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Sample records for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl hmg-coa reductase

  1. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase modulator: toward age- and sex-personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Pallottini, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis maintenance is regulated by a cellular feedback system that senses cholesterol amount in cellular membranes. 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) plays a pivotal role in cholesterol metabolism as it is the key rate-limiting enzyme of its biosynthetic pathway; its inhibition provokes a feedback response capable of reducing plasma cholesterol content. HMGR inhibition is a keystone in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease and, therefore, statins (HMGR inhibitors) are widely prescribed even though they may sometimes induce side effects. These drugs are prescribed indifferently to both man and women even if there are several well-known differences in cholesterol metabolism depending on the gender and the age. Thus, gender-related differences in cholesterol metabolism should be taken into account to identify new targets for customized pharmacological treatments for hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26135220

  2. Multitasking of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme a reductase inhibitor: beyond cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabro, Paolo; Yeh, Edward T H

    2004-01-01

    Statins can profoundly affect cellular metabolism by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for cholesterol synthesis. Many physicians prescribe statins to lower plasma cholesterol levels, which has beneficial effects in both the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. However, in vitro, in vivo, animal, and clinical studies have all shown that statins may also have important pleiotropic properties. In fact, a number of clinical studies have suggested that statins are involved in modulating diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia (including Alzheimer's disease). However, because these studies have been only preliminary and observational in nature, large randomized, placebo-controlled studies are needed to confirm the modulatory role of statins in these important diseases.

  3. Targeting and topology in the membrane of plant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, N; Boronat, A

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate. This is the first committed step of isoprenoid biosynthesis. A common feature of all known plant HMGR isoforms is the presence of two highly conserved hydrophobic sequences in the N-terminal quarter of the protein. Using an in vitro system, we showed that the two hydrophobic sequences of Arabidopsis HMGR1S function as internal signal sequences. Specific recognition of these sequences by the signal recognition particle mediates the targeting of the protein to microsomes derived from the endoplasmic reticulum. Arabidopsis HMGR is inserted into the microsomal membrane, and the two hydrophobic sequences become membrane-spanning segments. The N-terminal end and the C-terminal catalytic domain of Arabidopsis HMGR are positioned on the cytosolic side of the membrane, whereas only a short hydrophilic sequence is exposed to the lumen. Our results suggest that the plant HMGR isoforms known to date are primarily targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum and have the same topology in the membrane. This reinforces the hypothesis that mevalonate is synthesized only in the cytosol. The possibility that plant HMGRs might be located in different regions of the endomembrane system is discussed. PMID:8718626

  4. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase increases the expression of interferon-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Chen, Fuwang; Ma, Teng; Dong, Meichen; Wang, Fei; Pang, Daxing; Peng, Zhiyuan; Ren, Linzhu

    2014-12-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) pathway is an important metabolic route that is present in almost every organism. However, whether HMGCR affects the expression of interferon (IFN)-responsive genes is unclear. In the present study, expression levels of IFN-responsive genes were monitored by real time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that expression levels of IFN-responsive genes were significantly increased in HMGCR-downregulated cells and HMGCR inhibitor-treated cells, indicating that inhibition of HMGCR activates the expression of IFN-responsive genes. The result in this study will provide new insight into the role of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in antiviral research.

  5. Subcellular Localization of Arabidopsis 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase1

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; González, Víctor M.; Castel, Susanna; Trelease, Richard N.; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Arró, Montserrat; Boronat, Albert; Campos, Narciso; Ferrer, Albert; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    Plants produce diverse isoprenoids, which are synthesized in plastids, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the nonorganellar cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the synthesis of mevalonate, a rate-limiting step in the cytoplasmic pathway. Several branches of the pathway lead to the synthesis of structurally and functionally varied, yet essential, isoprenoids. Several HMGR isoforms have been identified in all plants examined. Studies based on gene expression and on fractionation of enzyme activity suggested that subcellular compartmentalization of HMGR is an important intracellular channeling mechanism for the production of the specific classes of isoprenoids. Plant HMGR has been shown previously to insert in vitro into the membrane of microsomal vesicles, but the final in vivo subcellular localization(s) remains controversial. To address the latter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells, we conducted a multipronged microscopy and cell fractionation approach that included imaging of chimeric HMGR green fluorescent protein localizations in transiently transformed cell leaves, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in wild-type and stably transformed seedlings, immunogold electron microscopy examinations of endogenous HMGR in seedling cotyledons, and sucrose density gradient analyses of HMGR-containing organelles. Taken together, the results reveal that endogenous Arabidopsis HMGR is localized at steady state within ER as expected, but surprisingly also predominantly within spherical, vesicular structures that range from 0.2- to 0.6-μm diameter, located in the cytoplasm and within the central vacuole in differentiated cotyledon cells. The N-terminal region, including the transmembrane domain of HMGR, was found to be necessary and sufficient for directing HMGR to ER and the spherical structures. It is believed, although not directly demonstrated, that these vesicle-like structures are derived from segments of HMGR

  6. Statins and Myotoxic Effects Associated With Anti-3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yurika; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Murata, Ken-ya; Kurashige, Takashi; Ikawa, Masamichi; Asahi, Masaru; Konishi, Hirofumi; Mitsuma, Satsuki; Kawabata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Statins have a variety of myotoxic effects and can trigger the development of inflammatory myopathies or myasthenia gravis (MG) mediated by immunomodulatory properties. Autoantibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) have been identified in patients with statin-associated myopathy. The purpose of the present study is to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of anti-HMGCR antibodies and to elucidate the clinical significance of anti-HMGCR antibodies in Japanese patients with inflammatory myopathies or MG. We enrolled 75 patients with inflammatory myopathies, who were all negative for anti-signal recognition particle and anti-aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase antibodies. They were referred to Keio University and National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry between October 2010 and September 2012. We also studied 251 patients with MG who were followed at the MG Clinic at Keio University Hospital. Anti-HMGCR antibodies were detected by ELISA. We investigated demographic, clinical, radiological, and histological findings associated with anti-HMGCR antibodies. We established the anti-HMGCR ELISA with the recombinant protein. Protein immunoprecipitation detected autoantigens corresponding to HMGCR. Immunohistochemistry using muscle biopsy specimens revealed regenerating muscle fibers clearly stained by polyclonal anti-HMGCR antibodies and patients’ serum. Anti-HMGCR autoantibodies were specifically detected in 8 patients with necrotizing myopathy. The seropositivity rate in the necrotizing myopathy patients was significantly higher than those in the patients with other histological diagnoses of inflammatory myopathies (31% vs 2%, P = 0.001). Statins were administered in only 3 of the 8 anti-HMGCR-positive patients. Myopathy associated with anti-HMGCR antibodies showed mild limb weakness and favorable response to immunotherapy. All 8 patients exhibited increased signal intensities on short T1 inversion recovery of

  7. Functional size of rat hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase as determined by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, P.A.; Kempner, E.S.; Lan, S.F.; Erickson, S.K.

    1985-08-25

    The functional molecular weight of rat liver 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase was determined by radiation inactivation. Both isolated hepatic microsomes and primary hepatocytes were irradiated with high energy electrons at -135 degrees C, and the residual microsomal enzyme activity was subsequently determined. The loss of enzyme activity in both irradiated microsomes and microsomes isolated from irradiated hepatocytes followed a single exponential decay which corresponded to a molecular mass of 200 kDa. This minimal molecular size of the functional enzyme was unaffected by either addition of cholestyramine to the rat diet or addition of 25-hydroxycholesterol plus mevalonate to the isolated rat hepatocytes. In addition, surviving enzyme protein was determined by immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled enzyme from hepatocytes that had been incubated with (TVS)methionine before irradiation. The target size for loss of the monomer subunits was 98 kDa. The simplest interpretation of these results is that rat liver 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in situ is a noncovalently linked dimer of the Mr = 97,200 enzyme subunit.

  8. Identification of a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene highly expressed in the root tissue of Taraxacum kok-saghyz

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kazak dandelion (Taraxacum kok-saghyz, Tk) is a rubber-producing plant currently being investigated as a source of natural rubber for industrial applications. Like many other isoprenoids, rubber is a downstream product of the mevalonate pathway. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) en...

  9. Comparison of regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in hepatoma cells grown in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beirne, O R; Watson, J A

    1976-01-01

    Unlike the normal liver, numerous transplantable rodent and human hepatomas are unable to alter their rate of sterol synthesis and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-GoA) reductase [mevalonate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.34] activity in response to a dietary cholesterol challenge. It has been suggested that this metabolic defect is linked to the process of malignant transformation. Hepatoma 7288C "lacks" feedback regulation of cholesterol synthesis when grown in vivo but expresses this regulatory property when grown in vitro (then called HTC). Therefore, it was used as a model system to answer whether an established hepatoma cell line that modulates its rate of cholesterol synthesis in vitro can express this property when grown in vivo, and whether cells reisolated from the tumor mass have the same regulatory phenotype as before transplantation. Our results show that long-term growth of hepatoma 7288C in tissue culture has not caused a biotransformation that permits feedback regulation of HMG-CoA reductase when the cells are transplanted back into host animals. In addition, HTC cells reisolated from the tumor mass and established in tissue culture continue to have the ability to regulate HMG-CoA reductase activity. Therefore, malignant transformation is not categorically linked to the loss of the cellular components necessary to regulate sterol synthesis and HMG-CoA reductase activity. Images PMID:183207

  10. Sequence comparison of a segment of the gene for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in zygomycetes.

    PubMed

    Burmester, A; Czempinski, K

    1994-03-01

    In this paper we compare the sequences of a segment of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene, isolated from eleven different strains belonging to four species of the fungal order Mucorales, Parasitella parasitica, Absidia glauca, Mucor mucedo (Mucoraceae) and Blakeslea trispora (Choanephoraceae). The segment was obtained by polynucleotide-chain-reaction amplification with primers derived from conservative regions of the gene. For the species M. mucedo and P. parasitica we have obtained evidence for two different types of HMG-CoA reductase genes by hybridization of genomic DNA with the amplified fragment and by cloning and sequencing of two different fragments. The different genes from one species show a sequence similarity of around 80% at the protein sequence level, whereas sequences of the same type from different species show similarity ranging between 91-96%. The highest similarity was found between the genes of type 1 from B. trispora and M. mucedo, although these species belong to different families. Southern-blot analysis of A. glauca DNA and B. trispora DNA revealed a second copy of the genes.

  11. Induction mechanism of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Katsuyoshi; Uritani, Ikuzo; Oba, Kazuko

    2003-05-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, EC1.1.1.34), the key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, was purified from microsomes of potato tuber tissue, and a polyclonal antibody and two monoclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme were prepared. HMGR protein content was measured by immunotitration and radioimmunoassay using these antibodies. HMGR activity was very low in the fresh tissues of both potato tuber and sweet potato root. The activity in potato tuber was increased by cutting and further by additional fungal infection of the cut tissues. In sweet potato root tissue, the activity was scarcely increased after cutting alone, but was markedly increased by additional fungal infection or chemical treatment. The HMGR protein contents in both fresh potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues were also very low, and increased markedly in response to cutting and fungal infection. From these results, we proposed a hypothesis on the induction mechanism of HMGR after cutting and fungal infection in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

  12. Modulation of dendritic cell immunobiology via inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Tina; Pfueller, Caspar F; Luessi, Felix; Bendix, Ivo; Paterka, Magdalena; Prozorovski, Timour; Treue, Denise; Luenstedt, Sarah; Herz, Josephine; Siffrin, Volker; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Zipp, Frauke; Waiczies, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The maturation status of dendritic cells determines whether interacting T cells are activated or if they become tolerant. Previously we could induce T cell tolerance by applying a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (HMGCRI) atorvastatin, which also modulates MHC class II expression and has therapeutic potential in autoimmune disease. Here, we aimed at elucidating the impact of this therapeutic strategy on T cell differentiation as a consequence of alterations in dendritic cell function. We investigated the effect of HMGCRI during differentiation of peripheral human monocytes and murine bone marrow precursors to immature DC in vitro and assessed their phenotype. To examine the stimulatory and tolerogenic capacity of these modulated immature dendritic cells, we measured proliferation and suppressive function of CD4+ T cells after stimulation with the modulated immature dendritic cells. We found that an HMGCRI, atorvastatin, prevents dendrite formation during the generation of immature dendritic cells. The modulated immature dendritic cells had a diminished capacity to take up and present antigen as well as to induce an immune response. Of note, the consequence was an increased capacity to differentiate naïve T cells towards a suppressor phenotype that is less sensitive to proinflammatory stimuli and can effectively inhibit the proliferation of T effector cells in vitro. Thus, manipulation of antigen-presenting cells by HMGCRI contributes to an attenuated immune response as shown by promotion of T cells with suppressive capacities.

  13. Thermodynamic and Structure Guided Design of Statin Based Inhibitors of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Bills, Elizabeth; Bolton, Gary; Bratton, Larry D.; Caspers, Nicole L.; Dunbar, James B.; Harris, Melissa S.; Hutchings, Richard H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Larsen, Scott D.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2008-10-02

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, are effective at lowering mortality levels associated with cardiovascular disease; however, 2--7% of patients may experience statin-induced myalgia that limits compliance with a treatment regimen. High resolution crystal structures, thermodynamic binding parameters, and biochemical data were used to design statin inhibitors with improved HMGR affinity and therapeutic index relative to statin-induced myalgia. These studies facilitated the identification of imidazole 1 as a potent (IC{sub 50} = 7.9 nM) inhibitor with excellent hepatoselectivity (>1000-fold) and good in vivo efficacy. The binding of 1 to HMGR was found to be enthalpically driven with a {Delta}H of -17.7 kcal/M. Additionally, a second novel series of bicyclic pyrrole-based inhibitors was identified that induced order in a protein flap of HMGR. Similar ordering was detected in a substrate complex, but has not been reported in previous statin inhibitor complexes with HMGR.

  14. Cloning and functional characterization of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase gene from Withania somnifera: an important medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nehal; Gupta, Parul; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is one of the most valuable medicinal plants synthesizing a large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides, the C28-steroidal lactones derived from triterpenoids. Though the plant has been well characterized in terms of phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities, not much is known about the biosynthetic pathway and genes responsible for biosynthesis of these compounds. In this study, we have characterized the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) catalyzing the key regulatory step of the isoprenoid biosynthesis. The 1,728-bp full-length cDNA of Withania HMGR (WsHMGR) encodes a polypeptide of 575 amino acids. The amino acid sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis suggest that WsHMGR has typical structural features of other known plant HMGRs. The relative expression analysis suggests that WsHMGR expression varies in different tissues as well as chemotypes and is significantly elevated in response to exposure to salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and mechanical injury. The functional color assay in Escherichia coli showed that WsHMGR could accelerate the biosynthesis of carotenoids, establishing that WsHMGR encoded a functional protein and may play a catalytic role by its positive influence in isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  15. Dual Targeting of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Histone Deacetylase as a Therapy for Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tzu-Tang; Lin, Yi-Ting; Chen, Wen-Shu; Luo, Ping; Lin, Yu-Chin; Shun, Chia-Tung; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Jhih-Bin; Chen, Nai-Wei; Fang, Jim-Min; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Yang, Kai-Chien; Chang, Li-Chun; Tai, Kang-Yu; Liang, Jin-Tung; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2016-08-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGR) inhibitors decreasing serum cholesterol and have shown promise in cancer prevention. In this study, we demonstrated the oncogenic role of HMGR in colorectal cancer (CRC) by disclosing increased HMGR activity in CRC patients and its enhancement of anti-apoptosis and stemness. Our previous studies showed that statins containing carboxylic acid chains possessed activity against histone deacetylases (HDACs), and strengthened their anti-HDAC activity through designing HMGR-HDAC dual inhibitors, JMF compounds. These compounds exerted anti-cancer effect in CRC cells as well as in AOM-DSS and Apc(Min/+) CRC mouse models. JMF mostly regulated the genes related to apoptosis and inflammation through genome-wide ChIP-on-chip analysis, and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) predicted their respective regulation by NR3C1 and NF-κB. Furthermore, JMF inhibited metastasis, angiogenesis and cancer stemness, and potentiated the effect of oxaliplatin in CRC mouse models. Dual HMGR-HDAC inhibitor could be a potential treatment for CRC. PMID:27448759

  16. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase reduce receptor-mediated endocytosis in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, James E; Davidson, Robert G; McTaggart, Fergus; Orton, Terry C; Scott, Robert C; Smith, Graham J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2004-09-01

    Renal proximal tubule cells are responsible for the reabsorption of proteins that are present in the tubular lumen. This occurs by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that has a requirement for some GTP-binding proteins. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase used for the therapeutic reduction of cholesterol-containing plasma lipoproteins. However, they can also reduce intracellular levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates that are derived from the product of the enzyme, mevalonate, and are required for the prenylation and normal function of GTP-binding proteins. The hypothesis that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in renal proximal tubule cells could reduce receptor mediated-endocytosis was therefore tested. Five different statins inhibited the uptake of FITC-labeled albumin by the proximal tubule-derived opossum kidney cell line in a dose-dependent manner and in the absence of cytotoxicity. The reduction in albumin uptake was related to the degree of inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. Simvastatin (e.g., statin) inhibited receptor-mediated endocytosis of both FITC-albumin and FITC-beta(2)-microglobulin to similar extents but without altering the binding of albumin to the cell surface. The effect on albumin endocytosis was prevented by mevalonate and by the isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate but not by cholesterol. Finally, evidence that the inhibitory effect of statins on endocytosis of proteins may be caused by reduced prenylation and thereby decreased function of one or more GTP-binding proteins is provided. These data establish the possibility in principle that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins in proximal tubule cells may reduce tubular protein reabsorption. PMID:15339975

  17. Enhanced Production of a Plant Monoterpene by Overexpression of the 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Catalytic Domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Juan; Pardo, Ester; Orejas, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Linalool production was evaluated in different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing the Clarkia breweri linalool synthase gene (LIS). The wine strain T73 was shown to produce higher levels of linalool than conventional laboratory strains (i.e., almost three times the amount). The performance of this strain was further enhanced by manipulating the endogenous mevalonate (MVA) pathway: deregulated overexpression of the rate-limiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) doubled linalool production. In a haploid laboratory strain, engineering of this key step also improved linalool yield. PMID:20675444

  18. Is the Reaction Catalyzed by 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase a Rate-Limiting Step for Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Plants?

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, J.; Wolf, F.; Proulx, J.; Cuellar, R.; Saunders, C.

    1995-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the irreversible conversion of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A to mevalonate and is considered a key regulatory step controlling isoprenoid metabolism in mammals and fungi. The rate-limiting nature of this enzyme for isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants remains controversial. To investigate whether HMGR activity could be limiting in plants, we introduced a constitutively expressing hamster HMGR gene into tabacco (Nicotiana tabaccum L.) plants to obtain unregulated HMGR activity. The impact of the resulting enzyme activity on the biosynthesis and accumulation of particular isoprenoids was evaluated. Expression of the hamster HMGR gene led to a 3- to 6-fold increase in the total HMGR enzyme activity. Total sterol accumulation was consequently increased 3- to 10-fold, whereas end-product sterols such as sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol were increased only 2-fold. The level of cycloartenol, a sterol biosynthetic intermediate, was increased more than 100-fold. Although the synthesis of total sterols appears to be limited normally by HMGR activity, these results indicate that the activity of one or more later enzyme(s) in the pathway must also be involved in determining the relative accumulation of end-product sterols. The levels of other isoprenoids such as carotenoids, phytol chain of chlorophyll, and sesquiterpene phytoalexins were relatively unaltered in the transgenic plants. It appears from these results that compartmentation, channeling, or other rate-determining enzymes operate to control the accumulation of these other isoprenoid end products. PMID:12228673

  19. Inhibition of Squalene Synthase and Squalene Epoxidase in Tobacco Cells Triggers an Up-Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Wentzinger, Laurent F.; Bach, Thomas J.; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée

    2002-01-01

    To get some insight into the regulatory mechanisms controlling the sterol branch of the mevalonate pathway, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow-2) cell suspensions were treated with squalestatin-1 and terbinafine, two specific inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS) and squalene epoxidase, respectively. These two enzymes catalyze the first two steps involved in sterol biosynthesis. In highly dividing cells, SQS was actively expressed concomitantly with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and both sterol methyltransferases. At nanomolar concentrations, squalestatin was found to inhibit efficiently sterol biosynthesis as attested by the rapid decrease in SQS activity and [14C]radioactivity from acetate incorporated into sterols. A parallel dose-dependent accumulation of farnesol, the dephosphorylated form of the SQS substrate, was observed without affecting farnesyl diphosphate synthase steady-state mRNA levels. Treatment of tobacco cells with terbinafine is also shown to inhibit sterol synthesis. In addition, this inhibitor induced an impressive accumulation of squalene and a dose-dependent stimulation of the triacylglycerol content and synthesis, suggesting the occurrence of regulatory relationships between sterol and triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathways. We demonstrate that squalene was stored in cytosolic lipid particles, but could be redirected toward sterol synthesis if required. Inhibition of either SQS or squalene epoxidase was found to trigger a severalfold increase in enzyme activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, giving first evidence for a positive feedback regulation of this key enzyme in response to a selective depletion of endogenous sterols. At the same time, no compensatory responses mediated by SQS were observed, in sharp contrast to the situation in mammalian cells. PMID:12226513

  20. Mevalonate regulates polysome distribution and blocks translation-dependent suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase mRNA: relationship to translational control.

    PubMed

    Peffley, D M; Gayen, A K

    1995-05-01

    We reported previously that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase synthesis is regulated at the translational level by mevalonate. To determine at what stage mevalonate affects reductase synthesis, we examined the distribution of reductase mRNA in polysomes from cells treated with lovastatin alone; lovastatin and 25-hydroxycholesterol; or lovastatin, 25-hydroxycholesterol, and mevalonate. In lovastatin-treated cells, reductase mRNA was primarily associated with heavy polysome fractions. When 25-hydroxycholesterol was added to lovastatin-treated cells, reductase mRNA levels were reduced approximately fourfold in all polysome fractions, with no accompanying redistribution of reductase mRNA into lighter polysome fractions. However, addition of both 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevalonate to lovastatin-treated cells shifted reductase mRNA from heavier to lighter polysome fractions. No change in the distribution of control beta-actin or ribosomal protein S17 mRNA occurred with any of the treatments. These results suggest that mevalonate suppresses reductase synthesis at the level of initiation. When the translation inhibitor cycloheximide was added to all three regimens, reductase mRNA shifted into heavy polysome fractions. Treatment with either lovastatin alone or lovastatin plus 25-hydroxycholesterol resulted in a 50% greater loss of reductase mRNA from the heavy polysome fractions compared to the same fractions from noncycloheximide-treated cells. No loss of reductase mRNA occurred when cycloheximide was added to cells treated with both 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevalonate. beta-Actin mRNA levels and polysome distribution were not significantly changed by cycloheximide under any of these conditions. Translationally mediated suppression of reductase mRNA did not occur when protein synthesis was inhibited with puromycin. Our results indicate that regulation of reductase mRNA levels is translation-dependent and is linked to the rate of elongation.

  1. Species-specific expansion and molecular evolution of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene family in plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Wei; Wei, Hengling; He, Qiuling; Chen, Jinhong; Zhang, Baohong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2014-01-01

    The terpene compounds represent the largest and most diverse class of plant secondary metabolites which are important in plant growth and development. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) is one of the key enzymes contributed to terpene biosynthesis. To better understand the basic characteristics and evolutionary history of the HMGR gene family in plants, a genome-wide analysis of HMGR genes from 20 representative species was carried out. A total of 56 HMGR genes in the 14 land plant genomes were identified, but no genes were found in all 6 algal genomes. The gene structure and protein architecture of all plant HMGR genes were highly conserved. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the plant HMGRs were derived from one ancestor gene and finally developed into four distinct groups, two in the monocot plants and two in dicot plants. Species-specific gene duplications, caused mainly by segmental duplication, led to the limited expansion of HMGR genes in Zea mays, Gossypium raimondii, Populus trichocarpa and Glycine max after the species diverged. The analysis of Ka/Ks ratios and expression profiles indicated that functional divergence after the gene duplications was restricted. The results suggested that the function and evolution of HMGR gene family were dramatically conserved throughout the plant kingdom. PMID:24722776

  2. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductases from fungi: a proposal as a therapeutic target and as a study model.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Pavón, Dulce; Sánchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Ibarra, José Antonio; Tamariz, Joaquín; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-Co-A into mevalonate. This step is the limiting point for the synthesis of cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. We describe in this article the genome organization of HMGR coding genes and those deduced from different fungi, recount the evidence showing statins as HMGR inhibitors for ergosterol synthesis and its effect in yeast viability, and propose fungal HMGR (HMGRf) as a model to study the use of pharmaceutical compounds to inhibit cholesterol and ergosterol synthesis. Bibliographical search and bioinformatic analyses were performed and discussed. HMGRfs belong to the class I with a high homology in the catalytic region. The sterol biosynthetic pathway in humans and fungi share many enzymes in the initial steps (such as the HMGR enzyme), but in the last steps enzymes are different rendering the two final products: cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. With regards to inhibitors such as statins and other compounds, these affect also fungal viability. Since HMGR from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Ustilago maydis are very similar to the human HMGR in the catalytic regions, we propose that fungal enzymes can be used to test inhibitors for a potential use in humans. We consider that HMGRf is a good therapeutic target to design and test new antifungal compounds. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270073

  3. (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a product of the mva operon of Pseudomonas mevalonii, is regulated at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y L; Beach, M J; Rodwell, V W

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 505-base-pair (bp) segment of DNA situated upstream of mvaA, the structural gene for (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) of Pseudomonas mevalonii. The DNA segment that we characterized includes the promoter region for the mva operon. Nuclease S1 mapping and primer extension analysis showed that mvaA is the promoter-proximal gene of the mva operon. Transcription initiates at -56 bp relative to the first A (+1) of the translation start site. Transcription in vivo was induced by mevalonate. Structural features of the mva promoter region include an 80-bp A + T-rich region, and -12, -24 consensus sequences that resemble sequences of sigma 54 promoters in enteric organisms. The relative amplitudes of catalytic activity, enzyme protein, and mvaA mRNA are consistent with a model of regulation of this operon at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:2477360

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana contains two differentially expressed 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase genes, which encode microsomal forms of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Enjuto, M; Balcells, L; Campos, N; Caelles, C; Arró, M; Boronat, A

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in plant isoprenoid biosynthesis. Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes, HMG1 and HMG2, that encode HMGR. We have cloned these two genes and analyzed their structure and expression. HMG1 and HMG2 consist of four exons and three small introns that interrupt the coding sequence at equivalent positions. The two genes share sequence similarity in the coding regions but not in the 5'- or 3'-flanking regions. HMG1 mRNA is detected in all tissues, whereas the presence of HMG2 mRNA is restricted to young seedlings, roots, and inflorescences. The similarity between the two encoded proteins (HMGR1 and HMGR2) is restricted to the regions corresponding to the membrane and the catalytic domains. Arabidopsis HMGR2 represents a divergent form of the enzyme that has no counterpart among plant HMGRs characterized so far. By using a coupled in vitro transcription-translation assay, we show that both HMGR1 and HMGR2 are cotranslationally inserted into endoplasmic reticulum-derived microsomal membranes. Our results suggest that the endoplasmic reticulum is the only cell compartment for the targeting of HMGR in Arabidopsis and support the hypothesis that in higher plants the formation of mevalonate occurs solely in the cytosol. Images PMID:8302869

  5. Metabolically regulated endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase: evidence for requirement of a geranylgeranylated protein.

    PubMed

    Leichner, Gil S; Avner, Rachel; Harats, Dror; Roitelman, Joseph

    2011-09-16

    In mammalian cells, the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mevalonate pathway, is ubiquitylated and degraded by the 26 S proteasome when mevalonate-derived metabolites accumulate, representing a case of metabolically regulated endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we studied which mevalonate-derived metabolites signal for HMGR degradation and the ERAD step(s) in which these metabolites are required. In HMGR-deficient UT-2 cells that stably express HMGal, a chimeric protein between β-galactosidase and the membrane region of HMGR, which is necessary and sufficient for the regulated ERAD, we tested inhibitors specific to different steps in the mevalonate pathway. We found that metabolites downstream of farnesyl pyrophosphate but upstream to lanosterol were highly effective in initiating ubiquitylation, dislocation, and degradation of HMGal. Similar results were observed for endogenous HMGR in cells that express this protein. Ubiquitylation, dislocation, and proteasomal degradation of HMGal were severely hampered when production of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate was inhibited. Importantly, inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation markedly attenuated ubiquitylation and dislocation, implicating for the first time a geranylgeranylated protein(s) in the metabolically regulated ERAD of HMGR.

  6. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species.

  7. Expression of the Hevea brasiliensis (H.B.K.) Mull. Arg. 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase 1 in Tobacco Results in Sterol Overproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, H.; Grausem, B.; Benveniste, P.; Chye, M. L.; Tan, C. T.; Song, Y. H.; Chua, N. H.

    1995-01-01

    A genomic fragment encoding one (HMGR1) of the three 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductases (HMGRs) from Hevea brasiliensis (H.B.K.) Mull. Arg. (M.-L. Chye, C.-T. Tan, N.-H. Chua [1992] Plant Mol Biol 19: 473-484) was introduced into Nicotiana tabacum L. cv xanthi via Agrobacterium transformation to study the influence of the hmg1 gene product on plant isoprenoid biosynthesis. Transgenic plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control wild-type plants and displayed the same developmental pattern. Transgenic lines showed an increase in the level of total sterols up to 6-fold, probably because of an increased expression level of hmg1 mRNA and a corresponding increased enzymatic activity for HMGR, when compared with the level of total sterols from control lines not expressing the hmg1 transgene. In addition to the pathway end products, campesterol, sitosterol, and stigmasterol, some biosynthetic intermediates such as cycloartenol also accumulated in transgenic tissues. Most of the overproduced sterols were detected as steryl-esters and were likely to be stored in cytoplasmic lipid bodies. These data strongly support the conclusion that plant HMGR is a key limiting enzyme in phytosterol biosynthesis. PMID:12228630

  8. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  9. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductases from fungi: a proposal as a therapeutic target and as a study model.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Pavón, Dulce; Sánchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Ibarra, José Antonio; Tamariz, Joaquín; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-Co-A into mevalonate. This step is the limiting point for the synthesis of cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. We describe in this article the genome organization of HMGR coding genes and those deduced from different fungi, recount the evidence showing statins as HMGR inhibitors for ergosterol synthesis and its effect in yeast viability, and propose fungal HMGR (HMGRf) as a model to study the use of pharmaceutical compounds to inhibit cholesterol and ergosterol synthesis. Bibliographical search and bioinformatic analyses were performed and discussed. HMGRfs belong to the class I with a high homology in the catalytic region. The sterol biosynthetic pathway in humans and fungi share many enzymes in the initial steps (such as the HMGR enzyme), but in the last steps enzymes are different rendering the two final products: cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. With regards to inhibitors such as statins and other compounds, these affect also fungal viability. Since HMGR from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Ustilago maydis are very similar to the human HMGR in the catalytic regions, we propose that fungal enzymes can be used to test inhibitors for a potential use in humans. We consider that HMGRf is a good therapeutic target to design and test new antifungal compounds. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  10. Molecular cloning of mevalonate pathway genes from Taraxacum brevicorniculatum and functional characterisation of the key enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    van Deenen, Nicole; Bachmann, Anne-Lena; Schmidt, Thomas; Schaller, Hubert; Sand, Jennifer; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Taraxacum brevicorniculatum is known to produce high quality rubber. The biosynthesis of rubber is dependent on isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) precursors derived from the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. The cDNA sequences of seven MVA pathway genes from latex of T. brevicorniculatum were isolated, including three cDNA sequences encoding for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductases (TbHMGR1-3). Expression analyses indicate an important role of TbHMGR1 as well as for the HMG-CoA synthase (TbHMGS), the diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase and the mevalonate kinase in the provision of precursors for rubber biosynthesis. The amino acid sequences of the TbHMGRs show the typical motifs described for plant HMGRs such as two transmembrane domains and a catalytic domain containing two HMG-CoA and two NADP(H) binding sites. The functionality of the HMGRs was demonstrated by complementation assay using an IPP auxotroph mutant of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the transient expression of the catalytic domains of TbHMGR1 and TbHMGR2 in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in a strong accumulation of sterol precursors, one of the major groups of pathway end-products.

  11. Farnesol-Induced Cell Death and Stimulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Tobacco cv Bright Yellow-2 Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Bach, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Growth inhibition of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow-2) cells by mevinolin, a specific inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) could be partially overcome by the addition of farnesol. However, farnesol alone inhibited cell division and growth as measured by determination of fresh weight increase. When 7-d-old tobacco cv Bright Yellow-2 cells were diluted 40-fold into fresh culture, the cells exhibited a dose-dependent sensitivity to farnesol, with 25 μm sufficient to cause 100% cell death, as measured by different staining techniques, cytometry, and monitoring of fragmentation of genomic DNA. Cells were less sensitive to the effects of farnesol when diluted only 4-fold. Farnesol was absorbed by the cells, as examined by [1-3H]farnesol uptake, with a greater relative enrichment by the more diluted cells. Both mevinolin and farnesol treatments stimulated apparent HMGR activity. The stimulation by farnesol was also reflected in corresponding changes in the steady-state levels of HMGR mRNA and enzyme protein with respect to HMGR gene expression and enzyme protein accumulation. PMID:10938345

  12. Species-Specific Expansion and Molecular Evolution of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (HMGR) Gene Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liu, Wei; Wei, Hengling; He, Qiuling; Chen, Jinhong; Zhang, Baohong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2014-01-01

    The terpene compounds represent the largest and most diverse class of plant secondary metabolites which are important in plant growth and development. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) is one of the key enzymes contributed to terpene biosynthesis. To better understand the basic characteristics and evolutionary history of the HMGR gene family in plants, a genome-wide analysis of HMGR genes from 20 representative species was carried out. A total of 56 HMGR genes in the 14 land plant genomes were identified, but no genes were found in all 6 algal genomes. The gene structure and protein architecture of all plant HMGR genes were highly conserved. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the plant HMGRs were derived from one ancestor gene and finally developed into four distinct groups, two in the monocot plants and two in dicot plants. Species-specific gene duplications, caused mainly by segmental duplication, led to the limited expansion of HMGR genes in Zea mays, Gossypium raimondii, Populus trichocarpa and Glycine max after the species diverged. The analysis of Ka/Ks ratios and expression profiles indicated that functional divergence after the gene duplications was restricted. The results suggested that the function and evolution of HMGR gene family were dramatically conserved throughout the plant kingdom. PMID:24722776

  13. Contribution of Accelerated Degradation to Feedback Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Cholesterol Metabolism in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonghwan; Hartman, Isamu Z; Calhoun, Leona N; Garland, Kristina; Young, Gennipher A; Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey; Xu, Fang; Engelking, Luke; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2016-06-24

    Accumulation of sterols in endoplasmic reticulum membranes stimulates the ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in synthesis of cholesterol. This ubiquitination marks HMGCR for proteasome-mediated degradation and constitutes one of several mechanisms for feedback control of cholesterol synthesis. Mechanisms for sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGCR have been elucidated through the study of cultured mammalian cells. However, the extent to which these reactions modulate HMGCR and contribute to control of cholesterol metabolism in whole animals is unknown. Here, we examine transgenic mice expressing in the liver the membrane domain of HMGCR (HMGCR (TM1-8)), a region necessary and sufficient for sterol-accelerated degradation, and knock-in mice in which endogenous HMGCR harbors mutations that prevent sterol-induced ubiquitination. Characterization of transgenic mice revealed that HMGCR (TM1-8) is appropriately regulated in the liver of mice fed a high cholesterol diet or chow diet supplemented with the HMGCR inhibitor lovastatin. Ubiquitination-resistant HMGCR protein accumulates in the liver and other tissues disproportionately to its mRNA, indicating that sterol-accelerated degradation significantly contributes to feedback regulation of HMGCR in vivo Results of these studies demonstrate that HMGCR is subjected to sterol-accelerated degradation in the liver through mechanisms similar to those established in cultured cells. Moreover, these studies designate sterol-accelerated degradation of HMGCR as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease. PMID:27129778

  14. Partial cloning, tissue distribution and effects of epigallocatechin gallate on hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA transcripts in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Cocci, Paolo; Mosconi, Gilberto; Palermo, Francesco Alessandro

    2014-07-25

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major active component of the green tea, has recently been found to inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoAR) activity in vitro and to modulate lipogenesis in vivo. In this study we have evaluated the effects of short-term in vivo exposure to EGCG (6 μg g(-1) BW or 9 μg g(-1) BW) on hepatic HMGCoAR gene expression of goldfish (Carassius auratus). We initially characterized a partial sequence of goldfish HMGCoAR suggesting that the obtained fragment shares high similarity (>92%) with other fish HMGCoAR sequences. Further, the HMGCoAR transcript was detected in all goldfish tissues (except muscle) but primarily in liver, brain and gonads; on the contrary, low expression levels were found in intestine, heart, gill, and kidney. Both EGCG doses significantly decreased hepatic HMGCoAR mRNA levels 180 min post-injection. HMGCoAR was also significantly down-regulated at 90 min after injection in fish treated with the highest dose of EGCG. Our results demonstrate that hepatic HMGCoAR gene expression is acutely responsive to short-term EGCG exposure in goldfish. This finding suggests a potential role of EGCG in transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis.

  15. Expression of the Arabidopsis HMG2 gene, encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, is restricted to meristematic and floral tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Enjuto, M; Lumbreras, V; Marín, C; Boronat, A

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of mevalonate, which is considered the first rate-limiting step in isoprenoid biosynthesis, is catalyzed by the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34). In Arabidopsis, HMGR is encoded by two differentially expressed genes (HMG1 and HMG2). The transcriptional activity of the HMG2 gene was studied after fusing different regions of its 5' flanking region to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and transforming the resulting constructs into tobacco plants. The spatial and temporal expression directed by the HMG2 promoter in the transgenic plants is consistent with the expression pattern previously established by RNA analysis using an HMG2-specific probe. HMG2 expression is restricted to meristematic (root tip and shoot apex) and floral (secretory zone of the stigma, mature pollen grains, gynoecium vascular tissue, and fertilized ovules) tissues. Deletion analysis of the HMG2 5' flanking region was conducted in transgenic plants and transfected protoplasts. The region containing nucleotides -857 to +64 of the HMG2 gene was sufficient to confer high levels of expression in both floral and meristematic tissues, although deletion to nucleotide -503 resulted in almost complete loss of expression. Sequences contained within the 5' transcribed, untranslated region are also important for gene expression. The biological significance of the restricted pattern of expression of HMG2 is also discussed. PMID:7780305

  16. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  17. Diurnal variation in the fraction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the active form in the mammary gland of the lactating rat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R A; Middleton, B; West, D W

    1986-01-01

    'Expressed' and 'total' activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) were measured in freeze-clamped samples of mammary glands from lactating rats at intervals throughout the 24 h light/dark cycle. 'Expressed' activities were measured in microsomal fractions isolated and assayed in the presence of 100 mM-KF. 'Total' activities were determined in microsomal preparations from the same homogenates but washed free of KF and incubated with exogenously added sheep liver phosphoprotein phosphatase before assay. Both 'expressed' and 'total' activities of HMG-CoA reductase underwent a diurnal cycle, which had a major peak 6 h into the light phase and a nadir 15 h later, i.e. 9 h into the dark period. Both activities showed a secondary peak of activity (around 68% of the maximum activity) at the time of changeover from dark to light, with a trough in the value of the 'expressed' activity that was close to the nadir value. 'Expressed' activity was lower than 'total' at all time points, indicating the presence of enzyme molecules inactivated by covalent phosphorylation. Nevertheless the 'expressed'/'total' activity ratio was comparatively constant and varied only between 43% and 75%. Immunotitration of enzyme activity, with antiserum raised in sheep against purified rat liver HMG-CoA reductase, confirmed the presence of both active and inactive forms of the enzyme and indicated that at the peak and nadir the variation in 'expressed' HMG-CoA reductase activity resulted from changes in the total number of enzyme molecules rather than from covalent modification. The sample obtained after 3 h of the light phase exhibited an anomalously low 'total' HMG-CoA reductase activity, which could be increased when Cl- replaced F- in the homogenization medium. The result suggests that at that time the activity of the enzyme could be regulated by mechanisms other than covalent phosphorylation or degradation. PMID:3814075

  18. A Novel Role for Coenzyme A during Hydride Transfer in 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Critchelow, Chandra J.; Schmidt, Tim; Min, Jung-Ki; Wrensford, Louise V.; Burgner, John W.; Rodwell, Victor W.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we take advantage of the ability of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) from Pseudomonas mevalonii to remain active while in its crystallized form to study the changing interactions between the ligands and protein as the first reaction intermediate is created. HMG-CoA reductase catalyzes one of the few double oxidation–reduction reactions in intermediary metabolism that take place in a single active site. Our laboratory has undertaken an exploration of this reaction space using structures of HMG-CoA reductase complexed with various substrate, nucleotide, product, and inhibitor combinations. With a focus in this publication on the first hydride transfer, our structures follow this reduction reaction as the enzyme converts the HMG-CoA thioester from a flat sp2-like geometry to a pyramidal thiohemiacetal configuration consistent with a transition to an sp3 orbital. This change in the geometry propagates through the coenzyme A (CoA) ligand whose first amide bond is rotated 180° where it anchors a web of hydrogen bonds that weave together the nucleotide, the reaction intermediate, the enzyme, and the catalytic residues. This creates a stable intermediate structure prepared for nucleotide exchange and the second reduction reaction within the HMG-CoA reductase active site. Identification of this reaction intermediate provides a template for the development of an inhibitor that would act as an antibiotic effective against the HMG-CoA reductase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23802607

  19. Masou salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) ethanol extract decreases 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase expression in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Taek; Chung, Mi Ja; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Ham, Seung-Shi

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the hypocholesterolemic effects of masou salmon 70% ethanol extract (MSE) and to determine the molecular mechanism by which MSE exerts its effects in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese mice. We hypothesize that the MSE may contain abundant n-3 fatty acids, so a diet containing MSE may also have hypolipidemic effects by assessing several key gene expressions in cholesterol metabolism such as the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice were fed a 40% HF diet for 5 weeks, after which time the animals were fed an HF diet containing 0 mg/kg, 75 mg/kg, or 150 mg/kg MSE (HF, HF + MSE 1, and HF + MSE 2 groups, respectively) for an additional 4 weeks (n = 8 in each group, for a total of 24 mice). We found that feeding MSE with an HF diet prevented hypercholesterolemia in diet-induced obese mice; daily MSE feeding reduced total cholesterol levels in plasma and liver by 12.3% and 16.2%, respectively. Furthermore, we examined the expression of key cholesterol metabolism genes by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and found that messenger RNA levels of HMG-CoA reductase were decreased by up to 5-fold, but the expression of both LDL receptor and CYP7A1 did not change. Thus, MSE may exert its hypocholesterolemic effect by altering the expression of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:19285603

  20. Involvement of tristetraprolin in transcriptional activation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, Gene C.; Edelman, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, Patricia A.

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin blocks transcription of HMGR in vivo in rat liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin inhibits insulin activation of HMGR transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin acts to rapidly increase tristetraprolin in liver nuclear extracts. -- Abstract: Several AU-rich RNA binding element (ARE) proteins were investigated for their possible effects on transcription of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) in normal rats. Using in vivo electroporation, four different siRNAs to each ARE protein were introduced together with HMGR promoter (-325 to +20) luciferase construct and compared to saline controls. All four siRNAs to tristetraprolin (TTP) completely eliminated transcription from the HMGR promoter construct. Since insulin acts to rapidly increase hepatic HMGR transcription, the effect of TTP siRNA on induction by insulin was tested. The 3-fold stimulation by insulin was eliminated by this treatment. In comparison, siRNA to AU RNA binding protein/enoyl coenzyme A hydratase (AUH) had no effect. These findings indicate a role for TTP in the insulin-mediated activation of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Anti-3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Antibodies in Chinese Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yongpeng; Lu, Xin; Peng, Qinglin; Shu, Xiaoming; Wang, Guochun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to detect the prevalence of anti-3-hydroxyl-3- methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (anti-HMGCR) antibodies in Chinese patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs), and to analyze the clinical features of the antibody-positive IIM patients. Methods The presence of anti-HMGCR antibodies was detected in 405 patients with IIMs, 90 healthy controls, and 221 patients with other rheumatic diseases by using an ELISA kit. Clinical data from anti-HMGCR antibody-positive and -negative patients were compared. Long-term follow-up of the anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients was conducted to evaluate the role of anti-HMGCR antibody in IIM disease prognosis. Results Of the 405 IIM patients, 22 (5.4%) were found to carry the anti-HMGCR antibody. These IIM patients were predominantly female (73%), and only 3 anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients with IIM were exposure to statins. Most patients experienced progressive onset, and presented with muscular weakness. Dysphagia was observed in half of the patients (p < 0.01), and 15% of these patients experienced the complication of interstitial lung disease (ILD) (p > 0.05). Mean creatine kinase (CK) levels were higher in antibody-positive patients than in antibody-negative patients (p < 0.05). Muscle biopsies were available from 12 anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients, eight who experienced myofiber necrosis and showed very little or no evidence of inflammatory cell infiltrates in their muscle biopsies. Of these eleven patients who were followed-up 2.5- to 29-month, 73% experienced improvement after treatment. A cross-sectional study showed that anti-HMGCR antibody levels were significantly associated with CK levels (r = 0.486, p = 0.026) as well as with Myositis Disease Activity Assessment (MYOACT) scores (r = -0.67, p = 0.003) during the initial visit. However, changes in serum anti-HMGCR antibody levels did not correlate with changes in CK levels, Manual Muscle Testing 8 (MMT-8

  2. Effect of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Inhibitor on Disease Activity in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Bin; Yin, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Li-Dan; Wang, Li; Zheng, Wen-Jie; Chen, Hua; Wu, Qing-Jun; Tang, Fu-Lin; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Shan, Guangliang; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (also known as statins) are widely used as lipid-lowering agents in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to reduce their cardiovascular risk. However, whether they have an effect on RA disease activity is controversial. This study aimed to investigate the effect of statins on disease activity in RA patients. A systematic literature review was performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ISI WEB of Knowledge, Scopus, and Clinical Trials Register databases. Only prospective randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing the efficacy of statins with placebo on adult RA patients were included. The efficacy was measured according to the ACR criteria, EULAR criteria, DAS28, HAQ score, ESR, or CRP. The Jadad score was used for quality assessment. The inverse variance method was used to analyze continuous outcomes. A fixed-effects model was used when there was no significant heterogeneity; otherwise, a random-effects model was used. For stability of results, we performed leave-one-study-out sensitivity analysis by omitting individual studies one at a time from the meta-analysis. Publication bias was assessed using Egger test. A total 13 studies involving 737 patients were included in the meta-analysis; 11 studies were included in the meta-analysis based on DAS28, while the other 2 studies were only included in the meta-analysis based on ESR or CRP. The standardized mean difference (SMD) in DAS28 between the statin group and the placebo group was −0.55 (95% CI [−0.83, −0.26], P = 0.0002), with an I2 value of 68%. Subgroup analysis showed that patients with more active disease tended to benefit more from statin therapy (SMD −0.73, P = 0.01) than patients with moderate or low disease activity (SMD −0.38, P = 0.03). Statin therapy also significantly reduced tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, ESR, and CRP compared with placebo, but the reduction in HAQ score and VAS was not

  3. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles; Campos, Narciso

    2015-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells.

  4. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. PMID:26015445

  5. Ketanserin, an antidepressant, exerts its antileishmanial action via inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) enzyme of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushma; Dinesh, Neeradi; Kaur, Preet Kamal; Shamiulla, Baigadda

    2014-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major health problems existing globally. The current chemotherapy for leishmaniasis presents several drawbacks like toxicity and increased resistance to existing drugs, and hence, there is a necessity to look out for the novel drug targets and new chemical entities. Current trend in drug discovery arena is the "repurposing" of old drugs for the treatment of diseases. In the present study, an antidepressant, ketanserin, was found lethal to both Leishmania donovani promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes with no apparent toxicity to the cells. Ketanserin killed promastigotes and amastigotes with an IC50 value of 37 μM and 28 μM respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Ketanserin was found to inhibit L. donovani recombinant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) enzyme with an IC50 value of 43 μM. Ketanserin treated promastigotes were exogenously supplemented with sterols like ergosterol and cholesterol to rescue cell death. Ergosterol could recover the inhibition partially, whereas cholesterol supplementation completely failed to rescue the inhibited parasites. Further, HMGR-overexpressing parasites were generated by transfecting Leishmania promastigotes with an episomal pspα hygroα-HMGR construct. Wild-type and HMGR overexpressors of L. donovani were used to study the effect and mode of action of this inhibitor. The HMGR overexpressors showed twofold resistance to ketanserin. These observations suggest that the lethal effect of ketanserin is due to inhibition of HMGR, the rate-limiting enzyme of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Since targeting of the sterol biosynthetic pathway enzymes may be useful therapeutically, the present study may have implications in treatment of leishmaniasis.

  6. Immune-mediated myopathy related to anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase antibodies as an emerging cause of necrotizing myopathy induced by statins.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Clément; Beaufrére, Anne Marie; Boyer, Olivier; Drouot, Laurent; Soubrier, Martin; Tournadre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) associated with statin use and anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody is a new and emerging entity that supports a link between statin use and IMNM and raises the questions of distinct clinical phenotypes and treatment strategy. We describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a patient and discuss the spectrum of IMNM and statin-induced myopathies. A 65-year-old man was suffering from proximal muscle weakness and elevated CK levels, following exposure to statin therapy. The symptoms worsened despite discontinuation of the drug. At that point, no myositis-specific or -associated antibodies were detected. Malignancy screening did not reveal abnormalities. Muscle biopsy demonstrated a predominantly necrotizing myopathy with minimal lymphocytic infiltrates, MHC class I expression in necrotic muscle fibers, and complement deposition on scattered non-necrotic muscle fibers. Muscle protein analysis by western blot was normal. The patient did not improve with steroid and methotrexate and required monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Muscle strength gradually improved, CK levels normalized and IVIG were stopped 1 year later. Screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies, not available at the time of presentation, was highly positive. Identification of anti-HMGCR antibodies in statin-exposed patients with myopathy appears to be helpful both for differential diagnosis and for treatment strategy. In patients who did not improve after discontinuation of the statin treatment, a muscle biopsy should be performed as well as screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies. Patients with this disorder require aggressive immunosuppressive treatment.

  7. Expression of a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase gene from Camptotheca acuminata is differentially regulated by wounding and methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, R J; Maldonado-Mendoza, I E; McKnight, T D; Nessler, C L

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated a gene, hmg1, for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) from Camptotheca acuminata, a Chinese tree that produces the anti-cancer monoterpenoid indole alkaloid camptothecin (CPT). HMGR supplies mevalonate for the synthesis of the terpenoid component of CPT as well as for the formation of many other primary and secondary metabolites. In Camptotheca, hmg1 transcripts were detected only in young seedlings and not in vegetative organs of older plants. Regulation of the hmg1 promoter was studied in transgenic tobacco using three translational fusions (-1678, -1107, -165) with the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Histochemical analysis of plants containing each of the three promoter fusions showed similar developmental and spatial expression patterns. In vegetative tissues, GUS staining was localized to the epidermis of young leaves and stems, particularly in glandular trichomes. Roots showed intense staining in the cortical tissues in the elongation zone and light staining in the cortex of mature roots. hmg1::GUS expression was also observed in sepals, petals, pistils, and stamens of developing flowers, with darkest staining in the ovary wall, ovules, stigmas, and pollen. Leaf discs from plants containing each of the translational fusions showed a 15- to 20-fold wound induction of hmg1::GUS expression over 72 h; however, this increase in GUS activity was completely suppressed by treatment with methyl jasmonate. Taken together, these data show that a 165-bp fragment of Camptotheca hmg1 promoter is sufficient to confer developmental regulation as well as wound induction and methyl jasmonate suppression of GUS expression in transgenic tobacco. PMID:8208857

  8. Metabolic Control of Avocado Fruit Growth (Isoprenoid Growth Regulators and the Reaction Catalyzed by 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase).

    PubMed

    Cowan, A. K.; Moore-Gordon, C. S.; Bertling, I.; Wolstenholme, B. N.

    1997-06-01

    The effect of isoprenoid growth regulators on avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit growth and mesocarp 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity was investigated during the course of fruit ontogeny. Both normal and small-fruit phenotypes were used to probe the interaction between the end products of isoprenoid biosynthesis and the activity of HMGR in the metabolic control of avocado fruit growth. Kinetic analysis of the changes in both cell number and size revealed that growth was limited by cell number in phenotypically small fruit. In small fruit a 70% reduction in microsomal HMGR activity was associated with an increased mesocarp abscisic acid (ABA) concentration. Application of mevastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMGR, reduced the growth of normal fruit and increased mesocarp ABA concentration. These effects were reversed by co-treatment of fruit with mevalonic acid lactone, isopentenyladenine, or N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N-phenylurea, but were not significantly affected by either gibberellic acid or stigmasterol. However, stigmasterol appeared to partially restore fruit growth when co-injected with mevastatin in either phase II or III of fruit growth. In vivo application of ABA reduced fruit growth and mesocarp HMGR activity and accelerated fruit abscission, effects that were reversed by co-treatment with isopentenyladenine. Together, these observations indicate that ABA accumulation down-regulates mesocarp HMGR activity and fruit growth, and that in situ cytokinin biosynthesis modulates these effects during phase I of fruit ontogeny, whereas both cytokinins and sterols seem to perform this function during the later phases.

  9. Metabolic Control of Avocado Fruit Growth (Isoprenoid Growth Regulators and the Reaction Catalyzed by 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase).

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, A. K.; Moore-Gordon, C. S.; Bertling, I.; Wolstenholme, B. N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of isoprenoid growth regulators on avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit growth and mesocarp 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity was investigated during the course of fruit ontogeny. Both normal and small-fruit phenotypes were used to probe the interaction between the end products of isoprenoid biosynthesis and the activity of HMGR in the metabolic control of avocado fruit growth. Kinetic analysis of the changes in both cell number and size revealed that growth was limited by cell number in phenotypically small fruit. In small fruit a 70% reduction in microsomal HMGR activity was associated with an increased mesocarp abscisic acid (ABA) concentration. Application of mevastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMGR, reduced the growth of normal fruit and increased mesocarp ABA concentration. These effects were reversed by co-treatment of fruit with mevalonic acid lactone, isopentenyladenine, or N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N-phenylurea, but were not significantly affected by either gibberellic acid or stigmasterol. However, stigmasterol appeared to partially restore fruit growth when co-injected with mevastatin in either phase II or III of fruit growth. In vivo application of ABA reduced fruit growth and mesocarp HMGR activity and accelerated fruit abscission, effects that were reversed by co-treatment with isopentenyladenine. Together, these observations indicate that ABA accumulation down-regulates mesocarp HMGR activity and fruit growth, and that in situ cytokinin biosynthesis modulates these effects during phase I of fruit ontogeny, whereas both cytokinins and sterols seem to perform this function during the later phases. PMID:12223724

  10. Cloning and characterization of an elicitor-responsive gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase involved in 20-hydroxyecdysone production in cell cultures of Cyanotis arachnoidea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu Jun; Zheng, Li Ping; Zhao, Pei Fei; Zhao, Yi Lu; Wang, Jian Wen

    2014-11-01

    Cyanotis arachnoidea contains a rich source of bioactive phytoecdysteroids (i.e. analogues of insect steroid hormones). 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) supplies mevalonate for the synthesis of many secondary metabolites including 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), one of metabolism-enhancing phytoecdysteroids. In this study, in order to develop a sustainable source of 20E, cell suspension cultures were established from shoot cultures of C. arachnoidea, and a full length cDNA encoding HMGR (designated as CaHMGR) was cloned and characterized. The cDNA contained 2037 nucleotides with a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 1800 nucleotides, which was predicted to encode a peptide of 599 amino acids. Expression analysis by real-time PCR revealed that CaHMGR mRNA was abundant in C. arachnoidea stems, roots and leaves. When cultivated in Murashige & Skoog medium supplemented with 0.2 mg L(-1) 1-naphthlcetic acid (NAA) and 3.0 mg L(-1) 6-benzyladenine (6-BA), C. arachnoidea cells in suspension culture grew rapidly, yielding 20E (124.14 μg L(-1)) after 12 days. The content of 20E in cell cultures elicited by 0.2 mM methyl jasmonate (MeJA), 100 mg L(-1) yeast elicitor (YE) or 25 μM AgNO3 was increased 8-, 2-, and 6-fold over the control, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that CaHMGR was expressed at a higher level under the treatment of MeJA or Ag(+) elicitor. Our results suggested that 20E accumulation may be the result of the expression up-regulation of CaHMGR involved in the biosynthesis under the treatment of various elicitors.

  11. Functional Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Encoding Genes in Triterpene Saponin-Producing Ginseng1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Ok Ran; Oh, Ji Yeon; Jang, Moon-Gi; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenosides are glycosylated triterpenes that are considered to be important pharmaceutically active components of the ginseng (Panax ginseng ‘Meyer’) plant, which is known as an adaptogenic herb. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the biosynthesis of triterpene saponin through the mevalonate pathway in ginseng remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the role of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) concerning ginsenoside biosynthesis. Through analysis of full-length complementary DNA, two forms of ginseng HMGR (PgHMGR1 and PgHMGR2) were identified as showing high sequence identity. The steady-state mRNA expression patterns of PgHMGR1 and PgHMGR2 are relatively low in seed, leaf, stem, and flower, but stronger in the petiole of seedling and root. The transcripts of PgHMGR1 were relatively constant in 3- and 6-year-old ginseng roots. However, PgHMGR2 was increased five times in the 6-year-old ginseng roots compared with the 3-year-old ginseng roots, which indicates that HMGRs have constant and specific roles in the accumulation of ginsenosides in roots. Competitive inhibition of HMGR by mevinolin caused a significant reduction of total ginsenoside in ginseng adventitious roots. Moreover, continuous dark exposure for 2 to 3 d increased the total ginsenosides content in 3-year-old ginseng after the dark-induced activity of PgHMGR1. These results suggest that PgHMGR1 is associated with the dark-dependent promotion of ginsenoside biosynthesis. We also observed that the PgHMGR1 can complement Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hmgr1-1 and that the overexpression of PgHMGR1 enhanced the production of sterols and triterpenes in Arabidopsis and ginseng. Overall, this finding suggests that ginseng HMGRs play a regulatory role in triterpene ginsenoside biosynthesis. PMID:24569845

  12. Control of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Activity in Cultured Human Fibroblasts by Very Low Density Lipoproteins of Subjects with Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Gianturco, Sandra H.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Jackson, Richard L.; Patsch, Josef R.; Sybers, Harley D.; Taunton, O. David; Yeshurun, Daniel L.; Smith, Louis C.

    1978-01-01

    Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human normolipemic plasma, and the VLDL, the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and LDL from patients with Type III hyperlipoproteinemic plasma were tested for their abilities to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in cultured human fibroblasts from normal subjects and a Type III patient. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in the fibroblasts of a patient with Type III hyperlipoproteinemia appears to be normal. VLDL from normal subjects, isolated by angle head ultracentrifugation (d < 1.006) or by gel filtration on BioGel A-5m, were about 5 times less effective than LDL in suppressing HMG-CoA reductase activity, based on protein content, in agreement with previous reports with normal fibroblasts. Zonal centrifugation of normal VLDL isolated by both methods showed that the VLDL contained IDL. Normal VLDL from the angle head rotor, refractionated by the zonal method, had little, if any, ability to suppress the HMG-CoA reductase activity in either normal or Type III fibroblasts. VLDL, IDL, and LDL fractionated by zonal ultracentrifugation from Type III plasma gave half-maximum inhibition at 0.2-0.5 μg of protein/ml, indistinguishable from the suppression caused by normal LDL. Type III VLDL did not suppress HMG-CoA reductase in mutant LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. Zonally isolated VLDL obtained from one Type IV and one Type V patient gave half-maximal suppression at 5 and 0.5 μg of protein/ml, respectively. Molecular diameters and apoprotein compositions of the zonally isolated normal and Type III VLDL were similar; the major difference in composition was that Type III VLDL contained more cholesteryl esters and less triglyceride than did normal VLDL. The compositions and diameters of the Type IV and Type V VLDL were similar to normal VLDL. These findings show that the basic defect in Type III hyperlipoproteinemia is qualitatively

  13. Role of 26S proteasome and HRD genes in the degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, an integral endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, R Y; Gardner, R G; Rine, J

    1996-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-R), a key enzyme of sterol synthesis, is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In both humans and yeast, HMG-R is degraded at or in the ER. The degradation of HMG-R is regulated as part of feedback control of the mevalonate pathway. Neither the mechanism of degradation nor the nature of the signals that couple the degradation of HMG-R to the mevalonate pathway is known. We have launched a genetic analysis of the degradation of HMG-R in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a selection for mutants that are deficient in the degradation of Hmg2p, an HMG-R isozyme. The underlying genes are called HRD (pronounced "herd"), for HMG-CoA reductase degradation. So far we have discovered mutants in three genes: HRD1, HRD2, and HRD3. The sequence of the HRD2 gene is homologous to the p97 activator of the 26S proteasome. This p97 protein, also called TRAP-2, has been proposed to be a component of the mature 26S proteasome. The hrd2-1 mutant had numerous pleiotropic phenotypes expected for cells with a compromised proteasome, and these phenotypes were complemented by the human TRAP-2/p97 coding region. In contrast, HRD1 and HRD3 genes encoded previously unknown proteins predicted to be membrane bound. The Hrd3p protein was homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-1 protein, a negative regulator of at least two different membrane proteins, and contained an HRD3 motif shared with several other proteins. Hrd1p had no full-length homologues, but contained an H2 ring finger motif. These data suggested a model of ER protein degradation in which the Hrd1p and Hrd3p proteins conspire to deliver HMG-R to the 26S proteasome. Moreover, our results lend in vivo support to the proposed role of the p97/TRAP-2/Hrd2p protein as a functionally important component of the 26S proteasome. Because the HRD genes were required for the degradation of both regulated and unregulated substrates of ER degradation, the HRD genes are the

  14. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA contents in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 by distinct classes of mevalonate-derived metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, L H; Griffioen, M

    1988-01-01

    Hep G2 cells were incubated under conditions known to influence the HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA) reductase activity, e.g. in the presence of compactin (a competitive inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase itself) and U18666A (a squalene-2,3-epoxide cyclase inhibitor). We studied the effects of these conditions both on the HMG-CoA reductase activity and on the reductase mRNA content. In the presence of compactin the mRNA content increased, but less than the enzyme activity, as determined after removal of the inhibitor. The increase in mRNA could be prevented by addition of mevalonate or by a combination of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plus a low concentration of mevalonate. LDL alone prevented the compactin-induced increases in mRNA and activity only partially. The effect of U18666A on reductase mRNA content and activity was biphasic, i.e. a slight decrease at low (0.3-0.5 microM) concentrations, with a concomitant formation of polar sterols [Boogaard, Griffioen & Cohen (1987) Biochem. J. 241, 345-351], and an increase at high (20-30 microM) concentrations, with complete blockage of sterol formation. At these high concentrations of U18666A, additional compactin (2 microM) increased the reductase activity, but not the mRNA content. We conclude that non-sterol metabolites of mevalonate regulate exclusively at the enzyme level, whereas sterol metabolites regulate at the reductase mRNA level. In the latter group of regulators we distinguish mevalonate metabolites which can, and metabolites which cannot, be replaced by exogenous LDL. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2848511

  15. Effects of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, atorvastatin and simvastatin, on the expression of endothelin-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Perera, O; Pérez-Sala, D; Navarro-Antolín, J; Sánchez-Pascuala, R; Hernández, G; Díaz, C; Lamas, S

    1998-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis has been attributed to alterations in the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway or to an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1). The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to ameliorate endothelial function. However, the physiological basis of this observation is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of Atorvastatin and Simvastatin on the pre-proET-1 mRNA expression and ET-1 synthesis and on the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) transcript and protein levels in bovine aortic endothelial cells. These agents inhibited pre-proET-1 mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion (60-70% maximum inhibition) and reduced immunoreactive ET-1 levels (25-50%). This inhibitory effect was maintained in the presence of oxidized LDL (1-50 microg/ml). No significant modification of pre-proET-1 mRNA half-life was observed. In addition, mevalonate, but not cholesterol, reversed the statin-mediated decrease of pre-proET-1 mRNA levels. eNOS mRNA expression was reduced by oxidized LDL in a dose-dependent fashion (up to 57% inhibition), whereas native LDL had no effect. Statins were able to prevent the inhibitory action exerted by oxidized LDL on eNOS mRNA and protein levels. Hence, these drugs might influence vascular tone by modulating the expression of endothelial vasoactive factors. PMID:9637705

  16. Effects of 15-oxa-32-vinyl-lanost-8-ene-3 beta,32 diol on the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and low density lipoprotein receptor in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Lopez, D; Chambers, C M; Zhao, Z; Beach, D L; Ko, S S; Trzaskos, J M

    1998-09-15

    The mechanisms by which oxylanosterols regulate expression of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and lower serum cholesterol levels were examined by using a novel nonmetabolizable oxylanosterol mimic, 15-oxa-32-vinyl-lanost-8-ene-3 beta, 32 diol (DMP 565). This compound, unlike other nonmetabolizable oxylanosterols, is not a substrate for lanosterol 14 alpha-methyl demethylase. Feeding rats a diet supplemented with 0.02% DMP 565 markedly decreased HMG-CoA reductase immunoreactive protein and enzyme activity levels without affecting mRNA levels. The rate of reductase protein degradation was unaffected. However, the rate of translation was reduced to less than 20% of control. Thus, DMP 565 appears to regulate hepatic HMG-CoA reductase gene expression primarily at the level of translation. The pronounced inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by DMP 565 resulted in a compensatory increase in the functioning of the hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, possibly by increased cycling, as evidenced by a marked increase in the rate of degradation of the LDL receptor. The half-life of the receptor was decreased from over 7 h to only 1 h in animals receiving DMP 565. This increase in the rate of degradation occurred without a change in the steady state level of the receptor. Addition of dietary cholesterol attenuated the increased turnover of the LDL receptor. These effects on the hepatic LDL receptor have also been observed with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (G. C. Ness et al., 1996, Arch. Biochem, Biophys. 325, 242-248). However, the effect of DMP 565 on the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was of a greater magnitude when equal doses of the drugs were used. These regulatory actions of DMP 565 provide, in part, an explanation for the observed hypocholesterolemic action of this compound.

  17. On the involvement of intramolecular protein disulfide in the irreversible inactivation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase by diallyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Omkumar, R V; Kadam, S M; Banerji, A; Ramasarma, T

    1993-06-24

    Treatment with diallyl disulfide, a constituent of garlic oil, irreversibly inactivated microsomal and a soluble 50 kDa form of HMG-CoA reductase. No radioactivity was found to be protein-bound on treating the soluble enzyme with [35S]diallyl disulfide, indicating the absence of the mixed disulfide of the type allyl-S-S-protein. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses of the diallyl-disulfide-treated protein showed no traces of the dimer of the type protein-S-S-protein, but clearly indicated BME-reversible increased mobility, as expected of an intramolecular protein disulfide. The sulfhydryl groups, as measured by alkylation with iodo[2-14C]acetic acid, were found to decrease in the diallyl-disulfide-treated enzyme protein. Tryptic peptide analysis also gave support for the possible presence of disulfide-containing peptides in such a protein. It appears that diallyl disulfide inactivated HMG-CoA reductase by forming an internal protein disulfide that became inaccessible for reduction by DTT, and thereby retaining the inactive state of the enzyme. PMID:8518292

  18. Characterization and expression of two cDNA encoding 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase isoforms in coffee (Coffea arabica L.).

    PubMed

    Tiski, Iris; Marraccini, Pierre; Pot, David; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio

    2011-10-01

    In higher plants there are two independent pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis, located in the cytosol (mevalonic acid or MVA pathway) or in the plastids [methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway]. The 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is the first committed step in the MVA pathway. Using the information available from the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project, we found 13 ESTs that originated two isoforms, CaHMGR1 and CaHMGR2, for the enzyme HMGR of Coffea arabica. A complementary DNA encoding the isoform CaHMGR1 was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. The full-length cDNA of CaHMGR1 was 2,242 bp containing a 1,812-bp ORF encoding 604 amino acids. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the deduced CaHMGR1 had extensive homology with other plant HMGRs and contained two transmembrane domains and two putative HMGR binding sites and two NADP(H)-binding sites. Under normal growth conditions, transcripts of isoform CaHMRG1 were detected in fruit tissues (pulp, perisperm, and endosperm) only at the initial stages of development, flower buds and leaves. CaHMRG2 was expressed in all tissues and during all fruit development stages examined. These results suggest a constitutive expression of isoform CaHMGR2, while the isoform CaHMGR1 shows temporal and tissue-specific transcriptional activation.

  19. Ubiquitin is conjugated by membrane ubiquitin ligase to three sites, including the N terminus, in transmembrane region of mammalian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase: implications for sterol-regulated enzyme degradation.

    PubMed

    Doolman, Ram; Leichner, Gil S; Avner, Rachel; Roitelman, Joseph

    2004-09-10

    The stability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis, is negatively regulated by sterols. HMGR is anchored in the ER via its N-terminal region, which spans the membrane eight times and contains a sterol-sensing domain. We have previously established that degradation of mammalian HMGR is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (Ravid, T., Doolman, R., Avner, R., Harats, D., and Roitelman, J. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 35840-35847). Here we expressed in HEK-293 cells an HA-tagged-truncated version of HMGR that encompasses all eight transmembrane spans (350 N-terminal residues). Similar to endogenous HMGR, degradation of this HMG(350)-3HA protein was accelerated by sterols, validating it as a model to study HMGR turnover. The degradation of HMG(240)-3HA, which lacks the last two transmembrane spans yet retains an intact sterol-sensing domain, was no longer accelerated by sterols. Using HMG(350)-3HA, we demonstrate that transmembrane region of HMGR is ubiquitinated in a sterol-regulated fashion. Through site-directed Lys --> Arg mutagenesis, we pinpoint Lys(248) and Lys(89) as the internal lysines for ubiquitin attachment, with Lys(248) serving as the major acceptor site for polyubiquitination. Moreover, the data indicate that the N terminus is also ubiquitinated. The degradation rates of the Lys --> Arg mutants correlates with their level of ubiquitination. Notably, lysine-less HMG(350)-3HA is degraded faster than wild-type protein, suggesting that lysines other than Lys(89) and Lys(248) attenuate ubiquitination at the latter residues. The ATP-dependent ubiquitination of HMGR in isolated microsomes requires E1 as the sole cytosolic protein, indicating that ER-bound E2 and E3 enzymes catalyze this modification. Polyubiquitination of HMGR is correlated with its extraction from the ER membrane, a process likely to be assisted by cytosolic p97/VCP/Cdc48p-Ufd1-Npl

  20. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Luo, Xue-Gang; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun; Pan, Li-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  1. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Luo, Xue-Gang; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun; Pan, Li-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  2. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2016-01-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  3. Characterization of a Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase which is able to phosphorylate native and protease cleaved purified hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Z.H.; Stonik, J.A.; Brewer, H.B. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have extensively purified a low molecular weight Ca/sup 2 +/, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from rat brain cytosol. This kinase (M/sub r/ 120,000) is able to phosphorylate both native and soluble purified HMG-CoA reductase. The concomitant inactivation and phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase was completely dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin. Incubation of phosphorylated /sup 32/P-HMG-CoA reductase was associated with the loss of /sup 32/P-radioactivity and reactivation of inactive enzyme. Maximal phosphorylation of purified HMG-CoA reductase involved the introduction of approximately 0.5 mol phosphate/53,000 enzyme fragment. The apparent Km for purified HMG-CoA reductase was .045 mg/ml. Microsomal native HMG-CoA reductase (M/sub r/ 100,000) was also phosphorylated and inactivated following incubation with calmodulin stimulated kinase, calmodulin, Ca/sup 2 +/ and Mg-ATP; dephosphorylation (reactivation) was catalyzed by the phosphoprotein phosphatase. The isolation and characterization of the M/sub r/ 120,000 calmodulin-binding enzyme complex provides additional insights into the mechanisms of the Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent regulation of HMG-CoA reductase phosphorylation. Based on these data and the authors previous in vitro and in vivo studies, they now propose that HMG-CoA reductase activity is modulated by three separate kinase systems.

  4. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  5. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase from ox liver. Properties of its acetyl derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D M; Tubbs, P K

    1985-01-01

    Ox liver mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (EC 4.1.3.5) reacts with acetyl-CoA to form a complex in which the acetyl group is covalently bound to the enzyme. This acetyl group can be removed by addition of acetoacetyl-CoA or CoA. The extent of acetylation and release of CoA were found to be highly temperature-dependent. At temperatures above 20 degrees C, a maximum value of 0.85 mol of acetyl group bound/mol of enzyme dimer was observed. Below this temperature the extent of rapid acetylation was significantly lowered. Binding stoichiometries close to 1 mol/mol of enzyme dimer were also observed when the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase activity was titrated with methyl methanethiosulphonate or bromoacetyl-CoA. This is taken as evidence for a 'half-of-the-sites' reaction mechanism for the formation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase. The Keq. for the acetylation was about 10. Isolated acetyl-enzyme is stable for many hours at 0 degrees C and pH 7, but is hydrolysed at 30 degrees C with a half-life of 7 min. This hydrolysis is stimulated by acetyl-CoA and slightly by succinyl-CoA, but not by desulpho-CoA. The site of acetylation has been identified as the thiol group of a reactive cysteine residue by affinity-labelling with the substrate analogue bromo[1-14C]acetyl-CoA. PMID:2860896

  6. Structural basis for the design of potent and species-specific inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthases.

    PubMed

    Pojer, Florence; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Richard, Stéphane B; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Chye, Mee-Len; Bach, Thomas J; Noel, Joseph P

    2006-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMGS) catalyzes the first committed step in the mevalonate metabolic pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and serves as an alternative target for cholesterol-lowering and antibiotic drugs. We have determined a previously undescribed crystal structure of a eukaryotic HMGS bound covalently to a potent and specific inhibitor F-244 [(E,E)-11-[3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-oxo-2-oxytanyl]-3,5,7-trimethyl-2,4-undecadienenoic acid]. Given the accessibility of synthetic analogs of the F-244 natural product, this inhibited eukaryotic HMGS structure serves as a necessary starting point for structure-based methods that may improve the potency and species-specific selectivity of the next generation of F-244 analogs designed to target particular eukaryotic and prokaryotic HMGS.

  7. Structural Basis for the Design of Potent and Species-specific Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA Synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Pojer,F.; Ferrer, J.; Richard, S.; Nagegowda, D.; Chye, M.; Bach, T.; Noel, J.

    2006-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMGS) catalyzes the first committed step in the mevalonate metabolic pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and serves as an alternative target for cholesterol-lowering and antibiotic drugs. We have determined a previously undescribed crystal structure of a eukaryotic HMGS bound covalently to a potent and specific inhibitor F-244 [(E,E)-11-[3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-oxo-2-oxytanyl]-3,5,7-trimethyl-2,4-undecadienenoic acid]. Given the accessibility of synthetic analogs of the F-244 natural product, this inhibited eukaryotic HMGS structure serves as a necessary starting point for structure-based methods that may improve the potency and species-specific selectivity of the next generation of F-244 analogs designed to target particular eukaryotic and prokaryotic HMGS.

  8. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric and 3-methylglutaric acids impair redox status and energy production and transfer in rat heart: relevance for the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Mateus Struecker; Seminotti, Bianca; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Parmeggiani, Belisa; Grings, Mateus; Wajner, Moacir; Leipnitz, Guilhian

    2016-09-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase (HL) deficiency is characterized by tissue accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG), and 3-methylglutaric (MGA) acids. Affected patients present cardiomyopathy, whose pathomechanisms are not yet established. We investigated the effects of HMG and MGA on energy and redox homeostasis in rat heart using in vivo and in vitro models. In vivo experiments showed that intraperitoneal administration of HMG and MGA decreased the activities of the respiratory chain complex II and creatine kinase (CK), whereas HMG also decreased the activity of complex II-III. Furthermore, HMG and MGA injection increased reactive species production and carbonyl formation, and decreased glutathione concentrations. Regarding the enzymatic antioxidant defenses, HMG and MGA increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities, while only MGA diminished the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, as well as the protein content of SOD1. Pre-treatment with melatonin (MEL) prevented MGA-induced decrease of CK activity and SOD1 levels. In vitro results demonstrated that HMG and MGA increased reactive species formation, induced lipid peroxidation and decreased glutathione. We also verified that reactive species overproduction and glutathione decrease provoked by HMG and MGA were abrogated by MEL and lipoic acid (LA), while only MEL prevented HMG- and MGA-induced lipoperoxidation. Allopurinol (ALP) also prevented reactive species overproduction caused by both metabolites. Our data provide solid evidence that bioenergetics dysfunction and oxidative stress are induced by HMG and MGA in heart, which may explain the cardiac dysfunction observed in HL deficiency, and also suggest that antioxidant supplementation could be considered as adjuvant therapy for affected patients.

  9. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa liuE gene encodes the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A lyase, involved in leucine and acyclic terpene catabolism.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Avilés, Mauricio; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Reyes-de la Cruz, Homero; Campos-García, Jesús

    2009-07-01

    The enzymes involved in the catabolism of leucine are encoded by the liu gene cluster in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. A mutant in the liuE gene (ORF PA2011) of P. aeruginosa was unable to utilize both leucine/isovalerate and acyclic terpenes as the carbon source. The liuE mutant grown in culture medium with citronellol accumulated metabolites of the acyclic terpene pathway, suggesting an involvement of liuE in both leucine/isovalerate and acyclic terpene catabolic pathways. The LiuE protein was expressed as a His-tagged recombinant polypeptide purified by affinity chromatography in Escherichia coli. LiuE showed a mass of 33 kDa under denaturing and 79 kDa under nondenaturing conditions. Protein sequence alignment and fingerprint sequencing suggested that liuE encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase (HMG-CoA lyase), which catalyzes the cleavage of HMG-CoA to acetyl-CoA and acetoacetate. LiuE showed HMG-CoA lyase optimal activity at a pH of 7.0 and 37 degrees C, an apparent K(m) of 100 microM for HMG-CoA and a V(max) of 21 micromol min(-1) mg(-1). These results demonstrate that the liuE gene of P. aeruginosa encodes for the HMG-CoA lyase, an essential enzyme for growth in both leucine and acyclic terpenes.

  10. Isolation of pig mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene promoter: characterization of a peroxisome proliferator-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, J A; Mallolas, J; Nicot, C; Bofarull, J; Rodríguez, J C; Hegardt, F G; Haro, D; Marrero, P F

    1999-01-01

    Low expression of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase gene during development correlates with an unusually low hepatic ketogenic capacity and lack of hyperketonaemia in piglets. Here we report the isolation and characterization of the 5' end of the pig mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene. The 581 bp region proximal to the transcription start site permits transcription of a reporter gene, confirming the function of the promoter. The pig mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter is trans-activated by the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and a functional response element for PPAR (PPRE) has been localized in the promoter region. Pig PPRE is constituted by an imperfect direct repeat (DR-1) and a downstream sequence, both of which are needed to confer PPAR-sensitivity to a thymidine kinase promoter and to form complexes with PPAR.retinoid X receptor heterodimers. A role of PPAR trans-activation in starvation-associated induction of gene expression is suggested. PMID:9882632

  11. Cloning, Expression Profiling and Functional Analysis of CnHMGS, a Gene Encoding 3-hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Synthase from Chamaemelum nobile.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng; Chen, Qiangwen; Tao, Tingting; Lei, Jing; Zhang, Weiwei; Liao, Yongling; Chang, Jie; Li, Xingxiang

    2016-01-01

    Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L.) is renowned for its production of essential oils, which major components are sesquiterpenoids. As the important enzyme in the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase (HMGS) catalyze the crucial step in the mevalonate pathway in plants. To isolate and identify the functional genes involved in the sesquiterpene biosynthesis of C. nobile L., a HMGS gene designated as CnHMGS (GenBank Accession No. KU529969) was cloned from C. nobile. The cDNA sequence of CnHMGS contained a 1377 bp open reading frame encoding a 458-amino-acid protein. The sequence of the CnHMGS protein was highly homologous to those of HMGS proteins from other plant species. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that CnHMGS clustered with the HMGS of Asteraceae in the dicotyledon clade. Further functional complementation of CnHMGS in the mutant yeast strain YSC6274 lacking HMGS activity demonstrated that the cloned CnHMGS cDNA encodes a functional HMGS. Transcript profile analysis indicated that CnHMGS was preferentially expressed in flowers and roots of C. nobile. The expression of CnHMGS could be upregulated by exogenous elicitors, including methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid, suggesting that CnHMGS was elicitor-responsive. The characterization and expression analysis of CnHMGS is helpful to understand the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid in C. nobile at the molecular level and also provides molecular wealth for the biotechnological improvement of this important medicinal plant. PMID:27005600

  12. Avian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase: sensitivity of enzyme activity to thiol/disulfide exchange and identification of proximal reactive cysteines.

    PubMed Central

    Hruz, P. W.; Miziorko, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Catalysis by purified avian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase is critically dependent on the reduction state of the enzyme, with less than 1% of optimal activity being observed with the air-oxidized enzyme. The enzyme is irreversibly inactivated by sulfhydryl-directed reagents with the rate of this inactivation being highly dependent upon the redox state of a critical cysteine. Methylation of reduced avian lyase with 1 mM 4-methylnitrobenzene sulfonate results in rapid inactivation of the enzyme with a k(inact) of 0.178 min-1. The oxidized enzyme is inactivated at a sixfold slower rate (k(inact) = 0.028 min-1). Inactivation of the enzyme with the reactive substrate analog 2-butynoyl-CoA shows a similar dependence upon the enzyme's redox state, with a sevenfold difference in k(inact) observed with oxidized vs. reduced forms of the enzyme. Chemical cross-linking of the reduced enzyme with stoichiometric amounts of the bifunctional reagents 1,3-dibromo-2-propanone (DBP) or N,N'-ortho-phenylene-dimaleimide (PDM) coincides with rapid inactivation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of enzyme treated with bifunctional reagent reveals a band of twice the molecular weight of the lyase monomer, indicating that an intersubunit cross-link has been formed. Differential labeling of native and cross-linked protein with [1-14C]iodoacetate has identified as the primary cross-linking target a cysteine within the sequence VSQAACR, which maps at the carboxy-terminus of the cDNA-deduced sequence of the avian enzyme (Mitchell, G.A., et al., 1991, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 49, 101). In contrast, bacterial HMG-CoA lyase, which contains no corresponding cysteine, is not cross-linked by comparable treatment with bifunctional reagent. These results provide evidence for a potential regulatory mechanism for the eukaryotic enzyme via thiol/disulfide exchange and identify a cysteinyl residue with the reactivity and juxtaposition required for participation in disulfide

  13. 3-Methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiencies: a coupled enzyme assay useful for their detection.

    PubMed

    Narisawa, K; Gibson, K M; Sweetman, L; Nyhan, W L

    1989-09-15

    A coupled assay has been developed using 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA and NaH14CO3 which permits the detection of deficiencies of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA-lyase. The products of the reaction were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Using this method the site of the defect was documented in a patient with deficiency of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, 2 patients with deficiency of 3-methyl-glutaconyl-CoA hydratase, and 2 patients with deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA lyase.

  14. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Targeting Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Atrial Fibrillation: Role of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Inhibition with Statins

    PubMed Central

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana Catarina; Reilly, Svetlana; Brandes, Ralf P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a burgeoning health-care problem, and the currently available therapeutic armamentarium is barely efficient. Experimental and clinical evidence implicates inflammation and myocardial oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AF. Recent Advances: Local and systemic inflammation has been found to both precede and follow the new onset of AF, and NOX2-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in human right atrial samples has been independently associated with the occurrence of AF in the postoperative period in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents can prevent atrial electrical remodeling in animal models of atrial tachypacing and the new onset of AF after cardiac surgery, suggesting a causal relationship between inflammation/oxidative stress and the atrial substrate that supports AF. Critical Issues: Statin therapy, by redressing the myocardial nitroso-redox balance and reducing inflammation, has emerged as a potentially effective strategy for the prevention of AF. Evidence indicates that statins prevent AF-induced electrical remodeling in animal models of atrial tachypacing and may reduce the new onset of AF after cardiac surgery. However, whether statins have antiarrhythmic properties in humans has yet to be conclusively demonstrated, as data from randomized controlled trials specifically addressing the relevance of statin therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of AF remain scanty. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the putative antiarrhythmic effects of statins may afford tailoring AF treatment to specific clinical settings and patient's subgroups. Large-scale randomized clinical trials are needed to support the indication of statin therapy solely on the basis of AF prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1268–1285. PMID:23924190

  16. The Arabidopsis FLAKY POLLEN1 gene encodes a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase required for development of tapetum-specific organelles and fertility of pollen grains.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Sumie; Nishimori, Yuka; Yamada, Miho; Saito, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Miyake, Hiroshi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-06-01

    The pollen coat is a surface component of pollen grains required for fertilization. To study how the pollen coat is produced, we identified and characterized a recessive and conditional male-sterile Arabidopsis mutant, flaky pollen1-1 (fkp1-1), whose pollen grains lack functional pollen coats. FKP1 is a single-copy gene in the Arabidopsis genome and encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMG-CoA synthase), an enzyme of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway involved in biosynthesis of isoprenoids such as sterols. We found that fkp1-1 possesses a T-DNA insertion 550 bp upstream of the initiation codon. RT-PCR and promoter analyses revealed that fkp1-1 results in knockdown of FKP1 predominantly in tapetum. Electron microscopy showed that the mutation affected the development of tapetum-specific lipid-containing organelles (elaioplast and tapetosome), causing the deficient formation of fkp1-1 pollen coats. These results suggest that both elaioplasts, which accumulate vast amount of sterol esters, and tapetosomes, which are unique oil-accumulating structures, require the MVA pathway for development. Null alleles of fkp1 were male-gametophyte lethal upon pollen tube elongation, whereas female gametophytes were normal. These results show that the MVA pathway is essential, at least in tapetal cells and pollen grains, for the development of tapetum-specific organelles and the fertility of pollen grains.

  17. Application of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and identification of a heterozygous Alu-associated deletion and a uniparental disomy of chromosome 1 in two patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Naomi; Ishige, Mika; Tanaka, Toju; Ichihara, Tomoko; Ohara, Katsuaki; Kouzan, Hiroko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMGCL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the leucine catabolic pathway and ketone body synthesis, and is clinically characterized by metabolic crises with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. In the present study, we initially used PCR with genomic followed by direct sequencing to investigate the molecular genetic basis of HMGCL deficiency in two patients clinically diagnosed with the condition. Although we identified a mutation in each patient, the inheritance patterns of these mutations were not consistent with disease causation. Therefore, we investigated HMGCL using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to determine the copy numbers of all exons. A heterozygous deletion that included exons 2-4 was identified in one of the patients. MLPA revealed that the other patient had two copies for all HMGCL exons. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 1 was confirmed in this patient by microarray analysis. These findings indicate that MLPA is useful for the identification of genomic aberrations and mutations other than small-scale nucleotide alterations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMGCL deficiency caused by uniparental disomy. PMID:25872961

  18. Conversion of acetyl-coenzyme A into 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A in radish seedlings. Evidence of a single monomeric protein catalyzing a FeII/quinone-stimulated double condensation reaction.

    PubMed

    Weber, T; Bach, T J

    1994-02-10

    We solubilized from radish membranes and purified to apparent homogeneity a monomeric protein (55.5 kDa) capable of catalyzing the two-step conversion of acetyl-CoA into 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl(HMG)-CoA. Unlike the situation described for other eukaryotes (yeast, animals), both enzyme activities needed for HMG-CoA synthesis (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, AACT and HMG-CoA synthase, HMGS) appear to be localized on a single polypeptide. Thus, the enzyme system is further referred to as AACT/HMGS. The reaction as catalyzed by purified AACT/HMGS is strongly stimulated in vitro in presence of FeII-chelates (namely EDTA) and of quinone cofactors with pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) being by far the most effective one studied so far. Whereas the FeII stimulation is apparently due to a Vmax effect, PQQ increases the affinity of the enzyme system towards acetyl-CoA (1.9 microM vs. 5.9 microM, at 50 microM FeII, 100 microM EDTA, 20 microM PQQ). Stimulation by naphthoquinone (NQ) can be overcome in the presence of halogenated NQ-derivatives, while activation by PQQ remains unaffected, possibly indicating a much more specific-binding of the latter cofactor. Gel filtration experiments of enzyme after preincubation in presence of PQQ indicate that there is no covalent-binding of the quinone cofactor to the enzyme. As is also shown with partially purified enzyme from maize membranes, phenylhydrazine, known to react with PQQ as the prosthetic group of quinoproteins (see van der Meer et al. (1987) FEBS Lett. 221, 299-304), efficiently inhibits the reaction. The data lead us to suggest a reaction mechanism that involves radical formation by the redox couple FeII/PQQ, thereby possibly facilitating the energetically unfavorable Claisen condensation as catalyzed during the first partial (AACT) reaction.

  19. Crystal structures of two bacterial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyases suggest a common catalytic mechanism among a family of TIM barrel metalloenzymes cleaving carbon-carbon bonds.

    PubMed

    Forouhar, Farhad; Hussain, Munif; Farid, Ramy; Benach, Jordi; Abashidze, Mariam; Edstrom, William C; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B; Fu, Zhuji; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Miziorko, Henry M; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John F

    2006-03-17

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase catalyzes the terminal steps in ketone body generation and leucine degradation. Mutations in this enzyme cause a human autosomal recessive disorder called primary metabolic aciduria, which typically kills victims because of an inability to tolerate hypoglycemia. Here we present crystal structures of the HMG-CoA lyases from Bacillus subtilis and Brucella melitensis at 2.7 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively. These enzymes share greater than 45% sequence identity with the human orthologue. Although the enzyme has the anticipated triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold, the catalytic center contains a divalent cation-binding site formed by a cluster of invariant residues that cap the core of the barrel, contrary to the predictions of homology models. Surprisingly, the residues forming this cation-binding site and most of their interaction partners are shared with three other TIM barrel enzymes that catalyze diverse carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions believed to proceed through enolate intermediates (4-hydroxy-2-ketovalerate aldolase, 2-isopropylmalate synthase, and transcarboxylase 5S). We propose the name "DRE-TIM metallolyases" for this newly identified enzyme family likely to employ a common catalytic reaction mechanism involving an invariant Asp-Arg-Glu (DRE) triplet. The Asp ligates the divalent cation, while the Arg probably stabilizes charge accumulation in the enolate intermediate, and the Glu maintains the precise structural alignment of the Asp and Arg. We propose a detailed model for the catalytic reaction mechanism of HMG-CoA lyase based on the examination of previously reported product complexes of other DRE-TIM metallolyases and induced fit substrate docking studies conducted using the crystal structure of human HMG-CoA lyase (reported in the accompanying paper by Fu, et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7526-7532). Our model is consistent with extensive mutagenesis results and can

  20. Crystal Structures of Two Bacterial 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Lyases Suggest a Common Catalytic Mechanism among a Family of TIM Barrel Metalloenzymes Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Hussain, M.; Farid, R.; Benach, J.; Abashidze, M.; Edstrom, W.; Vorobiev, S.; Montelione, G.; Hunt, J.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase catalyzes the terminal steps in ketone body generation and leucine degradation. Mutations in this enzyme cause a human autosomal recessive disorder called primary metabolic aciduria, which typically kills victims because of an inability to tolerate hypoglycemia. Here we present crystal structures of the HMG-CoA lyases from Bacillus subtilis and Brucella melitensis at 2.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These enzymes share greater than 45% sequence identity with the human orthologue. Although the enzyme has the anticipated triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold, the catalytic center contains a divalent cation-binding site formed by a cluster of invariant residues that cap the core of the barrel, contrary to the predictions of homology models. Surprisingly, the residues forming this cation-binding site and most of their interaction partners are shared with three other TIM barrel enzymes that catalyze diverse carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions believed to proceed through enolate intermediates (4-hydroxy-2-ketovalerate aldolase, 2-isopropylmalate synthase, and transcarboxylase 5S). We propose the name 'DRE-TIM metallolyases' for this newly identified enzyme family likely to employ a common catalytic reaction mechanism involving an invariant Asp-Arg-Glu (DRE) triplet. The Asp ligates the divalent cation, while the Arg probably stabilizes charge accumulation in the enolate intermediate, and the Glu maintains the precise structural alignment of the Asp and Arg. We propose a detailed model for the catalytic reaction mechanism of HMG-CoA lyase based on the examination of previously reported product complexes of other DRE-TIM metallolyases and induced fit substrate docking studies conducted using the crystal structure of human HMG-CoA lyase (reported in the accompanying paper by Fu, et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7526-7532). Our model is consistent with extensive mutagenesis results and

  1. Metabolism of leucine in fibroblasts from patients with deficiencies in each of the major catabolic enzymes: branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase, isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, I; Søvik, O; Sweetman, L; Nyhan, W L

    1985-12-01

    The metabolism of leucine was studied in cultured human fibroblasts derived from patients with defects in each of the major steps in the catabolism of the amino acid. Intact fibroblasts were incubated with [U-14C]leucine and the organic acid products were isolated by liquid partition chromatography. In control fibroblasts the major product of leucine was 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid. This was also the case for fibroblasts with deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase. There was little or no accumulation of the compound with fibroblasts from patients with maple syrup urine disease and isovaleric acidemia.

  2. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Kishta, Sara; Ei-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  3. Statins in therapy: understanding their hydrophilicity, lipophilicity, binding to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, ability to cross the blood brain barrier and metabolic stability based on electrostatic molecular orbital studies.

    PubMed

    Fong, Clifford W

    2014-10-01

    The atomic electrostatic potentials calculated by the CHELPG method have been shown to be sensitive indicators of the gas phase and solution properties of the statins. Solvation free energies in water, n-octanol and n-octane have been determined using the SMD solvent model. The percentage hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity (or lipophilicity) of the statins in solution have been determined using (a) the differences in solvation free energies between n-octanol and n-octane as a measure of hydrophilicity, and the solvation energy in octane as a measure of hydrophobicity (b) the sum of the atomic electrostatic charges on the hydrogen bonding and polar bonding nuclei of the common pharmacophore combined with a solvent measure of hydrophobicity, and (c) using the buried surface areas after statin binding to HMGCR to calculate the hydrophobicity of the bound statins. The data suggests that clinical definitions of statins as either "hydrophilic" or "lipophilic" based on experimental partition coefficients are misleading. An estimate of the binding energy between rosuvastatin and HMGCR has been made using: (a) a coulombic electrostatic interaction model, (b) the calculated desolvation and resolvation of the statin in water, and (c) the first shell transfer solvation energy as a proxy for the restructuring of the water molecules immediately adjacent to the active binding site of HMGCR prior to binding. Desolvation and resolvation of the statins before and after binding to HMGCR are major determinants of the energetics of the binding process. An analysis of the amphiphilic nature of lovastatin anion, acid and lactone and fluvastatin anion and their abilities to cross the blood brain barrier has indicated that this process may be dominated by desolvation and resolvation effects, rather than the statin molecular size or statin-lipid interactions within the bilayer. The ionization energy and electron affinity of the statins are sensitive physical indicators of the ease that the various statins can undergo endogenous oxidative metabolism. The absolute chemical hardness is also an indicator of the stability of the statins, and may be a useful indicator for drug design. PMID:25128668

  4. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Kishta, Sara; EI-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  5. The management of pregnancy and delivery in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pipitone, Angela; Raval, Donna B; Duis, Jessica; Vernon, Hilary; Martin, Regina; Hamosh, Ada; Valle, David; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2016-06-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG)-CoA lyase is required for ketogenesis and leucine degradation. Patients with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency typically present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis, which can be fatal if untreated. The patient is a 28-year-old female with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency who presented at 4 weeks gestation for prenatal care. Protein intake as well as carnitine supplementation were gradually increased to support maternal and fetal demands up to 65 g per day for protein and 80 mg/kg/day for carnitine. Fetal growth was appropriate. At 36 5/7 weeks, she presented with spontaneous rupture of membranes. Twice maintenance 10% glucose-containing intravenous fluids were initiated. During labor, vomiting and metabolic acidosis developed. Delivery was by cesarean. Preeclampsia developed postpartum. The patient recovered well and was discharged home on postpartum day 5. Stress of pregnancy and labor and delivery can lead to metabolic decompensation in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency. Patients should be monitored closely by a biochemical geneticist, dietitian, and high-risk obstetrician at a tertiary care center during their pregnancy. Fasting should be avoided. Intravenous 10% glucose-containing fluids should be provided to prevent catabolism and metabolic decompensation during labor and delivery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26997609

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... body cannot process a particular protein building block ( amino acid ) called leucine. Additionally, the disorder prevents the body ... Specifically, it is responsible for processing leucine, an amino acid that is part of many proteins. HMG-CoA ...

  7. Enhancement of β-carotene production by over-expression of HMG-CoA reductase coupled with addition of ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guo-liang; Wen, Ke-rui; Duan, Chang-qing

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the synergistic effect of overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene and adding ergosterol synthesis inhibitor, ketoconazole, on β-carotene production in the recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. The results showed that the over-expression of HMG-CoA reductase gene and adding 100 mg/l ketoconazole alone can result in 135.1 and 15.6% increment of β-carotene concentration compared with that of the control (2.05 mg/g dry weight of cells), respectively. However, the combination of overexpressing HMG-CoA reductase gene and adding ketoconazole can achieve a 206.8% increment of pigment content (6.29 mg/g dry weight of cells) compared with that of the control. Due to the fact that over-expression of the HMG-CoA reductase gene can simultaneously improve the flux of the sterol and carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, it can be concluded that under the circumstances of blocking sterol biosynthesis, increasing the activity of HMG-CoA reductase can result in more precursors FPP fluxing into carotenoid branch and obtain a high increment of β-carotene production. The results of this study collectively suggest that the combination of overexpressing HMG-CoA reductase gene and supplying ergosterol synthesis inhibitor is an effective strategy to improve the production of desirable isoprenoid compounds such as carotenoids. PMID:22086347

  8. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Hung; Huang, Kao-Jean; Weng, Ching-Feng; Shiuan, David

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR). The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank) database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening. PMID:26170618

  9. Chronic HMGCR/HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor treatment contributes to dysglycemia by upregulating hepatic gluconeogenesis through autophagy induction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Yeo; Kwon, Obin; Choe, Eun Yeong; Kim, Chul Hoon; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Myung-Shik; Yun, Mijin; Cha, Bong Soo; Kim, Young-Bum; Lee, Hyangkyu; Kang, Eun Seok

    2015-01-01

    Statins (HMGCR/HMG-CoA reductase [3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase] inhibitors) are widely used to lower blood cholesterol levels but have been shown to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the molecular mechanism underlying diabetogenic effects remains to be elucidated. Here we show that statins significantly increase the expression of key gluconeogenic enzymes (such as G6PC [glucose-6-phosphatase] and PCK1 (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 [soluble]) in vitro and in vivo and promote hepatic glucose output. Statin treatment activates autophagic flux in HepG2 cells. Acute suppression of autophagy with lysosome inhibitors in statin treated HepG2 cells reduced gluconeogenic enzymes expression and glucose output. Importantly, the ability of statins to increase gluconeogenesis was impaired when ATG7 was deficient and BECN1 was absent, suggesting that autophagy plays a critical role in the diabetogenic effects of statins. Moreover autophagic vacuoles and gluconeogenic genes expression in the liver of diet-induced obese mice were increased by statins, ultimately leading to elevated hepatic glucose production, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic statin therapy results in insulin resistance through the activation of hepatic gluconeogenesis, which is tightly coupled to hepatic autophagy. These data further contribute to a better understanding of the diabetogenic effects of stains in the context of insulin resistance. PMID:26389569

  10. 7-Dehydrocholesterol-dependent proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase suppresses sterol biosynthesis in a mouse model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fitzky, B U; Moebius, F F; Asaoka, H; Waage-Baudet, H; Xu, L; Xu, G; Maeda, N; Kluckman, K; Hiller, S; Yu, H; Batta, A K; Shefer, S; Chen, T; Salen, G; Sulik, K; Simoni, R D; Ness, G C; Glossmann, H; Patel, S B; Tint, G S

    2001-09-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome (SLOS), a relatively common birth-defect mental-retardation syndrome, is caused by mutations in DHCR7, whose product catalyzes an obligate step in cholesterol biosynthesis, the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol. A null mutation in the murine Dhcr7 causes an identical biochemical defect to that seen in SLOS, including markedly reduced tissue cholesterol and total sterol levels, and 30- to 40-fold elevated concentrations of 7-dehydrocholesterol. Prenatal lethality was not noted, but newborn homozygotes breathed with difficulty, did not suckle, and died soon after birth with immature lungs, enlarged bladders, and, frequently, cleft palates. Despite reduced sterol concentrations in Dhcr7(-/-) mice, mRNA levels for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-controlling enzyme for sterol biosynthesis, the LDL receptor, and SREBP-2 appeared neither elevated nor repressed. In contrast to mRNA, protein levels and activities of HMG-CoA reductase were markedly reduced. Consistent with this finding, 7-dehydrocholesterol accelerates proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase while sparing other key proteins. These results demonstrate that in mice without Dhcr7 activity, accumulated 7-dehydrocholesterol suppresses sterol biosynthesis posttranslationally. This effect might exacerbate abnormal development in SLOS by increasing the fetal cholesterol deficiency. PMID:11560960

  11. 7-Dehydrocholesterol–dependent proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase suppresses sterol biosynthesis in a mouse model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fitzky, Barbara U.; Moebius, Fabian F.; Asaoka, Hitoshi; Waage-Baudet, Heather; Xu, Liwen; Xu, Guorong; Maeda, Nobuyo; Kluckman, Kimberly; Hiller, Sylvia; Yu, Hongwei; Batta, Ashok K.; Shefer, Sarah; Chen, Thomas; Salen, Gerald; Sulik, Kathleen; Simoni, Robert D.; Ness, Gene C.; Glossmann, Hartmut; Patel, Shailendra B.; Tint, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome (SLOS), a relatively common birth-defect mental-retardation syndrome, is caused by mutations in DHCR7, whose product catalyzes an obligate step in cholesterol biosynthesis, the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol. A null mutation in the murine Dhcr7 causes an identical biochemical defect to that seen in SLOS, including markedly reduced tissue cholesterol and total sterol levels, and 30- to 40-fold elevated concentrations of 7-dehydrocholesterol. Prenatal lethality was not noted, but newborn homozygotes breathed with difficulty, did not suckle, and died soon after birth with immature lungs, enlarged bladders, and, frequently, cleft palates. Despite reduced sterol concentrations in Dhcr7–/– mice, mRNA levels for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-controlling enzyme for sterol biosynthesis, the LDL receptor, and SREBP-2 appeared neither elevated nor repressed. In contrast to mRNA, protein levels and activities of HMG-CoA reductase were markedly reduced. Consistent with this finding, 7-dehydrocholesterol accelerates proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase while sparing other key proteins. These results demonstrate that in mice without Dhcr7 activity, accumulated 7-dehydrocholesterol suppresses sterol biosynthesis posttranslationally. This effect might exacerbate abnormal development in SLOS by increasing the fetal cholesterol deficiency. PMID:11560960

  12. Transcription of the three HMG-CoA reductase genes of Mucor circinelloides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Precursors of sterols, carotenoids, the prenyl groups of several proteins and other terpenoid compounds are synthesised via the acetate-mevalonate pathway. One of the key enzyme of this pathway is the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase, which catalyses the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate. HMG-CoA reductase therefore affects many biological processes, such as morphogenesis, synthesis of different metabolites or adaptation to environmental changes. In this study, transcription of the three HMG-CoA reductase genes (designated as hmgR1, hmgR2 and hmgR3) of the β-carotene producing Mucor circinelloides has been analysed under various culturing conditions; effect of the elevation of their copy number on the carotenoid and ergosterol content as well as on the sensitivity to statins has also been examined. Results Transcripts of each gene were detected and their relative levels varied under the tested conditions. Transcripts of hmgR1 were detected only in the mycelium and its relative transcript level seems to be strongly controlled by the temperature and the oxygen level of the environment. Transcripts of hmgR2 and hmgR3 are already present in the germinating spores and the latter is also strongly regulated by oxygen. Overexpression of hmgR2 and hmgR3 by elevating their copy numbers increased the carotenoid content of the fungus and decreased their sensitivity to statins. Conclusions The three HMG-CoA reductase genes of M. circinelloides displayed different relative transcript levels under the tested conditions suggesting differences in their regulation. They seem to be especially involved in the adaptation to the changing oxygen tension and osmotic conditions of the environment as well as to statin treatment. Overexpression of hmgR2 and hmgR3 may be used to improve the carotenoid content. PMID:24731286

  13. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Double-stranded RNAs Target HMG-CoA Reductase (HMGR) Gene Inhibits the Growth, Development and Survival of Cotton Bollworms

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Cheng, Linlin; Qi, Xuewei; Ge, Zonghe; Niu, Changying; Zhang, Xianlong; Jin, Shuangxia

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been developed as a powerful technique in the research of functional genomics as well as plant pest control. In this report, double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) targeting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene, which catalyze a rate-limiting enzymatic reaction in the mevalonate pathway of juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis in cotton bollworm, was expressed in cotton plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. PCR and Sothern analysis revealed the integration of HMGR gene into cotton genome. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR confirmed the high transcription level of dsHMGR in transgenic cotton lines. The HMGR expression both in transcription and translation level was significantly downregulated in cotton bollworms (helicoverpa armigera) larvae after feeding on the leaves of HMGR transgenic plants. The transcription level of HMGR gene in larvae reared on transgenic cotton leaves was as much as 80.68% lower than that of wild type. In addition, the relative expression level of vitellogenin (Vg, crucial source of nourishment for offspring embryo development) gene was also reduced by 76.86% when the insect larvae were fed with transgenic leaves. The result of insect bioassays showed that the transgenic plant harboring dsHMGR not only inhibited net weight gain but also delayed the growth of cotton bollworm larvae. Taken together, transgenic cotton plant expressing dsRNAs successfully downregulated HMGR gene and impaired the development and survival of target insect, which provided more option for plant pest control. PMID:26435695

  14. Ethnic variability in the plasma exposures of OATP1B1 substrates such as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors: a kinetic consideration of its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Y; Maeda, K; Sugiyama, Y

    2013-07-01

    Because the plasma exposure levels of rosuvastatin in Asians are generally twice those in Caucasians, the starting dose for Asians in the United States is set to half of that for non-Asians. However, the precise role of ethnicity in the clearance of rosuvastatin has not yet been clarified. This review focuses on ethnic variability in the clinical pharmacokinetics of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) and angiotensin II receptor antagonists. The mechanisms of such variability are discussed quantitatively, with building a hypothetical model for pravastatin, and validated against other statins. Our analyses suggest that the ethnic variability in the plasma exposure of statins cannot be explained only by the difference in the allele frequencies of organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and the intrinsic ethnic variability in the activity of OATP1B1 (the ratio of Japanese/Caucasians is 0.584) must be considered. Further work and validation with additional data will clarify the applicability of this model to other OATP1B1 substrates.

  15. In vitro and in vivo downregulation of the ATP binding cassette transporter B1 by the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Atil, Bihter; Berger-Sieczkowski, Evelyn; Bardy, Johanna; Werner, Martin; Hohenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Extrusion of chemotherapeutics by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters like ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) represents a crucial mechanism of multidrug resistance in cancer therapy. We have previously shown that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor simvastatin directly inhibits ABCB1, alters the glycosylation of the transporter, and enhances the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin with subsequent anti-cancer action. Here, we show that simvastatin reduces endogenous dolichol levels and ABCB1 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Coapplication with dolichol prevents the downregulation of the ABCB1 transporter. Importantly, dolichol also attenuated simvastatin-induced apoptosis, unmasking involvement of unfolded protein response. Direct monitoring of the fluorescent fusion protein YFP-ABCB1 further confirms concentration-dependent reduction of ABCB1 in HEK293 cells by simvastatin. In simvastatin-treated murine xenografts, ABCB1 was also reduced in the liver and rhabdomyosarcoma but did not reach significance in neuroblastoma. Nevertheless, the in vivo anti-cancer effects of simvastatin are corroborated by increased apoptosis in tumor tissues. These findings provide experimental evidence for usage of simvastatin in novel chemotherapeutic regimens and link dolichol depletion to simvastatin-induced anti-cancer activity.

  16. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibition Promotes Neurological Recovery, Peri-Lesional Tissue Remodeling, and Contralesional Pyramidal Tract Plasticity after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ertugrul; Reitmeir, Raluca; Kilic, Ülkan; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Kelestemur, Taha; Ethemoglu, Muhsine Sinem; Ozturk, Gurkan; Hermann, Dirk M.

    2014-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors are widely used for secondary stroke prevention. Besides their lipid-lowering activity, pleiotropic effects on neuronal survival, angiogenesis, and neurogenesis have been described. In view of these observations, we were interested whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibition in the post-acute stroke phase promotes neurological recovery, peri-lesional, and contralesional neuronal plasticity. We examined effects of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin (0.2 or 2.0 mg/kg/day i.c.v.), administered starting 3 days after 30 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion for 30 days. Here, we show that rosuvastatin treatment significantly increased the grip strength and motor coordination of animals, promoted exploration behavior, and reduced anxiety. It was associated with structural remodeling of peri-lesional brain tissue, reflected by increased neuronal survival, enhanced capillary density, and reduced striatal and corpus callosum atrophy. Increased sprouting of contralesional pyramidal tract fibers crossing the midline in order to innervate the ipsilesional red nucleus was noticed in rosuvastatin compared with vehicle-treated mice, as shown by anterograde tract tracing experiments. Western blot analysis revealed that the abundance of HMG-CoA reductase was increased in the contralesional hemisphere at 14 and 28 days post-ischemia. Our data support the idea that HMG-CoA reductase inhibition promotes brain remodeling and plasticity far beyond the acute stroke phase, resulting in neurological recovery. PMID:25565957

  17. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor Improves Endothelial Dysfunction in Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats Via Down-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung-Won; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hyo-soo; Oh, Buyng-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Caveolin-1 regulates nitric oxide (NO) signaling by modulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The purpose of this study was to examine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves impaired endothelial function of the aorta in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to determine the underlying mechanisms involved. Eight-week-old male SHR were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=11) or a rosuvastatin group (ROS, n=12), rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) administered for eight weeks. Abdominal aortic rings were prepared and responses to acetylcholine (10-9-10-4 M) were determined in vitro. To evaluate the potential role of NO and caveolin-1, we examined the plasma activity of NOx, eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and expression of caveolin-1. The relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced in ROS compared to CON. Expression of eNOS RNA was unchanged, whereas NOx level and phosphorylated-eNOS at serine-1177 was increased accompanied with depressed level of caveolin-1 in ROS. We conclude that 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor can improve impaired endothelial dysfunction in SHR, and its underlying mechanisms are associated with increased NO production. Furthermore, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor can activate the eNOS by phosphorylation related to decreased caveolin-1 abundance. These results imply the therapeutic strategies for the high blood pressure-associated endothelial dysfunction through modifying caveolin status. PMID:20052342

  18. 3-Hydroxymethyl coenzyme A reductase inhibition attenuates spontaneous smooth muscle tone via RhoA/ROCK pathway regulated by RhoA prenylation.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish

    2010-06-01

    RhoA prenylation may play an important step in the translocation of RhoA in the basal internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone. Statins inhibit downstream posttranslational RhoA prenylation by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition (HMGCRI). The role of statins in relation to RhoA prenylation in the pathophysiology of the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle has not been investigated. In the present studies, we determined the effect of classical HMGCRI simvastatin on the basal IAS tone and RhoA prenylation and in the levels of RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) in the cytosolic vs. membrane fractions of the smooth muscle. Simvastatin produced concentration-dependent decrease in the IAS tone (via direct actions at the smooth muscle cells). The decrease in the IAS tone by simvastatin was associated with the decrease in the prenylation of RhoA, as well as RhoA/ROCK in the membrane fractions of the IAS, in the basal state. The inhibitory effects of the HMGCRI were completely reversible by geranylgeranyltransferase substrate geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Relaxation of the IAS smooth muscle via HMGCRI simvastatin is mediated via the downstream decrease in the levels of RhoA prenylation and ROCK activity. Studies support the concept that RhoA prenylation leading to RhoA/ROCK translocation followed by activation is important for the basal tone in the IAS. Data suggest that the role of HMG-CoA reductase may go beyond cholesterol biosynthesis, such as the regulation of the smooth muscle tone. The studies have important implications in the pathophysiological mechanisms and in the novel therapeutic approaches for anorectal motility disorders.

  19. [Molecular characterization of a HMG-CoA reductase gene from a rare and endangered medicinal plant, Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Gang; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2014-03-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate in mavalonic acid pathway, which is the first committed step for isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants. However, it still remains unclear whether HGMR gene plays a role in the isoprenoid biosynthesis in Dendrobium officinale, an endangered epiphytic orchid species. In the present study, a HMGR encoding gene, designed as DoHMGR1 (GenBank accession JX272632), was identified from D. officinale using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods, for the first time. The full length cDNA of DoHMGR1 was 2 071 bp in length and encoded a 562-aa protein with a molecular weight of 59.73 kD and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.18. The deduced DoHMGR1 protein, like other HMGR proteins, constituted four conserved domains (63-561, 147-551, 268-383 and 124-541) and two transmembrane motifs (42-64 and 85-107). Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that DoHMGR1 had high identity (67%-89%) to a number of HMGR genes from various plants and was closely related to Vanda hybrid cultivar, rice and maize monocots. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis revealed that DoHMGR1 was expressed in the three included organs. The transcripts were the most abundant in the roots with 2.13 fold over that in the leaves, followed by that in the stems with 1.98 fold. Molecular characterization of DoHMGR1 will be useful for further functional elucidation of the gene involving in isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway in D. officinale. PMID:24961116

  20. Statins, HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Improve Neovascularization by Increasing the Expression Density of CXCR4 in Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kuang-Hsing; Cheng, Wan-Li; Shih, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tsao, Nai-Wen; Kao, Yung-Ta; Lin, Chih-Ting; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Huang, Chun-Yao; Lin, Feng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are used to reduce cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Accordingly, statins regulate nitric oxide (NO) and glutamate metabolism, inflammation, angiogenesis, immunity and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) functions. The function of EPCs are regulated by stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), etc. Even though the pharmacologic mechanisms by which statins affect the neovasculogenesis of circulating EPCs, it is still unknown whether statins affect the EPCs function through the regulation of CXCR4, a SDF-1 receptor expression. Therefore, we desired to explore the effects of statins on CXCR4 expression in EPC-mediated neovascularization by in vitro and in vivo analyses. In animal studies, we analyzed the effects of atorvastatin or rosuvastatin treatments in recovery of capillary density and blood flow, the expression of vWF and CXCR4 at ischemia sites in hindlimb ischemia ICR mice. Additionally, we analyzed whether the atorvastatin or rosuvastatin treatments increased the mobilization, homing, and CXCR4 expression of EPCs in hindlimb ischemia ICR mice that underwent bone marrow transplantation. The results indicated that statins treatment led to significantly more CXCR4-positive endothelial progenitor cells incorporated into ischemic sites and in the blood compared with control mice. In vivo, we isolated human EPCs and analyzed the effect of statins treatment on the vasculogenic ability of EPCs and the expression of CXCR4. Compared with the control groups, the neovascularization ability of EPCs was significantly improved in the atorvastatin or rosuvastatin group; this improvement was dependent on CXCR4 up-regulation. The efficacy of statins on improving EPC neovascularization was related to the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis and might be regulated by the NO. In conclusion, atorvastatin and rosuvastatin improved

  1. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  2. [Autoimmune myopathy associated with statin use].

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, Unn; Mygland, Åse

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that statins can have a toxic effect on musculature, but less widely known that they can also trigger progressive autoimmune myopathy. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy is characterised by proximal muscle weakness, antibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in serum, and necrosis without lymphocytic infiltration on muscle biopsy. PMID:27637055

  3. Identifying statin-associated autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Albayda, Jemima; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Statins up-regulate expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis and the major target of autoantibodies in statin-associated immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. As muscle cells regenerate, they express high levels of HMGCR, which may sustain the immune response even after statin therapy is stopped. Awareness of this entity will help physicians who prescribe statins to take action to limit the associated morbidity.

  4. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight: evidence from genetic analysis and randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Holmes, Michael V; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Stender, Stefan; Johnson, Paul C D; Scott, Robert A; Leusink, Maarten; Verweij, Niek; Sharp, Stephen J; Guo, Yiran; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Amuzu, Antoinette; Li, KaWah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A; Drenos, Fotios; Li, Yun R; Lowe, Gordon; Gallacher, John; Stewart, Marlene C W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Buxbaum, Sarah G; van der A, Daphne L; Forouhi, Nita G; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Schnabel, Renate B; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Romanvan; Stepaniak, Urszula; Malyutina, Sofia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Veglia, Fabrizio; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G J; de Borst, Gert Jan; de Jong, Pim A; Algra, Ale; Spiering, Wilko; der Zee, Anke H Maitland-van; Klungel, Olaf H; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A; Eaton, Charles B; Robinson, Jennifer G; Duggan, David; Kjekshus, John; Downs, John R; Gotto, Antonio M; Keech, Anthony C; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R; Waters, David D; Pedersen, Terje R; Amarenco, Pierre; Nakamura, Haruo; McMurray, John J V; Lewsey, James D; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Ray, Kausik K; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Manson, JoAnn E; Price, Jackie F; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard W; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Schreiner, Pamela J; Fornage, Myriam; Siscovick, David S; Cushman, Mary; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Redline, Susan; Patel, Sanjay R; Whittaker, John C; Hamsten, Anders; Delaney, Joseph A; Dale, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom R; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Kathiresan, Sekar; Castillo, Berta A; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Marmot, Michael G; Krauss, Ronald M; Tsai, Michael; Coresh, Josef; Hoogeveen, Ronald C; Psaty, Bruce M; Lange, Leslie A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Dudbridge, Frank; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Kivimäki, Mika; Timpson, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Hingorani, Aroon D; Sattar, Naveed

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. Methods We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR gene, rs17238484 (for the main analysis) and rs12916 (for a subsidiary analysis) as proxies for HMGCR inhibition by statins. We examined associations of these variants with plasma lipid, glucose, and insulin concentrations; bodyweight; waist circumference; and prevalent and incident type 2 diabetes. Study-specific effect estimates per copy of each LDL-lowering allele were pooled by meta-analysis. These findings were compared with a meta-analysis of new-onset type 2 diabetes and bodyweight change data from randomised trials of statin drugs. The effects of statins in each randomised trial were assessed using meta-analysis. Findings Data were available for up to 223 463 individuals from 43 genetic studies. Each additional rs17238484-G allele was associated with a mean 0·06 mmol/L (95% CI 0·05–0·07) lower LDL cholesterol and higher body weight (0·30 kg, 0·18–0·43), waist circumference (0·32 cm, 0·16–0·47), plasma insulin concentration (1·62%, 0·53–2·72), and plasma glucose concentration (0·23%, 0·02–0·44). The rs12916 SNP had similar effects on LDL cholesterol, bodyweight, and waist circumference. The rs17238484-G allele seemed to be associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] per allele 1·02, 95% CI 1·00–1·05); the rs12916-T allele association was consistent (1·06, 1·03–1·09). In 129 170 individuals in randomised trials, statins lowered LDL cholesterol by 0·92 mmol/L (95% CI 0·18–1·67) at 1-year of follow-up, increased bodyweight by 0·24 kg (95% CI 0·10–0·38 in all trials; 0·33 kg, 95% CI 0·24–0·42 in placebo or standard care controlled trials and −0·15 kg, 95% CI −0·39 to 0·08 in intensive

  5. Statins can induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Gale, Jesse; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2014-02-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins, are commonly prescribed for prevention of cardiovascular morbidity. A rare side effect of statin medication is the induction of autoimmune illnesses, including myasthenia gravis (myasthenia). Here we present two patients with seropositive myasthenia that developed 4 weeks after initiation of atorvastatin, increasing the total reported patients to seven. Reviewing recent literature we highlight the connections between statins, auto-immunity and myasthenia. Statins may favour T-cell phenotypes that reduce cell-mediated immunity but could increase antibody-mediated humoral immunity.

  6. Biochemical and molecular tools for the production of useful terpene products from pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Gloria, E

    1999-01-01

    Among other natural products such as colorants and flavorants, natural fungicides like the pepper phytoalexin capsidiol, and the related biochemical pathways, may be used for practical approaches. Key enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A: reductase, the farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase and and farnesyl pyrophosphate cyclases are known and some related genes have been isolated. However, specific enzymes for important and final modifications as methylation and others, are still to be studied. Construction of chimeric enzymes allowed already the synthesis of different products and the possibilities of designing new enzymes by gene manipulation to produce unknown and useful chemicals are open. PMID:10335386

  7. Regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis and sterol uptake in a sterol-auxotrophic yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, R T; Parks, L W

    1987-01-01

    Inhibition of sterol uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sterol auxotroph FY3 (alpha hem1 erg7 ura) by delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is dependent on the ability of the organism to synthesize heme from ALA. Sterol-depleted cells not exposed to ALA or strain PFY3 cells, with a double heme mutation, exposed to ALA did not exhibit inhibition of sterol uptake. Addition of ALA to sterol-depleted FY3 stimulated production of a high endogenous concentration of 2,3-oxidosqualene (25.55 micrograms mg-1 [dry weight]) at 24 h, whereas FY3 not exposed to ALA or PFY3 exposed to ALA did not accumulate 2,3-oxidosqualene. The high concentration of 2,3-oxidosqualene in FY3 with ALA decreased, and 2,3;22,23-dioxidosqualene increased to a very high level. The elevation of 2,3-oxidosqualene by ALA was correlated with a fivefold increase in the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34). The enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase was prevented by cycloheximide but not chloramphenicol and was dependent on a fermentative energy source. Inhibition of sterol uptake could not be attributed to 2,3-oxidosqualene or 2,3;22,23-dioxidosqualene but was due to a nonsaturating level of ergosterol produced as a consequence of heme competency through a leaky erg7 mutation. PMID:3301810

  8. Transcriptome and gene expression analysis in cold-acclimated guayule (Parthenium argentatum) rubber-producing tissue.

    PubMed

    Ponciano, Grisel; McMahan, Colleen M; Xie, Wenshuang; Lazo, Gerard R; Coffelt, Terry A; Collins-Silva, Jillian; Nural-Taban, Aise; Gollery, Martin; Shintani, David K; Whalen, Maureen C

    2012-07-01

    Natural rubber biosynthesis in guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is associated with moderately cold night temperatures. To begin to dissect the molecular events triggered by cold temperatures that govern rubber synthesis induction in guayule, the transcriptome of bark tissue, where rubber is produced, was investigated. A total of 11,748 quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. The vast majority of ESTs encoded proteins that are similar to stress-related proteins, whereas those encoding rubber biosynthesis-related proteins comprised just over one percent of the ESTs. Sequence information derived from the ESTs was used to design primers for quantitative analysis of the expression of genes that encode selected enzymes and proteins with potential impact on rubber biosynthesis in field-grown guayule plants, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, small rubber particle protein, allene oxide synthase, and cis-prenyl transferase. Gene expression was studied for field-grown plants during the normal course of seasonal variation in temperature (monthly average maximum 41.7 °C to minimum 0 °C, from November 2005 through March 2007) and rubber transferase enzymatic activity was also evaluated. Levels of gene expression did not correlate with air temperatures nor with rubber transferase activity. Interestingly, a sudden increase in night temperature 10 days before harvest took place in advance of the highest CPT gene expression level.

  9. Coordinated gene expression for pheromone biosynthesis in the pine engraver beetle, Ips pini (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, Christopher I.; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    In several pine bark beetle species, phloem feeding induces aggregation pheromone production to coordinate a mass attack on the host tree. Male pine engraver beetles, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), produce the monoterpenoid pheromone component ipsdienol de novo via the mevalonate pathway in the anterior midgut upon feeding. To understand how pheromone production is regulated in this tissue, we used quantitative real-time PCR to examine feeding-induced changes in gene expression of seven mevalonate pathway genes: acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, mevalonate 5-diphosphate decarboxylase, isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase, geranyl-diphosphate synthase (GPPS), and farnesyl-diphosphate synthase (FPPS). In males, expression of all these genes significantly increased upon feeding. In females, the expression of the early mevalonate pathway genes (up to and including the isomerase) increased significantly, but the expression of the later genes (GPPS and FPPS) was unaffected or decreased upon feeding. Thus, feeding coordinately regulates expression of the mevalonate pathway genes necessary for pheromone biosynthesis in male, but not female, midguts. Furthermore, basal mRNA levels were 5- to 41-fold more abundant in male midguts compared to female midguts. This is the first report of coordinated regulation of mevalonate pathway genes in an invertebrate model consistent with their sex-specific role in de novo pheromone biosynthesis.

  10. Simvastatin Hydroxy Acid Fails to Attain Sufficient Central Nervous System Tumor Exposure to Achieve a Cytotoxic Effect: Results of a Preclinical Cerebral Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Davis, Abigail D; Boulos, Nidal; Turner, David C; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-04-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors were potent hits against a mouse ependymoma cell line, but their effectiveness against central nervous system tumors will depend on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and attain a sufficient exposure at the tumor. Among 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors that had activity in vitro, we prioritized simvastatin (SV) as the lead compound for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies based on its potential for central nervous system penetration as determined from in silico models. Furthermore, we performed systemic plasma disposition and cerebral microdialysis studies of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in a murine model of ependymoma to characterize plasma and tumor extracellular fluid (tECF) pharmacokinetic properties. The murine dosage of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was equivalent to the maximum tolerated dose in patients (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) based on equivalent plasma exposure of simvastatin acid (SVA) between the two species. SV is rapidly metabolized in murine plasma with 15 times lower exposure compared with human plasma. SVA exposure in tECF was <33.8 ± 11.9 µg/l per hour, whereas the tumor to plasma partition coefficient of SVA was <0.084 ± 0.008. Compared with in vitro washout IC50 values, we did not achieve sufficient exposure of SVA in tECF to suggest tumor growth inhibition; therefore, SV was not carried forward in subsequent preclinical efficacy studies. PMID:26802130

  11. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  12. Postprandial dyslipidemia: an atherogenic disorder common in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, H N; Illingworth, D R

    2001-09-20

    The increased risk of coronary artery disease among patients with diabetes mellitus is attributable, in part, to specific disorders of lipoprotein metabolism that are common in this population. These include disordered metabolism of very-low-density lipoprotein and/or chylomicrons that may be proatherogenic. Elevated postprandial triglycerides, peak postprandial triglyceridemia, and late postprandial triglyceride levels have been associated in clinical trials with both early coronary artery and carotid artery atherosclerosis for persons with normal lipid profiles and those with mild-to-moderate hyperlipidemia, independently of established risk factors. If hyperlipidemia cannot be managed through better glycemic control, diet, and exercise, then hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, fibric acid derivatives, and omega-3 fatty acids are safe and effective lipid-altering agents that can be used to correct these disorders.

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of statins in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Amelia J; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Arora, Devinder S; Grant, Gary D; McDermott, Catherine M; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K

    2014-11-10

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins' effects on the central nervous system (CNS), particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins' effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins' possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed.

  14. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers.

  15. Reduced mitochondrial coenzyme Q10 levels in HepG2 cells treated with high-dose simvastatin: A possible role in statin-induced hepatotoxicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Tavintharan, S. Ong, C.N.; Jeyaseelan, K.; Sivakumar, M.; Lim, S.C.; Sum, C.F.

    2007-09-01

    Lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is well achieved by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins inhibit the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a precursor for cholesterol and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ{sub 10}). In HepG2 cells, simvastatin decreased mitochondrial CoQ{sub 10} levels, and at higher concentrations was associated with a moderately higher degree of cell death, increased DNA oxidative damage and a reduction in ATP synthesis. Supplementation of CoQ{sub 10}, reduced cell death and DNA oxidative stress, and increased ATP synthesis. It is suggested that CoQ{sub 10} deficiency plays an important role in statin-induced hepatopathy, and that CoQ{sub 10} supplementation protects HepG2 cells from this complication.

  16. Pharmacogenetics of Response to Statins

    PubMed Central

    Zineh, Issam

    2016-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are among the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide. On average, statins improve lipid profiles and have been shown to have ancillary beneficial effects on inflammation, platelet activity, and endothelial function. However, variability in drug response exists regardless of the measured phenotype, and genetic variability may be a contributing factor. Recently, there has been an interesting shift in statin pharmacogenetic studies. Novel study designs have been employed and nontraditional candidate genes have been investigated in relation to both lipid and nonlipid responses to statins. This review outlines earlier pharmacogenetic studies and highlights newly published findings that expand on previous work. Furthermore, a framework is provided in which the necessary next steps in research are described, with the ultimate goal of translating pharmacogenetic findings into clinically meaningful changes in patient care. PMID:18241612

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane sterol modifications in response to growth in the presence of ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Caprioglio, H M; Casey, W M; Parks, L W

    1990-01-01

    Membranes isolated from yeasts grown in the presence of ethanol do not display the thermally induced transition in diphenylhexatriene anisotropy that is seen in control cells when they are exposed to ethanol in vitro. The total sterol content of the cells that were exposed to ethanol during growth is reduced, with no steryl esters being detected. A greater proportion of the total sterol pool is ergosterol in cells grown in the presence of alcohol. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase is reduced by ethanol in vitro. Ethanol-exposed cells take up more exogenous sterol under aerobic conditions than do control cells. The presence of ethanol during growth reduces the activity of the plasma membrane enzyme, chitin synthase, as well as increasing the thermosensitivity of this enzyme. PMID:2275534

  18. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mohassel, Payam; Mammen, Andrew L

    2013-10-01

    Statins are among the most commonly prescribed medications that significantly reduce cardiovascular risk in selected individuals. However, these drugs can also be associated with muscle symptoms ranging from mild myalgias to severe rhabdomyolysis. Although statin myotoxicity is usually self-limited, in some instances statin-exposed subjects can develop an autoimmune myopathy typically characterized by progressive weakness, muscle enzyme elevations, a necrotizing myopathy on muscle biopsy, and autoantibodies that recognize 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the pharmacologic target of statins. These antibodies are also found in some autoimmune myopathy patients without statin exposure. Importantly, anti-HMGCR antibodies are not found in the vast majority of statin-exposed subjects without autoimmune myopathy, including those with self-limited statin intolerance. Thus, testing for these antibodies may help differentiate those with self-limited statin myopathy who recover after statin discontinuation from those with a progressive statin-associated autoimmune myopathy who typically require immunosuppressive therapy.

  19. Lovastatin-induced RhoA modulation and its effect on senescence in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Inkyoung; Park, Chaehwa; Kang, Won Ki . E-mail: wkkang@smc.samsung.co.kr

    2006-01-20

    Lovastatin inhibits a 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and prevents the synthesis of cholesterol precursors, such as farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), responsible for important cell signaling in cell proliferation and migration. Recently, the anti-cancer effect of lovastatin has been suggested in various tumor types. In this study, we showed that a low dose lovastatin induced senescence and G1 cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells. Addition of GGPP or mevalonate, but not FPP, prevented the lovastatin-induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and cell senescence. We found that constitutively active RhoA (caRhoA) reversed lovastatin-induced senescence in caRhoA-transfected PC-3 cells. Thus, we postulate that modulation of RhoA may be critical in lovastatin-induced senescence in PC-3 cells.

  20. Clinically significant drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ament, P W; Bertolino, J G; Liszewski, J L

    2000-03-15

    A large number of drugs are introduced every year, and new interactions between medications are increasingly reported. Consequently, it is no longer practical for physicians to rely on memory alone to avoid potential drug interactions. Multiple drug regimens carry the risk of adverse interactions. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. Regularly updated manuals of drug interactions and CD-ROM-formatted programs are useful office references. PMID:10750880

  1. Peptides from cowpea present antioxidant activity, inhibit cholesterol synthesis and its solubilisation into micelles.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marcelo Rodrigues; Soares Freitas, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Corrêa Carlos, Amanda Caroline; Siguemoto, Érica Sayuri; Fontanari, Gustavo Guadagnucci; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-02-01

    In previous studies, it was reported that the protein isolated from the cowpea interferes favourably in lipid metabolism, and reduces cholesterol synthesis. The present study investigated the role of cowpea peptide fractions in the micellar solubilisation of cholesterol, in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) activity, and in the in vitro antioxidant capacity, considering the effects of thermal processing. The protein was isolated from the raw and cooked beans and digested to simulate human digestion. The peptides from the protein isolate of raw bean with molecular mass lower than 3kDa reduced 89% of the HMGCR enzymatic reaction velocity. The cooked cowpeas were more effective in inhibiting the micellar solubility of cholesterol than the raw ones but not the antioxidant activity. This is the first report that cowpea peptides inhibit cholesterol homeostasis in vitro in two distinct routes, and act as an antioxidant.

  2. Statin-induced necrotizing myositis – A discrete autoimmune entity within the “statin-induced myopathy spectrum”

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Philip; Cooper, Robert; McHugh, Neil; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing myositis is increasingly being recognised as part of the “statin-induced myopathy spectrum”. As in other immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myositis is characterised by proximal muscle weakness with marked serum creatine kinase elevations and histological evidence of myonecrosis, and with little or no inflammatory cell infiltration. Unlike other necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myopathy is associated with the presence of autoantibodies directed against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (the enzyme target of statin therapies), and with HLA-DRB1*11. This article summarises the clinical presentation, investigations and management of this rare, but serious complication of statin therapy. PMID:23851103

  3. A novel therapeutic effect of statins on nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Procino, Giuseppe; Wang, David Q-H; Svelto, Maria; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-02-01

    Statins competitively inhibit hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, resulting in reduced plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Recently, it has been shown that statins exert additional 'pleiotropic' effects by increasing expression levels of the membrane water channels aquaporin 2 (AQP2). AQP2 is localized mainly in the kidney and plays a critical role in determining cellular water content. This additional effect is independent of cholesterol homoeostasis, and depends on depletion of mevalonate-derived intermediates of sterol synthetic pathways, i.e. farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. By up-regulating the expression levels of AQP2, statins increase water reabsorption by the kidney, thus opening up a new avenue in treating patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a hereditary disease that yet lacks high-powered and limited side effects therapy. Aspects related to water balance determined by AQP2 in the kidney, as well as standard and novel therapeutic strategies of NDI are discussed.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 and statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    Statins inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which is involved in the production of mevalonic acid in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. This pathway also results in the production of other bioactive molecules including coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone or ubidecarenone). Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring coenzyme with antioxidant effects that is involved in electron transport in mitochondria and is thought to play a role in energy transfer in skeletal muscle. Muscle-related problems are a frequently reported adverse effect of statins, and it has been hypothesised that a reduced endogenous coenzyme Q10 concentration is a cause of statin-induced myopathy. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has therefore been proposed to reduce the adverse muscular effects sometimes seen with statins. Here, we consider whether coenzyme Q10 has a place in the management of statin-induced myopathy.

  5. Myopathy with anti-HMGCR antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Ali; Choksi, Rati; Bucelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinical features and myopathology changes in muscle fibers, connective tissue, and vessels in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody–associated myopathies. Methods: Retrospective review of records and myopathologic features of 49 consecutive patients with myopathies and serum HMGCR antibodies. Results: Clinical features included onset age from 12 to 83 years, female predominance (67%), proximal, symmetric weakness (84%), muscle discomfort (78%), dysphagia (35%), systemic features, including skin rash and interstitial lung disease (37%), statin use (38%), and a high serum creatine kinase (83%). Myopathology included muscle fiber necrosis or regeneration (66%), myonuclear pathology (43%), perimysial connective tissue damage (61%), and lymphocytic foci (27%). Conclusions: Patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies present with weakness and muscle discomfort and often have damage to both perimysial connective tissue and muscle fibers, with necrosis and myonuclear pathology. Only a minority of patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies have a history of statin exposure. PMID:26090508

  6. Drug Interaction and Pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, JA

    2010-01-01

    The topic of drug–drug interactions has received a great deal of recent attention from the regulatory, scientific, and health care communities worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. The pharmacist, along with the prescriber has a duty to ensure that patients are aware of the risk of side effects and a suitable course of action should they occur. With their detailed knowledge of medicine, pharmacists have the ability to relate unexpected symptoms experienced by patients to possible adverse effects of their drug therapy. PMID:21042495

  7. HRD1 suppresses the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells by promoting IGF-1R degradation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue-Mei; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Chen, Fang; Guo, Wan-Hua; Wang, Yan-Yang; Li, Hang-Yu; Tang, Jin-Hai; Ding, Ying; Shen, Ya-Chen; Li, Min; Xuan, Wen-Ying; Liu, Lin-Hui; Wang, Jia; Wang, Xue-Rong; Gao, Ze-Jun; Liang, Xiu-Bin; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-12-15

    HRD1 (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl reductase degradation) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We found that HRD1 was significantly downregulated in 170 breast cancer tissues. Low tumoral HRD1 expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics and a shorter survival in breast cancer patients. P65 specifically bound to the HRD1 promoter and inhibited HRD1 expression. Suppression of NF-κB activity reversed IL-6-induced downregulation of HRD1 expression. HRD1 interacted with IGF-1R and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Overexpression of HRD1 resulted in the inhibition of growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HRD1 attenuated IL-6-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MCF10A cells. These findings uncover a novel role for HRD1 in breast cancer.

  8. HRD1 suppresses the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells by promoting IGF-1R degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shen, Ya-Chen; Li, Min; Xuan, Wen-Ying; Liu, Lin-Hui; Wang, Jia; Wang, Xue-Rong; Gao, Ze-Jun; Liang, Xiu-Bin; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    HRD1 (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl reductase degradation) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We found that HRD1 was significantly downregulated in 170 breast cancer tissues. Low tumoral HRD1 expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics and a shorter survival in breast cancer patients. P65 specifically bound to the HRD1 promoter and inhibited HRD1 expression. Suppression of NF-κB activity reversed IL-6-induced downregulation of HRD1 expression. HRD1 interacted with IGF-1R and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Overexpression of HRD1 resulted in the inhibition of growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HRD1 attenuated IL-6-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MCF10A cells. These findings uncover a novel role for HRD1 in breast cancer. PMID:26536657

  9. Three's company: regulation of cell fate by statins.

    PubMed

    Vamvakopoulos, Joannis E

    2005-04-01

    Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (statins), the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate biosynthetic pathway, are currently the leading prescription drugs worldwide. Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a powerful physiological regulator of cellular development, function and dynamics. Statins are known to induce cellular apoptosis in vitro; however, the clinical relevance of this action remains controversial. This paper draws from 15 years' worth of research to explore the impact of statin treatment on cell fate, as represented by the interlinked processes of cellular growth, differentiation and apoptosis. In particular, I outline our current understanding of the pertinent molecular mechanisms; and discuss the evidence for clinical relevance of statin-induced apoptosis.

  10. The relationship between HMGCR genetic variation, alternative splicing, and statin efficacy.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marisa Wong

    2010-06-01

    Statins are a class of cholesterol lowering drugs that inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the enzyme which catalyzes the rate limiting step of cholesterol biosynthesis. Although numerous trials have demonstrated statin efficacy in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk, there is substantial variation between individuals in the magnitude of plasma LDL-cholesterol reduction. Pharmacogenetic studies have identified HMGCR genetic variation associated with this inter-individual variation. Here we describe how these studies lead to the discovery that HMGCR alternative splicing of exon 13 is not only a marker, but also a determinant of statin efficacy; not only for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, but also as a chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer.

  11. Atorvastatin treatment does not affect gonadal and adrenal hormones in type 2 diabetes patients with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Santini, Stefano A; Carrozza, Cinzia; Lulli, Paola; Zuppi, Cecilia; CarloTonolo, Gian; Musumeci, Salvatore

    2003-01-01

    Atorvastatin, a second generation synthetic 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, reduces both intracellular cholesterol synthesis and serum cholesterol levels, and this could have a potential negative impact on gonadal and adrenal steroidogenesis. Hypercholesterolemia in type 2 diabetes, even when mild, must be treated in an aggressive way, due to the more strict therapeutic goals than in the non diabetic population. Since the wide use of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statins) in type 2 diabetes, the main aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of "therapeutic" doses of atorvastatin on gonadal and adrenal hormones in 24 type 2 diabetic patients (16 males and 8 postmenopausal females), with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia (LDL-cholesterol = 150.1 +/- 32.0 and 189.9 +/- 32.9 mg/dl, respectively) studied before and after a 3 months treatment with atorvastatin (20 mg/day). In all patients, lipids and serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S), androstendione and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured, with the addition, only in males, of testosterone and free testosterone index. After atorvastatin treatment a significant decrease in total and LDL cholesterol was observed (p < 0.05), while HDL-cholesterol did not significantly change ( p = N.S.), as no significant difference was found between steroid hormones measured before and after atorvastatin either in male and females. In conclusion, our data suggest that, in type 2 diabetic patients, the use of atorvastatin has no clinically important effects on either gonadal or adrenal steroid hormones.

  12. Anti-HMGCR antibodies as a biomarker for immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies: A history of statins and experience from a large international multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Musset, Lucile; Allenbach, Yves; Benveniste, Olivier; Boyer, Olivier; Bossuyt, Xavier; Bentow, Chelsea; Phillips, Joe; Mammen, Andrew; Van Damme, Philip; Westhovens, René; Ghirardello, Anna; Doria, Andrea; Choi, May Y; Fritzler, Marvin J; Schmeling, Heinrike; Muro, Yoshinao; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Ortiz-Villalvazo, Miguel A; Bizzaro, Nicola; Infantino, Maria; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Guochun; Vencovský, Jiří; Klein, Martin; Krystufkova, Olga; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Hue, Sophie; Belmondo, Thibaut; Danko, Katalin; Mahler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In an effort to find naturally occurring substances that reduce cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), statins were first discovered by Endo in 1972. With the widespread prescription and use of statins to decrease morbidity from myocardial infarction and stroke, it was noted that approximately 5% of all statin users experienced muscle pain and weakness during treatment. In a smaller proportion of patients, the myopathy progressed to severe morbidity marked by proximal weakness and severe muscle wasting. Remarkably, Mammen and colleagues were the first to discover that the molecular target of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is an autoantibody target in patients that develop an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). These observations have been confirmed in a number of studies but, until today, a multi-center, international study of IMNM, related idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), other auto-inflammatory conditions and controls has not been published. Accordingly, an international, multi-center study investigated the utility of anti-HMGCR antibodies in the diagnosis of statin-associated IMNM in comparison to different forms of IIM and controls. This study included samples from patients with different forms of IIM (n=1250) and patients with other diseases (n=656) that were collected from twelve sites and tested for anti-HMGCR antibodies by ELISA. This study confirmed that anti-HMGCR autoantibodies, when found in conjunction with statin use, characterize a subset of IIM who are older and have necrosis on muscle biopsy. Taken together, the data to date indicates that testing for anti-HMGCR antibodies is important in the differential diagnosis of IIM and might be considered for future classification criteria. PMID:27491568

  13. Unsaturated fatty acids and phytosterols regulate cholesterol transporter genes in Caco-2 and HepG2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngki; Carr, Timothy P

    2013-02-01

    Dietary consumption of phytosterols and certain fatty acids has been shown to reduce cholesterol absorption and plasma cholesterol concentrations. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether phytosterols or fatty acids can alter the expression of cholesterol transporters by functioning as signaling molecules. This study tested the hypothesis that various fatty acids and phytosterols commonly found in the food supply can modulate the expression of transporters including Niemann-Pick C1-like 1, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and scavenger receptor class B type I and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the intestine and liver. Caco-2 cells were used as models of enterocytes, and HepG2 cells were used as a model of hepatocytes. The cells were treated for 18 hours with 100 μmol/L of a fatty acid, or for 24 hours with 10 μmol/L of 25α-hydroxycholesterol, or 100 μmol/L of cholesterol, sitosterol, and stigmasterol to measure expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in Caco-2 cells and sterols in HepG2 cells significantly reduced the messenger RNA expression levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1, scavenger receptor class B type I, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Importantly, sitosterol and stigmasterol reduced the messenger RNA levels of genes to a similar extent as cholesterol. The data support the hypothesis that unsaturated fatty acid and phytosterols can act as signaling molecules and alter the expression of genes involved in cholesterol transport and metabolism.

  14. Anti-HMGCR antibodies as a biomarker for immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies: A history of statins and experience from a large international multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Musset, Lucile; Allenbach, Yves; Benveniste, Olivier; Boyer, Olivier; Bossuyt, Xavier; Bentow, Chelsea; Phillips, Joe; Mammen, Andrew; Van Damme, Philip; Westhovens, René; Ghirardello, Anna; Doria, Andrea; Choi, May Y; Fritzler, Marvin J; Schmeling, Heinrike; Muro, Yoshinao; García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Ortiz-Villalvazo, Miguel A; Bizzaro, Nicola; Infantino, Maria; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Peng, Qinglin; Wang, Guochun; Vencovský, Jiří; Klein, Martin; Krystufkova, Olga; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Hue, Sophie; Belmondo, Thibaut; Danko, Katalin; Mahler, Michael

    2016-10-01

    In an effort to find naturally occurring substances that reduce cholesterol by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), statins were first discovered by Endo in 1972. With the widespread prescription and use of statins to decrease morbidity from myocardial infarction and stroke, it was noted that approximately 5% of all statin users experienced muscle pain and weakness during treatment. In a smaller proportion of patients, the myopathy progressed to severe morbidity marked by proximal weakness and severe muscle wasting. Remarkably, Mammen and colleagues were the first to discover that the molecular target of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), is an autoantibody target in patients that develop an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). These observations have been confirmed in a number of studies but, until today, a multi-center, international study of IMNM, related idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), other auto-inflammatory conditions and controls has not been published. Accordingly, an international, multi-center study investigated the utility of anti-HMGCR antibodies in the diagnosis of statin-associated IMNM in comparison to different forms of IIM and controls. This study included samples from patients with different forms of IIM (n=1250) and patients with other diseases (n=656) that were collected from twelve sites and tested for anti-HMGCR antibodies by ELISA. This study confirmed that anti-HMGCR autoantibodies, when found in conjunction with statin use, characterize a subset of IIM who are older and have necrosis on muscle biopsy. Taken together, the data to date indicates that testing for anti-HMGCR antibodies is important in the differential diagnosis of IIM and might be considered for future classification criteria.

  15. Response of the Cholesterol Metabolism to a Negative Energy Balance in Dairy Cows Depends on the Lactational Stage

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation. PMID:26034989

  16. Response of the cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance in dairy cows depends on the lactational stage.

    PubMed

    Gross, Josef J; Kessler, Evelyne C; Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation. PMID:26034989

  17. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  18. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  19. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called steroid 5-alpha reductase 2. This enzyme is involved ... external genitalia. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene prevent steroid 5-alpha reductase 2 from effectively converting testosterone ...

  1. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  2. Ribonucleotide Reductase-- a Radical Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Peter; Ehrenberg, Anders

    1983-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases catalyze the enzymatic formation of deoxyribonucleotides, an obligatory step in DNA synthesis. The native form of the enzyme from Escherichia coli or from mammalian sources contains as part of its polypeptide structure a free tyrosyl radical, stabilized by an iron center. The radical participates in all probability in the catalytic process during the substitution of the hydroxyl group at C-2 of ribose by a hydrogen atom. A second, inactive form of the E. coli reductase lacks the tyrosyl radical. Extracts from E. coli contain activities that interconvert the two forms. The tyrosyl radical is introduced in the presence of oxygen, while anaerobiosis favors its removal, suggesting a regulatory role in DNA synthesis for oxygen.

  3. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  4. Evidence that biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical.

    PubMed Central

    Shalloe, F; Elliott, G; Ennis, O; Mantle, T J

    1996-01-01

    A search of the database shows that human biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical. We have isolated flavin reductase from bovine erythrocytes and show that the activity co-elutes with biliverdin-IX beta reductase. Preparations of the enzyme that are electrophoretically homogeneous exhibit both flavin reductase and biliverdin-IX beta reductase activities; however, they are not capable of catalysing the reduction of biliverdin-IX alpha. Although there is little obvious sequence identity between biliverdin-IX alpha reductase (BVR-A) and biliverdin-IX beta reductase (BVR-B), they do show weak immunological cross-reactivity. Both enzymes bind to 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose. PMID:8687377

  5. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  6. Membrane remodeling, an early event in benzo[alpha]pyrene-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tekpli, Xavier; Rissel, Mary; Huc, Laurence; Catheline, Daniel; Sergent, Odile; Rioux, Vincent; Legrand, Philippe; Holme, Jorn A.; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Therese; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique

    2010-02-15

    Benzo[alpha]pyrene (B[alpha]P) often serves as a model for mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Our previous work suggested a role of membrane fluidity in B[alpha]P-induced apoptotic process. In this study, we report that B[alpha]P modifies the composition of cholesterol-rich microdomains (lipid rafts) in rat liver F258 epithelial cells. The cellular distribution of the ganglioside-GM1 was markedly changed following B[alpha]P exposure. B[alpha]P also modified fatty acid composition and decreased the cholesterol content of cholesterol-rich microdomains. B[alpha]P-induced depletion of cholesterol in lipid rafts was linked to a reduced expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase). Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and B[alpha]P-related H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation were involved in the reduced expression of HMG-CoA reductase and in the remodeling of membrane microdomains. The B[alpha]P-induced membrane remodeling resulted in an intracellular alkalinization observed during the early phase of apoptosis. In conclusion, B[alpha]P altered the composition of plasma membrane microstructures through AhR and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dependent-regulation of lipid biosynthesis. In F258 cells, the B[alpha]P-induced membrane remodeling was identified as an early apoptotic event leading to an intracellular alkalinization.

  7. Biologically active low density lipoprotein in human peripheral lymph.

    PubMed Central

    Reichl, D; Myant, N B; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1978-01-01

    We have compared the ability of human serum and peripheral lymph to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), to activate cholesteryl ester synthesis, and to compete with 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) for binding to LDL receptors in cultured human fibroblasts. Whole lymph was active in all three tests and the activity per unit volume in lymph was approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. All three biologic activities in lymph were confined to the d less than 1.063 g/ml fraction. Whole lymph had no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity in fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, whose cells lack LDL receptors. The LDL-like biologic activity per unit mass of immunologically active apoprotein B was approximately the same in lymph as in serum. The current data indicate that functionally active LDL is present in lymph and that the concentration of this lipoprotein is approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. PMID:201669

  8. Deciphering molecular mechanism underlying hypolipidemic activity of echinocystic Acid.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Lai, Peng; Du, Jun-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA) and oleanolic acid (OA) at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0) to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139  μ M, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT. PMID:24669228

  9. Inhibition of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase by L-659,699

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, M.D.; Yudkovitz, J.B.; Lo, C.Y.L.; Chen, J.S.; Alberts, A.W.; Hunt, V.M.; Chang, M.N.; Yang, S.S.; Thompson, K.L.; Chiang, Y.C.P.; Chabala, J.C.

    1987-11-01

    A ..beta..-lactone isolated from Fusarium sp. has been shown to be a potent specific inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase from rat liver. The structure of this ..beta..-lactone, termed L-659,699, is (E,E)-11-(3-hydroxymethyl)-4-oxo-2-oxytanyl)-3,5,7-trimethyl-2,4-undecadienenoic acid. A partially purified preparation of cytoplasmic HMG-CoA synthase from rat liver was inhibited by L-659,699 with an IC/sub 50/ of 0.12 ..mu..M. The enzymes HMG-CoA reductase, ..beta..-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase, an fatty acid synthase were not inhibited to any extent by this compound. In cultured Hep G2 cells, the compound inhibited the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)acetate into sterols with an IC/sub 50/ of 6 ..mu..M, while incorporation of (/sup 3/H)mevalonate into sterols in these cells was not affected. The activity of HMG-CoA reductase in the cultured Hep G2 cells was induced in a dose-dependent manner by incubation with L-659,699. A 37-fold increase in reductase was observed after a 24-hr incubation with 62 ..mu..M L-659,699. The effect of a number of analogs of L-659,699 on HMG-CoA synthase is also discussed.

  10. Crude Ethanol Extract of Pithecellobium ellipticum as a Potential Lipid-Lowering Treatment for Hypercholesterolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Janet P.-C.; Wijaya, Sumi; Ting, Kang-Nee; Wiart, Christophe; Mustafa, Kamarul'Ain; Shipton, Fiona; Khoo, Teng-Jin

    2014-01-01

    If left untreated, hypercholesterolaemia can lead to atherosclerosis, given time. Plants from the Fabaceae family have shown the ability to significantly suppress atherosclerosis progression. We selected four extracts from Pithecellobium ellipticum, from the Fabaceae family, to be screened in a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) assay. The ethanol extract, at a concentration of 500 μg/mL, exhibited superior inhibition properties over the other extracts by demonstrating 80.9% inhibition, while 0.223 μg/mL of pravastatin (control) showed 78.1% inhibition towards enzymatic activity. These findings led to the fractionation of the ethanol extract using ethyl acetate : methanol (95 : 5), gradually increasing polarity and produced seven fractions (1A to 7A). Fraction 7A at 150 μg/mL emerged as being the most promising bioactive fraction with 78.7% inhibition. FRAP, beta carotene, and DPPH assays supported the findings from the ethanol extract as it exhibited good overall antioxidant activity. The antioxidant properties have been said to reduce free radicals that are able to oxidize lipoproteins which are the cause of atherosclerosis. Phytochemical screenings revealed the presence of terpenoid, steroid, flavonoid, and phenolic compounds as the responsible group of compound(s), working individually or synergistically, within the extract to prevent binding of HMG-CoA to HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:24839451

  11. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  12. Biliverdin reductase isozymes in metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Luke; Hosick, Peter A; John, Kezia; Stec, David E; Hinds, Terry D

    2015-04-01

    The biliverdin reductase (BVR) isozymes BVRA and BVRB are cell surface membrane receptors with pleiotropic functions. This review compares, for the first time, the structural and functional differences between the isozymes. They reduce biliverdin, a byproduct of heme catabolism, to bilirubin, display kinase activity, and BVRA, but not BVRB, can act as a transcription factor. The binding motifs present in the BVR isozymes allow a wide range of interactions with components of metabolically important signaling pathways such as the insulin receptor kinase cascades, protein kinases (PKs), and inflammatory mediators. In addition, serum bilirubin levels have been negatively associated with abdominal obesity and hypertriglyceridemia. We discuss the roles of the BVR isozymes in metabolism and their potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:25726384

  13. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  14. Producing aglycons of ginsenosides in bakers' yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhubo; Wang, Beibei; Liu, Yi; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Xianan; Liu, Tao; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenosides are the primary bioactive components of ginseng, which is a popular medicinal plant that exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. Protopanaxadiol, protopanaxatriol and oleanolic acid are three basic aglycons of ginsenosides. Producing aglycons of ginsenosides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was realized in this work and provides an alternative route compared to traditional extraction methods. Synthetic pathways of these three aglycons were constructed in S. cerevisiae by introducing β-amyrin synthase, oleanolic acid synthase, dammarenediol-II synthase, protopanaxadiol synthase, protopanaxatriol synthase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from different plants. In addition, a truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, squalene synthase and 2,3-oxidosqualene synthase genes were overexpressed to increase the precursor supply for improving aglycon production. Strain GY-1 was obtained, which produced 17.2 mg/L protopanaxadiol, 15.9 mg/L protopanaxatriol and 21.4 mg/L oleanolic acid. The yeast strains engineered in this work can serve as the basis for creating an alternative way for producing ginsenosides in place of extractions from plant sources. PMID:24424342

  15. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, drastically depresses Ca2+ channel activity and uncouples excitation from contraction in cardiac cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, J F; Schmid, A; Romey, G; Nano, J L; Lazdunski, M

    1986-01-01

    Mevinolin (MK803), a potent inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) (Ki, 30 X 10(-9) M), depressed de novo synthesis of cholesterol in 11-day chicken embryonic cardiac cells cultured in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS). Cardiac cells exposed to different concentrations of mevinolin for 1-3 days presented different electrophysiological and mechanical properties: The resting membrane potential, the rate of increase, and the shape of the action potential and contractile properties were changed at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM mevinolin. At a concentration of 1 microM mevinolin, the cardiac cells became quiescent and electrical stimulation induced action potentials of short duration without contraction. Isoproterenol and Bay K8644 were unable to restore excitability and contraction. Although the number of receptors for the tritiated Ca2+ channel blocker nitrendipine was the same in control and in mevinolin-treated cells, voltage-clamp data on isolated cardiac cells and 45Ca2+ flux experiments on monolayers showed that most of the slow Ca2+ channel activity was lost in mevinolin-treated cells. These results suggest that the disappearance of Ca2+ channel activity is most probably at the origin of the loss of cardiac contractility. PMID:2429325

  16. Navigating the Shallows and Rapids of Cholesterol Synthesis Downstream of HMGCR.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Laura J; Howe, Vicky; Prabhu, Anika V; Luu, Winnie; Brown, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is vital for human life, but its levels must be tightly regulated. Too little cholesterol leads to developmental disorders, but too much is widely appreciated as contributing to heart disease. Levels are regulated through the coordinated control of cholesterol synthesis, uptake and efflux. Here, we focus on cholesterol synthesis. The cholesterol synthesis pathway involves more than twenty enzymes, but most research so far has focused on a very early enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), a well characterised control point. This is largely because HMGCR is the target of the successful cholesterol-lowering drugs, the statins. Our recent work has examined several other enzymes in the pathway and revealed complex regulatory mechanisms that also contribute to the control of cholesterol synthesis. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional regulation of the two terminal enzymes, 7- and 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7 and DHCR24), where we have found that a cooperative transcriptional program exists. We also discuss the post-translational regulation of another critical enzyme, squalene monooxygenase (SM), which has its protein levels controlled by cholesterol, and DHCR24, which has its activity affected by sterols and related compounds, as well as via phosphorylation/signalling. There is an unforeseen complexity in the regulation of cholesterol synthesis which requires further investigation.

  17. Interaction between Glucose and Lipid Metabolism: More than Diabetic Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucose and lipid metabolism are linked to each other in many ways. The most important clinical manifestation of this interaction is diabetic dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated triglycerides, low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and predominance of small-dense LDL particles. However, in the last decade we have learned that the interaction is much more complex. Hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-C cannot only be the consequence but also the cause of a disturbed glucose metabolism. Furthermore, it is now well established that statins are associated with a small but significant increase in the risk for new onset diabetes. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood but modulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA)-reductase may play a central role as genetic data indicate that mutations resulting in lower HMG CoA-reductase activity are also associated with obesity, higher glucose concentrations and diabetes. Very interestingly, this statin induced increased risk for new onset type 2 diabetes is not detectable in subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia seem to have a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, a phenomenon which seems to be dose-dependent (the higher the low density lipoprotein cholesterol, the lower the risk). Whether there is also an interaction between lipoprotein(a) and diabetes is still a matter of debate. PMID:26566492

  18. Bioinformatics approaches for structural and functional analysis of proteins in secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Sanchita; Singh, Swati; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-11-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is an affluent storehouse of large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides. These secondary metabolites are produced by withanolide biosynthetic pathway. Very less information is available on structural and functional aspects of enzymes involved in withanolides biosynthetic pathways of Withiana somnifera. We therefore performed a bioinformatics analysis to look at functional and structural properties of these important enzymes. The pathway enzymes taken for this study were 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, and cycloartenol synthase. The prediction of secondary structure was performed for basic structural information. Three-dimensional structures for these enzymes were predicted. The physico-chemical properties such as pI, AI, GRAVY and instability index were also studied. The current information will provide a platform to know the structural attributes responsible for the function of these protein until experimental structures become available.

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of ten genes associated with picrosides biosynthesis in Picrorhiza kurrooa.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harsharan; Gahlan, Parul; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-02-25

    Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth. is an economically important medicinal plant known to yield picrosides which have high medicinal value. Picroside I and picroside II are major picrosides associated with various bioactivities. The present work analyzed the expression of various genes of the picrosides biosynthesis pathway in different tissues of the plant in relation to the picrosides content. Eight full-length cDNA sequences namely, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (2.317 kb), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (1.767 kb), 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-d-erythritol kinase (1.674 kb), 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (1.701 kb), acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (1.545 kb), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (2.241 kb), isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase (987 bp) and geranyl diphosphate synthase (1.434 kb), were cloned to full-length followed by expression analysis of ten genes vis-à-vis picrosides content analysis. There is maximum accumulation of picrosides in leaf tissue followed by the rhizome and root, and a similar pattern of expression was found in all the ten genes. The genes responded to the modulators of the picrosides biosynthesis. Picrosides accumulation was enhanced by application of hydrogen peroxide and abscisic acid, whereas methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid treatment decreased the content.

  20. The effect of essential oils of dietary wormwood (Artemisia princeps), with and without added vitamin E, on oxidative stress and some genes involved in cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Ja; Kang, Ah-Young; Park, Sung-Ok; Park, Kuen-Woo; Jun, Hee-Jin; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2007-08-01

    Wormwood (Artemisia princeps) due to the abundance of antioxidant in its essential oils (EO), has been used as a traditional drug and health food in Korea. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of atherosclerosis thus antioxidative chemicals improves hepatic lipid metabolism partly by reducing oxysterol formation. The antioxidant activity was assessed using two methods, human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and the anti-DPPH free radical assays. It was found that the antioxidant activity of EO with vitamin E higher than EO alone. To study mechanisms accounting for the antiatherosclerotic properties of this wormwood EO, we examined the expression of key genes in cholesterol metabolism such as the LDL receptor, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and sterol regulatory element binding proteins. The induction was increased up to twofold at 0.05 mg/mL of EO treatment in HepG2 cells for 24h. When EO (0.2 mg/mL) was co-incubated with vitamin E, interestingly, the LDL receptor was dramatically induced by 5-6-folds. HMG-CoA reductase did not change. However, treatment with the higher concentration resulted in cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that wormwood EO with vitamin E may be anti-atherogenic due to their inhibition of LDL oxidation and upregulation of the LDL receptor.

  1. Pectin isolated from prickly pear (Opuntia SSP) modifies LDL metabolism in cholesterol-fed guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, M.L.; McNamara, D.J. )

    1990-02-26

    The effects of dietary pectin on plasma and hepatic cholesterol (CH) levels, plasma lipoprotein profiles, hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) binding to hepatic membranes were investigated by feeding 1% pectin to guinea pigs on a high CH diet. Animals were fed either chow + 0.25% CH (HC diet) or the CH diet + 1% prickly pear pectin (HC-P diet) for 25 days. Plasma CH levels were decreased 26% by the HC-P with 33% decreases in LDL and KDL. LDL peak density shifted from 1.040 to 1.055 g/ml with pectin. Hepatic total, free and esterified CH levels were reduced 60, 40 and 85% respectively by the HC-P diet. In contrast, HMG-CoA reductase activity was unaffected. {sup 125}I-LDL binding to hepatic membranes was increased by intake of the HC-P diet compared to the HC diet. The affinity of the apo B/E receptor for LDL was not affected by dietary pectin while the receptor number was increased 1.5-fold in animals on the HC-P diet. These data suggest that the parameters of HC metabolism affected by dietary pectin are consistent with an increased demand on the hepatic CH pools which possibly results from increased fecal excretion of bile acids.

  2. Management of dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia with a fixed-dose combination of sitagliptin and simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Helmut; Anderson, Matt S; Musliner, Thomas; Hanson, Mary E; Engel, Samuel S

    2013-01-01

    The risk of death due to heart disease and stroke is up to four times higher in individuals with diabetes compared to individuals without diabetes. Most guidelines that address treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes consider diabetes a cardiovascular disease (CVD) "risk equivalent" and recommend intensive treatment of dyslipidemia for the purpose of CVD prevention. Statins (3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase [HMG-CoA reductase] inhibitors) are first-line agents in achieving lipid goals as an adjunct to diet and exercise and should be used in most patients. In addition to lipid management and blood pressure control, glycemic control is a basic component in the management of diabetes. Glycemic control is achieved by combining diabetes self-management education, diet and exercise, and, where required, antihyperglycemic agents (OHAs). Persistence and adherence to therapy are critical in achieving recommended treatment goals. However, overall compliance with concomitantly prescribed OHAs and statins is low in patients with type 2 diabetes. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) therapies have been shown to improve adherence by reducing pill burden, the complexity of treatment regimen, and, potentially, cost. Based on the available evidence regarding the pharmacokinetics and the efficacy and safety profiles of each component drug, the sitagliptin/simvastatin FDC may provide a rational and well-tolerated approach to achieving better adherence to multiple-drug therapy and improved lipid lowering and glycemic control, with consequent reduction in cardiovascular risk, diabetic microvascular disease, and mortality in diabetic patients for whom treatment with both compounds is appropriate.

  3. 5 alpha-reductase deficiency without hypospadias.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, W K; Taylor, N F; Hughes, I A; Taylor, J; Ransley, P G; Grant, D B

    1990-01-01

    A boy aged 4 with penoscrotal hypospadias and his brother aged 12 with micropenis had typical changes of homozygous 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. After three injections of chorionic gonadotrophin there was a trivial rise in plasma dihydrotestosterone with a normal increase in plasma testosterone. Urine steroid chromatography showed abnormally high 5 beta: 5 alpha ratios and 5 alpha-reductase activity was appreciably reduced in genital skin fibroblasts. The results indicate that 5 alpha-reductase deficiency is not invariably associated with genital ambiguity. PMID:2248513

  4. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... reductase enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (also known as ... is responsible for the last step in the production of tetrahydrobiopterin. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several building blocks ...

  5. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  6. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  7. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  8. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  9. Lovastatin insensitive 1, a Novel pentatricopeptide repeat protein, is a potential regulatory factor of isoprenoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Tang, Jianwei; Nagata, Noriko; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Seki, Hikaru; Kiuchi, Reiko; Kaneko, Yasuko; Nakazawa, Miki; Matsui, Minami; Matsumoto, Shogo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2007-02-01

    Higher plants have two metabolic pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidal non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. Despite the compartmentalization of these two pathways, metabolic flow occurs between them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cross-talk. To identify such regulatory mechanisms, we isolated and characterized the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant lovastatin insensitive 1 (loi1), which is resistant to lovastatin and clomazone, inhibitors of the MVA and MEP pathways, respectively. The accumulation of the major products of these pathways, i.e. sterols and chlorophyll, was less affected by lovastatin and clomazone, respectively, in loi1 than in the wild type. Furthermore, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity analysis showed higher activity of HMGR in loi1-1 treated with lovastatin than that in the WT. We consider that the lovastatin-resistant phenotype of loi1-1 was derived from this post-transcriptional up-regulation of HMGR. The LOI1 gene encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein. PPR proteins are thought to regulate the expression of genes encoded in organelle genomes by post-transcriptional regulation in mitochondria or plastids. Our results demonstrate that LOI1 is predicted to localize in mitochondria and has the ability to bind single-stranded nucleic acids. Our investigation revealed that the post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial RNA may be involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis in both the MVA and MEP pathways.

  10. The molecular mechanism of the cholesterol-lowering effect of dill and kale: The influence of the food matrix components.

    PubMed

    Danesi, Francesca; Govoni, Marco; D'Antuono, Luigi Filippo; Bordoni, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    Foods are complex matrices containing many different compounds, all of which contribute to the overall effect of the food itself, although they have different mechanisms of action. While evaluating the effect of bioactive compounds, it is important to consider that the use of a single compound can hide the effects of the other molecules that can act synergistically or antagonistically in the same food. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of food matrix components by comparing two edible plants (dill and kale) with cholesterol-lowering potential and similar contents of their most representative bioactive, quercetin. The molecular effects of the extracts were evaluated in HepG2 cells by measuring the expression of sterol-regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) at the mRNA and protein level. The results reported here show that both extracts reduced the cellular cholesterol level with a similar trend and magnitude. It is conceivable that the slightly different results are due to the diverse composition of minor bioactive compounds, indicating that only by considering food as a whole is it possible to understand the complex relationship between food, nutrition, and health in a foodomics vision. PMID:27028988

  11. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update.

    PubMed

    Babcook, Melissa A; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords "statin and prostate cancer" within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case-control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  12. Elicitation of Diosgenin Production in Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seedlings by Methyl Jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Spandan; Chikara, Surendra K; Sharma, Mahesh C; Chaudhary, Abhinav; Alam Syed, Bakhtiyar; Chaudhary, Pooja S; Mehta, Aditya; Patel, Maulik; Ghosh, Arpita; Iriti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), an elicitor of plant defense mechanisms, on the biosynthesis of diosgenin, a steroidal saponin, were investigated in six fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) varieties (Gujarat Methi-2, Kasuri-1, Kasuri-2, Pusa Early Branching, Rajasthan Methi and Maharashtra Methi-5). Treatment with 0.01% MeJA increased diosgenin levels, in 12 days old seedlings, from 0.5%-0.9% to 1.1%-1.8%. In addition, MeJA upregulated the expression of two pivotal genes of the mevalonate pathway, the metabolic route leading to diosgenin: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG) and sterol-3-β-glucosyl transferase (STRL). In particular, MeJA increased the expression of HMG and STRL genes by 3.2- and 22.2-fold, respectively, in the Gujarat Methi-2 variety, and by 25.4- and 28.4-fold, respectively, in the Kasuri-2 variety. Therefore, MeJA may be considered a promising elicitor for diosgenin production by fenugreek plants. PMID:26694357

  13. AMPK in the small intestine in normal and pathophysiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Elodie; Grenier, Emilie; Bendjoudi Ouadda, Ali; El Chebly, Mounib; Ziv, Ehud; Beaulieu, Jean François; Sané, Alain; Spahis, Schohraya; Laville, Martine; Levy, Emile

    2014-03-01

    The role of AMPK in regulating energy storage and depletion remains unexplored in the intestine. This study will to define its status, composition, regulation and lipid function, as well as to examine the impact of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes on intestinal AMPK activation, insulin sensitivity, and lipid metabolism. Caco-2/15 cells and Psammomys obesus (P. obesus) animal models were experimented. We showed the predominance of AMPKα1 and the prevalence of α1/β2/γ1 heterotrimer in Caco-2/15 cells. The activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside and metformin resulted in increased phospho(p)-ACC. However, the down-regulation of p-AMPK by compound C and high glucose lowered p-ACC without affecting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Administration of metformin to P. obesus with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes led to 1) an up-regulation of intestinal AMPK signaling pathway typified by ascending p-AMPKα(-Thr172); 2) a reduction in ACC activity; 3) an elevation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1; 4) a trend of increase in insulin sensitivity portrayed by augmentation of p-Akt and phospho-glycogen synthetase kinase 3β; 5) a reduced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and ERK1/2; and 6) a decrease in diabetic dyslipidemia following lowering of intracellular events that govern lipoprotein assembly. These data suggest that AMPK fulfills key functions in metabolic processes in the small intestine.

  14. High Maternal Serum Estradiol Levels Induce Dyslipidemia in Human Newborns via a Hepatic HMGCR Estrogen Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ye; Lv, Ping-Ping; Ding, Guo-Lian; Yu, Tian-Tian; Liu, Ye; Shen, Yan; Hu, Xiao-Ling; Lin, Xian-Hua; Tian, Shen; Lv, Min; Song, Yang; Guo, Meng-Xi; Ke, Zhang-Hong; Xu, Hong; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Shi, Feng-Tao; Huang, He-Feng

    2015-01-01

    While the intrauterine environment is essential for the health of offspring, the impact of high maternal serum estradiol (E2) on lipid metabolism in offspring and the mechanisms are unknown. We found that ovarian stimulation (OS) could result in high E2 levels in women throughout pregnancy. Strikingly, their newborns showed elevated total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels that were positively related with E2 in newborns. In vitro, E2 dose-dependently stimulated TC and LDL-C secretion, and increased expression of the cholesterol synthesis rate-limiting enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) in HepG2 cells and mouse fetal hepatocytes. In vivo, high maternal E2 was detected and fetal livers also showed significantly higher HMGCR expression in an OS mouse model. Notably, an estrogen response element (ERE) was identified in the HMGCR promoter, indicating that high maternal serum E2 could up-regulate HMGCR expression in fetal hepatocytes via an ERE that in turn induces elevated levels of TC and LDL-C in offspring. Conclusion: OS can induce a high maternal E2 environment, which up-regulates HMGCR expression in fetal hepatocytes via an ERE in the promoter, and induces elevated levels of TC and LDL-C in newborns that may be related to increased risk of metabolic disease in adulthood. PMID:25961186

  15. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers. PMID:25069381

  16. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis.

    PubMed

    Healey, Gareth D; Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  17. Possible effects of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Alevtina; Koc, Emine Rabia; Sahin, Semsettin; Duzgun, Ulkuhan; Acar, Burcu; Ilhan, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The problem of noise has recently gained more attention as it has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, its influence has yet to be fully elucidated. Other than being an unpleasant stimulus, noise may cause health disorders through annoyance and stress, including oxidative stress. Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, may possess antioxidant properties. Based on rat models, our project investigates the effect of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage, and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were analyzed in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results indicated that superoxide dismutase values were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex, while malondialdehyde values in the brainstem and cerebellum were significantly increased in the group with only noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase values in the brainstem were significantly increased, but nitric oxide values in the cerebellum and brainstem and malondialdehyde values in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in the group where only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased superoxide dismutase values in the cerebral cortex and brainstem, but significantly reduced malondialdehyde values in the brain stem. Consequently, our data show that brain tissue was affected by oxidative stress due to continued exposure to noise. This noise-induced stress decreases with rosuvastatin therapy.

  18. Is rosuvastatin protective against on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat serum?

    PubMed

    Koc, Emine Rabia; Ersoy, Alevtina; Ilhan, Atilla; Erken, Haydar Ali; Sahın, Semsettin

    2015-01-01

    Noise, one of the main components of modern society, has become an important environmental problem. Noise is not only an irritating sound, but also a stress factor leading to serious health problems. In this study, we have investigated possible effects of rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, thought to have an antioxidant effect, on noise-induced oxidative stress in the serum of rat models. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. In order to ease their adaptation, 2 weeks before the experiment, the rats were divided into four groups (with eight rats per each group): Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant (Malondialdehyde, nitric oxide [NO], protein carbonyl [PC]) and antioxidant (superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione peroxidase [GSH-PX], catalase [CAT]) parameters were analyzed in the serum. Results indicated that SOD values were found to be significantly lower, while PC values in serum were remarkably higher in the group that was exposed to only noise. GSH-Px values in serum dramatically increased in the group on which only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased CAT values, whereas it resulted in reduced PC and NO values in serum. In conclusion, our data show that noise exposure leads to oxidative stress in rat serum; however, rosuvastatin therapy decreases the oxidative stress caused by noise exposure.

  19. Modulation of the Isoprenoid/Cholesterol Biosynthetic Pathway During Neuronal Differentiation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Segatto, Marco; Di Tunno, Ilenia; Leone, Stefano; Pfrieger, Frank W; Pallottini, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    During differentiation, neurons acquire their typical shape and functional properties. At present, it is unclear, whether this important developmental step involves metabolic changes. Here, we studied the contribution of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway to neuronal differentiation using the mouse neuroblastoma cell line N1E-115 as experimental model. Our results show that during differentiation, the activity of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), a key enzyme of MVA pathway, and the level of Low Density Lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) decrease, whereas the level of LDLr-related protein-1 (LRP1) and the dimerization of Scavanger Receptor B1 (SRB-1) rise. Pharmacologic inhibition of HMGR by simvastatin accelerated neuronal differentiation by modulating geranylated proteins. Collectively, our data suggest that during neuronal differentiation, the activity of the MVA pathway decreases and we postulate that any interference with this process impacts neuronal morphology and function. Therefore, the MVA pathway appears as an attractive pharmacological target to modulate neurological and metabolic symptoms of developmental neuropathologies. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2036-2044, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27392312

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Simvastatin via Inducing the Autophagy on Spinal Cord Injury in the Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Wang, Guannan; Wang, Yansong; Han, Donghe; Bi, Jing; Yuan, Yajiang; Yao, Tianchen; Wan, Zhanghui; Li, Haihong; Mei, Xifan

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, is invariably used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Simvastatin has been recently demonstrated to have a neuroprotective effect in nervous system diseases. The present study aimed to further verify the neuroprotection and molecular mechanism of simvastatin on rats after spinal cord injury (SCI). The expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-B was evidently enhanced at postoperation days 3 and 5, respectively. However, the reduction of the mTOR protein and ribosomal protein S6 kinase p70 subtype (p70S6K) phosphorylation level occurred at the same time after SCI. Simvastatin significantly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Meanwhile, immunofluorescence results indicated that the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and caspase-3 protein was obviously reduced by simvastatin. Furthermore, Nissl staining and Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores showed that the quantity and function of motor neurons were visibly preserved by simvastatin after SCI. The findings of this study showed that simvastatin induced autophagy by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway and contributed to neuroprotection after SCI. PMID:26539474

  1. Effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on blood lipid metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Yan, Jingna; Luo, Liyong; Zhang, Dongying

    2015-06-01

    Disorders of blood lipid metabolism are the primary risk factors for many diseases. Recently, the effect of Pu-erh tea on blood lipid metabolism has received increasing attention. However, the mechanism underlying its ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism is unclear. We set out to study this through assessing the effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on the central enzymes of blood lipid metabolism, including lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and pancreatic lipase (PL). We find that the Lp-PLA2, HMRG and PL activities are inhibited by PTAE in a dose-dependent manner and that the LCAT activity tends to increase with increasing PTAE concentrations. Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses reveal that PTAE acts as a competitive inhibitor for HMGR and PL and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for Lp-PLA2. Moreover, we determine that its active ingredients include catechins, gallic acid, caffeine, free amino acids, and soluble sugar. However, the effect of each ingredient and whether any of them have synergistic effects are still unknown. The results suggest that Pu-erh tea has a potent ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism and knowledge of the mechanisms provides insights into its potential therapeutic application as an alternative hypolipidemic drug.

  2. Relative efficacy of antilipemic agents in non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction.

    PubMed

    Santee, Jennifer; Lindsey, Cameron; Pace, Heather

    2012-08-01

    The investigators sought to summarize the percentage reduction in non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) achieved with various antilipemic regimens and to determine whether certain antilipemic regimens have been proven more effective in lowering non-HDL-C. A search of MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Iowa Drug Information Service Database from 1970 to May 2011 was performed. Criteria were used to exclude studies not published in English, studies with methodology limitations, and studies with variables that may affect efficacy beyond the antilipemic agent administered. Only randomized, controlled trials comparing medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration were reviewed to determine whether significant differences in percentage reduction in non-HDL-C had been observed between different medication regimens. A total of 51 trials reported data that could be used to determine the range of percentage reduction in non-HDL-C achieved by select antilipemic regimens. Of these 51 trials, 38 provided head-to-head comparisons of antilipemic regimens. Rosuvastatin and atorvastatin are the most potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) in lowering non-HDL-C. Adding ezetimibe, fibric acid derivatives, and omega-3 fatty acids to antilipemic monotherapy may result in further reduction in non-HDL-C. Subjects with certain characteristics (eg, nonwhite) were not prevalent in these studies. PMID:22551562

  3. Clinical overview of Omacor: a concentrated formulation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold

    2006-08-21

    Omacor (omega-3-acid ethyl esters; Reliant Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Liberty Corner, NJ) is a highly purified, prescription omega-3 fatty acid formulation with high concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (465 mg) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (375 mg) in each 1-g capsule, along with 4 mg (6 IU) of vitamin E. At a typical dose of 4 capsules/day, Omacor significantly lowers plasma triglyceride levels either as monotherapy or in combination with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) or fibrates. Omacor also modestly increases plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and has favorable effects on lipoprotein particle size and subclass distribution. Omacor is well tolerated, with few side effects other than mild gastrointestinal symptoms. Hyperglycemia, abnormal bleeding, elevations in muscle or liver enzymes, and/or abnormalities in kidney or nerve function have not been reported. Through its intensive purification process, Omacor has minimal "fishy" smell and taste, and it has not been reported to cause hypervitaminosis or illness due to exposure to environmental toxins. Omacor provides a safe, effective, well-tolerated approach to management of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:16919519

  4. Utilization of digital differential display to identify differentially expressed genes related to rumen development.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haga, Satoshi; So, KyoungHa; Yamauchi, Eri; Nakano, Miwa; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Choi, Kichoon; Katoh, Kazuo; Roh, Sang-Gun

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes associated with the development of the rumen epithelium by screening for candidate genes by digital differential display (DDD) in silico. Using DDD in NCBI's UniGene database, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene expression profiles were analyzed in rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum and other tissues in cattle. One hundred and ten candidate genes with high expression in the rumen were derived from a library of all tissues. The expression levels of 11 genes in all candidate genes were analyzed in the rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum of nine Japanese Black male calves (5-week-old pre-weaning: n = 3; 15-week-old weaned calves: n = 6). Among the 11 genes, only 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1-like (AKR1C1), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) showed significant changes in the levels of gene expression in the rumen between the pre- and post-weaning of calves. These results indicate that DDD analysis in silico can be useful for screening candidate genes related to rumen development, and that the changes in expression levels of three genes in the rumen may have been caused by weaning, aging or both.

  5. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Islam, Barira; Sharma, Charu; Adem, Abdu; Aburawi, Elhadi; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)). We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure-function relationship studies. PMID:26357462

  6. The Effects of Chunghyul-Dan (A Korean Medicine Herbal Complex) on Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Sang; Kwon, Seungwon; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Park, Seong-Uk; Moon, Sang-Kwan; Park, Jung-Mi; Ko, Chang-Nam; Cho, Ki-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Chunghyul-dan (CHD) is a herbal complex containing 80% ethanol extract and is composed of Scutellariae Radix, Coptidis Rhizoma, Phellodendri Cortex, Gardeniae Fructus, and Rhei Rhizoma. We have published several experimental and clinical research articles on CHD. It has shown antilipidemic, antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic, and inhibitory effects on ischemic stroke recurrence with clinical safety in the previous studies. The antilipidemic effect of CHD results from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and pancreatic lipase-inhibitory activity. The antihypertensive effect likely results from the inhibitory effect on endogenous catecholamine(s) release and harmonization of all components showing the antihypertensive effects. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on endothelial cells are implicated to dictate the antiatherosclerotic effects of CHD. It also showed neuroprotective effects on cerebrovascular and parkinsonian models. These effects of CHD could be helpful for the prevention of the recurrence of ischemic stroke. Therefore, we suggest that CHD could be a promising medication for treating and preventing cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, to validate and better understand these findings, well-designed clinical studies are required. PMID:27340412

  7. Effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on blood lipid metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Yan, Jingna; Luo, Liyong; Zhang, Dongying

    2015-06-01

    Disorders of blood lipid metabolism are the primary risk factors for many diseases. Recently, the effect of Pu-erh tea on blood lipid metabolism has received increasing attention. However, the mechanism underlying its ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism is unclear. We set out to study this through assessing the effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on the central enzymes of blood lipid metabolism, including lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and pancreatic lipase (PL). We find that the Lp-PLA2, HMRG and PL activities are inhibited by PTAE in a dose-dependent manner and that the LCAT activity tends to increase with increasing PTAE concentrations. Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses reveal that PTAE acts as a competitive inhibitor for HMGR and PL and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for Lp-PLA2. Moreover, we determine that its active ingredients include catechins, gallic acid, caffeine, free amino acids, and soluble sugar. However, the effect of each ingredient and whether any of them have synergistic effects are still unknown. The results suggest that Pu-erh tea has a potent ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism and knowledge of the mechanisms provides insights into its potential therapeutic application as an alternative hypolipidemic drug. PMID:26018873

  8. The protein quality control system manages plant defence compound synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; González-Guzmán, Miguel; De Geyter, Nathan; Lippens, Saskia; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Marhavý, Peter; Kremer, Anna; Morreel, Kris; Guérin, Christopher J; Tava, Aldo; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Thevelein, Johan M; Campos, Narciso; Goormachtig, Sofie; Goossens, Alain

    2013-12-01

    Jasmonates are ubiquitous oxylipin-derived phytohormones that are essential in the regulation of many development, growth and defence processes. Across the plant kingdom, jasmonates act as elicitors of the production of bioactive secondary metabolites that serve in defence against attackers. Knowledge of the conserved jasmonate perception and early signalling machineries is increasing, but the downstream mechanisms that regulate defence metabolism remain largely unknown. Here we show that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, jasmonate recruits the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) quality control system to manage the production of triterpene saponins, widespread bioactive compounds that share a biogenic origin with sterols. An ERAD-type RING membrane-anchor E3 ubiquitin ligase is co-expressed with saponin synthesis enzymes to control the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the supply of the ubiquitous terpene precursor isopentenyl diphosphate. Thus, unrestrained bioactive saponin accumulation is prevented and plant development and integrity secured. This control apparatus is equivalent to the ERAD system that regulates sterol synthesis in yeasts and mammals but that uses distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases, of the HMGR degradation 1 (HRD1) type, to direct destruction of HMGR. Hence, the general principles for the management of sterol and triterpene saponin biosynthesis are conserved across eukaryotes but can be controlled by divergent regulatory cues.

  9. Sagunja-Tang Improves Lipid Related Disease in a Postmenopausal Rat Model and HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Go, Hiroe; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Lee, Hye Won; Park, In Sil; Kil, Ki-Jung; Park, Sunmin; Kim, Dong il; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Sagunja-tang on the lipid related disease in a rat model of menopausal hyperlipidemia and lipid accumulation in methyl-β-cyclodextrin-induced HepG2 cells. In in vivo study using menopausal hyperlipidemia rats, Sagunja-tang reduced retroperitoneal and perirenal fat, serum lipids, atherogenic index, cardiac risk factor, media thickness, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis score, when compared to menopausal hyperlipidemia control rats. In HepG2 cells, Sagunja-tang significantly decreased the lipid accumulation, total cholesterol levels, and low-density/very-low-density lipoprotein levels. Moreover, Sagunja-tang reversed the methyl-β-cyclodextrin-induced decrease in the protein levels of critical molecule involved in cholesterol synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, and low-density lipoprotein receptor and inhibited protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase as well as activity. Phosphorylation level of AMP-activated protein kinase was stimulated by Sagunja-tang. These results suggest that Sagunja-tang has effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation through regulation of cholesterol synthesis and AMPK activity in vitro. These observations support the idea that Sagunja-tang is bioavailable both in vivo and in vitro and could be developed as a preventive and therapeutic agent of hyperlipidemia in postmenopausal females. PMID:25977697

  10. The Regulatory Domain of Squalene Monooxygenase Contains a Re-entrant Loop and Senses Cholesterol via a Conformational Change.

    PubMed

    Howe, Vicky; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Stevenson, Julian; Brown, Andrew J

    2015-11-13

    Squalene monooxygenase (SM) is an important control point in cholesterol synthesis beyond 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Although it is known to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum, its topology has not been determined. We have elucidated the membrane topology of the sterol-responsive domain of SM comprising the first 100 amino acids fused to GFP (SM N100-GFP) by determining the accessibility of 16 introduced cysteines to the cysteine-reactive, membrane-impermeable reagent PEG-maleimide. We have identified a region integrally associated with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane that is likely to interact with cholesterol or respond to cholesterol-induced membrane effects. By comparing cysteine accessibility with and without cholesterol treatment, we further present evidence to suggest that cholesterol induces a conformational change in SM N100-GFP. This change is likely to lead to its targeted degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system because degradation is blunted by treatment with the chemical chaperone glycerol, which retains SM N100-GFP in its native conformation. Furthermore, degradation can be disrupted by insertion of two N-terminal myc tags, implicating the N terminus in this process. Together, this information provides new molecular insights into the regulation of this critical control point in cholesterol synthesis.

  11. Evaluation of two novel biochemicals on plasma and egg yolk lipid composition and laying hen performance.

    PubMed

    Elkin, R G; Freed, M; Watkins, B A; Srebnik, M; Kieft, K A; Newton, R S

    1993-03-01

    PD132301-2, an inhibitor of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol O-acyltransferase (ACAT; EC 2.3.1.26), and 1-stearylboronic acid (SBA), a fatty acid analogue, were orally administered to White Leghorn hens in separate experiments to evaluate their effects on layer performance and plasma and egg yolk lipids. Five 60-wk-old hens each were fed either a corn-soybean meal basal layer ration, or the basal diet supplemented with .0121, .0363, or .1089% PD132301-2. In a second experiment, 12 37-wk-old hens each were fed either a basal layer ration, or the basal diet supplemented with .20 or .40% SBA. The duration of the experiments were 21 and 16 days, respectively. Neither compound significantly affected hen-day production, egg weight, yolk weight, BW gain, feed consumption, feed efficiency, plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, or egg yolk cholesterol content. PD132301-2 had no effect on yolk fatty acid profiles, and C22:6n3 was the only fatty acid altered by SBA. Although 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors have been successful in reducing egg cholesterol, ACAT inhibitors and fatty acid analogues apparently hold little promise in this regard. The results of the present work also support the concept that, in order to pharmacologically alter the cholesterol content of eggs, direct inhibition of key enzymes in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is necessary. PMID:8464792

  12. Mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate stimulates basal steroidogenesis by a cAMP-independent mechanism in mouse gonadal cells of both sexes.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, David; Leffler, Per; Ekwurtzel, Emelie; Martinsson, Gunilla; Liu, Kui; Selstam, Gunnar

    2008-05-01

    Phthalates are widely used as plasticizers in a number of daily-life products. In this study, we investigated the influence of mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), the active metabolite of the frequently used plasticizer di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), on gonadal steroidogenesis in vitro. MEHP (25-100 microM) stimulated basal steroid synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner in immortalized mouse Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1). The stimulatory effect was also detected in KK-1 granulosa tumor cells. MEHP exposure did not influence cAMP or StAR protein levels and induced a gene expression profile of key steroidogenic proteins different from the one induced by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Simultaneous treatment with MEHP and a p450scc inhibitor (aminoglutethimide) indicated that MEHP exerts its main stimulatory effect prior to pregnenolone formation. MEHP (10-100 microM) up-regulated hormone-sensitive lipase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, suggesting that MEHP increases the amount of cholesterol available for steroidogenesis. Our data suggest that MEHP, besides its known inhibitory effect on hCG action, can directly stimulate gonadal steroidogenesis in both sexes through a cAMP- and StAR-independent mechanism. The anti-steroidogenic effect of DEHP has been proposed to cause developmental disorders such as hypospadias and cryptorchidism, whereas a stimulation of steroid synthesis may prematurely initiate the onset of puberty and theoretically affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  13. Evidence for Chewing Insect-Specific Molecular Events Distinct from a General Wound Response in Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Korth, K. L.; Dixon, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The timing of transcript accumulation of several wound-induced genes is different in insect-damaged and mechanically damaged leaves. Transcripts for the proteinase inhibitor II and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase genes accumulate more rapidly in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leaves chewed on by caterpillars than in leaves damaged mechanically. The timing of maximum transcript accumulation was not affected by the degree of damage inflicted by the insect larvae. When applied to a mechanical wound site, regurgitant isolated from Manduca sexta larvae causes transcript accumulation profiles to shift to parallel those in insect-damaged tissue. Whether obtained from larvae fed either potato leaves or a nonplant diet, insect regurgitant fed through the petiole of detached leaves also induces accumulation of these transcripts. The transcript accumulation-inducing activity of regurgitant is enhanced by heating at 100[deg]C. Our data suggest that a heat-stable, insect-derived elicitor functions to induce the rapid accumulation of transcripts that may be involved in plant defense against herbivores. Distinct signal transduction pathways that can distinguish between insect damage and abiotic damage might therefore exist in plants. PMID:12223872

  14. Antitumor effects of the combination of cholesterol reducing drugs.

    PubMed

    Issat, Tadeusz; Nowis, Dominika; Bil, Jacek; Winiarska, Magdalena; Jakobisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub

    2011-07-01

    There are a number of potential mechanisms linking cholesterol homeostasis to processes that are tightly linked with carcinogenesis. Statins, which are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonic acid synthesis pathway, exert cytostatic and cytotoxic effects towards tumor cells. It seems that the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of statins result from blocking protein prenylation, leading to inhibition of isoprenoid compound synthesis. Another compound which affects cholesterol metabolism is the plant alkaloid berberine. The aim of this study was to investigate potential antitumor effects of lovastatin combined with berberine. Combined with berberine, lovastatin appeared to exert potentiated cytostatic and/or cytotoxic effects against human MDA-MB231 breast cancer and murine Panc 02 pancreatic cancer cells. The obtained results indicated that the effect of berberine is not dependent on blocking protein prenylation in cells, and the toxic effect of lovastatin combined with berberine is reversed by addition of the substrates of this pathway to the level brought out by lovastatin alone. Lovastatin-berberine combination caused cell cycle inhibition in G1 phase after 48 h of incubation with drugs. In a Panc 02 pancreatic cancer model in mice, lovastatin-berberine combination slightly, but significantly, slowed down tumor growth. Taking into account the number of patients treated with the investigated drugs one may suppose that the described interactions may be of clinical value.

  15. Effect of mevalonic acid on cholesterol synthesis in bovine intramuscular and subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomu; You, Wei; Cheng, Haijian; Zhang, Qingfeng; Song, Enliang; Wan, Fachun; Han, Hong; Liu, Guifen

    2016-02-01

    Mevalonic acid (MVA) is a key material in the synthesis of cholesterol; indeed, intracellular cholesterol synthesis is also called the mevalonic acid pathway. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is an essential enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. This study suggests that MVA may play an important role in the differentiation of bovine adipose tissue in vivo. We investigated differential mRNA expression in bovine intramuscular preadipocytes (BIPs) and bovine subcutaneous preadipocytes (BSPs) by culturing cells from the longissimus dorsi muscle and subcutaneous fat tissues of Luxi yellow cattle. The morphology of lipid accumulation of bovine preadipocytes was detected by Oil Red O staining, and total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) levels were measured. Temporospatial expression of HMGR was investigated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The TC, LDLC, and HDLC content did not significantly differ over time but increased slowly with increasing MVA concentration. HMGR expression increased over time and with increasing concentrations of MVA. MVA increased adipose cell proliferation in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. MVA stimulated HMGR expression in two cell types and its influence on adipocyte differentiation.

  16. Enhancement of ganoderic acid production by constitutively expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; He, Yi-Long; Zhang, De-Huai; Yue, Tong-Hui; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Li, Na; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-06-10

    The Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was expressed in Ganoderma lucidum to enhance antitumor ganoderic acid (GA) production. The effects of VHb expression on the accumulation of GAs and lanosterol (intermediate) and the transcription of GA biosynthesis genes were also investigated. In VHb-expressing G. lucidum, the maximum concentrations of four individual GAs (GA-S, GA-T, GA-Mk and GA-Me) were 19.1±1.8, 34.6±2.1, 191.5±13.1 and 45.2±2.8μg/100mg dry weight, respectively, which were 1.4-, 2.2, 1.9- and 2.0-fold higher than those obtained in the wild-type strain. Moreover, the maximum lanosterol concentration in the strain expressing VHb was 1.28-fold lower than that in the wild-type strain. The transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase genes were up-regulated by 1.6-, 1.5-, and 1.6-fold, respectively, in the strain expressing VHb. This work is beneficial in developing an efficient fermentation process for the hyperproduction of GAs. PMID:27080449

  17. Photocontrol of Elicitor Activity of PIP-1 to Investigate Temporal Factors Involved in Phytoalexin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghyun; Miyashita, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2015-07-01

    The peptide elicitor PIP-1 can induce various immune responses in tobacco cells. Previously, we showed that types of responses induced by PIP-1 are different depending on its stimulation periods; short-term stimulation induces weak responses, whereas long-term stimulation leads to strong responses including production of the phytoalexin capsidiol. However, key components that directly regulate the initiation of capsidiol biosynthesis in response to continuous stimulation with PIP-1 remain unclear. In this study, we designed a photocleavable PIP-1 analog containing 3-amino-3-(2-nitrophenyl)propionic acid as a photocleavable residue. The activity of the analog can be "switched off" using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation without undesired side effects. This analog induced a significant level of capsidiol production unless UV-irradiated, whereas no capsidiol production was observed when tobacco cells were UV-irradiated 1 h after treatment. Using this analog, we found that the elicitor-inducible 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity is regulated based on the duration of the stimulation with PIP-1, which could be associated with the initiation of capsidiol biosynthesis. PMID:26047371

  18. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  19. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Barira; Sharma, Charu; Adem, Abdu; Aburawi, Elhadi; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+). We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure–function relationship studies. PMID:26357462

  20. Effect of coenzyme q10 on myopathic symptoms in patients treated with statins.

    PubMed

    Caso, Giuseppe; Kelly, Patricia; McNurlan, Margaret A; Lawson, William E

    2007-05-15

    Treatment of hypercholesterolemia with statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) is effective in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, statin use is often associated with a variety of muscle-related symptoms or myopathies. Myopathy may be related in part to statin inhibition of the endogenous synthesis of coenzyme Q10, an essential cofactor for mitochondrial energy production. The aim of this study is to determine whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation would reduce the degree of muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Patients with myopathic symptoms were randomly assigned in a double-blinded protocol to treatment with coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/day, n = 18) or vitamin E (400 IU/day, n = 14) for 30 days. Muscle pain and pain interference with daily activities were assessed before and after treatment. After a 30-day intervention, pain severity decreased by 40% (p <0.001) and pain interference with daily activities decreased by 38% (p <0.02) in the group treated with coenzyme Q10. In contrast, no changes in pain severity (+9%, p = NS) or pain interference with daily activities (-11%, p = NS) was observed in the group treated with vitamin E. In conclusion, results suggest that coenzyme Q10 supplementation may decrease muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Thus, coenzyme Q10 supplementation may offer an alternative to stopping treatment with these vital drugs.

  1. Anti-aging Effect and Gene Expression Profiling of Aged Rats Treated with G. bimaculatus Extract

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Kun-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Extract from Gryllus bimaculatus crickets inhibits oxidation at the DNA level, with reduced production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Microarray analyses were performed with a rat 28K cDNA clone set array to identify the gene expression profiles of aged (10 months old) Wistar Kyoto rats treated for one month with 100 mg/kg G. bimaculatus ethanol extract to assess the effects. The extract produced a meaningful anti-edema effect, evident by the inhibition of creatinine phosphokinase activity. The weights of abdominal and ovarian adipose tissues were reduced and the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissues was increased in an extract dose-dependent manner. Compared with untreated control rats, rats treated with the extract displayed the upregulation of 1053 genes including Fas (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 6), Amigo3 (adhesion molecule with an immunoglobulin-like domain), Reticulon 4, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme (Hmgcr; a reductase), related anti-fatigue (enzyme metabolism), and Rtn antioxidant, and the downregulation of 73 genes including Ugt2b (UDP glycosyltransferase 2 family), Early growth response 1, and Glycoprotein m6a. Data suggest that G. bimaculatus extract may have value in lessening the effects of aging, resulting in a differential gene expression pattern indicative of a marked stress response and lower expression of metabolic and biosynthetic genes. PMID:26191384

  2. Pharmacy benefits management in the Veterans Health Administration: 1995 to 2003.

    PubMed

    Sales, Mariscelle M; Cunningham, Francesca E; Glassman, Peter A; Valentino, Michael A; Good, Chester B

    2005-02-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Pharmacy Benefits Management Strategic Healthcare Group (VA PBM) oversees the formulary for the entire VA system, which serves more than 4 million veterans and provides more than 108 million prescriptions per year. Since its establishment in 1995, the VA PBM has managed pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical-related policies, including drug safety and efficacy evaluations, pharmacologic management algorithms, and criteria for drug use. These evidence-based practices promote, optimize, and assist VA providers with the safe and appropriate use of pharmaceuticals while allowing for formulary decisions that can result in substantial cost savings. The VA PBM also has utilized various contracting techniques to standardize generic agents as well as specific drugs and drug classes (eg, antihistamines, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, alpha-blockers, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors [statins]). These methods have enabled the VA to save approximately dollar 1.5 billion since 1996 even as drug expenditures continued to rise from roughly dollar 1 billion in fiscal year (FY) 1996 to more than dollar 3 billion in FY 2003. Furthermore, the VA PBM has established an outcomes research section to undertake quality-improvement and safety initiatives that ultimately monitor and determine the clinical impact of formulary decisions on the VA system nationwide. The experiences of this pharmacy benefits program, including clinical and contracting processes/procedures and their impact on the VA healthcare system, are described.

  3. Effects of saturated and unsaturated fats given with and without dietary cholesterol on hepatic cholesterol synthesis and hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bochenek, W; Rodgers, J B

    1978-01-27

    Hepatic cholesterol synthesis was studied in rats after consuming diets of varying neutral lipid and cholesterol content. Cholesterol synthesis was evaluated by measuring 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and by determining the rate of 3H-labeled sterol production from [3H]mevalonate. Results were correlated with sterol balance data and hepatic lipid content. Hepatic cholesterol synthesis was relatively great when cholesterol was excluded from the diet. The source of neutral dietary lipids, saturated vs. unsaturated, produced no change in hepatic sterol synthesis. Values for fecal sterol outputs and hepatic cholesterol levels were also similar in rats consuming either saturated or unsaturated fats. When 1% cholesterol was added to the diet, hepatic cholesterol synthesis was suppressed but the degree of suppression was greater in rats consuming unsaturated vs. saturated fats. This was associated with greater accumulation of cholesterol in livers from rats consuming unsaturates and a reduction in fecal neutral sterol output in this group as opposed to results from rats on saturated fats. Cholesterol consumption also altered the fatty acid composition of hepatic phospholipids producing decreases in the percentages of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. It is concluded that dietary cholesterol alters cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in the liver and that this effect is enhanced by dietary unsaturated fats.

  4. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Islam, Barira; Sharma, Charu; Adem, Abdu; Aburawi, Elhadi; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)). We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure-function relationship studies.

  5. Beneficial effects of curcumin on hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance in high-fat-fed hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun-Mi; Choi, Myung-Sook; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Myung-Joo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Jeon, Seon-Min; Shin, Su-Kyung; Seong, Chi-Nam; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of curcumin (0.05-g/100-g diet) supplementation on a high-fat diet (10% coconut oil, 0.2% cholesterol, wt/wt) fed to hamsters, one of the rodent species that are most closely related to humans in lipid metabolism. Curcumin significantly lowered the levels of free fatty acid, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, whereas it elevated the levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and paraoxonase activity in plasma, compared with the control group. The levels of hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride were also lower in the curcumin group than in the control group. In the liver, fatty acid beta-oxidation activity was significantly higher in the curcumin group than in the control group, whereas fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase activities were significantly lower. Curcumin significantly lowered the lipid peroxide levels in the erythrocyte and liver compared with the control group. These results indicate that curcumin exhibits an obvious hypolipidemic effect by increasing plasma paraoxonase activity, ratios of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to total cholesterol and of apo A-I to apo B, and hepatic fatty acid oxidation activity with simultaneous inhibition of hepatic fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis in high-fat-fed hamsters.

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Simvastatin via Inducing the Autophagy on Spinal Cord Injury in the Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kai; Wang, Guannan; Wang, Yansong; Han, Donghe; Bi, Jing; Yuan, Yajiang; Yao, Tianchen; Wan, Zhanghui; Li, Haihong; Mei, Xifan

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, is invariably used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Simvastatin has been recently demonstrated to have a neuroprotective effect in nervous system diseases. The present study aimed to further verify the neuroprotection and molecular mechanism of simvastatin on rats after spinal cord injury (SCI). The expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-B was evidently enhanced at postoperation days 3 and 5, respectively. However, the reduction of the mTOR protein and ribosomal protein S6 kinase p70 subtype (p70S6K) phosphorylation level occurred at the same time after SCI. Simvastatin significantly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Meanwhile, immunofluorescence results indicated that the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and caspase-3 protein was obviously reduced by simvastatin. Furthermore, Nissl staining and Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores showed that the quantity and function of motor neurons were visibly preserved by simvastatin after SCI. The findings of this study showed that simvastatin induced autophagy by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway and contributed to neuroprotection after SCI. PMID:26539474

  7. Simvastatin Results in a Dose-Dependent Toxic Effect on Spiral Ganglion Neurons in an In Vitro Organotypic Culture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Leitmeyer, Katharina; Glutz, Andrea; Setz, Cristian; Wieland, Leonie; Egloff, Sulamith; Bodmer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Statins are inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, an enzyme necessary for the production of mevalonate. They are widely used as cholesterol-lowering drugs. However, conflicting data about the effect of statins on neuronal cells has been published. To explore the effect of simvastatin on spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), SG explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of simvastatin. In addition, SG explants were treated with mevalonate and with the combination of simvastatin and mevalonate. SGN number, length of the neurites, area of nonneuronal supporting cells, and neuronal survival were analyzed. Simvastatin treatment results in a significant dose-dependent decrease of SG neurite number, length of neurites, area of supporting cells, and SG neuronal survival compared to control. Interestingly, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin increased SG neuronal survival compared to simvastatin treatment only. However, treatment with mevalonate in addition to simvastatin did not influence SG neurite number, length of neurites, and area of supporting cells compared to simvastatin treatment only. Our results suggest a neurotoxic effect of simvastatin on SGNs in vitro. Neurotoxicity seems to be at least partially mediated by the mevalonate pathway. Therefore, caution is warranted to use simvastatin as a potential otoprotective drug. PMID:27051663

  8. Simvastatin inhibits protein isoprenylation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Stephen M; Johnson, Kachael; Siefert, Matthew; Shank, Sam; Sironi, Luigi; Wolozin, Benjamin; Landreth, Gary E; Ziady, Assem G

    2016-08-01

    Evidence suggests that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Statin action in patients with AD, as in those with heart disease, is likely to be at least partly independent of the effects of statins on cholesterol. Statins can alter cellular signaling and protein trafficking through inhibition of isoprenylation of Rho, Cdc42, and Rab family GTPases. The effects of statins on protein isoprenylation in vivo, particularly in the central nervous system, are poorly studied. We utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis approaches to directly monitor the levels of isoprenylated and non-isoprenylated forms of Rho and Rab family GTPases. We report that simvastatin significantly inhibits RhoA and Rab4, and Rab6 isoprenylation at doses as low as 50nM in vitro. We also provide the first in vivo evidence that statins inhibit the isoprenylation of RhoA in the brains of rats and RhoA, Cdc42, and H-Ras in the brains of mice treated with clinically relevant doses of simvastatin.

  9. 27-Hydroxycholesterol contributes to disruptive effects on learning and memory by modulating cholesterol metabolism in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D-D; Yu, H-L; Ma, W-W; Liu, Q-R; Han, J; Wang, H; Xiao, R

    2015-08-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is important for neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS). The oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) is a cholesterol metabolite that crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and may be a useful substitutive marker for neurodegenerative diseases. However, the effects of 27-OHC on learning and memory and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. To determine this mechanism, we investigated learning and memory and cholesterol metabolism in rat brain following the injection of various doses of 27-OHC into the caudal vein. We found that 27-OHC increased cholesterol levels and upregulated the expression of liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter protein family member A1 (ABCA1). In addition, 27-OHC decreased the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CR) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in rat brain tissues. These findings suggest that 27-OHC may negatively modulate cognitive effects and cholesterol metabolism in the brain.

  10. Herbicidal effects of statin pharmaceuticals in Lemna gibba.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Reitsma, Tamara S; Lissemore, Linda I; Bestari, Ketut; Sibley, Paul K; Solomon, Keith R

    2006-08-15

    Statin pharmaceuticals, heavily prescribed in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR). In plants, these compounds also inhibit HMGR, which regulates cytosolic isoprenoid biosynthesis in the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Phytotoxicity was evaluated in the higher aquatic plant Lemna gibba exposed to atorvastatin and lovastatin for 7-days by measuring the concentrations of sterols and ubiquinone; products downstream in the MVA pathway. The efficiency of the parallel and unaffected methylerythritol phosphate pathway (MEP) was also evaluated by measuring the end product, plastoquinone. Statin treatment caused an accumulation of plastoquinone, and unexpectedly, ubiquinone, an artifact likely due to metabolite sharing from the plastidial MEP pathway. Statins were, however, highly phytotoxic to L. gibba and HPLC-UV analysis of plant extracts showed significantly decreased concentrations of both stigmasterol and beta-sitosterol, which are critical components of plant membranes and regulate morphogenesis and development. EC10 values for atorvastatin and lovastatin were as small as 26.1 and 32.8 microg/L, respectively. However, hazard quotients indicated that statins present little risk to the model higher aquatic plant Lemna gibba at environmentally relevant concentrations, even though pathway-specific endpoints were 2-3 times more sensitive than traditional gross morphological endpoints typically used in risk assessment. PMID:16955916

  11. Cross-talk between the cytosolic mevalonate and the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways in tobacco bright yellow-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Hoeffler, Jean-François; Meyer, Odile; Tritsch, Denis; Kagan, Isabelle A; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2003-07-18

    In plants, two pathways are utilized for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, the universal precursor for isoprenoid biosynthesis. The key enzyme of the cytoplasmic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway is 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR). Treatment of Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cells by the HMGR-specific inhibitor mevinolin led to growth reduction and induction of apparent HMGR activity, in parallel to an increase in protein representing two HMGR isozymes. Maximum induction was observed at 24 h. 1-Deoxy-d-xylulose (DX), the dephosphorylated first precursor of the plastidial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, complemented growth inhibition by mevinolin in the low millimolar concentration range. Furthermore, DX partially re-established feedback repression of mevinolin-induced HMGR activity. Incorporation studies with [1,1,1,4-2H4]DX showed that sterols, normally derived from MVA, in the presence of mevinolin are synthesized via the MEP pathway. Fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the second enzyme of the MEP pathway, was utilized to study the reverse complementation. Growth inhibition by fosmidomycin of TBY-2 cells could be partially overcome by MVA. Chemical complementation was further substantiated by incorporation of [2-13C]MVA into plastoquinone, representative of plastidial isoprenoids. Best rates of incorporation of exogenous stably labeled precursors were observed in the presence of both inhibitors, thereby avoiding internal isotope dilution.

  12. A novel bisphosphonate inhibitor of squalene synthase combined with a statin or a nitrogenous bisphosphonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wasko, Brian M; Smits, Jacqueline P; Shull, Larry W; Wiemer, David F; Hohl, Raymond J

    2011-11-01

    Statins and nitrogenous bisphosphonates (NBP) inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A reductase (HMGCR) and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS), respectively, leading to depletion of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) and disruption of protein prenylation. Squalene synthase (SQS) utilizes FPP in the first committed step from the mevalonate pathway toward cholesterol biosynthesis. Herein, we have identified novel bisphosphonates as potent and specific inhibitors of SQS, including the tetrasodium salt of 9-biphenyl-4,8-dimethyl-nona-3,7-dienyl-1,1-bisphosphonic acid (compound 5). Compound 5 reduced cholesterol biosynthesis and lead to a substantial intracellular accumulation of FPP without reducing cell viability in HepG2 cells. At high concentrations, lovastatin and zoledronate impaired protein prenylation and decreased cell viability, which limits their potential use for cholesterol depletion. When combined with lovastatin, compound 5 prevented lovastatin-induced FPP depletion and impairment of protein farnesylation. Compound 5 in combination with the NBP zoledronate completely prevented zoledronate-induced impairment of both protein farnesylation and geranylgeranylation. Cotreatment of cells with compound 5 and either lovastatin or zoledronate was able to significantly prevent the reduction of cell viability caused by lovastatin or zoledronate alone. The combination of an SQS inhibitor with an HMGCR or FDPS inhibitor provides a rational approach for reducing cholesterol synthesis while preventing nonsterol isoprenoid depletion.

  13. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    PubMed

    Lampi, Marsha C; Faber, Courtney J; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  14. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Lampi, Marsha C.; Faber, Courtney J.; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening. PMID:26761203

  15. Pravastatin transport across the hepatocyte canalicular membrane requires both ATP and a transmembrane pH gradient.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Y; Okuyama, Y; Miya, H; Matsusita, H; Kitano, M; Kamisako, T; Yamamoto, T

    1996-06-01

    Hepatic excretion of non-bile acid organic anions is reported to be ATP-dependent and a defect of this transport has been reported in congenitally jaundiced rats, animal models of human Dubin-Johnson syndrome. To investigate the effect of the transmembrane pH gradient on hepatocyte canalicular membrane transport of ATP-dependent organic anions, uptake of pravastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase-inhibiting organic anion, by hepatocyte canalicular membrane vesicles was observed in the presence or absence of transmembrane pH gradients. Uptake was assessed by a rapid filtration technique. ATP-dependent pravastatin uptake was stimulated in the presence of a transmembrane pH gradient (in > out) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Uptake was dependent on both pravastatin and ATP concentrations and showed saturation kinetics. After intravenous injection of [14C]-pravastatin (0.3 mumol), 81% of the dose was excreted in the bile within 35 min in SD rats, whereas only 20% was excreted in the bile in Eisai hyperbilirubinuria rats. ATP and the pH gradient also co-stimulated the uptake of pravastatin in Eisai hyperbilirubinuria rats, although the K(m) was much higher and Vmax was much lower than corresponding values in SD rats. This coincided well with the marked reduction in vivo biliary excretion of pravastatin in jaundiced rats.

  16. Drug-induced myopathies. An overview of the possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Owczarek, Jacek; Jasińska, Magdalena; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria

    2005-01-01

    Myopathy is usually a non-fatal muscle disease involving skeletal muscle weakness, tenderness and pain with the possibility of the plasma creatinine kinase elevation. There are many different types of myopathies, some of which are genetic, inflammatory, or related to endocrine dysfunction. Also, numerous drugs have been reported to possess myotoxic effect. Myopathy is included among the potential side-effects and toxicities associated with the lipid lowering agents, particularly 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors. However, the precise mechanism of statin-induced muscle toxicity remains unclear. The muscle-related side-effects reported with lipid-lowering drugs are significant but quite rare (0.1%), when used in monotherapy; while the incidence of steroid-induced myopathy has varied from 7 to 60%% and chronic alcoholic myopathy seems to be common complication of alcoholism affecting approximately 50% of patients, respectively. This review focuses on the differential pathophysiological grounds of these muscular injuries induced by statins, fibrates, as well as some other agents: corticosteroids or alcohol. A wide spectrum of possible mechanisms and hypotheses including muscle enzyme defects, changes in mitochondrial function and intracellular metabolism, the influence on the cell membrane stability and drug interactions involving P-glycoprotein or cytochrome P 450 system have been presented.

  17. Midgut tissue of male pine engraver , Ips pini, synthesizes monoterpenoid pheromone component ipsdienol de novo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gregory M.; Tittiger, Claus; Andrews, Gracie L.; Mastick, Grant S.; Kuenzli, Marilyn; Luo, Xin; Seybold, Steven J.; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2002-02-01

    For over three decades the site and pathways of bark beetle aggregation pheromone production have remained elusive. Studies on pheromone production in Ips spp. bark beetles have recently shown de novo biosynthesis of pheromone components via the mevalonate pathway. The gene encoding a key regulated enzyme in this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase ( HMG-R), showed high transcript levels in the anterior midgut of male pine engravers, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera:Scolytidae). HMG-R expression in the midgut was sex, juvenile hormone, and feeding dependent, providing strong evidence that this is the site of acyclic monoterpenoid (ipsdienol) pheromone production in male beetles. Additionally, isolated midgut tissue from fed or juvenile hormone III (JH III)-treated males converted radiolabeled acetate to ipsdienol, as assayed by radio-HPLC. These data support the de novo production of this frass-associated aggregation pheromone component by the mevalonate pathway. The induction of a metazoan HMG-R in this process does not support the postulated role of microorganisms in ipsdienol production.

  18. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on cholesterol gallstone formation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Min; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Na-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Soon; Zhang, Dan; Yi, Hee; Cho, Hee-Jung; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin-Suk; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the preventive effect of ω-3 fatty acids against cholesterol gallstone (CG) formation. CG formation was induced in C57BL/6J mice using a lithogenic diet (LD). The mice were divided into four treatment groups: i) LD, ii) LD plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), iii) LD plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and iv) LD plus EPA plus DHA. Subsequent to feeding the mice the LD for four weeks, EPA and/or DHA (70 mg/kg/day) were orally administered for eight weeks. The mice in the EPA treatment groups exhibited significantly less gallstone formation than those in the LD group. By contrast, DHA treatment only slightly suppressed gallstone formation. The expression of mucin 2, 5AC, 5B and 6 was significantly decreased in the gallbladders of mice in the EPA groups (70-90%) and the LD plus DHA group (30-50%), compared with that in the mice in the LD group. In addition, the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased in the livers of mice in the EPA treatment group compared with that in the livers of mice in the LD group. In conclusion, EPA was found to have a dominant anti-lithogenic effect in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:25333303

  19. Association of HMGCR polymorphism with late-onset Alzheimer's disease in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Zhan-Jie; Kong, Ling-Li; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) acts as a potential genetic modifier for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous reports identified that HMGCR rs3846662 polymorphism is associated with biosynthesis of cholesterol in AD pathology. In order to assess the involvement of the HMGCR polymorphism in the risk of late-onset AD (LOAD) in northern Han Chinese, we performed a case–control study of 2334 unrelated subjects (984 cases and 1350 age- and gender-matched controls) to evaluate the genotype and allele distributions of the HMGCR rs3846662 with LOAD. The genotype distribution (GG, AG, AA) of rs3846662 was significantly different between LOAD patients and controls (P = 0.003), but the allele distribution did not reach a significant difference (P = 0.614). After adjusting for age, gender and the APOE ε4 status, the minor A allele of rs3846662 was validated as a protective factor for LOAD in dominant model (OR = 0.796, P = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.657–0.965). Interestingly, we observed rs3846662 polymorphism was only significantly associated with LOAD in APOE ε4 non-carriers (OR = 0.735, P = 0.005, 95% CI = [0.593, 0.912]). In conclusion, our study demonstrates A allele of HMGCR rs3846662 acts as a protective factor for LOAD in northern Han Chinese. PMID:27009838

  20. Hypolipidemic activity of okra is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of cholesterol degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Chen, Gu; Ren, Dandan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the hypolipidemic activity of okra; therefore, we investigated the hypolipidemic activity of okra and its interaction with gene expression of several key components involved in lipid homeostasis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups and fed with hyperlipidemic diet or two hyperlipidemic diets supplemented with 1% or 2% okra powder for eight weeks. Results demonstrated that okra dose-dependently decreased serum and hepatic total cholesterol and triglyceride, and enhanced fecal excretion of bile acids. Gene expression analysis revealed that okra upregulated cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression, downregulated expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), with no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1A). It was suggested that hypolipidemic activity of okra was mediated most likely by upregulation of cholesterol degradation through CYP7A1 and by inhibition of lipogenesis through SREBP1c and FAS. Okra raw and fractionated polysaccharide showed strong bile acid binding capacity in vitro, which may contribute to the hypolipidemic activity observed. In conclusion, okra has potential application in the management of hyperlipidemia and its associated metabolic disorders.

  1. A novel therapeutic effect of statins on nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Procino, Giuseppe; Wang, David Q-H; Svelto, Maria; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Statins competitively inhibit hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, resulting in reduced plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Recently, it has been shown that statins exert additional ‘pleiotropic’ effects by increasing expression levels of the membrane water channels aquaporin 2 (AQP2). AQP2 is localized mainly in the kidney and plays a critical role in determining cellular water content. This additional effect is independent of cholesterol homoeostasis, and depends on depletion of mevalonate-derived intermediates of sterol synthetic pathways, i.e. farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. By up-regulating the expression levels of AQP2, statins increase water reabsorption by the kidney, thus opening up a new avenue in treating patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a hereditary disease that yet lacks high-powered and limited side effects therapy. Aspects related to water balance determined by AQP2 in the kidney, as well as standard and novel therapeutic strategies of NDI are discussed. PMID:25594563

  2. Protective effects of Houttuynia cordata aqueous extract in mice consuming a high saturated fat diet.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-cheng; Hsu, Pei-chun; Yin, Mei-chin

    2013-02-01

    The protective effects of Houttuynia cordata aqueous extract (HCAE) in mice consuming a high saturated fat diet (HFD) were examined. HCAE, at 0.5, 1, or 2%, was supplied in drinking water for 8 weeks. HCAE was rich in phenolic acids and flavonoids. HCAE intake at 1 and 2% decreased body weight, epididymal fat, insulin resistance, triglyceride and total cholesterol contents in plasma and liver from HFD-treated mice (p < 0.05). HFD enhanced hepatic activity of malic enzyme, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase; and augmented the hepatic level of saturated fatty acids (p < 0.05). HCAE intake at 2% reduced malic enzyme and FAS activities, and lowered saturated fatty acids content in liver (p < 0.05). HCAE suppressed HFD induced oxidative and inflammatory stress in the heart and liver via reducing the malondialdehyde level, retaining glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activity, decreasing tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 production (p < 0.05). These results support that Houttuynia cordata is a potent food against HFD induced obesity, and oxidative and inflammatory injury. PMID:23165792

  3. High-fat diet-induced obesity stimulates ketone body utilization in osteoclasts of the mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Shinya; Imai, Masahiko; Takahashi, Noriko; Fukui, Tetsuya

    2016-04-29

    Previous studies have shown that high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity increases the acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS) gene expression in lipogenic tissue. To investigate the effect of obesity on the AACS gene in other tissues, we examined the alteration of AACS mRNA levels in HFD-fed mice. In situ hybridization revealed that AACS was observed in several regions of the embryo, including the backbone region (especially in the somite), and in the epiphysis of the adult femur. AACS mRNA expression in the adult femur was higher in HFD-fed mice than in normal-diet fed mice, but this increase was not observed in high sucrose diet (HSD)-induced obese mice. In addition, HFD-specific increases were observed in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and interleukin (IL)-6 genes. Moreover, we detected higher AACS mRNA expression in the differentiated osteoclast cells (RAW 264), and found that AACS mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated by IL-6 treatment only in osteoclasts. These results indicate the novel function of the ketone body in bone metabolism. Because the abnormal activation of osteoclasts by IL-6 induces bone resorption, our data suggest that AACS and ketone bodies are important factors in the relationship between obesity and osteoporosis.

  4. Empagliflozin, via Switching Metabolism Toward Lipid Utilization, Moderately Increases LDL Cholesterol Levels Through Reduced LDL Catabolism.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Mayoux, Eric; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Costard, Clément; Mark, Michael; Sulpice, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    In clinical trials, a small increase in LDL cholesterol has been reported with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. The mechanisms by which the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin increases LDL cholesterol levels were investigated in hamsters with diet-induced dyslipidemia. Compared with vehicle, empagliflozin 30 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks significantly reduced fasting blood glucose by 18%, with significant increase in fasting plasma LDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, and total ketone bodies by 25, 49, and 116%, respectively. In fasting conditions, glycogen hepatic levels were further reduced by 84% with empagliflozin, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and total cholesterol hepatic levels were 31 and 10% higher, respectively (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). A significant 20% reduction in hepatic LDL receptor protein expression was also observed with empagliflozin. Importantly, none of these parameters were changed by empagliflozin in fed conditions. Empagliflozin significantly reduced the catabolism of (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-labeled LDL injected intravenously by 20%, indicating that empagliflozin raises LDL levels through reduced catabolism. Unexpectedly, empagliflozin also reduced intestinal cholesterol absorption in vivo, which led to a significant increase in LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). These data suggest that empagliflozin, by switching energy metabolism from carbohydrate to lipid utilization, moderately increases ketone production and LDL cholesterol levels. Interestingly, empagliflozin also reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, which in turn promotes LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion. PMID:27207551

  5. Statins activate GATA-6 and induce differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Hiromichi Abe, Mitsuru; Ono, Koh; Morimoto, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Takaya, Tomohide; Satoh, Noriko; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kita, Toru; Shimatsu, Akira; Hasegawa, Koji

    2008-10-03

    The beneficial effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) beyond cholesterol lowering involve their direct actions on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the effects of statins on phenotypic modulation of VSMCs are unknown. We herein show that simvastatin (Sm) and atorvastatin (At) inhibited DNA synthesis in human aortic VSMCs dose-dependently, while cell toxicity was not observed below the concentration of 1 {mu}M of Sm or 100 nM of At. Stimulating proliferative VSMCs with Sm or At induced the expression of SM-{alpha}-actin and SM-MHC, highly specific markers of differentiated phenotype. Sm up-regulated the binding activity of GATA-6 to SM-MHC GATA site and activated the transfected SM-MHC promoter in proliferative VSMCs, while mutating the GATA-6 binding site abolished this activation. Geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (10 {mu}M), an inhibitor of Rho family proteins, abolished the statin-mediated induction of the differentiated phenotype in VSMCs. These findings suggest that statins activate GATA-6 and induce differentiated VSMCs.

  6. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G.; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  7. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25507473

  8. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25423750

  9. Statins enhance cognitive performance in object location test in albino Swiss mice: involvement of beta-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; França, Lucas Moreira; Alcantara-Junior, José; Nogueira, Lucas Caixeta; de Brito, Thiago Marques; Lopes, Lousã; Junior, Fernando Mesquita; Vanzeler, Maria Luzinete; Bertoldo, Daniela Bohn; Dias, Paula Gomes; Colla, André R S; Hoeller, Alexandre; Duzzioni, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; de Lima, Thereza C M; Tasca, Carla Inês; Viola, Giordano Gubert

    2015-05-01

    Statins are inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, thereby inhibiting cell synthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids. Moreover, several studies have been evaluating pleiotropic effects of statins, mainly because they present neuroprotective effects in various pathological conditions. However, knowledge about behavioral effects of statins per se is relatively scarce. Considering these facts, we aimed to analyze behavioral responses of atorvastatin or simvastatin-treated mice in the open field test, elevated plus maze and object location test. Atorvastatin treatment for 7 consecutive days at 1 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg (v.o.) or simvastatin 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg enhanced cognitive performance in object location test when compared to control group (saline-treated mice). Simvastatin effects on mice performance in the object location test was abolished by post-training infusion of the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. Atorvastatin and simvastatin did not change the behavioral response in open field and elevated plus-maze (EPM) tests in any of the used doses. These data demonstrate the positive effects of both statins in cognitive processes in mice, without any alteration in locomotor parameters in the open field test or anxiolytic-like behavior in EPM. In conclusion, we demonstrate that atorvastatin and simvastatin per se improve the cognitive performance in a rodent model of spatial memory and this effect is related to beta-adrenergic receptors modulation.

  10. Trans, trans-farnesol as a mevalonate-derived inducer of murine 3T3-F442A pre-adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Torabi, Sheida

    2015-01-01

    Based on our finding that depletion of mevalonate-derived metabolites inhibits adipocyte differentiation, we hypothesize that trans, trans-farnesol (farnesol), a mevalonate-derived sesquiterpene, induces adipocyte differentiation. Farnesol dose-dependently (25–75 μmol/L) increased intracellular triglyceride content of murine 3T3-F442A pre-adipocytes measured by AdipoRed™ Assay and Oil Red-O staining. Concomitantly, farnesol dose-dependently increased glucose uptake and glucose transport protein 4 (GLUT4) expression without affecting cell viability. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot showed that farnesol increased the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a key regulator of adipocyte differentiation, and the mRNA levels of PPARγ-regulated fatty acid-binding protein 4 and adiponectin; in contrast, farnesol downregulated Pref-1 gene, a marker of pre-adipocytes. GW9662 (10 µmol/L), an antagonist of PPARγ, reversed the effects of farnesol on cellular lipid content, suggesting that PPARγ signaling pathway may mediate the farnesol effect. Farnesol (25–75 μmol/L) did not affect the mRNA level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway. Farnesol may be the mevalonate-derived inducer of adipocyte differentiation and potentially an insulin sensitizer via activation of PPARγ and upregulation of glucose uptake. PMID:26660152

  11. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses. PMID:27677551

  12. Identification of transformation products of rosuvastatin in water during ZnO photocatalytic degradation through the use of associated LC-QTOF-MS to computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Segalin, Jéferson; Sirtori, Carla; Jank, Louíse; Lima, Martha F S; Livotto, Paolo R; Machado, Tiele C; Lansarin, Marla A; Pizzolato, Tânia M

    2015-12-15

    Rosuvastatin (RST), a synthetic statin, is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, with a number of pleiotropic properties, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidation and cardiac remodelling attenuation. According to IMS Health, rosuvastatin was the third best-selling drug in the United States in 2012. RST was recently found in European effluent samples at a detection frequency of 36%. In this study, we evaluate the identification process of major transformation products (TPs) of RST generated during the heterogeneous photocatalysis process with ZnO. The degradation of the parent molecule and the identification of the main TPs were studied in demineralised water. The TPs were monitored and identified by liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS/MS). Ten TPs were tentatively identified and some of them originated from the hydroxylation suffered by the aromatic ring during the initial stages of the process. Structural elucidation of some of the most abundant or persistent TPs was evaluated by computational analysis, which demonstrated that this approach can be used as a tool to help the elucidation of structures of unknown molecules. The analysis of the parameters obtained from ab initio calculations for different isomers showed the most stable structures and, consequently, the most likely to be found.

  13. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  14. Suppressed Production of Methyl Farnesoid Hormones Yields Developmental Defects and Lethality in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Davy; Jones, Grace; Teal, Peter; Hammac, Courey; Messmer, Lexa; Osborne, Kara; Belgacem, Yasser Hadj; Martin, Jean-Rene

    2010-01-01

    A long-unresolved question in the developmental biology of Drosophila melanogaster has been whether methyl farnesoid hormones secreted by the ring gland are necessary for larval maturation and metamorphosis. In the present study, we have used RNAi techniques to inhibit 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reductase (HMGCR) expression selectively in the corpora allatal cells that produce the circulating farnesoid hormones. The developing larvae manifest a number of developmental, metabolic and morphogenetic derangements. These defects included the exhibition of an “ultraspiracle” death phenotype at the 1st to 2nd larval molt, similar to that exhibited by animals that are null for the farnesoid receptor ultraspiracle. The few larvae surviving past a second lethal period at the 2nd to 3rd instar larval molt, again with “ultraspiracle” phenotype, often became developmentally arrested after either attaining a misformed puparium or after formation of the white pupa. Survival past the “ultraspiracle” lethal phenotype could be rescued by dietary provision of an endogenous dedicated precursor to the three naturally secreted methyl farnesoid hormones. In addition to these developmental and morphogenetic defects, most larvae that survived to the late second instar exhibited a posterior-originating melanization of the tracheal system. These results support the hypothesis that larval methyl farnesoid hormones are necessary for larval survival and morphogenetic transformation through the larval and pupal metamorphic processes. PMID:19595690

  15. Copper induces the expression of cholesterogenic genes in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Per Arne; Englund, Mikael C O; Markström, Emilia; Ohlsson, Bertil G; Jernås, Margareta; Billig, Håkan; Torgerson, Jarl S; Wiklund, Olov; Carlsson, Lena M S; Carlsson, Björn

    2003-07-01

    Accumulation of lipids and cholesterol by macrophages and subsequent transformation into foam cells are key features in development of atherosclerosis. Serum copper concentrations have been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism behind the proatherogenic effect of copper is not clear. We used DNA microarrays to define the changes in gene expression profile in response to copper exposure of human macrophages. Expression monitoring by DNA microarray revealed 91 genes that were regulated. Copper increased the expression of seven cholesterogenic genes (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) synthase, IPP isomerase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, methyl sterol oxidase, H105e3 mRNA and sterol-C5-desaturase) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), and decreased the expression of CD36 and lipid binding proteins. The expression of LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase was also investigated using real time PCR. The expression of both of these genes was increased after copper treatment of macrophages (P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively). We conclude that copper activates cholesterogenic genes in macrophages, which may provide a mechanism for the association between copper and atherosclerosis. The effect of copper on cholesterogenic genes may also have implications for liver steatosis in early stages of Wilson's disease.

  16. Potato steroidal glycoalkaloid levels and the expression of key isoprenoid metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Krits, Pinchas; Fogelman, Edna; Ginzberg, Idit

    2007-12-01

    The potato steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) are toxic secondary metabolites, and their total content in tubers should not exceed 20 mg/100 g fresh weight. The two major SGA in cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) are alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine. SGA biosynthetic genes and the genetic factors that control their expression have not yet been determined. In the present study, potato genotypes exhibiting different levels of SGA content showed an association between high SGA levels in their leaves and tubers and high expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 (hmg1) and squalene synthase 1 (pss1), genes of the mevalonic/isoprenoid pathway. Transcripts of other key enzymes of branches of the isoprenoid pathway, vetispiradiene/sesquiterpene synthase (pvs1) and sterol C24-methyltransferase type1 (smt1), were undetectable or exhibited stable expression regardless of SGA content, respectively, suggesting facilitated precursor flow to the SGA biosynthetic branch. The transcript ratio of solanidine glucosyltransferase (sgt2) to solanidine galactosyltransferase (sgt1) was correlated to the documented chaconine-to-solanine ratio in the tested genotypes. Significantly higher expression of hmg1, pss1, smt1, sgt1 and sgt2 was monitored in the tuber phelloderm than in the parenchyma of the tuber's flesh, targeting the former as the main SGA-producing tissue in the tuber, in agreement with the known high SGA content in the layers directly under the tuber skin.

  17. Dyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2010-06-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated with the majority of de novo cholesterol synthesis occurring in the liver and intestine. 3 Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a major enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, is raised in both liver and intestine in diabetic animals. Niemann PickC1-like1 protein regulates cholesterol absorption in the intestine and facilitates cholesterol transport through the liver. There is evidence to suggest that the effect of inhibition of Niemann PickC1-like1 lowers cholesterol through its effect not only in the intestine but also in the liver. ATP binding cassette proteins G5/G8 regulate cholesterol re-excretion in the intestine and in the liver, cholesterol excretion into the bile. Diabetes is associated with reduced ATP binding cassette protein G5/G8 expression in both the liver and intestine in animal models. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is central to the formation of the chylomicron in the intestine and VLDL in the liver. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein mRNA is increased in diabetes in both the intestine and liver. Cross-talk between the intestine and liver is poorly documented in humans due to the difficulty in obtaining liver biopsies but animal studies are fairly consistent in showing relationships that explain in part mechanisms involved in cholesterol homeostasis.

  18. A pharmacological approach to test the diffusible signal activity of reactive oxygen intermediates in elicitor-treated tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Costet, Laurent; Dorey, Stephan; Fritig, Bernard; Kauffmann, Serge

    2002-01-01

    The capacity of H(2)O(2), the most stable of the reactive oxygen species (ROI), to diffuse freely across biological membranes and to signal gene expression suggests that H(2)O(2) could function as a short-lived second messenger diffusing from cell to cell. We tested this hypothesis in tobacco plants treated with a glycoprotein elicitor. Applied at 50 nM, it induces H(2)O(2) accumulation and the hypersensitive response restricted to the infiltrated zone 1 tissue. Stimulation of a set of defense responses also occurs in the surrounding zone 2 tissue without diffusion of the elicitor. ROI levels in zone 1 were modulated using N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) as a ROI scavenger and Rose Bengal (RB) as a ROI generator. We found that ROI appeared to act as signalling intermediates in pathways leading to salicylic acid accumulation, to PR1, PR5 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylCoA reductase expression in glycoprotein-treated zone 1 tissues. Compared to the treatment with the elicitor alone, co-infiltration of the glycoprotein and NAC increased the surface of zone 2 showing PR1 and O-methyltransferase expression. Application of RB had the opposite effect. The data suggest that, in our system, ROI did not act as a cell-to-cell diffusible signal to activate PR protein and O-methyltransferase expression in zone 2.

  19. Hypolipidemic effects of HVC1 in a high cholesterol diet-induced rat model of hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chae-Yun; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Cheon, Se-Yun; Lee, Kyungjin; Ham, Inhye; Choi, Ho-Young; Cho, Yong Baik; Cho, Byoung-Heon; Mok, So Youn; An, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    HVC1, a novel formation containing four herbs, was developed and its hypolipidemic effects in rats with high cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced hyperlipidemia were investigated. The rats were given a HCD for 8 weeks. The HVC1-treated groups were orally administered HVC1 at doses of 10, 50 or 250 mg/kg, respectively, and the simvastatin group was treated at a dose of 10 mg/kg. The normal diet and HCD control groups were administered with physiological saline. Oral administration of HVC1 (10, 50 or 250 mg/kg) significantly reduced the body weight of rats with hyperlipidemia and regulated the total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the serum. In addition, tissue analysis revealed that lipid accumulation in the liver and aorta was reduced by HVC1 administration. Furthermore, HVC1 significantly reduced the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor, as well as the protein level of 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the liver. The results clearly demonstrate that HVC1 has a potent hypolipidemic effect, and suggest that HVC1 should be evaluated as a potential treatment for hyperlipidemia. PMID:27510839

  20. Mulberry water extracts possess an anti-obesity effect and ability to inhibit hepatic lipogenesis and promote lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Huei; Liu, Li-Kaung; Chuang, Chao-Ming; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Huang, Chieng-Ning; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2011-03-23

    Obesity plays a critical role in dyslipidemia and related disorders. Mulberry water extracts (MWEs) contain polyphenols, including gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, rutin, and anthocyanins. In this study, using 6-week-old male hamsters, we investigated the anti-obese effect of MWEs. After 12 weeks of treatment, MWEs lowered high-fat diet (HFD)-induced body weight and visceral fat, accompanied with hypolipidemic effects by reducing serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, free fatty acid, and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio (n=8 for each group). MWEs decreased hepatic lipids, thus protected livers from impairment. The hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 were elevated, while fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase were reduced by MWEs, indicating that MWEs regulated lipogenesis and lipolysis, which exerted the anti-obese and hypolipidemic effects. Noticeably, MWEs showed both efficacy and safety in vivo. In concluson, MWEs can be used to reduce body weight, serum, and liver lipids.

  1. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for ¹⁹F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences.

  2. Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Regulates Renal Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aboudehen, Karam; Kim, Min Soo; Mitsche, Matthew; Garland, Kristina; Anderson, Norma; Noureddine, Lama; Pontoglio, Marco; Patel, Vishal; Xie, Yang; DeBose-Boyd, Russell; Igarashi, Peter

    2016-08-01

    HNF-1β is a tissue-specific transcription factor that is expressed in the kidney and other epithelial organs. Humans with mutations in HNF-1β develop kidney cysts, and HNF-1β regulates the transcription of several cystic disease genes. However, the complete spectrum of HNF-1β-regulated genes and pathways is not known. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation/next generation sequencing and gene expression profiling, we identified 1545 protein-coding genes that are directly regulated by HNF-1β in murine kidney epithelial cells. Pathway analysis predicted that HNF-1β regulates cholesterol metabolism. Expression of dominant negative mutant HNF-1β or kidney-specific inactivation of HNF-1β decreased the expression of genes that are essential for cholesterol synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding factor 2 (Srebf2) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr). HNF-1β mutant cells also expressed lower levels of cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates and had a lower rate of cholesterol synthesis than control cells. Additionally, depletion of cholesterol in the culture medium mitigated the inhibitory effects of mutant HNF-1β on the proteins encoded by Srebf2 and Hmgcr, and HNF-1β directly controlled the renal epithelial expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9, a key regulator of cholesterol uptake. These findings reveal a novel role of HNF-1β in a transcriptional network that regulates intrarenal cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26712526

  3. Chronic psychosocial stress in male mice causes an up-regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein in the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Reber, Stefan O

    2013-07-01

    Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) show an exaggerated adrenal corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (elevated platform (EPF), 5 min) despite no difference from EPF-exposed single-housed control (SHC) mice in corticotropin (ACTH) secretion. In the present study, we asked the question whether this CSC-induced increase in adrenal capability to produce and secrete corticosterone is paralleled by an enhanced adrenal availability and/or mobilization capacity of the corticosterone precursor molecule cholesterol. Employing oil-red staining and western blot analysis we revealed comparable relative density of cortical lipid droplets and relative protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) between CSC and SHC mice. However, relative protein expression of the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) was increased following CSC exposure. Moreover, analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) revealed increased LDL-C levels in CSC mice. Together with the pronounced increase in adrenal weight, evidently mediated by hyperplasia of adrenocortical cells, these data strongly indicate an enhanced adrenal availability of and capacity to mobilize cholesterol in chronic psychosocially-stressed mice, contributing to their increased in vivo corticosterone response during acute heterotypic stressor exposure.

  4. The Effects of Chunghyul-Dan (A Korean Medicine Herbal Complex) on Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Diseases: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Sang; Kwon, Seungwon; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Park, Seong-Uk; Moon, Sang-Kwan; Park, Jung-Mi; Ko, Chang-Nam; Cho, Ki-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Chunghyul-dan (CHD) is a herbal complex containing 80% ethanol extract and is composed of Scutellariae Radix, Coptidis Rhizoma, Phellodendri Cortex, Gardeniae Fructus, and Rhei Rhizoma. We have published several experimental and clinical research articles on CHD. It has shown antilipidemic, antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic, and inhibitory effects on ischemic stroke recurrence with clinical safety in the previous studies. The antilipidemic effect of CHD results from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and pancreatic lipase-inhibitory activity. The antihypertensive effect likely results from the inhibitory effect on endogenous catecholamine(s) release and harmonization of all components showing the antihypertensive effects. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on endothelial cells are implicated to dictate the antiatherosclerotic effects of CHD. It also showed neuroprotective effects on cerebrovascular and parkinsonian models. These effects of CHD could be helpful for the prevention of the recurrence of ischemic stroke. Therefore, we suggest that CHD could be a promising medication for treating and preventing cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, to validate and better understand these findings, well-designed clinical studies are required. PMID:27340412

  5. Renoprotective effect of myricetin restrains dyslipidemia and renal mesangial cell proliferation by the suppression of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-11-15

    Myricetin is a natural flavonoid used in various health management systems. In this present study myricetin tested to evaluate the effect on lipids and lipid metabolism enzymes in normal and streptozotocin (STZ) with cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. Diabetic nephrotoxic rats were significantly (P<0.05) increased the levels of urinary albumin and lipid profiles: total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), free fatty acids (FFAs), phospholipids (PLs), low density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and decreased in the levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). In addition, the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) were decreased significantly, whereas the 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HmgCoA) reductase activity was increased. The upregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1a (SREBP-1a), SREBP-1c, SREBP-2, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and downregulation peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) proteins expression levels were noticed. An administration of myricetin (1.0 mg/kg body weight (b/w)) for 12 weeks was brought the above parameters towards normal level. Histopathological study of kidney samples showed that extracellular mesangial matrix expansion, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephrotoxic rats was suppressed by myricetin treatment. Further our results indicate that administration of myricetin afforded remarkable protection against STZ-Cd induced alterations in lipid metabolism and thereby reduced the diabetic nephropathy in experimental rats. PMID:25240712

  6. In silico and in vitro Studies on Begomovirus Induced Andrographolide Biosynthesis Pathway in Andrographis Paniculata for Combating Inflammation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asifa; Sharma, Pooja; Khan, Feroz; Ajayakumar, P V; Shanker, Karuna; Samad, Abdul

    2016-07-01

    Andrographolide and neoandrographolide are major bioactive molecules of Andrographis paniculata, a well-known medicinal plant. These molecules exhibited varying degrees of anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities in-vitro and in-vivo. Role of begomovirus protein C2/TrAP in biosynthesis of andrographolide was identified through molecular modeling, docking and predicted results were substantiated by in vitro studies. Homology molecular modeling and molecular docking were performed to study the binding conformations and different bonding behaviors, in order to reveal the possible mechanism of action behind higher accumulation of andrographolide. It was concluded that C2/TrAP inhibit the activation of SNF1-Related Protein Kinase-1 (SnRK1) in terpenoid pathway and removes the negative regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) by SnRK1, leading to higher accumulation of andrographolide and neoandrographolide in begomovirus infected plants. The binding site residues of SnRK1 docked with C2/TrAP were found to be associated with ATP binding site, substrate binding site and activation loop. Predicted results were also validated by HPTLC. This study provides important insights into understanding the role of viral protein in altering the regulation of biosynthesis of andrographolide and could be used in future research to develop biomimetic methods for increasing the production of such phytometabolites having anti-cancerous and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27492239

  7. Polyunsaturated fatty acyl-coenzyme As are inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis in zebrafish and mice

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Santhosh; Tran, Vy My; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Schlegel, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipid disorders pose therapeutic challenges. Previously we discovered that mutation of the hepatocyte β-hydroxybutyrate transporter Slc16a6a in zebrafish causes hepatic steatosis during fasting, marked by increased hepatic triacylglycerol, but not cholesterol. This selective diversion of trapped ketogenic carbon atoms is surprising because acetate and acetoacetate can exit mitochondria and can be incorporated into both fatty acids and cholesterol in normal hepatocytes. To elucidate the mechanism of this selective diversion of carbon atoms to fatty acids, we fed wild-type and slc16a6a mutant animals high-protein ketogenic diets. We find that slc16a6a mutants have decreased activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr), despite increased Hmgcr protein abundance and relative incorporation of mevalonate into cholesterol. These observations suggest the presence of an endogenous Hmgcr inhibitor. We took a candidate approach to identify such inhibitors. First, we found that mutant livers accumulate multiple polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and PUFA-CoAs, and we showed that human HMGCR is inhibited by PUFA-CoAs in vitro. Second, we injected mice with an ethyl ester of the PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid and observed an acute decrease in hepatic Hmgcr activity, without alteration in Hmgcr protein abundance. These results elucidate a mechanism for PUFA-mediated cholesterol lowering through direct inhibition of Hmgcr. PMID:24057001

  8. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum.

  9. Effect on short- and long-term major adverse cardiac events of statin treatment in patients with acute myocardial infarction and renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Yup; Bae, Eun Hui; Choi, Joon Seok; Kim, Chang Seong; Park, Jeong Woo; Ma, Seong Kwon; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Soo Wan

    2012-05-15

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the effectiveness of statin therapy in reducing MACE in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and renal dysfunction (RD). In the present retrospective study of 12,853 patients with AMI, the patients were categorized into 4 groups: group I, statin therapy and no RD (estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); group II, neither statin therapy nor RD; group III, statin therapy and RD; group IV, no statin therapy but RD. The primary end points were death and complications during the hospital course. The secondary end points were MACE during 1 year of follow-up after AMI. Significant differences in the composite MACE during 12 months of follow-up were observed among the 4 groups (group I, 11.7%; group II, 19.0%; group III, 26.7%; and group IV, 45.5%; p <0.001). In a Cox proportional hazards model, mortality at 12 months increased stepwise from group II to IV compared to group I. Moreover, MACE-free survival in the severe RD group (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) was also greater in the statin-treated group. In conclusion, statin therapy reduced MACE at 1 year of follow-up in patients with AMI regardless of RD.

  10. Lovastatin, but not orlistat, reduces intestinal polyp volume in an ApcMin/+ mouse model.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Maria; Barone, Michele; Francavilla, Antonio; Tutino, Valeria; Bianco, Giusy; Tafaro, Angela; Minoia, Mario; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Napoli, Anna; Scavo, Maria Principia; Caruso, Maria Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    The statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoAR) and orlistat, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase (FAS), inhibit tumor cell growth by restricting cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis, respectively. We previously demonstrated that an omega (ω)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)- or olive oil-enriched diet reduced the polyp number and volume in ApcMin/+ mice. This phenomenon was associated with a significant inhibition of FAS and HMGCoAR, as well as an increase in the estrogen receptor (ER)β/α ratio. Herein, we evaluated the effect of lovastatin and orlistat on polyp development and ER expression in ApcMin/+ mice, in order to confirm previous data obtained with ω‑3-PUFAs and olive oil. As expected, the use of lovastatin and orlistat significantly reduced HMGCoAR and FAS enzymatic activities and gene expression in colonic tissues, but did not affect the number of intestinal polyps, while there was a statistically significant reduction in polyp volume only in the mouse group treated with lovastatin. In the mice receiving orlistat, we observed a significant increase in cell proliferation in the polyp tissue, as well as enhanced expression of ERα. Moreover, the overexpression of ERα was associated with a statistically significant increase in PES1, Shh and Gli1 protein levels, considered ERα-related molecular targets. PMID:27277576

  11. Empagliflozin, via Switching Metabolism Toward Lipid Utilization, Moderately Increases LDL Cholesterol Levels Through Reduced LDL Catabolism.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Mayoux, Eric; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Costard, Clément; Mark, Michael; Sulpice, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    In clinical trials, a small increase in LDL cholesterol has been reported with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. The mechanisms by which the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin increases LDL cholesterol levels were investigated in hamsters with diet-induced dyslipidemia. Compared with vehicle, empagliflozin 30 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks significantly reduced fasting blood glucose by 18%, with significant increase in fasting plasma LDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, and total ketone bodies by 25, 49, and 116%, respectively. In fasting conditions, glycogen hepatic levels were further reduced by 84% with empagliflozin, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and total cholesterol hepatic levels were 31 and 10% higher, respectively (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). A significant 20% reduction in hepatic LDL receptor protein expression was also observed with empagliflozin. Importantly, none of these parameters were changed by empagliflozin in fed conditions. Empagliflozin significantly reduced the catabolism of (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-labeled LDL injected intravenously by 20%, indicating that empagliflozin raises LDL levels through reduced catabolism. Unexpectedly, empagliflozin also reduced intestinal cholesterol absorption in vivo, which led to a significant increase in LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). These data suggest that empagliflozin, by switching energy metabolism from carbohydrate to lipid utilization, moderately increases ketone production and LDL cholesterol levels. Interestingly, empagliflozin also reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, which in turn promotes LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion.

  12. Effects of dietary tannic acid on the growth, hepatic gene expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity in Brandt's voles (Microtus brandti).

    PubMed

    Ye, Man-Hong; Nan, Yan-Lei; Ding, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jun-Bang; Liu, Qian; Wei, Wan-Hong; Yang, Sheng-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the physiological and biochemical responses of Brandt's voles to the persistent presence of dietary tannic acid. The diet for animals in the experimental group was supplemented with 3% dietary tannic acid for 5weeks. The control group received a commercial lab chow. No significant differences were detected in body weight, organ (heart, kidney, and liver) weights, and organ parameters between animals from two groups. However, voles in the experimental group had significantly higher daily food intake, increased contents of proline and histidine in saliva and feces after protein hydrolysis, and elevated hepatic expression of transferrin than the control. Our results suggested the existence of adaptive strategies developed in Brandt's voles to overcome the adverse effects of dietary tannic acid. (1) Food consumption was increased to satisfy their nutritional demands. (2) The secretion of tannic-acid-binding salivary proteins was promoted. (3) The absorption of iron was enhanced. These alterations contributed to neutralize the negative effects of tannic acid and maintain body mass in animals supplemented with tannic acid. As the result of the consumption of tannic acid, hepatic expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased, while the overall potential of the antioxidant system, characterized by increased hepatic enzymatic activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, was enhanced. Our results also implied the involvement of tannic acid in the regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in voles. PMID:26850644

  13. A role for the mevalonate pathway in early plant symbiotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Chabaud, Mireille; Genre, Andrea; Balloon, Allison J.; Maeda, Junko; Forshey, Kari; den Os, Désirée; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Coon, Joshua J.; Barker, David G.; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi produce signals that are perceived by host legume receptors at the plasma membrane and trigger sustained oscillations of the nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spiking), which in turn leads to gene expression and downstream symbiotic responses. The activation of Ca2+ spiking requires the plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase Does not Make Infections 2 (DMI2) as well as the nuclear cation channel DMI1. A key enzyme regulating the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reductase 1 (HMGR1), interacts with DMI2 and is required for the legume–rhizobium symbiosis. Here, we show that HMGR1 is required to initiate Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in Medicago truncatula roots in response to rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal signals. Furthermore, MVA, the direct product of HMGR1 activity, is sufficient to induce nuclear-associated Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in both wild-type plants and dmi2 mutants, but interestingly not in dmi1 mutants. Finally, MVA induced Ca2+ spiking in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells expressing DMI1. This demonstrates that the nuclear cation channel DMI1 is sufficient to support MVA-induced Ca2+ spiking in this heterologous system. PMID:26199419

  14. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  15. Inhibitory effect of statins on inflammation-related pathways in human abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Koichi; Nagasawa, Ayako; Kudo, Junichi; Onoda, Masahiko; Morikage, Noriyasu; Furutani, Akira; Aoki, Hiroki; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-05-18

    HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors (statins) have been suggested to attenuate abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth. However, the effects of statins in human AAA tissues are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effects of statins on proinflammatory molecules in human AAA walls in ex vivo culture. Simvastatin strongly inhibited the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in human AAA walls, but showed little effect on c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Simvastatin, as well as pitavastatin significantly reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-2 and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide (CXCL5) under both basal and TNF-α-stimulated conditions. Similar to statins, the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB, accompanied by a decreased secretion of MMP-9, MCP-2 and CXCL5. Moreover, the effect of simvastatin and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 was additive in inhibiting the secretion of MMP-9, MCP-2 and CXCL5. These findings indicate that statins preferentially inhibit the Rac1/NF-κB pathway to suppress MMP-9 and chemokine secretion in human AAA, suggesting a mechanism for the potential effect of statins in attenuating AAA progression.

  16. Cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase is phosphorylated at multiple amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Stroup, D. . E-mail: dstroup1@kent.edu; Ramsaran, J.R.

    2005-04-15

    The activity of cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase (gpCYP7A1), the rate limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, has been postulated to be regulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. This study has found that several kinase activators rapidly reduce the amount of bile acid produced by the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, and that gpCYP7A1 from HepG2 cell extracts eluted in the phosphoprotein fraction of FeIII columns. After incubating the HepG2 cells with radioactive orthophosphate, the band identified as gpCYP7Al on immunoblots was strongly labeled. Recombinant gpCYP7A was expressed as 6x HIS fusion polypeptides and subjected to kinase assays. The locations of phosphorylation were mapped further by screening synthetic peptides against AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase, protein kinase A, and a panel of nine protein kinase C isoforms. AMPK, also known as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase kinase, phosphorylated cholesterol 7{alpha}-hydroxylase, suggesting a potential mechanism of coordination of cholesterol synthesis and degradation.

  17. Modulation of the Isoprenoid/Cholesterol Biosynthetic Pathway During Neuronal Differentiation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Segatto, Marco; Di Tunno, Ilenia; Leone, Stefano; Pfrieger, Frank W; Pallottini, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    During differentiation, neurons acquire their typical shape and functional properties. At present, it is unclear, whether this important developmental step involves metabolic changes. Here, we studied the contribution of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway to neuronal differentiation using the mouse neuroblastoma cell line N1E-115 as experimental model. Our results show that during differentiation, the activity of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), a key enzyme of MVA pathway, and the level of Low Density Lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) decrease, whereas the level of LDLr-related protein-1 (LRP1) and the dimerization of Scavanger Receptor B1 (SRB-1) rise. Pharmacologic inhibition of HMGR by simvastatin accelerated neuronal differentiation by modulating geranylated proteins. Collectively, our data suggest that during neuronal differentiation, the activity of the MVA pathway decreases and we postulate that any interference with this process impacts neuronal morphology and function. Therefore, the MVA pathway appears as an attractive pharmacological target to modulate neurological and metabolic symptoms of developmental neuropathologies. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2036-2044, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Behavioral interactions of simvastatin and fluoxetine in tests of anxiety and depression

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Tainaê; Baungratz, Monaliza Marizete; Haskel, Suellen Priscila; de Lima, Daniela Delwing; da Cruz, Júlia Niehues; Magro, Débora Delwing Dal; da Cruz, José Geraldo Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Simvastatin inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, and is widely used to control plasma cholesterol levels and prevent cardiovascular disease. However, emerging evidence indicates that the beneficial effects of simvastatin extend to the central nervous system. The effects of simvastatin combined with fluoxetine provide an exciting and potential paradigm to decreased anxiety and depression. Thus, the present paper investigates the possibility of synergistic interactions between simvastatin and fluoxetine in models of anxiety and depression. We investigated the effects of subchronically administered simvastatin (1 or 10 mg/kg/day) combined with fluoxetine (2 or 10 mg/kg) at 24, 5, and 1 hour on adult rats before conducting behavioral tests. The results indicate that simvastatin and/or fluoxetine treatment reduces anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Our results showed that simvastatin and/or fluoxetine induced a significant increase in the swimming activity during the forced swimming test (antidepressant effect), with a concomitant increase in climbing time in simvastatin-treated animals only (noradrenergic activation). We hypothesize that anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of simvastatin and/or fluoxetine produce their behavioral effects through similar mechanisms and provide an important foundation for future preclinical research. PMID:23055736

  19. Metabolic engineering tanshinone biosynthetic pathway in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures.

    PubMed

    Kai, Guoyin; Xu, Hui; Zhou, Congcong; Liao, Pan; Xiao, Jianbo; Luo, Xiuqin; You, Lijia; Zhang, Lin

    2011-05-01

    Tanshinone is a group of active diterpenes widely used in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we report the introduction of genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) involved in tanshinone biosynthesis into Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots by Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer technology. Overexpression of SmGGPPS and/or SmHMGR as well as SmDXS in transgenic hairy root lines can significantly enhance the production of tanshinone to levels higher than that of the control (P<0.05). SmDXS showed much more powerful pushing effect than SmHMGR in tanshinone production, while SmGGPPS plays a more important role in stimulating tanshinone accumulation than the upstream enzyme SmHMGR or SmDXS in S. miltiorrhiza. Co-expression of SmHMGR and SmGGPPS resulted in highest production of tanshinone (about 2.727 mg/g dw) in line HG9, which was about 4.74-fold higher than that of the control (0.475 mg/g dw). All the tested transgenic hairy root lines showed higher antioxidant activity than the control. To our knowledge, this is the first report on enhancement of tanshinone content and antioxidant activity achieved through metabolic engineering of hairy roots by push-pull strategy in S. miltiorrhiza.

  20. Elicitation of Diosgenin Production in Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seedlings by Methyl Jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Spandan; Chikara, Surendra K.; Sharma, Mahesh C.; Chaudhary, Abhinav; Alam Syed, Bakhtiyar; Chaudhary, Pooja S.; Mehta, Aditya; Patel, Maulik; Ghosh, Arpita; Iriti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), an elicitor of plant defense mechanisms, on the biosynthesis of diosgenin, a steroidal saponin, were investigated in six fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) varieties (Gujarat Methi-2, Kasuri-1, Kasuri-2, Pusa Early Branching, Rajasthan Methi and Maharashtra Methi-5). Treatment with 0.01% MeJA increased diosgenin levels, in 12 days old seedlings, from 0.5%–0.9% to 1.1%–1.8%. In addition, MeJA upregulated the expression of two pivotal genes of the mevalonate pathway, the metabolic route leading to diosgenin: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG) and sterol-3-β-glucosyl transferase (STRL). In particular, MeJA increased the expression of HMG and STRL genes by 3.2- and 22.2-fold, respectively, in the Gujarat Methi-2 variety, and by 25.4- and 28.4-fold, respectively, in the Kasuri-2 variety. Therefore, MeJA may be considered a promising elicitor for diosgenin production by fenugreek plants. PMID:26694357

  1. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  2. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  3. Evolution of plant defense mechanisms. Relationships of phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases to pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

    PubMed

    Gang, D R; Kasahara, H; Xia, Z Q; Vander Mijnsbrugge, K; Bauw, G; Boerjan, W; Van Montagu, M; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-03-12

    Pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductase classes are phylogenetically related, as is a third, the so-called "isoflavone reductase homologs." This study establishes the first known catalytic function for the latter, as being able to engender the NADPH-dependent reduction of phenylcoumaran benzylic ethers. Accordingly, all three reductase classes are involved in the biosynthesis of important and related phenylpropanoid-derived plant defense compounds. In this investigation, the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase from the gymnosperm, Pinus taeda, was cloned, with the recombinant protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme reduces the benzylic ether functionalities of both dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol and dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol, with a higher affinity for the former, as measured by apparent Km and Vmax values and observed kinetic 3H-isotope effects. It abstracts the 4R-hydride of the required NADPH cofactor in a manner analogous to that of the pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases. A similar catalytic function was observed for the corresponding recombinant reductase whose gene was cloned from the angiosperm, Populus trichocarpa. Interestingly, both pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases catalyze enantiospecific conversions, whereas the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase only shows regiospecific discrimination. A possible evolutionary relationship among the three reductase classes is proposed, based on the supposition that phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases represent the progenitors of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

  4. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  5. Structural prototypes for an extended family of flavoprotein reductases: comparison of phthalate dioxygenase reductase with ferredoxin reductase and ferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Correll, C. C.; Ludwig, M. L.; Bruns, C. M.; Karplus, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of phthalate dioxygenase reductase (PDR), a monomeric iron-sulfur flavoprotein that delivers electrons from NADH to phthalate dioxygenase, is compared to ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) and ferredoxin, the proteins that reduce NADP+ in the final reaction of photosystem I. The folding patterns of the domains that bind flavin, NAD(P), and [2Fe-2S] are very similar in the two systems. Alignment of the X-ray structures of PDR and FNR substantiates the assignment of features that characterize a family of flavoprotein reductases whose members include cytochrome P-450 reductase, sulfite and nitrate reductases, and nitric oxide synthase. Hallmarks of this subfamily of flavoproteins, here termed the FNR family, are an antiparallel beta-barrel that binds the flavin prosthetic group, and a characteristic variant of the classic pyridine nucleotide-binding fold. Despite the similarities between FNR and PDR, attempts to model the structure of a dissociable FNR:ferredoxin complex by analogy with PDR reveal features that are at odds with chemical crosslinking studies (Zanetti, G., Morelli, D., Ronchi, S., Negri, A., Aliverti, A., & Curti, B., 1988, Biochemistry 27, 3753-3759). Differences in the binding sites for flavin and pyridine nucleotides determine the nucleotide specificities of FNR and PDR. The specificity of FNR for NADP+ arises primarily from substitutions in FNR that favor interactions with the 2' phosphate of NADP+. Variations in the conformation and sequences of the loop adjoining the flavin phosphate affect the selectivity for FAD versus FMN. The midpoint potentials for reduction of the flavin and [2Fe-2S] groups in PDR are higher than their counterparts in FNR and spinach ferredoxin, by about 120 mV and 260 mV, respectively. Comparisons of the structure of PDR with spinach FNR and with ferredoxin from Anabaena 7120, along with calculations of electrostatic potentials, suggest that local interactions, including hydrogen bonds, are the dominant

  6. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  7. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'.

  8. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  9. Synthesis of Nitrate Reductase in Chlorella

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, Edward A.; Shen, Teh-Chien; Ackermann, Renate

    1980-01-01

    Synthesis of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) in Chlorella vulgaris was studied under inducing conditions, i.e. with cells grown on ammonia and then transferred to nitrate medium. Cycloheximide (but not chloramphenicol) completely inhibited synthesis of the enzyme, but only if it was added at the start (i.e. at the time of nitrate addition) of the induction period. Cycloheximide inhibition became less effective as induction by nitrate proceeded. Enzyme from small quantities of culture (1 to 3 milliliters of packed cells) was purified to homogeneity with the aid of blue dextran-Sepharose chromatography. Incorporation of radioactivity from labeled arginine into nitrate reductase was measured in the presence and absence of cycloheximide. Conditions were found under which the inhibitor completely blocked the incorporation of labeled amino acid, but only slightly decreased the increase in nitrate reductase activity. The results indicate that synthesis of nitrate reductase from amino acids proceeds by way of a protein precursor which is inactive enzymically. PMID:16661310

  10. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  11. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A; Harter, Theresa M; Petrash, J Mark

    2007-03-01

    We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  12. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  13. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Khalequz; Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J; Lewis, Stephen J; Gaston, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o(-)) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o(-) cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions.

  14. Structure of aldose reductase from Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, M.; Abendroth, J.; Zhang, Y.; Sankaran, B.; Edwards, T. E.; Staker, B. L.; Van Voorhis, W. C.; Stewart, L. J.; Myler, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an anaerobic aerotolerant eukaryotic parasite of the intestines. It is believed to have diverged early from eukarya during evolution and is thus lacking in many of the typical eukaryotic organelles and biochemical pathways. Most conspicuously, mitochondria and the associated machinery of oxidative phosphorylation are absent; instead, energy is derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. Here, the 1.75 Å resolution crystal structure of G. lamblia aldose reductase heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli is reported. As in other oxidoreductases, G. lamblia aldose reductase adopts a TIM-barrel conformation with the NADP+-binding site located within the eight β-strands of the interior. PMID:21904059

  15. Steroid 5α-reductase 2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Berenice B; Batista, Rafael Loch; Domenice, Sorahia; Costa, Elaine M F; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Russell, David W; Wilson, Jean D

    2016-10-01

    Dihydrotestosterone is a potent androgen metabolite formed from testosterone by action of 5α-reductase isoenzymes. Mutations in the type 2 isoenzyme cause a disorder of 46,XY sex development, termed 5α-reductase type 2 deficiency and that was described forty years ago. Many mutations in the encoding gene have been reported in different ethnic groups. In affected 46,XY individuals, female external genitalia are common, but Mullerian ducts regress, and the internal urogenital tract is male. Most affected males are raised as females, but virilization occurs at puberty, and male social sex develops thereafter with high frequency. Fertility can be achieved in some affected males with assisted reproduction techniques, and adults with male social sex report a more satisfactory sex life and quality of life as compared to affected individuals with female social sex. PMID:27224879

  16. Discovery of pinoresinol reductase genes in sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Y; Kamimura, N; Nakajima, M; Hishiyama, S; Hara, H; Kasai, D; Tsuji, Y; Narita-Yamada, S; Nakamura, S; Katano, Y; Fujita, N; Katayama, Y; Fukuda, M; Kajita, S; Masai, E

    2013-01-10

    Bacterial genes for the degradation of major dilignols produced in lignifying xylem are expected to be useful tools for the structural modification of lignin in plants. For this purpose, we isolated pinZ involved in the conversion of pinoresinol from Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6. pinZ showed 43-77% identity at amino acid level with bacterial NmrA-like proteins of unknown function, a subgroup of atypical short chain dehydrogenases/reductases, but revealed only 15-21% identity with plant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. PinZ completely converted racemic pinoresinol to lariciresinol, showing a specific activity of 46±3 U/mg in the presence of NADPH at 30°C. In contrast, the activity for lariciresinol was negligible. This substrate preference is similar to a pinoresinol reductase, AtPrR1, of Arabidopsis thaliana; however, the specific activity of PinZ toward (±)-pinoresinol was significantly higher than that of AtPrR1. The role of pinZ and a pinZ ortholog of Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444 were also characterized.

  17. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yifeng; Li, Bin; Prakash, Divya; Ferry, James G; Elliott, Sean J; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2015-12-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism.

  18. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  19. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  20. Radical scavengers as ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Sinha, Barij Nayan

    2012-01-01

    This paper compiled all the previous reports on radical scavengers, an interesting class of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors. We have highlighted three key research areas: chemical classification of radical scavengers, structural and functional aspects of the radical site, and progress in drug designing for radical scavengers. Under the chemical classification section, we have recorded the discovery of hydroxyurea followed by discussions on hydroxamic acids, amidoximes, hydroxyguanidines, and phenolic compounds. In the next section, we have compiled the structural information for the radical site obtained from different crystallographic and theoretical studies. Finally, we have included the reported ligand based and structure based drug-designing studies.

  1. Structure of an integral membrane sterol reductase from Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Roberti, Rita; Blobel, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are essential biological molecules in the majority of life forms. Sterol reductases1 including Delta-14 sterol reductase (C14SR), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) and 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) reduce specific carbon-carbon double bonds of the sterol moiety using a reducing cofactor during sterol biosynthesis. Lamin B Receptor2 (LBR), an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, also contains a functional C14SR domain. Here we report the crystal structure of a Delta-14 sterol reductase (maSR1) from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a homolog of human C14SR, LBR, and DHCR7, with the cofactor NADPH. The enzyme contains 10 transmembrane segments (TM). Its catalytic domain comprises the C-terminal half (containing TM6-10) and envelops two interconnected pockets, one of which faces the cytoplasm and houses NADPH, while the other one is accessible from the lipid bilayer. Comparison with a soluble steroid 5β-reductase structure3 suggests that the reducing end of NADPH meets the sterol substrate at the juncture of the two pockets. A sterol reductase activity assay proves maSR1 can reduce the double bond of a cholesterol biosynthetic intermediate demonstrating functional conservation to human C14SR. Therefore, our structure as a prototype of integral membrane sterol reductases provides molecular insight into mutations in DHCR7 and LBR for inborn human diseases. PMID:25307054

  2. Biliverdin reductase: a target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Maines, Mahin D.

    2015-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase (BVR) is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s) of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1, and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ, and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26089799

  3. Ageing of glutathione reductase in the lens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Z; Augusteyn, R C

    1994-07-01

    The distribution of glutathione reductase activity in concentric layers from the lens has been determined as a function of age for 16 species. Primate lenses have almost ten times the level of glutathione reductase found in other species. Comparison with the activity of hexokinase revealed that this is not due to a higher overall rate of metabolism in these lenses. By contrast, the higher activity found in bird and fish lenses reflects a higher metabolic activity in these tissues. In all species, a gradient of activity was observed with the highest specific activity in the outermost cortical fibres, decreasing to virtually no activity in the inner parts of the tissue. No alterations were found in this gradient with increasing age, other than an increase in the amount of nuclear tissue essentially devoid of activity. The maximum activity in the outer cortical fibres was the same, regardless of the age of the lens. The time taken, in different species, for the specific activity to decrease by half, was estimated from the rate of protein accumulation. This time was found to vary from a few days to several years, indicating that the decrease in activity is not due to ageing but rather, it is related to the maturation of fibre cells. These observations are discussed in terms of current concepts of lens ageing and cataract formation. PMID:7835401

  4. The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs): Overview.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2015-06-01

    The aldo-keto reductase (AKR) protein superfamily contains >190 members that fall into 16 families and are found in all phyla. These enzymes reduce carbonyl substrates such as: sugar aldehydes; keto-steroids, keto-prostaglandins, retinals, quinones, and lipid peroxidation by-products. Exceptions include the reduction of steroid double bonds catalyzed by AKR1D enzymes (5β-reductases); and the oxidation of proximate carcinogen trans-dihydrodiol polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; while the β-subunits of potassium gated ion channels (AKR6 family) control Kv channel opening. AKRs are usually 37kDa monomers, have an (α/β)8-barrel motif, display large loops at the back of the barrel which govern substrate specificity, and have a conserved cofactor binding domain. AKRs catalyze an ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism in which NAD(P)H cofactor binds first and leaves last. In enzymes that favor NADPH, the rate of release of NADP(+) is governed by a slow isomerization step which places an upper limit on kcat. AKRs retain a conserved catalytic tetrad consisting of Tyr55, Asp50, Lys84, and His117 (AKR1C9 numbering). There is conservation of the catalytic mechanism with short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) even though they show different protein folds. There are 15 human AKRs of these AKR1B1, AKR1C1-1C3, AKR1D1, and AKR1B10 have been implicated in diabetic complications, steroid hormone dependent malignancies, bile acid deficiency and defects in retinoic acid signaling, respectively. Inhibitor programs exist world-wide to target each of these enzymes to treat the aforementioned disorders. Inherited mutations in AKR1C and AKR1D1 enzymes are implicated in defects in the development of male genitalia and bile acid deficiency, respectively, and occur in evolutionarily conserved amino acids. The human AKRs have a large number of nsSNPs and splice variants, but in many instances functional genomics is lacking. AKRs and their variants are now poised to be interrogated using

  5. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  6. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  7. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  8. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  9. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life

    PubMed Central

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria. PMID:24809024

  10. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria. PMID:24809024

  11. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria.

  12. Monodehydroascorbate reductase mediates TNT toxicity in plants.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Emily J; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Beynon, Emily; Lorenz, Astrid; Chechik, Victor; Bruce, Neil C

    2015-09-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a highly toxic and persistent environmental pollutant. Due to the scale of affected areas, one of the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of removing explosives pollution could be the use of plants. However, mechanisms of TNT phytotoxicity have been elusive. Here, we reveal that phytotoxicity is caused by reduction of TNT in the mitochondria, forming a nitro radical that reacts with atmospheric oxygen, generating reactive superoxide. The reaction is catalyzed by monodehydroascorbate reductase 6 (MDHAR6), with Arabidopsis deficient in MDHAR6 displaying enhanced TNT tolerance. This discovery will contribute toward the remediation of contaminated sites. Moreover, in an environment of increasing herbicide resistance, with a shortage in new herbicide classes, our findings reveal MDHAR6 as a valuable plant-specific target.

  13. Mevalonate-suppressive dietary isoprenoids for bone health.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huanbiao; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Shah, Anureet; Mo, Warren K; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shen, Chwan-Li

    2012-12-01

    Osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, the balancing acts for optimal bone health, are under the regulation of small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins (GTPases) including Ras, Rac, Rho and Rab. The activities of GTPases require post-translational modification with mevalonate-derived prenyl pyrophosphates. Mevalonate deprivation induced by competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase (e.g., statins) prevents the activation of GTPases, suppresses the expression of the receptor for activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) ligand (RANKL) and activation of NFκB and, consequently, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and induces osteoclast apoptosis. In contrast, statin-mediated inactivation of GTPases enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, vascular epithelial growth factor, and osteocalcin in osteoblasts and induces osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Animal studies show that statins inhibit bone resorption and increase bone formation. The anabolic effect of statins and other mevalonate pathway-suppressive pharmaceuticals resembles the anti-osteoclastogenic and bone-protective activities conferred by dietary isoprenoids, secondary products of plant mevalonate metabolism. The tocotrienols, vitamin E molecules with HMG CoA reductase-suppressive activity, induce mevalonate deprivation and concomitantly suppress the expression of RANKL and cyclooxygenase-2, the production of prostaglandin E2 and the activation of NFκB. Accordingly, tocotrienols inhibit osteoclast differentiation and induce osteoclast apoptosis, impacts reminiscent of those of statins. In vivo studies confirm the bone protective activity of tocotrienols at nontoxic doses. Blends of tocotrienols, statins and isoprenoids widely found in fruits, vegetables, grains, herbs, spices, and essential oils may synergistically suppress osteoclastogenesis while promoting osteoblastogenesis, offering a novel

  14. Effects of chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid on cholesterol absorption and metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanwen; Jones, Peter J H; Woollett, Laura A; Buckley, Donna D; Yao, Lihang; Granholm, Norman A; Tolley, Elizabeth A; Heubi, James E

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative and qualitative differences in intralumenal bile acids may affect cholesterol absorption and metabolism. To test this hypothesis, 2 cross-over outpatient studies were conducted in adults with apo-A IV 1/1 or apo-E 3/3 genotypes. Study 1 included 11 subjects 24 to 37 years of age, taking 15 mg/kg/day chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) or no bile acid for 20 days while being fed a controlled diet. Study 2 included 9 adults 25 to 38 years of age, taking 15 mg/kg/day deoxycholic acid (DCA) or no bile acid, following the same experimental design and procedures as study 1. CDCA had no effect on plasma lipid concentrations, whereas DCA decreased (P < 0.05) plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and tended to decrease (P = 0.15) low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol. CDCA treatment enriched (P < 0.0001) bile with CDCA and increased cholesterol concentration in micelles, whereas meal-stimulated bile acid concentrations were decreased. DCA treatment enriched (P < 0.0001) bile with DCA and tended to increase intralumenal cholesterol solubilized in micelles (P = 0.06). No changes were found in cholesterol absorption, free cholesterol fractional synthetic rate (FSR), or 3-hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl (HMG) CoA reductase and LDL receptor messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels after CDCA treatment. DCA supplementation tended to decrease cholesterol absorption and reciprocally increase FSR and HMG CoA reductase and LDL receptor mRNA levels. Results of these 2 studies suggest that the solubilization of cholesterol in the intestinal micelles is not a rate-limiting step for its absorption.

  15. Hypocholesterolemic effect of physically refined rice bran oil: studies of cholesterol metabolism and early atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ausman, Lynne M; Rong, Ni; Nicolosi, Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Physically refined rice bran oil containing 2-4% nontriglyceride components as compared to other vegetable oils appears to be associated with lipid lowering and antiinflammatory properties in several rodent, primate and human models. These experiments were designed to investigate possible mechanisms for the hypocholesterolemic effect of the physically refined rice bran oil and to examine its effect on aortic fatty streak formation. In the first experiment, 30 hamsters were fed, for 8 weeks, chow-based diets plus 0.03% added cholesterol and 5% (wt/wt) coconut, canola, or physically refined rice bran oil (COCO, CANOLA or PRBO animal groups, respectively). Both plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were significantly reduced in PRBO but not in CANOLA relative to COCO. PRBO also showed a significant 15-17% reduction in cholesterol absorption and significant 30% increase in neutral sterol (NS) excretion with no effect on bile acid (BA) excretion. Both CANOLA and PRBO showed a significant 300-500% increase in intestinal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and significant (>25%) decrease in hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activities with respect to COCO. In a second experiment, 36 hamsters were fed chow-based diets with 0.05% added cholesterol, 10% coconut oil and 4% additional COCO, CANOLA or PRBO. Relative to COCO and CANOLA, plasma TC and LDL-C were significantly reduced in PRBO. Early atherosclerosis (fatty streak formation) was significantly reduced (48%) only in PRBO, relative to the other two. These results suggest that the lipid lowering found in PRBO is associated with decreased cholesterol absorption, but not hepatic cholesterol synthesis, and that the decrease in fatty streak formation with this oil may be associated with its nontriglyceride components not present in the other two diets.

  16. Pharmacogenetics of cardiovascular drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bas J.M.; Klungel, Olaf H.; de Boer, Anthonius; Ch. Stricker, Bruno H.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2009-01-01

    In developed countries cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death. Cardiovascular drugs such as platelet aggregation inhibitors, oral anticoagulants, antihypertensives and cholesterol lowering drugs are abundantly prescribed to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease. Notable interindividual variation exists in the response to these pharmacotherapeutic interventions, which can be partially explained by factors such as gender, age, diet, concomitant drug use and environmental factors. Notwithstanding, a great part of this variability remains unknown. To a smaller or larger extent, genetic variability may contribute to the variability in response to these cardiovascular drugs. This review gives an overview of pharmacogenetic studies of genes that were reported to be associated with four commonly prescribed drugs/drug classes (platelet aggregation inhibitors, coumarins, antihypertensives and statins) and were studied at least 2 times with a similar outcome measure. In the field of cardiovascular drug therapy, polymorphisms in candidate genes such as the cycloxygenase-1, vitamin K reductase complex subunit 1, CYP2C9, alpha adducin and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase have received a great amount of interest in the pharmacogenetics of aspirin, coumarins, antihypertensives and statins respectively. However, only variations in VKORC1 and CYP2C9 have consistently been associated with drug response (coumarins) and have clinical implications. Clinical trials should provide evidence for the effectiveness of genotyping before this procedure will be a part of every day anticoagulant therapy. In spite of the tremendous amount of publications in this field, there is no reason to advocate for genetic testing for any other drugs cardiovascular drug therapy yet. Current approaches in pharmacogenetic research do not seem to lead to results that meet our expectations of individualized medicine. Therefore, new approaches are needed addressing issues and

  17. Cinnamon extract improves the body composition and attenuates lipogenic processes in the liver and adipose tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Bruna P; Gaique, Thaiane G; Souza, Luana L; Paula, Gabriela S M; Kluck, George E G; Atella, Georgia C; Gomes, Anne Caroline C; Simas, Naomi K; Kuster, Ricardo M; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C; Oliveira, Karen J

    2015-10-01

    In models of metabolic disorders, cinnamon improves glucose and lipid metabolism. This study explores the effect of chronic supplementation with aqueous cinnamon extract (CE) on the lipid metabolism of rats. Male adult Wistar rats were separated into a control group (CTR) receiving water and a CE Group receiving aqueous cinnamon extract (400 mg of cinnamon per kg body mass per day) by gavage for 25 consecutive days. Cinnamon supplementation did not change the food intake or the serum lipid profile but promoted the following changes: lower body mass gain (P = 0.008), lower relative mass of white adipose tissue (WAT) compartments (P = 0.045) and higher protein content (percentage of the carcass) (P = 0.049). The CE group showed lower leptin mRNA expression in the WAT (P = 0.0017) and an important tendency for reduced serum leptin levels (P = 0.059). Cinnamon supplementation induced lower mRNA expression of SREBP1c (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c) in the WAT (P = 0.001) and liver (P = 0.013) and lower mRNA expression of SREBP2 (P = 0.002), HMGCoA reductase (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase) (P = 0.0003), ACAT1 (acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1) (P = 0.032) and DGAT2 (diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2) (P = 0.03) in the liver. These changes could be associated with the reduced esterified cholesterol and triacylglycerol content detected in this tissue. Our results suggest that chronic ingestion of aqueous cinnamon extract attenuates lipogenic processes, regulating the expression of key enzymes and transcriptional factors and their target genes, which are directly involved in lipogenesis. These molecular changes possibly promote adaptations that would prevent an increase in circulating cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels and prevent lipid accumulation in tissues, such as liver and WAT. Therefore, we speculate that cinnamon may also be useful for preventing or retarding the development of lipid disorders.

  18. Effect of dietary supplementation of Bacillus subtilis B10 on biochemical and molecular parameters in the serum and liver of high-fat diet-induced obese mice* #

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Kai; Li, Ya-li; Wang, Yang; Wen, Jing; Wu, Hong-zhao; Yu, Dong-you; Li, Wei-fen

    2015-01-01

    While a high-fat diet (HFD) is assumed to be related to fat-mediated oxidative stress decreasing antioxidant enzyme activity, probiotics are believed to have positive effects on the regulation of HFD-induced obesity as well as lipid metabolism, energy homeostasis, and anti-oxidation. Because Bacillus subtilis B10 has beneficial effects on the abnormal lipid metabolism and the oxidative stress in HFD-induced obese mice, ICR mice were randomly assigned into an HFD group and the HFD was supplemented with 0.1% (w/w) Bacillus subtilis B10 (HFD+B10 group). Thereafter, 30-d treatments were run, and then hepatic lipid level and antioxidant status were measured. The expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in the liver was determined by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We found that HFD-induced obese mice treated with B10 showed a decrease in weight gain, serum glucose activity as well as hepatic triglyceride (TG), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) activities. In addition, the gene expressions of antioxidant genes, glutathione reductase (GR), xanthine oxidase (XO), heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), and lipid synthesis gene 3β-hydroxysteroid-∆24 reductase (DHCR24) in the HFD+B10 group were down-regulated, suggesting alleviation of oxidative stress, while the lipolysis gene 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), energy metabolism gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and the gene encoding tumor-suppressor protein p53 were up-regulated. The regulatory and positive effect of dietary supplementation of probiotic B10 suggests that it has a beneficial effect on the homeostasis of the lipid metabolism and on alleviating oxidative stress in HFD-induced obese mice. PMID:26055910

  19. Disruption of a sugar transporter gene cluster in a hyperthermophilic archaeon using a host-marker system based on antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Matsumi, Rie; Manabe, Kenji; Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a gene disruption system in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis using the antibiotic simvastatin and a fusion gene designed to overexpress the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene (hmg(Tk)) with the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter. With this system, we disrupted the T. kodakaraensis amylopullulanase gene (apu(Tk)) or a gene cluster which includes apu(Tk) and genes encoding components of a putative sugar transporter. Disruption plasmids were introduced into wild-type T. kodakaraensis KOD1 cells, and transformants exhibiting resistance to 4 microM simvastatin were isolated. The transformants exhibited growth in the presence of 20 microM simvastatin, and we observed a 30-fold increase in intracellular HMG-CoA reductase activity. The expected gene disruption via double-crossover recombination occurred at the target locus, but we also observed recombination events at the hmg(Tk) locus when the endogenous hmg(Tk) gene was used. This could be avoided by using the corresponding gene from Pyrococcus furiosus (hmg(Pf)) or by linearizing the plasmid prior to transformation. While both gene disruption strains displayed normal growth on amino acids or pyruvate, cells without the sugar transporter genes could not grow on maltooligosaccharides or polysaccharides, indicating that the gene cluster encodes the only sugar transporter involved in the uptake of these compounds. The Deltaapu(Tk) strain could not grow on pullulan and displayed only low levels of growth on amylose, suggesting that Apu(Tk) is a major polysaccharide-degrading enzyme in T. kodakaraensis.

  20. Chamber-specific differences in human cardiac fibroblast proliferation and responsiveness toward simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Farhan; DeFranco, Alessandra; Siddiqui, Ramail; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Emelyanova, Larisa; Holmuhamedov, Alisher; Ross, Gracious; Shi, Yang; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Kress, David; Tajik, A Jamil; Jahangir, Arshad

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblasts, the most abundant cells in the heart, contribute to cardiac fibrosis, the substrate for the development of arrythmogenesis, and therefore are potential targets for preventing arrhythmic cardiac remodeling. A chamber-specific difference in the responsiveness of fibroblasts from the atria and ventricles toward cytokine and growth factors has been described in animal models, but it is unclear whether similar differences exist in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs) and whether drugs affect their proliferation differentially. Using cardiac fibroblasts from humans, differences between atrial and ventricular fibroblasts in serum-induced proliferation, DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, cyclin gene expression, and their inhibition by simvastatin were determined. The serum-induced proliferation rate of human atrial fibroblasts was more than threefold greater than ventricular fibroblasts with faster DNA synthesis and higher mRNA levels of cyclin genes. Simvastatin predominantly decreased the rate of proliferation of atrial fibroblasts, with inhibition of cell cycle progression and an increase in the G0/G1 phase in atrial fibroblasts with a higher sensitivity toward inhibition compared with ventricular fibroblasts. The DNA synthesis and mRNA levels of cyclin A, D, and E were significantly reduced by simvastatin in atrial but not in ventricular fibroblasts. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin on atrial fibroblasts was abrogated by mevalonic acid (500 μM) that bypasses 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition. Chamber-specific differences exist in the human heart because atrial fibroblasts have a higher proliferative capacity and are more sensitive to simvastatin-mediated inhibition through HMG-CoA reductase pathway. This mechanism may be useful in selectively preventing excessive atrial fibrosis without inhibiting adaptive ventricular remodeling during cardiac injury.

  1. Effects of combined olmesartan and pravastatin on glucose intolerance and cardiovascular remodeling in a metabolic-syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Mizuki; Ohmori, Koji; Obayashi, Ayumi; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Junji; Noma, Takahisa; Yukiiri, Kazushi; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Kohno, Masakazu

    2009-07-01

    Hypertension and dyslipidemia frequently coexist in patients with progressive insulin resistance and thus constitute metabolic syndrome. We sought to determine the merits of combining an angiotensin II receptor blocker and a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor in treating this pathological condition. Five-week-old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, a model of metabolic syndrome, were untreated or treated with olmesartan 3 mg kg(-1) per day, pravastatin 30 mg kg(-1) per day or their combination for 25 weeks. Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats served as normal controls. The antihypertensive effect of olmesartan and the lipid-lowering properties of pravastatin were both augmented by the combination. The oral glucose tolerance test revealed that only the combined treatment significantly reduced the area under the time-glucose curve, which was accompanied by augmented adiponectin messenger RNA expression in epididymal adipose tissue. Although the total cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS) content did not significantly differ among the groups, the combined treatment significantly increased the content of dihydrofolate reductase, a key eNOS coupler. Dihydroethidium staining of the aorta showed that the combination most significantly attenuated superoxide production. Moreover, Azan-Mallory staining revealed that the combination most significantly limited the perivascular fibrosis and wall thickening of intramyocardial coronary arteries. In conclusion, the combination of olmesartan and pravastatin augmented adiponectin expression in white adipose tissue and improved glucose tolerance in a rat model of metabolic syndrome, which was associated with more significant ameliorations of cardiovascular redox state and remodeling than those by treatments with either agent alone. PMID:19461650

  2. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics of cholesterol-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Gerd; Drobnik, Wolfgang

    2003-04-01

    Cholesterol-lowering therapy is the central approach in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in industrialized countries. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are currently the most potent and widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs. Large-scale clinical trials unequivocally demonstrated the efficacy of statin treatment in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. In general, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are well tolerated, although in a minority of patients severe adverse effects like myopathy or rhabdomyolysis may develop. The incidence of this potentially life-threatening side effects increases with co-adminstration of drugs that are metabolized via the same pharmacokinetic pathways or at high-dose statin therapy. The recent focus on the pleiotropic effects of statins that are more frequently observed at higher doses and the conclusion drawn from the large statin trials that low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol is "the lower the better", may need careful consideration in individuals at risk of adverse drug reactions. On the other hand, not all patients respond to statin therapy with a reduction in coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. It is therefore of interest to develop diagnostic test systems, which would allow to identify patients at increased risk of adverse drug reactions or patients with a lack of therapeutic effect. Beside exogenous factors, genetic variability determines the response of an individual to drug therapy and the analysis of genetic variants affecting pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic aspects of drug therapy is the subject of pharmacogenomics. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pharmacology and the pharmacogenomics of statin therapy.

  3. Disruption of a sugar transporter gene cluster in a hyperthermophilic archaeon using a host-marker system based on antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Matsumi, Rie; Manabe, Kenji; Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a gene disruption system in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis using the antibiotic simvastatin and a fusion gene designed to overexpress the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene (hmg(Tk)) with the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter. With this system, we disrupted the T. kodakaraensis amylopullulanase gene (apu(Tk)) or a gene cluster which includes apu(Tk) and genes encoding components of a putative sugar transporter. Disruption plasmids were introduced into wild-type T. kodakaraensis KOD1 cells, and transformants exhibiting resistance to 4 microM simvastatin were isolated. The transformants exhibited growth in the presence of 20 microM simvastatin, and we observed a 30-fold increase in intracellular HMG-CoA reductase activity. The expected gene disruption via double-crossover recombination occurred at the target locus, but we also observed recombination events at the hmg(Tk) locus when the endogenous hmg(Tk) gene was used. This could be avoided by using the corresponding gene from Pyrococcus furiosus (hmg(Pf)) or by linearizing the plasmid prior to transformation. While both gene disruption strains displayed normal growth on amino acids or pyruvate, cells without the sugar transporter genes could not grow on maltooligosaccharides or polysaccharides, indicating that the gene cluster encodes the only sugar transporter involved in the uptake of these compounds. The Deltaapu(Tk) strain could not grow on pullulan and displayed only low levels of growth on amylose, suggesting that Apu(Tk) is a major polysaccharide-degrading enzyme in T. kodakaraensis. PMID:17259314

  4. [Study on anti-hyperlipidemia mechanism of high frequency herb pairs by molecular docking method].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lu-di; He, Yu-su; Chen, Xi; Tao, Ou; Li, Gong-Yu; Zhang, Yan-ling

    2015-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has definitely clinical effect in treating hyperlipidemia, but the action mechanism still need to be explored. Based on consulting Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010), all the lipid-lowering Chinese patent medicines were analyzed by associated rules data mining method to explore high frequency herb pairs. The top three couplet medicines with high support degree were Puerariae Lobatae Radix-Crataegi Fructus, Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma-Crataegi Fructus, and Polygoni Multiflori Radix-Crataegi Fructus. The 20 main ingredients were selected from the herb pairs and docked with 3 key hyperlipidemia targets, namely 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α ) and niemann-pick C1 like 1 (NPC1L1) to further discuss the molecular mechanism of the high frequency herb pairs, by using the docking program, LibDock. To construct evaluation rules for the ingredients of herb pairs, the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) value between computed and initial complexes was first calculated to validate the fitness of LibDock models. Then, the key residues were also confirmed by analyzing the interactions of those 3 proteins and corresponding marketed drugs. The docking results showed that hyperin, puerarin, salvianolic acid A and polydatin can interact with two targets, and the other five compounds may be potent for at least one of the three targets. In this study, the multi-target effect of high frequency herb pairs for lipid-lowering was discussed on the molecular level, which can help further researching new multi-target anti-hyperlipidemia drug. PMID:26591535

  5. Hepatic and Pulmonary Toxicogenomic Profiles in Mice Intratracheally Instilled With Carbon Black Nanoparticles Reveal Pulmonary Inflammation, Acute Phase Response, and Alterations in Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Julie A.; Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Williams, Andrew; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Global pulmonary and hepatic messenger RNA profiles in adult female C57BL/6 mice intratracheally instilled with carbon black nanoparticles (NPs) (Printex 90) were analyzed to identify biological perturbations underlying systemic responses to NP exposure. Tissue gene expression changes were profiled 1, 3, and 28 days following exposure to 0.018, 0.054, and 0.162 mg Printex 90 alongside controls. Pulmonary response was marked by increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute phase response (APR) genes that persisted to day 28 at the highest exposure dose. Genes in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase pathway were increased, and those involved in cholesterol efflux were decreased at least at the highest dose on days 1 and 3. Hepatic responses mainly consisted of the HMG-CoA reductase pathway on days 1 (high dose) and 28 (all doses). Protein analysis in tissues and plasma of 0.162 mg Printex 90–exposed mice relative to control revealed an increase in plasma serum amyloid A on days 1 and 28 (p < 0.05), decreases in plasma high-density lipoprotein on days 3 and 28, an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein on day 28 (p < 0.05), and marginal increases in total hepatic cholesterol on day 28 (p = 0.06). The observed changes are linked to APR. Although further research is needed to establish links between observations and the onset and progression of systemic disorders, the present study demonstrates the ability of NPs to induce systemic effects. PMID:22461453

  6. Management of dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia with a fixed-dose combination of sitagliptin and simvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Helmut; Anderson, Matt S; Musliner, Thomas; Hanson, Mary E; Engel, Samuel S

    2013-01-01

    The risk of death due to heart disease and stroke is up to four times higher in individuals with diabetes compared to individuals without diabetes. Most guidelines that address treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes consider diabetes a cardiovascular disease (CVD) “risk equivalent” and recommend intensive treatment of dyslipidemia for the purpose of CVD prevention. Statins (3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase [HMG-CoA reductase] inhibitors) are first-line agents in achieving lipid goals as an adjunct to diet and exercise and should be used in most patients. In addition to lipid management and blood pressure control, glycemic control is a basic component in the management of diabetes. Glycemic control is achieved by combining diabetes self-management education, diet and exercise, and, where required, antihyperglycemic agents (OHAs). Persistence and adherence to therapy are critical in achieving recommended treatment goals. However, overall compliance with concomitantly prescribed OHAs and statins is low in patients with type 2 diabetes. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) therapies have been shown to improve adherence by reducing pill burden, the complexity of treatment regimen, and, potentially, cost. Based on the available evidence regarding the pharmacokinetics and the efficacy and safety profiles of each component drug, the sitagliptin/simvastatin FDC may provide a rational and well-tolerated approach to achieving better adherence to multiple-drug therapy and improved lipid lowering and glycemic control, with consequent reduction in cardiovascular risk, diabetic microvascular disease, and mortality in diabetic patients for whom treatment with both compounds is appropriate. PMID:23761972

  7. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  8. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Gennis, Robert B; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2011-11-01

    Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol: O₂ oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O₂ and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O₂-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O₂, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated.

  9. Suppressed production of methyl farnesoid hormones yields developmental defects and lethality in Drosophila larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-unresolved question in the developmental biology of Drosophila melanogaster has been whether methyl farnesoid hormones secreted by the ring gland are necessary for larval maturation and metamorphosis. In this study, we have used RNAi techniques to inhibit 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reduct...

  10. Nitrate Reductase-Deficient Mutants in Barley 1

    PubMed Central

    Somers, David A.; Kuo, Tsung-Min; Kleinhofs, Andris; Warner, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    Nitrate reductase-deficient barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mutants were assayed for the presence of a functional molybdenum cofactor determined from the activity of the molybdoenzyme, xanthine dehydrogenase, and for nitrate reductase-associated activities. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to detect nitrate reductase cross-reacting material in the mutants. The cross-reacting material levels of the mutants ranged from 8 to 136% of the wild type and were correlated with their nitrate reductase-associated activities, except for nar 1c, which lacked all associated nitrate reductase activities but had 38% of the wild-type cross-reacting material. The cross-reacting material of two nar 1 mutants, as well as nar 2a, Xno 18, Xno 19, and Xno 29, exhibited rocket immunoprecipitates that were similar to the wild-type enzyme indicating structural homology between the mutant and wild-type nitrate reductase proteins. The cross-reacting materials of the seven remaining nar 1 alleles formed rockets only in the presence of purified wild-type nitrate reductase, suggesting structural modifications of the mutant cross-reacting materials. All nar 1 alleles and Xno 29 had xanthine dehydrogenase activity indicating the presence of functional molybdenum cofactors. These results suggest that nar 1 is the structural gene for nitrate reductase. Mutants nar 2a, Xno 18, and Xno 19 lacked xanthine dehydrogenase activity and are considered to be molybdenum cofactor deficient mutants. Cross-reacting material was not detected in uninduced wild-type or mutant extracts, suggesting that nitrate reductase is synthesized de novo in response to nitrate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:16662774

  11. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  12. Substrate induction of nitrate reductase in barley aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, T E; Varner, J E

    1969-01-01

    Nitrate induces the formation of nitrate reductase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Himalaya) aleurone layers. Previous work has demonstrated de novo synthesis of alpha-amylase by gibberellic acid in the same tissue. The increase in nitrate reductase activity is inhibited by cycloheximide and 6-methylpurine, but not by actinomycin D. Nitrate does not induce alpha-amylase synthesis, and it has no effect on the gibberellic acid-induced synthesis of alpha-amylase. Also, there is little or no direct effect of gibberellic acid (during the first 6 hr of induction) or of abscisic acid on the nitrate-induced formation of nitrate reductase. Gibberellic acid does interfere with nitrate reductase activity during long-term experiments (greater than 6 hr). However, the time course of this inhibition suggests that the inhibition may be a secondary one. Barley aleurone layers therefore provide a convenient tissue for the study of both substrate- and hormone-induced enzyme formation.

  13. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  14. Regulation of the Neurospora crassa assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Zeeb, D D; Owens, M S

    1977-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-nitrate reductase from Neurospora crassa was purified and found to be stimulated by certain amino acids, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Stimulation by citrate and the amino acids was dependent upon the prior removal of EDTA from the enzyme preparations, since low quantities of EDTA resulted in maximal stimulation. Removal of EDTA from enzyme preparations by dialysis against Chelex-containing buffer resulted in a loss of nitrate reductase activity. Addition of alanine, arginine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, tryptophan, and citrate restored and stimulated nitrate reductase activity from 29- to 46-fold. The amino acids tested altered the Km of NADPH-nitrate reductase for NADPH but did not significantly change that for nitrate. The Km of nitrate reductase for NADPH increased with increasing concentrations of histidine but decreased with increasing concentrations of glutamine. Amino acid modulation of NADPH-nitrate reductase activity is discussed in relation to the conservation of energy (NADPH) by Neurospora when nitrate is the nitrogen source. PMID:19423

  15. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  16. Effects of thioredoxin reductase-1 deletion on embryogenesis and transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Bondareva, Alla A.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Iverson, Sonya V.; Li, Yan; Lopez, Nathan I.; Lucas, Olivier; Merrill, Gary F.; Prigge, Justin R.; Siders, Ashley M.; Wakamiya, Maki; Wallin, Stephanie L.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd)1 maintain intracellular redox homeostasis in most organisms. Metazoans Txnrds also participate in signal transduction. Mouse embryos homozygous for a targeted null mutation of the txnrd1 gene, encoding the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase, were viable at embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) but not at E9.5. Histology revealed that txnrd1−/− cells were capable of proliferation and differentiation; however, mutant embryos were smaller than wild-type littermates and failed to gastrulate. In situ marker gene analyses indicated primitive streak mesoderm did not form. Microarray analyses on E7.5 txnrd−/− and txnrd+/+ littermates showed similar mRNA levels for peroxiredoxins, glutathione reductases, mitochondrial Txnrd2, and most markers of cell proliferation. Conversely, mRNAs encoding sulfiredoxin, IGF-binding protein 1, carbonyl reductase 3, glutamate cysteine ligase, glutathione S-transferases, and metallothioneins were more abundant in mutants. Many gene expression responses mirrored those in thioredoxin reductase 1-null yeast; however mice exhibited a novel response within the peroxiredoxin catalytic cycle. Thus, whereas yeast induce peroxiredoxin mRNAs in response to thioredoxin reductase disruption, mice induced sulfiredoxin mRNA. In summary, Txnrd1 was required for correct patterning of the early embryo and progression to later development. Conserved responses to Txnrd1 disruption likely allowed proliferation and limited differentiation of the mutant embryo cells. PMID:17697936

  17. Aldose Reductase, Oxidative Stress, and Diabetic Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  18. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and diabetic mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  19. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  20. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Role of 5 alpha-reductase in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Randall, V A

    1994-04-01

    The mechanism of androgen action varies in different tissues, but in the majority of androgen target tissues either testosterone or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binds to a specific androgen receptor to form a complex that can regulate gene expression. Testosterone is metabolized to DHT by the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase. The autosomal recessive genetic disorder of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency has clearly shown that the requirement for DHT formation varies with different tissues. In this syndrome genetic males contain normal male internal structures including testes, but exhibit ambiguous or female external genitalia at birth; at puberty they undergo partial virilization which includes development of a male gender identity even if brought up as females. Their development suggests that testosterone itself is able to stimulate psychosexual behaviour, development of the embryonic wolffian duct, muscle development, voice deepening, spermatogenesis, and axillary and pubic hair growth; DHT seems to be essential for prostate development and growth, the development of the external genitalia and male patterns of facial and body hair growth or male-pattern baldness. How different hormones operate to regulate genes via the same receptor is currently unknown, but appears to involve cell-specific factors. The 5-alpha-reductase enzyme has proved difficult to isolate biochemically, but recently at least two human isoenzymes have been identified using molecular biological methods. All the various 5 alpha-reductase-deficient kindreds have been shown to have mutations in 5 alpha-reductase 2, the predominant form in the prostate. The biological role of 5 alpha-reductase 1 has not yet been ascertained, but at present it cannot be ruled out that some of the actions ascribed to testosterone are indeed in cells producing DHT via this enzyme. The activity of 5 alpha-reductase is also implicated in benign prostatic hypertrophy, hirsutism and possibly male-pattern baldness; recent evidence

  2. Wolinella succinogenes quinol:fumarate reductase and its comparison to E. coli succinate:quinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, C Roy D

    2003-11-27

    The three-dimensional structure of Wolinella succinogenes quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR), a dihaem-containing member of the superfamily of succinate:quinone oxidoreductases (SQOR), has been determined at 2.2 A resolution by X-ray crystallography [Lancaster et al., Nature 402 (1999) 377-385]. The structure and mechanism of W. succinogenes QFR and their relevance to the SQOR superfamily have recently been reviewed [Lancaster, Adv. Protein Chem. 63 (2003) 131-149]. Here, a comparison is presented of W. succinogenes QFR to the recently determined structure of the mono-haem containing succinate:quinone reductase from Escherichia coli [Yankovskaya et al., Science 299 (2003) 700-704]. In spite of differences in polypeptide and haem composition, the overall topology of the membrane anchors and their relative orientation to the conserved hydrophilic subunits is strikingly similar. A major difference is the lack of any evidence for a 'proximal' quinone site, close to the hydrophilic subunits, in W. succinogenes QFR.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of cDNAs Encoding Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase from Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wanxiang; Yang, Li; Karim, Abdul; Luo, Keming

    2013-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA) and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+)-catechin and (−)-epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus. PMID:23741362

  4. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  5. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies.

  6. Statin therapy: rationale for a new agent, rosuvastatin.

    PubMed

    Korlipara, K

    2002-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a major cause of death in industrialised societies, and elevated serum lipids are a significant, highly prevalent and undertreated risk factor for this condition. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) have revolutionised the treatment of hyperlipidaemia, and results from large-scale, long-term clinical trials have shown that the substantial reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) achieved with these drugs are associated with dramatic decreases in cardiovascular risk. Results from recent comparative clinical trials that have included a new drug in this class, rosuvastatin (Crestor), have demonstrated that it is significantly superior to atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin in reducing total cholesterol, LDL-C and apolipoprotein B (Apo B). It is also significantly more effective than atorvastatin in increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I). Rosuvastatin was also superior to all these agents in helping patients meet European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) and National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) goals for LDL-C. The results of an increasing number of studies indicate that statins have a wide range of pleiotropic properties that almost certainly contribute to their ability to decrease cardiovascular risk and may also make them valuable for treatment of other diseases. These actions include plaque stabilisation, improvement of endothelial function, inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, reduction of expression of adhesion molecules, prevention of cholesterol esterification and accumulation, reduction of secretion of matrix metalloproteinases by macrophages, reduction of platelet activity, reduction of formation of thrombogenic factors, chemoprotection and induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Further exploration of these actions will provide key information about class effects

  7. The Topical Application of Rosuvastatin in Preventing Knee Intra-Articular Adhesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haixiao; Germanov, Alexey V.; Goryaeva, Galina L.; Yachmenev, Alexander N.; Gordienko, Dmitriy I.; Kuzin, Victor V.; Skoroglyadov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intra-articular adhesion is one of the common complications of post knee surgery and injury. The formation of joint adhesion can lead to serious dysfunction. Rosuvastatin (ROS) is a new 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, with multiple biological effects. In our study, the object was to evaluate the effectiveness of ROS in the prevention of post-operative knee adhesion in rats. Material/Methods Femoral condyle exposing surgery was performed on 45 healthy Sprague Dawley rats. Gelatin sponges soaked with 20 mg/kg of ROS, 10 mg/kg of ROS, or saline were used to cover the surgical site. The post-operative knee joints were fixed in a flexed position with micro Kirschner wires for four weeks. ROS effectiveness for treating intra-articular adhesion was determined with visual score evaluation, hydroxyproline content, histological analyses, immunohistochemistry, and inflammatory and vascular endothelial growth factors expression. Results The animals’ recovery was stable after surgery. The hydroxyproline content, visual score, and inflammatory vascular growth factors expression levels suggested that, compared with the control group, the ROS treatment groups showed better outcomes. ROS prevented joint adhesion formation, collagen deposition, and vascularization at the surgical site, and also inhibited inflammatory activity post-operatively. Compared with the 10 mg/kg ROS group, the 20 mg/kg ROS group showed significantly better outcomes. Conclusions The local application of ROS reduced intra-articular adhesion formation, collagen deposition, and vascularization at the surgical site, and inhibited inflammatory activity post-operatively. These results suggested optimal concentration of ROS to be 20 mg/kg. PMID:27115197

  8. Pleiotropic effects of statins on the treatment of chronic periodontitis – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Estanislau, Ilanna Mara Gomes; Terceiro, Icrólio Ribeiro Colares; Lisboa, Mario Roberto Pontes; Teles, Patrícia de Barros; Carvalho, Rosimary de Sousa; Martins, Ricardo Souza; Moreira, Maria Mônica Studart Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Aim Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and are an important group of hypolipidaemic drugs, widely used in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and cardiovascular disease. Some studies have shown that statins are able to modulate inflammation and alveolar bone loss. Methods In order to evaluate whether statins could influence periodontal treatment, improving the clinical and radiographic parameters in chronic periodontitis, a systematic review was conducted in the databases PUBMED and BIREME, searching for articles in English and Portuguese, published between the years 2004 and 2014, using the combined keywords statin, periodontal disease, periodontitis and alveolar bone. Studies regarding the treatment of chronic periodontitis in humans, blind or double-blind, retrospective cohort or randomized controlled trials that used statins topically or systemically were selected. Results Statins have important anti-inflammatory and immune effects, reducing levels of C-reactive protein and matrix metalloproteinases and their intermediate products, such as tumour necrosis factor-α, and are also able to inhibit the adhesion and extravasation of leukocytes, which block the co-stimulation of T cells. Statins reduce bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast formation and lead to increased apoptosis of these cells. The effect of statins on bone formation is related to the increased gene expression of bone morphogenetic protein in osteoblasts. Conclusion Although we found biological mechanisms and clinical results that show lower alveolar bone loss and reduction of clinical signs of inflammation, further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical applicability of statins in the routine treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:25444240

  9. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  10. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  11. Chemical and Genetic Validation of the Statin Drug Target to Treat the Helminth Disease, Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Long, Thavy; Asarnow, Dan; Suzuki, Brian M.; Singh, Rahul; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2014-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway is essential in eukaryotes and responsible for a diversity of fundamental synthetic activities. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway and is targeted by the ubiquitous statin drugs to treat hypercholesterolemia. Independent reports have indicated the cidal effects of statins against the flatworm parasite, S. mansoni, and the possibility that SmHMGR is a useful drug target to develop new statin-based anti-schistosome therapies. For six commercially available statins, we demonstrate concentration- and time-dependent killing of immature (somule) and adult S. mansoni in vitro at sub-micromolar and micromolar concentrations, respectively. Cidal activity trends with statin lipophilicity whereby simvastatin and pravastatin are the most and least active, respectively. Worm death is preventable by excess mevalonate, the product of HMGR. Statin activity against somules was quantified both manually and automatically using a new, machine learning-based automated algorithm with congruent results. In addition, to chemical targeting, RNA interference (RNAi) of HMGR also kills somules in vitro and, again, lethality is blocked by excess mevalonate. Further, RNAi of HMGR of somules in vitro subsequently limits parasite survival in a mouse model of infection by up to 80%. Parasite death, either via statins or specific RNAi of HMGR, is associated with activation of apoptotic caspase activity. Together, our genetic and chemical data confirm that S. mansoni HMGR is an essential gene and the relevant target of statin drugs. We discuss our findings in context of a potential drug development program and the desired product profile for a new schistosomiasis drug. PMID:24489942

  12. Identification of SnIP1, a novel protein that interacts with SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK1).

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Stephen P; Laurie, Sophie; Bertini, Laura; Beaudoin, Frederic; Dickinson, J Richard; Halford, Nigel G

    2002-05-01

    Plant SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK1) phosphorylates 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A, nitrate reductase and sucrose phosphate synthase in vitro, and is required for expression of sucrose synthase in potato tubers and excised leaves. In this study, a barley (Hordeum vulgare) endosperm cDNA, SnIP1, was isolated by two-hybrid screening with barley SnRK1b, a seed-specific form of SnRK1. The protein encoded by the SnIP1 cDNA was found to interact with barley SnRK1b protein in vitro. Southern analysis suggested that barley contains a single SnIP1 gene or small gene family. SnIP1 transcripts were detected in RNA isolated from leaf, root and mid-maturation seed. Sequence similarity searches against protein, nucleotide and expressed sequence tag databases identified hitherto uncharacterized sequences related to SnIP1 from maize (Zea mays, accession number AI691404), arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana. AC079673 and AB016886) and poplar (Populus balsamifera, AI166543). No homologous sequences were identified from outside the plant kingdom, but weak sequence similarity was found between the SnIP1 peptide and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) SNF4 and its mammalian homologue AMPKy. Nevertheless, SnIP1 failed to complement a yeast snf4 mutant. SnIP1 was found to have little overall sequence similarity with the PV42 family of SNF4-like plant proteins, but proteins of both the SnIP1 and PV42 families contain a conserved hydrophobic sequence we named the SnIP motif.

  13. Combination therapy with statins and omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Nambi, Vijay; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2006-08-21

    Combined dyslipidemia is the concurrent presence of multiple abnormalities in various lipid subfractions, including elevated concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs), as well as decreased concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines of the US National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) lowered the cut points for classification of TG levels, established non-HDL cholesterol levels as a secondary target of therapy in patients with TGs of >or=2.26 mmol/L (200 mg/dL), and defined the metabolic syndrome as a secondary target of therapy. Although 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are first-line therapy for most patients with elevated LDL cholesterol, statin monotherapy may not be sufficient to achieve recommended non-HDL cholesterol goals, and statins have only modest effects on reducing TG levels. Similarly, patients whose TG levels remain elevated despite treatment with a TG-lowering agent may require the addition of a statin to provide further TG reduction. In addition, statin therapy may be needed to offset the secondary increase in levels of LDL cholesterol that frequently results from treatment with a TG-lowering agent in patients with marked hypertriglyceridemia. In a number of small studies, the combination of statins and omega-3 fatty acids has been consistently shown to be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated treatment for combined dyslipidemia. Patients with recent myocardial infarction may also benefit from this combination. When considering risks and benefits of adding a second agent to statins for treatment of combined dyslipidemia, omega-3 fatty acids provide additional lipid improvements without requiring additional laboratory tests and do not increase risk for adverse muscle or liver effects. PMID:16919515

  14. Hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Pejic, Rade N; Lee, Daniel T

    2006-01-01

    hypertriglyceridemia, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors are preferred. In patients with low HDL levels and hypertriglyceridemia, extended release niacin can be considered. A combination of the medicines may be necessary in recalcitrant cases. PMID:16672684

  15. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management.

  16. Use of Atorvastatin in Lipid Disorders and Cardiovascular Disease in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yi-Cong; Zhao, Xi-Liang; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Statins are still underused for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in China. Hence, we conducted a systemic review on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and adverse events of atorvastatin, as well as on patient adherence. Data Sources: We conducted a systemic search in PubMed with the following keywords: “atorvastatin” (Supplementary concept) or “atorvastatin” (All field) and (“China” [AD] or “China” [all field] or “Chinese” [All field]). Study Selection: Clinical or basic research articles on atorvastatin were included. Results: Atorvastatin is a reversible and competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, decreasing the de novo cholesterol synthesis. The pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin among Chinese is similar to those in Caucasians, and several gene polymorphisms have proved to be associated with the metabolism of atorvastatin in the Chinese population. Several international multiple-center randomized control trials have demonstrated the benefit of atorvastatin for primary and secondary prevention of CVD. None of them, however, included the Chinese, and current evidence in the population is still inadequate, due to the small sample size, low study quality, short study duration, and the use of surrogate endpoints instead of clinical endpoints. The overall incidence of adverse events observed with atorvastatin did not increase in the 10–80 mg dose range, and was similar to that observed with placebo and in patients treated with other statins, which makes atorvastatin well-tolerated in the Chinese population. Moreover, high patient adherence was observed in clinical studies. Conclusions: Based on the current available evidence, there is no significant difference between Chinese and non-Chinese population in term of pharmacology and clinical efficacy/safety. High-quality evidence is still needed to support the use of atorvastatin in high-risk Chinese population. PMID:25591572

  17. TMEM55B is a Novel Regulator of Cellular Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Marisa W.; Bauzon, Frederick; Naidoo, Devesh; Theusch, Elizabeth; Stevens, Kristen; Schilde, Jessica; Schubert, Christian; Mangravite, Lara M.; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Temel, Ryan E.; Runz, Heiko; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inter-individual variation in pathways impacting cellular cholesterol metabolism can influence levels of plasma cholesterol, a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Inherent variation among immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from different donors can be leveraged to discover novel genes that modulate cellular cholesterol metabolism. The objective of this study was to identify novel genes that regulate cholesterol metabolism by testing for evidence of correlated gene expression with cellular levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) mRNA, a marker for cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in a large panel of LCLs. Approach and Results Expression array profiling was performed on 480 LCLs established from participants of the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics statin clinical trial, and transcripts were tested for evidence of correlated expression with HMGCR as a marker of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Of these, transmembrane protein 55b (TMEM55B) showed the strongest correlation (r=0.29, p=4.0E-08) of all genes not previously implicated in cholesterol metabolism and was found to be sterol regulated. TMEM55B knock-down in human hepatoma cell lines promoted the decay rate of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), reduced cell surface LDLR protein, impaired LDL uptake, and reduced intracellular cholesterol. Conclusions Here we report identification of TMEM55B as a novel regulator of cellular cholesterol metabolism through the combination of gene expression profiling and functional studies. The findings highlight the value of an integrated genomic approach for identifying genes that influence cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:25035345

  18. Coordinately Regulated Alternative Splicing of Genes Involved in Cholesterol Biosynthesis and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Devesh; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Temel, Ryan E.; McDaniel, Allison L.; Marshall, Stephanie M.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally regulated in response to cellular sterol content in a coordinated manner. A number of these genes, including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and LDL receptor (LDLR), undergo alternative splicing, resulting in reductions of enzyme or protein activity. Here we demonstrate that cellular sterol depletion suppresses, and sterol loading induces, alternative splicing of multiple genes involved in the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis including HMGCR and LDLR, the key regulators of cellular cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake, respectively. These changes were observed in both in vitro studies of the HepG2 human hepatoma derived cell line, as well as in vivo studies of St. Kitts vervets, also known as African green monkeys, a commonly used primate model for investigating cholesterol metabolism. These effects are mediated in part by sterol regulation of polypyrimidine tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1), since knock-down of PTBP1 eliminates sterol induced changes in alternative splicing of several of these genes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that influence HMGCR and LDLR alternative splicing (rs3846662 and rs688, respectively), have been associated with variation in plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. Sterol-induced changes in alternative splicing are blunted in carriers of the minor alleles for each of these SNPs, indicating an interaction between genetic and non-genetic regulation of this process. Our results implicate alternative splicing as a novel mechanism of enhancing the robust transcriptional response to conditions of cellular cholesterol depletion or accumulation. Thus coordinated regulation of alternative splicing may contribute to cellular cholesterol homeostasis as well as plasma LDL levels. PMID:21559365

  19. Coenzyme Q10 remarkably improves the bio-energetic function of rat liver mitochondria treated with statins.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Bardbori, Afshin; Najibi, Asma; Amirzadegan, Najmeh; Gharibi, Raziyeh; Dashti, Ayat; Omidi, Mahmoud; Saeedi, Arastoo; Ghafarian-Bahreman, Ali; Niknahad, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    CoQ10 shares a biosynthetic pathway with cholesterol therefore it can be a potential target of the widely available lipid-lowering agents such as statins. Statins are the most widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs with the ability to inhibit HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. Preclinical and clinical safety data have shown that statins do not cause serious adverse effects in humans. However, their long-term administration is associated with a variety of myopatic complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CoQ10 supplementation of animals under high fat diet (HFD) treated with statins is able to bypass the mitochondrial metabolic defects or not? Animals were divided into 7 groups and fed with either regular (RD) or HFD during experiments. The first group considered as regular control and fed with a RD. Groups 2-7 including HFD control, CoQ10 (10mg/kg), simvastatin (30mg/kg), atorvastatin (30mg/kg), simvastatin+CoQ10 or atorvastatin+CoQ10 treated orally for 30 days and fed with HFD. At the end of treatments, the animals were killed and blood samples were collected for biochemical examinations. The rat liver mitochondria were isolated and several mitochondrial indices including succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPP) were determined. We found that triglyceride (Tg), cholesterol (Chol) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were augmented with HFD compared to RD and treatment with statins remarkably lowered the Tg, Chol and LDL levels. Mitochondrial parameters including, SDA, ATP levels, MMP and MPP were reduced with statin treatment and improved by co-administration with CoQ10. PMID:26007644

  20. Amelioration of Renal Inflammation, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis Underlies the Protective Effect of Low Dosage of Atorvastatin in Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jaikumkao, Krit; Pongchaidecha, Anchalee; Thongnak, La-ongdao; Wanchai, Keerati; Arjinajarn, Phatchawan; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Lungkaphin, Anusorn

    2016-01-01

    Gentamicin is a commonly used aminoglycoside antibiotic. However, its therapeutic use is limited by its nephrotoxicity. The mechanisms of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity are principally from renal inflammation and oxidative stress. Since atorvastatin, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, exerts lipid-lowering effects, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory as well as anti-apoptotic effects, this study aimed to investigate the protective effects of atorvastatin against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were used and nephrotoxicity was induced by intraperitoneal injection of gentamicin, 100 mg/kg/day, for 15 days. Atorvastatin, 10 mg/kg/day, was administered by orally gavage 30 min before gentamicin injection on day 1 to 15 (pretreatment) or on day 10 to15 (delayed treatment). For only atorvastatin treatment group, it was given on day 1 to 15. At the end of the experiment, kidney weight, blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine as well as renal inflammation (NF-κB, TNFαR1, IL-6 and iNOS), renal fibrosis (TGFβ1), ER stress (calpain, GRP78, CHOP, and caspase 12) and apoptotic markers (cleaved caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2) as well as TUNEL assay were determined. Gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity was confirmed by marked elevations in serum urea and creatinine, kidney hypertrophy, renal inflammation, fibrosis, ER stress and apoptosis and attenuation of creatinine clearance. Atorvastatin pre and delayed treatment significantly improved renal function and decreased renal NF-κB, TNFαR1, IL-6, iNOS and TGFβ1 expressions. They also attenuated calpain, GRP78, CHOP, caspase 12, Bax, and increased Bcl-2 expressions in gentamicin-treated rat. These results indicate that atorvastatin treatment could attenuate gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats, substantiated by the reduction of inflammation, ER stress and apoptosis. The effect of atorvastatin in protecting from renal damage induced by gentamicin seems to be more effective when it

  1. Botrydial and botcinins produced by Botrytis cinerea regulate the expression of Trichoderma arundinaceum genes involved in trichothecene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Malmierca, Mónica G; Izquierdo-Bueno, Inmaculada; Mccormick, Susan P; Cardoza, Rosa E; Alexander, Nancy J; Moraga, Javier; Gomes, Eriston V; Proctor, Robert H; Collado, Isidro G; Monte, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea produce the sesquiterpenes harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively, and also the polyketides aspinolides and botcinins (Botcs), respectively. We analysed the role of BOT and Botcs in the Ta37-B. cinerea interaction, including the transcriptomic changes in the genes involved in HA (tri) and ergosterol biosynthesis, as well as changes in the level of HA and squalene-ergosterol. We found that, when confronted with B. cinerea, the tri biosynthetic genes were up-regulated in all dual cultures analysed, but at higher levels when Ta37 was confronted with the BOT non-producer mutant bcbot2Δ. The production of HA was also higher in the interaction area with this mutant. In Ta37-bcbot2Δ confrontation experiments, the expression of the hmgR gene, encoding the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is the first enzyme of the terpene biosynthetic pathway, was also up-regulated, resulting in an increase in squalene production compared with the confrontation with B. cinerea B05.10. Botcs had an up-regulatory effect on the tri biosynthetic genes, with BotcA having a stronger effect than BotcB. The results indicate that the interaction between Ta37 and B. cinerea exerts a stimulatory effect on the expression of the tri biosynthetic genes, which, in the interaction zone, can be attenuated by BOT produced by B. cinerea B05.10. The present work provides evidence for a metabolic dialogue between T. arundinaceum and B. cinerea that is mediated by sesquiterpenes and polyketides, and that affects the outcome of the interaction of these fungi with each other and their environment. PMID:26575202

  2. Regulation of bile acid synthesis in rat hepatocyte monolayer cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kubaska, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Primary hepatocyte monolayer cultures (PHC) were prepared and incubated in serum free media. Cells from a cholestyramine fed rat converted exogenous (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-bile acids at a 3-fold greater rate than rats fed a normal diet. PHC synthesize bile acids (BA) at a rate of approximately 0.06 ..mu..g/mg protein/h. The major bile acid composition, as determined by GLC, was ..beta..-muricholic acid (BMC) and cholic acid (CA) in a 3:1 ratio, respectively. PHC rapidly converted free BA and BA intermediates into taurine conjugated trihydroxy-BA up to 87h after plating. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A-reductase activity assayed in microsomes prepared from PHC, decreased during the initial 48h, then remained constant. Cholesterol 7..cap alpha..-hydroxylase activity decreased during the initial 48h, then increased during the next 48h. This occurred while whole cells produced BA at a linear rate. The effect of individual BA on bile acid synthesis (BAS) was also studied. Relative rates of BAS were measured as the conversion of (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol into (/sup 14/C)-BA. BA combinations were tested in order to simulate the composition of the enterohepatic circulation. The addition of TCA (525 ..mu..M) plus TCDCA (80..mu..M), in concentrations which greatly exceed the concentration of BA (60..mu..M) in rate portal blood, failed to inhibit BAS. BA plus phospholipid and/or cholesterol also did not inhibit BAS. Surprisingly, crude rat bile with a final concentration comparable to those in the synthetic mix inhibited (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol conversion into (/sup 14/C)-BA.

  3. The bHLH Transcription Factors TSAR1 and TSAR2 Regulate Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jan; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to stresses by producing a broad spectrum of bioactive specialized metabolites. Hormonal elicitors, such as jasmonates, trigger a complex signaling circuit leading to the concerted activation of specific metabolic pathways. However, for many specialized metabolic pathways, the transcription factors involved remain unknown. Here, we report on two homologous jasmonate-inducible transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family, TRITERPENE SAPONIN BIOSYNTHESIS ACTIVATING REGULATOR1 (TSAR1) and TSAR2, which direct triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula. TSAR1 and TSAR2 are coregulated with and transactivate the genes encoding 3-HYDROXY-3-METHYLGLUTARYL-COENZYME A REDUCTASE1 (HMGR1) and MAKIBISHI1, the rate-limiting enzyme for triterpene biosynthesis and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls HMGR1 levels, respectively. Transactivation is mediated by direct binding of TSARs to the N-box in the promoter of HMGR1. In transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts, TSAR1 and TSAR2 exhibit different patterns of transactivation of downstream triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes, hinting at distinct functionalities within the regulation of the pathway. Correspondingly, overexpression of TSAR1 or TSAR2 in M. truncatula hairy roots resulted in elevated transcript levels of known triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes and strongly increased the accumulation of triterpene saponins. TSAR2 overexpression specifically boosted hemolytic saponin biosynthesis, whereas TSAR1 overexpression primarily stimulated nonhemolytic soyasaponin biosynthesis. Both TSARs also activated all genes of the precursor mevalonate pathway but did not affect sterol biosynthetic genes, pointing to their specific role as regulators of specialized triterpene metabolism in M. truncatula.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic acid exerts farnesoid X receptor-antagonistic effects on bile acid and lipid metabolism in morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Michaela; Thorell, Anders; Claudel, Thierry; Jha, Pooja; Koefeler, Harald; Lackner, Carolin; Hoesel, Bastian; Fauler, Guenter; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Einarsson, Curt; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Bile acids (BAs) are major regulators of hepatic BA and lipid metabolism but their mechanisms of action in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are still poorly understood. Here we aimed to explore the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in modulating the cross-talk between liver and visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) regarding BA and cholesterol metabolism and fatty acid/lipid partitioning in morbidly obese NAFLD patients. Methods In this randomized controlled pharmacodynamic study, we analyzed serum, liver and vWAT samples from 40 well-matched morbidly obese patients receiving UDCA (20 mg/kg/day) or no treatment three weeks prior to bariatric surgery. Results Short term UDCA administration stimulated BA synthesis by reducing circulating fibroblast growth factor 19 and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation, resulting in cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase induction mirrored by elevated C4 and 7α-hydroxycholesterol. Enhanced BA formation depleted hepatic and LDL-cholesterol with subsequent activation of the key enzyme of cholesterol synthesis 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Blunted FXR anti-lipogenic effects induced lipogenic stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in the liver, thereby increasing hepatic triglyceride content. In addition, induced SCD activity in vWAT shifted vWAT lipid metabolism towards generation of less toxic and more lipogenic monounsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid. Conclusion These data demonstrate that by exerting FXR-antagonistic effects, UDCA treatment in NAFLD patients strongly impacts on cholesterol and BA synthesis and induces neutral lipid accumulation in both liver and vWAT. PMID:25617503

  5. Statin-associated myopathy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul D; Clarkson, Priscilla; Karas, Richard H

    2003-04-01

    Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are associated with skeletal muscle complaints, including clinically important myositis and rhabdomyolysis, mild serum creatine kinase (CK) elevations, myalgia with and without elevated CK levels, muscle weakness, muscle cramps, and persistent myalgia and CK elevations after statin withdrawal. We performed a literature review to provide a clinical summary of statin-associated myopathy and discuss possible mediating mechanisms. We also update the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports on statin-associated rhabdomyolysis. Articles on statin myopathy were identified via a PubMed search through November 2002 and articles on statin clinical trials, case series, and review articles were identified via a PubMed search through January 2003. Adverse event reports of statin-associated rhabdomyolysis were also collected from the FDA MEDWATCH database. The literature review found that reports of muscle problems during statin clinical trials are extremely rare. The FDA MEDWATCH Reporting System lists 3339 cases of statin-associated rhabdomyolysis reported between January 1, 1990, and March 31, 2002. Cerivastatin was the most commonly implicated statin. Few data are available regarding the frequency of less-serious events such as muscle pain and weakness, which may affect 1% to 5% of patients. The risk of rhabdomyolysis and other adverse effects with statin use can be exacerbated by several factors, including compromised hepatic and renal function, hypothyroidism, diabetes, and concomitant medications. Medications such as the fibrate gemfibrozil alter statin metabolism and increase statin plasma concentration. How statins injure skeletal muscle is not clear, although recent evidence suggests that statins reduce the production of small regulatory proteins that are important for myocyte maintenance.

  6. The Mechanisms Underlying the Hypolipidaemic Effects of Grifola frondosa in the Liver of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yinrun; Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Li, Xiangmin; Hu, Huiping; Li, Liangqiu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa and its regulation mechanism involved in lipid metabolism in liver of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The body weights and serum lipid levels of control rats, of hyperlipidaemic rats, and of hyperlipidaemic rats treated with oral G. frondosa were determined. mRNA expression and concentration of key lipid metabolism enzymes were investigated. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were markedly decreased in hyperlipidaemic rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were significantly down-regulated, while expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) was significantly up-regulated in the livers of treated rats compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. The concentrations of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to identify 20 proteins differentially expressed in livers of rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats. Of these 20 proteins, seven proteins were down-regulated, and 13 proteins were up-regulated. These findings indicate that the hypolipidaemic effects of G. frondosa reflected its modulation of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, absorption, and catabolic pathways. G. frondosa may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects by inhibiting LDL oxidation through down-regulation and up-regulating proteins expression in the liver of rats. Therefore, G. frondosa may produce both hypolipidaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, and potentially

  7. Long-term intake of a high prebiotic fiber diet but not high protein reduces metabolic risk after a high fat challenge and uniquely alters gut microbiota and hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dolan C; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-09-01

    A mismatch between early developmental diet and adulthood may increase obesity risk. Our objective was to determine the effects of re-matching rats to their weaning diets high in protein or fiber after transient high-fat/high-sucrose challenge in adulthood. We hypothesize that a long-term high fiber diet will be associated with a gut microbiota and hepatic gene expression reflective of reduced adiposity. Wistar rat pups were fed a control (C), high prebiotic fiber (HF), or high protein (HP) diet from 3-15 weeks of age; a high-fat/high-sucrose diet from 15-21 weeks; their respective C, HF, or HP diets from 21-25 weeks. Gut microbiota of cecal contents and hepatic gene expression were measured when rats were terminated at 25 weeks of age. HF rats had higher total bacteria, bifidobacteria and Bacteroides/Prevotella spp than C and HP at 25 weeks (P < 0.05). Firmicutes, especially Clostridium leptum, decreased in HF compared to C and HP (P < .05). The ratio of Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in HF versus C and HP at 25 weeks (P < .05). HF decreased hepatic cholesterol content compared to HP and C at 25 weeks. HF and HP increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA and decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase mRNA compared to C (P < .05). In conclusion, re-matching rats to a HF but not HP diet attenuated the typical increase in Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio associated with consumption of a high fat diet. Lower hepatic cholesterol with long-term HF diet intake may be related to alterations in gut microbiota and hepatic lipid metabolism.

  8. Isoprenylation is required for the processing of the lamin A precursor

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear lamina proteins, prelamin A, lamin B, and a 70-kD lamina- associated protein, are posttranslationally modified by a metabolite derived from mevalonate. This modification can be inhibited by treatment with (3-R,S)-3-fluoromevalonate, demonstrating that it is isoprenoid in nature. We have examined the association between isoprenoid metabolism and processing of the lamin A precursor in human and hamster cells. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by mevinolin (lovastatin) specifically depletes endogenous isoprenoid pools and inhibits the conversion of prelamin A to lamin A. Prelamin A processing is also blocked by mevalonate starvation of Mev- 1, a CHO cell line auxotrophic for mevalonate. Moreover, inhibition of prelamin A processing by mevinolin treatment is rapidly reversed by the addition of exogenous mevalonate. Processing of prelamin A is, therefore, dependent on isoprenoid metabolism. Analysis of the conversion of prelamin A to lamin A by two independent methods, immunoprecipitation and two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH gel electrophoresis, demonstrates that a precursor-product relationship exists between prelamin A and lamin A. Analysis of R,S-[5- 3H(N)]mevalonate-labeled cells shows that the rate of turnover of the isoprenoid group from prelamin A is comparable to the rate of conversion of prelamin A to lamin A. These results suggest that during the proteolytic maturation of prelamin A, the isoprenylated moiety is lost. A significant difference between prelamin A processing, and that of p21ras and the B-type lamins that undergo isoprenylation-dependent proteolytic maturation, is that the mature form of lamin A is no longer isoprenylated. PMID:2335559

  9. Hypergravity-induced changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, R.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Takeba, G.; Hoson, T.

    2003-05-01

    Under hypergravity conditions, the cell wall of stem organs becomes mechanically rigid and elongation growth is suppressed, which can be recognized as the mechanism for plants to resist gravitational force. The changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment were analyzed in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method, for identifying genes involved in hypergravity-induced growth suppression. Sixty-two cDNA clones were expressed differentially between the control and 300 g conditions: the expression levels of 39 clones increased, whereas those of 23 clones decreased under hypergravity conditions. Sequence analysis and database searching revealed that 12 clones, 9 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated, have homology to known proteins. The expression of these genes was further analyzed using RT-PCR. Finally, six genes were confirmed to be up-regulated by hypergravity. One of such genes encoded 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor ofterpenoids such as membrane sterols and several types of hormones. The expression of HMGR gene increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment. Also, compactin, an inhibitor of HMGR, prevented hypergravity-induced growth suppression, suggesting that HMGR is involved in suppression of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by hypergravity. In addition, hypergravity increased the expression levels of genes encoding CCR1 and ERD15, which were shown to take part in the signaling pathway of environmental stimuli such as temperature and water, and those of the α-tubulin gene. These genes may be involved in a series of cellular events leading to growth suppression of stem organs under hypergravity conditions.

  10. Dietary fenugreek and onion attenuate cholesterol gallstone formation in lithogenic diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raghunatha R L; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2011-10-01

    An animal study was conducted to evaluate the antilithogenic effect of a combination of dietary fenugreek seeds and onion. Lithogenic conditions were induced in mice by feeding them a high (0.5%) cholesterol diet (HCD) for 10 weeks. Fenugreek (12%) and onion (2%) were included individually and in combination in this HCD. Fenugreek, onion and their combination reduced the incidence of cholesterol gallstones by 75%, 27% and 76%, respectively, with attendant reduction in total cholesterol content by 38-42%, 50-72% and 61-80% in serum, liver and bile respectively. Consequently, the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio was reduced significantly in serum, liver and bile. The cholesterol saturation index of bile was reduced from 4.14 to 1.38 by the combination of fenugreek and onion and to 2.33 by onion alone. The phospholipid and bile acid contents of the bile were also increased. Changes in the hepatic enzyme activities (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase and cholesterol-27-hydroxylase) induced by HCD were countered by fenugreek, onion and their combination. Hepatic lipid peroxides were reduced by 19-22% and 39-45% with fenugreek, onion and their combination included in the diet along with the HCD. Increased accumulation of fat in the liver and inflammation of the gallbladder membrane produced by HCD were reduced by fenugreek, onion and their combination. The antilithogenic influence was highest with fenugreek alone, and the presence of onion along with it did not further increase this effect. There was also no additive effect of the two spices in the recovery of antioxidant molecules or in the antioxidant enzyme activities.

  11. Biochemical and molecular study of the influence of Amaranthus hypochondriacus flour on serum and liver lipids in rats treated with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Lucero López, Viviana R; Razzeto, Gabriela S; Escudero, Nora L; Gimenez, M Sofia

    2013-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis are frequent alterations due to alcohol abuse. Amaranth is a pseudocereal with hypolipidemic potential among other nutraceutical actions. Here we study the effect of Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah) seeds on serum and liver lipids, and the expression of genes associated to lipid metabolism and liver histology in male Wistar rats intoxicated with ethanol. The animals were divided into four groups; two groups were fed the American Institute of Nutrition 1993 for maintenance diet (AIN-93M), and the other two with AIN-93M containing Ah as protein source. One of each protein group received 20% ethanol in the drinking water, thus obtaining: CC (control casein), EC (ethanol casein), CAh (control Ah) and EAh (ethanol Ah). When comparing EAh vs . EC, we found a positive effect of Ah on lipids, preventing the increment of serum cholesterol (p <0.001), through the higher expression of the LDL receptor (p <0.001); and it also decreased free (p < 0.05) and esterified cholesterol (p <0.01) in liver, probably via the reduction of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase expression (p <0.001). We also observed that amaranth contributed to the decrease of fat deposits in liver, probably through the decrease in acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (p <0.01), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 1 (p <0.01) and diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (p <0.05) expression. The histological study showed a decrease in the fat deposits in the amaranth group when compared to casein; this is consistent with the biochemical and molecular parameters studied in this work. In conclusion, amaranth could be recommended to avoid the alterations in the lipid metabolism induced by alcohol and other harmful agents.

  12. Effect of rosuvastatin on hyperuricemic rats and the protective effect on endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xilifu, Dilidaer; Abudula, Abulizi; Rehemu, Nijiati; Zhao, Long; Zhou, Xinrong; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2014-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the development of cardiovascular diseases, renal injuries and hypertension induced by hyperuricemia. Therapies targeting uric acid (UA) may be beneficial in cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the effect of rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, was investigated to determine whether rosuvastatin improves endothelial dysfunction via the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) pathway and delays the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in hyperuricemic rats. A total of 72 Sprague-Dawley rats (age, 8 weeks) were randomly divided into six groups (12 rats per group), including the control, model, 2.5 mg/kg/day rosuvastatin, 5 mg/kg/day rosuvastatin, 10 mg/kg/day rosuvastatin and 53.57 mg/kg/day allopurinol groups. The model, rosuvastatin and allopurinol rats were subjected to hyperuricemia, induced by the administration of yeast extract powder (21 g/kg/day) and oxonic acid potassium salt (200 mg/kg/day). The hyperuricemic rats were treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10.0 mg/kg/day rosuvastatin orally for six weeks, while rats treated with allopurinol (53.57 mg/kg/day) were used as a positive control. The serum levels of NO and the gene expression levels of endothelial NO synthase in the aortic tissue increased, whereas the serum levels of UA, endothelin-1 and angiotensin II decreased in the hyperuricemic rats treated with rosuvastatin, particularly at a high rosuvastatin dose (10 mg/kg/day). In addition, the curative effect of the 10 mg/kg/day rosuvastatin group was evidently higher compared with the allopurinol group. Therefore, rosuvastatin may be a novel drug candidate for the treatment of hyperuricemia due to its endothelial protective properties.

  13. Metabolic cross-talk between pathways of terpenoid backbone biosynthesis in spike lavender.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Kutzner, Erika; Huber, Claudia; Segura, Juan; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Arrillaga, Isabel

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic cross-talk between the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in developing spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia Med) was analyzed using specific inhibitors and on the basis of (13)C-labeling experiments. The presence of mevinolin (MEV), an inhibitor of the MVA pathway, at concentrations higher than 0.5 μM significantly reduced plant development, but not the synthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids. On the other hand, fosmidomycin (FSM), an inhibitor of the MEP pathway, at concentrations higher than 20 μM blocked the synthesis of chlorophyll, carotenoids and essential oils, and significantly reduced stem development. Notably, 1.2 mM MVA could recover the phenotype of MEV-treated plants, including the normal growth and development of roots, and could partially restore the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments and, to a lesser extent, of the essential oils in plantlets treated with FSM. Spike lavender shoot apices were also used in (13)C-labeling experiments, where the plantlets were grown in the presence of [U-(13)C6]glucose. GC-MS-analysis of 1,8-cineole and camphor indicated that the C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) of both monoterpenes are predominantly biosynthesized via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. However, on the basis of the isotopologue profiles, a minor contribution of the MVA pathway was evident that was increased in transgenic spike lavender plants overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), the first enzyme of the MVA pathway. Together, these findings provide evidence for a transport of MVA-derived precursors from the cytosol to the plastids in leaves of spike lavender. PMID:26254184

  14. HRD1-Mediated IGF-1R Ubiquitination Contributes to Renal Protection of Resveratrol in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caifeng; Xu, Weifeng; Huang, Yujie; Li, Min; Shen, Yachen; You, Hui; Liang, Xiubin

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have provided evidence to demonstrate the beneficial renal effects of resveratrol (RESV) due to its antioxidant character and its capacity for activation of surtuin 1. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of RESV against kidney injury are still incompletely understood. The present study used Lepr db/db (db/db) and Lepr db/m (db/m) mice as models to evaluate the effect of RESV on diabetic nephropathy (DN). RESV reduced proteinuria and attenuated the progress of renal fibrosis in db/db mice. Treatment with RESV markedly attenuated the diabetes-induced changes in renal superoxide dismutase copper/zinc, superoxide dismutase manganese, catalase, and malonydialdehyde as well as the renal expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (NOX4), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and E-cadherin in db/db mice. The kidney expression of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) was increased in db/db mice, but the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl reductase degradation (HRD1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, was significantly decreased in the DN model. RESV treatment dramatically decreased IGF-1R and increased HRD1 expressions, consistent with data obtained with HKC-8 cells. HRD1 physically interacted with IGF-1R in HKC-8 cells and liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) data supported the concept that IGF-1R is one of the HRD1 substrates. HRD1 promoted the IGF-1R ubiquitination for degradation in HKC-8 cells, and the down-regulation of HRD1 reversed the protective effects of RESV in HKC-8 cells. In summary, we have demonstrated that RESV reduces proteinuria and attenuates the progression of renal fibrosis in db/db mice. These protective effects of RESV on DN were associated with the up-regulation of HRD1, induced by RESV, and the promotion of IGF-1R ubiquitination and degradation.

  15. Polyphenol-rich black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) extract regulates the expression of genes critical for intestinal cholesterol flux in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Youngki; Wegner, Casey J; Bolling, Bradley W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-09-01

    Black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) is a rich source of polyphenols. The hypolipidemic effects of polyphenol-rich black chokeberry extract (CBE) have been reported, but underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. We investigated the effect of CBE on the expression of genes involved in intestinal lipid metabolism. Caco-2 cells were incubated with 50 or 100 μg/ml of CBE for 24 h for quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction analysis. Expression of genes for cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and sterol regulatory element binding protein 2), apical cholesterol uptake (Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 and scavenger receptor class B Type 1) and basolateral cholesterol efflux [ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)] was significantly decreased by CBE compared with control. Western blot analysis confirmed that CBE inhibited expression of these proteins. In contrast, CBE markedly induced mRNA and/or protein levels of ABCG5 and ABCG8 that mediate apical cholesterol efflux to the intestinal lumen. Furthermore, CBE significantly increased mRNA and protein levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, and cellular LDL uptake. Expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and lipoprotein assembly, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, fatty acid synthase and acyl-CoA oxidase 1, was significantly decreased by CBE in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, CBE significantly increased sirtuin 1, 3 and 5 mRNA levels, while it decreased SIRT-2. Our data suggest that hypolipidemic effects of CBE may be attributed, at least in part, to increased apical efflux of LDL-derived cholesterol and to decreased chylomicron formation in the intestine; and specific isoforms of SIRT may play an important role in this process.

  16. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Kazuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Ishii, Norio; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Sarie; Murakami, Saiko; Nakao, Saya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Shuji; Kawada, Teruo; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects

  17. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites.

  18. Improved Biochemical Outcomes With Statin Use in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Katz, Matthew S.; Mak, Kimberley; Yamada, Yoshiya; Feder, David J.; Zhang Zhigang; Jia Xiaoyu; Shi Weiji; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and biochemical and survival outcomes after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1711 men with clinical stage T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT to a median dose of 81 Gy during 1995-2007. Preradiotherapy medication data were available for 1681 patients. Three hundred eighty-two patients (23%) were taking a statin medication at diagnosis and throughout RT. Nine hundred forty-seven patients received a short-course of neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with RT. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Results: The 5- and 8-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rates for statin patients were 89% and 80%, compared with 83% and 74% for those not taking statins (p = 0.002). In a multivariate analysis, statin use (hazard ratio [HR]0.69, p = 0.03), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) low-risk group, and ADT use were associated with improved PRFS. Only high-risk patients in the statin group demonstrated improvement in PRFS (HR 0.52, p = 0.02). Across all groups, statin use was not associated with improved distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.51). On multivariate analysis, lower NCCN risk group (p = 0.01) and ADT use (p = 0.005) predicted improved DMFS. Conclusions: Statin use during high-dose RT for clinically localized prostate cancer was associated with a significant improvement in PRFS in high-risk patients. These data suggest that statins have anticancer activity and possibly provide radiosensitization when used in conjunction with RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Differential influence of different dietary fatty acids on very low-density lipoprotein secretion when delivered to hepatocytes in chylomicron remnants.

    PubMed

    López-Soldado, Iliana; Avella, Michael; Botham, Kathleen M

    2009-02-01

    The influence of dietary fats carried in chylomicron remnants on the hepatic secretion of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) was investigated using chylomicron remnant-like particles (CRLPs) and cultured rat hepatocytes as the experimental model. Chylomicron remnant-like particles containing triacylglycerol (TG) from palm, olive, or corn (enriched in saturated, monounsaturated, or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids) oil, respectively, were incubated with cultured hepatocytes for 5 hours. The medium was then removed and replaced with medium without CRLPs; and the secretion of TG, cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B48 during the following 16 hours was determined. Secretion of TG into the d less than 1.050-g/mL fraction containing VLDL was unaffected by olive CRLPs, but was significantly increased in cells exposed to palm or corn CRLPs in comparison with both olive CRLPs and control incubations without CRLPs. Secretion of apolipoprotein B48, however, was not changed by any of the CRLP types. Apolipoprotein B messenger RNA levels were decreased by olive and corn CRLPs, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase messenger RNA abundance was increased by palm CRLPs; but expression of other genes involved in the regulation of VLDL secretion was unaffected. These findings demonstrate that CRLPs enriched in saturated fatty acids or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase the secretion of TG in VLDL, possibly because of the secretion of larger particles, whereas those enriched in monounsaturated fatty acids have no effect. Thus, different dietary fats have differential effects on VLDL secretion directly when delivered to the liver in chylomicron remnants.

  20. Suppression of VLDL secretion by cultured hepatocytes incubated with chylomicron remnants enriched in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is regulated by hepatic nuclear factor-4alpha.

    PubMed

    López-Soldado, Iliana; Avella, Michael; Botham, Kathleen M

    2009-12-01

    Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) suppress the secretion of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) directly when delivered to the liver in chylomicron remnants (CMR). The role of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and hepatic nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF-4alpha) in the regulation of this effect was investigated. Chylomicron remnant-like particles (CRLPs) containing triacylglycerol (TG) from palm (rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA)) or fish (rich in n-3 PUFA) oil were incubated with cultured rat hepatocytes (24h) and the expression of protein and mRNA for SREBP-1, SREBP-2 and HNF-4alpha, and levels of mRNA for their target genes were determined. SREBP-1 and -2 protein expression in the membrane and nuclear fractions was unaffected by either type of CRLPs. mRNA abundance for SREBP-1c and -2 was also unchanged by CRLP-treatment, as were levels of mRNA for target genes of SREBP-1, including steroyl CoA desaturase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and ATP citrate lyase, and SREBP-2 (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase). In contrast, HNF-4alpha protein and mRNA levels were significantly decreased by CRLPs enriched in n-3 PUFA, but not SFA, and the expression of mRNA for HNF-4alpha target genes, including HNF-1alpha, apolipoprotein B and the microsomal TG transfer protein, was also lowered by n-3 PUFA-, but not SFA-enriched CRLPs. These findings suggest that the direct suppression of VLDL secretion by dietary n-3 PUFA delivered to the liver in CMR is mediated via decreased expression of HNF-4alpha.

  1. Metal contamination as a possible etiology of fibropapillomatosis in juvenile female green sea turtles Chelonia mydas from the southern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cinthia Carneiro; Klein, Roberta Daniele; Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; Bianchini, Adalto

    2016-01-01

    Environmental contaminants have been suggested as a possible cause of fibropapillomatosis (FP) in green sea turtles. In turn, a reduced concentration of serum cholesterol has been indicated as a reliable biomarker of malignancy in vertebrates, including marine turtles. In the present study, metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn) concentrations, oxidative stress parameters [antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), protein carbonyls (PC), lipid peroxidation (LPO), frequency of micronucleated cells (FMC)], water content, cholesterol concentration and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity were analyzed in the blood/serum of juvenile (29.3-59.5cm) female green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) with FP (n=14) and without FP (n=13) sampled at Ubatuba coast (São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil). Green sea turtles were grouped and analyzed according to the severity of tumors. Individuals heavily afflicted with FP showed significantly higher blood Cu, Pb and Fe concentrations, blood LPO levels, as well as significantly lower serum cholesterol concentrations and HMGR activity than turtles without FP. Significant and positive correlations were observed between HMGR activity and cholesterol concentrations, as well as LPO levels and Fe and Pb concentrations. In turn, Cu and Pb concentrations were significantly and negatively correlated with HMGR activity and cholesterol concentration. Furthermore, Cu, Fe and Pb were positively correlated with each other. Therefore, the reduced concentration of serum cholesterol observed in green sea turtles heavily afflicted with FP is related to a Cu- and Pb-induced inhibition of HMGR activity paralleled by a higher LPO rate induced by increased Fe and Pb concentrations. As oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of viral infections, our findings support the idea that metal contamination, especially by Cu, Fe and Pb, may be implicated in the etiology of FP in green sea turtles through oxidative stress

  2. Nicotiana benthamiana as a Production Platform for Artemisinin Precursors

    PubMed Central

    van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.; Cankar, Katarina; Nogueira, Marilise; Bosch, Dirk; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Beekwilder, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Background Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration. The first committed precursor of artemisinin, amorpha-4,11-diene, was produced upon infiltration of a construct containing amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, accompanied by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Amorpha-4,11-diene was detected both in extracts and in the headspace of the N. benthamiana leaves. When the amorphadiene oxidase CYP71AV1 was co-infiltrated with the amorphadiene-synthesizing construct, the amorpha-4,11-diene levels strongly decreased, suggesting it was oxidized. Surprisingly, no anticipated oxidation products, such as artemisinic acid, were detected upon GC-MS analysis. However, analysis of leaf extracts with a non-targeted metabolomics approach, using LC-QTOF-MS, revealed the presence of another compound, which was identified as artemisinic acid-12-β-diglucoside. This compound accumulated to 39.5 mg.kg−1 fwt. Apparently the product of the heterologous pathway that was introduced, artemisinic acid, is further metabolized efficiently by glycosyl transferases that are endogenous to N. benthamiana. Conclusion/Significance This work shows that agroinfiltration of N. bentamiana can be used as a model to study the production of sesquiterpenoid pharmaceutical compounds. The interaction between the ectopically introduced pathway and the endogenous metabolism of the plant is discussed. PMID:21151979

  3. Disorders of lipid metabolism in nephrotic syndrome: mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome results in hyperlipidemia and profound alterations in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins (very low-density lipoprotein [VLDL], immediate-density lipoprotein [IDL], and low-density lipoprotein [LDL]), lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), and the total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio are increased in nephrotic syndrome. This is accompanied by significant changes in the composition of various lipoproteins including their cholesterol-to-triglyceride, free cholesterol-to-cholesterol ester, and phospholipid-to-protein ratios. These abnormalities are mediated by changes in the expression and activities of the key proteins involved in the biosynthesis, transport, remodeling, and catabolism of lipids and lipoproteins including apoproteins A, B, C, and E; 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase; fatty acid synthase; LDL receptor; lecithin cholesteryl ester acyltransferase; acyl coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase; HDL docking receptor (scavenger receptor class B, type 1 [SR-B1]); HDL endocytic receptor; lipoprotein lipase; and hepatic lipase, among others. The disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in nephrotic syndrome contribute to the development and progression of cardiovascular and kidney disease. In addition, by limiting delivery of lipid fuel to the muscles for generation of energy and to the adipose tissues for storage of energy, changes in lipid metabolism contribute to the reduction of body mass and impaired exercise capacity. This article provides an overview of the mechanisms, consequences, and treatment of lipid disorders in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:27165836

  4. The Mechanisms Underlying the Hypolipidaemic Effects of Grifola frondosa in the Liver of Rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yinrun; Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Li, Xiangmin; Hu, Huiping; Li, Liangqiu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa and its regulation mechanism involved in lipid metabolism in liver of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The body weights and serum lipid levels of control rats, of hyperlipidaemic rats, and of hyperlipidaemic rats treated with oral G. frondosa were determined. mRNA expression and concentration of key lipid metabolism enzymes were investigated. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were markedly decreased in hyperlipidaemic rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were significantly down-regulated, while expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) was significantly up-regulated in the livers of treated rats compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. The concentrations of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to identify 20 proteins differentially expressed in livers of rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats. Of these 20 proteins, seven proteins were down-regulated, and 13 proteins were up-regulated. These findings indicate that the hypolipidaemic effects of G. frondosa reflected its modulation of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, absorption, and catabolic pathways. G. frondosa may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects by inhibiting LDL oxidation through down-regulation and up-regulating proteins expression in the liver of rats. Therefore, G. frondosa may produce both hypolipidaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, and potentially

  5. SCAP/SREBP pathway is required for the full steroidogenic response to cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Van Yserloo, Brian; Golkowski, Martin G; Ong, Shao-En; Beavo, Joseph A; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-09-20

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulates steroidogenesis largely through a surge in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Steroidogenic rates are also critically dependent on the availability of cholesterol at mitochondrial sites of synthesis. This cholesterol is provided by cellular uptake of lipoproteins, mobilization of intracellular lipid, and de novo synthesis. Whether and how these pathways are coordinated by cAMP are poorly understood. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites in MA10 Leydig cells suggested that cAMP regulates multiple steps in these processes, including activation of the SCAP/SREBP pathway. SCAP [sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein] acts as a cholesterol sensor responsible for regulating intracellular cholesterol balance. Its role in cAMP-mediated control of steroidogenesis has not been explored. We used two CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) knockout approaches to test the role of SCAP in steroidogenesis. Our results demonstrate that SCAP is required for progesterone production induced by concurrent inhibition of the cAMP phosphodiesterases PDE4 and PDE8. These inhibitors increased SCAP phosphorylation, SREBP2 activation, and subsequent expression of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, whereas SCAP deficiency largely prevented these effects. Reexpression of SCAP in SCAP-deficient cells restored SREBP2 protein expression and partially restored steroidogenic responses, confirming the requirement of SCAP-SREBP2 in steroidogenesis. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase and isoprenylation attenuated, whereas exogenously provided cholesterol augmented, PDE inhibitor-induced steroidogenesis, suggesting that the cholesterol substrate needed for steroidogenesis is provided by both de novo synthesis and isoprenylation-dependent mechanisms. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel role for LH/cAMP in SCAP

  6. Regulation of renal lipid metabolism, lipid accumulation, and glomerulosclerosis in FVBdb/db mice with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuowei; Jiang, Tao; Li, Jinping; Proctor, Gregory; McManaman, James L; Lucia, Scott; Chua, Streamson; Levi, Moshe

    2005-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease has been associated with the presence of lipid deposits, but the mechanisms for the lipid accumulation have not been fully determined. In the present study, we found that db/db mice on the FVB genetic background with loss-of-function mutation of the leptin receptor (FVB-Lepr(db) mice or FVBdb/db) develop severe diabetic nephropathy, including glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, increased expression of type IV collagen and fibronectin, and proteinuria, which is associated with increased renal mRNA abundance of transforming growth factor-beta, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Electron microscopy demonstrates increases in glomerular basement membrane thickness and foot process (podocyte) length. We found that there is a marked increase in neutral lipid deposits in glomeruli and tubules by oil red O staining and biochemical analysis for cholesterol and triglycerides. We also detected a significant increase in the renal expression of adipocyte differentiation-related protein (adipophilin), a marker of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. We examined the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1 and -2, transcriptional factors that play an important role in the regulation of fatty acid, triglyceride, and cholesterol synthesis. We found significant increases in SREBP-1 and -2 protein levels in nuclear extracts from the kidneys of FVBdb/db mice, with increases in the mRNA abundance of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which mediates the increase in renal triglyceride and cholesterol content. Our results indicate that in FVBdb/db mice, renal triglyceride and cholesterol accumulation is mediated by increased activity of SREBP-1 and -2. Based on our previous results with transgenic mice overexpressing SREBP-1 in the kidney, we propose that increased expression of SREBPs plays an important role in causing renal lipid

  7. Molecular targets of a human HNF1 alpha mutation responsible for pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Antinozzi, P A; Hagenfeldt, K A; Maechler, P; Wollheim, C B

    2000-08-15

    The reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator system was employed in insulinoma INS-1 cells to achieve controlled inducible expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1 alpha)-P291fsinsC, the most common mutation associated with subtype 3 of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY3). Nuclear localized HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC protein exerts its dominant-negative effects by competing with endogenous HNF1 alpha for the cognate DNA-binding site. HNF1 alpha controls multiple genes implicated in pancreatic beta-cell function and notably in metabolism- secretion coupling. In addition to reduced expression of the genes encoding insulin, glucose transporter-2, L-pyruvate kinase, aldolase B and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, induction of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also significantly inhibits expression of mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) E1 subunit mRNA and protein. OGDH enzyme activity and [(14)C]pyruvate oxidation were also reduced. In contrast, the mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 were dramatically increased by HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC induction. As predicted from this altered gene expression profile, HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also inhibits insulin secretory responses to glucose and leucine, correlated with impaired nutrient-evoked mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. These unprecedented results suggest the molecular mechanism of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC causing beta-cell dysfunction. PMID:10944108

  8. Preventive effect of fermented Maillard reaction products from milk proteins in cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Oh, N S; Kwon, H S; Lee, H A; Joung, J Y; Lee, J Y; Lee, K B; Shin, Y K; Baick, S C; Park, M R; Kim, Y; Lee, K W; Kim, S H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dual effect of Maillard reaction and fermentation on the preventive cardiovascular effects of milk proteins. Maillard reaction products (MRP) were prepared from the reaction between milk proteins, such as whey protein concentrates (WPC) and sodium caseinate (SC), and lactose. The hydrolysates of MRP were obtained from fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB; i.e., Lactobacillus gasseri H10, L. gasseri H11, Lactobacillus fermentum H4, and L. fermentum H9, where human-isolated strains were designated H1 to H15), which had excellent proteolytic and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities (>20%). The antioxidant activity of MRP was greater than that of intact proteins in assays of the reaction with 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and trivalent ferric ions; moreover, the effect of MRP was synergistically improved by fermentation. The Maillard reaction dramatically increased the level of antithrombotic activity and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) inhibitory effect of milk proteins, but did not change the level of activity for micellar cholesterol solubility. Furthermore, specific biological properties were enhanced by fermentation. Lactobacillus gasseri H11 demonstrated the greatest activity for thrombin and HMGR inhibition in Maillard-reacted WPC, by 42 and 33%, respectively, whereas hydrolysates of Maillard-reacted SC fermented by L. fermentum H9 demonstrated the highest reduction rate for micellar cholesterol solubility, at 52%. In addition, the small compounds that were likely released by fermentation of MRP were identified by size-exclusion chromatography. Therefore, MRP and hydrolysates of fermented MRP could be used to reduce cardiovascular risks.

  9. Gravity resistance, another graviresponse in plants - role of microtubule-membrane-cell wall continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, T.; Saito, Y.; Usui, S.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.

    Resistance to the gravitational force has been a serious problem for plants to survive on land, after they first went ashore more than 400 million years ago. Thus, gravity resistance is the principal graviresponse in plants comparable to gravitropism. Nevertheless, only limited information has been obtained for this second gravity response. We have examined the mechanism of gravity resistance using hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation. The results led a hypothesis on the mechanism of plant resistance to the gravitational force that the plant constructs a tough body by increasing the cell wall rigidity, which are brought about by modification of the cell wall metabolism and cell wall environment, especially pH. The hypothesis was further supported by space experiments during the Space Shuttle STS-95 mission. On the other hand, we have shown that gravity signal may be perceived by mechanoreceptors (mechanosensitive ion channels) on the plasma membrane and amyloplast sedimentation in statocytes is not involved in gravity resistance. Moreover, hypergravity treatment increased the expression levels of genes encoding alpha-tubulin, a component of microtubules and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor of terpenoids such as membrane sterols. The expression of HMGR and alpha- and beta-tubulin genes increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment, depending on the magnitude of gravity. The determination of levels of gene products as well as the analysis with knockout mutants of these genes by T-DNA insertions in Arabidopsis supports the involvement of both membrane sterols and microtubules in gravity resistance. These results suggest that structural or physiological continuum of microtubule-cell membrane-cell wall is responsible for plant resistance to the gravitational force.

  10. Effect of curcumin supplementation on blood glucose, plasma insulin, and glucose homeostasis related enzyme activities in diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kwon-Il; Choi, Myung-Sook; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Yeo, Jiyoung; Jeon, Seon-Min; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of curcumin on insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice and their age-matched lean non-diabetic db/+ mice. Both db/+ and db/db mice were fed with or without curcumin (0.02%, wt/wt) for 6 wks. Curcumin significantly lowered blood glucose and HbA 1c levels, and it suppressed body weight loss in db/db mice. Curcumin improved homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and glucose tolerance, and elevated the plasma insulin level in db/db mice. Hepatic glucokinase activity was significantly higher in the curcumin-supplemented db/db group than in the db/db group, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activities were significantly lower. In db/db mice, curcumin significantly lowered the hepatic activities of fatty acid synthase, beta-oxidation, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme reductase, and acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase. Curcumin significantly lowered plasma free fatty acid, cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations and increased the hepatic glycogen and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase in db/db mice. Curcumin normalized erythrocyte and hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, gluthathione peroxidase) in db/db mice that resulted in a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation. However, curcumin showed no effect on the blood glucose, plasma insulin, and glucose regulating enzyme activities in db/+ mice. These results suggest that curcumin seemed to be a potential glucose-lowering agent and antioxidant in type 2 diabetic db/db mice, but had no affect in non-diabetic db/+ mice.

  11. Intravenous Administration of Simvastatin Improves Cognitive Outcome following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Andrea; Boutté, Angela M; Gilsdorf, Janice; Lu, Xi-Chun; Tortella, Frank C; Shear, Deborah A

    2016-08-15

    Simvastatin is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor commonly used to reduce serum cholesterol. The beneficial effects of oral simvastatin have been reported in pre-clinical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current study was designed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of simvastatin in a model of severe penetrating TBI using an intravenous (IV) route of administration. Rats were subjected to unilateral frontal penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI), and simvastatin was delivered intravenously at 30 min and 6 h post-injury and continued once daily for either 4 or 10 days post-PBBI. Motor function was assessed on the rotarod and cognitive performance was evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM) task. Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and the astrocytic biomarker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), were quantified at 1 h, 4 h, and 24 h post-injury. Histopathological damage was assessed at the terminal end-point. Rotarod testing revealed significant motor deficits in all injury groups but no significant simvastatin-induced therapeutic benefits. All PBBI-injured animals showed cognitive impairment on the MWM test; however, 10-day simvastatin treatment mitigated these effects. Animals showed significantly improved latency to platform and retention scores, whereas the 4-day treatment regimen failed to produce any significant improvements. Biomarker and cytokine analysis showed that IV simvastatin significantly reduced GFAP, interleukin (IL)-1α, and IL-17 serum levels by 4.0-, 2.6-, and 7.0-fold, respectively, at 4 h post-injury. Collectively, our results demonstrate that IV simvastatin provides significant protection against injury-induced cognitive dysfunction and reduces TBI-specific biomarker levels. Further research is warranted to identify the optimal dose and therapeutic window for IV delivery of simvastatin in models of severe TBI.

  12. Stimulation of artemisinin synthesis by combined cerebroside and nitric oxide elicitation in Artemisia annua hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian Wen; Zheng, Li Ping; Zhang, Ben; Zou, Ting

    2009-11-01

    This work examined the accumulation of artemisinin and related secondary metabolism pathways in hairy root cultures of Artemisia annua L. induced by a fungal-derived cerebroside (2S,2'R,3R,3'E,4E,8E)-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-2-N-(2'-hydroxy-3'-octadecenoyl)-3-hydroxy-9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine. The presence of the cerebroside induced nitric oxide (NO) burst and artemisinin biosynthesis in the hairy roots. The endogenous NO generation was examined to be involved in the cerebroside-induced biosynthesis of artemisinin by using NO inhibitors, N (omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide. The gene expression and activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase were stimulated by the cerebroside, but more strongly by the potentiation of NO. While the mevalonate pathway inhibitor, mevinolin, only partially inhibited the induced artemisinin accumulation, the plastidic 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway inhibitor, fosmidomycin, nearly arrested artemisinin accumulation induced by cerebroside and the combination elicitation with an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP). With the potentiation by SNP at 10 microM, the cerebroside elicitor stimulated artemisinin production in 20-day-old hairy root cultures up to 22.4 mg/l, a 2.3-fold increase over the control. These results suggest that cerebroside plays as a novel elicitor and the involvement of NO in the signaling pathway of the elicitor activity for artemisinin biosynthesis.

  13. PEG and ABA trigger methyl jasmonate accumulation to induce the MEP pathway and increase tanshinone production in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongfeng; Ma, Pengda; Liang, Xiao; Wei, Zheng; Liang, Zongsuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Fenghua

    2012-10-01

    Tanshinones, a group of active ingredients in Salvia miltiorrhiza, are derived from at least two biosynthetic pathways, which are the mevalonate (MVA) pathway in the cytosol and the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in the plastids. Abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ) are two well-known plant hormones induced by water stress. In this study, effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG), ABA and MJ on tanshinone production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots were investigated, and the role of MJ in PEG- and ABA-induced tanshinone production was further elucidated. The results showed that tanshinone production was significantly enhanced by treatments with PEG, ABA and MJ. The mRNA levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A reductase (HMGR), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) and 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), as well as the enzyme activities of HMGR and DXS were stimulated by all three treatments. PEG and ABA triggered MJ accumulation. Effects of PEG and ABA on tanshinone production were completely abolished by the ABA biosynthesis inhibitor [tungstate (TUN)] and the MJ biosynthesis inhibitor [ibuprofen (IBU)], while effects of MJ were almost unaffected by TUN. In addition, MJ-induced tanshinone production was completely abolished by the MEP pathway inhibitor [fosmidomycin (FOS)], but was just partially arrested by the MVA pathway inhibitor [mevinolin (MEV)]. In conclusion, a signal transduction model was proposed that exogenous applications of PEG and ABA triggered endogenous MJ accumulation by activating ABA signaling pathway to stimulate tanshinone production, while exogenous MJ could directly induce tanshinone production mainly via the MEP pathway in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

  14. Metal contamination as a possible etiology of fibropapillomatosis in juvenile female green sea turtles Chelonia mydas from the southern Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cinthia Carneiro; Klein, Roberta Daniele; Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; Bianchini, Adalto

    2016-01-01

    Environmental contaminants have been suggested as a possible cause of fibropapillomatosis (FP) in green sea turtles. In turn, a reduced concentration of serum cholesterol has been indicated as a reliable biomarker of malignancy in vertebrates, including marine turtles. In the present study, metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn) concentrations, oxidative stress parameters [antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP), protein carbonyls (PC), lipid peroxidation (LPO), frequency of micronucleated cells (FMC)], water content, cholesterol concentration and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity were analyzed in the blood/serum of juvenile (29.3-59.5cm) female green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) with FP (n=14) and without FP (n=13) sampled at Ubatuba coast (São Paulo State, southeastern Brazil). Green sea turtles were grouped and analyzed according to the severity of tumors. Individuals heavily afflicted with FP showed significantly higher blood Cu, Pb and Fe concentrations, blood LPO levels, as well as significantly lower serum cholesterol concentrations and HMGR activity than turtles without FP. Significant and positive correlations were observed between HMGR activity and cholesterol concentrations, as well as LPO levels and Fe and Pb concentrations. In turn, Cu and Pb concentrations were significantly and negatively correlated with HMGR activity and cholesterol concentration. Furthermore, Cu, Fe and Pb were positively correlated with each other. Therefore, the reduced concentration of serum cholesterol observed in green sea turtles heavily afflicted with FP is related to a Cu- and Pb-induced inhibition of HMGR activity paralleled by a higher LPO rate induced by increased Fe and Pb concentrations. As oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of viral infections, our findings support the idea that metal contamination, especially by Cu, Fe and Pb, may be implicated in the etiology of FP in green sea turtles through oxidative stress

  15. Enhancement of carotenoid production by disrupting the C22-sterol desaturase gene (CYP61) in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a basidiomycetous yeast that synthesizes astaxanthin, which is a carotenoid with a great biotechnological impact. The ergosterol and carotenoid synthesis pathways are derived from the mevalonate pathway, and in both pathways, cytochrome P450 enzymes are involved. Results In this study, we isolated and described the X. dendrorhous CYP61 gene, which encodes a cytochrome P450 involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. This gene is composed of nine exons and encodes a 526 amino acid polypeptide that shares significant percentages of identity and similitude with the C22-sterol desaturase, CYP61, from other fungi. Mutants derived from different parental strains were obtained by disrupting the CYP61 gene with an antibiotic selection marker. These mutants were not able to produce ergosterol and accumulated ergosta-5,8,22-trien-3-ol and ergosta-5,8-dien-3-ol. Interestingly, all of the mutants had a more intense red color phenotype than their respective parental strains. The carotenoid composition was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by RP-HPLC, revealing that the carotenoid content was higher in the mutant strains without major changes in their composition. The expression of the HMGR gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in the mevalonate pathway (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase), was analyzed by RT-qPCR showing that its transcript levels are higher in the CYP61 mutants. Conclusions These results suggest that in X. dendrorhous, ergosterol regulates HMGR gene expression by a negative feedback mechanism and in this way; it contributes in the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthesis. PMID:23075035

  16. Statins reverse renal inflammation and endothelial dysfunction induced by chronic high salt intake.

    PubMed

    Fiore, M C; Jimenez, P M; Cremonezzi, D; Juncos, L I; García, N H

    2011-08-01

    High salt intake (HS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease. Indeed, HS may promote blood-pressure-independent tissue injury via inflammatory factors. The lipid-lowering 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors exert beneficial lipid-independent effects, reducing the expression and synthesis of inflammatory factors. We hypothesized that HS impairs kidney structure and function in the absence of hypertension, and these changes are reversed by atorvastatin. Four groups of rats were treated for 6 wk in metabolic cages with their diets: normal salt (NS); HS, NS plus atorvastatin and HS plus atorvastatin. We measured basal and final body weight, urinary sodium and protein excretion (U(Prot)V), and systolic blood pressure (SBP). At the end of the experimental period, cholesterolemia, creatinine clearance, renal vascular reactivity, glomerular volume, cortical and glomerular endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression were measured. We found no differences in SBP, body weight, and cholesterolemia. HS rats had increased creatinine clearence, U(Prot)V, and glomerular volume at the end of the study. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation decreased by 40.4% in HS rats (P < 0.05). HS decreased cortical and glomerular eNOS and caused mild glomerular sclerosis, interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration, and increased cortical expression of TGF-β1. All of these salt-induced changes were reversed by atorvastatin. We conclude that long-term HS induces inflammatory and hemodynamic changes in the kidney that are independent of SBP. Atorvastatin corrected all, suggesting that the nitric oxide-oxidative stress balance plays a significant role in the earlier stages of salt induced kidney damage.

  17. Protective effects of a squalene synthase inhibitor, lapaquistat acetate (TAK-475), on statin-induced myotoxicity in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Eiichiro; Anayama, Hisashi; Hamajyo, Hitomi; Nagai, Hirofumi; Hirakata, Masao; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2007-08-15

    High-dose statin treatment has been recommended as a primary strategy for aggressive reduction of LDL cholesterol levels and protection against coronary artery disease. The effectiveness of high-dose statins may be limited by their potential for myotoxic side effects. There is currently little known about the molecular mechanisms of statin-induced myotoxicity. Previously we showed that T-91485, an active metabolite of the squalene synthase inhibitor lapaquistat acetate (lapaquistat: a previous name is TAK-475), attenuated statin-induced cytotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells [Nishimoto, T., Tozawa, R., Amano, Y., Wada, T., Imura, Y., Sugiyama, Y., 2003a. Comparing myotoxic effects of squalene synthase inhibitor, T-91485, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A. Biochem. Pharmacol. 66, 2133-2139]. In the current study, we investigated the effects of lapaquistat administration on statin-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Guinea pigs were treated with either high-dose cerivastatin (1 mg/kg) or cerivastatin together with lapaquistat (30 mg/kg) for 14 days. Treatment with cerivastatin alone decreased plasma cholesterol levels by 45% and increased creatine kinase (CK) levels by more than 10-fold (a marker of myotoxicity). The plasma CK levels positively correlated with the severity of skeletal muscle lesions as assessed by histopathology. Co-administration of lapaquistat almost completely prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity. Administration of mevalonolactone (100 mg/kg b.i.d.) prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity, confirming that this effect is directly related to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. These results strongly suggest that cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity is due to depletion of mevalonate derived isoprenoids. In addition, squalene synthase inhibition could potentially be used clinically to prevent statin-induced myopathy.

  18. Statins potently reduce the cytokine-mediated IL-6 release in SMC/MNC cocultures.

    PubMed

    Loppnow, Harald; Zhang, Li; Buerke, Michael; Lautenschläger, Michael; Chen, Li; Frister, Adrian; Schlitt, Axel; Luther, Tanja; Song, Nan; Hofmann, Britt; Rose-John, Stefan; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Werdan, Karl

    2011-04-01

    Inflammatory pathways are involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Interaction of vessel wall cells and invading monocytes by cytokines may trigger local inflammatory processes. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are standard medications used in cardiovascular diseases. They are thought to have anti-inflammatory capacities, in addition to their lipid-lowering effects. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of statins in the cytokine-mediated-interaction-model of human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and human mononuclear cells (MNC). In this atherosclerosis-related inflammatory model LPS (lipopolysaccharide, endotoxin), as well as high mobility group box 1 stimulation resulted in synergistic (i.e. over-additive) IL-6 (interleukin-6) production as measured in ELISA. Recombinant IL-1, tumour necrosis factor-α and IL-6 mediated the synergistic IL-6 production. The standard anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and indomethacin (Indo) reduced the synergistic IL-6 production by 60%. Simvastatin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin or pravastatin reduced the IL-6 production by 53%, 50%, 64% and 60%, respectively. The inhibition by the statins was dose dependent. Combination of statins with aspirin and/or Indo resulted in complete inhibition of the synergistic IL-6 production. The same inhibitors blocked STAT3 phosphorylation, providing evidence for an autocrine role of IL-6 in the synergism. MNC from volunteers after 5 day aspirin or simvastatin administration showed no decreased IL-6 production, probably due to drug removal during MNC isolation. Taken together, the data show that anti-inflammatory functions (here shown for statins) can be sensitively and reproducibly determined in this novel SMC/MNC coculture model. These data implicate that statins have the capacity to affect atherosclerosis by regulating cytokine-mediated innate inflammatory pathways in the vessel wall.

  19. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of simvastatin to treat Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, K.L.; Galasko, D.; Galvin, J.E.; Thomas, R.G.; van Dyck, C.H.; Aisen, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lowering cholesterol is associated with reduced CNS amyloid deposition and increased dietary cholesterol increases amyloid accumulation in animal studies. Epidemiologic data suggest that use of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) may decrease the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) and a single-site trial suggested possible benefit in cognition with statin treatment in AD, supporting the hypothesis that statin therapy is useful in the treatment of AD. Objective: To determine if the lipid-lowering agent simvastatin slows the progression of symptoms in AD. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of simvastatin was conducted in individuals with mild to moderate AD and normal lipid levels. Participants were randomly assigned to receive simvastatin, 20 mg/day, for 6 weeks then 40 mg per day for the remainder of 18 months or identical placebo. The primary outcome was the rate of change in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–cognitive portion (ADAS-Cog). Secondary outcomes measured clinical global change, cognition, function, and behavior. Results: A total of 406 individuals were randomized: 204 to simvastatin and 202 to placebo. Simvastatin lowered lipid levels but had no effect on change in ADAS-Cog score or the secondary outcome measures. There was no evidence of increased adverse events with simvastatin treatment. Conclusion: Simvastatin had no benefit on the progression of symptoms in individuals with mild to moderate AD despite significant lowering of cholesterol. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that simvastatin 40 mg/day does not slow decline on the ADAS-Cog. PMID:21795660

  20. Molecular Mechanisms involved in Farnesol-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Joung Hyuck; Jetten, Anton M.

    2009-01-01

    The isoprenoid alcohol farnesol is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, farnesol has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventative and anti-tumor agent in vivo. A number of different biochemical and cellular processes have been implicated in the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects of farnesol. These include regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα), the rate limiting enzymes in the mevalonate pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, respectively, and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In some cell types the action of farnesol is mediated through nuclear receptors, including activation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Recent studies have revealed that induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) play a critical role in the induction of apoptosis by farnesol in lung carcinoma cells. This induction was found to be dependent on the activation of the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway. In addition, farnesol induces activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway and a number of NF-κB target genes. Optimal activation of NF-κB was reported to depend on the phosphorylation of p65/RelA by the MEK1/2-MSK1 signaling pathway. In a number of cells farnesol-induced apoptosis was found to be linked to activation of the apoptosome. This review provides an overview of the biochemical and cellular processes regulated by farnesol in relationship to its growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-promoting, and anti-tumor effects. PMID:19520495

  1. Medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, B Timothy; Terrin, Michael C; Dalman, Ronald L

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common condition that may be lethal when it is unrecognized. Current guidelines suggest repair as the aneurysm diameter reaches 5.0 to 5.5 cm. Most aortic aneurysms are detected incidentally when imaging is done for other purposes or through screening programs. Ninety percent of these aneurysms are below the threshold for intervention at the time of detection. A number of studies have sought to determine factors that lead to progression of aneurysmal disease that might be amenable to intervention during this period of observation. We review these studies and make recommendations for the medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms. On the basis of our current knowledge of the causes of aneurysm, a number of approaches have been proposed to prevent progression of aneurysmal disease. These include hemodynamic management, inhibition of inflammation, and protease inhibition. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines rules of evidence have helped to define strength of evidence to support these approaches. Level A evidence (from large randomized trials) is available to indicate that observation of small aneurysms in men is safe up to a size of 5.5 cm and that propranolol does not inhibit aneurysm expansion. Level B evidence (from small randomized trials) suggests that roxithromycin or doxycycline will decrease the rate of aneurysm expansion. A number of studies agree that tobacco use is associated with an increased rate of aneurysm expansion. Level B and C evidence is available to suggest that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) may inhibit aneurysm expansion. There are animal data but no human data demonstrating that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, will decrease the rate of AAA expansion. A pharmacological agent without important side effects that inhibited aneurysm expansion could change

  2. Enhanced cholesterol reduction by simvastatin in diltiazem-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Rowland Yeo, K; Yeo, W W; Wallis, E J; Ramsay, L E

    1999-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether an interaction between diltiazem and the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor simvastatin may enhance the cholesterol-lowering response to simvastatin in diltiazem-treated patients. Methods One hundred and thirty-five patients attending the Sheffield hypertension clinic who started consecutively on simvastatin for primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) during the 2 years June, 1996—May 1998 were surveyed. From the clinic records we extracted and recorded absolute and percentage cholesterol responses to the starting dose of simvastatin and coprescription of diltiazem. Results The cholesterol reduction for the 19 patients on diltiazem was 33.3% compared with 24.7% in the remaining 116 patients (median difference 8.6%, 95% CI 1.1–12.2%, P < 0.02). The interindividual variability of cholesterol response to simvastatin was greater for patients not taking diltiazem than for those patients taking diltiazem. The ratio of the variances in response for the nondiltiazem group relative to the diltiazem group was 1.34 at 10 mg simvastatin daily (not significant, 95% CI 0.16–4.11), and 3.42 at 20 mg daily (P < 0.01, 95% CI 1.26–7.18). Concurrent diltiazem therapy (P < 0.04), age (P = 0.001) and starting dose of simvastatin (P = 0.002) were found to be significant independent predictors of percentage cholesterol response. Conclusions Patients who take both simvastatin and diltiazem may need lower doses of simvastatin to achieve the recommended reduction in cholesterol. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of this interaction need further study to confirm an enhanced effect on cholesterol reduction, and exclude an increased risk of adverse events. PMID:10583033

  3. Statins in lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Simvastatin and atorvastatin induce differential effects on tuberous sclerosis complex 2-null cell growth and signaling.

    PubMed

    Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Volgina, Alla V; Milavec, Megan; James, Melane L; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2013-11-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor genes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)1 and TSC2 cause pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and tuberous sclerosis (TS). Current rapamycin-based therapies for TS and LAM have a predominantly cytostatic effect, and disease progression resumes with therapy cessation. Evidence of RhoA GTPase activation in LAM-derived and human TSC2-null cells suggests that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor statins can be used as potential adjuvant agents. The goal of this study was to determine which statin (simvastatin or atorvastatin) is more effective in suppressing TSC2-null cell growth and signaling. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, showed a concentration-dependent (0.5-10 μM) inhibitory effect on mouse TSC2-null and human LAM-derived cell growth. Treatment with 10 μM simvastatin induced dramatic disruption of TSC2-null cell monolayer and cell rounding; in contrast, few changes were observed in cells treated with the same concentration of atorvastatin. Combined treatment of rapamycin with simvastatin but not with atorvastatin showed a synergistic growth-inhibitory effect on TSC2-null cells. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, inhibited the activity of prosurvival serine-threonine kinase Akt and induced marked up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, a marker of cell apoptosis. Simvastatin, but not atorvastatin, also induced concentration-dependent inhibition of p42/p44 Erk and mTORC1. Thus, our data show growth-inhibitory and proapoptotic effects of simvastatin on TSC2-null cells compared with atorvastatin. These findings have translational significance for combinatorial therapeutic strategies of simvastatin to inhibit TSC2-null cell survival in TS and LAM.

  4. Dietary fenugreek and onion attenuate cholesterol gallstone formation in lithogenic diet–fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Raghunatha R L; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2011-01-01

    An animal study was conducted to evaluate the antilithogenic effect of a combination of dietary fenugreek seeds and onion. Lithogenic conditions were induced in mice by feeding them a high (0.5%) cholesterol diet (HCD) for 10 weeks. Fenugreek (12%) and onion (2%) were included individually and in combination in this HCD. Fenugreek, onion and their combination reduced the incidence of cholesterol gallstones by 75%, 27% and 76%, respectively, with attendant reduction in total cholesterol content by 38–42%, 50–72% and 61–80% in serum, liver and bile respectively. Consequently, the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio was reduced significantly in serum, liver and bile. The cholesterol saturation index of bile was reduced from 4.14 to 1.38 by the combination of fenugreek and onion and to 2.33 by onion alone. The phospholipid and bile acid contents of the bile were also increased. Changes in the hepatic enzyme activities (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase and cholesterol-27-hydroxylase) induced by HCD were countered by fenugreek, onion and their combination. Hepatic lipid peroxides were reduced by 19–22% and 39–45% with fenugreek, onion and their combination included in the diet along with the HCD. Increased accumulation of fat in the liver and inflammation of the gallbladder membrane produced by HCD were reduced by fenugreek, onion and their combination. The antilithogenic influence was highest with fenugreek alone, and the presence of onion along with it did not further increase this effect. There was also no additive effect of the two spices in the recovery of antioxidant molecules or in the antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:21756271

  5. Cancer association as a risk factor for anti-HMGCR antibody-positive myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Masato; Hida, Ayumi; Hashimoto Maeda, Meiko; Taira, Kenichiro; Ikenaga, Chiseko; Uchio, Naohiro; Kubota, Akatsuki; Kaida, Kenichi; Miwa, Yusuke; Kurasawa, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Sonoo, Masahiro; Chiba, Atsuro; Shiio, Yasushi; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Izumi, Toru; Inoue, Manami; Kwak, Shin; Tsuji, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To show cancer association is a risk factor other than statin exposure for anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase autoantibody-positive (anti-HMGCR Ab+) myopathy. Methods: We analyzed the clinical features and courses of 33 patients (23 female and 10 male) with anti-HMGCR Ab+ myopathy among 621 consecutive patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Results: Among the 33 patients, 7 (21%) were statin-exposed and 26 were statin-naive. In relation with cancer, there were 12 patients (statin-exposed, n = 4) with cancers detected within 3 years of myopathy diagnosis (cancer association), 3 patients (all statin-naive) with cancers detected more than 3 years before myopathy diagnosis (cancer history), 10 cancer-free patients followed up for more than 3 years (all statin-naive), and 8 patients without cancer detection but followed up for less than 3 years (statin-exposed, n = 3). Therefore, 12 patients with cancer association (36%) formed a larger group than that of 7 statin-exposed patients (21%). Among 12 patients with cancer association, 92% had cancer detection within 1 year of myopathy diagnosis (after 1.3 years in the remaining patient), 83% had advanced cancers, and 75% died of cancers within 2.7 years. Of interest, 1 patient with cancer history had sustained increase in creatine kinase level over 12 years from cancer removal to the development of weakness. Conclusions: Patients with cancer association formed a large group with poor prognosis in our series of patients with anti-HMGCR Ab+ myopathy. The close synchronous occurrence of cancers and myopathies suggested that cancer association is one of the risk factors for developing anti-HMGCR Ab+ myopathy. PMID:27761483

  6. Effect of ETC-1002 on Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Hypercholesterolemic Patients Receiving Statin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Christie M; McKenney, James M; MacDougall, Diane E; Margulies, Janice R; Robinson, Paula L; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lalwani, Narendra D

    2016-06-15

    ETC-1002 is an oral, once-daily medication that inhibits adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase, an enzyme upstream of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, to reduce cholesterol biosynthesis. ETC-1002 monotherapy has demonstrated significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared with placebo in phase 2 studies. The objective of this study was to compare the lipid-lowering efficacy of ETC-1002 versus placebo when added to ongoing statin therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia. This phase 2b, multicenter, double-blind trial (NCT02072161) randomized 134 hypercholesterolemic patients (LDL-C, 115 to 220 mg/dl) on stable background statin therapy to 12 weeks of add-on treatment with ETC-1002 120 mg, ETC-1002 180 mg, or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the percent change in calculated LDL-C from baseline to week 12. For LDL-C, the least-squares mean percent change ± standard error from baseline to week 12 was significantly greater with ETC-1002 120 mg (-17 ± 4%, p = 0.0055) and ETC-1002 180 mg (-24 ± 4%, p <0.0001) than placebo (-4 ± 4%). ETC-1002 also dose dependently reduced apolipoprotein B by 15% to 17%, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 14% to 17%, total cholesterol by 13% to 15%, and LDL particle number by 17% to 21%. All these reductions in ETC-1002-treated cohorts were significantly greater than those with placebo. Rates of adverse events (AEs), muscle-related AEs, and discontinuations for AEs with ETC-1002 were similar to placebo. In conclusion, ETC-1002 120 mg or 180 mg added to stable statin therapy significantly reduced LDL-C compared to placebo and has a similar tolerability profile. PMID:27138185

  7. Garlic essential oil protects against obesity-triggered nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through modulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Tseng, Hui-Chun; Lin, Shuw-Yuan; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2014-06-25

    This study investigated the protective properties of garlic essential oil (GEO) and its major organosulfur component (diallyl disulfide, DADS) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal or high-fat diet (HFD) with/without GEO (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or DADS (10 and 20 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. GEO and DADS dose-dependently exerted antiobesity and antihyperlipidemic effects by reducing HFD-induced body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, and serum biochemical parameters. Administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg GEO and 20 mg/kg DADS significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in liver, accompanied by elevated antioxidant capacity via inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 expression during NAFLD development. The anti-NAFLD effects of GEO and DADS were mediated through down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, as well as stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. These results demonstrate that GEO and DADS dose-dependently protected obese mice with long-term HFD-induced NAFLD from lipid accumulation, inflammation, and oxidative damage by ameliorating lipid metabolic disorders and oxidative stress. The dose of 20 mg/kg DADS was equally as effective in preventing NAFLD as 50 mg/kg GEO containing the same amount of DADS, which demonstrates that DADS may be the main bioactive component in GEO.

  8. Patient considerations and clinical impact of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors in the management of dyslipidemia: focus on anacetrapib.

    PubMed

    Miyares, Marta A; Davis, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality within the United States and worldwide. Although targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in the prevention of CVD has been shown to be effective, evidence exists to indicate that significant cardiovascular (CV) risk remains in patients receiving 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) - a risk that may be correlated with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Among the various tactics under investigation to increase HDL-C, inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) appears the most adept to raise these levels. Although torcetrapib, a CETP inhibitor, demonstrated significant beneficial changes in HDL-C and LDL-C after 12 months of therapy when coadministered with atorvastatin, patients in the torcetrapib arm experienced a rise in mortality, including increased risk of death from CV and non-CV causes as well as a significant rise in major CV events. Later studies established that the adverse effects of torcetrapib were produced from molecule-specific off-target effects and not to the mechanism of CETP inhibition. These untoward outcomes have not been detected with anacetrapib, the third of the CETP inhibitors to enter Phase III trials. Furthermore, treatment with anacetrapib revealed both a statistically significant decrease in LDL-C and increase in HDL-C over placebo. While the place in therapy of niacin and fibrates to reduce CV events is currently in question secondary to the Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL Cholesterol/High Triglyceride and Impact on Global Health Outcomes and the Action to Control CV Risk in Diabetes trials, the ongoing large-scale, randomized-placebo, controlled-outcomes study with anacetrapib coadministered with statin treatment will not only test the hypothesis if CETP inhibition lowers residual CV risk but will also provide insight as to which patient

  9. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat.

  10. Modulation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence by co-administration of simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Tabatabaee, Amirhossein; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam; Naghizadeh, Bahareh

    2015-10-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, are widely used in the management of different diseases beyond their primary indication for lowering cholesterol. Previous studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of simvastatin in different animal models. In the present study, we examined the effects of simvastatin (30, 60, 100 and 300mg/kg, p.o.) on the development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence in mice. For the induction of morphine tolerance and dependence, mice were twice daily treated with morphine (10mg/kg, s.c.) for 5 consecutive days. Tolerance was evaluated by the hot-plate test and physical dependence by naloxone challenge, on the sixth day. The results showed that oral administration of simvastatin produced antinociceptive activity in a dose-dependent way. Co-administration of simvastatin with morphine did not affect the acute morphine-induced analgesia (10mg/kg, s.c.). However, repeated co-administration of simvastatin with morphine significantly attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine and inhibited the naloxone (5mg/kg, s.c.)-precipitated withdrawal signs (jumping and body weight loss). Also, simvastatin at doses of 100 and 300mg/kg attenuated the expression of morphine-induced tolerance and dependence. These data indicated that, while simvastatin can alleviate both development and expression of morphine-induced tolerance, it cannot enhance morphine-induced antinociception. Taken together, simvastatin may be used as an adjutant therapeutic agent in combination with morphine and or other opioids in patients with severe chronic pain.

  11. Voriconazole-Induced Hepatitis via Simvastatin- and Lansoprazole-Mediated Drug Interactions: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jose Luis; Tayek, John A

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic voriconazole concentrations have a narrow window of effectiveness before causing cholestatic hepatitis. After undergoing 1 year of voriconazole therapy for pulmonary aspergillosis, a 44-year-old man began treatment with 30 mg lansoprazole for gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Within 5 days of starting treatment with lansoprazole, the patient presented with fatigue, jaundice, and cholestatic hepatitis. The hepatitis promptly resolved after stopping lansoprazole treatment. Sixteen months later, the patient was given simvastatin therapy, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association to prevent cardiovascular disease for patients with diabetes who are aged >40 years and have one additional risk factor. Within 2 weeks of taking simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (statin) therapy, the patient redeveloped fatigue, jaundice, and cholestatic hepatitis. He described both episodes of fatigue and jaundice similarly in terms of onset and intensity. Voriconazole is metabolized by both CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 isoenzymes. Lansoprazole is an inhibitor of the CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Competition between voriconazole and lansoprazole likely led to increased voriconazole serum concentration and acute cholestatic hepatitis in this patient. Simvastatin inhibits the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. After the patient took 10 mg simvastatin daily for 2 weeks, cholestatic hepatitis occurred. The voriconazole concentration remained elevated (4.1 μg/ml) when measured 15 days after stopping simvastatin. The patient's Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale score of 7 revealed that the cholestatic hepatitis was probably precipitated by lansoprazole. Likewise, the patient's Naranjo score of 9 also revealed that cholestatic hepatitis was attributable to a definite adverse drug reaction precipitated by the addition of simvastatin to the stable baseline regimen of voriconazole. In a single patient, two different inhibitors of the cytochrome P450 pathway stimulated voriconazole

  12. In vitro interaction of lumefantrine and piperaquine by atorvastatin against Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs and combination therapy. A combinatorial approach protects each drug from the development of resistance and reduces generally the overall transmission rate of malaria. Statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase and a family of lipid-lowering drugs, have in vitro anti-malarial properties, and more specially atorvastatin. However, atorvastatin has a short elimination half-life (14 hours) and an efficient combination of anti-malarial drugs must associate a drug with a short elimination half-life and a drug with a long elimination half-life. The objective of the present work was to identify new potential partners among standard new anti-malarial drugs with long elimination half-life, such as lumefantrine, piperaquine, pyronaridine and atovaquone, to improve the in vitro activity of atorvastatin against different Plasmodium falciparum strains to treat uncomplicated malaria. Methods In vitro interaction of atorvastatin in combination with lumefantrine, piperaquine, pyronaridine and atovaquone was assessed against 13 P. falciparum strains by isotopic test. Results Atorvastatin showed additive effects with pyronaridine, piperaquine and lumefantrine. Atorvastatin increased the in vitro activity of lumefantrine and piperaquine at concentrations expected in clinical observations. The average IC50 values of lumefantrine decreased significantly from 31.9 nM to 20.5 nM (a decrease of 35.7%) in combination with 1 μM of atorvastatin. Conclusions Even though in vitro data indicate that atorvastatin improved the activity of lumefantrine and piperaquine, the same may not necessarily be true in vivo. Piperaquine, a new drug with long terminal elimination half-life, is currently a very promising anti-malarial drug. PMID:24886347

  13. HNRNPA1 regulates HMGCR alternative splicing and modulates cellular cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chi-Yi; Theusch, Elizabeth; Lo, Kathleen; Mangravite, Lara M.; Naidoo, Devesh; Kutilova, Mariya; Medina, Marisa W.

    2014-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway and is inhibited by statins, a class of cholesterol-lowering drugs. Expression of an alternatively spliced HMGCR transcript lacking exon 13, HMGCR13(−), has been implicated in the variation of plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and is the single most informative molecular marker of LDL-C response to statins. Given the physiological importance of this transcript, our goal was to identify molecules that regulate HMGCR alternative splicing. We recently reported gene expression changes in 480 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) after in vitro simvastatin treatment, and identified a number of statin-responsive genes involved in mRNA splicing. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (HNRNPA1) was chosen for follow-up since rs3846662, an HMGCR SNP that regulates exon 13 skipping, was predicted to alter an HNRNPA1 binding motif. Here, we not only demonstrate that rs3846662 modulates HNRNPA1 binding, but also that sterol depletion of human hepatoma cell lines reduced HNRNPA1 mRNA levels, an effect that was reversed with sterol add-back. Overexpression of HNRNPA1 increased the ratio of HMGCR13(−) to total HMGCR transcripts by both directly increasing exon 13 skipping in an allele-related manner and specifically stabilizing the HMGCR13(−) transcript. Importantly, HNRNPA1 overexpression also diminished HMGCR enzyme activity, enhanced LDL-C uptake and increased cellular apolipoprotein B (APOB). rs1920045, an SNP associated with HNRNPA1 exon 8 alternative splicing, was also associated with smaller statin-induced reduction in total cholesterol from two independent clinical trials. These results suggest that HNRNPA1 plays a role in the variation of cardiovascular disease risk and statin response. PMID:24001602

  14. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  15. Botrydial and botcinins produced by Botrytis cinerea regulate the expression of Trichoderma arundinaceum genes involved in trichothecene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Malmierca, Mónica G; Izquierdo-Bueno, Inmaculada; Mccormick, Susan P; Cardoza, Rosa E; Alexander, Nancy J; Moraga, Javier; Gomes, Eriston V; Proctor, Robert H; Collado, Isidro G; Monte, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea produce the sesquiterpenes harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively, and also the polyketides aspinolides and botcinins (Botcs), respectively. We analysed the role of BOT and Botcs in the Ta37-B. cinerea interaction, including the transcriptomic changes in the genes involved in HA (tri) and ergosterol biosynthesis, as well as changes in the level of HA and squalene-ergosterol. We found that, when confronted with B. cinerea, the tri biosynthetic genes were up-regulated in all dual cultures analysed, but at higher levels when Ta37 was confronted with the BOT non-producer mutant bcbot2Δ. The production of HA was also higher in the interaction area with this mutant. In Ta37-bcbot2Δ confrontation experiments, the expression of the hmgR gene, encoding the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is the first enzyme of the terpene biosynthetic pathway, was also up-regulated, resulting in an increase in squalene production compared with the confrontation with B. cinerea B05.10. Botcs had an up-regulatory effect on the tri biosynthetic genes, with BotcA having a stronger effect than BotcB. The results indicate that the interaction between Ta37 and B. cinerea exerts a stimulatory effect on the expression of the tri biosynthetic genes, which, in the interaction zone, can be attenuated by BOT produced by B. cinerea B05.10. The present work provides evidence for a metabolic dialogue between T. arundinaceum and B. cinerea that is mediated by sesquiterpenes and polyketides, and that affects the outcome of the interaction of these fungi with each other and their environment.

  16. Temperature influences β-carotene production in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing carotenogenic genes from Phaffia rhodozyma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Zhan, Wubing; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Red yeast Phaffia rhodozyma is a prominent microorganism able to synthesize carotenoid. Here, three carotenogenic cDNAs of P. rhodozyma CGMCC 2.1557, crtE, crtYB and crtI, were cloned and introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1. The recombinant Sc-EYBI cells could synthesize 258.8 ± 43.8 μg g(-1) dry cell weight (DCW) of β-carotene when growing at 20 °C, about 59-fold higher than in those growing at 30 °C. Additional expression of the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase from S. cerevisiae (Sc-EYBIH) increased the β-carotene level to 528.8 ± 13.3 μg g(-1) DCW as cells growing at 20 °C, 27-fold higher than cells growing at 30 °C, although cells grew faster at 30 °C than at 20 °C. Consistent with the much higher β-carotene level in cells growing at 20 °C, transcription level of three crt genes and cHMG1 gene in cells growing at 20 °C was a little higher than in those growing at 30 °C. Meanwhile, expression of three carotenogenic genes and accumulation of β-carotene promoted cell growth. These results reveal the influence of temperature on β-carotene biosynthesis and may be helpful for improving β-carotene production in recombinant S. cerevisiae. PMID:23861041

  17. New compounds able to control hepatic cholesterol metabolism: Is it possible to avoid statin treatment in aged people?

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Laura; Segatto, Marco; Pallottini, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Aging is characterized by the loss of homeostasis that leads to changes in the biochemical composition of tissues, reduced ability to respond adaptively to environmental stimuli, and increased susceptibility and vulnerability to diseases including coronary artery diseases, carotid artery disease and brain vessel disease. Hypercholesterolemia is one of the primary risk factors for these pathologies, whose incidence is highly related to aging. Almost 25% of men and 42% of women older than 65 years have a serum total cholesterol level greater than 240 mg/dL. The mechanisms behind this age-related increase in plasma cholesterol are still incompletely understood, thus, the control of plasma cholesterol content in aged people is more challenging than in adults. In this review the different pharmacological approaches to reduce plasma cholesterol levels, particularly in aged people, will be discussed. In brief, current therapies are mostly based on the prescription of statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors) that are pretty effective but that exert several side effects. More attention should be given to potential drug interactions, potential age-related changes in drug pharmacokinetics, adverse effects such as myopathy and competing risks when statins are prescribed to old patients. In combination or in alternative to statin therapy, other agents might be required to reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. Among the available drugs, the most commonly prescribed are those addressed to reduce cholesterol absorption, to modulate lipoprotein lipase activity and bile acid sequestrants: even these pharmacological interventions are not exempt from side effects. The use of antioxidants or organoselenium compounds and the discovery of new proteins able to modulate exclusively LDL receptor recycling such as Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 and SEC24 offer new pharmacological approaches to selectively reduce the main causes of

  18. Forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma disstria) induce local and systemic diurnal emissions of terpenoid volatiles in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides): cDNA cloning, functional characterization, and patterns of gene expression of (-)-germacrene D synthase, PtdTPS1.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Huber, Dezene P W; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-02-01

    Feeding forest tent caterpillars (FTCs) induced local and systemic diurnal emissions of (-)-germacrene D, along with (E)-beta-ocimene, linalool, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT), benzene cyanide, and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene, from leaves of hybrid poplar. FTC feeding induced substantially higher levels of volatiles in local and systemic leaves than did mechanical wounding. A full-length poplar sesquiterpene synthase cDNA (PtdTPS1) was isolated and functionally identified as (-)-germacrene D synthase. Expression of PtdTPS1, expression of genes of early, intermediate and late steps in terpenoid biosynthesis, and expression of a lipoxygenase gene (PtdLOX1) were analyzed in local FTC-infested and systemic leaves. Transcript levels of PtdTPS1 and PtdLOX1 were strongly increased in response to herbivory. PtdTPS1 was also induced by mechanical wounding or by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment. FTC feeding did not affect transcript levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), and isoprene synthase (IPS). Two other TPS genes, PtdTPS2 and PtTPS3, and farnesyl diphosphate synthase were only very transiently induced. These results illustrate differential expression of terpenoid pathway genes in response to insect feeding and a key function of (-)-germacrene D synthase PtdTPS1 for herbivore-induced local and systemic volatile emissions in hybrid poplar. FTC-induced transcripts of PtdTPS1 followed diurnal rhythm. Spatial patterns of FTC-induced PtdTPS1 transcript accumulation revealed acropetal but not basipetal direction of the systemic response. Implications for tritrophic poplar-FTC-predator/parasitoid interactions are discussed. PMID:14756770

  19. Hypolipidemic effects of Myrica rubra extracts and main compounds in C57BL/6j mice.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Li, Xuegang; Xiao, Yubo; Yong, Yang; Zhang, Zaiqi; Li, Shuping; Zhou, Taimei; Yang, Daqing; Gao, Pincao; Xin, Xiaoliang

    2016-08-10

    The present study evaluated the antihyperlipidemic activity of myricetin, myricetrin, the alcohol fraction (AF) and the ethyl acetate fraction (EF) obtained from the bark of Myrica rubra (MR) in high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFHC) induced hyperlipidemic C57BL/6j mice. Mice were treated with myricetin, myricetrin, AF and EF with a dose of 130 mg per kg per day for 35 days. After treatment, serum parameters including total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total bile acids (TBA), etc., were examined. The results revealed that EF showed the highest weight lowering activity (P < 0.01). All tested samples decreased the levels of the TC, TG, LDL-C, TBA and LPS (lipopolysaccharide) content in the serum of mice to different extents. Liver fat deposition was significantly reduced after myricetin, myricetrin, AF and EF therapy (P < 0.01). Additionally, the cell size of epididymal adipose tissue was also decreased in myricetin, AF and EF groups (P < 0.05). The antihyperlipidemic activity of these samples may be attributed to the inhibition of lipid synthesis via suppressing the expression of HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase) and ACC1 (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), promoting the metabolism and excretion of lipids via up-regulating the expression of SREBP2 (sterol regulatory element binding proteins), LDLR (low density lipoprotein receptor), UCP2 (uncoupling protein 2) and CYP7A1 (cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase). These results may provide a powerful foundation for seeking and utilizing Myrica rubra bio-active compounds for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27459037

  20. Evolution of the lipid trial protocol of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Henry N; Bonds, Denise E; Lovato, Laura C; Crouse, John R; Elam, Marshall B; Linz, Peter E; O'connor, Patrick J; Leiter, Lawrence A; Weiss, Daniel; Lipkin, Edward; Fleg, Jerome L

    2007-06-18

    The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) lipid trial aims to test whether a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) plus a fibrate is more efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events than a statin plus placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with defined glycemic control. This is a blinded component in a 5,518-patient subset of the ACCORD cohort. These participants were randomized to either be (1) treated with simvastatin (titrated to 40 mg/day if necessary to achieve a goal low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol level of <2.59 mmol/L [100 mg/dL]) plus placebo or (2) treated to the same goal LDL cholesterol level with the statin plus active fenofibrate 160 mg/day or its bioequivalent (or 54 mg/day if the estimated glomerular filtration rate ranges from 30 to <50 mL/min per 1.73 m2). Setting an upper limit of LDL cholesterol qualifying for randomization excluded patients who would not likely achieve the LDL cholesterol goal. Recruitment for ACCORD began in January 2001, and follow-up is scheduled to end in June 2009. Since recruitment began, several clinical trials and consensus statements have been published that led to changes in the details of the lipid treatment algorithm and protocol. This report describes the design of the lipid protocol and modifications to the protocol during the course of the study in response to and in anticipation of these developments. The current protocol is designed to provide an ethically justifiable test of combined statin plus fibrate treatment consistent with the highest level of safety and lipid treatment standards of care.

  1. Effects of fumonisin B1 alone and combined with deoxynivalenol or zearalenone on porcine granulosa cell proliferation and steroid production.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, Cristina; Caloni, Francesca; Schreiber, Nicole B; Spicer, Leon J

    2014-05-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a Fusarium mycotoxin frequently occurring in corn in combination with deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone. The aim of this study was to determine if FB1, alone and combined with DON or α-zearalenol (ZEA), zearalenone major active metabolite, can affect granulosa cell proliferation, steroid production, and gene expression in swine. Porcine granulosa cells were cultured for 2 days in serum-containing medium followed by 1 or 2 days in serum-free medium with or without added treatments. Fumonisin B1 had inhibitory effects on granulosa cell proliferation. Deoxynivalenol strongly inhibited cell growth, and no significant difference was detected in combination with FB1. α-Zearalenol showed a stimulatory effect on granulosa cell numbers even in combination with FB1. Regarding steroid production, FB1 increased progesterone production, and FB1 had no effect on estradiol production. Deoxynivalenol strongly inhibited progesterone and estradiol production, and FB1 had no significant effect on this response. α-Zearalenol increased progesterone production, and its combination with FB1 produced additive effects. α-Zearalenol had no effect on estradiol production, whereas it decreased estradiol production when co-treated with FB1. Fumonisin B1 was found to decrease CYP11A1 messenger RNA abundance, and the stimulatory effect of FB1 on progesterone production was found to be not dependent on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase activity suggesting that FB1 increases progesterone production through a different mechanism. The results show that these Fusarium mycotoxins can influence porcine granulosa cell proliferation and steroid production, thereby demonstrating their potential reproductive effects on swine.

  2. Blood lipids and prostate cancer: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    PubMed

    Bull, Caroline J; Bonilla, Carolina; Holly, Jeff M P; Perks, Claire M; Davies, Neil; Haycock, Philip; Yu, Oriana Hoi Yun; Richards, J Brent; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Doug; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G; MacInnis, Robert J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Micheal, Agnieszka; Pandha, Hardev; Smith, George Davey; Lewis, Sarah J; Martin, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    Genetic risk scores were used as unconfounded instruments for specific lipid traits (Mendelian randomization) to assess whether circulating lipids causally influence prostate cancer risk. Data from 22,249 prostate cancer cases and 22,133 controls from 22 studies within the international PRACTICAL consortium were analyzed. Allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be uniquely associated with each of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride (TG) levels, were first validated in an independent dataset, and then entered into logistic regression models to estimate the presence (and direction) of any causal effect of each lipid trait on prostate cancer risk. There was weak evidence for an association between the LDL genetic score and cancer grade: the odds ratio (OR) per genetically instrumented standard deviation (SD) in LDL, comparing high- (≥7 Gleason score) versus low-grade (<7 Gleason score) cancers was 1.50 (95% CI: 0.92, 2.46; P = 0.11). A genetically instrumented SD increase in TGs was weakly associated with stage: the OR for advanced versus localized cancer per unit increase in genetic risk score was 1.68 (95% CI: 0.95, 3.00; P = 0.08). The rs12916-T variant in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.00; P = 0.03). In conclusion, circulating lipids, instrumented by our genetic risk scores, did not appear to alter prostate cancer risk. We found weak evidence that higher LDL and TG levels increase aggressive prostate cancer risk, and that a variant in HMGCR (that mimics the LDL lowering effect of statin drugs) reduces risk. However, inferences are limited by sample size and evidence of pleiotropy. PMID:26992435

  3. Sequence Diversity in Coding Regions of Candidate Genes in the Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway of Wild Potato Species

    PubMed Central

    Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C.; Tokuhisa, James G.; Ginzberg, Idit; Holliday, Jason A.; Veilleux, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Natural variation in five candidate genes of the steroidal glycoalkaloid (SGA) metabolic pathway and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping were studied in six wild [Solanum chacoense (chc 80-1), S. commersonii, S. demissum, S. sparsipilum, S. spegazzinii, S. stoloniferum] and cultivated S. tuberosum Group Phureja (phu DH) potato species with contrasting levels of SGAs. Amplicons were sequenced for five candidate genes: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 and 2 (HMG1, HMG2) and 2.3-squalene epoxidase (SQE) of primary metabolism, and solanidine galactosyltransferase (SGT1), and glucosyltransferase (SGT2) of secondary metabolism. SNPs (n = 337) producing 354 variations were detected within 3.7 kb of sequenced DNA. More polymorphisms were found in introns than exons and in genes of secondary compared to primary metabolism. Although no significant deviation from neutrality was found, dN/dS ratios < 1 and negative values of Tajima’s D test suggested purifying selection and genetic hitchhiking in the gene fragments. In addition, patterns of dN/dS ratios across the SGA pathway suggested constraint by natural selection. Comparison of nucleotide diversity estimates and dN/dS ratios showed stronger selective constraints for genes of primary rather than secondary metabolism. SNPs (n = 24) with an exclusive genotype for either phu DH (low SGA) or chc 80-1 (high SGA) were identified for HMG2, SQE, SGT1 and SGT2. The SolCAP 8303 Illumina Potato SNP chip genotyping revealed eight informative SNPs on six pseudochromosomes, with homozygous and heterozygous genotypes that discriminated high, intermediate and low levels of SGA accumulation. These results can be used to evaluate SGA accumulation in segregating or association mapping populations. PMID:23853090

  4. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat. PMID:16581337

  5. Anticholesterolemic effect of 3,4-di(OH)-phenylpropionic amides in high-cholesterol fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soon-Ja; Bok, Song-Hae; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong Bok; Choi, Myung-Sook . E-mail: mschoi@knu.ac.kr

    2005-10-01

    Two amide synthetic derivatives of 3,4-di(OH)-hydrocinnamate (HC), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic (L-serine methyl ester) amide (E030) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic (L-aspartic acid) amide (E076), were investigated to compare their lipid-lowering efficacy with HC. Male rats were fed a 1 g/100 g high-cholesterol diet for 6 weeks with supplements of either clofibrate (0.02%, w/w), HC (0.025%, w/w), E030 (0.039%, w/w) or E076 (0.041%, w/w). The clofibrate supplement was used as a positive control for the lipid-lowering efficacy. The food intakes and body weight gains were not significantly different among the groups. The plasma and hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lower in clofibrate, HC, E030, and E076-supplemented groups compared to the control group. The supplementation of HC and its amide derivatives was as effective as clofibrate in increasing the ratio of HDL-cholesterol to total plasma cholesterol and reducing the atherogenic index (AI). The hepatic cholesterol level in the HC and E076 groups was significantly lower than that in the clofibrate group. The hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase) and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activities were significantly lower in the all test groups than in the control group. The excretion of neutral sterol was significantly higher in the HC, E030, and E076-supplemented groups compared to the control group. The plasma AST and ALT activities, indirect indexes of hepatic toxicity, were significantly lower in the HC, E030, and E076-supplemented groups than in the control group. Accordingly, the current results suggest that E030 and E076, two amide synthetic derivatives of HC, are effective in lowering lipid activity.

  6. The bHLH Transcription Factors TSAR1 and TSAR2 Regulate Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to stresses by producing a broad spectrum of bioactive specialized metabolites. Hormonal elicitors, such as jasmonates, trigger a complex signaling circuit leading to the concerted activation of specific metabolic pathways. However, for many specialized metabolic pathways, the transcription factors involved remain unknown. Here, we report on two homologous jasmonate-inducible transcription factors of the basic helix-loop-helix family, TRITERPENE SAPONIN BIOSYNTHESIS ACTIVATING REGULATOR1 (TSAR1) and TSAR2, which direct triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula. TSAR1 and TSAR2 are coregulated with and transactivate the genes encoding 3-HYDROXY-3-METHYLGLUTARYL-COENZYME A REDUCTASE1 (HMGR1) and MAKIBISHI1, the rate-limiting enzyme for triterpene biosynthesis and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls HMGR1 levels, respectively. Transactivation is mediated by direct binding of TSARs to the N-box in the promoter of HMGR1. In transient expression assays in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts, TSAR1 and TSAR2 exhibit different patterns of transactivation of downstream triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes, hinting at distinct functionalities within the regulation of the pathway. Correspondingly, overexpression of TSAR1 or TSAR2 in M. truncatula hairy roots resulted in elevated transcript levels of known triterpene saponin biosynthetic genes and strongly increased the accumulation of triterpene saponins. TSAR2 overexpression specifically boosted hemolytic saponin biosynthesis, whereas TSAR1 overexpression primarily stimulated nonhemolytic soyasaponin biosynthesis. Both TSARs also activated all genes of the precursor mevalonate pathway but did not affect sterol biosynthetic genes, pointing to their specific role as regulators of specialized triterpene metabolism in M. truncatula. PMID:26589673

  7. Coenzyme Q10 remarkably improves the bio-energetic function of rat liver mitochondria treated with statins.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Bardbori, Afshin; Najibi, Asma; Amirzadegan, Najmeh; Gharibi, Raziyeh; Dashti, Ayat; Omidi, Mahmoud; Saeedi, Arastoo; Ghafarian-Bahreman, Ali; Niknahad, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    CoQ10 shares a biosynthetic pathway with cholesterol therefore it can be a potential target of the widely available lipid-lowering agents such as statins. Statins are the most widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs with the ability to inhibit HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. Preclinical and clinical safety data have shown that statins do not cause serious adverse effects in humans. However, their long-term administration is associated with a variety of myopatic complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CoQ10 supplementation of animals under high fat diet (HFD) treated with statins is able to bypass the mitochondrial metabolic defects or not? Animals were divided into 7 groups and fed with either regular (RD) or HFD during experiments. The first group considered as regular control and fed with a RD. Groups 2-7 including HFD control, CoQ10 (10mg/kg), simvastatin (30mg/kg), atorvastatin (30mg/kg), simvastatin+CoQ10 or atorvastatin+CoQ10 treated orally for 30 days and fed with HFD. At the end of treatments, the animals were killed and blood samples were collected for biochemical examinations. The rat liver mitochondria were isolated and several mitochondrial indices including succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPP) were determined. We found that triglyceride (Tg), cholesterol (Chol) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were augmented with HFD compared to RD and treatment with statins remarkably lowered the Tg, Chol and LDL levels. Mitochondrial parameters including, SDA, ATP levels, MMP and MPP were reduced with statin treatment and improved by co-administration with CoQ10.

  8. Clinical course and treatment of anti-HMGCR antibody–associated necrotizing autoimmune myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Langguth, Daman; Hardy, Todd A.; Garg, Nidhi; Bundell, Chris; Rojana-Udomsart, Arada; Dale, Russell C.; Robertson, Thomas; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We examined a cohort of Australian patients with statin exposure who developed a necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) associated with a novel autoantibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and describe the clinical and therapeutic challenges of managing these patients and an optimal therapeutic strategy. Methods: Clinical, laboratory, EMG, and histopathologic results and response to immunomodulation are reported in 6 Australian patients with previous statin exposure and antibodies targeting HMGCR. Results: All patients presented with painless proximal weakness following statin therapy, which persisted after statin cessation. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels ranged from 2,700 to 16,200 IU/L. EMG was consistent with a myopathic picture. Muscle biopsies revealed a pauci-immune necrotizing myopathy. Detailed graphical representation of the clinical course of these patients showed a close association with rising CK and an increase in clinical weakness signifying relapses, particularly upon weaning or ceasing steroids. All 6 patients were responsive to initial steroid therapy, with 5 relapsing upon attempts to wean steroids. Both CK and clinical strength improved with the reinstitution of immunotherapy, in particular steroids and IV immunoglobulin (IVIg). All patients required treatment with varying multiagent immunosuppressive regimens to achieve clinical remission, including prednisone (n = 6), IVIg (n = 5), plasmapheresis (n = 2), and additional therapy including methotrexate (n = 6), cyclophosphamide (n = 2), rituximab (n = 2), azathioprine (n = 1), and cyclosporine (n = 1). Conclusions: Recognition of HMGCR antibody–associated NAM is important because these patients are responsive to immunosuppression, and early multiagent therapy and a slow and cautious approach to withdrawing steroids may improve outcomes. PMID:25866831

  9. Targeting the Mevalonate Cascade as a New Therapeutic Approach in Heart Disease, Cancer and Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Behzad; Wiechec, Emmilia; Ande, Sudharsana R; Sharma, Pawan; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Post, Martin; Freed, Darren H.; Hashemi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Shahla; Zeki, Amir A.; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, also known as the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is an essential cellular pathway that is involved in diverse cell functions. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR) is the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to MVA. Given its role in cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis, the regulation of HMGCR has been intensely investigated. Because all cells require a steady supply of MVA, both the sterol (i.e. cholesterol) and non-sterol (i.e. isoprenoid) products of MVA metabolism exert coordinated feedback regulation on HMGCR through different mechanisms. The proper functioning of HMGCR as the proximal enzyme in the MVA pathway is essential under both normal physiologic conditions and in many diseases given its role in cell cycle pathways and cell proliferation, cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, cell cytoskeletal dynamics and stability, cell membrane structure and fluidity, mitochondrial function, proliferation, and cell fate. The blockbuster statin drugs (‘statins’) directly bind to and inhibit HMGCR, and their use for the past thirty years has revolutionized the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases, in particular coronary heart disease. Initially thought to exert their effects through cholesterol reduction, recent evidence indicates that statins also have pleiotropic immunomodulatory properties independent of cholesterol lowering. In this review we will focus on the therapeutic applications and mechanisms involved in the MVA cascade including Rho GTPase and Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling, statin inhibition of HMGCR, geranylgeranyltransferase (GGTase) inhibition, and farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibition in cardiovascular disease, pulmonary diseases (e.g. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cancer. PMID:24582968

  10. Vanillic acid prevents the deregulation of lipid metabolism, endothelin 1 and up regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in nitric oxide deficient hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Subramanian; Prahalathan, Pichavaram; Saravanakumar, Murugesan; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-11-15

    Hypertension is one of the main factors causing cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of vanillic acid against nitric oxide deficient rats. Hypertension was induced in adult male albino rats of Wistar strain, weighing 180-220g, by oral administration of N(ω)-nitro-l arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) 40mg/kg in drinking water for 4 weeks. Vanillic acid was administered orally at a dose of 50mg/kg b.w. Nitric oxide deficient rats showed increased levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and decreased heart nitric oxide metabolites (NOx). A significant increase in the levels of plasma cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C), triglycerides (TG), free fatty acids (FFA), phospholipids (PL), 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in the plasma, liver and kidney and decreased level of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) are observed, whereas there is a decrease in the activities of plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) in nitric oxide deficient rats. l-NAME rats also showed an increase in TC, TG, FFA and PL levels in the liver and kidney tissues. Vanillic acid treatment brought the above parameters towards near normal level. Moreover the down regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and up regulated expression of endothelin 1 (ET1) components was also attenuated by vanillic acid treatment. All the above outcomes were confirmed by the histopathological examination. These results suggest that vanillic acid has enough potential to attenuate hypertension, dyslipidemia and hepatic and renal damage in nitric oxide deficient rats. PMID:25239071

  11. Phase I biomarker modulation study of atorvastatin in women at increased risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Arun, Banu K; Gong, Yun; Liu, Diane; Litton, Jennifer K; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Jack Lee, J; Vornik, Lana; Ibrahim, Nuhad K; Cornelison, Terri; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Heckman-Stoddard, Brandy M; Koenig, Kimberly B; Alvarez, Ricardo R; Murray, James L; Valero, Vicente; Lippman, Scott M; Brown, Powel; Sneige, Nour

    2016-07-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), tamoxifen, and raloxifene that reduce the risk of breast cancer are limited to only estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. In addition, patient acceptance of SERMs is low due to toxicity and intolerability. New agents with improved toxicity profile that reduce risk of ER-negative breast cancer are urgently needed. Observational studies show that statins can reduce breast cancer incidence and recurrence. The objective of this prospective short-term prevention study was to evaluate the effect of a lipophilic statin, atorvastatin, on biomarkers in breast tissue and serum of women at increased risk. Eligible participants included women with previous history of carcinoma in situ, or atypical hyperplasia, or 5 year breast cancer projected Gail risk >1.67 %, or lifetime breast cancer risk >20 % calculated by models including Claus, Tyrer-Cuzick, Boadicea, or BRCAPRO. Patients underwent baseline fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the breast, blood collection for biomarker analysis, and were randomized to either no treatment or atorvastatin at 10, 20, or 40 mg/day dose for 3 months. At 3 months, blood collection and breast FNA were repeated. Biomarkers included C-reactive protein (CRP), lipid profile, atorvastatin, and its metabolites, Ki-67, bcl-2, EGFR, and pEGFR. Baseline genotype for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) was also measured. Among 60 patients evaluated, a significant reduction in serum CRP, cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and increase in atorvastatin metabolites in serum and breast FNAs was demonstrated. No changes were observed in other tissue biomarkers. This study shows that atorvastatin and its metabolites are detectable in breast samples and may lower serum CRP among women without hyperlipidemia. PMID:27287781

  12. Resistance to high-fat diet-induced obesity and altered expression of adipose-specific genes in HSL-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kenji; Shen, Wen-Jun; Patel, Shailja; Natu, Vanita; Wang, Jining; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2003-12-01

    To elucidate the role of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in diet-induced obesity, HSL-deficient (HSL-/-) and wild-type mice were fed normal chow or high-fat diets. HSL-/- mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity showing higher core body temperatures. Weight and triacylglycerol contents were decreased in white adipose tissue (WAT) but increased in both brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of HSL-/- mice. Serum insulin levels in the fed state and tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA levels in adipose tissues were higher, whereas serum levels of adipocyte complement-related protein of 30 kDa (ACRP30)/adiponectin and leptin, as well as mRNA levels of ACRP30/adiponectin, leptin, resistin, and adipsin in WAT, were lower in HSL-/- mice than in controls. Expression of transcription factors associated with adipogenesis (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, CAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha) and lipogenesis (carbohydrate response element-binding protein, adipocyte determination- and differentiation-dependent factor-1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c), as well as of adipose differentiation markers (adipocyte lipid-binding protein, perilipin, lipoprotein lipase), lipogenic enzymes (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 and -2, fatty acid synthase, ATP citrate lyase) and insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, GLUT4), was suppressed in WAT but not in BAT of HSL-/- mice. In contrast, expression of genes associated with cholesterol metabolism (sterol-regulatory element-binding protein-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1) and thermogenesis (uncoupling protein-2) was upregulated in both WAT and BAT of HSL-/- mice. Our results suggest that impaired lipolysis in HSL deficiency affects lipid metabolism through alterations of adipose differentiation and adipose-derived hormone levels.

  13. Pravastatin normalizes ET-1-induced contraction in the aorta of type 2 diabetic OLETF rats by suppressing the KSR1/ERK complex.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Shingo; Taguchi, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kamata, Katsuo; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2012-10-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 is a likely candidate for a key role in diabetic vascular complications. In the present study, we hypothesized that treatment with pravastatin (an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase) would normalize the ET-1-induced contraction in aortas isolated from type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rats. Contractile responses were examined by measuring isometric force in endothelium-denuded aortic helical strips from four groups: Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO; genetic control), OLETF (type 2 diabetic), pravastatin-treated LETO, and pravastatin-treated OLETF rats. Both immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation assays were used to examine Src, protein phosphatase (PP)2A, kinase suppressor of Ras (KSR)1, and ERK signaling pathway protein levels and activities. In endothelium-denuded aortas isolated from OLETF rats at the chronic stage of diabetes (56-60 wk) (vs. those from age-matched LETO rats), we found the following: 1) ET-1-induced contraction was enhanced, 2) ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased, 3) phosphorylations of KSR1 and PP2A were reduced (i.e., enhancement of the kinase active state), 4) ERK1/2-KSR1 complexes were increased, and 5) Src tyrosine kinase activity was diminished. Endothelium-denuded aortas isolated from OLETF rats treated with pravastatin (10 mg/kg po, daily for 4 wk) exhibited normalized ET-1-induced contractions and suppressed ET-1-stimulated ERK phosphorylation, with the associated phosphorylated KSR1 and phosphorylated PP2A levels being increased toward normal levels. These results suggest that in type 2 diabetic rats, pravastatin normalizes ET-1-induced contraction in aortic smooth muscle via a suppression of PP2A/KSR1/ERK activities after an enhancement of Src kinase activity.

  14. Essential Role of TGF-β/Smad Pathway on Statin Dependent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Sánchez-Galán, Eva; Santamaría, Beatriz; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luís Miguel; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Background The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins) exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-β/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. Methodology In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-β. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-β receptor type II (TRII), and increased TGF-β synthesis and TGF-β/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-β induced apoptosis and increased TGF-β-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-β/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. Conclusions Statins enhance TGF-β/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-β/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs. PMID:19088845

  15. Targeting the mevalonate cascade as a new therapeutic approach in heart disease, cancer and pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Behzad; Wiechec, Emilia; Ande, Sudharsana R; Sharma, Pawan; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Post, Martin; Freed, Darren H; Hashemi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Shahla; Zeki, Amir A; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-07-01

    The cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, also known as the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is an essential cellular pathway that is involved in diverse cell functions. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR) is the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to MVA. Given its role in cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis, the regulation of HMGCR has been intensely investigated. Because all cells require a steady supply of MVA, both the sterol (i.e. cholesterol) and non-sterol (i.e. isoprenoid) products of MVA metabolism exert coordinated feedback regulation on HMGCR through different mechanisms. The proper functioning of HMGCR as the proximal enzyme in the MVA pathway is essential under both normal physiologic conditions and in many diseases given its role in cell cycle pathways and cell proliferation, cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, cell cytoskeletal dynamics and stability, cell membrane structure and fluidity, mitochondrial function, proliferation, and cell fate. The blockbuster statin drugs ('statins') directly bind to and inhibit HMGCR, and their use for the past thirty years has revolutionized the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases, in particular coronary heart disease. Initially thought to exert their effects through cholesterol reduction, recent evidence indicates that statins also have pleiotropic immunomodulatory properties independent of cholesterol lowering. In this review we will focus on the therapeutic applications and mechanisms involved in the MVA cascade including Rho GTPase and Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling, statin inhibition of HMGCR, geranylgeranyltransferase (GGTase) inhibition, and farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibition in cardiovascular disease, pulmonary diseases (e.g. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)), and cancer.

  16. Synergistic Effect of Simvastatin Plus Radiation in Gastric Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Implications of BIRC5 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Taekyu; Lee, Inkyoung; Kim, Jungmin; Kang, Won Ki

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We investigated the synergistic effect of simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor plus radiation therapy, on the proliferation and survival of gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We also studied several genes involved in the simvastatin/radiation-induced effects. Methods and Materials: Gastric cancer (AGS, SNU601, MKN1, and MKN28) and CRC (CoLo320, SW48, HT29, and HCT8) cell lines were treated with 0.2 μM simvastatin alone, or in combination with 0 to 4 Gy of radiation, and subjected to clonogenic survival and proliferation assays in vitro. To assess the molecular mechanism of the combination treatment, we performed microarray analysis, immunoblot assays, small interfering RNA knockdown experiments, and plasmid rescue assays. The antitumoral effects of simvastatin and radiation were evaluated in vivo using xenograft models. Results: The combination therapy of simvastatin plus radiation inhibited basal clonogenic survival and proliferation of GC and CRC cells in vitro. Simvastatin suppressed the expression of BIRC5 and CTGF genes in these cancer cells. In vivo, the combined treatment with simvastatin and radiation significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors compared with treatment with radiation alone. Conclusion: We suggest that simvastatin has a synergistic effect with radiation on GC and CRC through the induction of apoptosis, which may be mediated by a simultaneous inhibition of BIRC5 and CTGF expression. A clinical trial of simvastatin in combination with radiation in patients with GC or CRC is warranted.

  17. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management. PMID:26900108

  18. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites. PMID:27147449

  19. Effects of dietary plant meal and soya-saponin supplementation on intestinal and hepatic lipid droplet accumulation and lipoprotein and sterol metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Kortner, Trond M; Penn, Michael; Hansen, Anne Kristine; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-02-01

    Altered lipid metabolism has been shown in fish fed plant protein sources. The present study aimed to gain further insights into how intestinal and hepatic lipid absorption and metabolism are modulated by plant meal (PM) and soya-saponin (SA) inclusion in salmon feed. Post-smolt Atlantic salmon were fed for 10 weeks one of four diets based on fishmeal or PM, with or without 10 g/kg SA. PM inclusion resulted in decreased growth performance, excessive lipid droplet accumulation in the pyloric caeca and liver, and reduced plasma cholesterol levels. Intestinal and hepatic gene expression profiling revealed an up-regulation of the expression of genes involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein (LP) synthesis (apo, fatty acid transporters, microsomal TAG transfer protein, acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase, choline kinase and choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase A), cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase) and associated transcription factors (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and PPARγ). SA inclusion resulted in reduced body pools of cholesterol and bile salts. The hepatic gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid biosynthesis (cytochrome P450 7A1 (cyp7a1)) as well as the transcription factor liver X receptor and the bile acid transporter abcb11 (ATP-binding cassette B11) was down-regulated by SA inclusion. A significant interaction was observed between PM inclusion and SA inclusion for plasma cholesterol levels. In conclusion, gene expression profiling suggested that the capacity for LP assembly and cholesterol synthesis was up-regulated by PM exposure, probably as a compensatory mechanism for excessive lipid droplet accumulation and reduced plasma cholesterol levels. SA inclusion had hypocholesterolaemic effects on Atlantic salmon, accompanied by decreased bile salt metabolism.

  20. Dietary fenugreek and onion attenuate cholesterol gallstone formation in lithogenic diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raghunatha R L; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2011-10-01

    An animal study was conducted to evaluate the antilithogenic effect of a combination of dietary fenugreek seeds and onion. Lithogenic conditions were induced in mice by feeding them a high (0.5%) cholesterol diet (HCD) for 10 weeks. Fenugreek (12%) and onion (2%) were included individually and in combination in this HCD. Fenugreek, onion and their combination reduced the incidence of cholesterol gallstones by 75%, 27% and 76%, respectively, with attendant reduction in total cholesterol content by 38-42%, 50-72% and 61-80% in serum, liver and bile respectively. Consequently, the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio was reduced significantly in serum, liver and bile. The cholesterol saturation index of bile was reduced from 4.14 to 1.38 by the combination of fenugreek and onion and to 2.33 by onion alone. The phospholipid and bile acid contents of the bile were also increased. Changes in the hepatic enzyme activities (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase and cholesterol-27-hydroxylase) induced by HCD were countered by fenugreek, onion and their combination. Hepatic lipid peroxides were reduced by 19-22% and 39-45% with fenugreek, onion and their combination included in the diet along with the HCD. Increased accumulation of fat in the liver and inflammation of the gallbladder membrane produced by HCD were reduced by fenugreek, onion and their combination. The antilithogenic influence was highest with fenugreek alone, and the presence of onion along with it did not further increase this effect. There was also no additive effect of the two spices in the recovery of antioxidant molecules or in the antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:21756271

  1. Interleukin-33 stimulates GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Eliana; Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Lemberger, Christof E; de Martin, Rainer; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Maurer, Gerald; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, is involved in various inflammatory conditions targeting amongst other cells the endothelium. Besides regulating the maturation and functions of myeloid cells, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage-CSF (M-CSF) have been shown to play a role in such pathologies too. It was the aim of our study to investigate a possible influence of IL-33 on GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells. IL-33, but not IL-18 or IL-37, stimulated GM-CSF and M-CSF mRNA expression and protein production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs) through the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway in an IL-1-independent way. This effect was inhibited by the soluble form of ST2 (sST2), which is known to act as a decoy receptor for IL-33. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor fluvastatin could also be shown to moderately reduce the IL-33-mediated effect on M-CSF, but not on GM-CSF expression. In addition, IL-33, IL-1β, GM-CSF and M-CSF were detected in endothelial cells of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques using immunofluorescence. Upregulation of GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells, an effect that appears to be mediated by NF-κB and to be independent of IL-1, may be an additional mechanism through which IL-33 contributes to inflammatory activation of the vessel wall. PMID:27173404

  2. Statins in nephrotic syndrome: a new weapon against tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Nostro, Lorena; Crascì, Eleonora; Barillà, Antonio; Cosentini, Vincenzo; Aloisi, Carmela; Sofi, Tito; Campo, Susanna; Frisina, Nicola

    2005-11-01

    The nephrotic syndrome is characterized by metabolic disorders leading to an increase in circulating lipoproteins levels. Hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia in this case may depend on a reduction in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins catabolism and on an increase in hepatic synthesis of Apo B-containing lipoproteins. These alterations are the starting point of a self-maintaining mechanism, which can accelerate the progression of chronic renal failure. Indeed, hyperlipidemia can affect renal function, increase proteinuria and speed glomerulosclerosis, thus determining a higher risk of progression to dialysis. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis from mevalonate and its inhibitors, or statins, can therefore interfere with the above-mentioned consequences of hyperlipidemia. Statins are already well known for their effectiveness on primary cardiovascular prevention, which cannot be explained only through their hypolipemic effect. As far as kidney diseases are concerned, statin therapy has been shown to prevent creatinine clearance decline and to slow renal function loss, particularly in case of proteinuria, and its favorable effect may depend only partially on the attenuation of hyperlipidemia. Statins may therefore confer tissue protection through lipid-independent mechanisms, which can be triggered by other mediators, such as angiotensin receptor blockers. Possible pathways for the protective action of statins, other than any hypocholesterolemic effect, are: cellular apoptosis/proliferation balance, inflammatory cytokines production, and signal transduction regulation. Statins also play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory and immune response, coagulation process, bone turnover, neovascularization, vascular tone, and arterial pressure. In this study, we would like to provide scientific evidences for the pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be the starting point for the

  3. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-11-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. PMID:2513480

  4. Partial vinylphenol reductase purification and characterization from Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Tchobanov, Iavor; Gal, Laurent; Guilloux-Benatier, Michèle; Remize, Fabienne; Nardi, Tiziana; Guzzo, Jean; Serpaggi, Virginie; Alexandre, Hervé

    2008-07-01

    Brettanomyces is the major microbial cause for wine spoilage worldwide and causes significant economic losses. The reasons are the production of ethylphenols that lead to an unpleasant taint described as 'phenolic odour'. Despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces has remained poorly studied at the metabolic level. The origin of the ethylphenol results from the conversion of vinylphenols in ethylphenol by Brettanomyces hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase. However, no information is available on the vinylphenol reductase responsible for the conversion of vinylphenols in ethylphenols. In this study, a vinylphenol reductase was partially purified from Brettanomyces bruxellensis that was active towards 4-vinylguaiacol and 4-vinylphenol only among the substrates tested. First, a vinylphenol reductase activity assay was designed that allowed us to show that the enzyme was NADH dependent. The vinylphenol reductase was purified 152-fold with a recovery yield of 1.77%. The apparent K(m) and V(max) values for the hydrolysis of 4-vinylguaiacol were, respectively, 0.14 mM and 1900 U mg(-1). The optimal pH and temperature for vinylphenol reductase were pH 5-6 and 30 degrees C, respectively. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 26 kDa. Trypsic digest of the protein was performed and the peptides were sequenced, which allowed us to identify in Brettanomyces genome an ORF coding for a 210 amino acid protein.

  5. Crystal structure of red chlorophyll catabolite reductase: enlargement of the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase family.

    PubMed

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Kitamori, Yuka; Noguchi, Masato; Kohchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2009-06-01

    The key steps in the degradation pathway of chlorophylls are the ring-opening reaction catalyzed by pheophorbide a oxygenase and sequential reduction by red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR). During these steps, chlorophyll catabolites lose their color and phototoxicity. RCCR catalyzes the ferredoxin-dependent reduction of the C20/C1 double bond of red chlorophyll catabolite. RCCR appears to be evolutionarily related to the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase (FDBR) family, which synthesizes a variety of phytobilin pigments, on the basis of sequence similarity, ferredoxin dependency, and the common tetrapyrrole skeleton of their substrates. The evidence, however, is not robust; the identity between RCCR and FDBR HY2 from Arabidopsis thaliana is only 15%, and the oligomeric states of these enzymes are different. Here, we report the crystal structure of A. thaliana RCCR at 2.4 A resolution. RCCR forms a homodimer, in which each subunit folds in an alpha/beta/alpha sandwich. The tertiary structure of RCCR is similar to those of FDBRs, strongly supporting that these enzymes evolved from a common ancestor. The two subunits are related by noncrystallographic 2-fold symmetry in which the alpha-helices near the edge of the beta-sheet unique in RCCR participate in intersubunit interaction. The putative RCC-binding site, which was derived by superimposing RCCR onto biliverdin-bound forms of FDBRs, forms an open pocket surrounded by conserved residues among RCCRs. Glu154 and Asp291 of A. thaliana RCCR, which stand opposite each other in the pocket, likely are involved in substrate binding and/or catalysis.

  6. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    PubMed

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  7. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  8. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  9. Some physical and immunological properties of ox kidney biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Rigney, E M; Phillips, O; Mantle, T J

    1988-01-01

    The liver, kidney and spleen of the mouse and rat and the kidney and spleen of the ox express a monomeric form of biliverdin reductase (Mr 34,000), which in the case of the ox kidney enzyme exists in two forms (pI 5.4 and 5.2) that are probably charge isomers. The livers of the mouse and rats express, in addition, a protein (Mr 46,000) that cross-reacts with antibodies raised against the ox kidney enzyme and may be related to form 2 described by Frydman, Tomaro, Awruch & Frydman [(1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 759, 257-263]. Higher-Mr forms appear to exist in the guinea pig and hamster. The ox kidney enzyme has three thiol groups, of which two are accessible to 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoate) in the native enzyme. Immunocytochemical analysis reveals that biliverdin reductase is localized in proximal tubules of the inner cortex of the rat kidney. Biliverdin reductase antiserum also stains proximal tubules in human and ox kidney. The staining of podocytes in glomeruli of ox kidney with antiserum to aldose reductase is particularly prominent. The localization of biliverdin reductase in the inner cortical zone of rat kidney is similar to that described for glutathione S-transferase YfYf, and it is suggested that one function of this 'intracellular binding protein' may be to maintain a low free concentration of biliverdin to allow biliverdin reductase to operate efficiently. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3060109

  10. The inhibitory activity of aldose reductase in vitro by constituents of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Sri; Ersam, Taslim; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-15

    We investigated aldose reductase inhibition of Garcinia mangostana Linn. from Indonesia. Dichloromethane extract of the root bark of this tree was found to demonstrate an IC50 value of 11.98 µg/ml for human aldose reductase in vitro. From the dichloromethane fraction, prenylated xanthones were isolated as potent human aldose reductase inhibitors. We discovered 3-isomangostin to be most potent against aldose reductase, with an IC50 of 3.48 µM.

  11. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  16. Domain evolution and functional diversification of sulfite reductases.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Ashita; Goswami, Sulip; Riley, Monica; Teske, Andreas; Sogin, Mitchell

    2005-02-01

    Sulfite reductases are key enzymes of assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, which occur in diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. They share a highly conserved domain "C-X5-C-n-C-X3-C" for binding siroheme and iron-sulfur clusters that facilitate electron transfer to the substrate. For each sulfite reductase cluster, the siroheme-binding domain is positioned slightly differently at the N-terminus of dsrA and dsrB, while in the assimilatory proteins the siroheme domain is located at the C-terminus. Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the siroheme-binding domain shows that sulfite reductase sequences diverged from a common ancestor into four separate clusters (aSir, alSir, dsr, and asrC) that are biochemically distinct; each serves a different assimilatory or dissimilatory role in sulfur metabolism. The phylogenetic distribution and functional grouping in sulfite reductase clusters (dsrA and dsrB vs. aSiR, asrC, and alSir) suggest that their functional diversification during evolution may have preceded the bacterial/archaeal divergence.

  17. The Kinetics and Inhibition of the Enzyme Methemoglobin Reductase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, A. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry experiment which involves the preparation and kinetics of an oxidation-reduction enzyme system, methemoglobin reductase. A crude enzyme extract is prepared and assayed spectrophotometrically. The enzyme system obeys Michaelis-Menton kinetics with respect to both substrate and the NADH cofactor. (MLH)

  18. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  19. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  20. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  1. A detoxifying oxygen reductase in the anaerobic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Vicente, João B; Tran, Vy; Pinto, Liliana; Teixeira, Miguel; Singh, Upinder

    2012-09-01

    We report the characterization of a bacterial-type oxygen reductase abundant in the cytoplasm of the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Upon host infection, E. histolytica is confronted with various oxygen tensions in the host intestine, as well as increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species at the site of local tissue inflammation. Resistance to oxygen-derived stress thus plays an important role in the pathogenic potential of E. histolytica. The genome of E. histolytica has four genes that encode flavodiiron proteins, which are bacterial-type oxygen or nitric oxide reductases and were likely acquired by lateral gene transfer from prokaryotes. The EhFdp1 gene has higher expression in virulent than in nonvirulent Entamoeba strains and species, hinting that the response to oxidative stress may be one correlate of virulence potential. We demonstrate that EhFdp1 is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica and that the protein levels are markedly increased (up to ~5-fold) upon oxygen exposure. Additionally, we produced fully functional recombinant EhFdp1 and demonstrated that this enzyme is a specific and robust oxygen reductase but has poor nitric oxide reductase activity. This observation represents a new mechanism of oxygen resistance in the anaerobic protozoan pathogen E. histolytica.

  2. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  3. Domain Evolution and Functional Diversification of Sulfite Reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Goswami, Sulip; Riley, Monica; Teske, Andreas; Sogin, Mitchell

    2005-02-01

    Sulfite reductases are key enzymes of assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, which occur in diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. They share a highly conserved domain "C-X5-C-n-C-X3-C" for binding siroheme and iron-sulfur clusters that facilitate electron transfer to the substrate. For each sulfite reductase cluster, the siroheme-binding domain is positioned slightly differently at the N-terminus of dsrA and dsrB, while in the assimilatory proteins the siroheme domain is located at the C-terminus. Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the siroheme-binding domain shows that sulfite reductase sequences diverged from a common ancestor into four separate clusters (aSir, alSir, dsr, and asrC) that are biochemically distinct; each serves a different assimilatory or dissimilatory role in sulfur metabolism. The phylogenetic distribution and functional grouping in sulfite reductase clusters (dsrA and dsrB vs. aSiR, asrC, and alSir) suggest that their functional diversification during evolution may have preceded the bacterial/archaeal divergence.

  4. Molecular genetics of steroid 5 alpha-reductase 2 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Thigpen, A E; Davis, D L; Milatovich, A; Mendonca, B B; Imperato-McGinley, J; Griffin, J E; Francke, U; Wilson, J D; Russell, D W

    1992-01-01

    Two isozymes of steroid 5 alpha-reductase encoded by separate loci catalyze the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Inherited defects in the type 2 isozyme lead to male pseudohermaphroditism in which affected males have a normal internal urogenital tract but external genitalia resembling those of a female. The 5 alpha-reductase type 2 gene (gene symbol SRD5A2) was cloned and shown to contain five exons and four introns. The gene was localized to chromosome 2 band p23 by somatic cell hybrid mapping and chromosomal in situ hybridization. Molecular analysis of the SRD5A2 gene resulted in the identification of 18 mutations in 11 homozygotes, 6 compound heterozygotes, and 4 inferred compound heterozygotes from 23 families with 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. 6 apparent recurrent mutations were detected in 19 different ethnic backgrounds. In two patients, the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes correlated with the severity of the disease. The high proportion of compound heterozygotes suggests that the carrier frequency of mutations in the 5 alpha-reductase type 2 gene may be higher than previously thought. Images PMID:1522235

  5. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  6. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  7. Differential molecular response of monodehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase by nitration and S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N.; Luque, Francisco; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The ascorbate–glutathione cycle is a metabolic pathway that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide and involves enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Proteomic studies have shown that some enzymes in this cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) are potential targets for post-translational modifications (PMTs) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Using purified recombinant pea peroxisomal MDAR and cytosolic and chloroplastic GR enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO–) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) which are known to mediate protein nitration and S-nitrosylation processes, respectively, were analysed. Although ONOO– and GSNO inhibit peroxisomal MDAR activity, chloroplastic and cytosolic GR were not affected by these molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated MDAR revealed that Tyr213, Try292, and Tyr345 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by ONOO–. The location of these residues in the structure of pea peroxisomal MDAR reveals that Tyr345 is found at 3.3 Å of His313 which is involved in the NADP-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr345 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition of MDAR activity by ONOO–. These results provide new insights into the molecular regulation of MDAR which is deactivated by nitration and S-nitrosylation. However, GR was not affected by ONOO– or GSNO, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to conserve redox status by maintaining the level of reduced GSH. Under a nitro-oxidative stress induced by salinity (150mM NaCl), MDAR expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels) was increased, probably to compensate the inhibitory effects of S-nitrosylation and nitration on the enzyme. The present data show the modulation of the antioxidative response of key enzymes in the ascorbate–glutathione cycle by nitric oxide (NO)-PTMs, thus indicating the close involvement

  8. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N2O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N2O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N2O reductase activity was inhibited by O2, C2H2, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 μM) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 μM) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N2O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater (Km = 2.17 μM), estuarine (Km = 14.5 μM), and alkaline-saline (Km = 501 μM) environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N2O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N2O per m2 per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N2O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N2O per m2 per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  9. 3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from oilseed rape (Brassica napus).

    PubMed

    Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Smith, C G; Sidebottom, C; Slabas, A R

    1992-04-01

    3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase (E.C. 1.1.1.100, alternatively known as beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] reductase), a component of fatty acid synthetase has been purified from seeds of rape by ammonium sulphate fractionation, Procion Red H-E3B chromatography, FPLC gel filtration and high performance hydroxyapatite chromatography. The purified enzyme appears on SDS-PAGE as a number of 20-30 kDa components and has a strong tendency to exist in a dimeric form, particularly when dithiothreitol is not present to reduce disulphide bonds. Cleveland mapping and cross-reactivity with antiserum raised against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase both indicate that the multiple components have similar primary structures. On gel filtration the enzyme appears to have a molecular mass of 120 kDa suggesting that the native structure is tetrameric. The enzyme has a strong preference for the acetoacetyl ester of acyl carrier protein (Km = 3 microM) over the corresponding esters of the model substrates N-acetyl cysteamine (Km = 35 mM) and CoA (Km = 261 microM). It is inactivated by dilution but this can be partly prevented by the inclusion of NADPH. Using an antiserum prepared against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase, the enzyme has been visualised inside the plastids of rape embryo and leaf tissues by immunoelectron microscopy. Amino acid sequencing of two peptides prepared by digestion of the purified enzyme with trypsin showed strong similarities with 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from avocado pear and the Nod G gene product from Rhizobium meliloti.

  10. Identification and characterization of 2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A reductase, the prototype of a novel class of dearomatizing reductases.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Christian; Estelmann, Sebastian; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Müller, Michael; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Boll, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The enzymatic dearomatization of aromatic ring systems by reduction represents a highly challenging redox reaction in biology and plays a key role in the degradation of aromatic compounds under anoxic conditions. In anaerobic bacteria, most monocyclic aromatic growth substrates are converted to benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), which is then dearomatized to a conjugated dienoyl-CoA by ATP-dependent or -independent benzoyl-CoA reductases. It was unresolved whether or not related enzymes are involved in the anaerobic degradation of environmentally relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this work, a previously unknown dearomatizing 2-naphthoyl-CoA reductase was purified from extracts of the naphthalene-degrading, sulphidogenic enrichment culture N47. The oxygen-tolerant enzyme dearomatized the non-activated ring of 2-naphthoyl-CoA by a four-electron reduction to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthoyl-CoA. The dimeric 150 kDa enzyme complex was composed of a 72 kDa subunit showing sequence similarity to members of the flavin-containing 'old yellow enzyme' family. NCR contained FAD, FMN, and an iron-sulphur cluster as cofactors. Extracts of Escherichia coli expressing the encoding gene catalysed 2-naphthoyl-CoA reduction. The identi