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Sample records for 3-mv ams facility

  1. Recent advances in AMS of 36Cl with a 3-MV-tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martschini, Martin; Forstner, Oliver; Golser, Robin; Kutschera, Walter; Pavetich, Stefan; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Suter, Martin; Wallner, Anton

    2011-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl ( t1/2 = 0.30 Ma) at natural isotopic concentrations requires high particle energies for the separation from the stable isobar 36S and was so far the exclusive domain of tandem accelerators with at least 5 MV terminal voltage. Using terminal foil stripping and a detection setup consisting of a split-anode ionization chamber and an additional energy signal from a silicon strip detector, a 36S suppression of >10 4 at 3 MV terminal voltage was achieved. To further increase the 36S suppression energy loss straggling in various counter gases (C 4H 10, Ar-CH 4 and C 4H 10-Ar) and the effect of "energy focusing" below the maximum of the Bragg curve was investigated. The comparison of experimental data with simulations and published data yielded interesting insights into the physics underlying the detectors. Energy loss, energy straggling and angular scattering determine the 36S suppression. In addition, we improved ion source conditions, target backing materials and the cathode design with respect to sulfur output and cross contamination. These changes allow higher currents during measurement ( 35Cl - current ≈ 5 μA) and also increased the reproducibility. An injector to detector efficiency for 36Cl ions of 8% (16% stripping yield for the 7+ charge state in the accelerator, 50% 36Cl detection efficiency) was achieved, which can favorably be compared to other facilities. The memory effect in our ion source was also thoroughly investigated. Currently our measured blank value is 36Cl/Cl ≈ 3 × 10 -15 when samples with a ratio of 10 -11 are used in the same sample wheel and 36Cl/Cl ≈ 5 × 10 -16 if measured together with samples with a ratio of 10 -12 or below. This is in good agreement with the lowest so far published isotope ratios around 5 × 10 -16 and demonstrates that 3 MV tandems can achieve the same sensitivity for 36Cl as larger machines.

  2. AMS of 36Cl with the VERA 3 MV tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martschini, Martin; Andersson, Pontus; Forstner, Oliver; Golser, Robin; Hanstorp, Dag; Lindahl, Anton O.; Kutschera, Walter; Pavetich, Stefan; Priller, Alfred; Rohlén, Johan; Steier, Peter; Suter, Martin; Wallner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress with compact ionization chambers has opened new possibilities for isobar suppression in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Separation of 36Cl (t1/2 = 0.30 Ma) at natural isotopic levels from its stable isobar 36S became feasible at particle energies of 24 MeV, which are also accessible for medium-sized tandem accelerators with 3 MV terminal voltage like VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator). Investigations with an ionization chamber revealed how physics favors isobar separation even at energies below the maximum of the Bragg curve. The strong energy focusing effect at high energy losses reduces energy straggling significantly and isobar separation steadily increases up to almost full energy loss. With an optimized detection setup, sulfur suppression factors of 2 × 104 have been achieved. Refraining from the additional use of degrader foils has the benefit of high transmission to the detector (∼16%), but requires a low sulfur output from the ion source. Therefore several backing materials have been screened for sulfur content. The dependence of the sulfur output on the AgCl sample size has been investigated as well. Precision and accuracy have been thoroughly assessed over the last two years. Since drifts in the spectra are efficiently corrected by monitoring the position of the 36S peak, the reproducibility for high ratio samples (36Cl/Cl > 10-12) is better than 2%. Our blank value of 36Cl/Cl ≈ (5 ± 5) × 10-16 is competitive to other labs. 36Cl has become a routine AMS-isotope at VERA. Recently we also explored novel techniques for additional sulfur suppression already in the ion source. While results with a small gas reaction cell in front of the sputter target were discouraging, a decrease in the sulfur/chlorine ratio by one order of magnitude was achieved by directing 300 mW continuous wave laser beam at 445 nm towards the cathode in the ion source.

  3. A new ion beam facility based on a 3 MV Tandetron™ at IFIN-HH, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Ghiță, D. G.; Moșu, D. V.; Călinescu, C. I.; Podaru, N. C.; Mous, D. J. W.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    A 3 MV Tandetron™ accelerator system has been installed and commissioned at the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, Măgurele, Romania. The main purpose of this machine is to strengthen applied nuclear physics research ongoing in our institute for more than four decades. The accelerator system was developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V. (HVE) and comprises three high energy beam lines. The first beam line is dedicated to ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques: Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry - RBS, Nuclear Reaction Analysis - NRA, Particle Induced X-ray and γ-ray Emission - PIXE and PIGE and micro-beam experiments - μ-PIXE. The second beam line is dedicated to high energy ion implantation experiments and the third beam line was designed mainly for nuclear cross-sections measurements used in nuclear astrophysics. A unique feature, the first time in operation at an accelerator facility is the Na charge exchange canal (CEC), which is used to obtain high intensity beams of He- of at least 3 μA. The results of the acceptance tests demonstrate the huge potential of this new facility in various fields, from IBA to radiation hardness studies and from medical or environmental applications to astrophysics. The main features of the accelerator are presented in this paper.

  4. Radiocarbon measurements at the CSIRO AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sie, S. H.; Leaney, F.; Gillespie, R.; Suter, G. F.; Ryan, C. G.

    1994-06-01

    The CSIRO AMS facility based on a 3 MV Tandetron at the HIAF (Heavy Ion Analytical Facility) laboratory became operational in 1990 for 14C measurements, achieving 2-4% precision. The main drive behind the AMS development is its potential use in exploration, and although the cosmogenic isotopes are potentially useful in regolith studies, the emphasis is shifting towards the development of the capability of in-situ detection of ultra traces of heavy stable isotopes and geochronology. The 14C capability, and other cosmogenic isotopes, will continue to be developed, to meet other CSIRO interests, e.g. in environmental problems.

  5. Can-AMS: The New Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility At The University Of Ottawa

    SciTech Connect

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Clark, I. D.; Kotzer, T.; Litherland, A. E.

    2011-06-01

    The Canadian Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Ottawa will be equipped with a new, 3 MV tandem accelerator with peripheral equipment for the analysis of elements ranging from tritium to the actinides. This facility, along with a wide array of support instrumentation recently funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, will be located in a new science building on the downtown campus of the University of Ottawa. In addition to providing the standard AMS measurements on {sup 14}C, {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I for earth, environmental, cultural and biomedical sciences, this facility will incorporate the new technologies of anion isobar separation at low energies using RFQ chemical reaction cells for {sup 36}Cl and new heavy element applications, integrated sample combustion and gas ion source for biomedical and environmental {sup 14}C analysis and the use of novel target matrices for expanding the range of applicable elements and simplifying sample preparation, all currently being developed at IsoTrace. This paper will outline the design goals for the new facility, present some details of the new AMS technologies, in particular the Isobar Separator for Anions and discuss the design of the AMS system resulting from these requirements.

  6. The ANTARES AMS facility at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.; Smith, A. M.; Zoppi, U.; Child, D.; Mifsud, C.; van der Gaast, H.; Williams, A.; Williams, M.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of ANTARES operations, describing (1) technical upgrades that now allow routine 0.3-0.4% 14C precision for 1 mg carbon samples and 1% precision for 100 micrograms, (2) proficiency at 236U measurements in environmental samples, (3) new developments in AMS of platinum group elements and (4), some major application projects undertaken over the period of the past three years. Importantly, the facility is poised to enter into a new phase of expansion with the recent delivery of a 2 MV 14C tandem accelerator system from High Voltage Engineering (HVE) and a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer from Micromass Inc. for combustion of organic samples and isotopic analysis.

  7. 26Al at the AMS facility in Lund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faarinen, Mikko; Bazhal, Sergei; Falkengren-Grerup, U.; Hellborg, Ragnar; Kiisk, Madis; Magnusson, Carl Erik; Persson, Per; Skog, Göran; Stenström, Kristina

    2004-08-01

    To broaden the AMS programme in Lund by including Al studies, a new injector has been installed and tested at the 3 MV Pelletron accelerator. Detailed optical calculations have been performed to obtain maximum mass and energy resolution. The design of the injector, the improvement in the resolution compared to the old injector, as well as preliminary tests with a 26Al-beam, are presented. By using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure the long-lived aluminium isotope 26Al it has become possible to study the uptake, distribution and retention of aluminium in biological system under physiologically realistic conditions. Results from a pilot project on 26Al in wheat plants are presented.

  8. The Naples University 3 MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Campajola, L.; Brondi, A.

    2013-07-18

    The 3 MV tandem accelerator of the Naples University is used for research activities and applications in many fields. At the beginning of operation (1977) the main utilization was in the field of nuclear physics. Later, the realization of new beam lines allowed the development of applied activities as radiocarbon dating, ion beam analysis, biophysics, ion implantation etc. At present, the availability of different ion sources and many improvements on the accelerator allow to run experiments in a wide range of subjects. An overview of the characteristics and major activities of the laboratory is presented.

  9. Status report on the Seoul National University AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. C.; Youn, M.; Kim, I. C.; Park, J. H.; Song, Y. M.; Kang, J.; Choi, H. R.

    2004-08-01

    We report recent progress at the Seoul National University AMS facility in the area of sample preparations, facility maintenance, and briefly describe examples of present applications and future plans. The background level depending on the preparation methods is discussed, and water preparation line that are still under development is described. As the successful application of our facility, dating results of a historic site and a Paleolithic site, dating of Siberian permafrost and bomb pulse measurement are shown. Future plans for Be/Al AMS and biomedical application are discussed.

  10. Bioanalysis works in the IAA AMS facility: Comparison of AMS analytical method with LSC method in human mass balance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaoka, Teiji; Isono, Yoshimi; Setani, Kaoru; Sakai, Kumiko; Yamada, Ichimaro; Sato, Yoshiaki; Gunji, Shinobu; Matsui, Takao

    2007-06-01

    Institute of Accelerator Analysis Ltd. (IAA) is the first Contract Research Organization in Japan providing Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) analysis services for carbon dating and bioanalysis works. The 3 MV AMS machines are maintained by validated analysis methods using multiple control compounds. It is confirmed that these AMS systems have reliabilities and sensitivities enough for each objective. The graphitization of samples for bioanalysis is prepared by our own purification lines including the measurement of total carbon content in the sample automatically. In this paper, we present the use of AMS analysis in human mass balance and metabolism profiling studies with IAA 3 MV AMS, comparing results obtained from the same samples with liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Human samples such as plasma, urine and feces were obtained from four healthy volunteers orally administered a 14C-labeled drug Y-700, a novel xanthine oxidase inhibitor, of which radioactivity was about 3 MBq (85 μCi). For AMS measurement, these samples were diluted 100-10,000-fold with pure-water or blank samples. The results indicated that AMS method had a good correlation with LSC method (e.g. plasma: r = 0.998, urine: r = 0.997, feces: r = 0.997), and that the drug recovery in the excreta exceeded 92%. The metabolite profiles of plasma, urine and feces obtained with HPLC-AMS corresponded to radio-HPLC results measured at much higher radioactivity level. These results revealed that AMS analysis at IAA is useful to measure 14C-concentration in bioanalysis studies at very low radioactivity level.

  11. A new AMS facility in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, C.; Chávez-Lomelí, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Huerta, A.; Andrade, E.; Barrios, E.

    2014-07-01

    A new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry system has been installed at the Institute of Physics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). A sample preparation chemistry laboratory equipped with computer controlled graphitization equipment (AGEIII) has also been established. Together both facilities constitute the LEMA (Laboratorio de Espectrometría de Masas con Aceleradores) first of its kind in Mexico. High sensitivity characterization of the concentration in a sample of 14C as well as 10Be, 26Al, 129I and Pu are now possible. Since the demand for 14C dating is far more abundant, a data analysis program was developed in the cross-platform programming language Python in order to calculate radiocarbon age. Results from installation, acceptance tests and the first results of 14C analyses of reference materials prepared in our own facility are presented.

  12. The Leibniz-Labor AMS facility at the Christian-Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, M.-J.; Schleicher, M.; Grootes, P. M.; Erlenkeuser, H.; Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.; Sarnthein, J. M.; Willkomm, H.

    1997-03-01

    The AMS facility of the Leibniz-Labor für Altersbestimmung und Isotopenforschung of the Christian-Albrechts Universität is based on a 3 MV Tandetron from High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE) with a single cesium sputter ion source and a separator/recombinator for simultaneous injecton of the three isotopic carbon beams. The AMS system is similar to those at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA, and the University of Groningen, The Netherland, but it has some new features based on experience at these two facilities. These include improved vacuum seals, beam diagnostics, X-ray and background suppression as well as a more reliable system control through a PLC-unit with a serial line to the main system computer. The open system design of the beam optics allows significant horizontal and vertical movement of the ion beams without loss to the walls of the system. This leads to plateaus in the response of the isotope beams and ratios to changing values of various ion optical elements. Combined with highly stable power supplies, this gives reproducible measurements. The acceptance tests, e.g., showed that Poisson counting statistics at 0.15% and 0.22% respectively, determined the statistical uncertainty in the {14C}/{12C} ratios measured for the individual samples of two test series. Strong discrimination of unwanted ions results in low background count rates in the detector, equivalent to an apparent age of 75000 years at present, in spite of the open architecture. Routine measurements since late January 1996 (to late May 1996) have dated 127 unknown samples, mostly foraminifera. The prototype of the carbonate to CO2 conversion system and the graphite system used for the measurements are also described.

  13. Detection of 59Ni at the Lund AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Per; Kiisk, Madis; Erlandsson, Bengt; Faarinen, Mikko; Hellborg, Ragnar; Skog, Göran; Stenström, Kristina

    2000-10-01

    In the use of small tandem accelerators for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), interfering isobars are often troublesome, especially when heavier isotopes such as 59Ni are to be measured. One way to reduce this problem is to combine AMS with the detection of characteristic projectile X-rays. After analysis in the AMS system, the ions are stopped in a suitable target and it is possible to identify the ions by atomic number and thereby separate the isobars. In order to lower the detection limit in the case of 59Ni in stainless steel samples, it is necessary to chemically reduce the content of 59Co in the sample. Further improvements in the reduction of the X-ray background and in the chemical reduction of cobalt have led to nearly a factor of 10 lower detection limit of 59Ni at the Lund AMS facility compared to what has been reported earlier. The content of 59Ni in some steel samples obtained from Swedish nuclear power plants has been measured and the results are presented here.

  14. LLNL/UC AMS facility and research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. C.; Proctor, I. D.; Southon, J. R.; Caffee, M. W.; Heikkinen, D. W.; Roberts, M. L.; Moore, T. L.; Turteltaub, K. W.; Nelson, D. E.; Loyd, D. H.; Vogel, J. S.

    1990-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample throughput, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers.

  15. Status of the "new" AMS facility in Trondheim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Vaernes, Einar; Svarva, Helene Løvstrand; Larsen, Eiliv; Gulliksen, Steinar; Klein, Matthias; Mous, Dirk J. W.

    2015-10-01

    The Radiocarbon Laboratory of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim has a long history, dating back to the 1950s. Its relatively new AMS facility is based on a 1 MV Tandetron from High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V. that is equipped with a hybrid solid/gas SO-110 ion source, a low energy spectrometer supporting sequential injection, a high energy analysis system consisting of a magnet and an electrostatic deflector, allowing insertion of an absorber foil for isobar suppression, and a two dimensional gas ionisation detector (E and ΔE). The system is at present capable of measuring 10Be, 14C, and 26Al and can be easily modified to measure isotopes of higher masses. Acceptance tests results for 10Be1+, 14C2+, 26Al1+, and 26Al3+ are presented. The laboratory measures only 14C at present and the routine procedures are described. The system has demonstrated a very low background (70,000 14C years BP or 2·10-16 on Alfa Aesar 40795 graphite powder, -200 mesh, 99.9995%) for 14C when charge state 2+ is measured and the interference of Li ions in the detector is minimal. Some ion optical peculiarities of the system are also discussed.

  16. Status and plans for the PRIME Lab AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, D.; Ma, X.; Miller, T.; Mueller, K.; Perry, M.; Rickey, F.; Sharma, P.; Simms, P.; Lipschutz, M.; Vogt, S.

    1997-03-01

    The operation, status, performance, and upgrade plans for the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) are described. The AMS system is in routine operation for all of the commonly-used AMS nuclides. Chemical preparation is being performed for all nuclides measured in many different matrices. Construction of a new injector and terminal stripper system is in progress; a fast-isotope-switching system is in the final design stage.

  17. Radiocarbon AMS at IOP: System improvements and dating of groundwater from Bhadrak district, Orissa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, G. V. Ravi; Dutta, K.; Ray, D. K.

    2008-04-01

    The radiocarbon AMS facility at Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar is based on a 3 MV tandem accelerator. In this paper, we present the recent improvements to the AMS system at this general purpose accelerator facility. We report an effective method of overcoming terminal voltage instability often met with in switching between AMS and other modes of operation of the accelerator. We report the radiocarbon measurements made on connate groundwater samples from the Bhadrak district of Orissa state (eastern India) to identify the regions that require artificial recharge.

  18. ERDA at the 9 MV Tandem and at the 3 MV Tandetron of IFIN-HH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrascu, H.; Petrascu, M.; Pantelica, D.; Negoita, F.; Ionescu, P.; Mihai, M. D.; Acsente, T.; Statescu, M.; Scafes, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    Recoil spectrometry using heavy ions proposed in 1976 by L'Ecuyer has evolved into a universal IBA technique. Few years later an experimental setup for simultaneous light and medium heavy element detection including a compact ΔE(gas)-Er(solid) telescope, was developed at the Tandem accelerator of IFIN-HH. To increase the resolution, an integrated preamplifier was mounted close to the ionization chamber. The calibration procedure for the telescope and the software for the quantitative evaluation of the data are briefly presented. Recently, a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been installed and commissioned at the IFIN-HH. Among several ion-beam techniques for detection and depth profiling of hydrogen isotopes, Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) technique using a low energy 4He beam, proposed by Doyle and Peercy, is particularly advantageous. By measuring simultaneously both the H or D recoiling at a forward angle and backscattered 4He ions, a rather complete characterization of the sample can be achieved. Selected results from our investigations, obtained using these facilities, are presented.

  19. A New {sup 14}C-AMS Facility at UFF- Niteroi, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Macario, K. D.; Anjos, R. M.; Linares, R.; Carvalho, C.; Queiroz, E.

    2010-08-04

    We report a new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility at the Physics Institute of Fluminense Federal University in Brazil, the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory - LACRON. The sample preparation laboratory is ready to perform chemical treatment through graphitization and the acquisition of a Single Stage Accelerator Mass Spectrometry System is in progress. LACRON will be the first independent laboratory to perform the {sup 14}C-AMS technique not only in Brazil but in Latin America.

  20. The Am-243 Neutron Capture Measurement at the n_TOF Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Guerrero, C.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; García-Ríos, A.; González-Romero, E.; Martínez, T.; Villamarin, D.; Kadi, Y.; Colonna, N.; Marrone, S.; Meaze, M. H.; Tagliente, G.; Terlizzi, R.; Abbondanno, U.; Belloni, F.; Fujii, K.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Andriamonje, S.; Calviani, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Patronis, N.; Audouin, L.; David, S.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Badurek, G.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Pigni, M. T.; Poch, A.; Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Lukic, S.; Rudolf, G.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Calvino, F.; Capote, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Mengoni, A.; Lozano, M.; Quesada, J. M.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Tavora, L.; Marques, L.; Salgado, J.; Vaz, P.; Cennini, P.; Dahlfors, M.; Ferrari, A.; Gramegna, F.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Mastinu, P.; Praena, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Wendler, H.; Chepel, V.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Goncalves, I.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Neves, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Gunsing, F.; Aerts, G.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A.; Cortes, G.; Pretel, C.; Couture, A. J.; Cox, J.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Dillman, I.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Mosconi, M.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wisshak, K.; Dolfini, R.; Rubbia, C.; Domingo Pardo, C.; Tain, J. L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Lampoudis, C.; Savvidis, I.; Furman, W.; Konovalov, V.; Goverdovski, A.; Ketlerov, V.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Álvarez, H.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Reifarth, R.; Igashira, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Massimi, C.; Vannini, G.; Oshima, M.; Papadopoulos, C.; Vlastou, R.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Plompen, A.; Rullhusen, P.; Rauscher, T.; Rosetti, M.; Ventura, A.

    2013-03-01

    The 243Am neutron capture cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility1 in the 0.7 eV-2 keV energy range. The n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter2 (TAC) composed by 40 BaF2 crystals has been used in the measurement for detecting the electromagnetic cascades produced in the 243Am(n, γ) reactions. All current evaluations in the resolved resonance region are based essentially in fission measurements and in only one transmission measurement.3 The analysis of the measurement has been finished recently, and it is ready for its distribution to the EXFOR nuclear database. In addition, the data obtained with the TAC provide valuable information on the level density in the compound nucleus 244Am and on its electromagnetic de-excitation scheme. In particular, the 243Am data will be combined with data from previous measurements of 241Am, 240Pu, 237Np and 233,234,236U and with future measurements of 235,238U for a systematic investigation of the photon strength functions in actinides.

  1. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies.

    PubMed

    Shu, Anthony; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Grün, Eberhard; Horányi, Mihály; Kempf, Sascha; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Northway, Paige; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Thomas, Evan

    2012-07-01

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Institüt für Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-7) torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-10) torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  2. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Anthony; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kempf, Sascha; Thomas, Evan; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Northway, Paige; Gruen, Eberhard; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Srama, Ralf; and others

    2012-07-15

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Instituet fuer Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -7} torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -10} torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  3. Status of the compact 1 MV AMS facility at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, E.; López-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Ruiz-Gómez, A.; Santos, F. J.; García-León, M.; Maden, C.; Alfimov, V.

    2008-05-01

    Since February 2006, the new 1 MV multielement compact AMS facility SARA (Spanish Accelerator for Radionuclides Analyses) at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Sevilla (Spain) is fully operative. During the first one and a half year of operation, the viability of the system for the measurement of 10Be, 14C, 129I and plutonium isotopes, 239Pu and 240Pu, has been evaluated. First results have demonstrated that, in terms of precision and detection limits, the performance of the device compares to other compact AMS facilities, although some progress can still be done in order to optimize its capacities. At this moment, background levels are in the order of 10-14 for 10Be/9Be, 10-13 for 129I/127I, 10-15 for 14C/12C (processed and unprocessed blank) and about 106 atoms for plutonium isotopes: 239Pu, 240Pu and 242Pu. In this work, the current status of the AMS measurements at CNA for the above mentioned radionuclides is described.

  4. The André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory - The new accelerator mass spectrometry facility at the University of Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Clark, I. D.; Cornett, R. J.; Litherland, A. E.; Klein, M.; Mous, D. J. W.; Alary, J.-F.

    2015-10-01

    The University of Ottawa, Canada, has installed a multi-element, 3 MV tandem AMS system as the cornerstone of their new Advanced Research Complex and the principal analytical instrument of the André E. Lalonde Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory. Manufactured by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., the Netherlands, it is equipped with a 200 sample ion source, a high resolution, 120° injection magnet, a 90° high energy analysis magnet (mass-energy product 350 MeV-AMU), a 65°, 1.7 m radius electric analyzer and a 2 channel gas ionization detector. It is designed to analyze isotopes ranging from tritium to the actinides and to accommodate the use of fluoride target materials. This system is being extended with a second injection line, consisting of selected components from the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. This line will contain a pre-commercial version of the Isobar Separator for Anions, manufactured by Isobarex Corp., Bolton, Ontario, Canada. This instrument uses selective ion-gas reactions in a radio-frequency quadrupole cell to attenuate both atomic and molecular isobars. This paper discusses the specifications of the new AMS equipment, reports on the acceptance test results for 10Be, 14C, 26Al and 127I and presents typical spectra for 10Be and actinide analyses.

  5. Status report of the 1 MV AMS facility at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Elena Chamizo; Santos, Francisco Javier; López-Gutiérrez, José María; Padilla, Santiago; García-León, Manuel; Heinemeier, Jan; Schnabel, Christoph; Scognamiglio, Grazia

    2015-10-01

    SARA (Spanish Accelerator for Radionuclides Analysis) was the first multielemental AMS facility installed in Spain in 2005. Since then it has been dedicated to the routine analysis of several radionuclides, such as 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 129I and Pu isotopes. Tests have been carried out with other isotopes, such as 41Ca, 236U and 237Np, and several changes have been made to the original facility to improve performance. First, an upgraded version of the ion source SO-110 has allowed us more stable measurement conditions for volatile elements (i.e. iodine), and a better general performance. Besides, changes in the target geometry have improved the ionization efficiency and long-term stability of the source output. Moreover, different software upgrades have been introduced to meet our routine operational needs. Finally, changing the movable Faraday-cup associated electronics now allows the measurement of smaller currents (in the range of pA), which has been key for the study of 236U/238U atomic ratio in environmental samples. Apart from these modifications it has to be noted that routine radiocarbon measurements have been moved to a Micadas system (200 kV) installed at CNA in 2012. In this paper we will illustrate the evolution of the facility up to now, and our future prospects will be introduced.

  6. A MATLAB-based interface for the beam-transport system of an AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guzmán, J. M.; Gómez-Morilla, I.; Enamorado-Báez, S. M.; Moreno-Suárez, A. I.; Pinto-Gómez, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility located at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA, Seville, Spain). We determine the beam transport through the optical system using the transfer matrix formalism in two different approaches (ray tracing and the beam-envelope approach) and describe it in terms of cross section size and emittance. The beam size results given by MATLAB are compared with the measured beam size in three of the four image points that the system has, obtaining a good agreement between them. This suggests that the first-order transfer matrix formalism is enough to simulate the optical behavior of the system.

  7. Recent developments of the 1 MV AMS facility at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scognamiglio, G.; Chamizo, E.; López-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Müller, A. M.; Padilla, S.; Santos, F. J.; López-Lora, M.; Vivo-Vilches, C.; García-León, M.

    2016-05-01

    The Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) hosts a 1 MV accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) apparatus since September 2005. In order to improve its overall performance, several updates have been made on the existing facility during the last 10 years of operation. In this paper, two modifications conducted in 2015 will be described. To increase the transmission of the ions through the accelerator, the stripping gas on the 1 MV CNA machine was changed from Ar to He. The measured maximum transmission for almost every isotope results to be higher, especially for heavy masses: for instance, in the case of uranium in the 3+ charge state, the transmission increased from 11% with Ar gas to about 38% with He gas. The second advance consisted of the substitution of the existing gas ionization chamber with a new one provided by ETH Zurich. The ETH detector features with its miniaturized design and is optimized for low energy AMS (i.e. very low electronic noise and efficient charge collection). As the electronic noise is the most important contribution to the resolution for light ions, the total energy resolution has been reduced by 15% in the case of 10Be, allowing a better discrimination against its isobar, 10B. For the heaviest radionuclides where the quality of the spectra is determined by the charge carrier production in the gas, the resolution for 2.7 MeV uranium ions was improved by 30%, probably due to a more efficient charge collection.

  8. 15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463AM4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory FacilityHood VentilationMechanical' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NAVFAC Drawing 1,174,312(463A-M-4)(1970), 'Alterations for Laboratory Facility-Hood Ventilation-Mechanical' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Battery Test Office & Storage Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  9. 129I measurements on the 1MV AMS facility at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA, Spain).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Guzmán, J M; López-Gutiérrez, J M; Pinto-Gómez, A R; Holm, E

    2012-01-01

    The AMS system at CNA has been the first 1MV compact AMS system designed and manufactured by HVE. In this paper we present the experimental set-up for (129)I measurements in this facility. Charge state +3 has been selected at high-energy side and an optimum stripper pressure of 6×10(-3)mbar of argon (mass thickness of about 0.15μgcm(-2)) has been reached to obtain lowest blank values ((129)I/(127)I≅3×10(-13)). The measurements of the reference materials provided by the IAEA have demonstrated the viability of this facility to make routine measurements of (129)I at environmental levels. This blank value obtained is enough for the measurement of most environmental samples and comparable with other reported backgrounds obtained in facilities working at higher energies and higher charge states.

  10. LLNL/UC (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)/(University of California) AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Southon, J.R.; Caffee, M.W.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Roberts, M.L.; Moore, T.L.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Nelson, D.E.; Loyd, D.H.; Vogel, J.S.

    1990-04-18

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample through-put, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Measurement and analysis of the Am243 neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Guerrero, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Balibrea, J.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lo Meo, S.; Lopes, I.; Lossito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; n TOF Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Background: The design of new nuclear reactors and transmutation devices requires to reduce the present neutron cross section uncertainties of minor actinides. Purpose: Improvement of the Am243(n,γ) cross section uncertainty. Method: The Am243(n,γ) cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN with a BaF2 total absorption calorimeter, in the energy range between 0.7 eV and 2.5 keV. Results: The Am243(n ,γ) cross section has been successfully measured in the mentioned energy range. The resolved resonance region has been extended from 250 eV up to 400 eV. In the unresolved resonance region our results are compatible with one of the two incompatible capture data sets available below 2.5 keV. The data available in EXFOR and in the literature have been used to perform a simple analysis above 2.5 keV. Conclusions: The results of this measurement contribute to reduce the Am243(n,γ) cross section uncertainty and suggest that this cross section is underestimated up to 25% in the neutron energy range between 50 eV and a few keV in the present evaluated data libraries.

  12. Optimization of a rod pinch diode radiography source at 2.3 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menge, P. R.; Johnson, D. L.; Maenchen, J. E.; Rovang, D. C.; Oliver, B. V.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2003-08-01

    Rod pinch diodes have shown considerable capability as high-brightness flash x-ray sources for penetrating dynamic radiography. The rod pinch diode uses a small diameter (0.4-2 mm) anode rod extended through a cathode aperture. When properly configured, the electron beam born off of the aperture edge can self-insulate and pinch onto the tip of the rod creating an intense, small x-ray source. Sandia's SABRE accelerator (2.3 MV, 40 Ω, 70 ns) has been utilized to optimize the source experimentally by maximizing the figure of merit (dose/spot diameter2) and minimizing the diode impedance droop. Many diode parameters have been examined including rod diameter, rod length, rod material, cathode aperture diameter, cathode thickness, power flow gap, vacuum quality, and severity of rod-cathode misalignment. The configuration producing the greatest figure of merit uses a 0.5 mm diameter gold rod, a 6 mm rod extension beyond the cathode aperture (diameter=8 mm), and a 10 cm power flow gap to produce up to 3.5 rad (filtered dose) at 1 m from a 0.85 mm x-ray on-axis spot (1.02 mm at 3° off axis). The resultant survey of parameter space has elucidated several physics issues that are discussed.

  13. Development of a fraction collector for coupling gas chromatography with an AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenbach, Andreas; Uhl, T.; Hain, A.; Scharf, A.; Kritzler, K.; Kretschmer, W.

    2008-05-01

    It has been shown that microscale 14C measurements are possible by using a gas handling system and a gas ion source [T. Uhl, W. Kretschmer, W. Luppold, A. Scharf, AMS measurements from microgram to milligram, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. (2005) 474 (240th ed.), T. Uhl, W. Luppold, A. Rottenbach, A. Scharf, K. Kritzler, W. Kretschmer, Development of an automatic gas handling system for microscale AMS (14C) measurements, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. (2007) 303 (259th ed.)]. In Erlangen a gas handling system was especially developed for environmental and biomedical investigations. For the separation of the compound of interest a standard gas chromatograph (GC) is used. To minimize the sample contamination and sample loss we have designed a fraction collector that connects a GC and an elemental analyzer (EA) directly. The selected compound is combusted in the EA and the resulting CO2 is then transferred into the gas handling system for AMS measurements. From the beginning of GC preparation up to the AMS measurement the sample is in a closed line. All operations are fully automated, so no manual operations are necessary. This guarantees high cleanness and maximum sample yield. Preliminary measurements are done using modern and old ethyl alcohol (from fermentation and of petrochemical origin, respectively). The results are consistent with their expected values although cross contamination and background signal increased as the sample mass was decreased.

  14. Missile Facilities (WS-133B, WS-133A/M) Career Ladder, AFSCs 44530G, 44550G, and 44570G.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    or more C1C)(,L)CT V )(,- 17. To vhat base are you assigned? Choose only one response. 1. Ellsworth AFB (Wing 2)E l -2. F. E. Warren AFB (Wing 5) 3...AD-A117 454 AIR FORC.E OCCUPATIONAL MEASUREMENT CENTER RANDOLPH AFB TX F/A 5/9MISILE FACILITIES MWS 1338. VS 133A/M) CAREER LADDER, AFSCS 44--ETCr~gn...OCCUPATIONAL MEASUREMENT CENTER S.,RANDOLPH AFB , TEXAS 78148 I_--- 82 07 06 255 PRIVACY ACT STATEMENT I c~c~c~ AUTHORITY: 5 Usc Sec 301, E09397, and AER 35-2

  15. Antibody-membrane switch (AMS) technology for facile cell line development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Wages, John M; Larrick, James W

    2014-10-01

    Generation of high-productivity cell lines remains a major bottleneck in therapeutic antibody development. Conventional cell line development often depends on gene amplification methodologies using dihydrofolate reductase or glutamine synthetase. Higher productivity is associated with an increased gene copy number. However, lack of selection pressure under the conditions of large-scale manufacturing leads to clonal instability. We have developed a novel method for cell line development, antibody-membrane switch (AMS) technology, that does not rely on gene amplification. This fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based, high-throughput method is facilitated by cell-surface antibody expression to rapidly and efficiently isolate high-producing cells. The switch between membrane expression and secretion is achieved by alternative splicing and specific DNA recombination. The antibody of interest is initially displayed on the cell surface to facilitate FACS. Isolated high-producing cells are then seamlessly transformed into production cells after removing the membrane-anchoring domain sequence with a DNA recombinase. AMS technology has been applied in a number of antibody cell line development projects, which typically last 2-3 months. The top production cell lines exhibit very high specific productivity of 40-60 pg/cell/day resulting in production titers of 2-4 g/l in 10-day batch culture.

  16. Measurement of the 241Am neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Altstadt, S.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Balibrea, J.; Bécares, V.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthier, B.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Durán, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fernández-Ordóñez, M.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Furman, V.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Katabuchi, T.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Licata, M.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    New neutron cross section measurements of minor actinides have been performed recently in order to reduce the uncertainties in the evaluated data, which is important for the design of advanced nuclear reactors and, in particular, for determining their performance in the transmutation of nuclear waste. We have measured the 241Am(n,γ) cross section at the n_TOF facility between 0.2 eV and 10 keV with a BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter, and the analysis of the measurement has been recently concluded. Our results are in reasonable agreement below 20 eV with the ones published by C. Lampoudis et al. in 2013, who reported a 22% larger capture cross section up to 110 eV compared to experimental and evaluated data published before. Our results also indicate that the 241Am(n,γ) cross section is underestimated in the present evaluated libraries between 20 eV and 2 keV by 25%, on average, and up to 35% for certain evaluations and energy ranges.

  17. 21 CFR 803.33 - If I am a user facility, what must I include when I submit an annual report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Reporting Requirements § 803.33 If I am a user facility, what must I include when I submit an annual report... during the annual reporting period including: (i) Report number; (ii) Name and address of the device... I submit an annual report? 803.33 Section 803.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  18. The design of a multisource americium-beryllium (Am-Be) neutron irradiation facility using MCNP for the neutronic performance calculation.

    PubMed

    Sogbadji, R B M; Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Odoi, H C; Attakorah-Birinkorang, S

    2014-08-01

    The americium-beryllium neutron irradiation facility at the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI), Ghana, was re-designed with four 20 Ci sources using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code to investigate the maximum amount of flux that is produced by the combined sources. The results were compared with a single source Am-Be irradiation facility. The main objective was to enable us to harness the maximum amount of flux for the optimization of neutron activation analysis and to enable smaller sample sized samples to be irradiated. Using MCNP for the design construction and neutronic performance calculation, it was realized that the single-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (1.8±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s and the four-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (5.4±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s which is a factor of 3.5 fold increase compared to the single-source Am-Be design. The criticality effective, k(eff), of the single-source and the four-source Am-Be designs were found to be 0.00115±0.0008 and 0.00143±0.0008, respectively.

  19. The first four years of the AMS-facility DREAMS: Status and developments for more accurate radionuclide data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugel, Georg; Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Enamorado Baez, Santiago Miguel; Scharf, Andreas; Ziegenrücker, René; Merchel, Silke

    2016-03-01

    DREAMS, the DREsden AMS-facility, is performing routine accelerator mass spectrometry of 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I for a wide range of applications. All DREAMS-data is normalised directly to primary standards or traceable to those via cross-calibration of secondary standards. Recent technical developments such as a low-memory ion source for 36Cl and 129I and sophisticated tuning strategies for 129I led to improved-accuracy data. Tests of ion source output have been performed with different metal binders, sample-to-binder mixing ratios, and compaction pressures in order to find optimal parameters. The highest and most stable outputs have been obtained for 10Be, 26Al, and 41Ca for the following binders and mixing ratios (by weight): BeO:Nb, 1:4; Al2O3:Ag, 1:1; CaF2:Ag, 1:4. Higher beam currents generally result in reduced statistical uncertainty. Cross-contamination and long-term memory seem to be underestimated problems asking for further tests and improvements such as the development of low-level in-house-standards.

  20. Fission Cross-section Measurements of (233)U, (245)Cm and (241,243)Am at CERN n_TOF Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Calviani, M.; Koehler, Paul Edward; N_TOF collaboration,

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of minor actinides have been measured using the n-TOF white neutron source at CERN, Geneva, as part of a large experimental program aiming at collecting new data relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for the design of advanced reactor systems. The measurements at n-TOF take advantage of the innovative features of the n-TOF facility, namely the wide energy range, high instantaneous neutron flux and good energy resolution. Final results on the fission cross-section of {sup 233}U, {sup 245}Cm and {sup 243}Am from thermal to 20 MeV are here reported, together with preliminary results for {sup 241}Am. The measurement have been performed with a dedicated Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), a fission fragment detector with a very high efficiency, relative to the very well known cross-section of {sup 235}U, measured simultaneously with the same detector.

  1. Production of {sup 17}F, {sup 15}O and other radioisotopes for PET using a 3 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A. D.; Davidson, R. J.; Nickles, R. J.

    1999-06-10

    Target systems for the production of positron emitting radioisotopes used for medical research with positron emission tomography (PET) are under development for a 3 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator (NEC 9SDH-2). This machine is intended primarily for the continuous production of short lived tracers labeled with {sup 15}O (t{sub 1/2}=122 s) or {sup 17}F (t{sub 1/2}=65 s) for determining regional cerebral blood flow in humans. Simple gas, liquid, and solid target systems are presented for the production of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O (yield at saturation 13 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 17}F]F{sub 2} (22 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 17}F] fluoride (aq.) (12 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 18}F]fluoride (aq.) (21 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 13}N] in graphite (25 mCi/{mu}A), and [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} (2.3 mCi/{mu}A). Current limitations on single window targets for each production are discussed.

  2. 21 CFR 803.30 - If I am a user facility, what reporting requirements apply to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING User Facility Reporting... information, from any source, that reasonably suggests that a device has or may have caused or contributed to the death of a patient of your facility. You must also submit the report to the device...

  3. 21 CFR 803.30 - If I am a user facility, what reporting requirements apply to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING User Facility Reporting... information, from any source, that reasonably suggests that a device has or may have caused or contributed to the death of a patient of your facility. You must also submit the report to the device...

  4. Measurement of the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 241Am at the time-of-flight facility n_TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P.; Milazzo, P. M.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Meaze, M. H.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrio, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2013-01-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross-section of 241Am has been measured relative to the standard fission cross-section of 235U between 0.5 and 20MeV. The experiment was performed at the CERN n_TOF facility. Fission fragments were detected by a fast ionization chamber by discriminating against the α-particles from the high radioactivity of the samples. The high instantaneous neutron flux and the low background of the n_TOF facility enabled us to obtain uncertainties of ≈ 5%. With the present results it was possible to resolve discrepancies between previous data sets and to confirm current evaluations, thus providing important information for design studies of future reactors with improved fuel burn-up.

  5. 36 CFR 1280.36 - May I file an appeal if I am banned from NARA facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facilities? Yes, within 30 calendar days of receiving such notification, an individual may appeal the... Administration (ND), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001). The Deputy Archivist has 30 calendar days..., within 30 calendar days of receiving the request, whether the ban remains in place or is...

  6. 21 CFR 803.30 - If I am a user facility, what reporting requirements apply to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...? (a) You must submit reports to the manufacturer or to us, or both, as specified below: (1) Reports of death. You must submit a report to us as soon as practicable but no more than 10 work days after the day... may have caused or contributed to the death of a patient of your facility. You must also submit the...

  7. Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instrumentation IX (AM 116) Newly Modified Cryogenic Optical Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ronnie; Kegley, Jeff; Keidel, John

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has maintained and operated a world-class x-ray optics and detector testing facility known as the X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) since the mid 1970's. The ground test and calibration of the Chandra X-ray Observatory optics and detectors were successfully completed at the XRCF in 1997. The beginning of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) development programs (NMSD, SBMD, AMSD, etc.) and the establishment of the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center at MSFC have led to an XRCF modification. In 1999 the facility was upgraded to perform cryogenic testing of lightweight visible optics (without compromising the existing x-ray testing capability). A thermal enclosure capable of 20 degrees Kelvin and vibration isolated instrumentation mount were added. A vacuum-compatible five-axis motion table was modified to operate under cryogenic conditions. Optics up to two meters in diameter with radii of curvature of up to twenty meters can be accommodated. Facility characterization tests and one NGST program mirror test have been completed to date. By July 2000, two other mirrors will be tested. Optical wavefront measurements were made at < 35 degrees Kelvin with several instruments located at the test mirror's radius of curvature. The current wavefront measuring instruments include a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, a point diffraction interferometer, a point spread function-measuring device, and a radius of curvature measuring instrument. A vibration insensitive phase shifting interferometer is planned for future optical testing. This paper will present a brief history of the facility, a discussion of its current x-ray optic testing capabilities, and a complete description of the new capabilities in the visible optical testing regime.

  8. A high resolution AMS-injector for the Pelletron in Lund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellborg, R.; Bazhal, S.; Faarinen, M.; Håkansson, K.; Magnusson, C.-E.; Persson, P.; Skog, G.; Stenström, K.

    2002-12-01

    A high resolution injector system has recently been installed at the Lund 3 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The new injector, designed mainly for (26) Al ions, will increase the experimental potential of the Lund AMS facility considerably. High quality energy- and mass-resolution is obtained by using a 90(°) spherical electrostatic analyzer followed by a 90(°) magnetic analyzer. The injector is equipped with a high intensity sputtering source with a spherical ionizer. A new analytical technique for acceptance calculations as well as PC-based computational methods have been used in the design of the ion optical system of the new injector. Compared to our old injector system which has a magnetic analyzer with a bending angle of only 15(°) , the new system has a more than ten times better resolution. The beam optics of the new system is also better designed to match the accelerator acceptance. In this way the ion transmission from the ion source to the detector, for different ions of interest in our AMS programme, has been increased.

  9. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  10. Reduced Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Young Men of Color Who Have Sex with Men: Findings from the Community-Based Organization Behavioral Outcomes of Many Men, Many Voices (CBOP-3MV) Project.

    PubMed

    Stein, Renee; Shapatava, Ekaterine; Williams, Weston; Griffin, Tanesha; Bell, Kelly; Lyons, Bridget; Uhl, Gary

    2015-11-01

    In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded community-based organizations (CBOs) to deliver Many Men, Many Voices (3MV) to young men of color who have sex with men. Although 3MV, a group-level behavioral intervention designed to reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors of black men who have sex with men (MSM), has shown effectiveness when delivered in a controlled research environment, there is limited evidence that the intervention is associated with similar outcomes in "real world" settings. For the current project, CDC funded three CBOs to conduct outcome monitoring of the 3MV intervention to determine if young MSM of color report changes in HIV risk behaviors postintervention. Using a repeated measures design, risk behaviors were collected at baseline and again at 3 and 6 months postintervention. Changes in risk behaviors were assessed using generalized estimating equations. Participants (n = 337) reported decreases in sexual risk behaviors at both follow-up time points, such as sex without a condom, sex without a condom and multiple partners, and sex without a condom with serodiscordant or status unknown partners. Results suggest that 3MV may be an effective tool for reducing HIV risk behaviors in this critical target population.

  11. Imaging AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T. |; Ramsey, C.B.; Hedges, R.E.M.

    1993-12-01

    The benefits of simultaneous high effective mass resolution and large spectrometer acceptance that accelerator mass spectrometry has afforded the bulk analysis of material samples by secondary ion mass spectrometry may also be applied to imaging SIMS. The authors are exploring imaging AMS with the addition to the Oxford {sup 14}C-AMS system of a scanning secondary ion source. It employs a sub micron probe and a separate Cs flood to further increase the useful ion yield. The source has been accommodated on the system by directly injecting sputtered ions into the accelerator without mass analysis. They are detected with a range of devices including new high-bandwidth detectors. Qualitative mass spectra may be easily generated by varying only the post-accelerator analysis magnet. Selected ion signals may be used for imaging. In developing the instrument for bioscience research the authors are establishing its capability for measuring the lighter elements prevalent in biological tissue. Importantly, the machine can map the distributions of radiocarbon labeled compounds with an efficiency of about 1{per_thousand}. A background due to misidentification of non-{sup 14}C ions as a result of the reduced ion mass filtering is too small to hinder high magnification microscopy.

  12. 21 CFR 803.33 - If I am a user facility, what must I include when I submit an annual report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING User Facility... medical device reports, or the number assigned by us for reporting purposes in accordance with § 803.3; (2...) Date of the annual report and report numbers identifying the range of medical device reports that...

  13. Differential-output B-dot and D-dot monitors for current and voltage measurements on a 20-MA, 3-MV pulsed-power accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, T. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Ives, H. C.; Gilliland, T. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Johnson, M. F.; Reynolds, P. G.; Moore, J. K.; Mourning, R. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Androlewicz, K. E.; Bailey, J. E.; Broyles, R. S.; Dinwoodie, T. A.; Donovan, G. L.; Dudley, M. E.; Hahn, K. D.; Kim, A. A.; Lee, J. R.; Leeper, R. J.; Leifeste, G. T.; Melville, J. A.; Mills, J. A.; Mix, L. P.; Moore, W. B. S.; Peyton, B. P.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Savage, M. E.; Seamen, J. F.; Serrano, J. D.; Sharpe, A. W.; Shoup, R. W.; Slopek, J. S.; Speas, C. S.; Struve, K. W.; van de Valde, D. M.; Woodring, R. M.

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a system of differential-output monitors that diagnose current and voltage in the vacuum section of a 20-MA 3-MV pulsed-power accelerator. The system includes 62 gauges: 3 current and 6 voltage monitors that are fielded on each of the accelerator’s 4 vacuum-insulator stacks, 6 current monitors on each of the accelerator’s 4 outer magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs), and 2 current monitors on the accelerator’s inner MITL. The inner-MITL monitors are located 6 cm from the axis of the load. Each of the stack and outer-MITL current monitors comprises two separate B-dot sensors, each of which consists of four 3-mm-diameter wire loops wound in series. The two sensors are separately located within adjacent cavities machined out of a single piece of copper. The high electrical conductivity of copper minimizes penetration of magnetic flux into the cavity walls, which minimizes changes in the sensitivity of the sensors on the 100-ns time scale of the accelerator’s power pulse. A model of flux penetration has been developed and is used to correct (to first order) the B-dot signals for the penetration that does occur. The two sensors are designed to produce signals with opposite polarities; hence, each current monitor may be regarded as a single detector with differential outputs. Common-mode-noise rejection is achieved by combining these signals in a 50-Ω balun. The signal cables that connect the B-dot monitors to the balun are chosen to provide reasonable bandwidth and acceptable levels of Compton drive in the bremsstrahlung field of the accelerator. A single 50-Ω cable transmits the output signal of each balun to a double-wall screen room, where the signals are attenuated, digitized (0.5-ns/sample), numerically compensated for cable losses, and numerically integrated. By contrast, each inner-MITL current monitor contains only a single B-dot sensor. These monitors are fielded in opposite-polarity pairs. The two signals from a pair

  14. AMS at ANTARES - The first 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, E. M.; Elliott, G.; Fallon, J.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Lee, P.; Smith, A. M.; Tuniz, C.; Zoppi, U.

    2000-10-01

    The status and capabilities of the ANTARES AMS facility after 10 years are reviewed. The common AMS radioisotopes, 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl and 129I, are routinely analysed. A capability for the detection of 236U and other actinide isotopes has been developed. The measurement program includes support to Quaternary science projects at Australian universities and to ANSTO projects in global climate change and nuclear safeguards.

  15. AMS beyond 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.

    1993-12-28

    The occasion of this conference, the Sixth International Conference on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, falls sixteen years after the remarkable triple simultaneous discovery of this powerful isotopic measurement. In the interval since the Fifth Conference in Paris in 1991, new facilities of both large and small size have become fully operational, achieving impressive gains in both measurement throughput and precision. The purpose of this short review is to extrapolate from recent gains and experience and to project the status of the field beyond the coming millennial date. AMS achieved instant application in archaeology and the geosciences and its early growth was stimulated by the excitement caused by the early results. The ability to obtain an accurate radiocarbon date with a sample one thousand times smaller than possible with scintillation or gas counting, the ability to trace {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in sea water with a similar thousand fold shrinkage in sample size, and the wide utility of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 129}I as tracers and chronometers of erosion, hydrology and paleoclimate were sufficient to drive the partial conversion of existing accelerators and the construction of new dedicated ones. These applications remain the core of the present field and continue to justify its growth. The past few years, however, have seen developments in new fields. Biomedicine, chemical kinetics, materials science, forensic dosimetry, and arms control/counter proliferation have been explored. These applications have varying promise and will influence development of AMS programs in new ways in the future.

  16. Synchronization system for Gamma-4 electrophysical facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, A. V.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Kozachek, A. V.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Glushkov, S. L.; Mironychev, B. P.; Martynov, V. M.; Turutin, V. V.; Kul'dyushov, D. A.; Pavlov, V. S.; Demanov, V. A.; Shikhanova, T. F.; Esaeva, Yu. A.

    2015-01-01

    A synchronization system for the Gamma-4 four-module electrophysical facility has been developed. It has been shown that the synchronization system should provide triggering (with precision not worse than ±3 ns) of the high-voltage gas-filled trigatron-type switches of the facility modules (144 spark gaps with an operating voltage of 1 MV), the pre-pulse switches of the modules (24 spark gaps with an operating voltage of 3 MV) and eight Arkad'ev-Marx generators (40 spark gaps with an operating voltage of 100 kV).

  17. AMS Data Analysis Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.

    2015-04-20

    This presentation discusses standard techniques and processes used for radiation mapping (RM) via an AMS, Aerial Measurement System. The advantages and shortcomings of standard AMS-based RM are presented, along with some suggested areas for improvement. Issues touched on include what gets counted, data quality, background correction, data processing, altitude correction, isotope extraction, contouring, and time shift.

  18. SCADA -- AM/FM interface: Platforms, technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.F. )

    1994-05-01

    Efficient utility operations is enhanced by close interoperation between automated mapping/facility management (AM/FM) and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. Important benefits of such integration are improvements in service quality and reduced maintenance costs. Development of an AM/FM -- SCADA interface to provide automatic database and display generation for SCADA through AM/FM functions is continuing by Valmet Automation. To minimize or eliminate vendor-dependence, the AM/FM-SCADA interface is compliant with the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) utility communication architecture (UCA). The utility industry is changing at an unprecedented rate. To remain a leader, or even to keep pace, utilities must be flexible and innovative. Competition forces companies to become more streamlined and efficient. These forces make the requirements for automation go beyond simple SCADA. Among several developing trends in the industry is the emergence of AM/FM. Collectively, these trends indicate the need to increase efficiency in the design, operation and maintenance of the transmission and distribution system. To accomplish its mission, SCADA and AM/FM must be a highly integrated system to provide timely information to its users. Open systems, the client-server paradigm and better information integration tools facilitate meeting these needs. UCA specification provides the technological glue, to achieve application integration between heterogeneous systems.

  19. AMS Prototyping Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the activity around the Asynchronous Message Service (AMS) prototype. An AMS reference implementation has been available since late 2005. It is aimed at supporting message exchange both in on-board environments and over space links. The implementation incoroporates all mandatory elements of the draft recommendation from July 2007: (1) MAMS, AMS, and RAMS protocols. (2) Failover, heartbeats, resync. (3) "Hooks" for security, but no cipher suites included in the distribution. The performance is reviewed, and a Benchmark latency test over VxWorks Message Queues is shown as histograms of a count vs microseconds per 1000-byte message

  20. AMS Prototyping Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the activity around the Asynchronous Message Service (AMS) prototype. An AMS reference implementation has been available since late 2005. It is aimed at supporting message exchange both in on-board environments and over space links. The implementation incoroporates all mandatory elements of the draft recommendation from July 2007: (1) MAMS, AMS, and RAMS protocols. (2) Failover, heartbeats, resync. (3) "Hooks" for security, but no cipher suites included in the distribution. The performance is reviewed, and a Benchmark latency test over VxWorks Message Queues is shown as histograms of a count vs microseconds per 1000-byte message

  1. AMS-02 antiprotons reloaded

    SciTech Connect

    Kappl, Rolf; Reinert, Annika; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang E-mail: areinert@th.physik.uni-bonn.de

    2015-10-01

    The AMS-02 collaboration has released preliminary data on the antiproton fraction in cosmic rays. The surprisingly hard antiproton spectrum at high rigidity has triggered speculations about a possible primary antiproton component originating from dark matter annihilations. In this note, we employ newly available AMS-02 boron to carbon data to update the secondary antiproton flux within the standard two-zone diffusion model. The new background permits a considerably better fit to the measured antiproton fraction compared to previous estimates. This is mainly a consequence of the smaller slope of the diffusion coefficient favored by the new AMS-02 boron to carbon data.

  2. The Dust Accelerator Facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Horanyi, M.; Colette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Robertson, S.; Shu, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X.

    2011-11-29

    The NASA Lunar Institute's Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies has recently completed the construction of a new experimental facility to study hypervelocity dust impacts. The installation includes a 3 MV Pelletron, accelerating small particles in the size range of 0.1 to few microns to velocities in the range of 1 to 100 km/s. Here we report the capabilities of our facility, and the results of our first experiments.

  3. AMS in Phytonutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A

    2003-08-26

    As public interest in phytonutrition continues to increase, the result will be an augmented demand for extensive phytochemical research. The fact that foods are inherently phytochemically complex dictates a need to apply scientific techniques, which can detect synergistic interaction among the many active principles and adjuvant substances in the plant, and furthermore, modify the activities of these components. As illustrated by the experiments discussed in this presentation, the advantages of AMS are unique and extensive. These advantages are best summarized by Dr. John Vogel, an originator of biological AMS experimentation: ''AMS brings (at least) three advantages to biochemical tracing: high sensitivity for finding low probability events or for use of physiologic-sized doses; small sample sizes for painless biopsies or highly specific biochemical separations; and reduction of overall radioisotope exposures, inventories, and waste streams.'' AMS opens the door to increased phytochemical tracing in humans to obtain biochemical data concerning human health at dietary relevant levels of exposure. AMS, thus, obviates the need for uncertain extrapolations from animal models, which express marginal relevance to human metabolism. The unparalleled capabilities and benefits of AMS will undoubtedly establish this particular MS technique as an important analytical tool in phytochemical research.

  4. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  5. AM 1316-241

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-24

    AM 1316-241 is made up of two interacting galaxies—a spiral galaxy on the left of the frame in front of an elliptical galaxy on the right of the frame. This image is part of a large collection of images of merging galaxies taken by NASA Hubble.

  6. The Schoolma'am.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Frances R.

    In the 1930s and reprinted in 1974, approximately 85 percent of the teachers in U.S. public schools were women--"schoolma'ams." This book provides a portrait of women teachers of that era, as well as a comprehensive overview of their lives, their careers, the conditions under which they taught in rural and urban schools, and the…

  7. 47 CFR 73.24 - Broadcast facilities; showing required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Broadcast facilities; showing required. 73.24... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.24 Broadcast facilities; showing required. An authorization for a new AM broadcast station or increase in facilities of an existing station will be issued...

  8. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  9. Welding of AM350 and AM355 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. J.; Wroth, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to establish optimum procedures for TIG welding and heat treating of AM350 and AM355 steel sheet in thicknesses ranging from 0.010 inch to 0.125 inch. Statistical analysis of the test data was performed to determine the anticipated minimum strength of the welded joints.

  10. 76 FR 55388 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change the community of license: CBS Radio East Inc., Station WLZL, Facility ID 72177,...

  11. 76 FR 50732 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change..., LLC, Station KOMO-FM, Facility ID 51167, BMPH-20110630AGT, From OAKVILLE, WA, To BELFAIR,...

  12. 77 FR 62512 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM..., OK; COMMUNITY RADIO PROJECT, Station KZET, Facility ID 173810, BPED-20120914AEF, From CORTEZ, CO,...

  13. 77 FR 38631 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change...-20120515ABA, From FRANKLIN, LA, To BELLE ROSE, LA; CBS RADIO STATIONS INC., Station WMSF, Facility ID...

  14. 76 FR 14394 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. ] SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change... GREENE, Station KOYD, Facility ID 166015, BMPH-20110128ABF, From GACKLE, ND, To TOWER CITY, ND; RADIO...

  15. 76 FR 65192 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change...., Station NEW, Facility ID 166079, BNPH-20060310AEF, from Burke, SD, to Wagner, SD; Kona Coast Radio,...

  16. 75 FR 66098 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change the community of license: GRACE PUBLIC RADIO, Station KFKB, Facility ID 174471,...

  17. 76 FR 31961 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change..., AZ, To APACHE JUNCTION, AZ; LA NUEVA CADENA RADIO LUZ, INC., Station KLIT, Facility ID 86722,...

  18. 78 FR 9915 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change..., From GOSHEN, AL, To BRANTLEY, AL; AZALEA RADIO CORPORATION, Station NEW, Facility ID 183371,...

  19. 75 FR 51812 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-20912] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM.... SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change the community of license: BRYAN... STATION, TX; CUMULUS LICENSING LLC, Station KNRQ-FM, Facility ID 12501, BMPH-20100805AKO, From...

  20. 77 FR 45352 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change...-20120530AFQ, From ROCKY MOUNT, NC, To ELM CITY, NC; SIERRA RADIO, INC., Station KVXX, Facility ID 31618,...

  1. 77 FR 57086 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change the community of license: ALEXANDRA COMMUNICATIONS, INC., Station KRKZ- FM, Facility...

  2. 75 FR 63475 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change..., From CRAIGSVILLE, WV, To WEBSTER SPRINGS, WV; ENTRAVISION HOLDINGS, LLC, Station KVVA-FM, Facility...

  3. 77 FR 24954 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals to Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals to Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change... 17227, BPH-20120327ALB, From HUDSON, IA, To EVANSDALE; HOG RADIO, INC., Station KLYR-FM, Facility...

  4. 76 FR 22704 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change..., BMPED-20110302ABD, From DANBURY, NC, To MADISON, NC; COX RADIO, INC., Station WHIO-FM, Facility ID...

  5. 77 FR 75434 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change... ABERDEEN, WA; MCC RADIO, LLC, Station KDUX-FM, Facility ID 52676, BPH-20121114AGF, From ABERDEEN, WA,...

  6. 76 FR 6788 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change The Community of License. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM...-FM, Facility ID 32386, BPH-20101222ABO, From GREAT FALLS, MT, To HIGHWOOD, MT; THE MONTANA...

  7. Why Am I So Sad?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Am I So Sad? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Am I So Sad? A A A What's in this ... ON THIS TOPIC My Pet Died - How Can I Feel Better? Five Steps for Fighting Stress What ...

  8. Am I Doing Anything Wrong?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Eun-Woo

    1998-04-01

    Absolutely not! Let me be more specific. Am I doing anything I do not want to do with my career? I don't think so. Am I satisfied? My initial career goal was to teach at a small four-year university and do research with undergraduate students. But I am more than satisfied with what I am doing now, and I am enjoying my job. It is true that many new and talented Ph.D.'s are currently looking for careers at two-year colleges instead of universities. Many people expect this trend will be even greater in the future. Surveys also show that younger people (20-30's) care a great deal about both family and career. Thus, a teaching job at a two-year college is ideal for them. It was quite a surprise to find that many of my friends, who are very talented in research, are now teaching at two-year colleges.

  9. 'Who am I?'.

    PubMed

    Schellinski, Kristina

    2014-04-01

    The dreams and existential questions of those, who came into being in order to replace a dead person, pivot around a central cry: 'Who am I?' If conceived, born or designated as a replacement child, such an individual may suffer-even as an adult-from a rarely recognized unconscious confusion of identity, compounded by grief and survivors' guilt. From before the child is born, the archetypal forces of death and life are joined in a fateful constellation; the soul of the replacement child bears the shadow of death from the very beginning of life. Hope for the replacement child lies in an emergence of true self as soul recreates original life. Analysis can help the replacement child experience a 'rebirth into true life', not as 'the one who returned', but as a psychologically newborn individual; the path of individuation countering the replacement child's identification with the dead. Jungian analysis offers unique concepts for understanding and healing the replacement child; C.G. Jung himself was born after two stillborn babies and an infant that lived only five days.

  10. AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies: Dynamic, College-Level Geoscience Courses Emphasizing Current Earth System Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Moran, J. M.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Mills, E. W.; Blair, B. A.; Hopkins, E. J.; Kiley, T. P.; Ruwe, E. E.

    2008-12-01

    at NOAA's National Weather Service Training Center in Kansas City, MO, and plans a workshop in May 2009. From June 2006-2008, similar oceanography workshops were held at University of Washington and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) facilities in Seattle, WA. Participants implemented the course following the workshop and were then invited to a follow-up workshop at the AMS Annual Meeting to present their course experiences and learn more about general diversity initiatives within the atmospheric and oceanic sciences. As a result of the Diversity Projects, 145 minority-serving institutions have implemented AMS Weather Studies and 77 have implemented AMS Ocean Studies.

  11. The use of AMS to the biomedical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.

    1991-04-01

    The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) began making AMS measurements in 1989. Biomedical experiments were originally limited by sample preparation techniques, but we expect the number of biomedical samples to increase five-fold. While many of the detailed techniques for making biomedical measurements resemble those used in other fields, biological tracer experiments differ substantially from the observational approaches of earth science investigators. The role of xenobiotius in initiating mutations in cells is of particular interest. One measure of the damage caused to the genetic material is obtained by counting the number of adducts formed by a chemical agent at a given dose. AMS allows direct measurement of the number of adducts through stoichiometric quantification of the {sup 14}C label attached to the DNA after exposure to a labelled carcinogen. Other isotopes of interest include tritium, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 79}SE, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 26}Al and {sup 129}I. Our experiments with low dose environmental carcinogens reflect the protocols which will become a common part of biomedical AMS. In biomedical experiments, the researcher defines the carbon to be analyzed through dissection and/or chemical purification; thus the sample is merely'' combusted and graphitized at the AMS facility. However, since biomedical samples can have a {sup 14}C range of five orders of magnitude, preparation of graphite required construction of a special manifold to prevent cross-contamination. Additionally, a strain of {sup 14}C-depleted C57BL/6 mice is being developed to further reduce background in biomedical experiments. AMS has a bright and diverse future in radioisotope tracing. Such work requires a dedicated amalgamation of AMS scientists and biomedical researchers who will redesign experimental protocols to maximize the AMS technique and minimize the danger of catastrophic contamination. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Improving AMS Detection of the Biomedical Radiotracer 41Ca with Segmented Radio-Frequency Quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, Jean-Francois; Javahery, Gholamreza; Kieser, William E.; Litherland, Albert E.; Cousins, Lisa M.

    41Ca is an important biomedical radiotracer finding many applications in biological, nutritional and medical studies. The detection of 41Ca by AMS is however limited by an important background signal of 41K originating from biological samples and from contaminated cesium in the source. An approach consisting of using PbF2-assisted in-source fluorination in combination with an Isobar Separator for Anions (ISA), a device incorporating a low energy radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) gas cell, promises to push down the limit of detection of 41Ca attainable on small (<3 MV) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) systems by several orders of magnitude. Such on-line reduction of 41K should also result in a simplification of biological sample preparation and less concern about variable 41K contamination of the cesium beam. The selective collision-induced fragmentation of KF3- versus CaF3-, occurring in the gas cell of an ISA equipped with a double segment RFQ, have been reported earlier1), leading to K being suppressed by a factor of 1e4 over Ca. We present here the future configuration of the ISA, redesigned using multi-segmented RFQ to enhance further this effect and improve transmission through the gas cell. A segmented RFQ is an appropriate tool to finely control ion energy down to the few eV's separating the fragmentation energies of the two fluoride species. This pre-commercial ISA destined to be used at the newly established A. E. Lalonde AMS laboratory at University of Ottawa (Canada) will be presented. Some practicalities of integrating a low energy RFQ-based device in a high energy AMS system will also be discussed.

  13. On-line I-/Te- separation for the AMS analysis of 125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C. R. J.; Cornett, R. J.; Zhao, X.-L.; Litherland, A. E.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    The isobar separator for anions (ISA) was used together with a 3 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) to demonstrate the real time (on-line) separation of Te- from I-. Following the ion source mass spectrometry and major retardation to tens of eV, the ISA uses a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) ion guide to confine and direct I- and associated Te- isobar anions through a gas-reaction cell, where chemical reactions occur at eV energies with the electronegative gas NO2. Anions are subsequently reaccelerated out of the ISA to near original ion source extraction energies for AMS analysis. At 5 mTorr NO2 in the ISA gas-reaction cell, 125Te- was observed to be attenuated by a factor of ∼107 as compared to 127I- that did not experience significant (<50%) losses. A comparative test using 37Cl- and 32S- (having similar chemical properties to iodine and tellurium) showed a 32S- attenuation of >107 relative to 37Cl- under the same ISA-AMS conditions. The preferential destruction of Te- (and S-) at eV energies in the ISA is likely due to a larger favorable destruction cross-section with NO2. This study is the first demonstration of I-Te anion separation for AMS, and makes possible the use of 125I, free of the contaminant 125Te isobar after suitable sample purification, for future 129I/125I carrier-free analyses of natural samples at ultra-low trace levels.

  14. Tritium AMS for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.L.; Velsko, C.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-08-01

    We are developing {sup 3}H-AMS to measure {sup 3}H activity of mg-sized biological samples. LLNL has already successfully applied {sup 14}C AMS to a variety of problems in the area of biomedical research. Development of {sup 3}H AMS would greatly complement these studies. The ability to perform {sup 3}H AMS measurements at sensitivities equivalent to those obtained for {sup 14}C will allow us to perform experiments using compounds that are not readily available in {sup 14}C-tagged form. A {sup 3}H capability would also allow us to perform unique double-labeling experiments in which we learn the fate, distribution, and metabolism of separate fractions of biological compounds.

  15. AMS/DOE Graduate Fellowship

    SciTech Connect

    None None

    2011-06-15

    The American Meteorological Society (AMS) Fellowship Program was established in 1991. To date, AMS has awarded over 150 Fellowships. This five year DOE award provided for one Fellowship a year for five years. The objective of this program is to provide enough funding to a student so as to allow the student to focus solely on coursework requirements, thus allowing them to begin their research at an earlier date.

  16. Further study on highly sensitive AMS measurement of 53Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kejun, Dong; Hao, Hu; Xianggao, Wang; Chaoli, Li; Ming, He; Zhenyu, Li; Shaoyong, Wu; Jiancheng, Liu; Guowen, Zheng; Heng, Li; Zhigang, Chen; Guangshan, Liu; Jian, Yuan; Shan, Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The AMS facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy has been equipped with a ΔE-Q3D detection system for the measurements of 53Mn. While the sample material of MnO2 and the extraction ions of MnO- were used previously in AMS measurement of 53Mn with fairly good results, a method has recently been developed with the extraction of MnF- from ion source using MnF2 and MnO2 + PbF2 as sample materials. As a result, a sensitivity of 10-14 (53Mn/Mn) has been achieved. Compared with the original MnO-/MnO2 approach, the method of MnF- extraction, combined with ΔE-Q3D detection technique, demonstrated an improved sensitivity for AMS measurement of 53Mn.

  17. 241Am (n,gamma) isomer ratio measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Evelyn M; Vieira, David J; Moody, Walter A; Slemmons, Alice K

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy of the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemistry ratio. We have performed an activation experiment to measure the {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}) cross section leading to either the ground state of {sup 242g}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 16 hr) which decays to {sup 242}Cm (t{sub 1/2} = 163 d) or the long-lived isomer {sup 242m}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 141 yr). This experiment will develop a new set of americium cross section evaluations that can be used with a measured {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemical measurement for nuclear forensic purposes. This measurement is necessary to interpret the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am ratio because a good measurement of this neutron capture isomer ratio for {sup 241}Am does not exist. The targets were prepared in 2007 from {sup 241}Am purified from LANL stocks. Gold was added to the purified {sup 241}Am as an internal neutron fluence monitor. These targets were placed into a holder, packaged, and shipped to Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, where they were irradiated at their Van de Graff facility in February 2008. One target was irradiated with {approx}25 keV quasimonoenergetic neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction for 3 days and a second target was also irradiated for 3 days with {approx}500 keV neutrons. Because it will be necessary to separate the {sup 242}Cm from the {sup 241}Am in order to measure the amount of {sup 242}Cm by alpha spectrometry, research into methods for americium/curium separations were conducted concurrently. We found that anion exchange chromatography in methanol/nitric acid solutions produced good separations that could be completed in one day resulting in a sample with no residue. The samples were returned from Germany in July 2009 and were counted by gamma spectrometry. Chemical separations have commenced on the blank sample. Each sample will be spiked with {sup 244}Cm, dissolved and digested in nitric acid solutions. One third of each sample will be processed at a time

  18. 40 CFR 63.11160 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Cadmium, and Beryllium Applicability and Compliance Dates § 63.11160 Am I subject to this subpart? (a) You... beryllium production facility that is an area source of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions. (b) The affected source is each existing or new primary zinc production facility or primary beryllium production...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11160 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Cadmium, and Beryllium Applicability and Compliance Dates § 63.11160 Am I subject to this subpart? (a) You... beryllium production facility that is an area source of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions. (b) The affected source is each existing or new primary zinc production facility or primary beryllium production...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11160 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Cadmium, and Beryllium Applicability and Compliance Dates § 63.11160 Am I subject to this subpart? (a) You... beryllium production facility that is an area source of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions. (b) The affected source is each existing or new primary zinc production facility or primary beryllium production...

  1. 40 CFR 63.11160 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Cadmium, and Beryllium Applicability and Compliance Dates § 63.11160 Am I subject to this subpart? (a) You... beryllium production facility that is an area source of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions. (b) The affected source is each existing or new primary zinc production facility or primary beryllium production...

  2. 40 CFR 63.11160 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Cadmium, and Beryllium Applicability and Compliance Dates § 63.11160 Am I subject to this subpart? (a) You... beryllium production facility that is an area source of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions. (b) The affected source is each existing or new primary zinc production facility or primary beryllium production...

  3. Neutron transmission and capture of 241Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampoudis, C.; Kopecky, S.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Gunsing, F.; Sage, C.; Bouland, O.; Noguere, G.

    2013-03-01

    A set of neutron transmission and capture experiments based on the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique, were performed in order to determine the 241Am capture cross section in the energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 keV. The GELINA facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) served as the neutron source. A pair of C6D6 liquid scintillators was used to register the prompt gamma rays emerging from the americium sample, while a Li-glass detector was used in the transmission setup. Results from the capture and transmission data acquired are consistent with each other, but appear to be inconsistent with the evaluated data files. Resonance parameters have been derived for the data up to the energy of 100 eV.

  4. AMS of the Minor Plutonium Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Steier, P.; Hrnecek, E.; Priller, A.; Quinto, F.; Srncik, M.; Wallner, A.; Wallner, G.; Winkler, S.

    2013-01-01

    VERA, the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, is especially equipped for the measurement of actinides, and performs a growing number of measurements on environmental samples. While AMS is not the optimum method for each particular plutonium isotope, the possibility to measure 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu and 244Pu on the same AMS sputter target is a great simplification. We have obtained a first result on the global fallout value of 244Pu/239Pu = (5.7 ± 1.0) × 10−5 based on soil samples from Salzburg prefecture, Austria. Furthermore, we suggest using the 242Pu/240Pu ratio as an estimate of the initial 241Pu/239Pu ratio, which allows dating of the time of irradiation based solely on Pu isotopes. We have checked the validity of this estimate using literature data, simulations, and environmental samples from soil from the Salzburg prefecture (Austria), from the shut down Garigliano Nuclear Power Plant (Sessa Aurunca, Italy) and from the Irish Sea near the Sellafield nuclear facility. The maximum deviation of the estimated dates from the expected ages is 6 years, while relative dating of material from the same source seems to be possible with a precision of less than 2 years. Additional information carried by the minor plutonium isotopes may allow further improvements of the precision of the method. PMID:23565016

  5. AMS of the Minor Plutonium Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Steier, P; Hrnecek, E; Priller, A; Quinto, F; Srncik, M; Wallner, A; Wallner, G; Winkler, S

    2013-01-01

    VERA, the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, is especially equipped for the measurement of actinides, and performs a growing number of measurements on environmental samples. While AMS is not the optimum method for each particular plutonium isotope, the possibility to measure (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu, (242)Pu and (244)Pu on the same AMS sputter target is a great simplification. We have obtained a first result on the global fallout value of (244)Pu/(239)Pu = (5.7 ± 1.0) × 10(-5) based on soil samples from Salzburg prefecture, Austria. Furthermore, we suggest using the (242)Pu/(240)Pu ratio as an estimate of the initial (241)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, which allows dating of the time of irradiation based solely on Pu isotopes. We have checked the validity of this estimate using literature data, simulations, and environmental samples from soil from the Salzburg prefecture (Austria), from the shut down Garigliano Nuclear Power Plant (Sessa Aurunca, Italy) and from the Irish Sea near the Sellafield nuclear facility. The maximum deviation of the estimated dates from the expected ages is 6 years, while relative dating of material from the same source seems to be possible with a precision of less than 2 years. Additional information carried by the minor plutonium isotopes may allow further improvements of the precision of the method.

  6. STS-91 AMS-01 payload moved from MPPF to SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) is lifted in KSC's MultiPayload Processing Facility in preparation for a move to the Space Station Processing Facility via the Payload Environmental Transportation System. The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is scheduled to be flown on the 9th and final Mir docking mission, scheduled for launch in May. The objectives of the AMS-1 investigation are to search for anti-matter and dark matter in space and to study astrophysics. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. After docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will join the STS-91 crew and return to Earth aboard Discovery.

  7. STS-91 AMS-01 payload moved from MPPF to SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) is lifted in KSC's MultiPayload Processing Facility in preparation for a move to the Space Station Processing Facility via the Payload Environmental Transportation System. The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is scheduled to be flown on the 9th and final Mir docking mission, scheduled for launch in May. The objectives of the AMS-1 investigation are to search for anti-matter and dark matter in space and to study astrophysics. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. After docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will join the STS-91 crew and return to Earth aboard Discovery.

  8. (26)Al investigations at the AMS-laboratory in Lund.

    PubMed

    Faarinen, M; Magnusson, C E; Hellborg, R; Mattsson, S; Kiisk, M; Persson, P; Schütz, A; Skog, G; Stenström, K

    2001-11-01

    At the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) laboratory in Lund, a facility for (26)Al analysis is under development. The sensitivity is expected to be several orders of magnitude higher than with standard mass spectrometry. The planned biomedical program includes studies of aluminium uptake, distribution and retention in man. The initial work has been concentrated on the construction and testing of a new dedicated injector for the accelerator and on the preparation of biological samples for aluminium analysis. The current quality of the facility is presented and the first experimental results reported.

  9. Automated accelerator controls for a 3 MV tandem Pelletron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathmell, R. D.; Kitchen, R. L.; Luck, T. R.; Sundquist, M. L.

    1991-05-01

    A new accelerator control system has been developed which uses a real-time, multitasking operating system running on a Motorola 68030 based microcomputer. The system includes multiple graphic and text displays and allows the operator to communicate via these displays to the accelerator, which is interfaced to CAMAC. Most accelerator parameters can be controlled using a mouse in conjunction with a single graphic display, eliminating the need to change CRT pages in order to control parameters from the source to the target. A touch screen is also available to permit a number of parameters to be at the operator's finger tips at all times. Operating parameters for a new beam and energy can be automatically set by scaling from a previously stored run. The program and database are structured to facilitate interlocking and closed loop control of parameters. The hardware configuration, structure and features of the software will be reviewed.

  10. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  11. AMS/DOE Fellowship Recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Stephanie

    2016-11-21

    The AMS/DOE graduate fellowships were awarded to three students entering their first year of graduate study. The funds allowed each student to take a full course load during their first of year of graduate study which helps each of them to enter the professional, scientific community at an earlier date. Each recipient is academically outstanding, received glowing references of support and demonstrated their strong desire to perform scientific research. As part of the fellowship, each of the students was invited to attend the AMS Annual Meeting where they got to participate in the AMS student conference, attend scientific sessions and visit the exhibition hall. In addition, a student awards luncheon was held where each of the recipients got to meet their sponsor and receive a certificate.

  12. Overview of AMS (CCSDS Asynchronous Message Service)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Asynchronous Message Service (AMS). The topics include: 1) Key Features; 2) A single AMS continuum; 3) The AMS Protocol Suite; 4) A multi-continuum venture; 5) Constraining transmissions; 6) Security; 7) Fault Tolerance; 8) Performance of Reference Implementation; 9) AMS vs Multicast (1); 10) AMS vs Multicast (2); 11) RAMS testing exercise; and 12) Results.

  13. 47 CFR 73.3516 - Specification of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification of facilities. 73.3516 Section 73... BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.3516 Specification of facilities. (a) An application for facilities in the AM, FM, TV or Class A TV broadcast services, or low power TV service shall...

  14. 47 CFR 73.1615 - Operation during modification of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation during modification of facilities. 73... modification of facilities. When the licensee of an existing AM, FM, TV or Class A TV station is in the process of modifying existing facilities as authorized by a construction permit and determines it is...

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers maneuver the cylindrical payload canister into place around Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B). Once secure inside the canister, the rover will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Delta rocket. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Pad 17-B June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers maneuver the cylindrical payload canister into place around Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B). Once secure inside the canister, the rover will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Delta rocket. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Pad 17-B June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the background, right, workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility get ready to lift Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) to the third stage of the Delta rocket (foreground) for mating. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the background, right, workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility get ready to lift Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) to the third stage of the Delta rocket (foreground) for mating. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, an overhead crane lowers Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) over the third stage of the Delta rocket. The rover will be mated to the third stage for launch. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, an overhead crane lowers Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) over the third stage of the Delta rocket. The rover will be mated to the third stage for launch. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers prepare to mate the Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) above with the third stage of the Delta rocket below. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers prepare to mate the Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) above with the third stage of the Delta rocket below. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the connections after the Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) above was mated with the third stage of the Delta rocket below. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the connections after the Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) above was mated with the third stage of the Delta rocket below. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers prepare to mate the Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) above with the third stage of the Delta rocket below. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers prepare to mate the Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) above with the third stage of the Delta rocket below. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) is moved out of the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility for transfer to Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B) is moved out of the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility for transfer to Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility secure the lower panels of a payload canister around Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B). The rover will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Delta rocket. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Pad 17-B June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility secure the lower panels of a payload canister around Mars Exploration Rover 1 (MER-B). The rover will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Delta rocket. The second of twin rovers being sent to Mars, it is equipped with a robotic arm, a drilling tool, three spectrometers, and four pairs of cameras that allow it to have a human-like, 3D view of the terrain. Each rover could travel as far as 100 meters in one day to act as Mars scientists' eyes and hands, exploring an environment where humans can't yet go. MER-B is scheduled to launch from Pad 17-B June 26 at one of two available times, 12:27:31 a.m. EDT or 1:08:45 a.m. EDT.

  3. Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osters, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Texas A&M University is a research extensive institution located in College Station. More than 45,000 students attend the university (about 20% are graduate or professional students). Academically, the university is known for its engineering, business, and agricultural and veterinary medicine programs, although there are more than 150 programs…

  4. Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osters, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Texas A&M University is a research extensive institution located in College Station. More than 45,000 students attend the university (about 20% are graduate or professional students). Academically, the university is known for its engineering, business, and agricultural and veterinary medicine programs, although there are more than 150 programs…

  5. I am a White Male

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sammons, Jeffrey L.

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that competence and merit are elements in need of examination, and gives four reasons why being a woman, black, or Spanish-American is a qualification for academic appointment. Stresses that energy ought to be directed to increasing support of colleges and universities and not to fighting affirmative action. (Author/AM)

  6. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists AM251 and AM630 activate TRPA1 in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mayur; Patwardhan, Amol; Salas, Margaux M.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have been utilized extensively in vivo as well as in vitro, but their selectivity has not been fully examined. We investigated activation of sensory neurons by two cannabinoid antagonists – AM251 and AM630. AM251 and AM630 activated trigeminal (TG) sensory neurons in a concentration-dependent fashion (threshold 1 μM). AM251 and AM630 responses are mediated by the TRPA1 channel in a majority (90–95%) of small-to-medium TG sensory neurons. AM630 (1–100 μM), but not AM251, was a significantly more potent agonist in cells co-expressing both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels. We next evaluated AM630 and AM251 effects on TRPV1- and TRPA1-mediated responses in TG neurons. Capsaicin (CAP) effects were inhibited by pre-treatment with AM630, but not AM251. Mustard oil (MO) and WIN55,212-2 (WIN) TRPA1 mediated responses were also inhibited by pre-treatment with AM630, but not AM251 (25uM each). Co-treatment of neurons with WIN and either AM630 or AM251 had opposite effects: AM630 sensitized WIN responses, whereas AM251 inhibited WIN responses. WIN-induced inhibition of CAP responses in sensory neurons was reversed by AM630 pre-treatment and AM251 co-treatment (25μM each), as these conditions inhibit WIN responses. Hindpaw injections of AM630 and AM251 did not produce nocifensive behaviors. However, both compounds modulated CAP-induced thermal hyperalgesia in wild-type mice and rats, but not TRPA1 null-mutant mice. AMs also partially regulate WIN inhibition of CAP-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a TRPA1-dependent fashion. In summary, these findings demonstrate alternative targets for the cannabinoid antagonists, AM251 and AM630, in peripheral antihyperalgesia which involve certain TRP channels. PMID:21645531

  7. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists AM251 and AM630 activate TRPA1 in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mayur; Patwardhan, Amol; Salas, Margaux M; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Akopian, Armen N

    2011-09-01

    Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have been utilized extensively in vivo as well as in vitro, but their selectivity has not been fully examined. We investigated activation of sensory neurons by two cannabinoid antagonists - AM251 and AM630. AM251 and AM630 activated trigeminal (TG) sensory neurons in a concentration-dependent fashion (threshold 1 μM). AM251 and AM630 responses are mediated by the TRPA1 channel in a majority (90-95%) of small-to-medium TG sensory neurons. AM630 (1-100 μM), but not AM251, was a significantly more potent agonist in cells co-expressing both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels. We next evaluated AM630 and AM251 effects on TRPV1- and TRPA1-mediated responses in TG neurons. Capsaicin (CAP) effects were inhibited by pre-treatment with AM630, but not AM251. Mustard oil (MO) and WIN55,212-2 (WIN) TRPA1 mediated responses were also inhibited by pre-treatment with AM630, but not AM251 (25 uM each). Co-treatment of neurons with WIN and either AM630 or AM251 had opposite effects: AM630 sensitized WIN responses, whereas AM251 inhibited WIN responses. WIN-induced inhibition of CAP responses in sensory neurons was reversed by AM630 pre-treatment and AM251 co-treatment (25 μM each), as these conditions inhibit WIN responses. Hindpaw injections of AM630 and AM251 did not produce nocifensive behaviors. However, both compounds modulated CAP-induced thermal hyperalgesia in wild-type mice and rats, but not TRPA1 null-mutant mice. AMs also partially regulate WIN inhibition of CAP-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a TRPA1-dependent fashion. In summary, these findings demonstrate alternative targets for the cannabinoid antagonists, AM251 and AM630, in peripheral antihyperalgesia which involve certain TRP channels.

  8. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  9. Report on 241,242Am(n,x) surrogate cross section measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Ressler, J J; Gostic, J; Henderson, R A; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J E; Bleuel, D; Kritcher, A; Matoon, C; Scielzo, N D; Stoyer, M A

    2011-02-16

    The main goal of this measurement is to determine the {sup 242}Am(n,f) and {sup 241}Am(n,f) cross sections via the surrogate {sup 243}Am. Gamma-ray data was also collected for the purpose of measuring the (n,2n) cross-sections. The experiment was conducted using the STARS/LIBERACE experimental facility located at the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory the first week of February 2011. A description of the experiment and status of the data analysis follow.

  10. 7 CFR 65.105 - AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL..., AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.105 AMS. AMS means the Agricultural Marketing...

  11. Content-Based Networking: DTN, AMS, Sharednet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2006-01-01

    A detailed viewgraph presentation on DTN, AMS, and Sharednet content-based networking is shown. The contents include: 1) DARPA Content-Based Networking Summary of Requirements; 2) Concept; 3) Key Features of AMS; 4) Overview of Sharednet; 5) SharedNet Deployment History; 6) SharedNet AMS DTN; 7) Detailed Structure; and 8) Bottom line.

  12. Selection of Additive Manufacturing (AM) Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    Recent advancements in technology have enabled Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as Three-Dimensional (3-D) printing, to become a powerful ...Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been tracking AM over recent years and is considering investing in...9 1 I. INTRODUCTION Additive Manufacturing (AM) has become a very powerful

  13. 7 CFR 1280.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1280.602 Section 1280.602... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.602 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee of...

  14. 7 CFR 1230.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1230.602 Section 1230.602... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.602 Administrator, AMS. The term Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or...

  15. The 129I AMS program at PRIME Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Elmore, David; Miller, Thomas; Vogt, Stephan

    1997-03-01

    The current status of sample preparation activities and AMS determination of {129I}/{I} ratios are described. Determination of {129I}/{I} ratios is being performed routinely at the precision of 3% (at 10-11 level). A system background of 20-80 × 10-15 of {129I}/{I} ratio has been achieved without a time-of-flight (TOF) detector and without a low-energy electrostatic deflector. An intercomparison of {129I}/{I} ratios for AgI samples obtained from other AMS facilities and for the round robin exercise by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) show an excellent agreement. Potential applications of 129I for tracing groundwater and ocean water are discussed.

  16. Characterisation of a protection level Am-241 calibration source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, G. A.; Rossiter, M. J.; Williams, T. T.

    1992-11-01

    The various measurements involved in the commissioning process of an Am-241 radioactive source and transport mechanisms to be used for protection level calibration work are detailed. The source and its handling mechanisms are described and measurements to characterize the resultant gamma ray beam are described. For the beam measurements, the inverse square law is investigated and beam uniformity is assessed. A trial calibration of ionization chambers is described. The Am-241 irradiation facility is concluded to be suitable for calibrating secondary standards as part of the calibration service offered for protection level instruments. The umbra part of beam is acceptably uniform for a range of chambers and the measurements obtained were predictable and consistent. This quality will be added to the range of qualities offered as part of the protection level secondary standard calibration service.

  17. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-82 Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz flashes a wide grin for photographers after landing his T-38 jet at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Horowitz and the other six members of the STS-82 crew came from their home base at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, to spend the last few days before launch at KSC. STS-82 is scheduled for liftoff on Feb. 11 during a 65-minute launch window that opens at 3:56 a.m. EST. The 10-day flight aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will be the second Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-02-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-82 Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz flashes a wide grin for photographers after landing his T-38 jet at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Horowitz and the other six members of the STS-82 crew came from their home base at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, to spend the last few days before launch at KSC. STS-82 is scheduled for liftoff on Feb. 11 during a 65-minute launch window that opens at 3:56 a.m. EST. The 10-day flight aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery will be the second Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission.

  19. Plutonium measurements on the 1 MV AMS system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, Elena; Enamorado, Santiago Miguel; García-León, Manuel; Suter, Martin; Wacker, Lukas

    2008-11-01

    Plutonium isotopes have been recently added to the list of radionuclides that can be measured with the new generation of compact AMS facilities. In this paper we present first experimental results concerning the development of the plutonium AMS technique at 680 kV on the 1 MV AMS system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Sevilla, Spain. This is the first compact AMS machine designed and manufactured by High Voltage Engineering Europa. As we demonstrate, the obtained backgrounds for 239,240Pu, of about 10 6 atoms, and the 239Pu/ 238U mass suppression factor, in the range of 10 -9, compare to the ones achieved on other AMS facilities. With the measurement of reference materials provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA-375, IAEA-Soil-6, IAEA-381) and samples already studied on the 600 kV compact ETH/PSI AMS system at Zürich, we show that the CNA system can be perfectly used for the routine measurement of plutonium isotopes at environmental levels.

  20. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  1. Low energy AMS of americium and curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christl, Marcus; Dai, Xiongxin; Lachner, Johannes; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has evolved over the past years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analyses. While analyses of U and Pu isotopes have already become routine at the ETH Zurich 0.5 MV AMS system "Tandy", there is an increasing demand for highly sensitive analyses of the higher actinides such as Am and Cm for bioassay applications and beyond. In order to extend the actinide capabilities of the compact ETH Zurich AMS system and to develop new, more sensitive bioassay routines, a pilot study was carried out. The aim was to investigate and document the performance and the potential background of Am and Cm analyses with low energy AMS. Our results show that 241Am and Cm isotopes can be determined relative to a 243Am tracer if samples and AMS standards are prepared identically with regard to the matrix elements, in which the sample is dispersed. In this first test, detection limits for Cm and Am isotopes are all in the sub-femtogram range and even below 100 ag for Cm isotopes. In a systematic background study in the mass range of the Cm isotopes, two formerly unknown metastable triply charged Th molecules were found on amu(244) and amu(248). The presence of such a background is not a principal problem for AMS if the stripper pressure is increased accordingly. Based on our first results, we conclude that ultra-trace analyses of Am and Cm isotopes for bioassay are very well possible with low energy AMS.

  2. 30 CFR 285.601 - When am I required to submit my plans to MMS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When am I required to submit my plans to MMS? 285.601 Section 285.601 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and...

  3. 75 FR 1621 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... the community of license: COVENANT NETWORK, Station NEW, Facility ID 171236, BMPED-20091118AGS, From... COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License AGENCY: Federal... 8438, BMP-20091125ABD, From ASHLAND, VA, To POWHATAN, VA; HAMPTONS COMMUNITY RADIO CORPORATION, Station...

  4. A&M. Jet engine test building (TAN609). Exterior. Equipment inside rollup ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Jet engine test building (TAN-609). Exterior. Equipment inside roll-up door is blowdown test facility, part of loft-semiscale program. Note width of central section serving as blast protection for operator on left side. Photographer: Cahoon. Date: July 22, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-3703 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 75 FR 6395 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change..., WY; COMMANDER COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION, Station WRTM- FM, Facility ID 19864, BPH-20100107AAB, From...

  6. 40 CFR 60.4230 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines What This Subpart Covers § 60.4230 Am I subject to this subpart? (a... spark ignition (SI) internal combustion engines (ICE) as specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (6) of... facilities with internal combustion engines that are acting as temporary replacement units and that...

  7. 40 CFR 60.4230 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines What This Subpart Covers § 60.4230 Am I subject to this subpart? (a... spark ignition (SI) internal combustion engines (ICE) as specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (6) of... facilities with internal combustion engines that are acting as temporary replacement units and that...

  8. 40 CFR 60.4230 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ignition Internal Combustion Engines What This Subpart Covers § 60.4230 Am I subject to this subpart? (a... spark ignition (SI) internal combustion engines (ICE) as specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (6) of... facilities with internal combustion engines that are acting as temporary replacement units and that...

  9. Cosmic-Ray Studies with an Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS Detector) on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Plyaskin, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the physics research program implemented with an alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS detector) by a large-scale international collaboration on board the International Space Station is presented. The features of the experimental facility under construction are given, along with some results obtained during the test flight of the prototype spectrometer on board a space shuttle.

  10. AM-AM/AM-PM distortion versus complex Volterra kernels for modeling RF transceiver blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimmino, Rosario F.; Monsurrò, Pietro; Romano, Francesco; Scotti, Giuseppe; Trifiletti, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    We investigate AM/PM distortion models and compare them with baseband (BB) Volterra models. We show that the AM/PM model can be considered a special case of memoryless baseband Volterra models, and that adding memory can improve modeling accuracy by allowing the simulation of more complex nonlinearities. We report models of an LNA, a downconversion mixer, an upconversion mixer, and one class-AB Power Amplifier. All circuits are simulated using the 45nm STMicroelectronics CMOS process with Virtuoso, while the PA, with discrete devices, is simulated using ADS. Adding memory improves performance at the expense of increased numerical complexity: this makes real-time simulation and real-time calibration more expensive, so that there is a trade-off between complexity and accuracy or linearity (after calibration). Foreground calibration's techniques only require the real-time computation of the correction (inverse) system's output, whereas background calibration also requires the real-time estimation of the model coefficients, so the relevant complexity is that which is required during correction.

  11. Environmental radiation protection studies related to nuclear industries, using AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellborg, Ragnar; Erlandsson, Bengt; Faarinen, Mikko; Hâkansson, Helena; Hâkansson, Kjell; Kiisk, Madis; Magnusson, Carl-Erik; Persson, Per; Skog, Göran; Stenström, Kristina; Mattsson, Sören; Thornberg, Charlotte

    2001-07-01

    14C is produced in nuclear reactors during normal operation and part of it is continuously released into the environment. Because of the biological importance of carbon and the long physical half-life of 14C it is of interest to study these releases. The 14C activity concentrations in the air and vegetation around some Swedish as well as foreign nuclear facilities have been measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 59Ni is produced by neutron activation in the stainless steel close to the core of a nuclear reactor. The 59Ni levels have been measured in order to be able to classify the different parts of the reactor with respect to their content of long-lived radionuclides before final storage. The technique used to measure 59Ni at a small accelerator such as the Lund facility has been developed over the past few years and material from the Swedish nuclear industry has been analyzed.

  12. Arcjet Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    PL-TR--91-3085 PL-TR-- ________AD-A243 948 1-8 ARCJET FACILITY Captain Salvador Castillo October 1991 OVa99 Final Report - - A P P R O V...REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED September 1991 Final Aug 86 to Aug 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS ARCJET FACILITY PE- 62302F...Electric Propulsion Laboratory has designed and begun installation of an arcjet research facility. A 5 foot by 10 foot long chamber with eight 12 inch

  13. Mechanical reliability of AMS hydraulic penile prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, S C

    1995-12-01

    The mechanical reliability of AMS hydraulic penile prostheses implanted in 203 patients from April 1985 to June 1995 were evaluated. AMS Hydroflex prosthesis showed the highest incidence of mechanical failure (18.8%; 6/32 patients) during a mean follow-up period of 94.5 (64-117) months. Mean functioning time of the prostheses until malfunction was 50 (0-100) months. Bilateral fractures at junction of rear reservior and inflation chamber were found in 3 patients. AMS Dynaflex had a failure rate of 2.4% (2/85 patients) for an average of 35.3 (1-59) months. One patient showed complete fracture of silicone ball covering the proximal end of rear reservior onto which rear tip extenders are snapped. Regarding 3-piece inflatable prosthesis, AMS 700, AMS 700CX and AMS Ultrex had failure rates of 11.1% (1/9 patients), 10.5% (2/19 patients) and 4.0% (1/25 patients) during a mean follow-up period of 116.4 (103-125), 79.0 (60-94) and 44.4 (22-57) months, respectively. The verified causes of the mechanical failures were a tiny rupture of the cylinder in one case of AMS 700, an incomplete fracture of input tube in one case of AMS 700CX and a pump malfunction in one case of Ultrex. However, none of 33 cases of AMS 700CXM showed mechanical failure for an average of 21.3 (2-43) months. Therefore, AMS 700CXM and Ultrex seem to be very reliable, and the reliability of AMS Dynaflex was much higher than that of AMS Hydroflex. However, the long-term reliability of these devices needs more time to be determined.

  14. Mechanical reliability of AMS hydraulic penile prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical reliability of AMS hydraulic penile prostheses implanted in 203 patients from April 1985 to June 1995 were evaluated. AMS Hydroflex prosthesis showed the highest incidence of mechanical failure (18.8%; 6/32 patients) during a mean follow-up period of 94.5 (64-117) months. Mean functioning time of the prostheses until malfunction was 50 (0-100) months. Bilateral fractures at junction of rear reservior and inflation chamber were found in 3 patients. AMS Dynaflex had a failure rate of 2.4% (2/85 patients) for an average of 35.3 (1-59) months. One patient showed complete fracture of silicone ball covering the proximal end of rear reservior onto which rear tip extenders are snapped. Regarding 3-piece inflatable prosthesis, AMS 700, AMS 700CX and AMS Ultrex had failure rates of 11.1% (1/9 patients), 10.5% (2/19 patients) and 4.0% (1/25 patients) during a mean follow-up period of 116.4 (103-125), 79.0 (60-94) and 44.4 (22-57) months, respectively. The verified causes of the mechanical failures were a tiny rupture of the cylinder in one case of AMS 700, an incomplete fracture of input tube in one case of AMS 700CX and a pump malfunction in one case of Ultrex. However, none of 33 cases of AMS 700CXM showed mechanical failure for an average of 21.3 (2-43) months. Therefore, AMS 700CXM and Ultrex seem to be very reliable, and the reliability of AMS Dynaflex was much higher than that of AMS Hydroflex. However, the long-term reliability of these devices needs more time to be determined. PMID:8924226

  15. PRIME lab AMS performance, upgrades and research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Bourgeois, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Ma, X.; Miller, T.; Mueller, K.; Rickey, F.; Simms, P.; Vogt, S.

    2000-10-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for AMS that provides the scientific community with timely, reliable and high quality chemical processing (~600 samples/year) and AMS measurements (~3000 samples/year) of 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 129I. The AMS system is based on an upgraded FN (7 MV) tandem accelerator that has recently been modified to improve performance. The precision is 1% for 14C and it is 3-5% for the other nuclides for radioisotope/stable isotope ratios at the 10-12 levels. System background for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl and 41Ca is 1-10×10-15 while for 129I the natural abundance limits it to 20×10-15. Research is being carried out in Earth, planetary, and biomedical sciences. Geoscience applications include determination of exposure ages of glacial moraines, volcanic eruptions, river terraces, and fault scarps. Burial histories of sand are being determined to decipher the timing of human expansion and climatic history. Environmental applications are tracing the release of radioactivity from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, water tracing, and neutron dosimetry. The applications using meteoric nuclides are oil field brines, sediment subduction, radiocarbon dating, and groundwater 36Cl mapping. Radionuclide concentrations are also determined in meteorites and tektites for deciphering space and terrestrial exposure histories.

  16. EOS-AM1 Nickel Hydrogen Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles W.; Keys, Denney J.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Wannemacher, Hari E.; Vaidyanathan, Harry

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the interim results of the Earth Observing System AM-1 project (EOS-AM-1) nickel hydrogen cell life test being conducted under contract to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at the Lockheed Martin Missile and Space (LMMS) facility in East Windsor, NJ; and at COMSAT Labs., Clarksburg, MD. The purpose of die tests is to verify that the EOS-AM-1 cell design can meet five years of real-time Low Earth Orbit (LEO) cycling. The tests include both real-time LEO and accelerated stress tests. At LMMS, the first real-time LEO simulated 99 minute orbital cycle started on February 7, 1994 and the test has been running continuously since that time, with 18,202 LEO cycles completed as of September 1, 1997. Each cycle consists of a 64 minute charge (VT at 1.507 volts per cell, 1.06 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge) and a 35 minute constant power discharge at 177 watts (22.5% DOD). At COMSAT, the accelerated stress test consists of 90 minute orbital cycles at 60% DOD with a 30 minute discharge at 60 amperes and a 60 minute charge at 40 amperes (VT at 1.54 volts per cell to 1.09 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge). The real-time LEO life test battery consists of seven, 50AH (nameplate rating) Eagle-Picher, Inc. (EPI) Mantech cells manufactured into three, 3-cell pack assemblies (there are two place holder cells that are not part of the life test electrical circuit). The test pack is configured to simulate the conductive thermal design of the spacecraft battery, including: conductive aluminum sleeves, 3-cell pack aluminum baseplate, and honeycomb panel all mounted to a liquid (-5 C) cold plate. The entire assembly is located in a thermal chamber operating at +30 C. The accelerated stress test unit consists of five cells mounted in machined aluminum test sleeves and is operating at +10 C. The real-time LEO life test battery has met all performance requirements through the first 18

  17. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  18. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  19. Photometry and dynamics of the minor mergers AM 1228-260 and AM 2058-381

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Jimenez, J. A.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Bonatto, C.; Rodrigues, I.; Krabbe, A. C.; Winge, Cláudia

    2015-08-01

    We investigate interaction effects on the dynamics and morphology of the galaxy pairs AM 2058-381 and AM 1228-260. This work is based on r' images and long-slit spectra obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini South Telescope. The luminosity ratio between the main (AM 2058A) and secondary (AM 2058B) components of the first pair is a factor of ˜ 5, while for the other pair, the main (AM 1228A) component is 20 times more luminous than the secondary (AM 1228B). The four galaxies have pseudo-bulges, with a Sérsic index n < 2. Their observed radial velocities profiles (RVPs) present several irregularities. The receding side of the RVP of AM 2058A is displaced with respect to the velocity field model, while there is a strong evidence that AM 2058B is a tumbling body, rotating along its major axis. The RVPs for AM 1228A indicate a misalignment between the kinematic and photometric major axes. The RVP for AM 1228B is quite perturbed, very likely due to the interaction with AM 1228A. NFW halo parameters for AM 2058A are similar to those of the Milky Way and M 31. The halo mass of AM 1228A is roughly 10 per cent that of AM 2058A. The mass-to-light (M/L) of AM 2058 agrees with the mean value derived for late-type spirals, while the low M/L for AM 1228A may be due to the intense star formation ongoing in this galaxy.

  20. Variations in AmLi source spectra and their estimation utilizing the 5 Ring Multiplicity Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann-Smith, R.; Beddingfield, D. H.; Enqvist, A.; Swinhoe, M. T.

    2017-06-01

    Active-mode assay systems are widely used for the safeguards of uranium items to verify compliance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Systems such as the Active-Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) use americium-lithium (AmLi) neutron sources to induce fissions which are measured to determine the sample mass. These systems have historically relied on calibrations derived from well-defined standards. Recently, restricted access to standards or more difficult measurements have resulted in a reliance on modeling and simulation for the calibration of systems, which introduces potential simulation biases. The AmLi source energy spectra commonly used in the safeguards community do not accurately represent measurement results and the spectrum uncertainty can represent a large contribution to the total modeling uncertainty in active-mode systems. The 5-Ring Multiplicity Counter (5RMC) has been used to measure 17 AmLi sources. The measurements showed a significant spectral variation between different sources. Utilization of a spectrum that is specific to an individual source or a series of sources will give improved results over historical general spectra when modeling AmLi sources. Candidate AmLi neutron spectra were calculated in MCNP and SOURCES4C for a range of physical AmLi characteristics. The measurement and simulation data were used to fit reliable and accurate AmLi spectra for use in the simulation of active-mode systems. Spectra were created for average Gammatron C, Gammatron N, and MRC series sources, and for individual sources. The systematic uncertainty introduced by physical aspects of the AmLi source were characterized through simulations. The accuracy of spectra from the literature was compared.

  1. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurement of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV ⩽ En ⩽ 20 MeV at n_TOF at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cerutti, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Meaze, M. H.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Wallner, A.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; n TOF Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements of 233U, 243Am and 241Am relative to 235U have been carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN. A fast ionization chamber has been employed. All samples were located in the same detector; therefore the studied elements and the reference 235U target are subject to the same neutron beam.

  2. A&M. Plot plan of administration and A&M areas. Shows relationships ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Plot plan of administration and A&M areas. Shows relationships among administration buildings and to A&M building (TAN-607), railroad turntable. Ralph M. Parsons 902-2&3-ANP-U 3. Date: December 1952. INEEL index code no. 032-0100-00-693-106690 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Beneficial uses of /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Mangeng, C.A.; Thayer, G.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report assesses the uses of /sup 241/Am and the associated costs and supply. The study shows that /sup 241/Am-fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators in the range of 1 to 5 W electrical provide the most promising use of kilogram amounts of this isotope. For medical uses, where purity is essential, irradiation of /sup 241/Am can produce 97% pure /sup 238/Pu at $21,000/g. Using a pyro-metallurgical process, /sup 241/Am could be recovered from molten salt extraction (MSE) residues at an estimated incremental cost of $83/g adjusted to reflect the disposal costs of waste products. This cost of recovery is less than the $300/g cost for disposal of the /sup 241/Am contained in the MSE residues.

  4. Exotic negative molecules in AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golser, Robin; Gnaser, Hubert; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Wallner, Anton

    2007-06-01

    "The techniques and equipment developed for AMS studies are well suited for identifying exotic negative ions". With this sentence begins a pioneering paper by Roy Middleton and Jeff Klein (M&K) on small doubly-charged negative carbon clusters [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123 (1997) 532]. M&K were the first to utilize Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to prove the existence of these clusters and a number of other exotic molecules. We review M&K's efforts and show how their work is being continued at other laboratories. The latest developments are: (1) the discovery of long-lived molecular hydrogen anions H2-,D2-and (2) the unambiguous identification of the smallest doubly-charged negative molecule (LiF3)2-. In particular we show new experimental data for D3-, and for (LiF3)2-, and we try to answer the question why M&K's search for this di-anion was unsuccessful.

  5. Estimating the AmLi Neutron Spectrum from Measured Ring Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Weinmann-Smith, Robert; Beddingfield, David H.; Enqvist, Andreas; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas

    2016-11-10

    These are a set of slides on estimating the AmLi neutron spectrum from measured ring ratios. The IAEA uses an AmLi source in the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) to verify compliance with nonproliferation treaties. The UNCL requires calibration with known uranium samples. The AmLi spectrum isn’t known well enough to allow simulated calibrations. Alphas lose energy traveling through AmO2 particle of unknown size. Energy reduction below Li threshold enhances O contribution. Unknown Li matrix material affects neutron production and thermalization. There is large variation in spectra from each element. Other topics covered include: applications, physics considerations, current spectra, measurement overview, measurement results - variation between sources, simulations, spectra fitting, other simulations, and conclusions.

  6. A new and compact system at the AMS laboratory in Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Enachescu, M.; Petre, A. R.; Simion, C. A.; Calinescu, C. I.; Ghita, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    AMS research started more than 15 years ago at our National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest. A first facility was constructed based on our multipurpose 9 MV tandem accelerator and was upgraded several times. In May 2012 a new Cockcroft Walton type 1 MV HVEE tandetron AMS system, was commissioned. Two chemistry laboratories were constructed and are routinely performing the target preparation for carbon dating and for other isotope applications such as for geology, environment physics, medicine and forensic physics. Performance parameters of the new system are shown.

  7. Facility rehabilitation

    Treesearch

    Edwin H. Ketchledge

    1971-01-01

    Restoration of vegetation on damaged sites is the most perplexing challenge in facility rehabilitation. In the Adirondack Mountains, the ecological impact of recreationists on the natural environment has become critical in two high-quality interior areas: on the steep higher slopes where trails soon become eroding stream channels, washing away the thin mountain soils;...

  8. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find…

  9. Asian Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Asian underground facilities are reviewed. The YangYang underground Laboratory in Korea and the Kamioka observatory in Japan are operational and several astrophysical experiments are running. Indian Neutrino Observatory(INO) and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) are under construction and underground experiments are being prepared. Current activities and future prospects at those underground sites are described.

  10. Determination of plutonium in environmental samples by AMS and alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hrnecek, E; Steier, P; Wallner, A

    2005-01-01

    Environmental samples from nuclear weapons test sites at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa (French Polynesia, south Pacific) have been analyzed for their content of plutonium isotopes by applying the independent techniques of decay counting (Alpha Spectrometry) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Here, we propose the combination of both techniques which results in a maximum of information on the isotopic signature of Pu in environmental samples. Plutonium was chemically separated from the bulk material by anion exchange. (242)Pu was used as an internal standard for both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The samples for alpha spectrometry were prepared by micro-precipitation with NdF(3). After alpha spectrometry, the samples were reprocessed for AMS. Pu was co-precipitated with Fe(OH)(3) and finally, solid samples were prepared. At the VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) facility, the various Pu isotopes were separated by their isotopic masses and quantified by the AMS technique. A good agreement of the results obtained from the AMS measurements was found with those obtained from Alpha Spectrometry. Overall, the data agree on average within 10% of each other. Isotope ratios for (238)Pu, (239)Pu and (240)Pu can be extracted from our investigations. Alpha spectrometry delivers data for the (238)Pu and the combination of ((239+240))Pu concentrations in those samples. In addition, the AMS technique provides information on the individual concentrations of (240)Pu and (239)Pu.

  11. AMS-02 as a Space Weather Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, K.; Bindi, V.; Chati, M.; Consolandi, C.; Corti, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a state-of-the-art space detector that measures particles in the energy range of hundreds of MeV to a few TeV. AMS-02 has been installed onboard of the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011 where it will operate for the duration of the station. To date, there is an abundance of space-based solar data collected in the low energy regimes, whereas there are very few direct measurements of higher energy particles available. AMS-02 is capable of measuring arrival time and composition of the highest energy SEPs in space. It is crucial to build a better knowledge base regarding the most energetic and potentially harmful events. We are currently developing a program to employ AMS-02 as a real-time space weather observatory. SEPs with higher energies are usually accelerated during a short period of time and they are the first particles to reach the Earth. AMS-02, measuring these highest energy SEPs, can alert the onset of an SEP event. During the past two years of operation, we have identified two main quantities in AMS-02 that are particularly sensitive to the arrival of SEPs: the detector livetime and the transition radiation detector (TRD) event size. By monitoring the detector livetime and the TRD event size, AMS-02 can pinpoint in real-time the arrival of SEPs inside the Earth's magnetosphere operating as a space weather detector.

  12. Innovative Instructional Tools from the AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, W. E.; Geer, I. W.; Mills, E. W.; Nugnes, K. A.; Stimach, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Since 1996, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has been developing online educational materials with dynamic features that engage students and encourage additional exploration of various concepts. Most recently, AMS transitioned its etextbooks to webBooks. Now accessible anywhere with internet access, webBooks can be read with any web browser. Prior versions of AMS etextbooks were difficult to use in a lab setting, however webBooks are much easier to use and no longer a hurdle to learning. Additionally, AMS eInvestigations Manuals, also in webBook format, include labs with innovative features and educational tools. One such example is the AMS Climate at a Glance (CAG) app that draws data from NOAA's Climate at a Glance website. The user selects historical data of a given parameter and the app calculates various statistics revealing whether or not the results are consistent with climate change. These results allow users to distinguish between climate variability and climate change. This can be done for hundreds of locations across the U.S. and on multiple time scales. Another innovative educational tool used in AMS eInvestigations Manuals is the AMS Conceptual Climate Energy Model (CCEM). The CCEM is a computer simulation designed to enable users to track the paths that units of energy might follow as they enter, move through and exit an imaginary system according to simple rules applied to different scenarios. The purpose is to provide insight into the impacts of physical processes that operate in the real world. Finally, AMS educational materials take advantage of Google Earth imagery to reproduce the physical aspects of globes, allowing users to investigate spatial relationships in three dimensions. Google Earth imagery is used to explore tides, ocean bottom bathymetry and El Nino and La Nina. AMS will continue to develop innovative educational materials and tools as technology advances, to attract more students to the Earth sciences.

  13. The electronics for the AMS-02 calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, F.; Di Falco, S.; Incagli, M.; Vannini, C.; Magazzù, C.; Pedreschi, E.; Piendibene, M.; Pilo, F.; Spinella, F.

    2007-03-01

    AMS-02 is an astroparticle experiment that will operate on board of the ISS for a period of about three years. The main scientific goals of the experiment are the search for antimatter and dark matter and the study of gamma rays. In AMS-02 the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) plays a key role for its high capability to measure e+, e- and gamma spectra and to discriminate electromagnetic showers from hadronic cascades [C. Adloff, et al., Performance of a 3D imaging electromagnetic calorimeter for the AMS02 space experiment, Proceedings of Calor 2004, Perugia, Italy. [1

  14. Latest AMS Results on Cosmic Ray fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, Bruna; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a wide acceptance high-energy physics experiment installed on the International Space Station in May 2011 and it has been operating continuously since then. Accurate studies of CR composition and energy spectra can be performed in AMS thanks to the unprecedented collected statistics - more than 90 billion events as of today - and the redundant measurements of particle charge, velocity, rigidity and energy. In this contribution we will present an overview of the latest results on anti-particles, electrons and light nuclei fluxes. On behalf of the AMS Collaboration.

  15. Study of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of U, Am, and Cm at n_TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, P. M.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becčvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2010-08-01

    Neutron induced fission cross sections of several isotopes have been measured at the CERN n_TOF spallation neutron facility. Between them some measurements involve isotopes (233U, 241Am, 243Am, 245Cm) relevant for applications to nuclear technologies. The n_TOF facility delivers neutrons with high instantaneous flux and in a wide energy range, from thermal up to 250 MeV. The experimental apparatus consists of an ionization chamber that discriminates fission fragments and α particles coming from natural radioactivity of the samples. All the measurements were performed referring to the standard cross section of 235U.

  16. Space Station Live: First Findings from the AMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    PAO Officer Kyle Herring interviews Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Project Manager Trent Martin about the first findings from the AMS. A small team from Johnson Space Center collaborates with AM...

  17. An accelerator facility for WDM, HEDP, and HIF investigations in Nazarbayev University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaikanov, M.; Baigarin, K.; Tikhonov, A.; Urazbayev, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Remnev, G.; Shubin, B.; Stepanov, A.; Shamanin, V.; Waldron, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nazarbayev University (NU) in Astana, Kazakhstan, is planning to build a new multi-MV, ∼10 to several hundred GW/cm2 ion accelerator facility which will be used in studies of material properties at extreme conditions relevant to ion-beam-driven inertial fusion energy, and other applications. Two design options have been considered. The first option is a 1.2 MV induction linac similar to the NDCX-II at LBNL, but with modifications, capable of heating a 1 mm spot size thin targets to a few eV temperature. The second option is a 2 - 3 MV, ∼200 kA, single-gap-diode proton accelerator powered by an inductive voltage adder. The high current proton beam can be focused to ∼1 cm spot size to obtain power densities of several hundred GW/cm2, capable of heating thick targets to temperatures of tens of eV. In both cases, a common requirement to achieving high beam intensity on target and pulse length compression is to utilize beam neutralization at the final stage of beam focusing. Initial experiments on pulsed ion beam neutralization have been carried out on a 0.3 MV, 1.5 GW single-gap ion accelerator at Tomsk Polytechnic University with the goal of creating a plasma region in front of a target at densities exceeding ∼1012 cm-3.

  18. Space Station Live: Installing the AMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    PAO Officer Kyle Herring interviews NASA astronaut Mike Fincke about his contribution during STS-134, the shuttle mission that installed the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) in May 2011. As a miss...

  19. AMS applied to Hiroshima and Chernobyl dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Marchetti, A.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    Two projects employing AMS are summarized and updated. One project employs AMS to measure {sup 36}Cl in concrete and other mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to help reconstruct neutron fluences received by the atom-bomb survivors. In this project, we have demonstrated a large discrepancy between the neutron activation measured in Hiroshima and predictions based on the current dosimetry system. This discrepancy has practical implications for radiation risk assessment and radiation protection standards. The other project employs AMS to measure {sup 129}I in soil and other environmental samples from Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. This is a proof-of-principle study to determine if the long lived {sup 129}I isotope (half life, 16 x 10{sup 6} y) measured by AMS can be used to reconstruct deposition of the short lived {sup 131}I isotope from the 1986 Chernobyl reactor accident. This is required because {sup 131}I disappeared before adequate measurements could be made.

  20. Challenge of COPD: Am I at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD Am I at Risk? Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... or the American Lung Association's COPD information section. COPD Learn More Breathe Better ® Program The COPD Learn ...

  1. Stomach Flu: How Long Am I Contagious?

    MedlinePlus

    ... long am I contagious if I have the stomach flu? Answers from James M. Steckelberg, M.D. You can ... more, depending on which virus is causing your stomach flu (gastroenteritis). A number of viruses can cause ...

  2. On the Light Curves of AM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smak, J.

    2017-03-01

    Light curves of AM CVn are analyzed by decomposing them into their Fourier components. The amplitudes of the fundamental mode and overtones of the three components: the superhumps, the negative superhumps and the orbital variations, are found to be variable. This implies that variations in the shape of the observed light curve of AM CVn are not only due to the interference between those components, but also due to the intrinsic variability within these components.

  3. The use of MOX caramel fuel mixed with (241)Am, (242m)Am and (243)Am as burnable absorber actinides for the MTR research reactors.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Ismail; Albarhoum, Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    The MOX (UO2&PuO2) caramel fuel mixed with (241)Am, (242m)Am and (243)Am as burnable absorber actinides was proposed as a fuel of the MTR-22MW reactor. The MCNP4C code was used to simulate the MTR-22MW reactor and estimate the criticality and the neutronic parameters, and the power peaking factors before and after replacing its original fuel (U3O8-Al) by the MOX caramel fuel mixed with (241)Am, (242m)Am and (243)Am actinides. The obtained results of the criticality, the neutronic parameters, and the power peaking factors for the MOX caramel fuel mixed with (241)Am, (242m)Am and (243)Am actinides were compared with the same parameters of the U3O8-Al original fuel and a maximum difference is -6.18% was found. Additionally, by recycling 2.65% and 2.71% plutonium and (241)Am, (242m)Am and (243)Am actinides in the MTR-22MW reactor, the level of (235)U enrichment is reduced from 4.48% to 3% and 2.8%, respectively. This also results in the reduction of the (235)U loading by 32.75% and 37.22% for the 2.65%, the 2.71% plutonium and (241)Am, (242m)Am and (243)Am actinides, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A&M. Aerial view of turntable and A&M building (TAN607). Pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Aerial view of turntable and A&M building (TAN-607). Pool, hot shop, cold shop, and machine shop are completed. Track leading to left edge of view goes to the IET. Ancient lake shoreline and berm beyond A&M building. Camera facing east. Administrative buildings beyond berm. Date: November 24, 1954. INEEL negative no. 13205 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Progress on 241Am Production for Use in Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S. R.; Bell, K. J.; Brown, J.; Carrigan, C.; Carrott, M. J.; Gregson, C.; Clough, M.; Maher, C. J.; Mason, C.; Rhodes, C. J.; Rice, T. G.; Sarsfield, M. J.; Stephenson, K.; Taylor, R. J.; Tinsley, T. P.; Woodhead, D. A.; Wiss, T.

    2014-08-01

    Electrical power sources used in outer planet missions are a key enabling technology for data acquisition and communications. Power sources generate electricity from the thermal energy from alpha decay of the radioisotope 238Pu via thermo-electric conversion. Production of 238Pu requires specialist facilities including a nuclear reactor and reprocessing plants that are expensive to build and operate, so naturally, a more economical alternative is attractive to the industry. Within Europe 241Am is a feasible alternative to 238Pu that can provide a heat source for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and radioisotope heating units (RHUs). As a daughter product of 241Pu decay, 241Am is present at 1000s kg levels within the UK civil plutonium stockpile.A chemical separation process is required to extract the 241Am in a pure form and this paper describes such a process, successfully developed to the proof of concept stage.

  6. Study on migration behaviour of 237Np and 241Am in near-surface environments.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tadao; Ya-Anant, Nanthavan

    2011-07-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to investigate migration behaviour of (237)Np and (241)Am, which were deposited onto the ground surface from spent fuel reprocessing facilities. Migration experiments by column method were conducted for a sandy soil and a reddish soil by varying the volume of eluting solution. There seemed to be two chemical species of (237)Np in the sandy soil column: one is cationic and the other is particulate form. The particulates moved without significant interaction with the sandy soil. The sorption of cationic (237)Np was controlled by both a reversible ion-exchange reaction and irreversible reactions. Most of (241)Am was formed into rather large particulates and trapped in the sandy soil column. The (237)Np and (241)Am loaded into the reddish soil column moved deeper with increasing eluting volume. The sorption was mainly controlled by ion-exchange reaction. The migration behaviour might be evaluated by the distribution coefficient.

  7. Detection limits of pollutants in water for PGNAA using Am Be source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelifi, R.; Amokrane, A.; Bode, P.

    2007-09-01

    A basic PGNAA facility with an Am-Be neutron source is described to analyze the pollutants in water. The properties of neutron flux were determined by MCNP calculations. In order to determine the efficiency curve of a HPGe detector, the prompt-gamma rays from chlorine were used and an exponential curve was fitted. The detection limits for typical water sample are also estimated using the statistical fluctuations of the background level in the areas of recorded the prompt-gamma spectrum.

  8. 33 CFR 103.300 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area Maritime Security (AMS... SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee § 103.300 Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee. (a) The AMS Committee is established under the...

  9. 30 CFR 285.107 - How do I show that I am qualified to be a lessee or grant holder?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I show that I am qualified to be a lessee or grant holder? 285.107 Section 285.107 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER...

  10. Subsurface stratigraphy and structure of A/M area at the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fallaw, W.C.; Sims, W.R.; Haselow, J.S.

    1991-08-01

    This report is a study of the stratigraphy and structure of the A/M Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Post-Closure Care Permit process on the Savannah River Site. The data from the lithologic and geophysical logs of 93 wells is the basis of this analysis.

  11. Subsurface stratigraphy and structure of A/M area at the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Fallaw, W.C.; Sims, W.R.; Haselow, J.S.

    1991-08-01

    This report is a study of the stratigraphy and structure of the A/M Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Post-Closure Care Permit process on the Savannah River Site. The data from the lithologic and geophysical logs of 93 wells is the basis of this analysis.

  12. Compact AMS System At Yamagata University

    SciTech Connect

    Tokanai, Fuyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Anshita, Minoru; Izumi, Akihiro; Sakurai, Hirohisa; Saito, Tsugio

    2011-06-01

    A new compact accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system has been installed in the Kaminoyama research institute at Yamagata University. The AMS system is based on a 0.5 MV Pelletron accelerator developed by National Electrostatics Corp. The performance of the system was investigated using C series samples (C1-C8), standard samples (HOxII), and reagent graphite without any chemical treatment. The precision of {sup 14}C measurements for the standard samples is typically higher than 0.3%. The ratio of {sup 14}C to {sup 12}C is less than 6x10{sup -16} for the reagent graphite. In this paper, we present the performance of the new compact AMS system, as well as of the fully automated 20-reactor graphite lines equipped at the research institute.

  13. Downgrading Nuclear Facilities to Radiological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Jeffrey F.; Farr, Jesse Oscar; Duran, Leroy

    2015-08-01

    Based on inventory reductions and the use of alternate storage facilities, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) downgraded 4 SNL Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) nuclear facilities to less-than-HC-3 radiological facilities. SNL’s Waste Management and Pollution Prevention Department (WMPPD) managed the HC-3 nuclear facilities and implemented the downgrade. This paper will examine the downgrade process,

  14. Absolute calibration of 10Be AMS standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Imamura, Mineo; Caffee, Marc W.; Southon, John R.; Finkel, Robert C.; McAninch, Jeffrey

    2007-05-01

    The increased detection sensitivity offered by AMS has dramatically expanded the utility of 10Be. As these applications become more sophisticated attention has focused on the accuracy of the 10Be standards used to calibrate the AMS measurements. In recent years it has become apparent that there is a discrepancy between two of the most widely used 10Be AMS standards, the ICN 10Be standard and the NIST 10Be standard. The ICN (ICN Chemical & Radioisotope Division) 10Be AMS standard was calibrated by radioactive decay counting. Dilutions, ranging from 5 × 10 -13 to 3 × 10 -1110Be/Be, have been prepared and are extensively used in many AMS laboratories. The NIST 10Be standard, prepared at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is calibrated by mass spectrometric isotope ratio measurements. To provide an independent calibration of the 10Be standards we implanted a known number of 10Be atoms in both Si detectors and Be foil targets. The 10Be concentrations in these targets were measured by AMS. The results were compared with both the ICN and NIST AMS standards. Our 10Be measurements indicate that the 10Be/ 9Be isotopic ratio of the ICN AMS standard, which is based on a 10Be half-life of 1.5 × 10 6 yr, is 1.106 ± 0.012 times lower than the nominal value. Since the decay rate of the ICN standard is well determined, the decrease in 10Be/ 9Be ratio requires that the 10Be half-life be reduced to (1.36 ± 0.07) × 10 6 yr. The quoted uncertainty includes a ±5% uncertainty in the activity measurement carried out by ICN. In a similar fashion, we determined that the value of the NIST 10Be standard (SRM4325) is (2.79 ± 0.03) × 10 -1110Be/ 9Be, within error of the certified value of (2.68 ± 0.14) × 10 -11. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) internal standards were also included in this study. We conclude that the 9Be(n, γ) neutron cross section is 7.8 ± 0.23 mb, without taking into account the uncertainty in the neutron irradiation.

  15. AMS-02 antiprotons: implications for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Using the updated proton and helium fluxes just released by the Ams-02 experiment we reevaluate the secondary astrophysical antiproton to proton ratio and its uncertainties, and compare it with the ratio preliminarly reported by AMS-02. We find no unambiguous evidence for a significant excess with respect to expectations. Yet, some preference for a flatter energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient (with respect to the Med benchmark often used in the literature) starts to emerge. Finally, we provide a first assessment of the room left for exotic components such as Galactic Dark Matter annihilation, deriving new stringent constraints.

  16. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  17. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  18. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  19. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  20. Pro-Am Collaboration and the AAVSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, A.

    2006-04-01

    Professionals need to be aware that there is a valuable resource available and waiting to be used -- the amateur astronomy community. We give some examples of how pro-am collaborations have worked in the past, indicate the advantages and disadvantages of such collaborations, and suggest methods by which a professional can find and work effectively with amateur astronomers.

  1. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  4. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  5. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  6. Breadboard Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  7. Chemical thermodynamic representation of AmO 2- x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiriet, C.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2003-08-01

    The AmO 2- x solid solution data set for the dependence of the oxygen potential on the composition, x, and temperature was retrieved from the literature and represented by a thermodynamic model. The data set was analysed by least-squares using equations derived from the classical thermodynamic theory for the solid solution of a solute in a solvent. Two representations of the AmO 2- x data were used, namely the Am 5/4O 2-AmO 2 and AmO 3/2-AmO 2 solid solution. No significant difference was found between the two, and the Am 5/4O 2-AmO 2 solution was preferred on the basis of the phase diagram. From the results the Gibbs energy of formation of Am 5/4O 2 has been derived.

  8. CAOS spectroscopy of Am stars Kepler targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, G.; Ripepi, V.; Biazzo, K.; Busá, I.; Frasca, A.; Leone, F.; Giarrusso, M.; Munari, M.; Scuderi, S.

    2015-07-01

    The Kepler space mission and its K2 extension provide photometric time series data with unprecedented accuracy. These data challenge our current understanding of the metallic-lined A stars (Am stars) for what concerns the onset of pulsations in their atmospheres. It turns out that the predictions of current diffusion models do not agree with observations. To understand this discrepancy, it is of crucial importance to obtain ground-based spectroscopic observations of Am stars in the Kepler and K2 fields in order to determine the best estimates of the stellar parameters. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of high-resolution spectroscopic data for seven stars previously classified as Am stars. We determine the effective temperatures, surface gravities, projected rotational velocities, microturbulent velocities and chemical abundances of these stars using spectral synthesis. These spectra were obtained with CAOS, a new instrument recently installed at the observing station of the Catania Astrophysical Observatory on Mt Etna. Three stars have already been observed during quarters Q0-Q17, namely: HD 180347, HD 181206 and HD 185658, while HD 43509 was already observed during K2 C0 campaign. We confirm that HD 43509 and HD 180347 are Am stars, while HD 52403, HD 50766, HD 58246, HD 181206 and HD 185658 are marginal Am stars. By means of non-LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) analysis, we derived oxygen abundances from O I λ7771-5 Å triplet and we also discussed the results obtained with both non-LTE and LTE approaches.

  9. Liposomal amphotericin B, AmBisome.

    PubMed

    Hay, R J

    1994-05-01

    The unilamellar liposomal formulation of amphotericin B, AmBisome, is composed of hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine, distearoyl phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol. Early studies of its efficacy in an open design showed that remissions could be induced in candidosis and aspergillosis and that doses of up to 5 mg/kg could be used. Adverse events were infrequent, with the main abnormality seen being hypokalaemia in about 18% of patients. Subsequent developments have extended this work. AmBisome has been used in two open studies of patients with invasive aspergillosis; in one of these remission was achieved in 77% of 17 patients with confirmed infection who had failed to respond to conventional amphotericin B. In AIDS patients with cryptococcosis AmBisome given for 6 weeks at 3 mg/kg daily produced mycological remission of meningitis in 67%. Other infections treated with the drug include zygomycete (mucormycosis) and Fusarium infections. AmBisome has also been used as preventative therapy in bone marrow transplant recipients and was found to reduce fungal colonisation rates. There were fewer systemic fungal infections in the treated versus placebo groups although this did not achieve statistical significance. Lack of renal and liver toxicity or anaemia has been confirmed in subsequent studies. In addition febrile reactions to the AmBisome are rare. The drug has also been used effectively in children, including infants, with systemic fungal infections. In visceral leishmaniasis patients, including HIV positive individuals, remissions have been obtained using drug regimens of 1-2 mg/kg of 2.1 days and 3 mg/kg for 10 days.

  10. Report on 240Am(n,x) surrogate cross section test measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ressler, J J; Burke, J T; Gostic, J; Bleuel, D; Escher, J E; Henderson, R A; Koglin, J; Reed, T; Scielzo, N D; Stoyer, M A

    2012-02-01

    The main goal of the test measurement was to determine the feasibility of the {sup 243}Am(p,t) reaction as a surrogate for {sup 240}Am(n,f). No data cross section data exists for neutron induced reactions on {sup 240}Am; the half-life of this isotope is only 2.1 days making direct measurements difficult, if not impossible. The 48-hour experiment was conducted using the STARS/LIBERACE experimental facility located at the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in August 2011. A description of the experiment and results is given. The beam energy was initially chosen to be 39 MeV in order to measure an equivalent neutron energy range from 0 to 20 MeV. However, the proton beam was not stopped in the farady cup and the beam was deposited in the surrounding shielding material. The shielding material was not conductive, and a beam current, needed for proper tuning of the beam as well as experimental monitoring, could not be read. If the {sup 240}Am(n,f) surrogate experiment is to be run at LBNL, simple modifications to the beam collection site will need to be made. The beam energy was reduced to 29 MeV, which was within an energy regime of prior experiments and tuning conditions at STARS/LIBERACE. At this energy, the beam current was successfully tuned and measured. At 29 MeV, data was collected with both the {sup 243}Am and {sup 238}U targets. An example particle identification plot is shown in Fig. 1. The triton-fission coincidence rate for the {sup 243}Am target and {sup 238}U target were measured. Coincidence rates of 0.0233(1) cps and 0.150(6) cps were observed for the {sup 243}Am and {sup 238}U targets, respectively. The difference in count rate is largely attributed to the available target material - the {sup 238}U target contains approximately 7 times more atoms than the {sup 243}Am. A proton beam current of {approx}0.7 nA was used for measurements on both targets. Assuming a full experimental run under similar conditions, an estimate for the

  11. Variations in AmLi source spectra and their estimation utilizing the 5 Ring Multiplicity Counter

    DOE PAGES

    Weinmann-Smith, Robert; Beddingfield, David H.; Enqvist, Andreas; ...

    2017-02-28

    Active-mode assay systems are widely used for the safeguards of uranium items to verify compliance with the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Systems such as the Active-Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL) use americium-lithium (AmLi) neutron sources to induce fissions which are measured to determine the sample mass. These systems have historically relied on calibrations derived from well-defined standards. Recently, restricted access to standards or more difficult measurements have resulted in a reliance on modeling and simulation for the calibration of systems, which introduces potential simulation biases. Furthermore, the AmLi source energy spectra commonly used in the safeguardsmore » community do not accurately represent measurement results and the spectrum uncertainty can represent a large contribution to the total modeling uncertainty in active-mode systems.« less

  12. Investigation of the 241Am(n ,2 n )240Am cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamara, A.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Diakaki, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Patronis, N.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2016-01-01

    The 241Am(n ,2 n )240Am reaction cross section has been measured at four energies, 10.0, 10.4, 10.8, and 17.1 MeV, by means of the activation technique, relative to the 27Al(n ,α )24Na reaction reference cross section. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 2H(d ,n )3He and the 3H(d ,n )4He reactions at the 5.5 MV Tandem T11/25 accelerator laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos". The high purity 241Am targets were provided by JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium. The induced γ -ray activity of 240Am was measured with high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Auxiliary Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the mcnp code. The present results are in agreement with data obtained earlier and predictions obtained with the empire code.

  13. A&M. TAN607. Elevation for secondphase expansion of A&M Building. Work ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Elevation for second-phase expansion of A&M Building. Work areas south of the Carpentry Shop. High-bay shop, decontamination room at south-most end. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. Ralph M. Parsons 1299-5-ANP/GE-3-607-A 106. Date: August 1956. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-00-693-107166 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. A&M. A&M building (TAN607). Camera facing east. From left to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. A&M building (TAN-607). Camera facing east. From left to right, pool section, hot shop, cold shop, and machine shop. Biparting doors to hot shop are in open position behind shroud. Four rail tracks lead to hot shop and cold shop. Date: August 20, 1954. INEEL negative no. 11706 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. 75 FR 15389 - No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Child Left Behind Act of 2001. DATES: The Committee's second meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on April 12... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR CHAPTER VI No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction... that the No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee...

  16. Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

  17. Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in plutonium analysis.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    The paper summarizes the results of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio studies in atmospheric fallout samples collected in 1986 over Gdynia (Poland) as well as three Baltic fish species collected in 1997 using the accelerator mass spectrometry. A new generation of AMS has been developed during last years and this method is an efficient and good technique to measure long-lived radioisotopes in the environment and provides the most accurate determination of the atomic ratios between (240)Pu and (239)Pu. The nuclide compositions of plutonium in filter samples correspond to their means of production. AMS measurements of atmospheric fallout collected in April showed sufficient increase of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio from 0.28 from March to 0.47. Also such high increase of (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, close to reactor core (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, was observed in September and equaled 0.47.

  19. Suppression of FM-to-AM modulation by polarizing fiber front end for high-power lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhi; Wang, Xiaochao; Fan, Wei; Li, Xuechun; Jiang, Youen; Li, Rao; Huang, Canhong; Lin, Zunqi

    2016-10-10

    FM-to-AM modulation is an important effect in the front end of high-power lasers that influences the temporal profile. Various methods have been implemented in standard-fiber and polarization-maintaining (PM)-fiber front ends to suppress the FM-to-AM modulation. To analyze the modulation in the front end, a theoretical model is established and detailed simulations carried out that show that the polarizing (PZ) fiber, whose fast axis has a large loss, can successfully suppress the modulation. Moreover, the stability of the FM-to-AM modulation can be improved, which is important for the front end to obtain a stable output. To verify the model, a PZ fiber front end is constructed experimentally. The FM-to-AM modulation, without any compensation, is less than 4%, whereas that of the PM fiber front end with the same structure is nearly 20%. The stability of the FM-to-AM modulation depth is analyzed experimentally and the peak-to-peak and standard deviation (SD) are 2% and 0.38%, respectively, over 3 h. The experimental results agree with the simulation results and both prove that the PZ fiber front end can successfully suppress the FM-to-AM conversion. The PZ fiber front end is a promising alternative for improving the performance of the front end in high-power laser facilities.

  20. Biocorrosion behavior of biodegradable nanocomposite fibers coated layer-by-layer on AM50 magnesium implant.

    PubMed

    Abdal-Hay, Abdalla; Hasan, Anwarul; Kim, Yu-Kyoung; Yu-Kyoung; Lee, Min-Ho; Hamdy, Abdel Salam; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of hybrid nanofibers to improve the biodegradation rate and biocompatibility of AM50 magnesium alloy. Biodegradable hybrid membrane fiber layers containing nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) particles and poly(lactide)(PLA) nanofibers were coated layer-by-layer (LbL) on AM50 coupons using a facile single-step air jet spinning (AJS) approach. The corrosion performance of coated and uncoated coupon samples was investigated by means of electrochemical measurements. The results showed that the AJS 3D membrane fiber layers, particularly the hybrid membrane layers containing a small amount of nHA (3 wt.%), induce a higher biocorrosion resistance and effectively decrease the initial degradation rate compared with the neat AM50 coupon samples. The adhesion strength improved highly due to the presence of nHA particles in the AJS layer. Furthermore, the long biodegradation rates of AM50 alloy in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were significantly controlled by the AJS-coatings. The results showed a higher cytocompatibility for AJS-coatings compared to that for neat Mg alloys. The nanostructured nHA embedded hybrid PLA nanofiber coating can therefore be a suitable coating material for Mg alloy as a potential material for biodegradable metallic orthopedic implants.

  1. Qualifying the Sunpower M87N Cryocooler for Operation in the AMS-02 Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustafi, Shuvo; Banks, Stuart; Shirey, Kim; Breon, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMs-02) experiment uses a superfluid helium dewar to cool a large superconducting magnet. The outer vapor-cooled shields of the dewar are to be held at 80 K by four Sunpower M87N cryocoolers. These cryocoolers have magnetic components that might interact with the external applied field generated by the superconducting magnet, thereby degrading the cryocoolers' performance. Engineering models of the Sunpower M87 have been qualified for operation in a magnetic environment similar to the AMs-02 magnetic environment. Although there was no noticeable performance degradation at field levels that were comparable to AMs-02 field levels, there appears to be a small performance degradation at higher field levels. It was theorized that there were three possible issues related to these performance losses at high magnetic fields: i) induced piston rubbing on the cylinder wall due to forces and torques on the linear motor due to the applied magnetic fields; ii) Magnetic hysteretic and/or eddy current damping of the balancer due to its motion in the applied magnetic fields; iii) Inductance losses in motor due to the applied magnetic field. The experiments conducted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) cyclotron facility in June 2002 were designed to test these. Tests were performed over a range of field levels that were lower, comparable, and higher than the field levels that the cryocoolers will experience in the AMs-02 operating environment. This paper describes the experiments and the inferences derived from them.

  2. AMS with light nuclei at small accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Enachescu, M.

    2017-06-01

    AMS applications with lighter nuclei are presented. It will be shown how Carbon-14, Boron-10, Beryllium-10, and Tritium-3 can be used to provide valuable information in forensic science, environmental physics, nuclear pollution, in material science and for diagnose of the plasma confinement in fusion reactors. Small accelerators are reliable, efficient and possess the highest ion beam transmissions that confer high precision in measurements.

  3. Signal Enhancement in AM-FM Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-17

    the short-time linear assumption, it provides a good test of the suppression algorithm. A 10-ms Hamming window, a 4-ms frame, and a 2048-point DFT...complex suppression with a different test signal consisting of the AM-FM interference added to an information signal generated from a closing stapler...1st The results of an informal listening test are also listed in Table 1, based on the judgment of interference reduction and clarity of the information

  4. Heat capacities and thermal conductivities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Akinori; Ichise, Kenichi; Arai, Yasuo

    2011-07-01

    The thermal diffusivity of AmO 2 was measured from 473 to 773 K and that of AmO 1.5 between 473 and 1373 K using a laser flash method. The enthalpy increment of AmO 2 was measured from 335 to 1081 K and that of AmO 1.5 between 335 and 1086 K using drop calorimetry. The heat capacities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5 were derived from the enthalpy increment measurements. The thermal conductivity was determined from the measured thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and bulk density. The heat capacities of AmO 2 was found larger than that of AmO 1.5. The thermal conductivities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5 were found to decrease with increasing temperature in the investigated temperature range. The thermal conductivity of AmO 1.5 with A -type hexagonal structure was smaller than that of AmO 2 with C-type fluorite structure but larger than that of sub-stoichiometric AmO 1.73.

  5. Binaries among AP and AM stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, P.; Ginestet, N.; Carquillat, J.-M.; Carrier, F.; Udry, S.

    1998-04-01

    The results of long-term surveys of radial velocities of cool Ap and Am stars are presented. There are two samples, one of about 100 Ap stars and the other of 86 Am stars. Both have been observed with the CORAVEL scanner from Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France. The conspicuous lack of short-period binaries among cool Ap stars seems confirmed, although this may be the result of an observational bias; one system has a period as short as 1.6 days. A dozen new orbits could be determined, including that of one SB2 system. Considering the mass functions of 68 binaries from the literature and from our work, we conclude that the distribution of the mass ratios is the same for the Bp-Ap stars than for normal G dwarfs. Among the Am stars, we found 52 binaries, i.e. 60%; an orbit could be computed for 29 of them. Among these 29, there are 7 SB2 systems, one triple and one quadruple system. The 21 stars with an apparently constant radial velocity may show up later as long-period binaries with a high eccentricity. The mass functions of the SB1 systems are compatible with cool main-sequence companions, also suggested by ongoing spectral observations.

  6. The unusual helium variable AM Canum Venaticorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provencal, J. L.; Winget, D. E.; Nather, R. E.; Robinson, E. L.; Solheim, J.-E.; Clemens, J. C.; Bradley, J. L.; Kleinman, S. J.; Kanaan, A.; Claver, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    The unusual variable star AM CVn has puzzled astronomers for over 40 years. This object, both a photometric and spectroscopic variable, is believed to contain a pair of hydrogen-deficient white dwarfs of extreme mass ratio, transferring material via an accretion disk. We examine the photometric properties of AM CVn, analyzing 289 hours of high-speed photometric data spanning 1976 to 1992. The power spectrum displays significant peaks at 988.7, 1248.8, 1902.5, 2853.8, 3805.2, 4756.5, and 5707.8 microHz (1011.4, 800.8, 525.6, 350.4, 262.8, 210.2, and 175.2 s). We find no detectable power at 951.3 microHz (1051 s), the previously reported main frequency. The 1902.5, 2853.9, and 3805.2 microHz peaks are multiplets, with frequency splitting in each case of 20.77 +/- 0.05 microHz. The 1902.5 microHz seasonal pulse shapes are identical, within measurement noise, and maintain the same amplitude and phase as a function of color. We have determined the dominant frequency to be 1902.50902 +/- 0.00001 microHz with dot P = +1.71 (+/- 0.04) x 10(exp -11) s/s. We discuss the implications of these findings on a model for AM CVn.

  7. Think Big: Leadership Projects for AMS and Montessori Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    2014-01-01

    The American Montessori Society's (AMS) 2014 Living Legacy recipient, John Chattin-McNichols, delivered the keynote address at the Annual Conference in Dallas, TX, on March 27, 2014, In his speech, he described three overall highlights of AMS: (1) AMS is now a world-leading organization; (2) It must become a learning organization; and (3)…

  8. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  9. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  10. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  11. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  12. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  13. 30 CFR 75.156 - AMS operator, qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false AMS operator, qualifications. 75.156 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Qualified and Certified Persons § 75.156 AMS operator, qualifications. (a) To be qualified as an AMS operator, a person shall be provided with...

  14. Challenges of Enterprise Wide AM for Air Force Sustainment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    that paradigm will take time and deliberate steps. AM designers will need to be creative , innovative and utilize a new design method- ology that will...ing the Air Force have the necessary AM foundational skills. AM designers will need to be creative , innovative, and utilize a new design methodology

  15. Think Big: Leadership Projects for AMS and Montessori Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    2014-01-01

    The American Montessori Society's (AMS) 2014 Living Legacy recipient, John Chattin-McNichols, delivered the keynote address at the Annual Conference in Dallas, TX, on March 27, 2014, In his speech, he described three overall highlights of AMS: (1) AMS is now a world-leading organization; (2) It must become a learning organization; and (3)…

  16. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  17. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  18. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  19. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  20. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  1. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  2. Accumulation, organ distribution, and excretion kinetics of ²⁴¹Am in Mayak Production Association workers.

    PubMed

    Suslova, Klara G; Sokolova, Alexandra B; Efimov, Alexander V; Miller, Scott C

    2013-03-01

    Americium-241 (²⁴¹Am) is the second most significant radiation hazard after ²³⁹Pu at some of the Mayak Production Association facilities. This study summarizes current data on the accumulation, distribution, and excretion of americium compared with plutonium in different organs from former Mayak PA workers. Americium and plutonium were measured in autopsy and bioassay samples and correlated with the presence or absence of chronic disease and with biological transportability of the aerosols encountered at different workplaces. The relative accumulation of ²⁴¹Am was found to be increasing in the workers over time. This is likely from ²⁴¹Pu that increases with time in reprocessed fuel and from the increased concentrations of ²⁴¹Am and ²⁴¹Pu in inhaled alpha-active aerosols. While differences were observed in lung retention with exposures to different industrial compounds with different transportabilities (i.e., dioxide and nitrates), there were no significant differences in lung retention between americium and plutonium within each transportability group. In the non-pulmonary organs, the highest ratios of ²⁴¹Am/²⁴¹Am + SPu were observed in the skeleton. The relative ratios of americium in the skeleton versus liver were significantly greater than for plutonium. The relative amounts of americium and plutonium found in the skeleton compared with the liver were even greater in workers with documented chronic liver diseases. Excretion rates of ²⁴¹Am in ‘‘healthy’’ workers were estimated using bioassay and autopsy data. The data suggest that impaired liver function leads to reduced hepatic ²⁴¹Am retention, leading to increased ²⁴¹Am excretion.

  3. The ionoluminescence apparatus at the LABEC external microbeam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calusi, S.; Colombo, E.; Giuntini, L.; Giudice, A. Lo; Manfredotti, C.; Massi, M.; Pratesi, G.; Vittone, E.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the main features of the ionoluminescence (IL) apparatus recently installed at the external scanning microbeam facility of the 3 MV Tandetron accelerator of the INFN LABEC Laboratory in Firenze. The peculiarity of this IL set-up resides in the fact that the light produced by the ion irradiation of the specimen is collected by a bifurcated optical fiber, so that photons are shunted both to a CCD spectrometer, working in the 200-900 nm wavelength range, and to a photomultiplier (PMT). The accurate focusing of the optical system allows high photon collection efficiency and this results in rapid acquisition of luminescence spectra with low ion currents on luminescent materials; simultaneously, luminescence maps with a spatial resolution of 10 μm can be acquired through the synchronization of PMT photon detection with the position of the scanning focused ion beam. An optical filter with a narrow passband facing the photomultiplier allows chromatic selectivity of the luminescence centres. The IL apparatus is synergistically integrated into the existing set-up for ion beam analyses (IBA). The upgraded system permits simultaneous IL and PIXE/PIGE/BS measurements. With our integrated system, we have been studying raw lapis lazuli samples of different known origins and precious lapis lazuli artworks of the Collezione Medicea of Museum of Natural History, University of Firenze, aiming at characterising their composition and provenance.

  4. A new salicylate synthase AmS is identified for siderophores biosynthesis in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T).

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Dai, Shengwang; Shen, Jinzhao; Ren, Biao; Huang, Pei; Wang, Qiushui; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Buchang; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-07-01

    Siderophores are important for the growth of bacteria or the applications in treatment of iron overload-associated diseases due to the iron-chelating property. Salicylate synthase played a key role in the biosynthesis of some NRPS-derived siderophores by the providing of an iron coordination moiety as the initial building block. A new salicylate synthase, namely AmS, was identified in the biosynthesis pathway of siderophore amychelin in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T), since it shunt chorismate, an integrant precursor, from primary to secondary metabolite flow. The amino acid sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that AmS grouped into a new cluster. In vitro assays of AmS revealed its wide temperature tolerance ranged from 0 to 40 °C and narrow pH tolerant ranged from 7.0 to 9.0. AmS was resistant to organic solvents and non-ionic detergents. Moreover, AmS converted chorismate to salicylate with K m of 129.05 μM, k cat of 2.20 min(-1) at optimal conditions, indicating its low substrate specificity and comparable velocity to reported counterparts (Irp9 and MbtI). These properties of AmS may improve the iron-seizing ability of A. methanolica to compete with its neighbors growing in natural environments. Most importantly, serine and cysteine residues were found to be important for the catalytic activity of AmS. This study presented AmS as a new cluster of salicylate synthase and the reaction mechanism and potential applications of salicylate synthase were highlighted as well.

  5. Development of an AMS method to study oceanic circulation characteristics using cosmogenic 39Ar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collon, P.H.; Bichler, M.; Caggiano, J.; Cecil, L.D.; El, Masri Y.; Golser, R.; Jiang, C.L.; Heinz, A.; Henderson, D.; Kutschera, W.; Lehmann, B.E.; Leleux, P.; Loosli, H.H.; Pardo, R.C.; Paul, M.; Rehm, K.E.; Schlosser, P.; Scott, R.H.; Smethie, W.M.; Vondrasek, R.

    2004-01-01

    Initial experiments at the ATLAS facility [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 92 (1994) 241] resulted in a clear detection of cosmogenic 39Ar signal at the natural level. The present paper summarizes the recent developments of 39Ar AMS measurements at ATLAS: the use of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) positive ion source equipped with a special quartz liner to reduce 39K background, the development of a gas handling system for small volume argon samples, the acceleration of 39Ar8+ ions to 232 MeV, and the final separation of 39Ar from 39K in a gas-filled spectrograph. The first successful AMS measurements of 39Ar in ocean water samples from the Southern Atlantic ventilation experiment (SAVE) are reported. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Report on fact finding visit to Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J. T.; Ressler, J. J.; Scielzo, N. D.

    2011-07-16

    I am actively investigating how to form a larger collaboration that will include Texas A&M as a key partner. The Institute currently has thousands of hours of beam time available for experiments per year. The facility is well staffed at the technical and engineering levels and hosts a large complement of undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral researchers. I have also discovered that the NNSA has a matching program to help foster University-LLNL partnerships. There is currently up to $125k of matching funds available at LLNL available for collaborative research. A Texas A&M-LLNL collaboration would allow us to build a strong pipeline of students and researchers into the NNSA laboratories. We would also be able to have multiple students, post-docs and researchers involved and potentially lead some of the many experiments we need done to perform for our research programs.

  7. AMS at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Ivascu, M.; Plostinaru, D.; Catana, D.; Marinescu, L.; Radulescu, M.; Nolte, E.

    2000-10-01

    A new beam line and injector deck for AMS measurements have been built at the 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucharest, Romania. The main components on the low-energy side are a high-current cesium sputter source, a 90° injection magnet and a pre-acceleration stage. At the high-energy side the beam line is achromatic, consisting of two 90° analysing magnets with mass energy product 120 MeV amu and a gas-filled ionization chamber. The system will be complete with a Wien filter and a multi-anode gas detector with time-of-flight discrimination. Presently, the AMS facility is undergoing tests and routine measurements are expected to start soon.

  8. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurement of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV En 20 MeV at nTOF at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P. F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P. A.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cerutti, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Koehler, Paul; The n_TOF Collaboration,

    2012-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements of 233U, 243Am and 241Am relative to 235U have been carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF at CERN. A fast ionization chamber has been employed. All samples were located in the same detector; therefore the studied elements and the reference 235U target are subject to the same neutron beam.

  9. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct postmarket...

  10. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct postmarket...

  11. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct postmarket...

  12. Rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 12.7-mm (1/2-in.) dia was determined in five-ball fatigue testers. The 10% life with the warm headed AMS 5900 balls was equivalent to that of AMS 5749 and over eight times that of AISI M-50. The AMS balls fabricated by cold heading had small surface cracks which initiated fatigue spalls where these cracks were crossed by running tracks. The cold-headed AMS 5900 balls had a 10% fatigue life an order of magnitude less than that of the warm headed balls even when failures on the cold headed balls at visible surface cracks were omitted.

  13. Plum Brook facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozar, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Research Facility (B-2); the Hydrogen Heat Transfer Facility (HHTF); the Rocket Dynamics and Control Facility (B-3); the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Site (K-Site); and the Space Power Facility (SPF).

  14. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  15. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  16. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  17. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  18. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  19. How to convert biological carbon into graphite for AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Getachew, G; Kim, S; Burri, B J; Kelly, P B; Haack, K W; Ognibene, T J; Buchholz, B A; Vogel, J S; Modrow, J; Clifford, A J

    2006-07-27

    Isotope tracer studies, particularly radiocarbon measurements, play a key role in biological, nutritional, and environmental research. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is now the most sensitive detection method for radiocarbon, but AMS is not widely used in kinetic studies of humans. Part of the reason is the expense, but costs would decrease if AMS were used more widely. One component in the cost is sample preparation for AMS. Biological and environmental samples are commonly reduced to graphite before they are analyzed by AMS. Improvements and mechanization of this multi-step procedure is slowed by a lack of organized educational materials for AMS sample preparation that would allow new investigators to work with the technique without a substantial outlay of time and effort. We present a detailed sample preparation protocol for graphitizing biological samples for AMS and include examples of nutrition studies that have used this procedure.

  20. A Summary of The 2000-2001 NASA Glenn Lear Jet AM0 Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David; Brinker, David; Snyder, David; Baraona, Cosmo; Jenkins, Phillip; Rieke, William J.; Blankenship, Kurt S.; Tom, Ellen M.

    2002-01-01

    Calibration of solar cells for space is extremely important for satellite power system design. Accurate prediction of solar cell performance is critical to solar array sizing, often required to be within 1%. The NASA Glenn Research Center solar cell calibration airplane facility has been in operation since 1963 with 531 flights to date. The calibration includes real data to Air Mass (AM) 0.2 and uses the Langley plot method plus an ozone correction factor to extrapolate to AM0. Comparison of the AM0 calibration data indicates that there is good correlation with Balloon and Shuttle flown solar cells. This paper will present a history of the airplane calibration procedure, flying considerations, and a brief summary of the previous flying season with some measurement results. This past flying season had a record 35 flights. It will also discuss efforts to more clearly define the ozone correction factor.

  1. Capture Cross-section Measurement of 241Am(n,γ) at J-PARC/MLF/ANNRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, H.; Ohta, M.; Kimura, A.; Furutaka, K.; Hirose, K.; Hara, K. Y.; Kin, T.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Nakamura, S.; Oshima, M.; Toh, Y.; Igashira, M.; Katabuchi, T.; Mizumoto, M.; Kino, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Fujii, T.; Fukutani, S.; Hori, J.; Takamiya, K.

    2014-05-01

    The 241Am(n, γ) 242Am cross sections have been measured for neutron energies between 0.01 and 10 eV using the Accurate Neutron-Nucleus Reaction measurement Instrument (ANNRI) installed at the Materials and Life-science experimental Facility (MLF) in J-PARC. ANNRI combines the strongest neutron-pulsed beam and a high energy resolution γ-ray spectrometer, making possible accurate measurements of neutron capture cross sections for highly radioactive samples. From the measured cross section, the Westcott neutron capture factor and strength of the first three resonances in 241Am are deduced. These results with precision less than 0.5 % are compared with those derived from JENDL-4.0.

  2. Educational Opportunities in Pro-Am Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, R. T.; Stencel, R. E.

    2006-08-01

    While many backyard stargazers take up the hobby just for fun, many others are attracted to it because of their keen interest in learning more about the universe. The best way to learn science is to do science. Happily, the technology available to today's amateur astronomers — including computer-controlled telescopes, CCD cameras, powerful astronomical software, and the Internet — gives them the potential to make real contributions to scientific research and to help support local educational objectives. Meanwhile, professional astronomers are losing access to small telescopes as funding is shifted to larger projects, including survey programs that will soon discover countless interesting objects needing follow-up observations. Clearly the field is ripe with opportunities for amateurs, professionals, and educators to collaborate. Amateurs will benefit from mentoring by expert professionals, pros will benefit from observations and data processing by increasingly knowledgeable amateurs, and educators will benefit from a larger pool of skilled talent to help them carry out astronomy-education initiatives. We will look at some successful pro-am collaborations that have already borne fruit and examine areas where the need and/or potential for new partnerships is especially large. In keeping with the theme of this special session, we will focus on how pro-am collaborations in astronomy can contribute to science education both inside and outside the classroom, not only for students of school age but also for adults who may not have enjoyed particularly good science education when they were younger. Because nighttime observations with sophisticated equipment are not always possible in formal educational settings, we will also mention other types of pro-am partnerships, including those involving remote observing, data mining, and/or distributed computing.

  3. New Ultraviolet Observations of AM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Richard A.; Eracleous, Michael; Flohic, Hélène M. L. G.

    2007-11-01

    We have obtained observations of the ultraviolet spectrum of AM CVn, an ultrashort-period helium cataclysmic variable, using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We obtained data in time-tag mode during two consecutive orbits of HST, covering 1600-3150 and 1140-1710 Å, respectively. The mean spectrum is approximately flat in fν. The absorption profiles of the strong lines of N V, Si IV, C IV, He II, and N IV are blueshifted and in some cases asymmetric, evidencing a wind that is partly occulted by the accretion disk. There is weak redshifted emission from N V and He II. The profiles of these lines vary mildly with time. The light curve shows a decline of ~20% over the span of the observations. There is also flickering and a 27 s (or 54 s) "dwarf nova oscillation," revealed in a power-spectrum analysis. The amplitude of this oscillation is larger at shorter wavelengths. We assemble and illustrate the spectral energy distribution of AM CVn from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. Modeling the accretion phenomenon in this binary system can in principle lead to a robust estimate of the mass accretion rate on to the central white dwarf, which is of great interest in characterizing the evolutionary history of the binary system. Inferences about the mass accretion rate depend strongly on the local radiative properties of the disk, as we illustrate. Uncertainty in the distance of AM CVn and other parameters of the binary system currently limit the ability to confidently infer the mass accretion rate. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 8159.

  4. Performances of the AMS-02 Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Coignet, G.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Kossakowski, R.; Lees-Rosier, S.; Pochon, J.; Vialle, J. P.; Cervelli, F.; di Falco, S.; Galeotti, S.; Incagli, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Spinella, F.; Venanzoni, G.; Falchini, E.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Paoletti, R.; Pilo, F.; Turini, N.; Valle, G.; Bolmont, J.; Jacholkowska, A.; Piron, F.; Sapinski, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Lu, Y.; Yang, C.

    2004-07-01

    A 3D imaging electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) made of scintillating fibers embedded in lead has been developed for the AMS-02 experiment to be installed on the International Space Station. A full scale ECAL prototype, partially instrumented, was tested in July 2002 in a beam at CERN. Several million events were recorded using muon, electron, proton, and antiproton beams, from which the ECAL behavior was determined. Results on the measurement of the ECAL parameters and performances are presented : radiation length, linearity, energy and angular resolutions, e/p separation.

  5. The AMS experiment: Results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, B.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment operates since May 2011 on board of the International Space Station to search for primordial anti-matter, to study the light anti-matter components in the Cosmic Rays (CR) and to perform a precision study of the CR composition and energy spectrum. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument up to now thanks to its large acceptance and the long exposure time. In this contribution we will discuss the most recent results, reviewing the instrument design and performances as well as the data analysis procedures enabling their achievement.

  6. Antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties of PGLa-AM1, CPF-AM1, and magainin-AM1: potent activity against oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    McLean, Denise T F; McCrudden, Maelíosa T C; Linden, Gerard J; Irwin, Christopher R; Conlon, J Michael; Lundy, Fionnuala T

    2014-11-01

    Cationic amphipathic α-helical peptides are intensively studied classes of host defence peptides (HDPs). Three peptides, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa-AM1), caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF-AM1) and magainin-AM1, originally isolated from norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of the African volcano frog Xenopus amieti (Pipidae), were studied for their antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities against oral and respiratory pathogens. Minimal effective concentrations (MECs), determined by radial diffusion assay, were generally lower than minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by microbroth dilution. PGLa-AM1 and CPF-AM1 were particularly active against Streptococcus mutans and all three peptides were effective against Fusobacterium nucleatum, whereas Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans proved to be relatively resistant micro-organisms. A type strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be more susceptible than the clinical isolate studied. PGLa-AM1 displayed the greatest propensity to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli, P. aeruginosa and Porphyromonas gingivalis. All three peptides showed less binding to P. gingivalis LPS than to LPS from the other species studied. Oral fibroblast viability was unaffected by 50 μM peptide treatments. Production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by oral fibroblasts was significantly increased following treatment with 1 or 10 μM magainin-AM1 but not following treatment with PGLa-AM1 or CPF-AM1. In conclusion, as well as possessing potent antimicrobial actions, the X. amieti peptides bound to LPS from three human pathogens and had no effect on oral fibroblast viability. CPF-AM1 and PGLa-AM1 show promise as templates for the design of novel analogues for the treatment of oral and dental diseases associated with bacteria or fungi.

  7. Recent developments of ion beam induced luminescence at the external scanning microbeam facility of the LABEC laboratory in Florence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, E.; Calusi, S.; Cossio, R.; Giuntini, L.; Giudice, A. Lo; Mandò, P. A.; Manfredotti, C.; Massi, M.; Mirto, F. A.; Vittone, E.

    2008-04-01

    A new ionoluminescence (IL) apparatus has been successfully installed at the external scanning microbeam facility of the 3 MV Tandetron accelerator of the INFN LABEC in Firenze; the apparatus for photon detection has been fully integrated in the existing ion beam analysis (IBA) set-up, for the simultaneous acquisition of IL and PIXE/PIGE/BS spectra and maps. The potential of the new set-up is illustrated in this paper by some results extracted by the analysis of art objects and advanced semiconductor materials. In particular, the adequacy of the new IBA set-up in the field of cultural heritage is pointed out by the coupled PIXE/IL micro-analysis of a lapis lazuli stone; concerning applications in material science, IL spectra from a N doped diamond sample were acquired and compared with CL analyses to evaluate the relevant sensitivities and the effect of ion damage.

  8. Calibration of a new experimental chamber for PIXE analysis at the Accelerator Facilities Division of Atomic Energy Centre Dhaka (AECD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md. Taufique; Shariff, Md. Asad; Hossein, Amzad; Abedin, Md. Joynal; Fazlul Hoque, A. K. M.; Chowdhuri, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    A new experimental chamber has been installed at the 3 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator Facilities Division in the Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka, to perform different Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques. The calibration of this new setup for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique has been done using a set of thin MicroMatter standards and GUPIX (PIXE spectrum analysis software), which is explicated in this paper. The effective thicknesses of the beryllium window of the X-ray detector and of the different absorbers used were determined. For standardization, the so called instrumental constant H (product of detector solid angle and the correction factor for the setup) as function of X-ray energy were determined and stored inside the GUPIX library for further PIXE analysis.

  9. AMS-graphite target production methods at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution during 1986-1991

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, A.R.; Jones, G.A. . Geology and Geophysics Dept.)

    1993-01-01

    In July 1986, an AMS radiocarbon target preparation laboratory was established at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst. to produce graphite to be analyzed at the NSF-Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Analysis at the Univ. of Arizona (Tucson). By June 1991, 923 graphite targets had been prepared and 847 analyzed. The lab procedures during this time included the careful documentation of weights of all starting samples, catalysts and final graphite yields, as well as the volume of CO[sub 2] gas evolved during CaCO[sub 3] hydrolysis or closed-tube organic carbon combustions. From these data, the authors evaluate the methods used in general and in this lab.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hidden population of AM CVns in the SDSS (Carter+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, P. J.; Marsh, T. R.; Steeghs, D.; Groot, P. J.; Nelemans, G.; Levitan, D.; Rau, A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Kupfer, T.; Roelofs, G. H. A.

    2012-11-01

    Catalogue of the 1947 AM CVn binary candidates selected from SDSS Data Release 7 (York+, 2000AJ....120.1579Y; Abazajian+, 2009ApJS..182..543A) based on their photometric colours (Roelofs+, 2009MNRAS.394..367R), together with FUV and NUV magnitudes obtained from a cross-match with GALEX (Martin+, 2005ApJ...619L...1M). Identification spectra of the observed candidates cover wavelength range ~4000-7000Å, and were obtained at various facilities. Spectra are supplied with relative flux calibration or normalised flux. Classifications are based on our spectroscopy, or spectra from subsequent SDSS data releases. (3 data files).

  11. SIRIUS - A new 6 MV accelerator system for IBA and AMS at ANSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuovic, Zeljko; Button, David; Cohen, David; Fink, David; Garton, David; Hotchkis, Michael; Ionescu, Mihail; Long, Shane; Levchenko, Vladimir; Mann, Michael; Siegele, Rainer; Smith, Andrew; Wilcken, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science (CAS) facility at ANSTO has been expanded with a new 6 MV tandem accelerator system supplied by the National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC). The beamlines, end-stations and data acquisition software for the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were custom built by NEC for rare isotope mass spectrometry, while the beamlines with end-stations for the ion beam analysis (IBA) are largely custom designed at ANSTO. An overview of the 6 MV system and its performance during testing and commissioning phase is given with emphasis on the IBA end-stations and their applications for materials modification and characterisation.

  12. Internal gastargets in AmPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaan, A. P.; Postma, O.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van Leeuwen, E.; Doets, M.; Kraan, M.

    1997-05-01

    Internal gas targets in AmPS A.P. Kaan, O. Postma, J.F.J. van den Brand, E. van Leeuwen, M. Doets, M. Kra= an National Institute for Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics; Kruislaan 409; 1098 SJ Amsterdam; Holland In the Amsterdam Puls Stretcher/storage ring AmPS(1 GeV electrons), we designed a set-up in order to accommodate a gas target with a density of 1016 mol/cm2. The storage cell needed for this purpose is a aluminium tube with a length of 40 cm, a diameter of 15 mm and a wall thickness of 25 =B5m. Three sets of conductance limiters on both sides of the target, combined with dry turbopumps are designed to be used as differential pumping stations. These limiters cause discontinuities in the beam path and must therefor be retractable and radio frequency compatible in both positions. Low =B5 materials must be used because of the depolarisation effects of changing magnetic fields. The calculations show that the flow resistance's are sufficient to reduce the load of the getter pumps to a level with which the lifetime of the pump elements remain acceptable. The design of the mechanics and the vacuum system will be explained. Recent results from the measurements after installation in combination with the influence on the lifetime on the beam will be presented

  13. ORFEUS and EUVE observations of AM herculis

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.; Paerels, F.B.S.; Raymond, J.C.

    1995-04-06

    Far-UV spectra of AM Her in a high optical state were obtained in 1993 September with the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) spectrometer aboard the ORFEUS telescope. The UCB spectrometer has a spectral resolution {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} 3000 and covers the 390-1170 {Angstrom} bandpass, but interstellar absorption leaves no detectable -flux below the Lyman limit. Spectra of AM Her were acquired during the intervals 04:19:40-04:36:26 UT on September 16 and 08:34:03-09:09:06 UT on September 17 of 1993. The corresponding magnetic phases are 0.75-0.84 and 0.88-1.07 according to the linear polarization ephemeris of S. Tapia. The main spectral features are the 0 VI doublet, C III {lambda}977, and He II {lambda}1085 (Balmer {gamma}). The bright C III {lambda}1176 multiplet, which is detected by IUE, is at the very end of the spectrum. At the full spectral resolution of the instrument, the 0 VI doublet shows broad and narrow components similar to that of the optical emission lines. The intensity ratio of the narrow component of the 0 VI doublet is {approximately} 1.3:1, much closer to the optically thick limit of 1:1 than the optically thin ratio of 2:1.

  14. Design of a synchronization system for the “Gamma-4” electrophysical facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, A. V.; Glushkov, S. L.; Mironychev, B. P.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Kozachek, A. V.; Martynov, V. M.; Turutin, V. V.; Sokolov, V. V.; Kul'Dushov, D. A.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shikhanova, T. F.

    2014-08-01

    At RFNC-VNIIEF on the basis of a “Gamma-1” high-current pulsed accelerator there is being developed a four-module “Gamma-4” electrophysical facility. A synchronization system of the "Gamma-4" facility is meant for a simultaneous (with precision not worse than ±3 ns) triggering of high-volt gas-filled trigatron type switches of modules' pulse forming systems (144 items, operating voltage ≤ 1 MV), modules' pre-pulse switches (24 items, ≤ 3 MV) and 8 Marx generators (40 items, ≤ 100 kV). The synchronization system comprises 54 pulse generators, involving 25 generators on the basis of water insulated forming lines with distributed parameters and multi-channel gas-filled switches. On matched cable loads with resistances 0.45 Ohm these generators form voltage pulses with amplitudes 100 kV with durations 25 ns. A jitter of switches of these generators does not exceed ± 2 ns. To raise the amplitude of pulse drivers of pulse forming system switches and pre-pulse switches of modules in the facility synchronization system there are used step-up transformers based on pulsed high-voltage cables.

  15. Structural geology, petrofabrics and magnetic fabrics (AMS, AARM, AIRM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Jackson, Mike

    2010-10-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was recognized as a feature of minerals in 1899, and petrofabric-compatible AMS fabrics were reported from 1942-1958. Shortly thereafter, cleavage and mineral lineation were associated with the principal axes of the AMS ellipsoid. AMS is describable by a magnitude ellipsoid, somewhat similar in concept to the finite strain ellipsoid, with principal susceptibilities (κ MAX, κ INT, κ MIN) as its axes and their average value being the mean susceptibility (κ). Orientations of the AMS axes usually have a reasonably straightforward structural significance but their magnitudes are more difficult to interpret, being the result of mineral abundances and different mineral-AMS. The strain ellipsoid is dimensionless (i.e., of unit-volume) and readily compared from one outcrop to another but the AMS ellipsoid represents the anisotropy of a physical property. Thus, (κ) determines the relative importance of AMS for different specimens, or compared outcrops, or component AMS subfabrics. AMS provides a petrofabric tool, unlike any other, averaging and sampling the orientation-distribution of all minerals and all subfabrics in a specimen. Sophisticated laboratory techniques may isolate the AMS contributions of certain minerals from one another, and of certain subfabrics (e.g. depositional from tectonic). However, suitable data processing of the basic AMS measurements (κ MAX, κ INT, κ MIN magnitudes and orientations, and the mean susceptibility, κ) may provide the same information. Thus, AMS provides the structural geologist with a unique tool that may isolate the orientations of subfabrics of different origins (sedimentary, tectonic, tectonic overprints etc.).

  16. Amiloride (Am) dissociates human neutrophil (N) activation events

    SciTech Connect

    Berkow, R.L.; Dodson, R.; Kraft, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human N can be stimulated to release granule contents and superoxide anion (O/sub 2/sup -//). These events are associated with an Am sensitive Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange and N alkalinization. Am has been reported to inhibit protein kinase C (PKC) in HL-60 cells. Due to the central role of PKC in N activation they assessed the effect of prolonged exposure of N to Am. When N were treated with 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -3/M Am at 37/sup 0/C for 15 min a dose dependent inhibition of O/sub 2/sup -// release was seen upon N stimulation with FMLP (10/sup -6/M), A23187 (10/sup -5/M), or serum treated Zymosan (Z) (2.5 mg/ml). Maximal inhibition depended on the time of exposure of N to Am prior to stimulation and remained after removal of Am by washing. N treated with 10/sup -3/M Am had a decreased influx of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ upon stimulation with FMLP. Phorbol myristate acetate induced release of N O/sub 2/sup -// was unaffected by pretreatment with Am. Similarly, Am did not inhibit stimulated N lysozyme release or the incorporation of /sup 32/P into proteins. Monensin (a Na/sup +//H/sup +/ ionophore) did not correct the Am induced inhibition of O/sub 2/sup -// suggesting that cell acidification alone can not explain the Am effect. In conclusion: (1) Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchange modulates N O/sub 2/sup -// release upon stimulation with FMLP, A23187, and Z. PMA induced N responses are not affected by cell acidification; (2) N granule release is under separate cellular control than O/sub 2/sup -//; (3) Am does not inhibit PKC or protein phosphorylation in N; and (4) decreased /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ influx may partially explain the Am effect on FMLP induced O/sub 2/sup -// release.

  17. Progress in AMS measurements at the LLNL spectrometer. [Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J.R.; Vogel, J.S.; Trumbore, S.E.; Davis, J.C.; Roberts, M.L.; Caffee, M.; Finkel, R.; Proctor, I.D.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Berno, A.J.; Hornady, R.S.

    1991-06-01

    The AMS measurement program at LLNL began in earnest in late 1989, and has initially concentrated on {sup 14}C measurements for biomedical and geoscience applications. We have now begun measurements on {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl, are presently testing the spectrometer performance for {sup 26}Al and {sup 3}H, and will begin tests on {sup 7}Be, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 129}I within the next few months. Our laboratory has a strong biomedical AMS program of {sup 14}C tracer measurements involving large numbers of samples (sometimes hundreds in a single experiment) at {sup 14}C concentrations which are typically .5--5 times Modern, but are occasionally highly enriched. The sample preparation techniques required for high throughput and low cross-contamination for this work are discussed elsewhere. Similar demands are placed on the AMS measurement system, and in particular on the ion source. Modifications to our GIC 846 ion source, described below, allow us to run biomedical and geoscience or archaeological samples in the same source wheel with no adverse effects. The source has a capacity for 60 samples (about 45 unknown) in a single wheel and provides currents of 30--60{mu}A of C{sup {minus}} from hydrogen-reduced graphite. These currents and sample capacity provide high throughput for both biomedical and other measurements: the AMS system can be started up, tuned, and a wheel of carbon samples measured to 1--1.5% in under a day; and 2 biomedical wheels can be measured per day without difficulty. We report on the present status of the Lawrence Livermore AMS spectrometer, including sample throughput and progress towards routine 1% measurement capability for {sup 14}C, first results on other isotopes, and experience with a multi-sample high intensity ion source. 5 refs.

  18. Preparation of a multi-isotope plutonium AMS standard and preliminary results of a first inter-lab comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, B.-A.; Dunai, T. J.; Dewald, A.; Heinze, S.; Feuerstein, C.; Strub, E.; Fifield, L. K.; Froehlich, M. B.; Tims, S. G.; Wallner, A.; Christl, M.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation of this work is to establish a new multi-isotope plutonium standard for isotopic ratio measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), since stocks of existing solutions are declining. To this end, certified reference materials (CRMs) of each of the individual isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, 242Pu and 244Pu were obtained from JRC IRMM (Joint Research Center Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements). These certified reference materials (IRMM-081a, IRMM-083, IRMM-043 and IRMM-042a) were diluted with nitric acid and mixed to obtain a stock standard solution with an isotopic ratio of approximately 1.0:1.0:1.0:0.1 (239Pu:240Pu:242Pu:244Pu). From this stock solution, samples were prepared for measurement of the plutonium isotopic composition by AMS. These samples have been measured in a round-robin exercise between the AMS facilities at CologneAMS, at the ANU Canberra and ETH Zurich to verify the isotopic ratio and to demonstrate the reproducibility of the measurements. The results show good agreement both between the different AMS measurements and with the gravimetrically determined nominal ratios.

  19. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  20. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis drops to the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  1. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis approaches the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  2. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A fire rescue truck stands by for safety reasons as Space Shuttle Atlantis slows to a stop on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  3. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis stirs up dust as it touches down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  4. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Its shadow precedes it as Space Shuttle Atlantis drops to the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  5. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis casts a needle-shaped shadow as it drops to the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  6. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis kicks up dust as it touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  7. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis approaches the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  8. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Its drag chute deployed, Space Shuttle Atlantis slows to a stop after touchdown on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  9. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is close to touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  10. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis drops to the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  11. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A fire rescue truck stands by for safety reasons as Space Shuttle Atlantis slows to a stop on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  12. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis casts a needle-shaped shadow as it drops to the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  13. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis approaches the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  14. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis kicks up dust as it touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  15. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis approaches the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  16. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis stirs up dust as it touches down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  17. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Its drag chute deployed, Space Shuttle Atlantis slows to a stop after touchdown on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  18. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Its shadow precedes it as Space Shuttle Atlantis drops to the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program. .

  19. STS-112 Atlantis landing at KSC's shuttle landing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis is close to touchdown at the Shuttle Landing Facility, completing the 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. The returning crew of Atlantis are Commander Jeffrey Ashby, Pilot Pamela Melroy, and Mission Specialists David Wolf, Piers Sellers, Sandra Magnus and Fyodor Yurchikhin. This landing is the 60th at KSC in the history of the Shuttle program.

  20. Designing Medical Facilities to Care for Patients with Highly Hazardous Communicable Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-14

    Schieffelin JS, Rubinson L, O’Dempsey T , Donovan SM, Bausch DG, Fowler RA, Fletcher TE. Being ready to treat Ebola virus disease patients. Am J Trop Med...Healthcare Facilities MARK G KORTEPETER MD, MPH1,2 ELENA H KWON, DO, MPH3 THEODORE J CIESLAK, MD1 1Department of Epidemiology University of...the Ebola outbreak.30,31,32 [REFs: Lowe - Am J Infect Control x 2] [REF - Jelden AmJInfectControl] In the old “slammer” model, this was not an issue

  1. 21 CFR 803.40 - If I am an importer, what kinds of individual adverse event reports must I submit, when must I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING Importer Reporting Requirements § 803.40 If I am an... facilities, individuals, or medical or scientific literature, whether published or unpublished, that reasonably suggests that one of your marketed devices may have caused or contributed to a death or...

  2. 21 CFR 803.40 - If I am an importer, what kinds of individual adverse event reports must I submit, when must I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING Importer Reporting Requirements § 803.40 If I am an... facilities, individuals, or medical or scientific literature, whether published or unpublished, that reasonably suggests that one of your marketed devices may have caused or contributed to a death or...

  3. Evaluation of Am-Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with (α, n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured and theoretical spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. The singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis, being dominated by scattering which is highly dependent on item placement.

  4. Pro-Am Collaboration for Support of NASA Comet ISON Observing Campaign (CIOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Warner, E.

    2013-09-01

    From the initial discovery of C/2012 S1 (ISON) by Russian amateur astronomers in September 2012 [1] to the present day, amateur astronomers provide valuable resources of global coverage, data, and legacy knowledge to the professional community. The NASA Comet ISON Observing Campaign (CIOC) has leveraged professional-amateur collaborations via web and social media as part of its mission to facilitate a multi-spectral and multi-facility observation campaign that includes an armada of NASA's ground-based facilities, orbital observatories, and spacecraft. One of the most important goals of these pro-am collaborations is the monitoring of the morphological, photometric, and activity-related evolution of the comet.

  5. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  6. Facility safety study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

  7. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program Consumer Information (MQSA) Search for a Certified Facility Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on Search ...

  8. Spacelab Data Processing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the Spacelab Data Processing Facility (SPDPF) are highlighted. The capturing, quality monitoring, processing, accounting, and forwarding of vital Spacelab data to various user facilities around the world are described.

  9. Biological AMS at Uppsala University: Status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2010-04-01

    In January 2007 a new research program was initiated at Uppsala University focusing on the biological applications of AMS. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron Tandem accelerator to study biological samples. With Microdosing applications in mind, a variety of measurements have been performed on human blood, plasma and urine that have been labeled with a 14C-labeled pharmaceutical drug covering a concentration range, spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, by studying small sample amounts and low concentrations, we have demonstrated sensitivity in the hundred zeptomole range for a small pharmaceutical substance in human blood. Another application of interest, based on the enhanced 14C activity from the cold war bomb-peak, is dating of DNA molecules providing fundamental data for the regenerative medicine and stem cell research community. We show data on a sensitive carrier method for measuring the isotopic ratio of small biological sample in the few μgC range.

  10. HR8844: a new hot Am star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Royer, F.

    2016-12-01

    Using one archival high dispersion high quality spectrum of HR8844 (A0V) obtained with the echelle spectrograph SOPHIE at Observatoire de Haute Provence, we show that this star is not a superficially normal A0V star as hitherto thought. The model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis modeling of the spectrum of HR8844 reveals large departures of its abundances from the solar composition. We report here on our first determinations of the elemental abundances of 41 elements in the atmosphere of HR8844. Most of the light elements are underabundant whereas the very heavy elements are overabundant in HR8844. This interesting new chemically peculiar star could be a hybrid object between the HgMn stars and the Am stars.

  11. French Pro/Am collaborations in exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Vanhuysse, M.; Bouchy, F.; Buil, C.; Cochard, F.; Thizy, O.; Martinez, P.; Desnoux, V.; Pujol, M.; Colas, F.

    2011-10-01

    Amateur astronomers have access to huge telescope time and can reach photometric precision up to a few mmag as well as radial velocity precision up to ˜ 50m.s-1 on brightest stars. We will first present some results of french amateur astronomers in transit photometry and radial velocity and then, we will present an over-view of all the collaborations which can be done between professional and amateur astronomers in the competitive exoplanet domain, and especially the current collaboration between french Pro & Am astronomers which was used in publication in A&A. Finally, we will present a new internet wiki page which goal is to develop such collaboration in different countries.

  12. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Rocket...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Rocket...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Rocket...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Rocket...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1290 - In Bering Sea, Shemya Island Area, Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Alaska; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1290 Section...; meteorological rocket launching facility, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zone. An arc of a...) Rockets will normally be launched one each day Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Rocket...

  17. Facilities maintenance handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and

  18. 2016 AMS Mario J. Molina Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Renyi

    2016-11-29

    A named symposium to honor Dr. Mario J. Molina was held 10–14 January 2016, as part of the 96th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Molina first demonstrated that industrially produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) decompose in the stratosphere and release chlorine atoms, leading to catalytic ozone destruction. His research in stratospheric chemistry was instrumental to the establishment of the 1987 United Nations Montreal Protocol to ban ozone-depleting substances worldwide. Dr. Molina’s contributions to preserving the planet Earth not only save the atmospheric ozone layer, but also protect the climate by reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases. He was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering research in understanding the stratospheric ozone loss mechanism. In 2013, President Barack Obama announced Dr. Molina as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The 2016 AMS Molina Symposium honored Dr. Molina’s distinguished contributions to research related to atmospheric chemistry. The symposium contained an integrated theme related to atmospheric chemistry, climate, and policy. Dr. Molina delivered a keynote speech at the Symposium. The conference included invited keynote speeches and invited and contributed oral and poster sessions, and a banquet was held on Tuesday January 12, 2016. The symposium covered all aspects of atmospheric chemistry, with topics including (1) Stratospheric chemistry, (2) Tropospheric chemistry, (3) Aerosol nucleation, growth, and transformation, (4) Aerosol properties, (5) Megacity air pollution, and (6) Atmospheric chemistry laboratory, field, and modeling studies. This DOE project supported 14 scientists, including graduate students, post docs, junior research scientists, and non-tenured assistant professors to attend this symposium.

  19. Science Facilities. An Interpretive Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Facilities.

    References pertaining to science facilities are organized and presented in the following categories--(1) biology facilities, (2) chemistry facilities, (3) physics facilities, (4) astronomy facilities, (5) elementary and secondary school science facilities, (6) college and university science facilities, and (7) planning and science laboratory. (FS)

  20. AMS results on positrons and antiprotons in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounine, Andrei; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a particle physics detector collecting data on the International Space Station since May 2011. Precision measurements of charged cosmic ray particles have been performed by AMS using a data sample of 85 billion cosmic ray events collected during the first five years of operations on the Station. The latest AMS results on the fluxes and flux ratios of the cosmic ray particles are presented with the emphasis on the measurements of positrons and antiprotons. They show unique features that require accurate theoretical interpretation as to their origin, be it from dark matter collisions or new astrophysical sources. On behalf of AMS.

  1. Latest AMS Results on elementary particles in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounine, Andrei; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a particle physics detector collecting data on the International Space Station since May 2011. Precision measurements of all elementary charged cosmic ray particles have been performed by AMS using a data sample of 85 billion cosmic ray events collected during the first five years of operations on the Station. The latest AMS results on the fluxes and flux ratios of the elementary cosmic ray particles are presented. They show unique features that require accurate theoretical interpretation as to their origin, be it from dark matter collisions or new astrophysical sources. On behalf of the AMS Collaboration.

  2. AmIQuin - An Ambient Mannequin for the Shopping Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschtscherjakov, Alexander; Reitberger, Wolfgang; Mirlacher, Thomas; Huber, Hermann; Tscheligi, Manfred

    We present AmIQuin, a virtual mannequin, which leverages an Ambient Intelligence (AmI) system within a shopping environment. AmIQuin is designed to replace a traditional shop window mannequin in order to enhance a customer's shopping experience by reacting to the customer's presence and presenting personalized information. The AmIQuin is implemented as 3D graphic representation of a mannequin displayed on a large screen situated in a shop window. In this paper, we describe the first cycle of an iterative User-Centered Design (UCD) process including the technical implementation of an AmIQuin prototype, along with an initial three days field study. The first prototypical version of the virtual mannequin presented in this paper moves its head or full body towards the beholder in response to recognizing a human face looking at it. We describe technical challenges of deploying an AmI application in the field. Our findings indicate the usefulness of an AmI application within the shopping context and give insights on customers' attitudes towards shop windows in general and the AmIQuin in particular. Furthermore, the study results reveal customers' wishes for future versions of the AmIQuin.

  3. Japanese and Eastern Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahata, M.

    2005-09-01

    The underground facilities in Japan and Korea are reviewed. Those facilities are Kamioka Observatory, Oto Cosmo Observatory, Ogoya Underground Laboratory, and Kashiwa Underground Laboratory in Japan and YangYang Underground Laboratory in Korea. Features of those facilities and radon reduction systems at Kamioka Observatory are presented.

  4. Facilities Engineering in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagluiso, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    An overview of NASA facilities is given outlining some of the more interesting and unique aspects of engineering and facilities associated with the space program. Outlined are some of the policies under which the Office of Facilities conducts its business. Included are environmental quality control measures.

  5. Considerations on Facilities Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Most facilities renovation projects occur because someone at the executive or board level has lobbied successfully for them. Often in public schools, the voters have agreed to the project as well via a building referendum. Therefore, facilities projects are highly visible to the community. Unlike many other issues in schools, facilities projects…

  6. Facilities Engineering in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagluiso, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    An overview of NASA facilities is given outlining some of the more interesting and unique aspects of engineering and facilities associated with the space program. Outlined are some of the policies under which the Office of Facilities conducts its business. Included are environmental quality control measures.

  7. Considerations on Facilities Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Most facilities renovation projects occur because someone at the executive or board level has lobbied successfully for them. Often in public schools, the voters have agreed to the project as well via a building referendum. Therefore, facilities projects are highly visible to the community. Unlike many other issues in schools, facilities projects…

  8. Aeronautical facilities assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, F. E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the free world's aeronautical facilities was undertaken and an evaluation made on where the relative strengths and weaknesses exist. Special emphasis is given to NASA's own capabilities and needs. The types of facilities surveyed are: Wind Tunnels; Airbreathing Propulsion Facilities; and Flight Simulators

  9. Indoor Athletic Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, E. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Examines the concept of shared-use facilities to help financially support and meet the demand for athletic facilities. Shared-use considerations are explored including cost sharing of ongoing operations, aesthetics, locker rooms, support facilities, parking and site access, and building access and security. (GR)

  10. Rental of School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Antonio Independent School District, TX.

    Regulations governing rental of facilities owned by the San Antonio School District (Texas) are documented as found in Section Eight of the school district's rules code ("Public Use of All School District Facilities"). Eight divisions of the code are as follows: (1) administration; (2) use of school facilities by pupils, employees, and…

  11. Progress report of the innovated KIST ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonkon; Eliades, John A.; Yu, Byung-Yong; Lim, Weon Cheol; Chae, Keun Hwa; Song, Jonghan

    2017-01-01

    The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, Seoul, Republic of (S.) Korea) ion beam facility consists of three electrostatic accelerators: a 400 kV single ended ion implanter, a 2 MV tandem accelerator system and a 6 MV tandem accelerator system. The 400 kV and 6 MV systems were purchased from High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE, Netherlands) and commissioned in 2013, while the 2 MV system was purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC, USA) in 1995. These systems are used to provide traditional ion beam analysis (IBA), isotope ratio analysis (ex. accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS), and ion implantation/irradiation for domestic industrial and academic users. The main facility is the 6 MV HVEE Tandetron system that has an AMS line currently used for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36 Cl, 41Ca and 129I analyses, and three lines for IBA that are under construction. Here, these systems are introduced with their specifications and initial performance results.

  12. Rockets Launched from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility supported the successful launch of three Terrier-Oriole suborbital rockets for the Department of Defense between 2:30 and 2:31 a.m. today, Feb. 24, from NASA’s launch range on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The next launch from the Wallops Flight Facility is a NASA Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital sounding rocket between 6 and 9 a.m. on March 27. The rocket will be carrying the Rocksat-X payload carrying university student developed experiments. Credit: NASA/Alison Stancil NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.; O’Holleran, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ζ-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in δ-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  14. Evaluation of the Eberline AMS-3A and AMS-4 Beta continuous air monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.L.; Sisk, D.R.

    1996-03-01

    Eberline AMS-3A-1 and AMS-4 beta continuous air monitors were tested against the criteria set forth in the ANSI Standards N42.18, Specification and Performance of On-site Instrumentation for Continuously Monitoring Radioactivity in Effluents, and ANSI N42.17B, Performance Specification for Health Physics Instrumentation - Occupational Airborne Radioactivity Monitoring Instrumentation. ANSI N42.18 does not, in general, specify testing procedures for demonstrating compliance with the criteria set forth in the standard; therefore, wherever possible, the testing procedures given in ANSI N42.17B were adopted. In all cases, the more restrictive acceptance criteria and/or the more demanding test conditions of the two standards were used.

  15. Pulmonary administration of Am80 regenerates collapsed alveoli.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hitomi; Horiguchi, Michiko; Ozawa, Chihiro; Akita, Tomomi; Hirota, Keiji; Shudo, Koichi; Terada, Hiroshi; Makino, Kimiko; Kubo, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2014-12-28

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an intractable pulmonary disease, which causes widespread and irreversible alveoli collapse. Nevertheless, there is no effective drug therapy that regenerates lung tissue or prevents the progression of COPD and clinical management of patients remains mostly supportive. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Am80 is useful as a novel pulmonary emphysema therapeutic drug. In this study, we treated the human alveolar epithelial stem cells with Am80 to clarify the differentiation-inducing mechanism and administrated Am80 transpulmonarily into elastase-induced COPD model mice to evaluate the effect of Am80 on pulmonary emphysema. First, we accordingly investigated whether Am80 had a differentiation-inducing effect on human alveolar epithelial stem cells, Am80 induced differentiation of human alveolar epithelial stem cells to alveolar type I and II cells dose dependently, and the proportion of differentiated into type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells as a result of treatment with 10 μM of Am80 for 7 days was approximately 20%. Second, we attempted to identify the major factor involved in the differentiation-inducing effect of human alveolar epithelial stem cells induced by Am80 using microarray analysis. In a microarray analysis, WNT1, lectin, SLIT, chordin, ck12, ck11, and neurexin3 showed the largest variation in the Am80-treated group compared with the controls. In quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction assay, Am80 resulted in significant reduction in the WNT1 expression ratio whereas increase in the neurexin3 expression ratio. We evaluated the repairs effect for collapsed alveoli by Am80 of pulmonary administration. In untreated and Am80-treated mice the average CT value at 2 days was, respectively, -506 and -439 and there was a significant difference. Likewise, the assessment of the distance between alveolar walls, Lm, confirmed that there was a significant difference between control (68.0±3.8 μm) and

  16. Climate Controls AM Fungal Distributions from Global to Local Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivlin, S. N.; Hawkes, C.; Muscarella, R.; Treseder, K. K.; Kazenel, M.; Lynn, J.; Rudgers, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have key functions in terrestrial biogeochemical processes; thus, determining the relative importance of climate, edaphic factors, and plant community composition on their geographic distributions can improve predictions of their sensitivity to global change. Local adaptation by AM fungi to plant hosts, soil nutrients, and climate suggests that all of these factors may control fungal geographic distributions, but their relative importance is unknown. We created species distribution models for 142 AM fungal taxa at the global scale with data from GenBank. We compared climate variables (BioClim and soil moisture), edaphic variables (phosphorus, carbon, pH, and clay content), and plant variables using model selection on models with (1) all variables, (2) climatic variables only (including soil moisture) and (3) resource-related variables only (all other soil parameters and NPP) using the MaxEnt algorithm evaluated with ENMEval. We also evaluated whether drivers of AM fungal distributions were phylogenetically conserved. To test whether global correlates of AM fungal distributions were reflected at local scales, we then surveyed AM fungi in nine plant hosts along three elevation gradients in the Upper Gunnison Basin, Colorado, USA. At the global scale, the distributions of 55% of AM fungal taxa were affected by both climate and soil resources, whereas 16% were only affected by climate and 29% were only affected by soil resources. Even for AM fungi that were affected by both climate and resources, the effects of climatic variables nearly always outweighed those of resources. Soil moisture and isothermality were the main climatic and NPP and soil carbon the main resource related factors influencing AM fungal distributions. Distributions of closely related AM fungal taxa were similarly affected by climate, but not by resources. Local scale surveys of AM fungi across elevations confirmed that climate was a key driver of AM fungal

  17. Automation in a material processing/storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.; Gordon, J.

    1997-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently developing a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to process and store legacy materials from the United States nuclear stockpile. A variety of materials, with a variety of properties, packaging and handling/storage requirements, will be processed and stored at the facility. Since these materials are hazardous and radioactive, automation will be used to minimize worker exposure. Other benefits derived from automation of the facility include increased throughput capacity and enhanced security. The diversity of materials and packaging geometries to be handled poses challenges to the automation of facility processes. In addition, the nature of the materials to be processed underscores the need for safety, reliability and serviceability. The application of automation in this facility must, therefore, be accomplished in a rational and disciplined manner to satisfy the strict operational requirements of the facility. Among the functions to be automated are the transport of containers between process and storage areas via an Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV), and various processes in the Shipping Package Unpackaging (SPU) area, the Accountability Measurements (AM) area, the Special Isotope Storage (SIS) vault and the Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) vault. Other areas of the facility are also being automated, but are outside the scope of this paper.

  18. Potential of the Bucharest 3 MV Tandetron™ for IBA studies of deer antler mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, S.; Garcia, A.; Landete-Castillejos, T.; Gallego, L.; Pantelica, D.; Pantelica, Ana; Preoteasa, E. A.; Scafes, Adela; Straticiuc, M.

    2016-03-01

    Combined PIXE and PIGE analysis was applied at the new Bucharest Tandetron to investigate biomineralization in two calcified tissues, deer antlers and femur bone. By annual loss and fast re-growth, antlers are a valuable model for bone as a dynamical system. Samples characterized by optical microscopy and histology were analyzed for P, Ca, F, Na, Mg, S, Cl, K, Zn, Sr by 3 MeV proton simultaneous PIXE and PIGE, using a hydroxyapatite standard and other reference materials. Good correlation between methods was found for P, and the concentrations were related to biological data. Antlers showed lower mineralization than femur, with the lowest values in the third antler beam. A power function of mineralization vs. "mineral age" of antlers was found. Thus combined PIXE and PIGE of antlers may bring highly relevant insights in biomineralization research.

  19. Mechanical Properties of AM Stainless Steel Parts and Repair Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C.; Carpenter, John S.

    2015-02-22

    Goals: Advance certification of AM materials and compare microstructure and its evolution during processing and deformation between AM fabricated and conventional steels. Deliverables achieved: Measured texture data for 17 steel samples on HIPPO, including material planned to be shocked in pRAD in FY16; quantified texture and austenite/ferrite phase fractions; and provide input data for deformation modeling.

  20. Application of TOS/AMS to TDRS E and F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The development of the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) and the study of an Apogee and Maneuvering Stage (AMS) to be used in conjunction with the TOS are presented. A definition of the TOS/AMS configuration is provided along with a detailed design analysis including layout drawings, component definition, performance, sts and spacecraft interface definition, schedules, cost estimates, and specifications documents.

  1. Treatment of AM 355 Steel for Adhesive Bonding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Surface treatments for AM355 prior to adhesive bonding have been developed. A sulfuric acid-dichromate immersion treatment and nitric acid...chromium content of the surface oxide layer produced using these and other treatments. Experiments indicate that AM355 is essentially impermeable to

  2. Why Am I in Such a Bad Mood?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breakfasts Shyness Why Am I in Such a Bad Mood? KidsHealth > For Teens > Why Am I in Such a Bad Mood? A A A What's in this article? ... like hurting yourself, that's more than just a bad mood and you need to tell someone. continue ...

  3. 50 CFR 648.163 - Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs... Management Measures for the Atlantic Bluefish Fishery § 648.163 Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs). (a... the transfer process described in § 648.162, then any overage will be measured against that state's...

  4. 50 CFR 648.163 - Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs... Management Measures for the Atlantic Bluefish Fishery § 648.163 Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs). (a... the transfer process described in § 648.162, then any overage will be measured against that state's...

  5. Plant uptake and transport of /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Mueller, R.T. Sr.; soufi, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    We conducted several experiments with /sup 241/Am to obtain a more complete understanding of how this transuranium element is absorbed and transported in plants. In a plant species (Tamarix pentandra Pall.) that has salt glands in the leaves excreting NaCl and other ions, /sup 241/Am was not pumped through these glands. Cyanide, which forms complexes with any metals, when applied to a calcareous soil, greatly increased the transport of /sup 241/Am into stems and leaves of bush bean plants. Radioactive cyanide (/sup 14/C) was also transported to leaves and stems. When radish was grown in both calcareous and noncalcareous soils, /sup 241/Am appeared to be fixed on the peel so firmly that it was resistant to removal by HNO/sub 3/ washing. The chelating agent DTPA induced increased transport of /sup 241/Am to leaves and into the fleshy roots of the radish.

  6. Biochemical paths in humans and cells: Frontiers of AMS bioanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Palmblad, N. M.; Ognibene, T.; Kabir, M. M.; Buchholz, B. A.; Bench, G.

    2007-06-01

    The publication rate of 3H and 14C use in biomedical research decreased by a factor of three since 1990 when the first applications of AMS in biomedicine were published. Against this decrease, the high sensitivity of AMS for these isotopes in small isolated samples has made significant contributions. New smaller spectrometers and increased commercial availability of AMS have solved some of the issues surrounding availability and cost, but improved quantitation in non-isotopic methods now compete with some early uses of AMS. We review the strength of AMS for quantifying rare biochemical events and chemical passages through individual people or cells and consider these as the frontiers of quantitation leading to profitable science unavailable to other techniques.

  7. Mechanical properties determination of AM components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzugan, J.; Sibr, M.; Konopík, P.; Procházka, R.; Rund, M.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of engineering materials and components is a crucial part for design and save service life utilization. Due to components processing technologies and exploitation conditions local properties can significantly vary from location to location over larger components as well as over small material volumes with gradual material changes such as welds, coatings or additively manufactured parts. The current paper is dealing with local properties characterisation for additively manufacture (AM) components by micro tensile test (M-TT). Components produced by additive manufacturing techniques yield properties variation in dependence of the considered location within the component regarding to direction in relation to deposition process. Properties vary over the thickness, length, angle or contacts with the supporting structures necessary for a successful components production by additive manufacturing techniques. The properties differences are mainly related to varying heating/reheating and cooling conditions at various locations of usually very complex parts produced mainly by these technologies. The standard testing procedures fail to characterize such local properties of complex shaped objects due to large size requirements on specimens. Therefore, new techniques have to be established for such detailed local characterizations. Results of miniaturized tensile tests application for local properties and orientations are shown here.

  8. Pro-Am collaborations in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, G. M.

    2004-10-01

    The text of the Presidential Address delivered at The Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London on 2003 October 29. In this second Presidential Address, I wish to discuss the very real opportunities that exist for collaboration between professional and amateur astronomers in a wide variety of fields. As the scope of research in astronomy grows by the day and some questions are answered, we are then often faced by even greater challenges. Professional astronomers naturally adjust their goals and areas of investigation. The result is that gaps are left in which the amateur can take over the role. Alternatively where there is a considerable technical challenge, the task can be shared by professional and amateurs with frequent exchanges of results and discussion. The main areas which are worthy of debate, involve whether the amateur is suitably equipped for the task, which naturally leads us to discuss the equipment available, and the observing techniques employed. It is also worth examining which classes of object are suited to the cause of Pro-Am.

  9. Neutron capture cross section of Am241

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    The neutron capture cross section of Am241 for incident neutrons from 0.02 eV to 320 keV has been measured with the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be 665±33 b. Our result is in good agreement with other recent measurements. Resonance parameters for En<12 eV were obtained using an R-matrix fit to the measured cross section. The results are compared with values from the ENDF/B-VII.0, Mughabghab, JENDL-3.3, and JEFF-3.1 evaluations. Γn neutron widths for the first three resonances are systematically larger by 5-15% than the ENDF/B-VII.0 values. The resonance integral above 0.5 eV was determined to be 1553±7 b. Cross sections in the resolved and unresolved energy regions above 12 eV were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory incorporating the width-fluctuation correction of Moldauer. The calculated results agree well with the measured data, and the extracted averaged resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those for the resolved resonances.

  10. Resource for the Development of Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Turteltaub, K. W.; Bench, G.; Buchholz, B. A.; Enright, H.; Kulp, K.; McCartt, A. D.; Malfatti, M.; Ognibene, T.; Loots, G.; Stewart, B. J.

    2016-04-08

    The NIH Research Resource for Biomedical AMS was originally funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1999 to develop and apply the technology of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in broad- based biomedical research. The Resource’s niche is to fill needs for ultra high sensitivity quantitation when isotope-labeled agents are used. The Research Resource’s Technology Research and Development (TR&D) efforts will focus on the needs of the biomedical research community in the context of seven Driving Biomedical Projects (DBPs) that will drive the Center’s technical capabilities through three core TR&Ds. We will expand our present capabilities by developing a fully integrated HPLC AMS to increase our capabilities for metabolic measurements, we will develop methods to understand cellular processes and we will develop and validate methods for the application of AMS in human studies, which is a growing area of demand by collaborators and service users. In addition, we will continue to support new and ongoing collaborative and service projects that require the capabilities of the Resource. The Center will continue to train researchers in the use of the AMS capabilities being developed, and the results of all efforts will be widely disseminated to advance progress in biomedical research. Towards these goals, our specific aims are to:1.) Increase the value and information content of AMS measurements by combining molecular speciation with quantitation of defined macromolecular isolates. Specifically, develop and validate methods for macromolecule labeling, characterization and quantitation.2.) Develop and validate methods and strategies to enable AMS to become more broadly used in human studies. Specifically, demonstrate robust methods for conducting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in humans and model systems.3.) Increase the accessibility of AMS to the Biomedical research community and the throughput of AMS through direct coupling to separatory

  11. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    English, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility.

  12. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Mir training Facility view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-02-22

    S95-04319 (22 Feb 1995) --- The neutral buoyancy facility at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, is used for underwater training for missions aboard the Russian Mir Space Station. The facility is similar to NASA's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, and the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.

  14. Facility Measures Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honess, Shawn B.; Narvaez, Pablo; Mcauley, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Partly automated facility measures and computes steady near magnetic field produced by object. Designed to determine magnetic fields of equipment to be installed on spacecraft including sensitive magnetometers, with view toward application of compensating fields to reduce interfernece with spacecraft-magnetometer readings. Because of its convenient operating features and sensitivity of its measurements, facility serves as prototype for similar facilities devoted to magnetic characterization of medical equipment, magnets for high-energy particle accelerators, and magnetic materials.

  15. Orientations of AM Her stars from their polarization properties - The case of the missing AM Her stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1985-01-01

    Observation of the polarization properties of the AM Her stars is used to determine their orientations. It is found that the AM Her stars are randomly distributed with respect to their inclination angle i but not with respect to their magnetic colatitude delta. The stars are concentrated along the semicircle cos-squared delta + cos-squared i = 1, where delta is the angle between the magnetic moment and the spin axis of the degenerate dwarf. This result implies that the discovery of AM Her stars is strongly affected by observational selection effects. It is suggested that these effects are a result of the way in which the AM Her stars have been identified observationally, and of the angular properties of high harmonic cyclotron emission. It is estimated that there are about three times as many AM Her stars as have been found so far.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is secure after transfer to the work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is secure after transfer to the work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane lowers NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane lowers NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, workers check the placement of NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft on a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, workers check the placement of NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft on a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers move NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into a high bay clean room. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers move NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into a high bay clean room. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is lifted off the pallet for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is lifted off the pallet for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane moves NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft toward a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane moves NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft toward a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft for transfer to a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is revealed. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft is revealed. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) lifts off from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, on Aug. 25 at 1:35:39 a.m. EDT. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Consisting of a 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF will be the largest infrared telescope ever launched into space. It is the fourth and final element in NASA’s family of orbiting “Great Observatories.” Its highly sensitive instruments will give a unique view of the Universe and peer into regions of space that are hidden from optical telescopes.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) lifts off from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, on Aug. 25 at 1:35:39 a.m. EDT. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Consisting of a 0.85-meter telescope and three cryogenically cooled science instruments, SIRTF will be the largest infrared telescope ever launched into space. It is the fourth and final element in NASA’s family of orbiting “Great Observatories.” Its highly sensitive instruments will give a unique view of the Universe and peer into regions of space that are hidden from optical telescopes.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shipped in an air-conditioned transportation van from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft, the first Mercury orbiter, arrives at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be offloaded and taken into a high bay clean room. After the spacecraft is removed from its shipping container, employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Shipped in an air-conditioned transportation van from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft, the first Mercury orbiter, arrives at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be offloaded and taken into a high bay clean room. After the spacecraft is removed from its shipping container, employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare to attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers prepare to attach an overhead crane to NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. The spacecraft will be moved to a work stand where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift helps offload NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft shipped from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift helps offload NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft shipped from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers get ready to remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the high bay clean room at the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers get ready to remove the protective cover from NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. Employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers check the moveable pallet holding NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers check the moveable pallet holding NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift begins lowering NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto the ground. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, a lift begins lowering NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto the ground. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., is offloaded. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., is offloaded. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers begin moving NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into the building MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - is being taken into a high bay clean room where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC, workers begin moving NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft into the building MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - is being taken into a high bay clean room where employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Doors are open on the air-conditioned transportation van that carried NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., to the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC. After offloading, MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Doors are open on the air-conditioned transportation van that carried NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., to the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities near KSC. After offloading, MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be taken into a high bay clean room and employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

  16. High-sensitivity isobar-free AMS measurements and reference materials for 55Fe, 68Ge and 202gPb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Bichler, M.; Buczak, K.; Fink, D.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Klix, A.; Krasa, A.; Kutschera, W.; Lederer, C.; Plompen, A.; Priller, A.; Schumann, D.; Semkova, V.; Steier, P.

    2013-01-01

    Isobaric interference represents one of the major limitations in mass spectrometry. For a few cases in AMS with tandem accelerators, isobaric interference is completely excluded like the well-known major isotopes 14C, 26Al, 129I. Additional isotopes are 55Fe (t1/2 = 2.74 years), 68Ge (t1/2 = 270.9 days) and 202Pb (t1/2 = 52.5 kyr), with 68Ge and 202Pb never been used in AMS so far. Their respective stable isobars, 55Mn, 68Zn and 202Hg do not form stable negative ions. The exceptional sensitivity of AMS for 55Fe, 68Ge and 202gPb offers important insights into such different fields like nuclear astrophysics, fundamental nuclear physics and technological applications. VERA, a dedicated AMS facility is well suited for developing procedures for new and non-standard isotopes. AMS measurements at the VERA facility established low backgrounds for these radionuclides in natural samples. Limits for isotope ratios of <10-15, <10-16 and ⩽2 × 10-14 were measured for 55Fe/56Fe, 68Ge/70Ge and 202Pb/Pb, respectively. In order to generate accurate isotope ratios of sample materials, AMS relies on the parallel measurement of reference materials with well-known ratios. A new and highly accurate reference material for 55Fe measurements with an uncertainty of ±1.6% was produced from a certified reference solution. In case of 68Ge dedicated neutron activations produced a sufficiently large number of 68Ge atoms that allowed quantifying them through the activity of its decay product 68Ga. Finally, for 202Pb, the short-lived isobar 202Tl was produced via neutron activation and served as a proxy for 202Pb AMS measurements.

  17. Developing a facility strategy.

    PubMed

    Capps, D M

    1994-05-01

    Successful planning for capital investment relies upon the ability of the management team to establish a cogent and comprehensive direction for facility development. The selection of an appropriate strategy integrates multiple issues: mission, service needs of the community, the external environment, the organization's ethos, current physical resources, operational systems, and vision. This paper will identify and discuss key components and data integral to formulating a facility strategy that outlines the basic direction for developing a facility master plan. The process itself will be presented as a working methodology that can be applied to the organization's resources and vision to generate a coherent facility strategy.

  18. AMS studies in Portuguese variscan granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Martins, Helena; Noronha, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    A large volume of Variscan granitic rocks outcrop in Central Iberian Zone which are well documented concerning geological mapping, petrography and geochemistry but whose magnetic characteristics and fabric remain unknown. In this study we summarize the available AMS data from approximately 644 sampling stations (5152 samples) on different massifs of Variscan Portuguese granites. Despite their different geological, petrographic and geochemical characteristics, magnetic susceptibility (K) values obtained for the majority of the studied granites range from 15 to 300 × 10-6 SI. The dominant paramagnetic behaviour of the granite bodies reflects the presence of ilmenite as the main iron oxide. This feature indicates the reduced conditions involved in the granite melt formation during the Variscan orogeny. The two-mica granites show K values ranging between 15 to 70 × 10-6 SI which are lower than values displayed by the biotite-rich facies scattered within the interval of 70 and 300 × 10-6 SI. The magnetite-bearing granites are scarce but represented in Lavadores, Gerês and Manteigas. Even so, only the Lavadores body could be considered as a true magnetite-type granite (K >3.0 × 10-3 SI) in face of its K, comprised between 1550 and 19303 × 10-6 SI. Magnetic anisotropy can be used as a "marker" for the deformation experienced by granite mushes during their crustal emplacement and further cooling. Magnetic anisotropy can thus be correlated with the finite deformation of a rock, as record by mineral fabrics. Post-tectonic granites, such as those from Vila Pouca de Aguiar, Pedras Salgadas, Caria, Vila da Ponte, Chaves and Lamas de Olo, have a magnetic anisotropy <2.5% which corresponds to a deformation hardly visible to the naked eye. Nevertheless, at microscopic scale, these granites display almost ubiquitous magmatic to submagmatic microstructures (rare wavy extinction in quartz, erratic subgrain boundaries in quartz and, eventually, folded or kinked biotites). For

  19. On the measurement of 10Be on the 1 MV compact AMS system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Gómez, A.; Chamizo-Calvo, E.; López-Gutierrez, J. M.; García-León, M.; Müller, A. M.; Christl, M.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we present the most recent improvements performed by our group on 10Be measurements on the 1 MV AMS system recently set up at the CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores), in Seville (Spain). Our efforts have been focused on the study of the viability of our system for BeO and BeF - measurements. To achieve this, different standard materials have been measured to demonstrate the reliability of the system for BeO measurements in a wide 10Be/ 9Be atomic ratio range and several environmental samples have been studied both at the 1 MV AMS CNA facility and at the 6 MV AMS ETH-PSI facility of Zurich to validate our measurements. The results show a good agreement between laboratories. New experiments also have been carried out selecting 1+ and 2+ charge states at the exit of the accelerator and inserting Si 3N 3.1 foils with different thicknesses to separate 10Be from its isobar, 10B. The influence of each foil on the overall transmission (detected 10Be compared to BeO - injected into the accelerator) and background level was also assessed. In addition some tests were also done to assess the viability of BeF 2 and BaBeF 4 measurements at our system. Several metal matrices and cathode preparation procedures for BeO samples were investigated to maximize current and cathode lifetime.

  20. AM(VI) partitioning studies. FY14 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce J.

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  1. Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Baseline Surveys for Emergency Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, C

    2012-06-04

    Originally established in the 1960s to support the Nuclear Test Program, the AMS mission is to provide a rapid and comprehensive worldwide aerial measurement, analysis, and interpretation capability in response to a nuclear/radiological emergency. AMS provides a responsive team of individuals whose processes allow for a mission to be conducted and completed with results available within hours. This presentation slide-show reviews some of the history of the AMS, summarizes present capabilities and methods, and addresses the value of the surveys.

  2. Comparative Convergence Analysis of Nonlinear AMLI-Cycle Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaozhe; Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Xu, Jinchao

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of our paper is to provide a comprehensive convergence analysis of the nonlinear algebraic multilevel iteration (AMLI)-cycle multigrid (MG) method for symmetric positive definite problems. We show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle MG method is uniformly convergent, based on classical assumptions for approximation and smoothing properties. Furthermore, under only the assumption that the smoother is convergent, we show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle method is always better (or not worse) than the respective V-cycle MG method. Finally, numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  3. The AMS Silicon Tracker: Performance Results from STS-91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, J.

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a detector designed to search for antimatter and dark matter in cosmic rays. AMS is programmed for installation on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for an operational period of 3 years. The magnetic spectrometer uses 5.5 m2 of silicon microstrip sensors to reconstruct charged particle trajectories. The AMS was flown on the NASA shuttle flight STS-91 in June 1998. In this contribution, we present results for the performance of the silicon tracker during the test flight.

  4. Delineating Glacial Till Bed Kinematics using AMS and Pebble Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentoso, M. J.; Evenson, E.; Kodama, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and pebble fabric analysis was used to explore glacial till bed kinematics in streamlined glacial landforms of the Weedsport Drumlin field of north central New York State. Five wave-truncated drumlins were sampled at two locations each along the shore of Lake Ontario. A total of 500 pebble orientations and 250 AMS samples were collected from 10 sampling sites in the drumlins. Six flutes were also sampled at 10 sampling sites for a total of 500 pebble orientations and 200 AMS measurements. All AMS measurements were conducted on a KLY-3s Kappabridge. The average orientation of the maximum principal susceptibility axes for the drumlins (N2°E) was parallel, within 95% confidence limits, to the average pebble long-axis orientations (N5°W) and parallel to the N-S trend of the drumlins. Both AMS and pebble average orientations plunge toward the north in the “up glacier” direction indicating an imbrication due to ice flow. The clustering of the AMS principal axis directions indicates that the strength of the AMS drumlin fabric is highly variable, at 3 of the 10 sites it is as strong as fabrics developed in a ring shear device (Iverson et al., 2008) at intermediate shear strains. AMS fabrics in the flutes are stronger and more unidirectional than for the drumlins with the average pebble direction (N4°E) parallel to the average AMS maximum susceptibility direction (N12°E), but not at the 95% confidence level. Northward plunge of these average orientations indicates an imbrication. The flutes trend N10°W, so the fabric orientations are not as closely parallel to the glacial landforms for the flutes as they are for the drumlins. Thermal demagnetization of three orthogonal components of an isothermal remanent magnetization indicates that the AMS is carried primarily by maghemite. The stronger AMS fabric in the flutes compared to the drumlins suggests that the till of the flutes has been subjected to higher strains and perhaps

  5. Search for Dark Matter with the AMS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, Carmen

    2006-11-28

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to operate on the International Space Station (ISS). The aim of AMS is the direct detection of charged particles in the rigidity range from 0.5 GV to few TV erform high statistics studies of cosmic rays in space and search for antimatter and dark matter. The most favored candidate to conform the cold dark matter is a non-relativistic interacting, massive particle (WIMP). AMS will be able to detect simultaneously the main signatures of the annihilation of such as particle: {gamma}, e+,p-bar in an energy range never reached before.

  6. Future User Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Lee

    2002-10-01

    The southeastern part of the U.S. is blessed with an array of national user facilities that are accessible to scientists in the region. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates 17 officially designated user facilities for the Department of Energy, the Jefferson Lab operates the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and a number of universities have forefront experimental facilities that are widely accessible. The long lead time necessary to originate and construct new user facilities makes it imperative to consider the needs of the physical sciences 10 to 20 years in the future. The construction of the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL positions the southeast to lead in neutron science. Upgrades are desired for CEBAF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The more future possibilities are less clear, but are becoming a focus of strategic planning among the national laboratories. Possibilities may arise in the U.S. for next-generation light sources, large computational centers, advanced fusion devices, nanotechnology centers, and perhaps facilities that are not yet contemplated. A regional discussion of the needs for large-scale user facilities in the southeast is important.

  7. Wake Shield Facility (WSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) is a free-flying research and development facility that is designed to use the pure vacuum of space to conduct scientific research in the development of new materials. The thin film materials technology developed by the WSF could some day lead to applications such as faster electronics components for computers.

  8. Relocatale Learning Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This document supplies guidelines for the future design of structures within one category of relocatable learning facilities--divisible facilities. The current use and average cost of portables; and teacher, student, and community reactions are discussed. Four types of relocatable structures are described: portable, mobile, divisible, and…

  9. Shaping Campus Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calcara, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Explains how colleges and universities, faced with emerging trends and increased competition, can utilize their facilities as strategic resources. Examines technology changes in the classroom and the effects on user needs, the trend toward real-world learning environments, and facility design planning that responds to social interaction and…

  10. Florida Educational Facilities, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…

  11. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FACILITIES INFORMATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    PERSONNEL OF THE FACILITIES INFORMATION SERVICE OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR COLLEGES COMPILED THIS LISTING OF BOOKS, ARTICLES, MONOGRAPHS, AND OTHER PRINTED MATERIALS RELEVANT TO JUNIOR COLLEGE FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN, AND CONSTRUCTION. IN ADDITION TO A "GENERAL" CATEGORY, REFERENCES ARE GROUPED UNDER HEADINGS OF AUDITORIUMS, COLLEGE…

  12. INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility *IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. This facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liquid Injection System. Each syste...

  13. Florida Educational Facilities, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…

  14. Shaping Campus Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calcara, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Explains how colleges and universities, faced with emerging trends and increased competition, can utilize their facilities as strategic resources. Examines technology changes in the classroom and the effects on user needs, the trend toward real-world learning environments, and facility design planning that responds to social interaction and…

  15. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Details the design goals, materials, and finish choices of a 38,400 square-foot dining facility and the delineation and organization of multiple spaces that comprise a 21,000 square-foot food service facility. This later design utilized market studies of student tastes and buying patterns to ensure student satisfaction. Includes seven photographs.…

  16. Science Facilities Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A bibliographic collection on science buildings and facilities is cited with many different reference sources for those concerned with the design, planning, and layout of science facilities. References are given covering a broad scope of information on--(1) physical plant planning, (2) management and safety, (3) building type studies, (4) design…

  17. INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility *IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. This facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liquid Injection System. Each syste...

  18. Long Range Facilities Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Richard Muther range facilities Many alterna- analysis indi- cated that if NASSCO ever expected to surpass its output of the last several years, current...Marine Engineers (SNAME) SP-1 Panel Meeting. The Maritime Administration had Richard Muther (an authority on long range facility planning) address a

  19. 5 CFR 1631.4 - Public reference facilities and current index.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... index. 1631.4 Section 1631.4 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD... § 1631.4 Public reference facilities and current index. (a) The Board maintains a public reading area located in room 4308 at 1250 H Street, NW., Washington, DC. Reading area hours are from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00...

  20. 5 CFR 1631.4 - Public reference facilities and current index.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... index. 1631.4 Section 1631.4 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD... § 1631.4 Public reference facilities and current index. (a) The Board maintains a public reading area located in room 4308 at 1250 H Street, NW., Washington, DC. Reading area hours are from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00...

  1. Angle Measurement System (AMS) for Establishing Model Pitch and Roll Zero, and Performing Single Axis Angle Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Bradley L.

    2007-01-01

    The angle measurement system (AMS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is a system for many uses. It was originally developed to check taper fits in the wind tunnel model support system. The system was further developed to measure simultaneous pitch and roll angles using 3 orthogonally mounted accelerometers (3-axis). This 3-axis arrangement is used as a transfer standard from the calibration standard to the wind tunnel facility. It is generally used to establish model pitch and roll zero and performs the in-situ calibration on model attitude devices. The AMS originally used a laptop computer running DOS based software but has recently been upgraded to operate in a windows environment. Other improvements have also been made to the software to enhance its accuracy and add features. This paper will discuss the accuracy and calibration methodologies used in this system and some of the features that have contributed to its popularity.

  2. Multiple target tracking with an AM reticule seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, K. W.

    1981-09-01

    A generic AM-reticle seeker was modelled, and its steady-state equilibrium position, in the presence of either two point targets or a point and an extended target, determined by digital computer simulation.

  3. 78 FR 69629 - Revitalization of the AM Radio Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... (NIF) signal at night. The Commission has previously held that AM coverage of less than 80 percent of... percent of the area of the community of license with a nighttime 5 mV/m signal or an NIF...

  4. The AM05 density functional applied to solids.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Ann E; Armiento, Rickard; Paier, Joachim; Kresse, Georg; Wills, John M; Mattsson, Thomas R

    2008-02-28

    We show that the AM05 functional [Armiento and Mattsson, Phys. Rev. B 72, 085108 (2005)] has the same excellent performance for solids as the hybrid density functionals tested in Paier et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154709 (2006); 125, 249901 (2006)]. This confirms the original finding that AM05 performs exceptionally well for solids and surfaces. Hartree-Fock hybrid calculations are typically an order of magnitude slower than local or semilocal density functionals such as AM05, which is of a regular semilocal generalized gradient approximation form. The performance of AM05 is on average found to be superior to selecting the best of local density approximation and PBE for each solid. By comparing data from several different electronic-structure codes, we have determined that the numerical errors in this study are equal to or smaller than the corresponding experimental uncertainties.

  5. 33 CFR 103.300 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of responsibility. For the purposes of this subchapter, Port Security Committees that were... responsibility; (2) Rules for membership; (3) The AMS Committee's organizational structure and procedural rules... meetings and records; and (6) Rules for handling and protecting classified, sensitive...

  6. 33 CFR 103.300 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of responsibility. For the purposes of this subchapter, Port Security Committees that were... responsibility; (2) Rules for membership; (3) The AMS Committee's organizational structure and procedural rules... meetings and records; and (6) Rules for handling and protecting classified, sensitive...

  7. Gaia14aae: the First Fully-Eclipsing AM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. J.; Marsh, T. R.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Breedt, E.; Campbell, H. C.; Dhillon, V. S.; Hardy, L. K.; Littlefair, S. P.

    2017-03-01

    AM CVns are a class of cataclysmic variables consisting of a white dwarf accreting H-deficient matter from a donor star. With periods of 5 to 65 minutes, AM CVns include the shortest period binaries containing white dwarfs. AM CVns are believed to form by one of three formation channels which can in principle be distinguished by the nature of the donor star, but are difficult to constrain observationally. Gaia14aae was one of the first transients discovered by the Gaia Science Alerts project. It eclipses on a period of 50 minutes, and is the only known AM CVn in which the white dwarf is fully eclipsed. This makes it an attractive system for parameter studies. We present an update on our attempts to measure these properties, using high-speed multi-colour photometry. Preliminary results suggest that the donor star is not as degenerate as predicted by models of white dwarf donors.

  8. 66. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COOLING BUILDING, LOOKING AM DAMPERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COOLING BUILDING, LOOKING AM DAMPERS, HIGH TEMPERATURE AND LOW TEMPERATURE COOLERS. APRIL 11, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  9. Am(VI) Extraction Final Report: FY16

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, Bruce Jay; Grimes, Travis Shane; Tillotson, Richard Dean; Law, Jack Douglas

    2016-08-01

    This report summarizes activities related to hexavalent Am extraction for FY16, in completion of FCR&D Milestone M3FT-16IN030103027. Activities concentrated on three areas of research: 1) centrifugal contactor hot testing, 2) Am(VI) stability studies, and 3) alternative oxidant studies. A brief summary of each task follows. Hot Testing: A new engineering-scale oxidation and solvent extraction test bed was built at Idaho National Laboratory to allow for solvent extraction testing of minor actinide separation concepts. The test bed consists of an oxidation vessel, filtration apparatus, four, 3D printed, 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors, feed/product vessels, and sample ports. This system replaced the previous 3 stage, 5-cm contactor test bed that was used for the initial testing in FY14. In the FY16 hot test, a feed simulant was spiked with 243Am and 139Ce and treated with 60 g/L sodium bismuthate for two hours to oxidize the Am(III) to Am(VI). This solution was then pumped through a filter and into the four-stage centrifugal contactor setup. The organic phase solvent formulation was 1 M diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA)/dodecane. The test showed that Am(VI) was produced by bismuthate oxidation and the residual oxidant was successfully filtered without back pressure buildup. Sixty-four percent of Am was extracted in the contactors using DEHBA. Both Am and Ce were quantitatively stripped by 0.1 M H2O2. Successful demonstration of the utility of small, printable contactors suggests that hot testing of separations concepts can now be conducted more often, since it is cheaper, generates less waste, and entails much less radcon risk than previous testing. Am(VI) stability: A rigorous examination of reagents was conducted to determine if contaminants could interfere with Am oxidation and extraction. An series of DAm measurements showed that bismuthate particle size, water source, acid quality, and DAAP batch or pre-treatment had little effect on extraction efficiency

  10. Counting Statistics and Ion Interval Density in AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Ognibene, T; Palmblad, M; Reimer, P

    2004-08-03

    Confidence in the precisions of AMS and decay measurements must be comparable for the application of the {sup 14}C calibration to age determinations using both technologies. We confirmed the random nature of the temporal distribution of {sup 14}C ions in an AMS spectrometer for a number of sample counting rates and properties of the sputtering process. The temporal distribution of ion counts was also measured to confirm the applicability of traditional counting statistics.

  11. Implications of AM for the Navy Supply Chain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Capital Asset : The more capable an AM machine, the more it costs, upward of $1M each in some cases. This also needs to be amortized. Intellectual...strategic deployment of additive manufacturing (AM) ma- chines throughout the supply chain, coupled with the right business model , is an imperative need in...operations plan that requires changes to our business decision modeling and the tools used to manage the supply chain, including Navy Enterprise Resource

  12. METC Combustion Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. Currently two combustion rigs are operating and one additional project is under construction for the facility. Space is available in the test cells for at least one additional test rig. A pressurized pulsed combustor began operating in July of 1993. The combustor will carry out pulsed combustion of natural gas at pressures up to 10 atmospheres. A high pressure steady flow rig is currently completely fabricated. The objective of this rig is to test novel, steady-flow, pressurized combustors that produce very low NO{sub x} and other emissions. An evaporation rig currently is in startup. This rig will test the concept of water injection in an externally fired cycle. The specific technical issue that the unit will address is evaporation rates of water droplets in high pressure flows.

  13. 17. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards south. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  14. 18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Topside facility, interior of facility manager's room, view towards west. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  15. Structural requirements of strigolactones for hyphal branching in AM fungi.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kohki; Ogasawara, Shin; Ito, Seisuke; Hayashi, Hideo

    2010-07-01

    Strigolactones are a group of terpenoid lactones that act as a host-derived signal in the rhizosphere communication of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and root parasitic weeds as well as an endogenous plant hormone regulating shoot branching in plants. Strigolactones induce hyphal branching in AM fungi at very low concentrations, suggesting a highly sensitive perception system for strigolactones present in AM fungi. However, little is known about the structural requirements of strigolactones for hyphal branching in AM fungi. Here, we tested a series of natural and synthetically modified strigolactones as well as non-strigolactone-type germination stimulants for hyphal branching-inducing activity in germinating spores of the AM fungus Gigaspora margarita. All tested compounds with a tricyclic lactone coupled to a methylbutenolide via an enol ether bond showed activity, but differed in the active concentration and in the branching pattern of hyphae. Truncation of the A- and AB-rings in the tricyclic ABC lactone of strigolactones resulted in a drastic reduction in hyphal branching activity. Although the connection of the C-ring in the tricyclic lactone to the methylbutenolide D-ring was shown to be essential for hyphal branching, the bridge structure in the C-D part was found not necessarily to be enol ether, being replaceable with either alkoxy or imino ethers. These structural requirements in AM fungi are very similar but not identical to those observed in root parasitic weeds, especially with respect to the enol ether bridge in the C-D part.

  16. AmBisome (liposomal amphotericin B): a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Boswell, G W; Buell, D; Bekersky, I

    1998-07-01

    AmBisome (NeXstarPharmaceuticals, San Dimas, CA) is a unilamellar liposomal formulation of amphotericin B that was recently approved for use as empirical treatment for presumed fungal infections in febrile neutropenic patients and for aspergillosis, candidiasis, and cryptococcosis infections refractory to amphotericin B. It is a small closed microscopic sphere (<100 nm in diameter) with an inner aqueous core (i.e., a true liposome). AmBisome remains as an intact sphere in vitro and for prolonged periods of time in vivo during the processes of systemic transport and pharmacologic action. As a consequence of its size and in vivo stability, AmBisome has physiochemical properties and a pharmacokinetic profile that are considerably different from those of currently available lipid-complexed amphotericin B formulations, with greatly increased area under the plasma concentration-time curve and much lower clearance at equivalent doses. AmBisome liposomes can be seen to accumulate at sites of fungal infection. Disruption of AmBisome liposomes occurs after attachment to the fungal cell wall and results in amphotericin B binding to fungal cell membrane ergosterol with subsequent cell lysis. AmBisome has been shown to penetrate the cell wall of both extracellular and intracellular forms of susceptible fungi.

  17. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  18. GRC Ground Support Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintOnge, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The ISS Program is conducting an "ISS Research Academy' at JSC the first week of August 2010. This Academy will be a tutorial for new Users of the International Space Station, focused primarily on the new ISS National Laboratory and its members including Non-Profit Organizations, other government agencies and commercial users. Presentations on the on-orbit research facilities accommodations and capabilities will be made, as well as ground based hardware development, integration and test facilities and capabilities. This presentation describes the GRC Hardware development, test and laboratory facilities.

  19. National Facilities study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This study provides a set of recommendations for improving the effectiveness of our nation's aeronautics and space facilities. The study plan considers current and future government and commercial needs as well as DOD and NASA mission requirements through the year 2023. It addresses shortfalls in existing capabilities, new facility requirements, upgrades, consolidations, and phase-out of existing facilities. If the recommendations are implemented, they will provide world-class capability where it is vital to our country's needs and make us more efficient in meeting future needs.

  20. TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Joye, BROTHERTON

    2005-04-19

    The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

  1. Fast neutron-induced fission of Pu-240, Am-243 and W-nat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A.; Haight, R.; Shcherbakov, O.; Vorobyev, A.; Carlson, A.

    2009-10-01

    The fast neutron-induced fission cross sections of Pu-240, Am-243, W-nat and Bi-209 have been obtained relative to the fission cross section of U-235 for incident neutrons from 1 MeV to 200 MeV in ``shape'' experiments. The measurements were done at the GNEIS facility simultaneously for each investigated isotopic target using two multiplate ionization chambers and the time-of-flight (TOF) technique on a 48-m flight path. The pulsed ``white spectrum'' neutron source GNEIS had an average intensity of 3 x 10^14 n/s, burst duration 10 ns and repetition rate 50 Hz. The statistical uncertainty of the measured cross section ratios for the actinide nuclei Pu-240 and Am-243 is about 2% at neutron energies above fission threshold and is less than 10% for the natW at energies above 150 MeV. The systematic error budget is discussed. In addition, the fission cross section of Bi-209 has been obtained to compare with results of previous experiments. The new fission cross section of U-235(n,f) from the international standards evaluation was used to convert the ratio data to fission cross-sections. Finally the shape fission cross section measurements were normalized using the new evaluations from the ENDF/B-VII.0 library for the actinides, while for the sub-actinides the normalization was done using the target thicknesses of investigated and reference (U-235) nuclei. The fission cross section of Am-243 above ˜40 MeV was measured for the first time and that of W-nat was measured for the first time with a ``white spectrum'' neutron source.

  2. Towards 1‰ AMS 14C measurement precision at the Rafter Radiocarbon Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Baisden, T. T.; Zondervan, A.; Kaiser, J.; Brailsford, G.; Moss, R.

    2012-12-01

    The radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 (Δ14CO2) is an increasingly important tracer used to quantify the different sources of CO2 in the atmosphere. Due to the absence of 14C in fossil fuels, 14CO2 is perhaps the best way to quantify recently added fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere. The sea-air CO2 flux also has Δ14C different from the atmosphere, so Δ14CO2 observations can be used to examine the one-way gross CO2 flux out of the oceans. Each one part per million (ppm) of fossil fuel CO2 added to the atmosphere decreases Δ14CO2 by about 2.6‰, and fossil fuel CO2 enhancements are typically in the range of a few ppm. The detection capability is therefore strongly influenced by the precision of 14C measurements. The World Meteorological Organization recommends a goal of 1‰ 14C precision, and Δ14CO2 measurements can currently be made to slightly better than 2‰ at several facilities. New Zealand has a long history of atmospheric Δ14CO2 measurements, starting in Wellington in 1955. Rafter lab recently obtained a new accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) and developed a new graphitization system. A major focus emerging from the upgrade is the opportunity to expand the high precision atmospheric Δ14CO2 capability. Results from the first year of measurements indicate 1.3‰ repeatability on modern atmospheric CO2 in samples as small as one liter of whole air, a significant improvement over previously reported AMS 14C repeatability. We use new measurements from the long-term Baring Head Δ14CO2 record demonstrate the utility of this new high precision capability in interpreting atmospheric signals. We will report on development of graphitization procedures and AMS methodology which allow us to achieve this precision. Progress towards 1‰ precision will be discussed.

  3. LANDSAT-D data format control book. Volume 6, appendix G: GSFC HDT-AM inventory tape (GHIT-AM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The data format specifications of the Goddard HDT inventory tapes (GHITS), which accompany shipments of archival digital multispectral scanner image data (HDT-AM tapes), are defined. The GHIT is a nine-track, 1600-BPI tape which conforms to the ANSI standard and serves as an inventory and description of the image data included in the shipment. The archival MSS tapes (HDT-AMs) contain radiometrically corrected but geometrically uncorrected image data plus certain ancillary data necessary to perform the geometric corrections.

  4. FISSION PARAMETERS MEASUREMENTS FOR NP, PU, AM, AND CM ISOTOPES INSIDE A SALT BLANKET MICROMODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Titarenko, Y. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Karpikhin, E. I.; Zhivun, V. M.; Koldobsky, A. B.; Mulambetov, R. D.; Fischenko, D. V.; Kvasova, S. V.; Fomushkin, E. F.; Gavrilov, V. V.; Lopatkin, A. V.; Lopatkin, A. V.; Muratov, V. G.; Mashnik, S. G.; Yasuda, H.

    2001-01-01

    Pursuing verification of the nuclear data for actinides, we have made a run of experiments to determine reaction rates in facilities with different neutron spectra. The researches of the kind are particularly argent when going over from the transmutation physics studies to designing the transmutation reactors and developing their fuel cycle equipment. In this case, the nuclear data on the minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) are notably interesting with the view to correct prediction of transmutation rates and t,o validation of hazardous nuclear and radiation environment for the external (off-reactor) fuel cycle. It is in the case of just those nuclides when the well-known ENDF/B6 and JENDL3.2 libraries give the most discrepant nuclear cross sections, thus necessitating the high- priority experimental tests.

  5. Development of forging and heat treating practices for AMS 5737 for use at liquid helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Greenlee, M.

    1981-08-10

    To achieve a combination of high yield-strength (sigma y), plane-strain fracture-toughness (K/sub IC/) and resistance to galling when turned against austenitic stainless steels in highly-loaded threaded turnbuckles in the M.F.T.F.-B (Mirror Fusion Test Facility), AMS 5737 (Fe-15Cr-25Ni-1Mo-V-Ti-Al-B), a heat-treatable Fe-base superalloy that is slightly-ferromagnetic under high magnetic fields at 4K, was chosen for large (approx. 340 kg) forged turn buckles. This report describes the forging and heat-treatment optimization program that resulted in good sigma y and K/sub IC/ over the 4 to 300K range of service-temperatures and the verification tests run on a pre-production forging and actual production parts.

  6. Towards the measurement of the13C(d, p)14C cross section using AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo-Morales, S.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Chávez, E.; Araujo-Escalona, V.

    2017-07-01

    A plan to study the total cross section for the13C(d, p)14C nuclear reaction has been developed for energies in the center-of-mass frame between 133 and 400 keV. The proposed experiment will use a deuterium beam (1-3 MeV of energy) from the Instituto de Física-UNAM 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and the produced14C will be afterwards measured by AMS technique in the LEMA-UNAM (HVEE 1 MV Tandetron). One of the main goals is to study the performance of the LEMA-UNAM facility in the cross section measurement in comparison with other data reported in the literature, measured by other techniques. In this work we present the current status of these studies. The relevance of the13C(d, p)14C reaction in the study of compound nucleus formation as well as in some astrophysics scenarios, and the importance of the development of the AMS technique to measure cross sections of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest in Mixico are also discussed.

  7. AMS undergoes a final weight and balance check in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Next, it will be placed in the Payload Canister and transported to Launch Complex 39A where it will be installed into Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. Weighing in at approximately three tons, the AMS is a major particle physics experiment that will look for cosmic antimatter originating from outside our galaxy. The data it gathers could also give clues about the mysterious 'dark matter' that may make up 90 percent or more of the universe. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, and the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir.

  8. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) ... it Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on ...

  9. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  10. A cryogenic test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  11. Planning Home Economics Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcy, Thomas H.; Schultz, Jerelyn B.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses modernizing, remodeling, or developing new home economic facilities. Equipment considerations, curriculum objectives, the making of a master plan, and planning reminders are provided along with a basic sketch to review prior to planning home economics laboratories. (Author)

  12. Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida marked the finish line for space shuttle missions since 1984. It is also staffed by a group of air traffic controllers who wor...

  13. Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

  14. Special Feature: Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, George; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Planning Laboratory Design" (Storm); "Perkins Money for Automotive Programs" (Cash); "Stretching a Budget" (Warren); "Video Teleconferencing--Powerful Communication for Occupational Educators" (Major); "Danger: Hazardous Materials" (Brown); and "Keeping Facilities Safe--Electrical…

  15. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  16. Facility Modernization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D; Ackley, R

    2007-05-10

    Modern and technologically up-to-date facilities and systems infrastructure are necessary to accommodate today's research environment. In response, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a continuing commitment to develop and apply effective management models and processes to maintain, modernize, and upgrade its facilities to meet the science and technology mission. The Facility Modernization Pilot Study identifies major subsystems of facilities that are either technically or functionally obsolete, lack adequate capacity and/or capability, or need to be modernized or upgraded to sustain current operations and program mission. This study highlights areas that need improvement, system interdependencies, and how these systems/subsystems operate and function as a total productive unit. Although buildings are 'grandfathered' in and are not required to meet current codes unless there are major upgrades, this study also evaluates compliance with 'current' building, electrical, and other codes. This study also provides an evaluation of the condition and overall general appearance of the structure.

  17. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines three renovated college facilities that offer student-friendly dining space. Renovation problems in the areas of food and entertainment, service and choice, and image versus architectural history preservation are addressed. (GR)

  18. Special Feature: Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, George; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Planning Laboratory Design" (Storm); "Perkins Money for Automotive Programs" (Cash); "Stretching a Budget" (Warren); "Video Teleconferencing--Powerful Communication for Occupational Educators" (Major); "Danger: Hazardous Materials" (Brown); and "Keeping Facilities Safe--Electrical…

  19. A flowsheet concept for an Am/Ln separation based on Am{sup VI} solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, B.J.; Law, J.D.

    2013-07-01

    The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term radiotoxicity of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. However, a separation amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Higher oxidation states of americium have recently been used to demonstrate solvent extraction-based separations using conventional fuel cycle ligands. Here, the successful partitioning of Am{sup VI} from the bulk of lanthanides and curium using diamyl-amyl-phosphonate (DAAP) extraction is reported. Due to the instability of Am{sup VI} in the organic phase it was readily selectively stripped to a new acidic aqueous phase to provide separation from co-extracted Ce{sup IV}. The use of NaBiO{sub 3} as an oxidant to separate Am from the lanthanides and Cm by solvent extraction has been successfully demonstrated on the bench scale. Based on these results, flowsheet concepts can be designed that result in 96 % Am recovery in the presence of a few percent of the remaining Cm and the lanthanides in two extraction contacts. Preliminary results also indicate that the DAAP extractant is robust toward γ- irradiation under realistic conditions of acidity and dissolved oxygen concentration.

  20. High- and low-Am RE inclusion phases in a U-Np-Pu-Am-Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Madden, James W.; O'Holleran, Thomas P.; Kennedy, J. Rory

    2015-03-01

    Structural, microstructural, and microchemical data were collected from rare-earth inclusions in an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with ~3 at% Am, 2% Np, and 9% rare-earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, and Nd). Two RE phases with different concentrations of Am were identified. The composition of high-Am RE inclusions is ~2-5 at% La, 15-20 % Ce, 5-10% Pr, 25-45% Nd, 1% Np, 5-10% Pu, and 10-20% Am. Some areas also have O, although this does not appear to be an essential part of the high-Am RE phase. The inclusions have a face-centered cubic structure with a lattice parameter a ~ 0.54 nm. The composition of the only low-Am RE inclusion studied in detail is ~~35-40 at% O, 40-45 % Nd, 1-2% Zr, 4-5% La, 9-10% Ce, and 6-7% Pr. This inclusion is an oxide with a crystal structure similar to the room-temperature structure of Nd2O3. Microstructural features suggest that oxidation occurred during casting, and that early crystallization of high-temperature oxides led to formation of two distinct RE phases.

  1. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  2. Facilities | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  3. Hanford Facility contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.; Miskho, A.G.; Brunke, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit-specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous materials spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases as a result of transportation activities, movement of materials, packaging, and storage of hazardous materials.

  4. Business Planning Core Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Itzkowitz, G.N.

    2014-01-01

    Thoughtful business planning is pivotal to the success of any business/operational venture. When planned in a thoughtful and detailed manner there are very few operational or financial surprises for an institution or facility (service center) to contend with. At Stony Brook Medicine we include SWOT analysis and a detailed Market Analysis as part of the process. This is bolstered by an initiative to ensure institutional policies are met so that facilities remain in compliance throughout their lifecycle. As we operate 14 facilities we have had the opportunity to become creative in our approach to coordinate activities, virtualize services, integrate new software business-to-business partners, and finally coordinate plans for phased consolidation instead of outright termination of services when required. As the Associate Dean for Scientific Operations and Research Facilities, the shared research facilities (cores) of the Medical School are in my direct line of sight. We understand their value to the meeting our overall research mission. We have found that an active process of monitoring to predict trouble as much as possible is the best approach for facilities. Some case analysis of this type of interaction will be presented as well.

  5. A simulation study of linear RF ion guides for AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.-L.; Litherland, A. E.

    2015-02-01

    The use of radiofrequency multipoles and particularly the radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) controlled gas cell to facilitate on-line isobar separations for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is being explored experimentally and theoretically in a preliminary way at present. These new methods have the potential to extend greatly the analytical scope of AMS. However, there are many technical challenges to adapt an RF gas cell isobar separating device and still maintain stable and high transmission for routine AMS using the high current Cs+ sputter ion sources developed for nuclear physics and adapted to the detection of rare radioactive isotopes for AMS. An overview of linear RF ion guide properties is therefore needed to assist in the conceptualization of their efficient additions into AMS. In this work the intrinsic properties of linear RF ion guides, which are relevant to the generation of the RF induced ion energy distributions and for the evaluation of the ion transmissions in vacuum, are systematically studied using SIMION 8.1. These properties are compared among radiofrequency quadrupole, hexapole and octupole ion guides, so that their usefulness for AMS applications can be evaluated and compared. By simulation it is found that to prepare a typical RF captured AMS ion beam to within a safe range of ion energies prior to the onset of gas interactions, a higher multipole is more suitable for the first RF field receptor, while a quadrupole operated with q2 ∼ 0.5 is more suited as the final ion guide for concentrating the energy-cooled ions near axis.

  6. Engineering directorate technical facilities catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog is designed to provide an overview of the technical facilities available within the Engineering Directorate at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The combined capabilities of these engineering facilities are essential elements of overall JSC capabilities required to manage and perform major NASA engineering programs. The facilities are grouped in the text by chapter according to the JSC division responsible for operation of the facility. This catalog updates the facility descriptions for the JSC Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog, JSC 19295 (August 1989), and supersedes the Engineering Directorate, Principle test and Development Facilities, JSC, 19962 (November 1984).

  7. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor

  8. Design and Qualification of the AMS-02 Flight Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirey, Kimberly; Banks,Stuart; Boyle, Rob; Unger, Reuven

    2005-01-01

    Four commercial Sunpower M87N Stirling-cycle cryocoolers will be used to extend the lifetime of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) experiment. The cryocoolers will be mounted to the AMS-02 vacuum case using a structure that will thermally and mechanically decouple the cryocooler from the vacuum case. This paper discusses modifications of the Sunpower M87N cryocooler to make it acceptable for space flight applications and suitable for use on AMS-02. Details of the flight model qualification test program are presented. AMS-02 is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector containing a large superfluid helium-cooled superconducting magnet. Highly sensitive detector plates inside the magnet measure a particle's speed, mass, charge, and direction. The AMS-02 experiment, which will be flown as an attached payload on the International Space Station, will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. Two engineering model cryocoolers have been under test at NASA Goddard since November 2001. Qualification testing of the engineering model cryocooler bracket assembly including random vibration and thermal vacuum testing was completed at the end of April 2005. The flight cryocoolers were received in December 2003. Acceptance testing of the flight cryocooler bracket assemblies began in May 2005 .

  9. Space Flight Qualification Program for the AMS-2 Commercial Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirey, K. A.; Banks, I. S.; Breon, S. R.; Boyle, R. F.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector containing a large superfluid helium-cooled superconducting magnet. Highly sensitive detector plates inside the magnet measure a particle's speed, momentum, charge, and path. The AMS-02 experiment will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS-02 will be installed on the International Space Station on Utilization Flight-4. The experiment will be run for at least three years. To extend the life of the stored cryogen and minimize temperature gradients around the magnet, four Stirling-cycle Sunpower M87N cryocoolers will be integrated with AMS-02. The cryocooler cold tip will be connected via a flexible strap to the outer vapor cooled shield of the dewar. Initial thermal analysis shows the lifetime of the experiment is increased by a factor of 2.8 with the use of the cryocooler. The AMS-02 project selected the Sunpower M87 cryocoolers and has asked NASA Goddard to qualify the cryocoolers for space flight use. This paper describes the interfaces with the cryocoolers and presents data collected during testing of the two engineering model cryocoolers. Tests include thermal performance characterization and launch vibration testing. Magnetic field compatibility testing will be presented in a separate paper at the conference.

  10. Dosimetry studies on prototype 241Am sources for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Gray, L

    1987-06-01

    Sealed sources of 241Am emit primarily 60 keV photons which, because of multiple Compton scattering, produce dose distributions in water that are comparable to those from 226Ra or 137Cs. However, americium gamma rays can be shielded by thin layers of high atomic number materials since the half value layer thickness is only 1/8th of a mm of lead for americium gamma rays as compared to a value of 12 mm for 226Ra gamma rays. This may allow effective in vivo shielding of critical organs, for example; the bladder can be partially shielded by hypaque solution, and the rectum and sigmoid colon by barium sulfate. In addition, the exposure to medical personnel involved in intracavitary application and patient care may be reduced substantially by the use of relatively thin lead aprons and light weight, portable shields. To investigate the feasibility of 241Am sources for intracavitary irradiation, dosimetry studies on prototype 241Am sources have been performed and a computer model for the determination of dose distributions around encapsulated cylindrical sources of 241Am has been developed and tested. Results of dosimetry measurements using ionization chambers, lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, a scanning scintillation probe, and film dosimetry, confirm theoretical predictions that these sources can deliver dose rates adequate for intracavitary irradiation. Further dosimetry measurements in simulated clinical situations using lead foils and test tubes filled with hypaque or barium sulfate, confirm the predicted effectiveness of in vivo shielding which can be readily achieved with 241Am sources.

  11. Design and Qualification of the AMS-02 Flight Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirey, Kimberly; Banks,Stuart; Boyle, Rob; Unger, Reuven

    2005-01-01

    Four commercial Sunpower M87N Stirling-cycle cryocoolers will be used to extend the lifetime of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) experiment. The cryocoolers will be mounted to the AMS-02 vacuum case using a structure that will thermally and mechanically decouple the cryocooler from the vacuum case. This paper discusses modifications of the Sunpower M87N cryocooler to make it acceptable for space flight applications and suitable for use on AMS-02. Details of the flight model qualification test program are presented. AMS-02 is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector containing a large superfluid helium-cooled superconducting magnet. Highly sensitive detector plates inside the magnet measure a particle's speed, mass, charge, and direction. The AMS-02 experiment, which will be flown as an attached payload on the International Space Station, will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. Two engineering model cryocoolers have been under test at NASA Goddard since November 2001. Qualification testing of the engineering model cryocooler bracket assembly including random vibration and thermal vacuum testing was completed at the end of April 2005. The flight cryocoolers were received in December 2003. Acceptance testing of the flight cryocooler bracket assemblies began in May 2005 .

  12. 241Am Ingrowth and Its Effect on Internal Dose

    DOE PAGES

    Konzen, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Generally, plutonium has been manufactured to support commercial and military applications involving heat sources, weapons and reactor fuel. This work focuses on three typical plutonium mixtures, while observing the potential of 241Am ingrowth and its effect on internal dose. The term “ingrowth” is used to describe 241Am production due solely from the decay of 241Pu as part of a plutonium mixture, where it is initially absent or present in a smaller quantity. Dose calculation models do not account for 241Am ingrowth unless the 241Pu quantity is specified. This work suggested that 241Am ingrowth be considered in bioassay analysis when theremore » is a potential of a 10% increase to the individual’s committed effective dose. It was determined that plutonium fuel mixtures, initially absent of 241Am, would likely exceed 10% for typical reactor grade fuel aged less than 30 years; however, heat source grade and aged weapons grade fuel would normally fall below this threshold. In conclusion, although this work addresses typical plutonium mixtures following separation, it may be extended to irradiated commercial uranium fuel and is expected to be a concern in the recycling of spent fuel.« less

  13. Antiproton identification below threshold with the AMS-02 RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zi-Yuan; Delgado Mendez, Carlos Jose; Giovacchini, Francesca; Haino, Sadakazu; Hoffman, Julia

    2017-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), which is installed on the International Space Station (ISS), has been collecting data successfully since May 2011. The main goals of AMS-02 are the search for cosmic anti-matter, dark matter and the precise measurement of the relative abundance of elements and isotopes in galactic cosmic rays. In order to identify particle properties, AMS-02 includes several specialized sub-detectors. Among these, the AMS-02 Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) is designed to provide a very precise measurement of the velocity and electric charge of particles. We describe a method to reject the dominant electron background in antiproton identification with the use of the AMS-02 RICH detector as a veto for rigidities below 3 GV. A ray tracing integration method is used to maximize the statistics of p¯ with the lowest possible e- background, providing 4 times rejection power gain for e- background with respect to only 3% of p¯ signal efficiency loss. By using the collected cosmic-ray data, e- contamination can be well suppressed within 3% with β ≈ 1, while keeping 76% efficiency for p¯ below the threshold. Supported by China Scholarship Council (CSC) under Grant No.201306380027.

  14. View of east end of Facility 222, with Facility 223 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of east end of Facility 222, with Facility 223 attached on left. Facility 273 at left edge and Facility 221 at right edge of photo. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Gymnasium & Theater, Neville Way, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. 33 CFR 103.510 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan review and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan... HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.510 Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan review and approval. Each AMS Plan will be submitted...

  16. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  17. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  18. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  19. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  20. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  1. 33 CFR 103.310 - Responsibilities of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Maritime Security (AMS) Committee. 103.310 Section 103.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Security (AMS) Committee § 103.310 Responsibilities of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee. (a) The AMS Committee shall: (1) Identify critical port infrastructure and operations; (2) Identify...

  2. 33 CFR 103.405 - Elements of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Security (AMS) Assessment. 103.405 Section 103.405 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Security (AMS) Assessment § 103.405 Elements of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Assessment. (a) The AMS Assessment must include the following elements: (1) Identification of the critical Marine Transportation...

  3. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Norman, E. B.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  4. Comprehensive facilities plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  5. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  6. AmBe Waste Minimization Activities Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kent D. Abney; Zita V. Svitra; Michael R. Cisneros

    1999-05-01

    The CST-11 objective for the Radioactive Source Recovery Project is to evaluate a nitric acid-based flowsheet and alternatives for dissolution, separation, and recovery of americium from AmBe neutron source materials returned from private and governmental institutions. Specific tasks performed during FY97 and FY98 included the experimental investigation of material dissolution rate and efficiency as a function of time and temperature for nitric acid as compared to hydrochloric acid. Alkaline dissolution reaction conditions using sodium hydroxide and ammonium bifluoride were also investigated. In both the acidic and alkaline dissolution conditions, the objective was to effect an initial separation of the americium from the beryllium or vice versa. The process solution and remaining solids should also be amenable to further processing and purification schemes. This work was performed on actual AmBe neutron source material in order to demonstrate the feasibility of {sup 241}Am purification from dismantled neutron sources.

  7. A new family of magnetic stars: the Am stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Petit, P.; Lignières, F.

    2016-12-01

    We presented the discovery of an ultra-weak field in three Am stars, β UMa, θ Leo, and Alhena, thanks to ultra-deep spectropolarimetric observations. Two of the three stars of this study shown peculiar magnetic signatures with prominent positive lobes like the one of Sirius A that are not expected in the standard theory of the Zeeman effect. Alhena, contrary to Sirius A, β UMa and θ Leo, show normal signatures. These detections of ultra-weak fields in Am stars suggest the existence of a new family of magnetic intermediate-mass stars: the Am stars. However the various shapes of the signatures required further observation to identify the physical processes at work in these stars. A preliminary explanation is based on microturbulence.

  8. Aspects of observations and evolution of AM CVn stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.

    A brief history is given of the very earliest work on HZ 29 (aka AM CVn), during which it was demoted from quasar to cataclysmic variable via hot subdwarf. An overview of the steadily increasing number of known AM CVn stars is given, which are all helium transferring close binaries. It is suggested that more work is needed on the effects of irradiation on the secondaries both from the point of long term evolution and as a possible mechanism for producing short term unstable mass transfer. Apart from their own intrinsic interest, the general properties of AM CVn stars may teach us something about their hydrogen-rich cousins, the more populous normal cataclysmic variables.

  9. Joint infrared and visual monitoring of AM Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Werner, M.; Krzeminski, W.

    1978-01-01

    Four cycles of the flux from the 3.1 hour X-ray variable AM Her have been observed simultaneously at four wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared. The data show periodic variations at all wavelengths but show systematic changes with wavelength in the relative depths and widths of the primary and secondary minima. The spectral energy distribution varies with phase, being reddest at primary minimum and bluest at the maximum. At primary minimum it is consistent with the energy distribution of an M2 V star plus a component which is flat with frequency; if an M2 V star is present, a lower limit of 100 pc can be placed on the distance to AM Her. The implications of the data on several models for AM Her are discussed.

  10. The AMS-02 lead-scintillating fibres Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Basara, L.; Bigongiari, G.; Bosi, F.; Brun, P.; Cadoux, F.; Cervelli, F.; Chambert, V.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Coignet, G.; Cougoulat, G.; Di Falco, S.; Dubois, J. M.; Elles, S.; Falchini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Fougeron, D.; Fouque, N.; Galeotti, S.; Gallucci, G.; Gherarducci, F.; Girard, L.; Giuseppe, F.; Goy, C.; Hermel, R.; Incagli, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Journet, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Lepareur, V.; Li, Z. H.; Lieunard, B.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, Y. S.; Maestro, P.; Magazzù, C.; Maire, M.; Orsini, A.; Paniccia, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Peltier, F.; Piendibene, M.; Pilo, F.; Pochon, J.; Rambure, T.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Spinella, F.; Tang, X. W.; Tassan-Viol, J.; Tazzioli, A.; Vannini, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Zhuang, H. L.

    2013-06-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a fine grained lead-scintillating fibres sampling calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the longitudinal and lateral shower development. It provides a high (≥106) electron/hadron discrimination with the other AMS-02 detectors [1] and good energy resolution. The calorimeter also provides a standalone photon trigger capability to AMS-02. The mechanical assembly was realized to ensure minimum weight, still supporting the intrinsically heavy calorimeter during launch. ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from GeV up to TeV. A full-scale flight-like model was tested using electrons and proton beams with energies ranging from 6 to 250 GeV.

  11. Quantifying exploratory low dose compounds in humans with AMS

    PubMed Central

    Dueker, Stephen R.; Vuong, Le T.; Lohstroh, Peter N.; Giacomo, Jason A.; Vogel, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an established technology whose essentiality extends beyond simply a better detector for radiolabeled molecules. Attomole sensitivity reduces radioisotope exposures in clinical subjects to the point that no population need be excluded from clinical study. Insights in human physiochemistry are enabled by the quantitative recovery of simplified AMS processes that provide biological concentrations of all labeled metabolites and total compound related material at non-saturating levels. In this paper, we review some of the exploratory applications of AMS 14C in toxicological, nutritional, and pharmacological research. This body of research addresses the human physiochemistry of important compounds in their own right, but also serves as examples of the analytical methods and clinical practices that are available for studying low dose physiochemistry of candidate therapeutic compounds, helping to broaden the knowledge base of AMS application in pharmaceutical research. PMID:21047543

  12. AMS 700 inflatable penile prosthesis with InhibiZone.

    PubMed

    McKim, Stephen E; Carson, Culley C

    2010-05-01

    Inflatable penile prostheses are the definitive therapy for erectile dysfunction refractory to medical therapy. For years mechanical malfunction was the most common cause of device failure, but recent advances in design have largely eliminated this, and now infection is the most significant problem with these implants. Antibiotic-coated medical devices, such as central venous and bladder catheters, have proven effective in reducing bacterial colonization and biofilm formation, leading to decreased rates of infection. In 2001, American Medical Systems (AMS) released its AMS 700 series penile prosthesis impregnated with a proprietary combination of the antibiotics rifampin and minocycline, called InhibiZone. Multiple studies have found that this device significantly reduces infection rates in men receiving penile prostheses. In July 2009, the US FDA approved the AMS 700 with InhibiZone as the only inflatable penile prosthesis with clinical evidence showing significant reduction in the rate of revision surgery due to infection.

  13. Quantifying exploratory low dose compounds in humans with AMS.

    PubMed

    Dueker, Stephen R; Vuong, Le T; Lohstroh, Peter N; Giacomo, Jason A; Vogel, John S

    2011-06-19

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an established technology whose essentiality extends beyond simply a better detector for radiolabeled molecules. Attomole sensitivity reduces radioisotope exposures in clinical subjects to the point that no population need be excluded from clinical study. Insights in human physiochemistry are enabled by the quantitative recovery of simplified AMS processes that provide biological concentrations of all labeled metabolites and total compound related material at non-saturating levels. In this paper, we review some of the exploratory applications of AMS (14)C in toxicological, nutritional, and pharmacological research. This body of research addresses the human physiochemistry of important compounds in their own right, but also serves as examples of the analytical methods and clinical practices that are available for studying low dose physiochemistry of candidate therapeutic compounds, helping to broaden the knowledge base of AMS application in pharmaceutical research.

  14. Pinpointing cosmic ray propagation with the AMS-02 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pato, Miguel; Hooper, Dan; Simet, Melanie E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov

    2010-06-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), which is scheduled to be deployed onboard the International Space Station later this year, will be capable of measuring the composition and spectra of GeV-TeV cosmic rays with unprecedented precision. In this paper, we study how the projected measurements from AMS-02 of stable secondary-to-primary and unstable ratios (such as boron-to-carbon and beryllium-10-to-beryllium-9) can constrain the models used to describe the propagation of cosmic rays throughout the Milky Way. We find that within the context of fairly simple propagation models, all of the model parameters can be determined with high precision from the projected AMS-02 data. Such measurements are less constraining in more complex scenarios, however, which allow for departures from a power-law form for the diffusion coefficient, for example, or for inhomogeneity or stochasticity in the distribution and chemical abundances of cosmic ray sources.

  15. The ACAT inhibitor VULM1457 significantly reduced production and secretion of adrenomedullin (AM) and down-regulated AM receptors on human hepatoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Drímal, J; Fáberová, V; Schmidtová, L; Bednáriková, M; Drímal, J; Drímal, D

    2005-12-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an important enzyme in the pathways of cholesterol esterification. It has been shown that new ACAT inhibitor 1-(2,6-diisopropyl-phenyl)-3-[4-(4'-nitrophenylthio)phenyl] urea (VULM1457) significantly reduced atherogenic activity in animal experimental atherosclerosis. Proliferative hormone adrenomedullin (AM) has been shown to be released in response to hypoxia, however, its role in cellular protection has remained elusive. The effect of increased local production of AM in cells and resultant down-regulation of AM receptors has not been investigated yet. We hypothesized that increased expression of AM in hypoxic cells was the result of excessive AM production with resultant AM receptor down-regulation, surface-membrane protein degradation and that the new specific ACAT inhibitor would reduce AM induction in hypoxia and thus proliferation of cells. In order to investigate specific cellular AM signaling and protection induced by VULM1457, we characterized specific surface-membrane [125I]AM receptors expressed on cells, evaluated AM secretion (RIA assays), AM mRNA expression in cultured cells (RT-PCR analysis) and proliferation (incorporation of [3H]thymidine) in control, hypoxic and metabolically stressed human hepatoblastoma cell lines exposed to gradually increasing concentrations of VULM1457. The new ACAT inhibitor VULM1457 in concentration 0.03 and 0.1 micromol/l significantly down-regulated specific AM receptors on HepG2 cells, reduced AM secretion of HepG2 cells exposed to hypoxia. These results suggest that VULM1457, as new member of ACAT family of inhibitors could negatively regulate cell proliferation induced by AM, which may correlate with down-regulation of membrane-bound AM receptors on HepG2 cells, and moreover, with the induction and expression of AM in hypoxia.

  16. Preparing a Facilities Master Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalina, David

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the steps in creating a facilities master plan. The facilities master plan is a long-range look at the development of one's facilities, combined with an implementation plan that indicates the steps, sequence and costs to get one there. There are three basic steps: (1) analyzing what one has (assessing one's facilities to…

  17. Structural Requirements of Strigolactones for Hyphal Branching in AM Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Kohki; Ogasawara, Shin; Ito, Seisuke; Hayashi, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Strigolactones are a group of terpenoid lactones that act as a host-derived signal in the rhizosphere communication of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and root parasitic weeds as well as an endogenous plant hormone regulating shoot branching in plants. Strigolactones induce hyphal branching in AM fungi at very low concentrations, suggesting a highly sensitive perception system for strigolactones present in AM fungi. However, little is known about the structural requirements of strigolactones for hyphal branching in AM fungi. Here, we tested a series of natural and synthetically modified strigolactones as well as non-strigolactone-type germination stimulants for hyphal branching-inducing activity in germinating spores of the AM fungus Gigaspora margarita. All tested compounds with a tricyclic lactone coupled to a methylbutenolide via an enol ether bond showed activity, but differed in the active concentration and in the branching pattern of hyphae. Truncation of the A- and AB-rings in the tricyclic ABC lactone of strigolactones resulted in a drastic reduction in hyphal branching activity. Although the connection of the C-ring in the tricyclic lactone to the methylbutenolide D-ring was shown to be essential for hyphal branching, the bridge structure in the C–D part was found not necessarily to be enol ether, being replaceable with either alkoxy or imino ethers. These structural requirements in AM fungi are very similar but not identical to those observed in root parasitic weeds, especially with respect to the enol ether bridge in the C–D part. PMID:20418334

  18. Frog skin peptides (tigerinin-1R, magainin-AM1, -AM2, CPF-AM1, and PGla-AM1) stimulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) by GLUTag cells.

    PubMed

    Ojo, O O; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2013-02-01

    Skin secretions of several frog species contain host-defense peptides with multiple biological activities including in vitro and in vivo insulin-releasing actions. This study investigates the effects of tigerinin-1R from Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Dicroglossidae) and magainin-AM1, magainin-AM2, caerulein precursor fragment (CPF-AM1) and peptide glycine leucine amide (PGLa-AM1) from Xenopus amieti (Pipidae) on GLP-1 secretion from GLUTag cells. Tigerinin-1R showed the highest potency producing a significant (P<0.05) increase in GLP-1 release at a concentration of 0.1nM for the cyclic peptide and 0.3nM for the reduced form. All peptides from X. amieti significantly (P<0.05) stimulated GLP-1 release at concentrations ⩾300nM with magainin-AM2 exhibiting the greatest potency (minimum concentration producing a significant stimulation=1nM). The maximum stimulatory response (3.2-fold of basal rate, P<0.001) was produced by CPF-AM1 at a concentration of 3μM. No peptide stimulated release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase from GLUTag cells at concentrations up to 3μM indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. The data indicate that frog skin peptides, by stimulating GLP-1 release as well as direct effects on insulin secretion, show therapeutic potential as agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Small scale shear zone in calcite: AMS and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxerová, Zuzana; Machek, Matěj; Kusbach, Vladimír; Racek, Martin; Silva, Pedro F.

    2016-04-01

    Two structural profiles across thin shear zone in calcite from quarry in Estremoz (Portugal) were studied to find a relationship between AMS and strain in natural rocks. The mesoscopic fabric is characterized by the change from the subhorizontal coarse-grained foliation towards the ~2cm-wide shear zone center with subvertical fine-grained foliation. In microstructure, the shear zone records dynamic recrystallization of calcite aggregate which resulted in development of porphyroclastic microstructure with increasing proportion of fine-grained recrystallized matrix towards the shear zone center. Two distinct crystallographic preferred orientations of calcite were recorded. One related with porphyroclasts, characterized by subvertical orientation of calcite axes and another associated with recrystallized matrix showing subhorizontal calcite axes orientation. The magnetic susceptibility ranges from -8e-6SI to 9e-6SI, with the average -4e-6SI. The majority of the rock mass is diamagnetic, corresponding well with the thermomagnetic curves, with local paramagnetic accumulations in form of thin bands. The AMS of the both profiles exhibits stable subvertical foliation bearing vertical lineation which is locally alternated by the medium-angle foliation. We interpret the AMS fabric pattern which is perpendicular to the mineral one as a type of inverse AMS fabric, due to high iron content in major part of calcite grains The magnetic and microstructural description of the shear zone is accompanied by numerical modeling of AMS based on CPO and different proportion of porphyroclasts, matrix and mica for purposes of deciphering the influence of present microstructural features on AMS.

  20. Modernizing sports facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, R.

    1996-09-01

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team to meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.

  1. A Materials Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Avery, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Materials Exposure Facility (MEF) is to provide a test bed in space for conducting long-term (greater than one year) materials experiments which require exposure to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. The proposed MEF is planned to be an integral part of the agency's Space Environments and Effects Research Program. The facility will provide experiment trays similar to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Each tray location is planned to have a power and data interface and robotic installation and removal provisions. Space environmental monitoring for each side of the MEF will also be provided. Since routine access to MEF for specimen retrieval is extremely important to the materials research, Space Station Freedom has been chosen as the preferred MEF carrier.

  2. Mars ultraviolet simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Zill, L P; Mack, R; DeVincenzi, D L

    1979-12-01

    A facility was established for long-duration ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure of natural and synthetic materials in order to test hypotheses concerning Martian soil chemistry observed by the Viking Mars landers. The system utilized a 2500 watt xenon lamp as the radiation source, with the beam passing through a heat-dissipating water filter before impinging upon an exposure chamber containing the samples to be irradiated. The chamber was designed to allow for continuous tumbling of the samples, maintenance of temperatures below 0 degrees C during exposure, and monitoring of beam intensity. The facility also provided for sample preparation under a variety of atmospheric conditions, in addition to the Mars nominal. As many as 33 sealed sample ampules have been irradiated in a single exposure. Over 100 samples have been irradiated for approximately 100 to 700 h. The facility has performed well in providing continuous UV irradiation of multiple samples for long periods of time under simulated Mars atmospheric and thermal conditions.

  3. Facility capability assessment.

    PubMed

    McCandless, J

    1994-06-01

    An inspection and evaluation procedure has been developed to assess the capabilities of contract toxicology laboratories. This procedure has been used for the inspection of 18 different contract toxicology laboratories. There are 10 areas inspected: 1. Facility 2. Personnel 3. Operations 4. Animals/Animal Care 5. Standard Operating Procedures 6. Quality Assurance 7. Equipment 8. Test Article 9. Data 10. Archives. Each of these areas is divided into categories with each category divided further into specific topics. Points are assigned to each topic. The points earned by the laboratory reflect the inspector's assessment of the laboratory's quality in each area. Area scores are added and a percentage score for the facility is calculated. This approach provides a clear distinction among the laboratories evaluated. The facility inspection and rating system played an important role in screening laboratories when the author worked for the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) corporate toxicology department. It highlighted strengths and weaknesses of individual laboratories.

  4. The Basis for Developing Samarium AMS for Fuel Cycle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Tumey, S J; Weaver, C J

    2008-10-13

    Modeling of nuclear reactor fuel burnup indicates that the production of samarium isotopes can vary significantly with reactor type and fuel cycle. The isotopic concentrations of {sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, and {sup 151}Sm are potential signatures of fuel reprocessing, if analytical techniques can overcome the inherent challenges of lanthanide chemistry, isobaric interferences, and mass/charge interferences. We review the current limitations in measurement of the target samarium isotopes and describe potential approaches for developing Sm-AMS. AMS sample form and preparation chemistry will be discussed as well as possible spectrometer operating conditions.

  5. AMS Climate Studies: Improving climate literacy through undergraduate education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Moran, J. M.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Mills, E. W.; Blair, B. A.; Hopkins, E. J.; Kiley, T. P., Jr.; Ruwe, E. E.

    2009-12-01

    In working to promote scientific literacy among the public, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has produced a suite of introductory college-level courses that engage students by investigating relevant topics in Earth science, and utilizing the most current, real-world environmental data. The newest of these courses, AMS Climate Studies, is a turnkey package which will be licensed by individual colleges for local offering in online, blended, or traditional lecture/lab settings. The course will place students in a dynamic learning environment where they will investigate Earth’s climate system using real-world data. This will allow the course to keep a strong focus on the science, while still addressing many of the societal impacts that draw the attention of today’s students. In this way, the course will serve as a great primer in preparing students to become responsible, scientifically-literate participants in discussions of climate science and climate change. Developed with major support from NASA, AMS Climate Studies will encourage students to investigate the atmosphere and world ocean as components of a larger Earth system. More than 500 colleges and universities throughout the United States have already offered AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies, after which AMS Climate Studies will be modeled. The learning system will consist of a fully-integrated set of printed and online learning materials focused around a brand new, hardcover 15-chapter textbook, Climate Studies: Introduction to Climate Science and an Investigations Manual with 30 lab-style activities that will emphasize the use of authentic science data. The package will also include a course website providing weekly Current Climate Studies activities along with access to environmental data streams, including an impressive suite of NASA and NOAA images and products. The development and testing of AMS Climate Studies is currently nearing completion. A number of college and university

  6. Correlation of strain with anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.

    1991-01-01

    Existing correlations between strain and anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) have been re-assessed using a single parameter to express both anisotropies. The P' parameter ( Hrouda, 1982) shows potential as a powerful single expression of the intensity of strain and of AMS. Previous correlations are improved by use of this parameter. Cautious optimism is justified for correlations between strain and susceptibility in a certain strain window between a lower limit (excluding the incomplete overprint of predeformation anisotropy) and an upper limit (excluding the effects of saturation anisotropy). For successful correlations the influence of stress-controlled recrystallisation should be minimal and the mineralogical sources of susceptibility must predate deformation.

  7. Pulsation behavior of classical Am star 60 Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiping, Li

    2000-08-01

    Five nights photoelectric photometric observations through v and y bands confirm the pulsation of classical Am δ Scuti variable 60 Tau. Power spectrum of light curves shows multi-period pulsation behavior of 60 Tau and two pulsation modes f1=13.0364 and f2=11.8521 cycles per day are definitely identified. Classical Am star 60 Tau is a complicated pulsation δ Scuti variable. Considering the pulsation constant Q, 60 Tau is identified to be low overtone f or p1 modes tendentiously.

  8. WSRC Am/Cm Stabilization Program - Cylindrical Induction Melter Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, W.A.

    1999-02-17

    1.1.1 Kilogram quantities of Americium and Curium isotopes (Am/Cm) have been produced at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. These highly radioactive isotopes have both government and commercial value and are currently stored as a nitric acid solution at the Savannah River Site. The material represents the largest source term in the F canyon at SRS. It is proposed that the Am/Cm material be vitrified to stabilize the material for long term, recoverable storage. This paper reviews the progress made during the process development phase of this program using the Cylindrical Induction Melter.

  9. AMS in payload bay viewed from Mir Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-24

    STS091-367-033 (2-12 June 1998) --- This photo of the Space Shuttle Discovery's aft section features the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), as seen from Russia's Mir space station, docked with Discovery at the time. AMS is the first large-magnet experiment ever placed in Earth orbit. The scientific goal of this high-energy physics experiment is to increase our understanding of the composition and origin of the universe. It is designed to search for and measure charged particles, including antimatter, outside Earth's atmosphere. The charge of such particles can be identified only by their trajectories in a magnetic field.

  10. On the abundance of Europium. [in Ap and Am stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartoog, M. R.; Cowley, C. R.; Adelman, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The inclusion of the effects of hyperfine splitting can significantly lower the abundance estimate of Eu from singly ionized lines which lie on the flat portion of the curve of growth. In the 21 cool Ap stars studied by Adelman and the five Am stars studied by Smith, the Eu abundance was reduced by 0.4 dex on the average. In individual cases, the reductions were as great as 0.9 dex. This makes the Eu abundance comparable to that of its neighboring rare earths Sm and Gd in the Ap stars and less than Sm and Gd in the Am stars, but still substantially overabundant with respect to solar values.

  11. National Facilities Study. Volume 1: Facilities Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The inventory activity was initiated to solve the critical need for a single source of site specific descriptive and parametric data on major public and privately held aeronautics and aerospace related facilities. This a challenging undertaking due to the scope of the effort and the short lead time in which to assemble the inventory and have it available to support the task group study needs. The inventory remains dynamic as sites are being added and the data is accessed and refined as the study progresses. The inventory activity also included the design and implementation of a computer database and analytical tools to simplify access to the data. This volume describes the steps which were taken to define the data requirements, select sites, and solicit and acquire data from them. A discussion of the inventory structure and analytical tools is also provided.

  12. 5 CFR 892.402 - I am a survivor annuitant as well as an active Federal employee; am I eligible for premium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... active Federal employee; am I eligible for premium conversion? 892.402 Section 892.402 Administrative... § 892.402 I am a survivor annuitant as well as an active Federal employee; am I eligible for premium... be based on your status as an active employee and your employing agency will deduct your premiums...

  13. Modular space station facilities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The modular space station will operate as a general purpose laboratory (GPL). In addition, the space station will be able to support many attached or free-flying research and application modules that would be dedicated to specific projects like astronomy or earth observations. The GPL primary functions have been organized into functional laboratories including an electrical/electronics laboratory, a mechanical sciences laboratory, an experiment and test isolation laboratory, a hard data process facility, a data evaluation facility, an optical sciences laboratory, a biomedical and biosciences laboratory, and an experiment/secondary command and control center.

  14. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  15. Measurement of 239Pu in urine samples at ultra-trace levels using a 1 MV compact AMS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Mendoza, H.; Chamizo, E.; Yllera, A.; García-León, M.; Delgado, A.

    2010-04-01

    Routine bioassay monitoring of Pu intake in exposed workers of research and nuclear industry is usually performed by alpha spectrometry. This technique involves large sample volumes of urine and time-consuming preparative and counting protocols. Compact accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facilities make feasible the determination of ultra low-level Pu activity concentrations and Pu isotopic ratios in biological samples (blood, urine and feces), being a rapid and cost-effective measurement technique. The plutonium results in urine samples presented here have been obtained on the 1 MV compact AMS system sited at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), in Seville, Spain. In this work, a different methodological approach has been developed alternative to the "classical" preparation of urine samples for alpha spectrometry. The procedure avoids the Pu precipitation step, and involves acid sample evaporation and acid digestion in a microwave oven. Finally, purification of plutonium was achieved by using chromatography columns filled up with BioRad AG1X2 anion exchange resin (Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc.). The total time needed for analysis is about 10 h, unlike the "classical" methods based on alpha spectrometry which need about 1 week. At present, it has been demonstrated that this method allows quantifying 239Pu activity concentrations in urine of, at least, 30 μBq (13 fg 239Pu). We can conclude that the procedure would be suitable to perform in vitro routine bioassay measurements. Moreover, the innovative application of AMS opens new and interesting analytical alternatives in this field.

  16. Weak etalon effect in wave plates can introduce significant FM-to-AM modulations in complex laser systems.

    PubMed

    Dangpeng, Xu; Jianjun, Wang; Mingzhong, Li; Honghuan, Lin; Rui, Zhang; Ying, Deng; Qinghua, Deng; Xiaodong, Huang; Mingzhe, Wang; Lei, Ding; Jun, Tang

    2010-03-29

    The conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation (FM-to-AM) effect is harmful to the high power laser facility based on the phase modulation technique. The FM-to-AM effect of phase modulation pulse induced by the weak etalon effect in wave plates was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A bulk phase modulator with a modulation frequency of 9.2GHz was employed. The numerical simulation results show that the FM-to-AM effect with a temporal modulation depth of 2.5% and 29.7% on the top of the pulse shape was induced by the weak etalon effect in half-wave plate with thickness of 1mm and residual reflectance ratio of 0.5% for 1 pass and 12 passes respectively. On the same condition, the temporal modulation depth is 3.0% and 23.4% respectively in the experiment. The results are in good agreement with numerical simulation results. To our knowledge, it is the first time to introduce the weak etalon effect in wave plates for a complex phase modulation laser system.

  17. Radiocarbon signal of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in nearby trees.

    PubMed

    Janovics, R; Kelemen, D I; Kern, Z; Kapitány, S; Veres, M; Jull, A J T; Molnár, M

    2016-03-01

    Tree ring series were collected from the vicinity of a Hungarian radioactive waste treatment and disposal facility and from a distant control background site, which is not influenced by the radiocarbon discharge of the disposal facility but it represents the natural regional (14)C level. The (14)C concentration of the cellulose content of tree rings was measured by AMS. Data of the tree ring series from the disposal facility was compared to the control site for each year. The results were also compared to the (14)C data of the atmospheric (14)C monitoring stations at the disposal facility and to international background measurements. On the basis of the results, the excess radiocarbon of the disposal facility can unambiguously be detected in the tree from the repository site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Microwave Driven Ion Source for Continuous-Flow AMS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, J.; Schneider, R.J.; Reden, K.F. von; Hayes, J.M.; Roberts, M.L.; Benthien, A.

    2005-03-15

    A microwave-driven, gas-fed ion source originally developed as a high-current positive ion injector for a Tandem accelerator at Chalk River has been the subject of a three-year development program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution NOSAMS facility. Off-line tests have demonstrated positive carbon currents of 1 mA and negative carbon currents of 80 {mu}A from CO2 gas feed. This source and a magnesium charge-exchange canal were coupled to the recombinator of the NOSAMS Tandetron for on-line tests, with the source fed with reference gasses and a combustion device.The promising results obtained have prompted the redesign of the microwave source for use as an on-line, continuous-flow injector for a new AMS facility under construction at NOSAMS. The new design is optimized for best transmission of the extracted positive-ion beam through the charge-exchange canal and for reliable operation at 40 kV extraction voltage. Other goals of the re-design include improved lifetime of the microwave window and the elimination of dead volumes in the plasma generator that increase sample hold-up time.This talk will include a summary of results obtained to date at NOSAMS with the Chalk River source and a detailed description of the new design.

  19. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  20. PFP Wastewater Sampling Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hirzel, D.R.

    1995-05-11

    This test report documents the results obtained while conducting operational testing of the sampling equipment in the 225-WC building, the PFP Wastewater Sampling Facility. The Wastewater Sampling Facility houses equipment to sample and monitor the PFP`s liquid effluents before discharging the stream to the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). The majority of the streams are not radioactive and discharges from the PFP Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC). The streams that might be contaminated are processed through the Low Level Waste Treatment Facility (LLWTF) before discharging to TEDF. The sampling equipment consists of two flow-proportional composite samplers, an ultrasonic flowmeter, pH and conductivity monitors, chart recorder, and associated relays and current isolators to interconnect the equipment to allow proper operation. Data signals from the monitors are received in the 234-5Z Shift Office which contains a chart recorder and alarm annunciator panel. The data signals are also duplicated and sent to the TEDF control room through the Local Control Unit (LCU). Performing the OTP has verified the operability of the PFP wastewater sampling system. This Operability Test Report documents the acceptance of the sampling system for use.