini, E; Filou, S; Vynios, D H; Naxakis, S S; Papadas, T A; Goumas, P D; Mastronikolis, N S

    2016-07-01

    Nasal polyps (NPs) are benign lesions of nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa affecting 1-4 % of all adults. Nasal polyposis affects the quality of patient's life as it causes nasal obstruction, postnasal drainage, purulent nasal discharge, hyposmia or anosmia, chronic sinusitis, facial pain and snoring. Without treatment, the disease can alter the craniofacial skeleton in cases of extended growth of polyps. The development of NPs is caused by the hyperplasia of nasal or paranasal sinuses mucosa, and edema of extracellular matrix. This is usually the result of high concentration of high molecular mass hyaluronan (HA) which is either overproduced or accumulated from blood supply. The size of HA presents high diversity and, especially in pathologic conditions, chains of low molecular mass can be observed. In NPs, chains of about 200 kDa have been identified and considered to be responsible for the inflammation. The purpose of the present study was the investigation, in NPs and normal nasal mucosa (NM), of the expression of the wild-type and alternatively spliced forms of hyaluronidases, their immunolocalization, and the expression of HA synthases to examine the isoform(s) responsible for the increased amounts of HA in NPs. Hyaluronidases' presence was examined on mRNA (RT-PCR analysis) and protein (immunohistochemistry) levels. Hyaluronan synthases' presence was examined on mRNA levels. Hyaluronidases were localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial and inflammatory cells, as well as in the matrix. On mRNA level, it was found that hyal-1-wt was decreased in NPs compared to NM and hyal-1-v3, -v4 and -v5 were substantially increased. Moreover, HAS2 and HAS3 were the only hyaluronan synthases detected, the expression of which was almost similar in NPs and NM. Overall, the results of the present study support that hyaluronidases are the main enzymes responsible for the decreased size of hyaluronan observed in NPs; thus they behave as inflammatory agents. Therefore, they

  20. Crystal structure of enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase at 2.5 angstroms resolution: a spiral fold defines the CoA-binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, C K; Mathieu, M; Zeelen, J P; Hiltunen, J K; Wierenga, R K

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structure of rat liver mitochondrial enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase complexed with the potent inhibitor acetoacetyl-CoA has been refined at 2.5 angstroms resolution. This enzyme catalyses the reversible addition of water to alpha,beta-unsaturated enoyl-CoA thioesters, with nearly diffusion-controlled reaction rates for the best substrates. Enoyl-CoA hydratase is a hexamer of six identical subunits of 161 kDa molecular mass for the complex. The hexamer is a dimer of trimers. The monomer is folded into a right-handed spiral of four turns, followed by two small domains which are involved in trimerization. Each turn of the spiral consists of two beta-strands and an alpha-helix. The mechanism for the hydratase/dehydratase reaction follows a syn-stereochemistry, a preference that is opposite to the nonenzymatic reaction. The active-site architecture agrees with this stereochemistry. It confirms the importance of Glu164 as the catalytic acid for providing the alpha-proton during the hydratase reaction. It also shows the importance of Glu144 as the catalytic base for the activation of a water molecule in the hydratase reaction. The comparison of an unliganded and a liganded active site within the same crystal form shows a water molecule in the unliganded subunit. This water molecule is bound between the two catalytic glutamates and could serve as the activated water during catalysis. Images PMID:8895557

  1. Age-related macular degeneration and protective effect of HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (statins): results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, D T Q; Mendes, T S; Cíntron-Colon, H R; Wang, S Y; Bhisitkul, R B; Singh, K; Lin, S C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association of hydroxymethylglutarylcoenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase inhibitor (statin) use with the prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods This cross-sectional study included 5604 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005 to 2008, ≥40 years of age, who were ascertained with regard to the diagnosis of AMD, the use of statins, and comorbidities and health-related behaviors such as smoking. Results The mean age of participants denying or confirming a history of AMD was 68 (SEM 0.90) and 55 (SEM 0.36) years, respectively. Individuals 68 years of age or older who were classified as long-term users of statins had statistically significant less self-reported AMD (odds ratio (OR) 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49–0.84; P=0.002), after adjusting for potential confounding variables. No significant association was found between the prevalence of AMD and statin consumption among subjects between 40 and 67 years of age (OR 1.61, 95% CI 0.85–3.03; P=0.137). Conclusions Our results suggest a possible beneficial effect of statin intake for the prevention of AMD in individuals 68 years of age or older. PMID:24503725

  2. Molecular cloning, modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis of type III polyketide synthase from Sargassum binderi (Phaeophyta).

    PubMed

    Baharum, Hariyanti; Morita, Hiroyuki; Tomitsuka, Akifumi; Lee, Fong-Chin; Ng, Kim-Yong; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Abe, Ikuro; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2011-10-01

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce an array of metabolites with diverse functions. In this study, we have cloned the complete reading frame encoding type III PKS (SbPKS) from a brown seaweed, Sargassum binderi, and characterized the activity of its recombinant protein biochemically. The deduced amino acid sequence of SbPKS is 414 residues in length, sharing a higher sequence similarity with bacterial PKSs (38% identity) than with plant PKSs. The Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad of PKS is conserved in SbPKS with differences in some of the residues lining the active and CoA binding sites. The wild-type SbPKS displayed broad starter substrate specificity to aliphatic long-chain acyl-CoAs (C(6)-C(14)) to produce tri- and tetraketide pyrones. Mutations at H(331) and N(364) caused complete loss of its activity, thus suggesting that these two residues are the catalytic residues for SbPKS as in other type III PKSs. Furthermore, H227G, H227G/L366V substitutions resulted in increased tetraketide-forming activity, while wild-type SbPKS produces triketide α-pyrone as a major product. On the other hand, mutant H227G/L366V/F93A/V95A demonstrated a dramatic decrease of tetraketide pyrone formation. These observations suggest that His(227) and Leu(366) play an important role for the polyketide elongation reaction in SbPKS. The conformational changes in protein structure especially the cavity of the active site may have more significant effect to the activity of SbPKS compared with changes in individual residues. PMID:21181422

  3. Asn-150 of Murine Erythroid 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase Modulates the Catalytic Balance between the Rates of the Reversible Reaction.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2015-12-25

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) catalyzes the first step in mammalian heme biosynthesis, the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent and reversible reaction between glycine and succinyl-CoA to generate CoA, CO2, and 5-aminolevulinate (ALA). Apart from coordinating the positioning of succinyl-CoA, Rhodobacter capsulatus ALAS Asn-85 has a proposed role in regulating the opening of an active site channel. Here, we constructed a library of murine erythroid ALAS variants with substitutions at the position occupied by the analogous bacterial asparagine, screened for ALAS function, and characterized the catalytic properties of the N150H and N150F variants. Quinonoid intermediate formation occurred with a significantly reduced rate for either the N150H- or N150F-catalyzed condensation of glycine with succinyl-CoA during a single turnover. The introduced mutations caused modifications in the ALAS active site such that the resulting variants tipped the balance between the forward- and reverse-catalyzed reactions. Although wild-type ALAS catalyzes the conversion of ALA into the quinonoid intermediate at a rate 6.3-fold slower than the formation of the same quinonoid intermediate from glycine and succinyl-CoA, the N150F variant catalyzes the forward reaction at a mere 1.2-fold faster rate than that of the reverse reaction, and the N150H variant reverses the rate values with a 1.7-fold faster rate for the reverse reaction than that for the forward reaction. We conclude that the evolutionary selection of Asn-150 was significant for optimizing the forward enzymatic reaction at the expense of the reverse, thus ensuring that ALA is predominantly available for heme biosynthesis. PMID:26511319

  4. Heterologous expression in Saccharopolyspora erythraea of a pentaketide synthase derived from the spinosyn polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christine J; Timoney, Máire C; Sheridan, Rose M; Kendrew, Steven G; Wilkinson, Barrie; Staunton, James C; Leadlay, Peter F

    2003-12-01

    A truncated version of the spinosyn polyketide synthase comprising the loading module and the first four extension modules fused to the erythromycin thioesterase domain was expressed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A novel pentaketide lactone product was isolated, identifying cryptic steps of spinosyn biosynthesis and indicating the potential of this approach for the biosynthetic engineering of spinosyn analogues. A pathway for the formation of the tetracyclic spinosyn aglycone is proposed. PMID:14685317

  5. Substrate Controlled Divergence in Polyketide Synthase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical characterization of polyketide synthases (PKSs) has relied on synthetic substrates functionalized as electrophilic esters to acylate the enzyme and initiate the catalytic cycle. In these efforts, N-acetylcysteamine thioesters have typically been employed for in vitro studies of full PKS modules as well as excised domains. However, substrate engineering approaches to control the catalytic cycle of a full PKS module harboring multiple domains remain underexplored. This study examines a series of alternatively activated native hexaketide substrates on the catalytic outcome of PikAIV, the sixth and final module of the pikromycin (Pik) pathway. We demonstrate the ability to control product formation with greater than 10:1 selectivity for either full module catalysis, leading to a 14-membered macrolactone, or direct cyclization to a 12-membered ring. This outcome was achieved through modifying the type of hexaketide ester employed, demonstrating the utility of substrate engineering in PKS functional studies and biocatalysis. PMID:25730816

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  7. AcsF Catalyzes the ATP-dependent Insertion of Nickel into the Ni,Ni-[4Fe4S] Cluster of Acetyl-CoA Synthase.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Christina M; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger

    2016-08-26

    Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) catalyzes the reversible condensation of CO, CoA, and a methyl-cation to form acetyl-CoA at a unique Ni,Ni-[4Fe4S] cluster (the A-cluster). However, it was unknown which proteins support the assembly of the A-cluster. We analyzed the product of a gene from the cluster containing the ACS gene, cooC2 from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans, named AcsFCh, and showed that it acts as a maturation factor of ACS. AcsFCh and inactive ACS form a stable 2:1 complex that binds two nickel ions with higher affinity than the individual components. The nickel-bound ACS-AcsFCh complex remains inactive until MgATP is added, thereby converting inactive to active ACS. AcsFCh is a MinD-type ATPase and belongs to the CooC protein family, which can be divided into homologous subgroups. We propose that proteins of one subgroup are responsible for assembling the Ni,Ni-[4Fe4S] cluster of ACS, whereas proteins of a second subgroup mature the [Ni4Fe4S] cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases. PMID:27382049

  8. Novel domain arrangement in the crystal structure of a truncated acetyl-CoA synthase fromMoorella thermoacetica†‡

    PubMed Central

    Volbeda, Anne; Darnault, Claudine; Tan, Xiangshi; Lindahl, Paul A.; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    Ni-dependent Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and CO dehydrogenase (CODH) constitute the central enzyme complex of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetyl-CoA formation. The crystal structure of a recombinant bacterial ACS lacking the N-terminal domain that interacts with CODH shows a large reorganization of the remaining two globular domains, producing a narrow cleft of suitable size, shape and nature to bind CoA. Sequence comparisons with homologous archaeal enzymes that naturally lack the N-terminal domain show that many amino acids lining this cleft are conserved. Besides the typical [4Fe-4S] center, the A-cluster contains only one proximal metal ion that, according to anomalous scattering data, is most likely Cu or Zn. Incorporation of a functional Ni2Fe4S4 A-cluster would require only minor structural rearrangements. Using available structures, a plausible model of the interaction between CODH and the smaller ACS in archaeal multi-enzyme complexes is presented, along with a discussion of evolutionary relationships of the archaeal and bacterial enzymes. PMID:19650626

  9. Bacterial phytoene synthase: molecular cloning, expression, and characterization of Erwinia herbicola phytoene synthase.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Math, Shivanand K; Desai, Shrivallabh B; Poulter, C Dale

    2003-03-25

    Phytoene synthase (PSase) catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to give prephytoene diphosphate (PPPP) and the subsequent rearrangement of the cyclopropylcarbinyl intermediate to phytoene. These reactions constitute the first pathway specific step in carotenoid biosynthesis. The crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was isolated from a plasmid containing the carotenoid gene cluster in Erwinia herbicola and cloned into an Escherichia coli expression system. Upon induction, recombinant phytoene synthase constituted 5-10% of total soluble protein. To facilitate purification of the recombinant enzyme, the structural gene for PSase was modified by site-directed mutagenesis to incorporate a C-terminal Glu-Glu-Phe (EEF) tripepetide to allow purification by immunoaffinity chromatography on an immobilized monoclonal anti-alpha-tubulin antibody YL1/2 column. Purified recombinant PSase-EEF gave a band at 34.5 kDa upon SDS-PAGE. Recombinant PSase-EEF was then purified to >90% homogeneity in two steps by ion-exchange and immunoaffinity chromatography. The enzyme required Mn(2+) for activity, had a pH optimum of 8.2, and was strongly stimulated by detergent. The concentration of GGPP needed for half-maximal activity was approximately 35 microM, and a significant inhibition of activity was seen at GGPP concentrations above 100 microM. The sole product of the reaction was 15,15'-Z-phytoene. PMID:12641468

  10. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  11. Structure and Function of Fusicoccadiene Synthase, a Hexameric Bifunctional Diterpene Synthase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengbin; Chou, Wayne K W; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2016-04-15

    Fusicoccin A is a diterpene glucoside phytotoxin generated by the fungal pathogen Phomopsis amygdali that causes the plant disease constriction canker, first discovered in New Jersey peach orchards in the 1930s. Fusicoccin A is also an emerging new lead in cancer chemotherapy. The hydrocarbon precursor of fusicoccin A is the tricyclic diterpene fusicoccadiene, which is generated by a bifunctional terpenoid synthase. Here, we report X-ray crystal structures of the individual catalytic domains of fusicoccadiene synthase: the C-terminal domain is a chain elongation enzyme that generates geranylgeranyl diphosphate, and the N-terminal domain catalyzes the cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to form fusicoccadiene. Crystal structures of each domain complexed with bisphosphonate substrate analogues suggest that three metal ions and three positively charged amino acid side chains trigger substrate ionization in each active site. While in vitro incubations reveal that the cyclase domain can utilize farnesyl diphosphate and geranyl diphosphate as surrogate substrates, these shorter isoprenoid diphosphates are mainly converted into acyclic alcohol or hydrocarbon products. Gel filtration chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments indicate that full-length fusicoccadiene synthase adopts hexameric quaternary structure, and small-angle X-ray scattering data yield a well-defined molecular envelope illustrating a plausible model for hexamer assembly. PMID:26734760

  12. Biosynthetic potential of sesquiterpene synthases: product profiles of Egyptian Henbane premnaspirodiene synthase and related mutants.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Vickery, Christopher R; Xu, Yi; Louie, Gordon V; O'Maille, Paul E; Bowman, Marianne; Nartey, Charisse M; Burkart, Michael D; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    The plant terpene synthase (TPS) family is responsible for the biosynthesis of a variety of terpenoid natural products possessing diverse biological functions. TPSs catalyze the ionization and, most commonly, rearrangement and cyclization of prenyl diphosphate substrates, forming linear and cyclic hydrocarbons. Moreover, a single TPS often produces several minor products in addition to a dominant product. We characterized the catalytic profiles of Hyoscyamus muticus premnaspirodiene synthase (HPS) and compared it with the profile of a closely related TPS, Nicotiana tabacum 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (TEAS). The profiles of two previously studied HPS and TEAS mutants, each containing nine interconverting mutations, dubbed HPS-M9 and TEAS-M9, were also characterized. All four TPSs were compared under varying temperature and pH conditions. In addition, we solved the X-ray crystal structures of TEAS and a TEAS quadruple mutant complexed with substrate and products to gain insight into the enzymatic features modulating product formation. These informative structures, along with product profiles, provide new insight into plant TPS catalytic promiscuity. PMID:27328867

  13. Inhibitory effect on in vitro LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity of the liquid-liquid partitioned fractions of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Persoon (lion's mane mushroom).

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly suggested as the key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Mushrooms have been implicated in having preventive effects against chronic diseases due especially to their antioxidant properties. In this study, in vitro inhibitory effect of Hericium erinaceus on LDL oxidation and the activity of the cholesterol biosynthetic key enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase, was evaluated using five liquid-liquid solvent fractions consisting of methanol : dichloromethane (M : DCM), hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), and aqueous residue (AQ). The hexane fraction showed the highest inhibition of oxidation of human LDL as reflected by the increased lag time (100 mins) for the formation of conjugated diene (CD) at 1 µg/mL and decreased production (68.28%, IC50 0.73 mg/mL) of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1 mg/mL. It also mostly inhibited (59.91%) the activity of the HMG Co-A reductase at 10 mg/mL. The GC-MS profiling of the hexane fraction identified the presence of myconutrients: inter alia, ergosterol and linoleic acid. Thus, hexane fraction of Hericium erinaceus was found to be the most potent in vitro inhibitor of both LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity having therapeutic potential for the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated vascular diseases. PMID:24959591

  14. Inhibitory Effect on In Vitro LDL Oxidation and HMG Co-A Reductase Activity of the Liquid-Liquid Partitioned Fractions of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Persoon (Lion's Mane Mushroom)

    PubMed Central

    Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly suggested as the key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Mushrooms have been implicated in having preventive effects against chronic diseases due especially to their antioxidant properties. In this study, in vitro inhibitory effect of Hericium erinaceus on LDL oxidation and the activity of the cholesterol biosynthetic key enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase, was evaluated using five liquid-liquid solvent fractions consisting of methanol : dichloromethane (M : DCM), hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), and aqueous residue (AQ). The hexane fraction showed the highest inhibition of oxidation of human LDL as reflected by the increased lag time (100 mins) for the formation of conjugated diene (CD) at 1 µg/mL and decreased production (68.28%, IC50 0.73 mg/mL) of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1 mg/mL. It also mostly inhibited (59.91%) the activity of the HMG Co-A reductase at 10 mg/mL. The GC-MS profiling of the hexane fraction identified the presence of myconutrients: inter alia, ergosterol and linoleic acid. Thus, hexane fraction of Hericium erinaceus was found to be the most potent in vitro inhibitor of both LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity having therapeutic potential for the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated vascular diseases. PMID:24959591

  15. Cellulose in Cyanobacteria. Origin of Vascular Plant Cellulose Synthase?

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, David R.; Romanovicz, Dwight K.; Brown, R. Malcolm

    2001-01-01

    Although cellulose biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria has been suggested previously, we present the first conclusive evidence, to our knowledge, of the presence of cellulose in these organisms. Based on the results of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy of microfibrils, and cellobiohydrolase I-gold labeling, we report the occurrence of cellulose biosynthesis in nine species representing three of the five sections of cyanobacteria. Sequence analysis of the genomes of four cyanobacteria revealed the presence of multiple amino acid sequences bearing the DDD35QXXRW motif conserved in all cellulose synthases. Pairwise alignments demonstrated that CesAs from plants were more similar to putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 than any other cellulose synthases in the database. Multiple alignments of putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and N. punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 with the cellulose synthases of other prokaryotes, Arabidopsis, Gossypium hirsutum, Populus alba × Populus tremula, corn (Zea mays), and Dictyostelium discoideum showed that cyanobacteria share an insertion between conserved regions U1 and U2 found previously only in eukaryotic sequences. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis indicates that the cyanobacterial cellulose synthases share a common branch with CesAs of vascular plants in a manner similar to the relationship observed with cyanobacterial and chloroplast 16s rRNAs, implying endosymbiotic transfer of CesA from cyanobacteria to plants and an ancient origin for cellulose synthase in eukaryotes. PMID:11598227

  16. Class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases and PHA-producing Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Takeharu; Hyakutake, Manami; Mizuno, Kouhei

    2015-08-01

    This review highlights the recent investigations of class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases, the newest classification of PHA synthases. Class IV synthases are prevalent in organisms of the Bacillus genus and are composed of a catalytic subunit PhaC (approximately 40 kDa), which has a PhaC box sequence ([GS]-X-C-X-[GA]-G) at the active site, and a second subunit PhaR (approximately 20 kDa). The representative PHA-producing Bacillus strains are Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus; the nucleotide sequence of phaC and the genetic organization of the PHA biosynthesis gene locus are somewhat different between these two strains. It is generally considered that class IV synthases favor short-chain-length monomers such as 3-hydroxybutyrate (C4) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (C5) for polymerization, but can polymerize some unusual monomers as minor components. In Escherichia coli expressing PhaRC from B. cereus YB-4, the biosynthesized PHA undergoes synthase-catalyzed alcoholytic cleavage using endogenous and exogenous alcohols. This alcoholysis is thought to be shared among class IV synthases, and this reaction is useful not only for the regulation of PHA molecular weight but also for the modification of the PHA carboxy terminus. The novel properties of class IV synthases will open up the possibility for the design of new PHA materials. PMID:26135986

  17. Acetolactate Synthase Activity in Developing Maize (Zea mays L.) Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Muhitch, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase (EC 4.1.3.18) activity was examined in maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm and embryos as a function of kernel development. When assayed using unpurified homogenates, embryo acetolactate synthase activity appeared less sensitive to inhibition by leucine + valine and by the imidazolinone herbicide imazapyr than endosperm acetolactate synthase activity. Evidence is presented to show that pyruvate decarboxylase contributes to apparent acetolactate synthase activity in crude embryo extracts and a modification of the acetolactate synthase assay is proposed to correct for the presence of pyruvate decarboxylase in unpurified plant homogenates. Endosperm acetolactate synthase activity increased rapidly during early kernel development, reaching a maximum of 3 micromoles acetoin per hour per endosperm at 25 days after pollination. In contrast, embryo activity was low in young kernels and steadily increased throughout development to a maximum activity of 0.24 micromole per hour per embryo by 45 days after pollination. The sensitivity of both endosperm and embryo acetolactate synthase activities to feedback inhibition by leucine + valine did not change during kernel development. The results are compared to those found for other enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and discussed with respect to the potential roles of the embryo and endosperm in providing amino acids for storage protein synthesis. PMID:16665871

  18. Studies of the isoprenoid-mediated inhibition of mevalonate synthesis applied to cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huanbiao; Elson, Charles E

    2004-07-01

    Pools of farnesyl diphosphate and other phosphorylated products of the mevalonate pathway are essential to the post-translational processing and physiological function of small G proteins, nuclear lamins, and growth factor receptors. Inhibitors of enzyme activities providing those pools, namely, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase and mevalonic acid-pyrophosphate decarboxylase, and of activities requiring substrates from the pools, the prenyl protein transferases, have potential for development as novel chemotherapeutic agents. Their potentials as suggested by the clinical responses recorded in Phase I and II investigations of inhibitors of HMG CoA reductase (the statins), of mevalonic acid-pyrophosphate decarboxylase (sodium phenylacetate and sodium phenylbutyrate), and of farnesyl protein transferase (R115777, SCH66336, BMS-214662, Tipifarnib, L-778,123, and, prematurely, perillyl alcohol) are dimmed by dose-limiting toxicities. These nondiscriminant growth-suppressive agents induce G1 arrest and initiate apoptosis and differentiation, effects attributed to modulation of cell signaling pathways either by modulating gene expression, suppressing the post-translational processing of signaling proteins and growth factor receptors, or altering diacylglycerol signaling. Diverse isoprenoids and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, modulate cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, initiate apoptosis, and suppress cellular signaling activities. Perillyl alcohol, the isoprenoid of greatest clinical interest, initially was considered to inhibit farnesyl protein transferase; follow-up studies revealed that perillyl alcohol suppresses the synthesis of small G proteins and HMG CoA reductase. In sterologenic tissues, sterol feedback control, mediated by sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) 1a and 2, exerts the primary regulation on HMG CoA reductase activity at the transcriptional level. Secondary regulation, a nonsterol isoprenoid

  19. Generation and Functional Evaluation of Designer Monoterpene Synthases.

    PubMed

    Srividya, N; Lange, I; Lange, B M

    2016-01-01

    Monoterpene synthases are highly versatile enzymes that catalyze the first committed step in the pathways toward terpenoids, the structurally most diverse class of plant natural products. Recent advancements in our understanding of the reaction mechanism have enabled engineering approaches to develop mutant monoterpene synthases that produce specific monoterpenes. In this chapter, we are describing protocols to introduce targeted mutations, express mutant enzyme catalysts in heterologous hosts, and assess their catalytic properties. Mutant monoterpene synthases have the potential to contribute significantly to synthetic biology efforts aimed at producing larger amounts of commercially attractive monoterpenes. PMID:27480686

  20. The Pseudouridine Synthases Proceed through a Glycal Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pseudouridine synthases isomerize (U) in RNA to pseudouridine (Ψ), and the mechanism that they follow has long been a question of interest. The recent elucidation of a product of the mechanistic probe 5-fluorouridine that had been epimerized to the arabino isomer suggested that the Ψ synthases might operate through a glycal intermediate formed by deprotonation of C2′. When that position in substrate U is deuterated, a primary kinetic isotope effect is observed, which indisputably indicates that the proposed deprotonation occurs during the isomerization of U to Ψ and establishes the mechanism followed by the Ψ synthases. PMID:27292228

  1. Computational design and selections for an engineered, thermostable terpene synthase

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Juan E; Lin, Chun-Shi; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Feld, Birte K; Avrantinis, Sara K; Bronson, Jonathan; Greaves, John; Saven, Jeffery G; Weiss, Gregory A

    2011-01-01

    Terpenoids include structurally diverse antibiotics, flavorings, and fragrances. Engineering terpene synthases for control over the synthesis of such compounds represents a long sought goal. We report computational design, selections, and assays of a thermostable mutant of tobacco 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (TEAS) for the catalysis of carbocation cyclization reactions at elevated temperatures. Selection for thermostability included proteolytic digestion followed by capture of intact proteins. Unlike the wild-type enzyme, the mutant TEAS retains enzymatic activity at 65°C. The thermostable terpene synthase variant denatures above 80°C, approximately twice the temperature of the wild-type enzyme. PMID:21739507

  2. The Pseudouridine Synthases Proceed through a Glycal Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Veerareddygari, Govardhan Reddy; Singh, Sanjay K; Mueller, Eugene G

    2016-06-29

    The pseudouridine synthases isomerize (U) in RNA to pseudouridine (Ψ), and the mechanism that they follow has long been a question of interest. The recent elucidation of a product of the mechanistic probe 5-fluorouridine that had been epimerized to the arabino isomer suggested that the Ψ synthases might operate through a glycal intermediate formed by deprotonation of C2'. When that position in substrate U is deuterated, a primary kinetic isotope effect is observed, which indisputably indicates that the proposed deprotonation occurs during the isomerization of U to Ψ and establishes the mechanism followed by the Ψ synthases. PMID:27292228

  3. Geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from Methanosarcina mazei: Different role, different evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2010-02-26

    The gene of (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase that is responsible for the biosynthesis of methanophenazine, an electron carrier utilized for methanogenesis, was cloned from a methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Goe1. The properties of the recombinant enzyme and the results of phylogenetic analysis suggest that the enzyme is closely related to (all-E) prenyl diphosphate synthases that are responsible for the biosynthesis of respiratory quinones, rather than to the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, including (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from a thermophilic archaeon.

  4. Dimer ribbons of ATP synthase shape the inner mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-01-01

    ATP synthase converts the electrochemical potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane into chemical energy, producing the ATP that powers the cell. Using electron cryo-tomography we show that the ATP synthase of mammalian mitochondria is arranged in long ∼1-μm rows of dimeric supercomplexes, located at the apex of cristae membranes. The dimer ribbons enforce a strong local curvature on the membrane with a 17-nm outer radius. Calculations of the electrostatic field strength indicate a significant increase in charge density, and thus in the local pH gradient of ∼0.5 units in regions of high membrane curvature. We conclude that the mitochondrial cristae act as proton traps, and that the proton sink of the ATP synthase at the apex of the compartment favours effective ATP synthesis under proton-limited conditions. We propose that the mitochondrial ATP synthase organises itself into dimer ribbons to optimise its own performance. PMID:18323778

  5. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  6. Sampling Long Timescale Protein Motions: OSRW Simulation of Active Site Loop Conformational Free Energies in Formyl-CoA:Oxalate CoA Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangbae; Chen, Mengen; Yang, Wei; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic snapshots have shown that conformational changes of a tetraglycine loop in the active site of formyl-CoA: oxalate CoA transferase (FRC) play an important role in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. Orthogonal space random walk (OSRW) simulations have been applied to obtain quantitative computational estimates of the relative free energy of the “open” and “closed” conformations of this loop together with the energetic barrier for interconversion of these states in wild type FRC. These OSRW calculations not only show that the two conformations have similar free energies but also predict a barrier that is consistent with the observed turnover number of the enzyme. In an effort to quantitate the importance of specific residues in the tetraglycine loop, OSRW simulations have also been performed on the G258A, G259A, G260A and G261A FRC variants both to examine the energetic effects of replacing each glycine residue and to correlate the computed energies with kinetic and structural observations. In enzymes with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM), the OSRW simulations reveal the adoption of additional low energy loop conformations. In the case of the G260A FRC variant, the new conformation identified by simulation is similar to that observed in the X-ray crystal structure of the protein. These results provide further evidence for the power of the OSRW method in sampling conformational space, and hence in providing quantitative free energy estimates for the conformations adopted by functionally important active site loops. In addition, these simulations model the motions of side chains that are correlated with changes in loop conformation thereby permitting access to long time-scale motions through the use of nanosecond simulations. PMID:20446682

  7. Aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase and/or thiolase overexpression coupled with CoA transferase downregulation lead to higher alcohol titers and selectivity in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations.

    PubMed

    Sillers, Ryan; Al-Hinai, Mohab Ali; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic engineering (ME) of Clostridium acetobutylicum has led to increased solvent (butanol, acetone, and ethanol) production and solvent tolerance, thus demonstrating that further efforts have the potential to create strains of industrial importance. With recently developed ME tools, it is now possible to combine genetic modifications and thus implement more advanced ME strategies. We have previously shown that antisense RNA (asRNA)-based downregulation of CoA transferase (CoAT, the first enzyme in the acetone-formation pathway) results in increased butanol to acetone selectivity, but overall reduced butanol yields and titers. In this study the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (aad) gene (encoding the bifunctional protein AAD responsible for butanol and ethanol production from butyryl-CoA and acetyl-CoA, respectively) was expressed from the phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb) promoter to enhance butanol formation and selectivity, while CoAT downregulation was used to minimize acetone production. This led to early production of high alcohol (butanol plus ethanol) titers, overall solvent titers of 30 g/L, and a higher alcohol/acetone ratio. Metabolic flux analysis revealed the likely depletion of butyryl-CoA. In order to increase then the flux towards butyryl-CoA, we examined the impact of thiolase (THL, thl) overexpression. THL converts acetyl-CoA to acetoacetyl-CoA, the first step of the pathway from acetyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA, and thus, combining thl overexpression with aad overexpression decreased, as expected, acetate and ethanol production while increasing acetone and butyrate formation. thl overexpression in strains with asRNA CoAT downregulation did not significantly alter product formation thus suggesting that a more complex metabolic engineering strategy is necessary to enhance the intracellular butyryl-CoA pool and reduce the acetyl-CoA pool in order to achieve improved butanol titers and selectivity. PMID:18726959

  8. HMG CoA reductase inhibitor-induced myotoxicity: pravastatin and lovastatin inhibit the geranylgeranylation of low-molecular-weight proteins in neonatal rat muscle cell culture.

    PubMed

    Flint, O P; Masters, B A; Gregg, R E; Durham, S K

    1997-07-01

    In previous studies, inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (HMGRI) was associated with myotoxicity in cultures of neonatal rat skeletal myotubes, and rhabdomyolysis in rats, rabbits, and humans in vivo. In vitro myotoxicity was directly related to HMGRI-induced depletion of mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol, since supplementation with these intermediate metabolites abrogated the toxicity. Both farnesol and geranylgeraniol are required for the posttranslational modification, or isoprenylation, of essential regulatory proteins in mammalian cells. The objective of the present study was to measure changes in protein isoprenylation in cultured neonatal rat skeletal muscle cells exposed for 24 hr to increasing concentrations of pravastatin or lovastatin. Proteins were labeled with [3H]mevalonate, [3H]farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), or [3H]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), and then separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by scintillation counting and densitometry of autoradiographs. Mevalonate and FPP labeling of the majority of proteins increased in a concentration-dependent manner, even at concentrations greater than 2 microM lovastatin and 25 microM pravastatin that completely inhibited cholesterol synthesis. In contrast, mevalonate and FPP labeling of three protein bands with molecular weights of 26.6, 27.7, and 28.9 kDa was markedly inhibited at concentrations higher than 1 microM lovastatin and 400 microM pravastatin, which inhibited protein synthesis and disrupted myotube morphology after longer exposures in a previous study. In contrast, these proteins were equally well labeled by GGPP at all HMGRI concentrations tested, suggesting that isoprenylation of the 26.9-, 27.8-, and 28.9-kDa proteins requires geranylgeraniol. The results of this study indicate that HMGRI-induced myotoxicity is most likely related to reduced posttranslational modification of specific regulatory proteins by geranylgeraniol. PMID:9221829

  9. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2012-03-31

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT‐encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T‐DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol‐localized, mevalonate‐derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  10. Effect of pravastatin, a HMG CoA reductase inhibitor, on blood lipids and aortic lipidosis in cholesterol-fed White Carneau pigeons.

    PubMed

    Hadjiisky, P; Hermier, D; Truffert, J; De Gennes, J L; Grosgogeat, Y

    1993-06-19

    The effect of pravastatin, an inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase, on blood lipids and aortic lipidosis was studied in young cholesterol-fed White Carneau pigeons. The birds were fed with normal ('N group', n = 20) or atherogenic diet (grains + 0.4% cholesterol + 4% lard) alone ('C group', n = 20) and in association with pravastatin ('P group', n = 20). Plasma lipids and aortic intima lipidosis were studied after 3-5 and 8-12 months of the diet. Compared to the N group, pigeons from C group exhibited hypercholesterolemia (TC = 1000 mg/dl) and hyperlipoproteinemia of which level was independent of the duration of the diet. Total VLDL (VLDL+LDL)-cholesterol and apolipoprotein-B levels rose significantly 15, 8 and 4 times, respectively, whereas HDL were increased two times (P < 0.01) in females only. Macroscopically visible intima lipidosis areas covered 40% and 80% of aortic surface after 3-5 and 8-12 months of the diet. In P group, the increase in plasma lipid values was significantly lower than in WC from C group: -40% for total cholesterol (600 mg/dl) (P < 0.01), -71% for VLDL (P < 0.001), -53% for (VLDL+LDL)-cholesterol (P < 0.01) and -54% for apo-B (P < 0.05). HDL remained as high as in C group. Consequently TC/HDL-C ratio was improved and atherogenic risk of cholesterol was reduced by 41% (P < 0.05). Intima lipidosis areas were lowered by 35% (P < 0.01). We conclude that pravastatin treatment involves (1) a decrease in hypercholesterolemia and hyperlipoproteinemia and (2) a lowering in extensiveness and severity of macroscopically visible aortic lipidosis in cholesterol-fed White Carneau pigeon. PMID:8318553

  11. Biosynthesis of riboflavin: an unusual riboflavin synthase of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, S; Korn, S; Lottspeich, F; Bacher, A

    1997-01-01

    Riboflavin synthase was purified by a factor of about 1,500 from cell extract of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. The enzyme had a specific activity of about 2,700 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, which is relatively low compared to those of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Amino acid sequences obtained after proteolytic cleavage had no similarity with known riboflavin synthases. The gene coding for riboflavin synthase (designated ribC) was subsequently cloned by marker rescue with a ribC mutant of Escherichia coli. The ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum specifies a protein of 153 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence agrees with the information gleaned from Edman degradation of the isolated protein and shows 67% identity with the sequence predicted for the unannotated reading frame MJ1184 of Methanococcus jannaschii. The ribC gene is adjacent to a cluster of four genes with similarity to the genes cbiMNQO of Salmonella typhimurium, which form part of the cob operon (this operon contains most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin B12). The amino acid sequence predicted by the ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum shows no similarity whatsoever to the sequences of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Most notably, the M. thermoautotrophicum protein does not show the internal sequence homology characteristic of eubacterial and yeast riboflavin synthases. The protein of M. thermoautotrophicum can be expressed efficiently in a recombinant E. coli strain. The specific activity of the purified, recombinant protein is 1,900 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C. In contrast to riboflavin synthases from eubacteria and fungi, the methanobacterial enzyme has an absolute requirement for magnesium ions. The 5' phosphate of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine does not act as a substrate. The findings suggest that riboflavin synthase has evolved independently in eubacteria and methanobacteria. PMID:9139911

  12. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cholesterol synthesis by increasing HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Takumi; Muramatsu, Aimi; Shimura, Mari; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of TGF-β1 on cholesterol synthesis in human keratinocytes. TGF-β1 increased the level of cholesterol and the mRNA level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in human keratinocytes. These results show that TGF-β1 induces cholesterol synthesis by increasing HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression in human keratinocytes. PMID:26932266

  13. Nitric oxide synthase in ferret brain: localization and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T.; Mitchell, J. A.; Schmidt, H. H.; Kohlhaas, K. L.; Warner, T. D.; Förstermann, U.; Murad, F.

    1992-01-01

    1. In the present study, we have investigated the distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the ferret brain. Nitric oxide synthase was determined biochemically and immunochemically. 2. In the rat brain, the highest nitric oxide synthase activity has been detected in the cerebellum. However, in the ferret brain, the highest activity was found in the striatum and the lowest in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex. The enzymatic activity was localized predominantly in the cytosolic fractions, it was dependent on NADPH and Ca2+, and inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine or NG-methyl-L-arginine. 3. Western blot analysis revealed that all regions of the ferret brain contained a 160 kD protein crossreacting with an antibody to nitric oxide synthase purified from the rat cerebellum, and the levels of relative intensity of staining by the antibody correlated with the distribution of nitric oxide synthase activity. 4. These results indicate that the ferret brain contains a nitric oxide synthase similar to the rat brain, but the distribution of enzymatic activity in the ferret brain differs markedly from the rat brain. Images Figure 1 PMID:1282076

  14. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs. PMID:25938092

  15. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Polygonum cuspidatum bifunctional chalcone synthase/benzalacetone synthase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Heshu; Yang, Mingfeng; Liu, Chunmei; Lu, Ping; Cang, Huaixing; Ma, Lanqing

    2013-08-01

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily of type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) generate the backbones of a variety of plant secondary metabolites. An active bifunctional chalcone synthase/benzalacetone synthase (CHS/BAS) from Polygonum cuspidatum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminally polyhistidine-tagged fusion protein, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using polyethylene glycol 4000 as a precipitant. The production of well shaped crystals of the complex between PcPKS1 and benzalacetone was dependent on the presence of sorbitol and barium chloride as additives. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2₁2₁2₁, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.23, b = 81.01, c = 122.89 Å, and diffracted X-rays to at least 2.0 Å resolution. PMID:23908031

  16. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  17. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  18. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  19. Tapentadol and nitric oxide synthase systems.

    PubMed

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Wolińska, Renata; Gąsińska, Emilia; Nagraba, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    Tapentadol, a new analgesic drug with a dual mechanism of action (μ-opioid receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition), is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. In this paper, the possible additional involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in the antinociceptive activity of tapentadol was investigated using an unspecific inhibitor of NOS, L-NOArg, a relatively specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, 7-NI, a relatively selective inhibitor of inducible NOS, L-NIL, and a potent inhibitor of endothelial NOS, L-NIO. Tapentadol (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) increased the threshold for mechanical (Randall-Selitto test) and thermal (tail-flick test) nociceptive stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. All four NOS inhibitors, administered intraperitoneally in the dose range 0.1-10 mg/kg, potentiated the analgesic action of tapentadol at a low dose of 2 mg/kg in both models of pain. We conclude that NOS systems participate in tapentadol analgesia. PMID:25485639

  20. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism. PMID:24827744

  1. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  2. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Willemoës, Martin; Grubmeyer, Charles; Winther, Jakob R

    2014-01-15

    The enigmatic kinetics, half-of-the-sites binding, and structural asymmetry of the homodimeric microbial OMP synthases (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.10) have been proposed to result from an alternating site mechanism in these domain-swapped enzymes [R.W. McClard et al., Biochemistry 45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal initial velocity plots. Replacement of Lys106, the postulated intersubunit communication device, produced intersecting lines in kinetic plots with a 2-fold reduction of kcat. Loop (R105G K109S H111G) and PRPP-binding motif (D131N D132N) mutant proteins, each without detectable enzymatic activity and ablated ability to bind PRPP, complemented to produce a heterodimer with a single fully functional active site showing intersecting initial velocity plots. Equilibrium binding of PRPP and orotidine 5'-monophosphate showed a single class of two binding sites per dimer in WT and K106S enzymes. Evidence here shows that the enzyme does not follow half-of-the-sites cooperativity; that interplay between catalytic sites is not an essential feature of the catalytic mechanism; and that parallel lines in steady-state kinetics probably arise from tight substrate binding. PMID:24262852

  3. The hypocholesterolemic activity of açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) is mediated by the enhanced expression of the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters 5 and 8 and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Melina Oliveira; Souza E Silva, Lorena; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; de Figueiredo, Bianca Barros; Costa, Daniela Caldeira; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the ingestion of açaí pulp can improve serum lipid profile in various animal models; therefore, we hypothesized that açaí pulp (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) may modulate the expression of the genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the liver and increase fecal excretion, thus reducing serum cholesterol. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression of 7α-hydroxylase and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters (ABCG5 and ABCG8), which are genes involved with the secretion of cholesterol in the rat. We also evaluated the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), and apolipoprotein B100, which are involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Female Fischer rats were divided into 4 groups: the C group, which was fed a standard AIN-93 M diet; the CA group, which was fed a standard diet supplemented with 2% açaí pulp; the H group, which was fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (25% soy oil and 1% cholesterol); and the HA group, which was fed a hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 2% açaí pulp. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were euthanized, and their blood and livers were collected. The HA group exhibited a significant decrease in serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and atherogenic index and also had increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cholesterol excretion in feces compared with the H group. In addition, the expression of the LDL-R, ABCG5, and ABCG8 genes was significantly increased by the presence of açaí pulp. These results suggest that açaí pulp promotes a hypocholesterolemic effect in a rat model of dietary-induced hypercholesterolemia through an increase in the expression of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G transporters, and LDL-R genes. PMID:23244543

  4. Genetic Construction of Truncated and Chimeric Metalloproteins Derived from the Alpha Subunit of Acetyl-CoA Synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Huay-Keng Loke; Xiangshi Tan; Paul A. Lindahl

    2002-06-28

    In this study, a genetics-based method is used to truncate acetyl-coenzyme A synthase from Clostridium thermoaceticum (ACS), an alpha2beta2 tetrameric 310 kda bifunctional enzyme. ACS catalyzes the reversible reduction of CO2 to CO and the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from CO (or CO2 in the presence of low-potential reductants), CoA, and a methyl group bound to a corrinoid-iron sulfur protein (CoFeSP). ACS contains 7 metal-sulfur clusters of 4 different types called A, B, C, and D. The B, C, and D clusters are located in the 72 kda beta subunit while the A-cluster, a Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster that serves as the active site for acetyl-CoA synthase activity, is located in the 82 kda alpha subunit. The extent to which the essential properties of the cluster, including catalytic, redox, spectroscopic, and substrate-binding properties, were retained as ACS was progressively truncated was determined. Acetyl-CoA synthase catalytic activity remained when the entire alpha subunit was removed, as long as CO, rather than CO2 and a low-potential reductant, was used as a substrate. Truncating an {approx} 30 kda region from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit yielded a 49 kda protein that lacked catalytic activity but exhibited A-cluster-like spectroscopic, redox, and CO binding properties. Further truncation afforded a 23 kda protein that lacked recognizable A-cluster properties except for UV-vis spectra typical of [Fe4S4]2+ clusters. Two chimeric proteins were constructed by fusing the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Chromatium vinosum to genes encoding the 49 kda and 82 kda fragments of the alpha subunit. The chimeric proteins exhibited EPR signals that were not the simple sum of the signals from the separate proteins, suggesting magnetic interactions between clusters. This study highlights the potential for using genetics to simplify the study of complex multi-centered metalloenzymes and to generate new complex metalloenzymes with interesting properties.

  5. Increase in nervonic acid content in transformed yeast and transgenic plants by introduction of a Lunaria annua L. 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS) gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiming; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Francis, Tammy; Katavic, Vesna; Brost, Jennifer M; Giblin, Michael; Barton, Dennis L; Taylor, David C

    2009-03-01

    Nervonic acid is a Very Long-Chain Monounsaturated Fatty Acid (VLCMFA), 24:1 Delta15 (cis-tetracos-15-enoic acid) found in the seed oils of Lunaria annua, borage, hemp, Acer (Purpleblow maple) and Tropaeolum speciosum (Flame flower). However, of these, only the "money plant" (Lunaria annua L.) has been studied and grown sparingly for future development as a niche crop and the outlook has been disappointing. Therefore, our goal was to isolate and characterize strategic new genes for high nervonic acid production in Brassica oilseed crops. To this end, we have isolated a VLCMFA-utilizing 3-Keto-Acyl-CoA Synthase (KCS; fatty acid elongase; EC 2.3.1.86) gene from Lunaria annua and functionally expressed it in yeast, with the recombinant KCS protein able to catalyze the synthesis of several VLCMFAs, including nervonic acid. Seed-specific expression of the Lunaria KCS in Arabidopsis resulted in a 30-fold increase in nervonic acid proportions in seed oils, compared to the very low quantities found in the wild-type. Similar transgenic experiments using B. carinata as the host resulted in a 7-10 fold increase in seed oil nervonic acid proportions. KCS enzyme activity assays indicated that upon using (14)C-22:1-CoA as substrate, the KCS activity from developing seeds of transgenic B. carinata was 20-30-fold higher than the low erucoyl-elongation activity exhibited by wild type control plants. There was a very good correlation between the Lun KCS transcript intensity and the resultant 22:1-CoA KCS activity in developing seed. The highest nervonic acid level in transgenic B. carinata expressing the Lunaria KCS reached 30%, compared to 2.8% in wild type plant. In addition, the erucic acid proportions in these transgenic lines were considerably lower than that found in native Lunaria oil. These results show the functional utility of the Lunaria KCS in engineering new sources of high nervonate/reduced erucic oils in the Brassicaceae. PMID:19082744

  6. Neuroprotective effects of atorvastatin against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in primary cortical neurones.

    PubMed

    Bösel, Julian; Gandor, Florin; Harms, Christoph; Synowitz, Michael; Harms, Ulrike; Djoufack, Pierre Chryso; Megow, Dirk; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Hörtnagl, Heide; Fink, Klaus B; Endres, Matthias

    2005-03-01

    Statins [3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors] exert cholesterol-independent pleiotropic effects that include anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative properties. Here, we examined direct protective effects of atorvastatin on neurones in different cell damage models in vitro. Primary cortical neurones were pre-treated with atorvastatin and then exposed to (i) glutamate, (ii) oxygen-glucose deprivation or (iii) several apoptosis-inducing compounds. Atorvastatin significantly protected from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity as evidenced by propidium iodide staining, nuclear morphology, release of lactate dehydrogenase, and mitochondrial tetrazolium metabolism, but not from oxygen-glucose deprivation or apoptotic cell death. This anti-excitototoxic effect was evident with 2-4 days pre-treatment but not with daily administration or shorter-term pre-treatment. The protective properties occurred independently of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibition because co-treatment with mevalonate or other isoprenoids did not reverse or attenuate neuroprotection. Atorvastatin attenuated the glutamate-induced increase of intracellular calcium, which was associated with a modulation of NMDA receptor function. Taken together, atorvastatin exerts specific anti-excitotoxic effects independent of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibition, which has potential therapeutic implications. PMID:15748157

  7. Binding Modes of Zaragozic Acid A to Human Squalene Synthase and Staphylococcal Dehydrosqualene Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr248 in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors. PMID:22474324

  8. Binding modes of zaragozic acid A to human squalene synthase and staphylococcal dehydrosqualene synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-05-25

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr(248) in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors. PMID:22474324

  9. Characterisation of the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit in maize

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Weigang, Linda; Fießelmann, Andreas; Letzel, Thomas; Frey, Monika; Gierl, Alfons; Glawischnig, Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background In bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium, tryptophan is synthesized from indole-3-glycerole phosphate (IGP) by a tryptophan synthase αββα heterotetramer. Plants have evolved multiple α (TSA) and β (TSB) homologs, which have probably diverged in biological function and their ability of subunit interaction. There is some evidence for a tryptophan synthase (TS) complex in Arabidopsis. On the other hand maize (Zea mays) expresses the TSA-homologs BX1 and IGL that efficiently cleave IGP, independent of interaction with TSB. Results In order to clarify, how tryptophan is synthesized in maize, two TSA homologs, hitherto uncharacterized ZmTSA and ZmTSAlike, were functionally analyzed. ZmTSA is localized in plastids, the major site of tryptophan biosynthesis in plants. It catalyzes the tryptophan synthase α-reaction (cleavage of IGP), and forms a tryptophan synthase complex with ZmTSB1 in vitro. The catalytic efficiency of the α-reaction is strongly enhanced upon complex formation. A 160 kD tryptophan synthase complex was partially purified from maize leaves and ZmTSA was identified as native α-subunit of this complex by mass spectrometry. ZmTSAlike, for which no in vitro activity was detected, is localized in the cytosol. ZmTSAlike, BX1, and IGL were not detectable in the native tryptophan synthase complex in leaves. Conclusion It was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that maize forms a tryptophan synthase complex and ZmTSA functions as α-subunit in this complex. PMID:18430213

  10. The Tomato Terpene Synthase Gene Family1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Falara, Vasiliki; Akhtar, Tariq A.; Nguyen, Thuong T.H.; Spyropoulou, Eleni A.; Bleeker, Petra M.; Schauvinhold, Ines; Matsuba, Yuki; Bonini, Megan E.; Schilmiller, Anthony L.; Last, Robert L.; Schuurink, Robert C.; Pichersky, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Compounds of the terpenoid class play numerous roles in the interactions of plants with their environment, such as attracting pollinators and defending the plant against pests. We show here that the genome of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains 44 terpene synthase (TPS) genes, including 29 that are functional or potentially functional. Of these 29 TPS genes, 26 were expressed in at least some organs or tissues of the plant. The enzymatic functions of eight of the TPS proteins were previously reported, and here we report the specific in vitro catalytic activity of 10 additional tomato terpene synthases. Many of the tomato TPS genes are found in clusters, notably on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, and 10. All TPS family clades previously identified in angiosperms are also present in tomato. The largest clade of functional TPS genes found in tomato, with 12 members, is the TPS-a clade, and it appears to encode only sesquiterpene synthases, one of which is localized to the mitochondria, while the rest are likely cytosolic. A few additional sesquiterpene synthases are encoded by TPS-b clade genes. Some of the tomato sesquiterpene synthases use z,z-farnesyl diphosphate in vitro as well, or more efficiently than, the e,e-farnesyl diphosphate substrate. Genes encoding monoterpene synthases are also prevalent, and they fall into three clades: TPS-b, TPS-g, and TPS-e/f. With the exception of two enzymes involved in the synthesis of ent-kaurene, the precursor of gibberellins, no other tomato TPS genes could be demonstrated to encode diterpene synthases so far. PMID:21813655

  11. The distribution of acetohydroxyacid synthase in soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Darryl R; Duxbury, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    Most bacteria possess the enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase, which is used to produce branched-chain amino acids. Enteric bacteria contain several isozymes suited to different conditions, but the distribution of acetohydroxyacid synthase in soil bacteria is largely unknown. Growth experiments confirmed that Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, and Enterobacter aerogenes contain isozymes of acetohydroxyacid synthase, allowing the bacteria to grow in the presence of valine (which causes feedback inhibition of AHAS I) or the sulfonylurea herbicide triasulfuron (which inhibits AHAS II) although a slight lag phase was observed in growth in the latter case. Several common soil isolates were inhibited by triasulfuron, but Pseudomonas fluorescens and Rhodococcus erythropolis were not inhibited by any combination of triasulfuron and valine. The extent of sulfonylurea-sensitive acetohydroxyacid synthase in soil was revealed when 21 out of 27 isolated bacteria in pure culture were inhibited by triasulfuron, the addition of isoleucine and/or valine reversing the effect in 19 cases. Primers were designed to target the genes encoding the large subunits (ilvB, ilvG and ilvI) of acetohydroxyacid synthase from available sequence data and a approximately 355 bp fragment in Bacillus subtilis, Arthrobacter globiformis, E. coli and S. enterica was subsequently amplified. The primers were used to create a small clone library of sequences from an agricultural soil. Phylogenetic analysis revealed significant sequence variation, but all 19 amino acid sequences were most closely related to published large subunit acetohydroxyacid synthase amino acid sequences within several phyla including the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The results suggested the majority of soil microorganisms contain only one functional acetohydroxyacid synthase enzyme sensitive to sulfonylurea herbicides. PMID:17624809

  12. Characterization of Lipoyl Synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Horstmann, Abigail K; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Cicchillo, Robert M; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of multiple and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is on the rise, necessitating the identification of new targets to combat an organism that has infected one-third of the world's population, according to the World Health Organization. The biosynthesis of the lipoyl cofactor is one possible target, given its critical importance in cellular metabolism and the apparent lack of functional salvage pathways in Mtb that are found in humans and many other organisms. The lipoyl cofactor is synthesized de novo in two committed steps, involving the LipB-catalyzed transfer of an octanoyl chain derived from fatty acid biosynthesis to a lipoyl carrier protein and the LipA-catalyzed insertion of sulfur atoms at C6 and C8 of the octanoyl chain. A number of in vitro studies of lipoyl synthases from Escherichia coli, Sulfolobus solfataricus, and Thermosynechococcus elongatus have been conducted, but the enzyme from Mtb has not been characterized. Herein, we show that LipA from Mtb contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters and converts an octanoyl peptide substrate to the corresponding lipoyl peptide product via the same C6-monothiolated intermediate as that observed in the E. coli LipA reaction. In addition, we show that LipA from Mtb forms a complex with the H protein of the glycine cleavage system and that the strength of association is dependent on the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine. We also show that LipA from Mtb can complement a lipA mutant of E. coli, demonstrating the commonalities of the two enzymes. Lastly, we show that the substrate for LipA, which normally acts on a post-translationally modified protein, can be reduced to carboxybenzyl-octanoyllysine. PMID:26841001

  13. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  14. Tertiary model of a plant cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda; Haigler, Candace H.; Kubicki, James D.; Zimmer, Jochen; Bonetta, Dario; DeBolt, Seth; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D atomistic model of a plant cellulose synthase (CESA) has remained elusive despite over forty years of experimental effort. Here, we report a computationally predicted 3D structure of 506 amino acids of cotton CESA within the cytosolic region. Comparison of the predicted plant CESA structure with the solved structure of a bacterial cellulose-synthesizing protein validates the overall fold of the modeled glycosyltransferase (GT) domain. The coaligned plant and bacterial GT domains share a six-stranded β-sheet, five α-helices, and conserved motifs similar to those required for catalysis in other GT-2 glycosyltransferases. Extending beyond the cross-kingdom similarities related to cellulose polymerization, the predicted structure of cotton CESA reveals that plant-specific modules (plant-conserved region and class-specific region) fold into distinct subdomains on the periphery of the catalytic region. Computational results support the importance of the plant-conserved region and/or class-specific region in CESA oligomerization to form the multimeric cellulose–synthesis complexes that are characteristic of plants. Relatively high sequence conservation between plant CESAs allowed mapping of known mutations and two previously undescribed mutations that perturb cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana to their analogous positions in the modeled structure. Most of these mutation sites are near the predicted catalytic region, and the confluence of other mutation sites supports the existence of previously undefined functional nodes within the catalytic core of CESA. Overall, the predicted tertiary structure provides a platform for the biochemical engineering of plant CESAs. PMID:23592721

  15. Functional characterization of two new members of the caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase-like gene family from Vanilla planifolia reveals a new class of plastid-localized O-methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Widiez, Thomas; Hartman, Thomas G; Dudai, Nativ; Yan, Qing; Lawton, Michael; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2011-08-01

    Caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferases (OMTs) have been characterized from numerous plant species and have been demonstrated to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Higher plant species are known to have additional caffeoyl CoA OMT-like genes, which have not been well characterized. Here, we identified two new caffeoyl CoA OMT-like genes by screening a cDNA library from specialized hair cells of pods of the orchid Vanilla planifolia. Characterization of the corresponding two enzymes, designated Vp-OMT4 and Vp-OMT5, revealed that in vitro both enzymes preferred as a substrate the flavone tricetin, yet their sequences and phylogenetic relationships to other enzymes are distinct from each other. Quantitative analysis of gene expression indicated a dramatic tissue-specific expression pattern for Vp-OMT4, which was highly expressed in the hair cells of the developing pod, the likely location of vanillin biosynthesis. Although Vp-OMT4 had a lower activity with the proposed vanillin precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, than with tricetin, the tissue specificity of expression suggests it may be a candidate for an enzyme involved in vanillin biosynthesis. In contrast, the Vp-OMT5 gene was mainly expressed in leaf tissue and only marginally expressed in pod hair cells. Phylogenetic analysis suggests Vp-OMT5 evolved from a cyanobacterial enzyme and it clustered within a clade in which the sequences from eukaryotic species had predicted chloroplast transit peptides. Transient expression of a GFP-fusion in tobacco demonstrated that Vp-OMT5 was localized in the plastids. This is the first flavonoid OMT demonstrated to be targeted to the plastids. PMID:21629984

  16. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas A.; O'Keeffe, Kayleigh R.; D'Aquila, Theresa; Yan, Qing Wu; Griffin, John D.; Killion, Elizabeth A.; Salter, Deanna M.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Greenberg, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ACSL isoforms. In vitro studies have suggested a role for ACSL5 in triglyceride synthesis; however, we have limited understanding of the in vivo actions of this ACSL isoform. Methods To elucidate the in vivo actions of ACSL5 we generated a line of mice in which ACSL5 expression was ablated in all tissues (ACSL5−/−). Results Ablation of ACSL5 reduced ACSL activity by ∼80% in jejunal mucosa, ∼50% in liver, and ∼37% in brown adipose tissue lysates. Body composition studies revealed that ACSL5−/−, as compared to control ACSL5loxP/loxP, mice had significantly reduced fat mass and adipose fat pad weights. Indirect calorimetry studies demonstrated that ACSL5−/− had increased metabolic rates, and in the dark phase, increased respiratory quotient. In ACSL5−/− mice, fasting glucose and serum triglyceride were reduced; and insulin sensitivity was improved during an insulin tolerance test. Both hepatic mRNA (∼16-fold) and serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) (∼13-fold) were increased in ACSL5−/− as compared to ACSL5loxP/loxP. Consistent with increased FGF21 serum levels, uncoupling protein-1 gene (Ucp1) and PPAR-gamma coactivator 1-alpha gene (Pgc1α) transcript levels were increased in gonadal adipose tissue. To further evaluate ACSL5 function in intestine, mice were gavaged with an olive oil bolus; and the rate of triglyceride appearance in serum was found to be delayed in ACSL5−/− mice as compared to control mice. Conclusions In summary, ACSL5−/− mice have increased hepatic and serum FGF21 levels, reduced adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure and delayed triglyceride absorption. These studies

  17. Highly Divergent Mitochondrial ATP Synthase Complexes in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Balabaskaran Nina, Praveen; Dudkina, Natalya V.; Kane, Lesley A.; van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mather, Michael W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.

    2010-01-01

    The F-type ATP synthase complex is a rotary nano-motor driven by proton motive force to synthesize ATP. Its F1 sector catalyzes ATP synthesis, whereas the Fo sector conducts the protons and provides a stator for the rotary action of the complex. Components of both F1 and Fo sectors are highly conserved across prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Therefore, it was a surprise that genes encoding the a and b subunits as well as other components of the Fo sector were undetectable in the sequenced genomes of a variety of apicomplexan parasites. While the parasitic existence of these organisms could explain the apparent incomplete nature of ATP synthase in Apicomplexa, genes for these essential components were absent even in Tetrahymena thermophila, a free-living ciliate belonging to a sister clade of Apicomplexa, which demonstrates robust oxidative phosphorylation. This observation raises the possibility that the entire clade of Alveolata may have invented novel means to operate ATP synthase complexes. To assess this remarkable possibility, we have carried out an investigation of the ATP synthase from T. thermophila. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed the ATP synthase to be present as a large complex. Structural study based on single particle electron microscopy analysis suggested the complex to be a dimer with several unique structures including an unusually large domain on the intermembrane side of the ATP synthase and novel domains flanking the c subunit rings. The two monomers were in a parallel configuration rather than the angled configuration previously observed in other organisms. Proteomic analyses of well-resolved ATP synthase complexes from 2-D BN/BN-PAGE identified orthologs of seven canonical ATP synthase subunits, and at least 13 novel proteins that constitute subunits apparently limited to the ciliate lineage. A mitochondrially encoded protein, Ymf66, with predicted eight transmembrane domains could be a substitute for the subunit a

  18. Argininosuccinate synthase: at the center of arginine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Ricci J.; Pendleton, Laura C.; Eichler, Duane C.

    2011-01-01

    The levels of L-arginine, a cationic, semi-essential amino acid, are often controlled within a cell at the level of local availability through biosynthesis. The importance of this temporal and spatial control of cellular L-arginine is highlighted by the tissue specific roles of argininosuccinate synthase (argininosuccinate synthetase) (EC 6.3.4.5), as the rate-limiting step in the conversion of L-citrulline to L-arginine. Since its discovery, the function of argininosuccinate synthase has been linked almost exclusively to hepatic urea production despite the fact that alternative pathways involving argininosuccinate synthase were defined, such as its role in providing arginine for creatine and for polyamine biosynthesis. However, it was the discovery of nitric oxide that meaningfully extended our understanding of the metabolic importance of non-hepatic argininosuccinate synthase. Indeed, our knowledge of the number of tissues that manage distinct pools of arginine under the control of argininosuccinate synthase has expanded significantly. PMID:21494411

  19. Sucrose Phosphate Synthase and Sucrose Accumulation at Low Temperature 1

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Charles L.; Huber, Joan L. A.; Huber, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of growth temperature on the free sugar and sucrose phosphate synthase content and activity of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf tissue was studied. When plants were grown at 25°C for 3 weeks and then transferred to a constant 5°C, sucrose, glucose, and fructose accumulated to high levels during a 14-d period. Predawn sugar levels increased from 14- to 20-fold over the levels present at the outset of the low-temperature treatment. Sucrose was the most abundant free sugar before, during, and after exposure to 5°C. Leaf sucrose phosphate synthase activity was significantly increased by the low-temperature treatment, whereas sucrose synthase and invertases were not. Synthesis of the sucrose phosphate synthase subunit was increased during and after low-temperature exposure and paralleled an increase in the steady-state level of the subunit. The increases in sucrose and its primary biosynthetic enzyme, sucrose phosphate synthase, are discussed in relation to adjustment of metabolism to low nonfreezing temperature and freezing stress tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16652990

  20. Plasticity and Evolution of (+)-3-Carene Synthase and (−)-Sabinene Synthase Functions of a Sitka Spruce Monoterpene Synthase Gene Family Associated with Weevil Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Christopher R.; Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The monoterpene (+)-3-carene is associated with resistance of Sitka spruce against white pine weevil, a major North American forest insect pest of pine and spruce. High and low levels of (+)-3-carene in, respectively, resistant and susceptible Sitka spruce genotypes are due to variation of (+)-3-carene synthase gene copy number, transcript and protein expression levels, enzyme product profiles, and enzyme catalytic efficiency. A family of multiproduct (+)-3-carene synthase-like genes of Sitka spruce include the three (+)-3-carene synthases, PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and the (−)-sabinene synthase PsTPS-sab. Of these, PsTPS-3car2 is responsible for the relatively higher levels of (+)-3-carene in weevil-resistant trees. Here, we identified features of the PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and PsTPS-sab proteins that determine different product profiles. A series of domain swap and site-directed mutations, supported by structural comparisons, identified the amino acid in position 596 as critical for product profiles dominated by (+)-3-carene in PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, and PsTPS-3car3, or (−)-sabinene in PsTPS-sab. A leucine in this position promotes formation of (+)-3-carene, whereas phenylalanine promotes (−)-sabinene. Homology modeling predicts that position 596 directs product profiles through differential stabilization of the reaction intermediate. Kinetic analysis revealed position 596 also plays a role in catalytic efficiency. Mutations of position 596 with different side chain properties resulted in a series of enzymes with different product profiles, further highlighting the inherent plasticity and potential for evolution of alternative product profiles of these monoterpene synthases of conifer defense against insects. PMID:25016016

  1. Subcellular localization of dinoflagellate polyketide synthases and fatty acid synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Van Dolah, Frances M; Zippay, Mackenzie L; Pezzolesi, Laura; Rein, Kathleen S; Johnson, Jillian G; Morey, Jeanine S; Wang, Zhihong; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2013-12-01

    Dinoflagellates are prolific producers of polyketide secondary metabolites. Dinoflagellate polyketide synthases (PKSs) have sequence similarity to Type I PKSs, megasynthases that encode all catalytic domains on a single polypeptide. However, in dinoflagellate PKSs identified to date, each catalytic domain resides on a separate transcript, suggesting multiprotein complexes similar to Type II PKSs. Here, we provide evidence through coimmunoprecipitation that single-domain ketosynthase and ketoreductase proteins interact, suggesting a predicted multiprotein complex. In Karenia brevis (C.C. Davis) Gert Hansen & Ø. Moestrup, previously observed chloroplast localization of PKSs suggested that brevetoxin biosynthesis may take place in the chloroplast. Here, we report that PKSs are present in both cytosol and chloroplast. Furthermore, brevetoxin is not present in isolated chloroplasts, raising the question of what chloroplast-localized PKS enzymes might be doing. Antibodies to K. brevis PKSs recognize cytosolic and chloroplast proteins in Ostreopsis cf. ovata Fukuyo, and Coolia monotis Meunier, which produce different suites of polyketide toxins, suggesting that these PKSs may share common pathways. Since PKSs are closely related to fatty acid synthases (FAS), we sought to determine if fatty acid biosynthesis colocalizes with either chloroplast or cytosolic PKSs. [(3) H]acetate labeling showed fatty acids are synthesized in the cytosol, with little incorporation in chloroplasts, consistent with a Type I FAS system. However, although 29 sequences in a K. brevis expressed sequence tag database have similarity (BLASTx e-value <10(-10) ) to PKSs, no transcripts for either Type I (cytosolic) or Type II (chloroplast) FAS are present. Further characterization of the FAS complexes may help to elucidate the functions of the PKS enzymes identified in dinoflagellates. PMID:27007632

  2. Understanding Plant Cellulose Synthases through a Comprehensive Investigation of the Cellulose Synthase Family Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Andrew; Specht, Chelsea D.

    2011-01-01

    The development of cellulose as an organizing structure in the plant cell wall was a key event in both the initial colonization and the subsequent domination of the terrestrial ecosystem by vascular plants. A wealth of experimental data has demonstrated the complicated genetic interactions required to form the large synthetic complex that synthesizes cellulose. However, these results are lacking an extensive analysis of the evolution, specialization, and regulation of the proteins that compose this complex. Here we perform an in-depth analysis of the sequences in the cellulose synthase (CesA) family. We investigate the phylogeny of the CesA family, with emphasis on evolutionary specialization. We define specialized clades and identify the class-specific regions within the CesA sequence that may explain this specialization. We investigate changes in regulation of CesAs by looking at the conservation of proposed phosphorylation sites. We investigate the conservation of sites where mutations have been documented that impair CesA function, and compare these sites to those observed in the closest cellulose synthase-like (Csl) families to better understand what regions may separate the CesAs from other Csls. Finally we identify two positions with strong conservation of the aromatic trait, but lacking conservation of amino acid identity, which may represent residues important for positioning the sugar substrate for catalysis. These analyses provide useful tools for understanding characterized mutations and post-translational modifications, and for informing further experiments to probe CesA assembly, regulation, and function through site-directed mutagenesis or domain swapping experiments. PMID:22629257

  3. Deprotonations in the Reaction of Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick W; Bernard, Steffen M; Sapra, Aparna; Smith, Janet L; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Palfey, Bruce A

    2016-06-14

    Many microorganisms use flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) to synthesize the essential nucleotide 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) from 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (dUMP), 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), and NADPH. FDTSs have a structure that is unrelated to the thymidylate synthase used by humans and a very different mechanism. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance evidence that FDTS ionizes N3 of dUMP using an active-site arginine. The ionized form of dUMP is largely responsible for the changes in the flavin absorbance spectrum of FDTS upon dUMP binding. dUMP analogues also suggest that the phosphate of dUMP acts as the base that removes the proton from C5 of the dUMP-methylene intermediate in the FDTS-catalyzed reaction. These findings establish additional differences between the mechanisms of FDTS and human thymidylate synthase. PMID:27214228

  4. Evolutionary history of the chitin synthases of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Alexey A; Likhoshway, Yelena V

    2016-06-01

    Chitin synthases are widespread among eukaryotes and known to have a complex evolutionary history in some of the groups. We have reconstructed the chitin synthase phylogeny using the most taxonomically comprehensive dataset currently available and have shown the presence of independently formed paralogous groups in oomycetes, ciliates, fungi, and all diatoms except raphid pennates. There were also two cases of horizontal gene transfer (HGT): transfer from fungus to early diatoms gave rise to diatom paralogous group, while transfer from raphid pennate diatom to Acantamoeba ancestor is, to our knowledge, restricted to a single gene in amoeba. Early evolution of chitin synthases is heavily obscured by paralogy, and further sequencing effort is necessary. PMID:26887391

  5. Divergence of multimodular polyketide synthases revealed by a didomain structure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianting; Gay, Darren C; Demeler, Borries; White, Mark A; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T

    2012-07-01

    The enoylreductase (ER) is the final common enzyme from modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) to be structurally characterized. The 3.0 Å-resolution structure of the didomain comprising the ketoreductase (KR) and ER from the second module of the spinosyn PKS reveals that ER shares an ∼600-Å(2) interface with KR distinct from that of the related mammalian fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast to the ER domains of the mammalian FAS, the ER domains of the second module of the spinosyn PKS do not make contact across the two-fold axis of the synthase. This monomeric organization may have been necessary in the evolution of multimodular PKSs to enable acyl carrier proteins to access each of their cognate enzymes. The isolated ER domain showed activity toward a substrate analog, enabling us to determine the contributions of its active site residues. PMID:22634636

  6. Divergence of multimodular polyketide synthases revealed by a didomain structure

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jianting; Gay, Darren C.; Demeler, Borries; White, Mark A.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.

    2012-01-01

    The enoylreductase (ER) is the final common enzyme from modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) to be structurally characterized. The 3.0 Å resolution structure of the didomain comprised of the ketoreductase (KR) and ER from the second module of the spinosyn PKS reveals that ER shares an ~600 Å2 interface with KR distinct from that of the related mammalian fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast to the ER domains of the mammalian FAS, the ER domains of the second module of the spinosyn PKS do not make contact across the twofold axis of the synthase. This monomeric organization may have been necessary in the evolution of multimodular PKSs to enable acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) to access each of their cognate enzymes. The isolated ER domain showed activity towards a substrate analog, enabling the contributions of its active site residues to be determined. PMID:22634636

  7. Plant terpenoid synthases: Molecular biology and phylogenetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bohlmann, Jörg; Meyer-Gauen, Gilbert; Croteau, Rodney

    1998-01-01

    This review focuses on the monoterpene, sesquiterpene, and diterpene synthases of plant origin that use the corresponding C10, C15, and C20 prenyl diphosphates as substrates to generate the enormous diversity of carbon skeletons characteristic of the terpenoid family of natural products. A description of the enzymology and mechanism of terpenoid cyclization is followed by a discussion of molecular cloning and heterologous expression of terpenoid synthases. Sequence relatedness and phylogenetic reconstruction, based on 33 members of the Tps gene family, are delineated, and comparison of important structural features of these enzymes is provided. The review concludes with an overview of the organization and regulation of terpenoid metabolism, and of the biotechnological applications of terpenoid synthase genes. PMID:9539701

  8. Synthase-dependent exopolysaccharide secretion in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, J.C.; Howell, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis and export of bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides is known to occur through several distinct mechanisms. Recent advances in the biochemistry and structural biology of several proteins in synthase-dependent polysaccharide secretion systems have identified key conserved components of this pathway in Gram-negative bacteria. These components include an inner-membrane-embedded polysaccharide synthase, a periplasmic tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing scaffold protein, and an outer-membrane β-barrel porin. There is also increasing evidence that many synthase-dependent systems are post-translationally regulated by the bacterial second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Here, we compare these core proteins in the context of the alginate, cellulose, and poly-β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) secretion systems. PMID:23117123

  9. Insulin receptor-mediated nutritional signalling regulates juvenile hormone biosynthesis and vitellogenin production in the German cockroach.

    PubMed

    Abrisqueta, Marc; Süren-Castillo, Songül; Maestro, José L

    2014-06-01

    Female reproductive processes, which comprise, amongst others, the synthesis of yolk proteins and the endocrine mechanisms which regulate this synthesis, need a considerable amount of energy and resources. The role of communicating that the required nutritional status has been attained is carried out by nutritional signalling pathways and, in particular, by the insulin receptor (InR) pathway. In the present study, using the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, as a model, we analysed the role of InR in different processes, but mainly those related to juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis and vitellogenin production. We first cloned the InR cDNA from B. germanica (BgInR) and then determined that its expression levels were constant in corpora allata and fat body during the first female gonadotrophic cycle. Results showed that the observed increase in BgInR mRNA in fat body from starved compared to fed females was abolished in those females treated with systemic RNAi in vivo against the transcription factor BgFoxO. RNAi-mediated BgInR knockdown during the final two nymphal stages produced significant delays in the moults, together with smaller adult females which could not spread the fore- and hindwings properly. In addition, BgInR knockdown led to a severe inhibition of juvenile hormone synthesis in adult female corpora allata, with a concomitant reduction of mRNA levels corresponding to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase-1, HMG-CoA synthase-2, HMG-CoA reductase and methyl farnesoate epoxidase. BgInR RNAi treatment also reduced fat body vitellogenin mRNA and oocyte growth. Our results show that BgInR knockdown produces similar phenotypes to those obtained in starved females in terms of corpora allata activity and vitellogenin synthesis, and indicate that the InR pathway mediates the activation of JH biosynthesis and vitellogenin production elicited by nutrition signalling. PMID:24657890

  10. Efficacy of Oral Curcuminoid Fraction from Curcuma xanthorrhiza and Curcuminoid Cider in High-cholesterol Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mauren, Flavia Maria; Yanti; Lay, Bibiana Widiati

    2016-01-01

    -related genes inducing formation of atherosclerosisCurcuminoid and its cider may offer cardioprotective effect for preventing hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis Abbreviations Used: ROS: Reactive oxygen species, NO: Nitric oxide, NOS: NO synthase, NADPH: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, CD44: Cluster of differentiation 44, ICAM-1: Intercellular adhesion molecule 1, iNOS: inducible NOS, LOX-1: lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1, HMG-CoA: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A, 5-HMF: 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, HCD: High-cholesterol diet PMID:27365981

  11. Mapping a kingdom-specific functional domain of squalene synthase.

    PubMed

    Linscott, Kristin B; Niehaus, Thomas D; Zhuang, Xun; Bell, Stephen A; Chappell, Joe

    2016-09-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis and consists of both an amino-terminal catalytic domain and a carboxy-terminal domain tethering the enzyme to the ER membrane. While the overall architecture of this enzyme is identical in eukaryotes, it was previously shown that plant and animal genes cannot complement a squalene synthase knockout mutation in yeast unless the carboxy-terminal domain is swapped for one of fungal origin. This implied a unique component of the fungal carboxy-terminal domain was responsible for the complementation phenotype. To identify this motif, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a squalene synthase knockout mutation, and expressed intact and chimeric squalene synthases originating from fungi, plants, and animals. In contrast to previous observations, all enzymes tested could partially complement the knockout mutation when the genes were weakly expressed. However, when highly expressed, non-fungal squalene synthases could not complement the yeast mutation and instead led to the accumulation of a toxic intermediate(s) as defined by mutations of genes downstream in the ergosterol pathway. Restoration of the complete complementation phenotype was mapped to a 26-amino acid hinge region linking the catalytic and membrane-spanning domains specific to fungal squalene synthases. Over-expression of the C-terminal domain containing a hinge domain from fungi, not from animals or plants, led to growth inhibition of wild-type yeast. Because this hinge region is unique to and highly conserved within each kingdom of life, the data suggests that the hinge domain plays an essential functional role, such as assembly of ergosterol multi-enzyme complexes in fungi. PMID:27320012

  12. Twisting and subunit rotation in single FOF1-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sielaff, Hendrik; Börsch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    FOF1-ATP synthases are ubiquitous proton- or ion-powered membrane enzymes providing ATP for all kinds of cellular processes. The mechanochemistry of catalysis is driven by two rotary nanomotors coupled within the enzyme. Their different step sizes have been observed by single-molecule microscopy including videomicroscopy of fluctuating nanobeads attached to single enzymes and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. Here we review recent developments of approaches to monitor the step size of subunit rotation and the transient elastic energy storage mechanism in single FOF1-ATP synthases. PMID:23267178

  13. Exploiting the Biosynthetic Potential of Type III Polyketide Synthases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan Ping; Go, Maybelle K; Yew, Wen Shan

    2016-01-01

    Polyketides are structurally and functionally diverse secondary metabolites that are biosynthesized by polyketide synthases (PKSs) using acyl-CoA precursors. Recent studies in the engineering and structural characterization of PKSs have facilitated the use of target enzymes as biocatalysts to produce novel functionally optimized polyketides. These compounds may serve as potential drug leads. This review summarizes the insights gained from research on type III PKSs, from the discovery of chalcone synthase in plants to novel PKSs in bacteria and fungi. To date, at least 15 families of type III PKSs have been characterized, highlighting the utility of PKSs in the development of natural product libraries for therapeutic development. PMID:27338328

  14. Analysis of the cercosporin polyketide synthase CTB1 reveals a new fungal thioesterase function

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Adam G.; Vagstad, Anna L.; Belecki, Katherine; Scheerer, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    The polyketide synthase CTB1 is demonstrated to catalyze pyrone formation thereby expanding the known biosynthetic repertoire of thioesterase domains in iterative, non-reducing polyketide synthases. PMID:23108075

  15. Identification of a cryptic type III polyketide synthase (1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase) from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Gopal Prasad; Oh, Tae-Jin; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2008-10-31

    We identified a 1,134-bp putative type III polyketide synthase from the sequence analysis of Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952, named Sp-RppA, which is characterized as 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase and shares 33% identity with SCO1206 from S. coelicolor A3(2) and 32% identity with RppA from S. griseus. The 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase is known to catalyze the sequential decarboxylative condensation, intramolecular cyclization, and aromatization of an oligoketide derived from five units of malonyl-CoA to give 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene, which spontaneously oxidizes to form 2,5,7-trihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (flaviolin). In this study, we report the in vivo expression and in vitro synthesis of flaviolin from purified gene product (Sp-RppA). PMID:18612244

  16. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Belkheir, Asma K; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents. PMID:27446151

  17. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Belkheir, Asma K.; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents. PMID:27446151

  18. Structure and mechanism of the diterpene cyclase ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-09-20

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase reveals three {alpha}-helical domains ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the {beta}{gamma} domains in ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase but exclusively in the {alpha} domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions.

  19. Loop residues and catalysis in OMP synthase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary P; Hansen, Michael Riis; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2012-06-01

    Residue-to-alanine mutations and a two-amino acid deletion have been made in the highly conserved catalytic loop (residues 100-109) of Salmonella typhimurium OMP synthase (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.10). As described previously, the K103A mutant enzyme exhibited a 10(4)-fold decrease in k(cat)/K(M) for PRPP; the K100A enzyme suffered a 50-fold decrease. Alanine mutations at His105 and Glu107 produced 40- and 7-fold decreases in k(cat)/K(M), respectively, and E101A, D104A, and G106A were slightly faster than the wild-type (WT) in terms of k(cat), with minor effects on k(cat)/K(M). Equilibrium binding of OMP or PRPP in binary complexes was affected little by loop mutation, suggesting that the energetics of ground-state binding have little contribution from the catalytic loop, or that a favorable binding energy is offset by costs of loop reorganization. Pre-steady-state kinetics for mutants showed that K103A and E107A had lost the burst of product formation in each direction that indicated rapid on-enzyme chemistry for WT, but that the burst was retained by H105A. Δ102Δ106, a loop-shortened enzyme with Ala102 and Gly106 deleted, showed a 10(4)-fold reduction of k(cat) but almost unaltered K(D) values for all four substrate molecules. The 20% (i.e., 1.20) intrinsic [1'-(3)H]OMP kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for WT is masked because of high forward and reverse commitment factors. K103A failed to express intrinsic KIEs fully (1.095 ± 0.013). In contrast, H105A, which has a smaller catalytic lesion, gave a [1'-(3)H]OMP KIE of 1.21 ± 0.0005, and E107A (1.179 ± 0.0049) also gave high values. These results are interpreted in the context of the X-ray structure of the complete substrate complex for the enzyme [Grubmeyer, C., Hansen, M. R., Fedorov, A. A., and Almo, S. C. (2012) Biochemistry 51 (preceding paper in this issue, DOI 10.1021/bi300083p )]. The full expression of KIEs by H105A and E107A may result from a less secure closure of the catalytic loop

  20. Growth hormone (GH) replacement decreases serum total and LDL-cholesterol in hypopituitary patients on maintenance HMG CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) therapy

    PubMed Central

    Monson, John P; Jönsson, Peter; Koltowska-Häggström, Maria; Kourides, Ione

    2007-01-01

    Objective Adult onset GH deficiency (GHD) is characterized by abnormalities of serum lipoprotein profiles and GH replacement results in favourable alterations in serum total and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol. Preliminary evidence has indicated that the effect of GH replacement in this respect may be additive to that of HMG CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) therapy. We have examined this possibility during prospective follow-up of adult onset hypopituitary patients enrolled in KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database), a pharmacoepidemiological study of GH replacement in adult hypopituitary patients. Design Lipoprotein profiles were measured centrally at baseline and after 12 months GH replacement therapy. Patients Sixty-one hypopituitary patients (30 male, 31 female) on maintenance statin therapy (mean 2·5 ± 2·7 SD years before GH) (statin group – SG) and 1247 (608 male, 639 female) patients not on hypolipidaemic therapy (nonstatin group – NSG) were studied. All patients were naïve or had not received GH replacement during the 6 months prior to study. Patients who developed diabetes mellitus during the first year of GH therapy or in the subsequent year and those with childhood onset GHD were excluded from this analysis. An established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was present in 18% SG and 4·4% NSG at baseline. Measurements Serum concentrations of total, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides and IGF-I were measured centrally in all patients and LDL-cholesterol was estimated using Friedewald's formula. Results The relative frequency of various statin use was simvastatin 52% (15·8 ± 8·1 mg, mean ± SD), atorvastatin 30% (14·4 ± 7·8 mg), pravastatin 9·8% (31·6 mg ± 13·9 mg), lovastatin 6·6% (17·5 ± 5 mg) and fluvastatin 1·6% (40 mg). Baseline serum total and LDL-cholesterol (mean ± SD) were 5·2 ± 1·4 and 3·1 ± 1·3 mmol/l in SG and 5·8 ± 1·2 and 3·7 ± 1·0 mmol/l in NSG, respectively (P < 0·0001

  1. SUGARBEET ROOT SUCROSE SYNTHASE ISOFORMS DIFFER IN DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION, SUBUNIT COMPOSITION AND RESPONSE TO PH.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sucrose synthase isoforms have been identified by activity stained isoelectric focused polyacrylamide electrophoresis in developing sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) root. Sucrose synthase isoform I (SuSyI) was present from the early stages of development to maturity. Sucrose synthase isoform II (S...

  2. Malate Synthase Activity in Cotton and Other Ungerminated Oilseeds

    PubMed Central

    Miernyk, Jan A.; Trelease, Richard N.; Choinski, John S.

    1979-01-01

    Extracts from several species and varieties of ungerminated cotton seeds plus homogenates from 18 other oilseeds (representing 11 different families) were examined for malate synthase and isocitrate lyase activity. Malate synthase activities in the various cotton seeds ranged from 35 to 129% of the units per dry seed weight found in Deltapine 16 cotton. For other oilseeds, the range was from 0.3 to 58% of Deltapine 16 cotton. Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) had the least activity per mg dry weight (12-fold lower than the next lowest species), while Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) had the highest level (8.53 units). On a per seed basis, these values were 15 and 747 nanomoles per minute. Malate synthase activity was measurable in all seed types examined, whereas isocitrate lyase could not be detected in any of the seeds. We suggest that synthesis of malate synthase during seed development is universal among oilseeds in the absence of glyoxylate-cycle-associated isocitrate lyase activity. PMID:16660858

  3. Subcellular targeting and trafficking of nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Oess, Stefanie; Icking, Ann; Fulton, David; Govers, Roland; Müller-Esterl, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Unlike most other endogenous messengers that are deposited in vesicles, processed on demand and/or secreted in a regulated fashion, NO (nitric oxide) is a highly active molecule that readily diffuses through cell membranes and thus cannot be stored inside the producing cell. Rather, its signalling capacity must be controlled at the levels of biosynthesis and local availability. The importance of temporal and spatial control of NO production is highlighted by the finding that differential localization of NO synthases in cardiomyocytes translates into distinct effects of NO in the heart. Thus NO synthases belong to the most tightly controlled enzymes, being regulated at transcriptional and translational levels, through co- and post-translational modifications, by substrate availability and not least via specific sorting to subcellular compartments, where they are in close proximity to their target proteins. Considerable efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie the intracellular targeting and trafficking of NO synthases, to ultimately understand the cellular pathways controlling the formation and function of this powerful signalling molecule. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms and triggers for subcellular routing and dynamic redistribution of NO synthases and the ensuing consequences for NO production and action. PMID:16722822

  4. Genetics Home Reference: N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of reactions that occurs in liver cells. This cycle processes excess nitrogen, generated when protein is used by the body, to make a compound called urea that is excreted by the kidneys. The ... cycle. In people with N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency , N- ...

  5. Incremental truncation of PHA synthases results in altered product specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xia, Yongzhen; Chen, Quan; Qi, Qingsheng

    2012-05-10

    PHA synthase is the key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of microbial polymers, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). In this study, we created a hybrid library of PHA synthase gene with different crossover points by an incremental truncation method between the C-terminal fragments of the phaC(Cn) (phaC from Cupriavidus necator) and the N-terminal fragments of the phaC1(Pa) (phaC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa). As the truncation of the hybrid enzyme increased, the in vivo PHB synthesis ability of the hybrids declined gradually. PHA synthase PhaC(Cn) with a deletion on N-terminal up to 83 amino acid residues showed no synthase activity. While with the removal of up to 270 amino acids from the N-terminus, the activity of the truncated PhaC(Cn) could be complemented by the N-terminus of PhaC1(Pa). Three of the hybrid enzymes W188, W235 and W272 (named by the deleted nucleic acid number) were found to have altered product specificities. PMID:22500895

  6. Polyhydroyxalkanoate synthase fusions as a strategy for oriented enzyme immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Hooks, David O; Venning-Slater, Mark; Du, Jinping; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a carbon storage polymer produced by certain bacteria in unbalanced nutrient conditions. The PHA forms spherical inclusions surrounded by granule associate proteins including the PHA synthase (PhaC). Recently, the intracellular formation of PHA granules with covalently attached synthase from Ralstonia eutropha has been exploited as a novel strategy for oriented enzyme immobilisation. Fusing the enzyme of interest to PHA synthase results in a bifunctional protein able to produce PHA granules and immobilise the active enzyme of choice to the granule surface. Functionalised PHA granules can be isolated from the bacterial hosts, such as Escherichia coli, and maintain enzymatic activity in a wide variety of assay conditions. This approach to oriented enzyme immobilisation has produced higher enzyme activities and product levels than non-oriented immobilisation techniques such as protein inclusion based particles. Here, enzyme immobilisation via PHA synthase fusion is reviewed in terms of the genetic designs, the choices of enzymes, the control of enzyme orientations, as well as their current and potential applications. PMID:24962396

  7. A geraniol-synthase gene from Cinnamomum tenuipilum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Li, Jing; Wang, Hao-Xin; Zeng, Ying

    2005-02-01

    Geraniol may accumulate up to 86-98% of the leaf essential oils in geraniol chemotypes of the evergreen camphor tree Cinnamomum tenuipilum. A similarity-based cloning strategy yielded a cDNA clone that appeared to encode a terpene synthase and which could be phylogenetically grouped within the angiosperm monoterpene synthase/subfamily. After its expression in Escherichia coli and enzyme assay with prenyl diphosphates as substrates, the enzyme encoded by the putative C. tenuipilum monoterpene synthase gene was shown to specifically convert geranyl diphosphate to geraniol as a single product by GC-MS analysis. Biochemical characterization of the partially purified recombinant protein revealed a strong dependency for Mg2+ and Mn2+, and an apparent Michaelis constant of 55.8 microM for geranyl diphosphate. Thus, a new member of the monoterpene synthase family was identified and designated as CtGES. The genome contains a single copy of CtGES gene. Expression of CtGES was exclusively observed in the geraniol chemotype of C. tenuipilum. Furthermore, in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that CtGES mRNA was localized in the oil cells of the leaves. PMID:15680985

  8. A particular phenotype in a girl with aldosterone synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tracy A; Mulatero, Paolo; Bosio, Maurizio; Lewicka, Sabina; Palermo, Mario; Veglio, Franco; Armanini, Decio

    2004-07-01

    Aldosterone synthase deficiency (ASD) usually presents in infancy as a life-threatening electrolyte imbalance. A 4-wk-old child of unrelated parents was examined for failure to thrive and salt-wasting. Notable laboratory findings were hyperkalemia, high plasma renin, and low-normal aldosterone levels. Urinary metabolite ratios of corticosterone/18-hydroxycorticosterone and 18-hydroxycorticosterone/aldosterone were intermediate between ASD type I and type II. Sequence analysis of CYP11B2, the gene encoding aldosterone synthase (P450c11AS), revealed that the patient was a compound heterozygote carrying a previously described mutation located in exon 4 causing a premature stop codon (E255X) and a further, novel mutation in exon 5 that also causes a premature stop codon (Q272X). The patient's unaffected father was a heterozygous carrier of the E255X mutation, whereas the unaffected mother was a heterozygous carrier of the Q272X mutation. Therefore, the patient's CYP11B2 encodes two truncated forms of aldosterone synthase predicted to be inactive because they lack critical active site residues as well as the heme-binding site. This case of ASD is of particular interest because despite the apparent lack of aldosterone synthase activity, the patient displays low-normal aldosterone levels, thus raising the question of its source. PMID:15240589

  9. Inhibition of N-acetylglutamate synthase by various monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic short-chain coenzyme A esters and the production of alternative glutamate esters.

    PubMed

    Dercksen, M; IJlst, L; Duran, M; Mienie, L J; van Cruchten, A; van der Westhuizen, F H; Wanders, R J A

    2014-12-01

    Hyperammonemia is a frequent finding in various organic acidemias. One possible mechanism involves the inhibition of the enzyme N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), by short-chain acyl-CoAs which accumulate due to defective catabolism of amino acids and/or fatty acids in the cell. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various acyl-CoAs on the activity of NAGS in conjunction with the formation of glutamate esters. NAGS activity was measured in vitro using a sensitive enzyme assay with ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) product analysis. Propionyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA proved to be the most powerful inhibitors of N-acetylglutamate (NAG) formation. Branched-chain amino acid related CoAs (isovaleryl-CoA, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA) showed less pronounced inhibition of NAGS whereas the dicarboxylic short-chain acyl-CoAs (methylmalonyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, glutaryl-CoA) had the least inhibitory effect. Subsequent work showed that the most powerful inhibitors also proved to be the best substrates in the formation of N-acylglutamates. Furthermore, we identified N-isovalerylglutamate, N-3-methylcrotonylglutamate and N-isobutyrylglutamate (the latter two in trace amounts), in the urines of patients with different organic acidemias. Collectively, these findings explain one of the contributing factors to secondary hyperammonemia, which lead to the reduced in vivo flux through the urea cycle in organic acidemias and result in the inadequate elimination of ammonia. PMID:23643712

  10. Correlation of nitric oxide produced by an inducible nitric oxide synthase-like protein with enhanced expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Inonotus obliquus cocultured with Phellinus morii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; Xi, Qi; Xu, Qian; He, Meihong; Ding, Jianing; Dai, Yucheng; Keller, Nancy P; Zheng, Weifa

    2015-05-01

    Fungal interspecific interactions enhance biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid metabolites (PM), and production of nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in this process. However, it remains unknown which signaling pathway(s) or regulator(s) mediate fungal PM biosynthesis. In this study, we cocultured two white-rot fungi, Inonotus obliquus and Phellinus morii, to examine NO production, expression of the genes involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism and accumulation of phenylpropanoid-derived polyphenols by I. obliquus. Coculture of the two fungi caused an enhanced NO biosynthesis followed by incr