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Sample records for 3-t mri system

  1. Philips 3T Intera Magnetic Resonance Imaging System and Upgrade of existing MRI equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Evanochko, William T

    2004-05-14

    The objective of this proposal was twofold. First, upgrade existing MRI equipment, specifically a research 4.1T whole-body system. Second, purchase a clinical, state-of-the-art 3T MRI system tailored specifically to cardiovascular and neurological applications. This project was within the guidelines of ''Medical Applications and Measurement Science''. The goals were: [1] to develop beneficial applications of magnetic resonance imaging; [2] discover new applications of MR strategies for medical research; and [2] apply them for clinical diagnosis. Much of this proposal searched for breakthroughs in this noninvasive and nondestructive imaging technology. Finally, this proposal's activities focused on research in the basic science of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, and engineering as applied to bioengineering. The centerpiece of this grant was our 4.1T ultra-high field whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance system and the newly acquired state-of-the-art, heart and head dedicated 3T clinical MRI system. We have successfully upgraded the equipment for the 4.1T system so that it is now state-of-the-art with new gradient and radio frequency amplifiers. We also purchase a unique In Vivo EKG monitoring unit that will permit tracking clinical quality EKG signals while the patient is in a high field MR scanner. Important upgrades of a peripheral vascular coil and a state-of-the-art clinical workstation for processing complex heart images were implemented. The most recent acquisition was the purchase of a state-of-the-art Philips 3T Intera clinical MRI system. This system is unique in that the magnet is only 5 1/2 feet long compare to over 12 feet long magnet of our 4.1T MRI system. The 3T MRI system is fully functional and its use and applications are already greatly benefiting the UAB with 200-300 micron resolution brain images and diagnostic quality MR angiography of coronary arteries in less than 5 minutes.

  2. Armor-piercing bullet: 3-T MRI findings and identification by a ferromagnetic detection system.

    PubMed

    Karacozoff, Alexandra M; Pekmezci, Murat; Shellock, Frank G

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues at 3 T for an armor-piercing bullet and to determine if this item could be identified using a ferromagnetic detection system. An armor-piercing bullet (.30 caliber, 7.62 × 39, copper-jacketed round, steel core; Norinco) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. Heating was assessed with the bullet in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive radio frequency body coil at a whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate of 2.9 W/kg for 15 minutes. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. In addition, a special ferromagnetic detection system (Ferroguard Screener; Metrasens, Lisle, Illinois) was used in an attempt to identify this armor-piercing bullet. The findings indicated that the armor-piercing bullet showed substantial magnetic field interactions. Heating was not excessive. Artifacts were large and may create diagnostic problems if the area of interest is close to this bullet. The ferromagnetic detection system yielded a positive result. We concluded that this armor-piercing bullet is MR unsafe. Importantly, this ballistic item was identified using the particular ferromagnetic detection system utilized in this investigation, which has important implications for MRI screening and patient safety.

  3. Occupational exposure levels of static magnetic field during routine MRI examination in 3T MR system.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Nakai, Toshiharu; Imai, Shinya; Izawa, Shuhei; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Occupational exposure to the high static magnetic fields (SMFs) during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations raises concerns of adverse health effects. In this study, personal exposure monitoring of the magnetic fields during routine examinations in two 3 T MRI systems was carried out. A three-axis Hall magnetometer was attached to a subject's chest during monitoring. Data acquisition started every time the subject entered the scanner room and ended when the subject exited the room. Four radiologic technologists from two different institutes participated in this study. The maximum exposed field ranged from 0 to 1250 mT and the average peak magnetic field (B) was 428 ± 231 mT (mean ± standard deviation (SD): number of samples (N) = 103). Then, the relationship between exposure levels and work duties was analyzed. The MRI examination of the head or neck showed the highest average peak B among four work categories. These results provide information of real exposure levels for 3 T MRI system operators and can also improve the current practical training advice for preventing extra occupational field exposure.

  4. A 20-Channel Receive-Only Mouse Array Coil for a 3T Clinical MRI System

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wiggins, Graham C.; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L.; Meise, Florian M.; Schreiber, Laura M.; Klose, Klaus J.; Heverhagen, Johannes T.

    2010-01-01

    A 20-channel phased-array coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of mice has been designed, constructed and validated with bench measurements and high resolution accelerated imaging. The technical challenges of designing a small, high density array have been overcome using individual small-diameter coil elements arranged on a cylinder in a hexagonal overlapping design with adjacent low impedance preamplifiers to further decouple the array elements. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification in accelerated imaging were simulated and quantitatively evaluated in phantoms and in vivo mouse images. Comparison between the 20-channel mouse array and a length-matched quadrature driven small animal birdcage coil showed an SNR increase at the periphery and in the center of the phantom of 3-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively. Comparison to a shorter but SNR-optimized birdcage coil (aspect ratio 1:1 and only half mouse coverage) showed an SNR gain of 2-fold at the edge of the phantom and similar SNR in the center. G-factor measurements indicate that the coil is well suited to acquire highly accelerated images. PMID:21433066

  5. Design of a loop resonator with a split-ring-resonator (SRR) for a human-body coil in 3 T MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Hyeok Woo; Cho, Young Ki; Kim, Byung Mun; Back, Hyun Man; Yoo, Hyoungsuk

    2016-04-01

    A new radio-frequency (RF) resonator for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging at clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is proposed in this paper. An approach based on the effects of the properties of metamaterials in split-ring resonators (SRRs) is used to design a new loop resonator with a SRR for NMR imaging. This loop resonator with a SRR is designed for NMR imaging at 3 T MRI systems. The 3D electromagnetic simulation was used to optimize the design of the proposed RF resonator and analyze it's performance at 3 T MRI systems. The proposed RF resonator provides strong penetrating magnetic fields at the center of the human phantom model, approximately 10%, as compared to the traditional loop-type RF resonator used for NMR imaging at clinical MRI systems. We also designed an 8-channel body coil for human-body NMR imaging by using the proposed loop resonator with a SRR. This body coil also produces more homogeneous and highly penetrating magnetic fields into the human phantom model.

  6. 3-T MRI safety assessments of magnetic dental attachments and castable magnetic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, K; Abe, Y; Ishii, T; Ishigami, T; Ohtani, K; Nagai, E; Ohyama, T; Umekawa, Y; Nakabayashi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the safety of different magnetic dental attachments during 3-T MRI according to the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-09 and F2052-06e1 standard testing methods and to develop a method to determine MRI compatibility by measuring magnetically induced torque. Methods: The temperature elevations, magnetically induced forces and torques of a ferromagnetic stainless steel keeper, a coping comprising a keeper and a cast magnetic alloy coping were measured on MRI systems. Results: The coping comprising a keeper demonstrated the maximum temperature increase (1.42 °C) for the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate and was calculated as 2.1 W kg−1 with the saline phantom. All deflection angles exceeded 45°. The cast magnetic alloy coping had the greatest deflection force (0.33 N) during 3-T MRI and torque (1.015 mN m) during 0.3-T MRI. Conclusions: The tested devices showed minimal radiofrequency (RF)-induced heating in a 3-T MR environment, but the cast magnetic alloy coping showed a magnetically induced deflection force and torque approximately eight times that of the keepers. For safety, magnetic dental attachments should be inspected before and after MRI and large prostheses containing cast magnetic alloy should be removed. Although magnetic dental attachments may pose no great risk of RF-induced heating or magnetically induced torque during 3-T MRI, their magnetically induced deflection forces tended to exceed acceptable limits. Therefore, the inspection of such devices before and after MRI is important for patient safety. PMID:25785821

  7. New Clinically-Feasible 3-T MRI Protocol to Discriminate Internal Brain Stem Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Michael J.; Chung, Sohae; Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Bruno, Mary T.; Fatterpekar, Girish M.; Shepherd, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Two new 3-T MRI contrast methods, track density imaging and echo modulation curve T2 mapping were combined with simultaneous multislice acquisition to reveal exquisite anatomical detail at 7 canonical levels of the brainstem. Compared to conventional MRI contrasts, many individual brainstem tracts and nuclear groups were directly visualized for the first time at 3-T. This new approach is clinically practical and feasible (total scan time = 20 min) allowing better brainstem anatomical localization and characterization. PMID:26869471

  8. Reconstruction of 7T-Like Images From 3T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Khosro; Shi, Feng; Zong, Xiaopeng; Shin, Hae Won; An, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    In the recent MRI scanning, ultra-high-field (7T) MR imaging provides higher resolution and better tissue contrast compared to routine 3T MRI, which may help in more accurate and early brain diseases diagnosis. However, currently, 7T MRI scanners are more expensive and less available at clinical and research centers. These motivate us to propose a method for the reconstruction of images close to the quality of 7T MRI, called 7T-like images, from 3T MRI, to improve the quality in terms of resolution and contrast. By doing so, the post-processing tasks, such as tissue segmentation, can be done more accurately and brain tissues details can be seen with higher resolution and contrast. To do this, we have acquired a unique dataset which includes paired 3T and 7T images scanned from same subjects, and then propose a hierarchical reconstruction based on group sparsity in a novel multi-level Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) space, to improve the quality of 3T MR image to be 7T-like MRI. First, overlapping patches are extracted from the input 3T MR image. Then, by extracting the most similar patches from all the aligned 3T and 7T images in the training set, the paired 3T and 7T dictionaries are constructed for each patch. It is worth noting that, for the training, we use pairs of 3T and 7T MR images from each training subject. Then, we propose multi-level CCA to map the paired 3T and 7T patch sets to a common space to increase their correlations. In such space, each input 3T MRI patch is sparsely represented by the 3T dictionary and then the obtained sparse coefficients are used together with the corresponding 7T dictionary to reconstruct the 7T-like patch. Also, to have the structural consistency between adjacent patches, the group sparsity is employed. This reconstruction is performed with changing patch sizes in a hierarchical framework. Experiments have been done using 13 subjects with both 3T and 7T MR images. The results show that our method outperforms previous

  9. Reconstruction of 7T-Like Images From 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Khosro; Shi, Feng; Zong, Xiaopeng; Shin, Hae Won; An, Hongyu; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    In the recent MRI scanning, ultra-high-field (7T) MR imaging provides higher resolution and better tissue contrast compared to routine 3T MRI, which may help in more accurate and early brain diseases diagnosis. However, currently, 7T MRI scanners are more expensive and less available at clinical and research centers. These motivate us to propose a method for the reconstruction of images close to the quality of 7T MRI, called 7T-like images, from 3T MRI, to improve the quality in terms of resolution and contrast. By doing so, the post-processing tasks, such as tissue segmentation, can be done more accurately and brain tissues details can be seen with higher resolution and contrast. To do this, we have acquired a unique dataset which includes paired 3T and 7T images scanned from same subjects, and then propose a hierarchical reconstruction based on group sparsity in a novel multi-level Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) space, to improve the quality of 3T MR image to be 7T-like MRI. First, overlapping patches are extracted from the input 3T MR image. Then, by extracting the most similar patches from all the aligned 3T and 7T images in the training set, the paired 3T and 7T dictionaries are constructed for each patch. It is worth noting that, for the training, we use pairs of 3T and 7T MR images from each training subject. Then, we propose multi-level CCA to map the paired 3T and 7T patch sets to a common space to increase their correlations. In such space, each input 3T MRI patch is sparsely represented by the 3T dictionary and then the obtained sparse coefficients are used together with the corresponding 7T dictionary to reconstruct the 7T-like patch. Also, to have the structural consistency between adjacent patches, the group sparsity is employed. This reconstruction is performed with changing patch sizes in a hierarchical framework. Experiments have been done using 13 subjects with both 3T and 7T MR images. The results show that our method outperforms previous

  10. Amyloidoma Involving the Orbit, Meckel's Cave and Infratemporal Fossa: 3T MRI Findings.

    PubMed

    Menetti, F; Bartolomei, I; Ambrosini-Spaltro, A; Salvi, F; Agati, R; Leonardi, M

    2009-03-23

    Amyloidoma is a rare lesion characterized by tissue deposition of an abnormal fibrillary protein (amyloid). It is the focal and localized counterpart of systemic amyloidosis, where the deposition of amyloid diffusely involves several organs. The few literature reports of intracranial amyloidomas include lesions involving the pituitary gland, orbit, cerebral hemispheres, temporal bone, cerebellopontine angle and jugular foramen. We describe the case of a 27-year-old woman presenting with painless slowly progressive proptosis of the right eye. The patient underwent a contrast-enhanced CT study of the head, followed by 3T MRI which disclosed a homogeneous mass in the right Meckel's cave and cavernous sinus, extending through an enlarged foramen ovale to the infratemporal fossa. The right optic nerve and ocular muscles were enlarged and infiltrated along with the retrobulbar fat by contrast-enhancing tissue. Thin contrast-enhanced MRI scans through the area of interest showed the mass to extend posterior to the gasserian ganglion, involving the cerebellopontine angle cistern, where the intracisternal parts of the III, V, and VI nerves bilaterally appeared enlarged and showed perineural enhancement. The lesion closely mimicked a malignant tumor with perineural tumor infiltration, so we performed fine needle biopsy of the portion of the lesion near the right foramen ovale under fluoroscopic guidance. Histopathology revealed that the lesion was an amyloidoma. Further clinical and blood examinations, serum chemistry, followed by biopsy of the periumbilical fat showed no signs of systemic amyloidosis or an underlying inflammatory or neoplastic disorder. No further treatment was instituted, follow-up MRI six months later showed no enlargement of the mass.

  11. In-bore setup and software for 3T MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Iordachita, Iulian; Song, Sang-Eun; Fedorov, Andriy; Oguro, Sota; Lasso, Andras; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-09-01

    MRI-guided prostate biopsy in conventional closed-bore scanners requires transferring the patient outside the bore during needle insertion due to the constrained in-bore space, causing a safety hazard and limiting image feedback. To address this issue, we present our custom-made in-bore setup and software to support MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3 T MRI scanner. The setup consists of a specially designed tabletop and a needle-guiding template with a Z-frame that gives a physician access to the perineum of the patient at the imaging position and allows the physician to perform MRI-guided transperineal biopsy without moving the patient out of the scanner. The software and Z-frame allow registration of the template, target planning and biopsy guidance. Initially, we performed phantom experiments to assess the accuracy of template registration and needle placement in a controlled environment. Subsequently, we embarked on our clinical trial (N = 10). The phantom experiments showed that the translational errors of the template registration along the right-left (RP) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes were 1.1 ± 0.8 and 1.4 ± 1.1 mm, respectively, while the rotational errors around the RL, AP and superior-inferior axes were (0.8 ± 1.0)°, (1.7 ± 1.6)° and (0.0 ± 0.0)°, respectively. The 2D root-mean-square (RMS) needle-placement error was 3 mm. The clinical biopsy procedures were safely carried out in all ten clinical cases with a needle-placement error of 5.4 mm (2D RMS). In conclusion, transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3T scanner is feasible using our custom-made tabletop setup and software, which supports manual needle placement without moving the patient out of the magnet.

  12. A 22-channel receive array with Helmholtz transmit coil for anesthetized macaque MRI at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Thomas; Keil, Boris; Serano, Peter; Mareyam, Azma; McNab, Jennifer A; Wald, Lawrence L; Vanduffel, Wim

    2013-11-01

    The macaque monkey is an important model for cognitive and sensory neuroscience that has been used extensively in behavioral, electrophysiological, molecular and, more recently, neuroimaging studies. However, macaque MRI has unique technical differences relative to human MRI, such as the geometry of highly parallel receive arrays, which must be addressed to optimize imaging performance. A 22-channel receive coil array was constructed specifically for rapid high-resolution anesthetized macaque monkey MRI at 3 T. A local Helmholtz transmit coil was used for excitation. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and noise amplification for parallel imaging were compared with those of single- and four-channel receive coils routinely used for macaque MRI. The 22-channel coil yielded significant improvements in SNR throughout the brain. Using this coil, the SNR in peripheral brain was 2.4 and 1.7 times greater than that obtained with single- or four-channel coils, respectively. In the central brain, the SNR gain was 1.5 times that of both the single- and four-channel coils. Finally, the performance of the array for functional, anatomical and diffusion-weighted imaging was evaluated. For all three modalities, the use of the 22-channel array allowed for high-resolution and accelerated image acquisition.

  13. A novel coil array for combined TMS/fMRI experiments at 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Navarro de Lara, Lucia I.; Windischberger, Christian; Kuehne, Andre; Woletz, Michael; Sieg, Jürgen; Bestmann, Sven; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Strasser, Bernhard; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To overcome current limitations in combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies by employing a dedicated coil array design for 3 Tesla. Methods The state‐of‐the‐art setup for concurrent TMS/fMRI is to use a large birdcage head coil, with the TMS between the subject's head and the MR coil. This setup has drawbacks in sensitivity, positioning, and available imaging techniques. In this study, an ultraslim 7‐channel receive‐only coil array for 3 T, which can be placed between the subject's head and the TMS, is presented. Interactions between the devices are investigated and the performance of the new setup is evaluated in comparison to the state‐of‐the‐art setup. Results MR sensitivity obtained at the depth of the TMS stimulation is increased by a factor of five. Parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of two is feasible with low g‐factors. Possible interactions between TMS and the novel hardware were investigated and were found negligible. Conclusion The novel coil array is safe, strongly improves signal‐to‐noise ratio in concurrent TMS/fMRI experiments, enables parallel imaging, and allows for flexible positioning of the TMS on the head while ensuring efficient TMS stimulation due to its ultraslim design. Magn Reson Med 74:1492–1501, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:25421603

  14. Ag/AgCl electrodes in the EEG/fMRI method in 3T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Cengiz; Kepceoğlu, Abdullah

    2013-10-01

    This study focuses on the comparison of two different types of EEG electrodes (the first B10-S-150 Ag/AgCl sintered ring electrode with 1, 5 mm touch proof safety socket and 150 cm heavy-duty lead wire and the second, B12-LS-100 Ag/AgCl sintered FE-electrode with 100 cm light-duty lead wire and 1, 5 mm touch proof safety socket with 5 kΩ resistor near sensor) used in the EEG/fMRI method in 3T MRI scanner. We compared these electrodes by their specific absorption rate (SAR) simulation values and the temperature change calculated by PRF method. The experimental setup of the study is described as follows: a phantom is prepared and the electrodes are placed on it. Then, a simulation for SAR values is realized. The temperature change is calculated by MR thermometer. As a result of this study, Ag/AgCl pin electrode is better to be use in EEG/fMRI; because the measured temperature change is expected to be low.

  15. Continuous Rapid Quantification of Stroke Volume using Magnetohydrodynamic Voltages in 3T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, T. Stan; Oshinski, John; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Stevenson, William G.; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background To develop a technique to non-invasively estimate Stroke Volume (SV) in real-time during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided procedures, based on induced Magnetohydrodynamic Voltages (VMHD) that occur in Electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings during MRI exams, leaving the MRI scanner free to perform other imaging tasks. Due to the relationship between blood-flow (BF) and VMHD, we hypothesized that a method to obtain SV could be derived from extracted VMHD vectors in the Vectorcardiogram frame-of-reference (VMHDVCG). Methods and Results To estimate a subject-specific BF-VMHD model, VMHDVCG was acquired during a 20-second breath-hold and calibrated versus aortic BF measured using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance (PCMR) in 10 subjects (n=10) and one subject diagnosed with Premature Ventricular Contractions (PVCs). Beat-to-Beat validation of VMHDVCG derived BF was performed using Real-Time Phase Contrast (RTPC) imaging in 7 healthy subjects (n=7) during a 15 minute cardiac exercise stress tests and 30 minutes after stress relaxation in 3T MRIs. Subject-specific equations were derived to correlate VMHDVCG to BF at rest, and validated using RTPC. An average error of 7.22% and 3.69% in SV estimation, respectively, was found during peak stress, and after complete relaxation. Measured beat-to-beat blood flow time-history derived from RTPC and VMHD were highly correlated using a Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient during stress tests (0.89) and after stress relaxation (=0.86). Conclusions Accurate beat-to-beat SV and BF were estimated using VMHDVCG extracted from intra-MRI 12-lead ECGs, providing a means to enhance patient monitoring during MR imaging and MR-guided interventions. PMID:26628581

  16. In-bore setup and Software for 3T MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Iordachita, Iulian; Song, Sang-Eun; Fedorov, Andriy; Oguro, Sota; Lasso, Andras; Fennessy, Fiona M; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    MRI-guided prostate biopsy in conventional closed-bore scanners requires transferring the patient outside the bore during needle insertion due to the constrained in-bore space, causing a safety hazard and limiting image feedback. To address this issue, we present our custom-made in-bore setup and software to support MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3 Tesla (T) MRI scanner. The setup consists of a specially designed tabletop and a needle-guiding template with Z-frame that give a physician access to the perineum of the patient at the imaging position and allow performance of MRI-guided transperineal biopsy without moving the patient out of the scanner. The software and Z-frame allow registration of the template, target planning, and biopsy guidance. Initially, we performed phantom experiments to assess the accuracy of template registration and needle placement in a controlled environment. Subsequently, we embarked on our clinical trial (N = 10). The phantom experiments showed that the translational errors of the template registration along the right-left (RP) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes were 1.1 ± 0.8 mm and 1.4 ± 1.1 mm respectively, while the rotational errors around the RL, AP, and superior-inferior axes were 0.8 ± 1.0 degrees, 1.7 ± 1.6 degrees, and 0.0 ± 0.0 degrees respectively. The 2D root-mean-square (RMS) needle placement error was 3.0 mm. The clinical biopsy procedures were safely carried out in all ten clinical cases with a needle placement error of 5.4 mm (2D RMS). In conclusion, transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3T scanner is feasible using our custom-made tabletop set up and software, which supports manual needle placement without moving the patient out of the magnet. PMID:22951350

  17. An optically powered CMOS tracking system for 3 T magnetic resonance environment.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Baykal; Tumer, Murat; Cindemir, Umut; Camli, Berk; Dundar, Gunhan; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Yalcinkaya, Arda D

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a fully optical Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) based catheter tracking system designed for 3 T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) environment is presented. The system aims to solve the Radio Frequency (RF) induced heating problem present in conventional wired catheter tracking systems used in MRI. It is based on an integrated circuit, consisting of a receiver and an optical power supply unit. The optical power supply unit includes a single on-chip photodiode and a DC-DC converter that boosts the low photodiode voltage output to voltages greater than 1.5 V. Through an optically driven switch, the accumulated charge on an a storage capacitor is transferred to the rest of the system. This operation is novel in the way that it is fully optical and the switch control is done through modulation of the applied light. An on-chip local oscillator signal for the receiver is avoided by application of an RF signal that is generated by the MRI machine at the receiving period. The signals received by a micro-coil antenna are processed by the on-chip direct conversion receiver. The processed signal is then transferred, also optically, to the outside world for tracking purposes. The frequency encoding method is used for MRI tracking. Operation with various levels of external optical power does not generate noticeble temperature increase in the system. The overall system is successfully tested in a 3 T MRI machine to demonstrate its full operation.

  18. MRBrainS Challenge: Online Evaluation Framework for Brain Image Segmentation in 3T MRI Scans

    PubMed Central

    Mendrik, Adriënne M.; Vincken, Koen L.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Breeuwer, Marcel; Bouvy, Willem H.; de Bresser, Jeroen; Alansary, Amir; de Bruijne, Marleen; Carass, Aaron; El-Baz, Ayman; Jog, Amod; Katyal, Ranveer; Khan, Ali R.; van der Lijn, Fedde; Mahmood, Qaiser; Mukherjee, Ryan; van Opbroek, Annegreet; Paneri, Sahil; Pereira, Sérgio; Rajchl, Martin; Sarikaya, Duygu; Smedby, Örjan; Silva, Carlos A.; Vrooman, Henri A.; Vyas, Saurabh; Wang, Chunliang; Zhao, Liang; Biessels, Geert Jan; Viergever, Max A.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for tissue segmentation in brain MRI scans. The multitude of methods proposed complicates the choice of one method above others. We have therefore established the MRBrainS online evaluation framework for evaluating (semi)automatic algorithms that segment gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on 3T brain MRI scans of elderly subjects (65–80 y). Participants apply their algorithms to the provided data, after which their results are evaluated and ranked. Full manual segmentations of GM, WM, and CSF are available for all scans and used as the reference standard. Five datasets are provided for training and fifteen for testing. The evaluated methods are ranked based on their overall performance to segment GM, WM, and CSF and evaluated using three evaluation metrics (Dice, H95, and AVD) and the results are published on the MRBrainS13 website. We present the results of eleven segmentation algorithms that participated in the MRBrainS13 challenge workshop at MICCAI, where the framework was launched, and three commonly used freeware packages: FreeSurfer, FSL, and SPM. The MRBrainS evaluation framework provides an objective and direct comparison of all evaluated algorithms and can aid in selecting the best performing method for the segmentation goal at hand. PMID:26759553

  19. MRBrainS Challenge: Online Evaluation Framework for Brain Image Segmentation in 3T MRI Scans.

    PubMed

    Mendrik, Adriënne M; Vincken, Koen L; Kuijf, Hugo J; Breeuwer, Marcel; Bouvy, Willem H; de Bresser, Jeroen; Alansary, Amir; de Bruijne, Marleen; Carass, Aaron; El-Baz, Ayman; Jog, Amod; Katyal, Ranveer; Khan, Ali R; van der Lijn, Fedde; Mahmood, Qaiser; Mukherjee, Ryan; van Opbroek, Annegreet; Paneri, Sahil; Pereira, Sérgio; Persson, Mikael; Rajchl, Martin; Sarikaya, Duygu; Smedby, Örjan; Silva, Carlos A; Vrooman, Henri A; Vyas, Saurabh; Wang, Chunliang; Zhao, Liang; Biessels, Geert Jan; Viergever, Max A

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for tissue segmentation in brain MRI scans. The multitude of methods proposed complicates the choice of one method above others. We have therefore established the MRBrainS online evaluation framework for evaluating (semi)automatic algorithms that segment gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on 3T brain MRI scans of elderly subjects (65-80 y). Participants apply their algorithms to the provided data, after which their results are evaluated and ranked. Full manual segmentations of GM, WM, and CSF are available for all scans and used as the reference standard. Five datasets are provided for training and fifteen for testing. The evaluated methods are ranked based on their overall performance to segment GM, WM, and CSF and evaluated using three evaluation metrics (Dice, H95, and AVD) and the results are published on the MRBrainS13 website. We present the results of eleven segmentation algorithms that participated in the MRBrainS13 challenge workshop at MICCAI, where the framework was launched, and three commonly used freeware packages: FreeSurfer, FSL, and SPM. The MRBrainS evaluation framework provides an objective and direct comparison of all evaluated algorithms and can aid in selecting the best performing method for the segmentation goal at hand.

  20. Neuronal correlates of gastric pain induced by fundus distension: a 3T-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Lu, C-L; Wu, Y-T; Yeh, T-C; Chen, L-F; Chang, F-Y; Lee, S-D; Ho, L-T; Hsieh, J-C

    2004-10-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity in gastric fundus is a possible pathogenesis for functional dyspepsia. The cortical representation of gastric fundus is still unclear. Growing evidence shows that the insula, but not the primary or secondary somatosensory region (SI or SII), may be the cortical target for visceral pain. Animal studies have also demonstrated that amygdala plays an important role in processing visceral pain. We used fMRI to study central projection of stomach pain from fundus balloon distension. We also tested the hypothesis that there will be neither S1 nor S2 activation, but amygdala activation with the fundus distension. A 3T-fMRI was performed on 10 healthy subjects during baseline, fullness (12.7 +/- 0.6 mmHg) and moderate gastric pain (17.0 +/- 0.8 mmHg). fMRI signal was modelled by convolving the predetermined psychophysical response. Statistical comparisons were performed between conditions on a group level. Gastric pain activated a wide range of cortical and subcortical structures, including thalamus and insula, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, basal ganglia, caudate nuclei, amygdala, brain stem, cerebellum and prefrontal cortex (P < 0.001). A subset of these neuronal substrates was engaged in the central processing of fullness sensation. SI and SII were not activated during the fundus stimulation. In conclusion, the constellation of neuronal structures activated by fundus distension overlaps the pain matrices induced musculocutaneous pain, with the exception of the absence of SI or SII activation. This may account for the vague nature of visceral sensation/pain. Our data also confirms that the insula and amygdala may act as the central role in visceral sensation/pain, as well as in the proposed sensory-limbic model of learning and memory of pain.

  1. Normal-appearing brain tissue analysis in radiologically isolated syndrome using 3 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, María Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To date, it remains largely unknown whether there is in radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) brain damage beyond visible T2 white matter lesions. We used single- voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging (3 T MRI) to analyze normal-appearing brain tissue regions in 18 RIS patients and 18 matched healthy controls. T2-hyperintense lesion volumes and structural brain volumes were also measured. The absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios of total N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartyl glutamate (NAA), choline-containing compounds, myoinositol, and glutamine-glutamate complex to creatine were calculated. Spectral analysis was performed by LCModel. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Compared with healthy controls, RIS patients did not show any significant differences in either the absolute concentration of NAA or NAA/Cr ratio in mid-parietal gray matter. A trend toward lower NAA concentrations (–3.35%) was observed among RIS patients with high risk for conversion to multiple sclerosis. No differences in the other metabolites or their ratios were observed. RIS patients showed lower fractional anisotropy only in clusters overlapping lesional areas, namely in the cingulate gyrus bilaterally and the frontal lobe subgyral bilaterally (P < 0.001). Normalized brain and cortical volumes were significantly lower in RIS patients than in controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). Our results suggest that in RIS, global brain and cortical atrophy are not primarily driven by significant occult microstructural normal appearing brain damage. Longitudinal MRI studies are needed to better understand the pathological processes underlying this novel entity. PMID:27399108

  2. Measurement of creatine kinase reaction rate in human brain using magnetization transfer image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (MT-ISIS) and a volume ³¹P/¹H radiofrequency coil in a clinical 3-T MRI system.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun-Kee; Sung, Young-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Zuo, Chun; Shi, Xianfeng; Mellon, Eric A; Renshaw, Perry F

    2011-08-01

    High-energy phosphate metabolism, which allows the synthesis and regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), is a vital process for neuronal survival and activity. In particular, creatine kinase (CK) serves as an energy reservoir for the rapid buffering of ATP levels. Altered CK enzyme activity, reflecting compromised high-energy phosphate metabolism or mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain, can be assessed using magnetization transfer (MT) MRS. MT (31)P MRS has been used to measure the forward CK reaction rate in animal and human brain, employing a surface radiofrequency coil. However, long acquisition times and excessive radiofrequency irradiation prevent these methods from being used routinely for clinical evaluations. In this article, a new MT (31)P MRS method is presented, which can be practically used to measure the CK forward reaction rate constant in a clinical MRI system employing a volume head (31)P coil for spatial localization, without contamination from the scalp muscle, and an acquisition time of 30 min. Other advantages associated with the method include radiofrequency homogeneity within the regions of interest of the brain using a volume coil with image-selected in vivo spectroscopy localization, and reduction of the specific absorption rate using nonadiabatic radiofrequency pulses for MT saturation. The mean value of k(f) was measured as 0.320 ± 0.075 s(-1) from 10 healthy volunteers with an age range of 18-40 years. These values are consistent with those obtained using earlier methods, and the technique may be used routinely to evaluate energetic processes in the brain on a clinical MRI system.

  3. A 64-channel 3T array coil for accelerated brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Blau, James N.; Biber, Stephan; Hoecht, Philipp; Tountcheva, Veneta; Setsompop, Kawin; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    A 64-channel brain array coil was developed and compared to a 32-channel array constructed with the same coil former geometry in order to precisely isolate the benefit of the two-fold increase in array coil elements. The constructed coils were developed for a standard clinical 3T MRI scanner and used a contoured head-shape curved former around the occipital pole and tapered in at the neck to both improve sensitivity and patient comfort. Additionally, the design is a compact, split-former design intended for robust daily use. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification (G-factor) for parallel imaging were quantitatively evaluated in human imaging and compared to a size and shape-matched 32-channel array coil. For unaccelerated imaging, the 64-channel array provided similar SNR in the brain center to the 32-channel array and 1.3-fold more SNR in the brain cortex. Reduced noise amplification during highly parallel imaging of the 64-channel array provided the ability to accelerate at approximately one unit higher at a given noise amplification compared to the sized-matched 32-channel array. For example, with a 4-fold acceleration rate, the central brain and cortical SNR of the 64-channel array was 1.2 and 1.4-fold higher, respectively, compared to the 32-channel array. The characteristics of the coil are demonstrated in accelerated brain imaging. PMID:22851312

  4. Computational dosimetry of induced electric fields during realistic movements in the vicinity of a 3 T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Kännälä, Sami; Jokela, Kari

    2013-04-01

    Medical staff working near magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed both to the static magnetic field itself and also to electric currents that are induced in the body when the body moves in the magnetic field. However, there are currently limited data available on the induced electric field for realistic movements. This study computationally investigates the movement induced electric fields for realistic movements in the magnetic field of a 3 T MRI scanner. The path of movement near the MRI scanner is based on magnetic field measurements using a coil sensor attached to a human volunteer. Utilizing realistic models for both the motion of the head and the magnetic field of the MRI scanner, the induced fields are computationally determined using the finite-element method for five high-resolution numerical anatomical models. The results show that the time-derivative of the magnetic flux density (dB/dt) is approximately linearly proportional to the induced electric field in the head, independent of the position of the head with respect to the magnet. This supports the use of dB/dt measurements for occupational exposure assessment. For the path of movement considered herein, the spatial maximum of the induced electric field is close to the basic restriction for the peripheral nervous system and exceeds the basic restriction for the central nervous system in the international guidelines. The 99th percentile electric field is a considerably less restrictive metric for the exposure than the spatial maximum electric field; the former is typically 60-70% lower than the latter. However, the 99th percentile electric field may exceed the basic restriction for dB/dt values that can be encountered during tasks commonly performed by MRI workers. It is also shown that the movement-induced eddy currents may reach magnitudes that could electrically stimulate the vestibular system, which could play a significant role in the generation of vertigo-like sensations reported

  5. Computational dosimetry of induced electric fields during realistic movements in the vicinity of a 3 T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Ilkka; Kännälä, Sami; Jokela, Kari

    2013-04-21

    Medical staff working near magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed both to the static magnetic field itself and also to electric currents that are induced in the body when the body moves in the magnetic field. However, there are currently limited data available on the induced electric field for realistic movements. This study computationally investigates the movement induced electric fields for realistic movements in the magnetic field of a 3 T MRI scanner. The path of movement near the MRI scanner is based on magnetic field measurements using a coil sensor attached to a human volunteer. Utilizing realistic models for both the motion of the head and the magnetic field of the MRI scanner, the induced fields are computationally determined using the finite-element method for five high-resolution numerical anatomical models. The results show that the time-derivative of the magnetic flux density (dB/dt) is approximately linearly proportional to the induced electric field in the head, independent of the position of the head with respect to the magnet. This supports the use of dB/dt measurements for occupational exposure assessment. For the path of movement considered herein, the spatial maximum of the induced electric field is close to the basic restriction for the peripheral nervous system and exceeds the basic restriction for the central nervous system in the international guidelines. The 99th percentile electric field is a considerably less restrictive metric for the exposure than the spatial maximum electric field; the former is typically 60-70% lower than the latter. However, the 99th percentile electric field may exceed the basic restriction for dB/dt values that can be encountered during tasks commonly performed by MRI workers. It is also shown that the movement-induced eddy currents may reach magnitudes that could electrically stimulate the vestibular system, which could play a significant role in the generation of vertigo-like sensations reported

  6. Brain morphometry reproducibility in multi-center 3T MRI studies: a comparison of cross-sectional and longitudinal segmentations.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, Jorge; Marizzoni, Moira; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bosch, Beatriz; Bartrés-Faz, David; Arnold, Jennifer; Benninghoff, Jens; Wiltfang, Jens; Roccatagliata, Luca; Nobili, Flavio; Hensch, Tilman; Tränkner, Anja; Schönknecht, Peter; Leroy, Melanie; Lopes, Renaud; Bordet, Régis; Chanoine, Valérie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Didic, Mira; Gros-Dagnac, Hélène; Payoux, Pierre; Zoccatelli, Giada; Alessandrini, Franco; Beltramello, Alberto; Bargalló, Núria; Blin, Olivier; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale longitudinal multi-site MRI brain morphometry studies are becoming increasingly crucial to characterize both normal and clinical population groups using fully automated segmentation tools. The test-retest reproducibility of morphometry data acquired across multiple scanning sessions, and for different MR vendors, is an important reliability indicator since it defines the sensitivity of a protocol to detect longitudinal effects in a consortium. There is very limited knowledge about how across-session reliability of morphometry estimates might be affected by different 3T MRI systems. Moreover, there is a need for optimal acquisition and analysis protocols in order to reduce sample sizes. A recent study has shown that the longitudinal FreeSurfer segmentation offers improved within session test-retest reproducibility relative to the cross-sectional segmentation at one 3T site using a nonstandard multi-echo MPRAGE sequence. In this study we implement a multi-site 3T MRI morphometry protocol based on vendor provided T1 structural sequences from different vendors (3D MPRAGE on Siemens and Philips, 3D IR-SPGR on GE) implemented in 8 sites located in 4 European countries. The protocols used mild acceleration factors (1.5-2) when possible. We acquired across-session test-retest structural data of a group of healthy elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) and compared the across-session reproducibility of two full-brain automated segmentation methods based on either longitudinal or cross-sectional FreeSurfer processing. The segmentations include cortical thickness, intracranial, ventricle and subcortical volumes. Reproducibility is evaluated as absolute changes relative to the mean (%), Dice coefficient for volume overlap and intraclass correlation coefficients across two sessions. We found that this acquisition and analysis protocol gives comparable reproducibility results to previous studies that used longer acquisitions without acceleration. We also show that

  7. Plasma system of the GOL-3T facility

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.; Burmasov, V. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V. Rovenskikh, A. F.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Sklyarov, V. F.

    2015-11-15

    The plasma system and diagnostics of the new facility GOL-3T are described. This facility is the final result of the first stage in the deep upgrade of the GOL-3 multiple-mirror system, which has operated at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics since 1988. The upgrade project supposes creation of two new independent facilities at the site of GOL-3. The GOL-3T facility is intended to study the physics of beam—plasma interaction and generation of subterahertz electromagnetic radiation during the collective relaxation of a high-power relativistic electron beam with a duration of 5–10 μs. Studies on the physics of multiple-mirror plasma confinement in axisymmetric magnetic systems will be continued in a new range of experiment parameters at the second facility, named GOL-NB.

  8. In vivo electric conductivity of cervical cancer patients based on B_{1}^{+} maps at 3T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balidemaj, E.; de Boer, P.; van Lier, A. L. H. M. W.; Remis, R. F.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Westerveld, G. H.; Nederveen, A. J.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Crezee, J.

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo electric conductivity (σ) values of tissue are essential for accurate electromagnetic simulations and specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment for applications such as thermal dose computations in hyperthermia. Currently used σ-values are mostly based on ex vivo measurements. In this study the conductivity of human muscle, bladder content and cervical tumors is acquired non-invasively in vivo using MRI. The conductivity of 20 cervical cancer patients was measured with the MR-based electric properties tomography method on a standard 3T MRI system. The average in vivo σ-value of muscle is 14% higher than currently used in human simulation models. The σ-value of bladder content is an order of magnitude higher than the value for bladder wall tissue that is used for the complete bladder in many models. Our findings are confirmed by various in vivo animal studies from the literature. In cervical tumors, the observed average conductivity was 13% higher than the literature value reported for cervical tissue. Considerable deviations were found for the electrical conductivity observed in this study and the commonly used values for SAR assessment, emphasizing the importance of acquiring in vivo conductivity for more accurate SAR assessment in various applications.

  9. Corticospinal Tract Tracing in the Marmoset with a Clinical Whole-Body 3T Scanner Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Benjamin; Bolan, Faye; Boulanouar, Kader; Renaud, Luc; Darmana, Robert; Vaysse, Laurence; Vieu, Christophe; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been described as a powerful tool to depict the architecture of neuronal circuits. In this study we investigated the potential use of in vivo MRI detection of manganese for tracing neuronal projections from the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy marmosets (Callithrix Jacchus). We determined the optimal dose of manganese chloride (MnCl2) among 800, 400, 40 and 8nmol that led to manganese-induced hyperintensity furthest from the injection site, as specific to the corticospinal tract as possible, and that would not induce motor deficit. A commonly available 3T human clinical MRI scanner and human knee coil were used to follow hyperintensity in the corticospinal tract 24h after injection. A statistical parametric map of seven marmosets injected with the chosen dose, 8 nmol, showed the corticospinal tract and M1 connectivity with the basal ganglia, substantia nigra and thalamus. Safety was determined for the lowest dose that did not induce dexterity and grip strength deficit, and no behavioral effects could be seen in marmosets who received multiple injections of manganese one month apart. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time in marmosets, a reliable and reproducible way to perform longitudinal ME-MRI experiments to observe the integrity of the marmoset corticospinal tract on a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:26398500

  10. Acute vertigo in an anesthesia provider during exposure to a 3T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Andrew; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Pavlicek, William; Thunberg, Christopher A; Seamans, David

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo induced by exposure to the magnetic field of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is a well-known phenomenon within the radiology community but is not widely appreciated by other clinical specialists. Here, we describe a case of an anesthetist experiencing acute vertigo while providing sedation to a patient undergoing a 3 Tesla MRI scan. After discussing previous reports, and the evidence surrounding MRI-induced vertigo, we review potential etiologies that include the effects of both static and time-varying magnetic fields on the vestibular apparatus. We conclude our review by discussing the occupational standards that exist for MRI exposure and methods to minimize the risks of MRI-induced vertigo for clinicians working in the MRI environment.

  11. Analysis of the role of lead resistivity in specific absorption rate for deep brain stimulator leads at 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Leonardo M; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBSs) can be hazardous because of the antenna-effect of leads exposed to the incident radio-frequency field. This study evaluated electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) changes as a function of lead resistivity on an anatomically precise head model in a 3T system. The anatomical accuracy of our head model allowed for detailed modeling of the path of DBS leads between epidermis and the outer table. Our electromagnetic finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis showed significant changes of 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR for the range of lead resistivity modeled, including highly conductive leads up to highly resistive leads. Antenna performance and whole-head SAR were sensitive to the presence of the DBS leads only within 10%, while changes of over one order of magnitude were observed for the peak 10 g averaged SAR, suggesting that local SAR values should be considered in DBS guidelines. With rho(lead) = rho(copper) , and the MRI coil driven to produce a whole-head SAR without leads of 3.2 W/kg, the 1 g averaged SAR was 1080 W/kg and the 10 g averaged SAR 120 W/kg at the tip of the DBS lead. Conversely, in the control case without leads, the 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR were 0.5 W/kg and 0.6 W/kg, respectively, in the same location. The SAR at the tip of lead was similar with electrically homogeneous and electrically heterogeneous models. Our results show that computational models can support the development of novel lead technology, properly balancing the requirements of SAR deposition at the tip of the lead and power dissipation of the system battery.

  12. Analysis of the Role of Lead Resistivity in Specific Absorption Rate for Deep Brain Stimulator Leads at 3T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Angelone, Leonardo M.; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBSs) can be hazardous because of the antenna-effect of leads exposed to the incident radio-frequency field. This study evaluated electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) changes as a function of lead resistivity on an anatomically precise head model in a 3T system. The anatomical accuracy of our head model allowed for detailed modeling of the path of DBS leads between epidermis and the outer table. Our electromagnetic finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis showed significant changes of 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR for the range of lead resistivity modeled, including highly conductive leads up to highly resistive leads. Antenna performance and whole-head SAR were sensitive to the presence of the DBS leads only within 10%, while changes of over one order of magnitude were observed for the peak 10 g averaged SAR, suggesting that local SAR values should be considered in DBS guidelines. With ρlead = ρcopper, and the MRI coil driven to produce a whole-head SAR without leads of 3.2 W/kg, the 1 g averaged SAR was 1080 W/kg and the 10 g averaged SAR 120 W/kg at the tip of the DBS lead. Conversely, in the control case without leads, the 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR were 0.5 W/kg and 0.6 W/kg, respectively, in the same location. The SAR at the tip of lead was similar with electrically homogeneous and electrically heterogeneous models. Our results show that computational models can support the development of novel lead technology, properly balancing the requirements of SAR deposition at the tip of the lead and power dissipation of the system battery. PMID:20335090

  13. Evaluation of Fat Suppression of Diffusion-weighted Imaging Using Section Select Gradient Reversal Technique on 3 T Breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Takemori, Daichi; Kimura, Daisuke; Yamada, Eiji; Higashida, Mitsuji

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluates fat suppression of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using section select gradient reversal (SSGR) technique in clinical images on 3 T breast MRI. A total of 20 patients with breast cancer were examined at a Philips Ingenia 3 T MRI. We acquired DWI with SPAIR, SSGR-SPAIR, STIR, and SSGR-STIR. We evaluated contrast between the fat region and lesion, the coefficient of variance (CV) of the fat region and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal breast tissue and lesion. The contrast between the fat region and lesion was improved with SSGR technique. The CV of the fattest region did not have any significant difference in SPAIR technique (p>0.05), but it was significantly decreased in the STIR technique using SSGR technique (p<0.05). Positive correlation was observed in ADC value between SPAIR and other fat suppression techniques (SSGR-SPAIR, STIR, SSGR-STIR). DWI using SSGR technique was suggested to be effective on 3 T breast MRI.

  14. Can MRI accurately detect pilon articular malreduction? A quantitative comparison between CT and 3T MRI bone models

    PubMed Central

    Radzi, Shairah; Dlaska, Constantin Edmond; Cowin, Gary; Robinson, Mark; Pratap, Jit; Schuetz, Michael Andreas; Mishra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Background Pilon fracture reduction is a challenging surgery. Radiographs are commonly used to assess the quality of reduction, but are limited in revealing the remaining bone incongruities. The study aimed to develop a method in quantifying articular malreductions using 3D computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) models. Methods CT and MRI data were acquired using three pairs of human cadaveric ankle specimens. Common tibial pilon fractures were simulated by performing osteotomies to the ankle specimens. Five of the created fractures [three AO type-B (43-B1), and two AO type-C (43-C1) fractures] were then reduced and stabilised using titanium implants, then rescanned. All datasets were reconstructed into CT and MRI models, and were analysed in regards to intra-articular steps and gaps, surface deviations, malrotations and maltranslations of the bone fragments. Results Initial results reveal that type B fracture CT and MRI models differed by ~0.2 (step), ~0.18 (surface deviations), ~0.56° (rotation) and ~0.4 mm (translation). Type C fracture MRI models showed metal artefacts extending to the articular surface, thus unsuitable for analysis. Type C fracture CT models differed from their CT and MRI contralateral models by ~0.15 (surface deviation), ~1.63° (rotation) and ~0.4 mm (translation). Conclusions Type B fracture MRI models were comparable to CT and may potentially be used for the postoperative assessment of articular reduction on a case-to-case basis. PMID:28090442

  15. Image quality and signal distribution in 1.5-T and 3-T MRI in mild traumatic brain injury patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Maija E.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Ylinen, Aarne; Öhman, Juha; Soimakallio, Seppo; Eskola, Hannu

    2009-02-01

    Clear standards are lacking in the imaging modalities of the deficit in mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) patients. The purpose of this study is to compare the image quality by signal distribution between 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla MRI in turbo spin echo (TSE) and gradient echo (GRE) images in normal hospital settings and to find preferences for which field to use in MTBI patients. We studied 40 MTBI patients with TSE and GRE; 20 patients were imaged at 1.5 T and 20 at 3 T. The imaging parameters were optimized separately for the two scanners. Histograms of the signal distribution in 22 ROIs were fitted to a 1-peak Gaussian model and the resulting peak positions were scaled in respect to the peak positions of genu of the corpus callosum and the caudate nuclei. Correlation of the contrast of the ROIs in reference to genu of the corpus callosum between both the two scanners and the two imaging sequences was good. Image contrast was similar at both in the TSE images; in the GRE images contrast improved from 1.5 T to 3 T. However, based on peak positions and widths, a slight drawback in the separability between the ROIs was observed when 1.5 T MRI was replaced by 3 T. No clear improvement in tissue contrast or separability of 3 T was found compared to 1.5 T. Imaging of MTBI with 3 T should therefore be based on other advantages of high-field imaging, such as improved SNR and spatial resolution.

  16. Superparamagnetic MRI probes for in vivo tracking of dendritic cell migration with a clinical 3 T scanner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Wu, Changqiang; Zhu, Wencheng; Xia, Chunchao; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Houbin; Wu, Jun; Lin, Gan; Wu, Bing; Gong, Qiyong; Song, Bin; Ai, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based vaccines have shown promising results in the immunotherapy of cancers and other diseases. How to track the in vivo fate of DC vaccines will provide important insights to the final therapeutic results. In this study, we chose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track murine DCs migration to the draining lymph node under a clinical 3 T scanner. Different from labeling immature DCs usually reported in literature, this study instead labeled matured DC with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle based imaging probes. The labeling process did not show negative impacts on cell viability, morphology, and surface biomarker expression. To overcome the imaging challenges brought by the limitations of the scanner, the size of lymph node, and the number of labeled cell, we optimized MRI pulse sequences. As a result, the signal reduction, caused either by gelatin phantoms containing as low as 12 SPIO-laden cells in each voxel or by the homing SPIO-laden DCs within the draining nodes after footpad injection of only 1 × 10(5) cells, can be clearly depicted under a 3 T MR scanner. Overall, the MRI labeling probes offer a low-toxic and high-efficient MR imaging platform for the assessment of DC-based immunotherapies.

  17. A comparison of distributional considerations with statistical analysis of resting state fMRI at 3T and 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Holmes, Martha J.; Newton, Allen T.; Morgan, Victoria L.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-high field 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers potentially unprecedented spatial resolution of functional activity within the human brain through increased signal and contrast to noise ratios over traditional 1.5T and 3T MRI scanners. However, the effects physiological and imaging artifacts are also greatly increased. Traditional statistical parametric mapping theories based on distributional properties representative of data acquired at lower fields may be inadequate for new 7T data. Herein, we investigate the model fitting residuals based on two 7T and one 3T protocols. We find that model residuals are substantively more non-Gaussian at 7T relative to 3T. Imaging slices that passed through regions with peak inhomogeneity problems (e.g., mid-brain acquisitions for the 7T hippocampus) exhibited visually higher degrees of distortion along with spatially correlated and extreme values of kurtosis (a measure of non- Gaussianity). The impacts of artifacts have been previously addressed for 3T data by estimating the covariance matrix of the regression errors. We further extend the robust estimation approach for autoregressive models and evaluate the qualitative impacts of this technique relative to traditional inference. Clear differences in statistical significance are shown between inferences based on classical versus robust assumptions, which suggest that inferences based on Gaussian assumptions are subject to practical (as well as theoretical) concerns regarding their power and validity. Hence, modern statistical approaches, such as the robust autoregressive model posed herein, are appropriate and suitable for inference with ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. 3T diffusion-weighted MRI of the thyroid gland with reduced distortion: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Nagala, S; Priest, A N; McLean, M A; Jani, P; Graves, M J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Single-shot diffusion-weighted (DW) echo planar imaging (EPI), which is commonly used for imaging the thyroid, is characterised by severe blurring and distortion. The objectives of this work were: 1, to show that a reduced-field of view (r-FOV) DW EPI technique can improve image quality; and 2, to investigate the effect of different reconstruction strategies on the resulting apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Methods: We implemented a single-shot, r-FOV DW EPI technique with a two-dimensional radiofrequency excitation pulse for DW imaging of the thyroid at 3T. Images were reconstructed using root sum of squares (SOS) and an optimal-B1 reconstruction (OBR). Phantom and in vivo experiments were performed to compare r-FOV and conventional full-FOV DW EPI with root SOS and OBR. Results: r-FOV with OBR substantially improved image quality at 3T. In phantoms, r-FOV gave more accurate ADCs than full-FOV. In vivo r-FOV always gave lower ADC values with respect to the full-FOV technique irrespective of the reconstruction used and whether only two or multiple b-values were used to compute the ADCs. Conclusion: r-FOV DW EPI can reduce image blurring and distortion at the expense of a low signal-to-noise ratio. OBR is a promising reconstruction technique for accurate ADC measurements in lower signal-to-noise ratio regimes, although further studies are needed to characterise its performance. Advances in knowledge: DW imaging of the thyroid at 3T could potentially benefit from r-FOV acquisition strategies, such as the r-FOV DW EPI technique proposed in this paper. PMID:23770539

  19. Development and preliminary evaluation of an ultrasonic motor actuated needle guide for 3T MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Image guided prostate interventions have been accelerated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and robotic technologies in the past few years. However, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided procedure still remains as vast majority in clinical practice due to engineering and clinical complexity of the MRI-guided robotic interventions. Subsequently, great advantages and increasing availability of MRI have not been utilized at its maximum capacity in clinic. To benefit patients from the advantages of MRI, we developed an MRI-compatible motorized needle guide device "Smart Template" that resembles a conventional prostate template to perform MRI-guided prostate interventions with minimal changes in the clinical procedure. The requirements and specifications of the Smart Template were identified from our latest MRI-guided intervention system that has been clinically used in manual mode for prostate biopsy. Smart Template consists of vertical and horizontal crossbars that are driven by two ultrasonic motors via timing-belt and mitergear transmissions. Navigation software that controls the crossbar position to provide needle insertion positions was also developed. The software can be operated independently or interactively with an open-source navigation software, 3D Slicer, that has been developed for prostate intervention. As preliminary evaluation, MRI distortion and SNR test were conducted. Significant MRI distortion was found close to the threaded brass alloy components of the template. However, the affected volume was limited outside the clinical region of interest. SNR values over routine MRI scan sequences for prostate biopsy indicated insignificant image degradation during the presence of the robotic system and actuation of the ultrasonic motors.

  20. Can T2-weighted 3-T breast MRI predict clinically occult inflammatory breast cancer before pathological examination? A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Kasami, Masako; Watanabe, Junichiro

    2014-01-01

    Occult inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is defined as an invasive cancer without any clinical inflammatory signs but with pathologically proven dermal lymphovascular invasion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of 3-T breast MRI to predict occult IBC before pathological examination and compare its effectiveness with that of mammography (MMG) and ultrasound (US). A retrospective review of clinical, radiological, and pathological records of 460 consecutive breast cancers revealed five proved occult IBCs. We analyzed the findings of 3-T MRI, MMG, and US for these five occult IBCs. Primary breast lesions were detected by 3-T MRI, MMG, and US in all five breasts with occult IBCs. 3-T MRI revealed 40% mass type lesions and 60% non-mass-like type lesions. Kinetic curve analysis of the primary breast lesions showed a rapid initial kinetic phase in 80% of lesions and a delayed washout pattern in 60% of lesions. 3-T MRI showed slight skin thickness in 60% of breasts, whereas MMG and US showed slight skin thickness in 40 and 20% of breasts, respectively. Subcutaneous and prepectoral edema, as evaluated on T2-weighted images, was present in all five breasts with occult IBCs. The presence of subcutaneous and prepectoral edema on T2-weighted 3-T breast MRI is an important finding that should suggest the diagnosis of occult IBC before pathological examination.

  1. SU-E-J-209: Geometric Distortion at 3T in a Commercial 4D MRI-Compatible Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Wronski, M; Kim, A; Stanisz, G; Sarfehnia, A; Keller, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There are very few commercial 4D phantoms that are marketed as MRI compatible. We are evaluating one such commercial phantom, made to be used with an MRI-Linear accelerator. The focus of this work is to characterize the geometric distortions produced in this phantom at 3T using 3 clinical MR pulse sequences. Methods: The CIRS MRI-Linac Dynamic Phantom (CIRSTM) under investigation in this study consists of a softwaredriven moving tumour volume within a thorax phantom body and enables dose accumulation by placing a dosimeter within the tumour volume. Our initial investigation is to evaluate the phantom in static mode prior to examining its 4D capability. The water-filled thorax phantom was scanned using a wide-bore Philips 3T Achieva MRI scanner employing a Thoracic xl coil and clinical 2D T1W FFE, 2D T1W TSE and 3D T1W TFE pulse sequences. Each of the MR image sets was rigidly fused with a reference CT image of the phantom employing a rigid registration with 6 degrees of freedom. Geometric distortions between the MR and CT image sets were measured in 3 dimensions at selected points along the periphery of the distortion grid embedded within the phantom body (11.5, 7.5 and 3 cm laterally, ant/post and sup/inf of magnetic isocenter respectively). Results: The maximal measured geometric distortions between the MR and reference CT points of interest were 0.9, 1.8 and 1.3 mm in the lateral, anteriorposterior and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. For all 3 spatial dimensions, the maximal distortions occurred for the FFE pulse sequence. Maximal distortions for the 2D FFE, 2D TSE and 3D TFE sequences were 1, 0.7 and 1.8 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Our initial static investigation of this phantom shows minimal geometric distortions at 3T along the periphery of the embedded grid. CIRS has provided us with a phantom at no charge for evaluation at 3 Tesla.

  2. Correlating quantitative tractography at 3T MRI and cognitive tests in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Reginold, William; Itorralba, Justine; Tam, Angela; Luedke, Angela C; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Reginold, Jennifer; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2016-12-01

    This study used diffusion tensor imaging tractography at 3 T MRI to relate cognitive function to white matter tracts in the brain. Brain T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery-weighted and diffusion tensor 3 T MRI scans were acquired in thirty-three healthy participants without mild cognitive impairment or dementia. They completed a battery of neuropsychological tests including the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Stroop test, Trail Making Test B, Wechsler Memory Scale-III Longest span forward, Wechsler Memory Scale-III Longest span backward, Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, California Verbal Learning Test Version II Long Delay Free Recall, and Letter Number Sequencing. Tractography was generated by the Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking method. The corpus callosum, cingulum, long association fibers, corticospinal/bulbar tracts, thalamic projection fibers, superior cerebellar peduncle, middle cerebellar peduncle and inferior cerebellar peduncle were manually segmented. The fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of these tracts were quantified. We studied the association between cognitive test scores and the MD and FA of tracts while controlling for age and total white matter hyperintensities volume. Worse scores on the Stroop test was associated with decreased FA of the corpus callosum, corticospinal/bulbar tract, and thalamic projection tracts. Scores on the other cognitive tests were not associated with either the FA or MD of measured tracts. In healthy persons the Stroop test appears to be a better predictor of the microstructural integrity of white matter tracts measured by DTI tractography than other cognitive tests.

  3. An implanted 8-channel array coil for high-resolution macaque MRI at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, T.; Keil, B.; Farivar, R.; McNab, J.A.; Polimeni, J. R.; Gerits, A.; Arsenault, J.T.; Wald, L. L.; Vanduffel, W.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-channel receive coil array was constructed and implanted adjacent to the skull in a male rhesus monkey in order to improve the sensitivity of (functional) brain imaging. The permanent implant was part of an acrylic headpost assembly and only the coil element loop wires were implanted. The tuning, matching, and preamplifier circuitry was connected via a removable external assembly. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification for parallel imaging were compared to a single-, 4-, and 8-channel external receive-only coil routinely used for macaque fMRI. In vivo measurements showed significantly improved SNR within the brain for the implanted versus the external coils. Within a region-of-interest covering the cerebral cortex, we observed a 5.4-, 3.6-fold, and 3.4-fold increase in SNR compared to the external single-, 4-, and 8-channel coil, respectively. In the center of the brain, the implanted array maintained a 2.4×, 2.5×, and 2.1× higher SNR, respectively compared to the external coils. The array performance was evaluated for anatomical, diffusion tensor and functional brain imaging. This study suggests that a stable implanted phased-array coil can be used in macaque MRI to substantially increase the spatial resolution for anatomical, diffusion tensor, and functional imaging. PMID:22609793

  4. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology.

  5. Voxel-based morphometry at ultra-high fields. A comparison of 7T and 3T MRI data

    PubMed Central

    Seiger, Rene; Hahn, Andreas; Hummer, Allan; Kranz, Georg S; Ganger, Sebastian; Küblböck, Martin; Kraus, Christoph; Sladky, Ronald; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological progress enables MRI recordings at ultra-high fields of 7 Tesla and above leading to brain images of higher resolution and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Despite these benefits, imaging at 7T exhibits distinct challenges due to B1 field inhomogeneities, causing decreased image quality and problems in data analysis. Although several strategies have been proposed, a systematic investigation of bias-corrected 7T data for voxel-based morphometry (VBM) is still missing and it is an ongoing matter of debate if VBM at 7T can be carried out properly. Here, an optimized VBM study was conducted, evaluating the impact of field strength (3T vs 7T) and pulse sequence (MPRAGE vs MP2RAGE) on gray matter volume (GMV) estimates. More specifically, twenty-two participants were measured under the conditions 3T MPRAGE, 7T MPRAGE and 7T MP2RAGE. Due to the fact that 7T MPRAGE data exhibited strong intensity inhomogeneities, an alternative preprocessing pipeline was proposed and applied for that data. VBM analysis revealed higher GMV estimates for 7T predominantly in superior cortical areas, caudate nucleus, cingulate cortex and the hippocampus. On the other hand, 3T yielded higher estimates especially in inferior cortical areas of the brain, cerebellum, thalamus and putamen compared to 7T. Besides minor exceptions, these results were observed for 7T MPRAGE as well for the 7T MP2RAGE measurements. Results gained in the inferior parts of the brain should be taken with caution, as native GM segmentations displayed misclassifications in these regions for both 7T sequences. This was supported by the test-retest measurements showing highest variability in these inferior regions of the brain for 7T also for the advanced MP2RAGE sequence. Hence, our data support the use of 7T MRI for VBM analysis in cortical areas, but direct comparison between field strengths and sequences requires careful assessment. Similarly, analysis of inferior cortical regions, cerebellum and

  6. Comparing 3 T and 1.5 T MRI for Tracking Alzheimer's Disease Progression with Tensor-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Ho, April J.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Leow, Alex D.; Yanovsky, Igor; Gutman, Boris; Dinov, Ivo D.; Leporé, Natasha; Stein, Jason L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Harvey, Danielle J.; Kornak, John; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    A key question in designing MRI-based clinical trials is how the main magnetic field strength of the scanner affects the power to detect disease effects. In 110 subjects scanned longitudinally at both 3.0 and 1.5 T, including 24 patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) [74.8 ± 9.2 years, MMSE: 22.6 ± 2.0 at baseline], 51 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) [74.1 ± 8.0 years, MMSE: 26.6 ± 2.0], and 35 controls [75.9 ± 4.6 years, MMSE: 29.3 ± 0.8], we assessed whether higher-field MR imaging offers higher or lower power to detect longitudinal changes in the brain, using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to reveal the location of progressive atrophy. As expected, at both field strengths, progressive atrophy was widespread in AD and more spatially restricted in MCI. Power analysis revealed that, to detect a 25% slowing of atrophy (with 80% power), 37 AD and 108 MCI subjects would be needed at 1.5 T versus 49 AD and 166 MCI subjects at 3 T; however, the increased power at 1.5 T was not statistically significant (α = 0.05) either for TBM, or for SIENA, a related method for computing volume loss rates. Analysis of cumulative distribution functions and false discovery rates showed that, at both field strengths, temporal lobe atrophy rates were correlated with interval decline in Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), mini-mental status exam (MMSE), and Clinical Dementia Rating sum-of-boxes (CDR-SB) scores. Overall, 1.5 and 3 T scans did not significantly differ in their power to detect neurodegenerative changes over a year. PMID:19780044

  7. Hobbs 3T MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    and LV remodeling.    Related findings this year:  Association between soluble receptor for  advanced   glycation   end   products  (sRAGE) and atherosclerosis...The  receptor  for  advanced   glycation   end   products   (RAGE)  is a  transmembrane  receptor expressed on a variety of  cells.  It modulates activity...Receptor for  advanced  gylcosylation  end   products Inverse association with CAC. Revision in  review at Diabetes Care.  BNP 3‐108   Unprocessed proBNP

  8. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M.; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (23Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (23Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a 23Na resonator was constructed for whole body 23Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B1-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body 23Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm3 and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the 23Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, 23Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  9. A Workspace-oriented Needle Guiding Robot for 3T MRI-guided Transperineal Prostate Intervention: Evaluation of In-bore Workspace and MRI Compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Eun; Hata, Nobuhiko; Iordachita, Iulian; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare; Tokuda, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided prostate interventions have been introduced to enhance the cancer detection. For accurate needle positioning, in-bore operated robotic systems have been developed and optimal use of the confined in-bore space become a critical engineering challenge. Methods As preliminary evaluation of our prostate intervention robot, we conducted a workspace design analysis using a new evaluation method that we developed for in-bore operated robots for transperineal prostate interventions, and an MRI compatibility study. Results The workspace analysis resulted in the effective workspace (VW) of 0.32, which is greater than that of our early prototype despite that the current robot is approximately 50% larger than the early prototype in sectional space. The MRI compatibility study resulted in less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction. Conclusions The new workspace evaluation method quantifies the workspace utilization of the in-bore operated robots for MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions, providing a useful tool for evaluation and new robot design. The robot creates insignificant electromagnetic noise during typical prostate imaging sequences. PMID:22492680

  10. Abdominal adipose tissue quantification on water-suppressed and non-water-suppressed MRI at 3T using semi-automated FCM clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valaparla, Sunil K.; Peng, Qi; Gao, Feng; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate measurements of human body fat distribution are desirable because excessive body fat is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we hypothesized that the performance of water suppressed (WS) MRI is superior to non-water suppressed (NWS) MRI for volumetric assessment of abdominal subcutaneous (SAT), intramuscular (IMAT), visceral (VAT), and total (TAT) adipose tissues. We acquired T1-weighted images on a 3T MRI system (TIM Trio, Siemens), which was analyzed using semi-automated segmentation software that employs a fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Sixteen contiguous axial slices, centered at the L4-L5 level of the abdomen, were acquired in eight T2DM subjects with water suppression (WS) and without (NWS). Histograms from WS images show improved separation of non-fatty tissue pixels from fatty tissue pixels, compared to NWS images. Paired t-tests of WS versus NWS showed a statistically significant lower volume of lipid in the WS images for VAT (145.3 cc less, p=0.006) and IMAT (305 cc less, p<0.001), but not SAT (14.1 cc more, NS). WS measurements of TAT also resulted in lower fat volumes (436.1 cc less, p=0.002). There is strong correlation between WS and NWS quantification methods for SAT measurements (r=0.999), but poorer correlation for VAT studies (r=0.845). These results suggest that NWS pulse sequences may overestimate adipose tissue volumes and that WS pulse sequences are more desirable due to the higher contrast generated between fatty and non-fatty tissues.

  11. A fast multiparameter MRI approach for acute stroke assessment on a 3T clinical scanner: preliminary results in a non-human primate model with transient ischemic occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank; Li, Chun-Xia; Yan, Yumei; Nair, Govind; Nagaoka, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yoji; Zola, Stuart; Howell, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Many MRI parameters have been explored and demonstrated the capability or potential to evaluate acute stroke injury, providing anatomical, microstructural, functional, or neurochemical information for diagnostic purposes and therapeutic development. However, the application of multiparameter MRI approach is hindered in clinic due to the very limited time window after stroke insult. Parallel imaging technique can accelerate MRI data acquisition dramatically and has been incorporated in modern clinical scanners and increasingly applied for various diagnostic purposes. In the present study, a fast multiparameter MRI approach including structural T1-weighted imaging (T1W), T2-weighted imaging (T2W), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), T2-mapping, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and magnetization transfer (MT) imaging, was implemented and optimized for assessing acute stroke injury on a 3T clinical scanner. A macaque model of transient ischemic stroke induced by a minimal interventional approach was utilized for evaluating the multiparameter MRI approach. The preliminary results indicate the surgical procedure successfully induced ischemic occlusion in the cortex and/or subcortex in adult macaque monkeys (n=4). Application of parallel imaging technique substantially reduced the scanning duration of most MRI data acquisitions, allowing for fast and repeated evaluation of acute stroke injury. Hence, the use of the multiparameter MRI approach with up to five quantitative measures can provide significant advantages in preclinical or clinical studies of stroke disease. PMID:24834423

  12. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer.

    PubMed

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-07-21

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (²³Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (²³Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a ²³Na resonator was constructed for whole body ²³Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B₁-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body ²³Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm³ and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the ²³Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, ²³Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  13. Multimodal imaging: Simultaneous EEG in a 3T Hybrid MR-PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuner, I.; Warbrick, T.; Tellmann, L.; Rota Kops, E.; Arrubla, J.; Boers, F.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The new generation of integrated MR-PET systems allows the simultaneous acquisition of MR and PET data. While MR delivers structural data with an excellent spatial resolution, the advantage of PET is its information on a molecular level. However, both modalities have a low temporal resolution. Thus, for pharmacological studies or patients who suffer from treatment resistant epilepsy the combination of yet another modality such as EEG could be desirable. We tested the feasibility of evoked visual potentials in a 3T Hybrid MR-PET system (Siemens Germany) in comparison to a standalone 3T Trio System (Siemens Germany). A T2*-weighted EPI sequence was used: TR: 2.2 s, TE: 30 ms, FOV: 200 mm, slice thickness 3, 36 slices in a healthy volunteer (male, 27 years old) using an MR-compatible 32-channel EEG system (Brainproducts, Munich, Germany). We applied 200 trials of visual stimulation from a white and black checkerboard. Visual evoked potentials were analyzed using Brain Vision Analyzer (Brainproducts, Munich, Germany). Gradient correction and cardioballistic artefact correction were performed as implemented in Vision Analyzer. Visual event related potentials were successfully recorded at the 3T Hybrid MR-PET system. Both curves differ slightly in shape and latency due to the following factors: the distance from the screen varies slightly and the size of the field of view of the subjects is smaller in the 3T MR-PET system in comparison to the 3T stand alone system. Extending the 3T MR-PET Hybrid system to 3T Hybrid MR-PET-EEG is feasible and adds another tool to clinical neuroimaging and research.

  14. Impact of the use of an endorectal coil for 3 T prostate MRI on image quality and cancer detection rate

    PubMed Central

    Gawlitza, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Thörmer, Gregor; Schaudinn, Alexander; Linder, Nicolas; Garnov, Nikita; Horn, Lars-Christian; Minh, Do Hoang; Ganzer, Roman; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to assess the impact of an additional endorectal coil on image quality and cancer detection rate within the same patients. At a single academic medical center, this transversal study included 41 men who underwent T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 T using surface coils only or in combination with an endorectal coil in the same session. Two blinded readers (A and B) randomly evaluated all image data in separate sessions. Image quality with respect to localization and staging was rated on a five-point scale. Lesions were classified according to their prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS) score version 1. Standard of reference was provided by whole-mount step-section analysis. Mean image quality scores averaged over all localization-related items were significantly higher with additional endorectal coil for both readers (p < 0.001), corresponding staging-related items were only higher for reader B (p < 0.001). With an endorectal coil, the rate of correctly detecting cancer per patient was significantly higher for reader B (p < 0.001) but not for reader A (p = 0.219). The numbers of histologically confirmed tumor lesions were rather similar for both settings. The subjectively rated 3-T image quality was improved with an endorectal coil. In terms of diagnostic performance, the use of an additional endorectal coil was not superior. PMID:28145525

  15. Impact of the use of an endorectal coil for 3 T prostate MRI on image quality and cancer detection rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawlitza, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Thörmer, Gregor; Schaudinn, Alexander; Linder, Nicolas; Garnov, Nikita; Horn, Lars-Christian; Minh, Do Hoang; Ganzer, Roman; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to assess the impact of an additional endorectal coil on image quality and cancer detection rate within the same patients. At a single academic medical center, this transversal study included 41 men who underwent T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 T using surface coils only or in combination with an endorectal coil in the same session. Two blinded readers (A and B) randomly evaluated all image data in separate sessions. Image quality with respect to localization and staging was rated on a five-point scale. Lesions were classified according to their prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS) score version 1. Standard of reference was provided by whole-mount step-section analysis. Mean image quality scores averaged over all localization-related items were significantly higher with additional endorectal coil for both readers (p < 0.001), corresponding staging-related items were only higher for reader B (p < 0.001). With an endorectal coil, the rate of correctly detecting cancer per patient was significantly higher for reader B (p < 0.001) but not for reader A (p = 0.219). The numbers of histologically confirmed tumor lesions were rather similar for both settings. The subjectively rated 3-T image quality was improved with an endorectal coil. In terms of diagnostic performance, the use of an additional endorectal coil was not superior.

  16. Workflow assessment of 3T MRI-guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy using a robotic needle guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tuncali, Kemal; Tokuda, Junichi; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Fennessy, Fiona; Tempany, Clare; Yoshimitsu, Kitaro; Magill, John; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy has become a valuable instrument for detection of prostate cancer in patients with continuing suspicion for aggressive cancer after transrectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) guided biopsy. The MRI-guided procedures are performed using mechanical targeting devices or templates, which suffer from limitations of spatial sampling resolution and/or manual in-bore adjustments. To overcome these limitations, we developed and clinically deployed an MRI-compatible piezoceramic-motor actuated needle guidance device, Smart Template, which allows automated needle guidance with high targeting resolution for use in a wide closed-bore 3-Tesla MRI scanner. One of the main limitations of the MRI-guided procedure is the lengthy procedure time compared to conventional TRUS-guided procedures. In order to optimize the procedure, we assessed workflow of 30 MRI-guided biopsy procedures using the Smart Template with focus on procedure time. An average of 3.4 (range: 2~6) targets were preprocedurally selected per procedure and 2.2 ± 0.8 biopsies were performed for each target with an average insertion attempt of 1.9 ± 0.7 per biopsy. The average technical preparation time was 14 ± 7 min and the in-MRI patient preparation time was 42 ± 7 min. After 21 ± 7 min of initial imaging, 64 ± 12 min of biopsy was performed yielding an average of 10 ± 2 min per tissue sample. The total procedure time occupying the MRI suite was 138 ± 16 min. No noticeable tendency in the length of any time segment was observed over the 30 clinical cases.

  17. Quantitative planar and volumetric cardiac measurements using 64 MDCT and 3T MRI versus standard 2D and M-mode echocardiography: Does anesthetic protocol matter?

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Rio, Alejandro Munoz Del; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P=1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  18. Superficial amygdala and hippocampal activity during affective music listening observed at 3 T but not 1.5 T fMRI.

    PubMed

    Skouras, Stavros; Gray, Marcus; Critchley, Hugo; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 T and 1.5 T fMRI results during emotional music listening. Stimuli comprised of psychoacoustically balanced instrumental musical pieces, with three different affective expressions (fear, neutral, joy). Participants (N=32) were split into two groups, one subjected to fMRI scanning using 3 T and another group scanned using 1.5 T. Whole brain t-tests (corrected for multiple comparisons) compared joy and fear in each of the two groups. The 3 T group showed significant activity differences between joy and fear localized in bilateral superficial amygdala, bilateral hippocampus and bilateral auditory cortex. The 1.5 T group showed significant activity differences between joy and fear localized in bilateral auditory cortex and cuneus. This is the first study to compare results obtained under different field strengths with regard to affective processes elicited by means of auditory/musical stimulation. The findings raise concern over false negatives in the superficial amygdala and hippocampus in affective studies conducted under 1.5 T and caution that imaging improvements due to increasing magnetic field strength can be influenced by region-specific characteristics.

  19. Volumetric Analysis of the Hypothalamus in Huntington Disease Using 3T MRI: The IMAGE-HD Study

    PubMed Central

    Gabery, Sanaz; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Lundh, Sofia Hult; Cheong, Rachel Y.; Churchyard, Andrew; Chua, Phyllis; Stout, Julie C.; Egan, Gary F.; Kirik, Deniz; Petersén, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Non-motor symptoms and signs such as psychiatric disturbances, sleep problems and metabolic dysfunction are part of the disease manifestation. These aspects may relate to changes in the hypothalamus, an area of the brain involved in the regulation of emotion, sleep and metabolism. Neuropathological and imaging studies using both voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET) have demonstrated pathological changes in the hypothalamic region during early stages in symptomatic HD. In this investigation, we aimed to establish a robust method for measurements of the hypothalamic volume in MRI in order to determine whether the hypothalamic dysfunction in HD is associated with the volume of this region. Using T1-weighted imaging, we describe a reproducible delineation procedure to estimate the hypothalamic volume which was based on the same landmarks used in histologically processed postmortem hypothalamic tissue. Participants included 36 prodromal HD (pre-HD), 33 symptomatic HD (symp-HD) and 33 control participants who underwent MRI scanning at baseline and 18 months follow-up as part of the IMAGE-HD study. We found no evidence of cross-sectional or longitudinal changes between groups in hypothalamic volume. Our results suggest that hypothalamic pathology in HD is not associated with volume changes. PMID:25659157

  20. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Methods: Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740–1110 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Results: Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Conclusion: Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Advances in knowledge: Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive

  1. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant) in Cognitively Impaired Patients.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Eric R; Blum, Kenneth; Hussman, Karl L; Han, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Marin, Gabriela; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Smayda, Richard; Gold, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19-90 years) displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54), 57.14% central atrophy (N=88), and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69). A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III) scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740) was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115). Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787). In the centrum semiovale (CS), reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622). Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002). Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064). Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165). Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087). In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740); high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417); and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166). Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294): the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  2. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant) in Cognitively Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Eric R.; Blum, Kenneth; Hussman, Karl L.; Han, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Marin, Gabriela; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Smayda, Richard; Gold, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19–90 years) displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54), 57.14% central atrophy (N=88), and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69). A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III) scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740) was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115). Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787). In the centrum semiovale (CS), reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622). Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002). Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064). Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165). Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087). In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740); high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417); and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166). Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294): the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  3. High responsivity to threat during the initial stage of perception in repression: a 3 T fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Victoria Gabriele; Rauch, Astrid Veronika; Kugel, Harald; ter Horst, Lena; Bauer, Jochen; Dannlowski, Udo; Ohrmann, Patricia; Lindner, Christian; Donges, Uta-Susan; Kersting, Anette; Egloff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Repression designates coping strategies such as avoidance, or denial that aim to shield the organism from threatening stimuli. Derakshan et al. have proposed the vigilance–avoidance theory of repressive coping. It is assumed that repressors have an initial rapid vigilant response triggering physiological responses to threat stimuli. In the following second stage repressors manifest avoidant cognitive biases. Functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T was used to study neural correlates of repressive coping during the first stages of perception of threat. Pictures of human faces bearing fearful, angry, happy and neutral expressions were briefly presented masked by neutral faces. Forty study participants (20 repressive and 20 sensitizing individuals) were selected from a sample of 150 female students on the basis of their scores on the Mainz Coping Inventory. Repressors exhibited stronger neural activation than sensitizers primarily in response to masked threatening faces (vs neutral baseline) in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex as well as in the cingulate gyrus, basal ganglia and insula. There was no brain region in which sensitizers showed increased activation to emotion expression compared to repressors. The present results are in line with the vigilance–avoidance theory which predicts heightened automatic responsivity to threatening stimuli in repression. PMID:22133562

  4. Wavelet based characterization of ex vivo vertebral trabecular bone structure with 3T MRI compared to microCT

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, R; Carballido-Gamio, J; Burghardt, A; Haase, S; Sedat, J W; Moss, W C; Majumdar, S

    2005-04-11

    Trabecular bone structure and bone density contribute to the strength of bone and are important in the study of osteoporosis. Wavelets are a powerful tool to characterize and quantify texture in an image. In this study the thickness of trabecular bone was analyzed in 8 cylindrical cores of the vertebral spine. Images were obtained from 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography ({micro}CT). Results from the wavelet based analysis of trabecular bone were compared with standard two-dimensional structural parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry) obtained using mean intercept length (MR images) and direct 3D distance transformation methods ({micro}CT images). Additionally, the bone volume fraction was determined from MR images. We conclude that the wavelet based analyses delivers comparable results to the established MR histomorphometric measurements. The average deviation in trabecular thickness was less than one pixel size between the wavelet and the standard approach for both MR and {micro}CT analysis. Since the wavelet based method is less sensitive to image noise, we see an advantage of wavelet analysis of trabecular bone for MR imaging when going to higher resolution.

  5. In vivo conductivity imaging of canine male pelvis using a 3T MREIT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Jeong, W. C.; Kim, Y. T.; Minhas, A. S.; Lee, T. H.; Lim, C. Y.; Park, H. M.; Seo, J. K.; Woo, E. J.

    2010-04-01

    The prostate is an imaging area of growing concern related with aging. Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are the most common diseases and significant cause of death for elderly men. Hence, the conductivity imaging of the male pelvis is a challenging task with a clinical significance. In this study, we performed in vivo MREIT imaging experiments of the canine male pelvis using a 3T MRI scanner. Adopting carbon-hydrogel electrodes and a multi-echo pulse sequence, we could inject as much as 10 mA current in a form of 51 ms pulse into the pelvis. Collecting magnetic flux density data inside the pelvis subject to multiple injection currents, we reconstructed cross-sectional conductivity images using a MREIT software package CoReHA. Scaled conductivity images of the prostate show a clear contrast between the central and peripheral zones which are related with prostate diseases including cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. In our future work, we will focus on prostate cancer model animal experiments.

  6. Evaluation of a 32-channel versus a 12-channel head coil for high-resolution post-contrast MRI in giant cell arteritis (GCA) at 3T.

    PubMed

    Franke, Philipp; Markl, Michael; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Vaith, Peter; Bürk, Jonas; Langer, Mathias; Geiger, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a 32-channel head coil for the characterization of mural inflammation patterns in the superficial cranial arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to a standard 12-channel coil at 3T MRI. 55 patients with suspected GCA underwent high resolution T1-weighted post-contrast MRI at 3T to detect inflammation related vessel wall enhancement using both coils. To account for different time delays between contrast agent injection and sequence acquisition, the patients were divided into two cohorts: 27 patients were examined with the 32-channel coil first and 28 patients with the 12-channel coil first. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers with regard to image quality, artifact level and arteries' inflammation according to a standardized ranking scale; furthermore signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were performed at three locations. Identification of arteries' inflammation was achieved with both coils with excellent inter-observer agreement (κ=0.89 for 12-channel and κ=0.96 for 32-channel coil). Regarding image grading, the inter-observer variability was moderate for the 12-channel (κ=0.5) and substantial for the 32-channel coil (κ=0.63). Significantly higher SNR and improved image quality (p<0.01) were obtained with the 32-channel coil in either coil order. Image quality for depiction of the superficial cranial arteries was superior for the 32-channel coil. For standardized GCA diagnosis, the 12-channel coil was sufficient.

  7. Development of 1.45-mm resolution four-layer DOI-PET detector for simultaneous measurement in 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Tachibana, Atsushi; Obata, Takayuki; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Suga, Mikio; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Recently, various types of PET-MRI systems have been developed by a number of research groups. However, almost all of the PET detectors used in these PET-MRI systems have no depth-of-interaction (DOI) capability. The DOI detector can reduce the parallax error and lead to improvement of the performance. We are developing a new PET-MRI system which consists of four-layer DOI detectors positioned close to the measured object to achieve high spatial resolution and high scanner sensitivity. As a first step, we are investigating influences the PET detector and the MRI system have on each other using a prototype four-layer DOI-PET detector. This prototype detector consists of a lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal block and a 4 × 4 multi-pixel photon counter array. The size of each crystal element is 1.45 mm × 1.45 mm × 4.5 mm, and the crystals are arranged in 6 × 6 elements × 4 layers with reflectors. The detector and some electric components are packaged in an aluminum shielding box. Experiments were carried out with 3.0 T MRI (GE, Signa HDx) and a birdcage-type RF coil. We demonstrated that the DOI-PET detector was normally operated in simultaneous measurements with no influence of the MRI measurement. A slight influence of the PET detector on the static magnetic field of the MRI was observed near the PET detector. The signal-to-noise ratio was decreased by presence of the PET detector due to environmental noise entering the MRI room through the cables, even though the PET detector was not powered up. On the other hand, no influence of electric noise from the PET detector in the simultaneous measurement on the MRI images was observed, even though the PET detector was positioned near the RF coil.

  8. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Collins, Adam PR; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Patients / methods Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an ‘adult’ 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p < 0.05, whole-brain FWE-corrected. Results Using a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil, we found significant positive BOLD responses in contralateral SMC after unilateral passive sensorimotor stimulation in all neonates (analyses restricted to artifact-free data sets = 8/13). Improved imaging characteristics of the neonatal MR-coil were evidenced by additional phantom and in vivo tSNR measurements: phantom studies revealed a 240% global increase in tSNR; in vivo studies revealed a 73% global and a 55% local (SMC) increase in tSNR, as compared to the ‘adult’ MR

  9. Online monitoring of BALB/3T3 metabolism and adhesion with multiparametric chip-based system.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, L; Kob, A; Drechsler, S; Ponti, J; Thedinga, E; Colpo, P; Ehret, R; Rossi, F

    2007-12-01

    A multiparametric chip-based system was employed to measure cell adhesion, metabolism, and response to metal compounds previously classified as cytotoxic in immortalized mouse fibroblasts (BALB/3T3 cell line). The system measures in parallel, online, and in label-free conditions the extracellular acidification rates (with pH-sensitive field effect transistors [ISFETs]), the cellular oxygen consumption (with amperometric electrode structures [Clark-type sensors]), and cell adhesion (with impedimetric interdigitated electrode structures [IDESs]). The experimental protocol was optimized to monitor metabolism and adhesion of the BALB/3T3 cell line. A total of 70,000 cells and a bicarbonate buffer-free running low-glucose Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) containing 10% fetal clone serum III and 1mM Hepes were selected to maintain cells in good conditions on the chip during the measurements performed under perfusion conditions. Cells were exposed to sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride, and cis-platinum at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 microM. The kinetics of cell response to these compounds was analyzed and suggests that the Clark-type sensors can be more sensitive than IDESs and ISFETs in detecting the presence of high chemical concentration when short exposure times (i.e., 2h) are considered. The cytotoxicity data obtained from the online measurements of acidification, respiration, and adhesion at 24h compare well, in terms of half-inhibition concentration values (IC(50)), with the ones obtained using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and colony-forming efficiency (CFE) assay. The results show a good sensitivity of the system combined with the advantages of the online and label-free detection methods that allow following cell status before, during, and after the treatment in the same experiment.

  10. MR Spectroscopic Imaging of Peripheral Zone in Prostate Cancer Using a 3T MRI Scanner: Endorectal versus External Phased Array Coils.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Margolis, Daniel Ja; Raman, Steven S; Ouellette, David; Sarma, Manoj K; Reiter, Robert E; Thomas, M Albert

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) detects alterations in major prostate metabolites, such as citrate (Cit), creatine (Cr), and choline (Ch). We evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of three-dimensional MRSI of prostate using an endorectal compared to an external phased array "receive" coil on a 3T MRI scanner. Eighteen patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and proton (1H) MRSI were included in this study. Immediately after the endorectal MRSI scan, the PCa patients were scanned with the external phased array coil. The endorectal coil-detected metabolite ratio [(Ch+Cr)/Cit] was significantly higher in cancer locations (1.667 ± 0.663) compared to non-cancer locations (0.978 ± 0.420) (P < 0.001). Similarly, for the external phased array, the ratio was significantly higher in cancer locations (1.070 ± 0.525) compared to non-cancer locations (0.521 ± 0.310) (P < 0.001). The sensitivity and accuracy of cancer detection were 81% and 78% using the endorectal 'receive' coil, and 69% and 75%, respectively using the external phased array 'receive' coil.

  11. Assessment of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns using the time-spatial labeling inversion pulse technique with 3T MRI: early clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kayoko; Ono, Yuko; Yoneyama, Hiroko; Nishina, Yu; Aihara, Yasuo; Okada, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Shuji

    2014-06-01

    CSF imaging using the time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (time-SLIP) technique at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. The study population comprised 15 healthy volunteers and five patients with MR findings showing expansive dilation of the third and lateral ventricles suggesting aqueductal stenosis (AS). Signal intensity changes were evaluated in the tag-labeled CSF, untagged brain parenchyma, and untagged CSF of healthy volunteers by changing of black-blood time-inversion pulse (BBTI). CSF flow from the aqueduct to the third ventricle, the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle, and the foramen of Monro to the lateral ventricle was clearly rendered in all healthy volunteers with suitable BBTI. The travel distance of CSF flow as demonstrated by the time-SLIP technique was compared with the distance between the aqueduct and the fourth ventricle. The distance between the foramen of Monro and the lateral ventricle was used to calculate the CSF flow/distance ratio (CD ratio). The CD ratio at each level was significantly reduced in patients suspected to have AS compared to healthy volunteers. CSF flow was not identified at the aqueductal level in most of the patients. Two patients underwent time-SLIP assessments before and after endoscopic third ventriculostomies (ETVs). CSF flow at the ETV site was confirmed in each patient. With the time-SLIP technique, CSF imaging is sensitive enough to detect kinetic changes in CSF flow due to AS and ETV.

  12. Iodothyronine Interactions with the System L1 Amino Acid Exchanger in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Fiona E; Roy, Lisa A; Taylor, Peter M

    2010-06-24

    Thyroid hormones enter isolated white adipocytes largely by a System L1-type amino acid transporter en route to exerting genomic actions. Differentiated 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes in culture express mRNA for LAT1 (the catalytic subunit of high-affinity System L1). L-[(125)I]-T(3) uptake into 3T3-L1 adipocytes included a substantial saturable component inhibited by leucine. L-[(3)H]phenylalanine uptake into 3T3-L1 cells was saturable (K(m) of 31 μM), competitively inhibited by T(3) (K(i) of 1.2 μM) and blocked by leucine, BCH, and rT(3) as expected for substrate interactions of System L1. Efflux of preloaded L-[(3)H]phenylalanine from 3T3-L1 adipocytes was trans stimulated by external leucine, demonstrating the obligatory exchange mechanism of System L1 transport. T(3) (10 μM) did not significantly trans stimulate L-[(3)H]phenylalanine efflux, but did competitively inhibit the trans stimulatory effect of 10 μM leucine. The results highlight strong competitive interactions between iodothyronines (T(3), rT(3)) and amino acids for transport by System L1 in adipocytes, which may impact cellular iodothyronine exchanges during altered states of protein nutrition.

  13. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  14. Tea catechins modulate the glucose transport system in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Manabu; Furuyashiki, Takashi; Yamada, Kayo; Aoki, Yukiko; Sakane, Iwao; Fukuda, Itsuko; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of tea catechins on the translocation of glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that the ethyl acetate fraction of green tea extract, containing abundant catechins, most decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake activity in 3T3-L1 cells. When the cells were treated with 50 μM catechins in the absence or presence of insulin for 30 min, nongallate-type catechins increased glucose uptake activity without insulin, whereas gallate-type catechins decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake activity. (-)-Epicatechin (EC) and (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), nongallate-type catechins, increased glucose uptake activity in the dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas (-)-catechin 3-gallate (Cg) and (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCg), gallate-type catechins, decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake activity in the dose- and time-dependent manner. When the cells were treated with 50 μM catechins for 30 min, EC and EGC promoted GLUT4 translocation, whereas Cg and EGCg decreased the insulin-induced translocation in the cells. EC and EGC increased phosphorylation of PKCλ/ζ without phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR) and Akt. Wortmannin and LY294002, inhibitors for phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K), decreased EC- and EGC-induced glucose uptake activity in the cells. Cg and EGCg decreased phosphorylation of PKCλ/ζ in the presence of insulin without affecting insulin-induced phosphorylation of IR, and Akt. Therefore, EC and EGC promote the translocation of GLUT4 through activation of PI3K, and Cg and EGCg inhibit insulin-induced translocation of GLUT4 by the insulin signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 cells.

  15. 3T MRI and 128-slice dual-source CT cisternography images of the cranial nerves a brief pictorial review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Martinez-Anda, Jaime J; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    There is a broad community of health sciences professionals interested in the anatomy of the cranial nerves (CNs): specialists in neurology, neurosurgery, radiology, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, maxillofacial surgery, radiation oncology, and emergency medicine, as well as other related fields. Advances in neuroimaging using high-resolution images from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) have made highly-detailed visualization of brain structures possible, allowing normal findings to be routinely assessed and nervous system pathology to be detected. In this article we present an integrated perspective of the normal anatomy of the CNs established by radiologists and neurosurgeons in order to provide a practical imaging review, which combines 128-slice dual-source multiplanar images from CT cisternography and 3T MR curved reconstructed images. The information about the CNs includes their origin, course (with emphasis on the cisternal segments and location of the orifices at the skull base transmitting them), function, and a brief listing of the most common pathologies affecting them. The scope of the article is clinical anatomy; readers will find specialized texts presenting detailed information about particular topics. Our aim in this article is to provide a helpful reference for understanding the complex anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  16. Dynamic 1.5-T vs 3-T true fast imaging with steady-state precession (trueFISP)-MRI sequences for assessment of velopharyngeal function

    PubMed Central

    Sinko, K; Czerny, C; Jagsch, R; Baumann, A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the image quality of MRI scans produced with 1.5- and 3.0-T devices during functional test condition. Methods: 65 MRI scans obtained with 1.5- (n = 43) or 3.0-T (n = 22) true fast imaging with steady-state precession (trueFISP) sequences from patients with a history of a cleft palate were evaluated. Two experts assessed the MRI scans, independently of each other, and blinded to the MRI technique used. Subjective ratings were entered on a five-point Likert scale. The median planes of three anatomical structures (velum, tongue and pharyngeal wall) were assessed in three functional states (at rest, during phonation of sustained “e” and during articulation of “kkk”). In addition, MRI scans taken during velopharyngeal closure were evaluated. Results: Under blinded conditions, both observers (radiologist and orthodontist) independently rated the quality of 1.5-T scans higher than that of 3.0 T. Statistical analysis of pooled data showed that the differences were highly significant (p < 0.009) in 4 out of 10 test conditions. The greatest differences in favour of 1.5 T were observed for MRI scans of the velum. Conclusions: 1.5 T used with trueFISP may be preferable over 3.0-T trueFISP for the evaluation of the velopharyngeal structures in the clinical routine. PMID:26090932

  17. Semi-Quantitative vs. Volumetric Determination of Endolymphatic Space in Menière’s Disease Using Endolymphatic Hydrops 3T-HR-MRI after Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Georg; Vieth, Volker; Weiss, Daniel; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Heindel, Walter; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Böckenfeld, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging enhances the clinical diagnosis of Menière's disease. This is accomplished by in vivo detection of endolymphatic hydrops, which are graded using different semi-quantitative grading systems. We evaluated an established, semi-quantitative endolymphatic hydrops score and with a quantitative method for volumetric assessment of the endolymphatic size. 11 patients with Menière's disease and 2 healthy subjects underwent high resolution endolymphatic hydrops 3 Tesla MRI with highly T2 weighted FLAIR and T2DRIVE sequences. The degree of endolymphatic hydrops was rated semi-quantitatively and compared to the results of 3D-volumetry. Moreover, the grade of endolymphatic hydrops was correlated with pure tone audiometry. Semi-quantitative grading and volumetric evaluation of the endolymphatic hydrops are in accordance (r = 0.92) and the grade of endolymphatic hydrops correlates with pure tone audiometry. Patients with a sickness duration of ≥ 30 months showed a significant higher total labyrinth fluid volume (p = 0.03). Fast, semi-quantitative evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops is highly reliable compared to quantitative/volumetric assessment. Endolymphatic space is significantly higher in patients with longer sickness duration. PMID:25768940

  18. 3T MRI investigation of cardiac left ventricular structure and function in a UK population: The tayside screening for the prevention of cardiac events (TASCFORCE) study

    PubMed Central

    Gandy, Stephen J.; Lambert, Matthew; Belch, Jill; Cavin, Ian; Crowe, Elena; Littleford, Roberta; MacFarlane, Jennifer A.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Nicholas, R. Stephen; Struthers, Allan; Sullivan, Frank; Waugh, Shelley A.; White, Richard D.; Weir‐McCall, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To scan a volunteer population using 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI of the left ventricular (LV) structure and function in healthy volunteers has been reported extensively at 1.5T. Materials and Methods A population of 1528 volunteers was scanned. A standardized approach was taken to acquire steady‐state free precession (SSFP) LV data in the short‐axis plane, and images were quantified using commercial software. Six observers undertook the segmentation analysis. Results Mean values (±standard deviation, SD) were: ejection fraction (EF) = 69 ± 6%, end diastolic volume index (EDVI) = 71 ± 13 ml/m2, end systolic volume index (ESVI) = 22 ± 7 ml/m2, stroke volume index (SVI) = 49 ± 8 ml/m2, and LV mass index (LVMI) = 55 ± 12 g/m2. The mean EF was slightly larger for females (69%) than for males (68%), but all other variables were smaller for females (EDVI 68v77 ml/m2, ESVI 21v25 ml/m2, SVI 46v52 ml/m2, LVMI 49v64 g/m2, all P < 0.05). The mean LV volume data mostly decreased with each age decade (EDVI males: –2.9 ± 1.3 ml/m2, females: –3.1 ± 0.8 ml/m2; ESVI males: –1.3 ± 0.7 ml/m2, females: –1.7 ± 0.5 ml/m2; SVI males: –1.7 ± 0.9 ml/m2, females: –1.4 ± 0.6 ml/m2; LVMI males: –1.6 ± 1.1 g/m2, females: –0.2 ± 0.6 g/m2) but the mean EF was virtually stable in males (0.6 ± 0.6%) and rose slightly in females (1.2 ± 0.5%) with age. Conclusion LV reference ranges are provided in this population‐based MR study at 3.0T. The variables are similar to those described at 1.5T, including variations with age and gender. These data may help to support future population‐based MR research studies that involve the use of 3.0T MRI scanners. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1186–1196. PMID:27143317

  19. CD4+CXCR3+ T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells drive accelerated atherosclerosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Clement, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Escoubet, Brigitte; Guedj, Kevin; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Nicoletti, Antonino; Papo, Thomas; Sacre, Karim

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Noteworthy, accelerated atherosclerosis in SLE patients appears to be independant of classical Framingham risk factors. This suggests that aggravated atherosclerosis in SLE patients may be a result of increased inflammation and altered immune responses. However, the mechanisms that mediate the acceleration of atherosclerosis in SLE remain elusive. Based on experimental data which includes both humans (SLE patients and control subjects) and rodents (ApoE-/- mice), we herein propose a multi-step model in which the immune dysfunction associated with SLE (i.e. high level of IFN-α production by TLR 9-stimulated pDCs) is associated with, first, an increased frequency of circulating pro inflammatory CD4+CXCR3+ T cells; second, an increased production of CXCR3 ligands by endothelial cells; third, an increased recruitment of pro-inflammatory CD4+CXCR3+ T cells into the arterial wall, and fourth, the development of atherosclerosis. In showing how SLE may promote accelerated atherosclerosis, our model also points to hypotheses for potential interventions, such as pDCs-targeted therapy, that might be studied in the future.

  20. A novel method to decrease electric field and SAR using an external high dielectric sleeve at 3 T head MRI: numerical and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Park, Bu S; Rajan, Sunder S; Guag, Joshua W; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2015-04-01

    Materials with high dielectric constant (HDC) have been used in high field MRI to decrease specific absorption rate (SAR), increase magnetic field intensity, and increase signal-to-noise ratio. In previous studies, the HDC materials were placed inside the RF coil decreasing the space available. This study describes an alternative approach that considers an HDC-based sleeve placed outside the RF coil. The effects of an HDC on the electromagnetic (EM) field were studied using numerical simulations with a coil unloaded and loaded with a human head model. In addition, experimental EM measurements at 128 MHz were performed inside a custom-made head coil, fitted with a distilled water sleeve. The numerical simulations showed up to 40% decrease in maximum 10 g-avg. SAR on the surface of the head model with an HDC material of barium titanate. Experimental measurements also showed up to 20% decrease of maximum electric field using an HDC material of distilled water. The proposed method can be incorporated in the design of high field transmit RF coils.

  1. An eight-channel T/R head coil for parallel transmit MRI at 3T using ultra-low output impedance amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Moody, Katherine Lynn; Hollingsworth, Neal A; Zhao, Feng; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Noll, Douglas C; Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2014-09-01

    Parallel transmit is an emerging technology to address the technical challenges associated with MR imaging at high field strengths. When developing arrays for parallel transmit systems, one of the primary factors to be considered is the mechanism to manage coupling and create independently operating channels. Recent work has demonstrated the use of amplifiers to provide some or all of the channel-to-channel isolation, reducing the need for on-coil decoupling networks in a manner analogous to the use of isolation preamplifiers with receive coils. This paper discusses an eight-channel transmit/receive head array for use with an ultra-low output impedance (ULOI) parallel transmit system. The ULOI amplifiers eliminated the need for a complex lumped element network to decouple the eight-rung array. The design and construction details of the array are discussed in addition to the measurement considerations required for appropriately characterizing an array when using ULOI amplifiers. B1 maps and coupling matrices are used to verify the performance of the system.

  2. An eight-channel T/R head coil for parallel transmit MRI at 3T using ultra-low output impedance amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Katherine Lynn; Hollingsworth, Neal A.; Zhao, Feng; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Noll, Douglas C.; Wright, Steven M.; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2014-01-01

    Parallel transmit is an emerging technology to address the technical challenges associated with MR imaging at high field strengths. When developing arrays for parallel transmit systems, one of the primary factors to be considered is the mechanism to manage coupling and create independently operating channels. Recent work has demonstrated the use of amplifiers to provide some or all of the channel-to-channel isolation, reducing the need for on-coil decoupling networks in a manner analogous to the use of isolation preamplifiers with receive coils. This paper discusses an eight-channel transmit/receive head array for use with an ultra-low output impedance (ULOI) parallel transmit system. The ULOI amplifiers eliminated the need for a complex lumped element network to decouple the eight rung array. The design and construction details of the array are discussed in addition to the measurement considerations required for appropriately characterizing an array when using ULOI amplifiers. B1 maps and coupling matrices are used to verify the performance of the system. PMID:25072190

  3. Final Report: A CdZnTe detector for MRI-compatible SPECT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2012-12-27

    The key objective of this project is to develop the enabling technology for future MRI-compatible nuclear (e.g. SPECT) imaging system, and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous MR and SPECT imaging studies of the same object. During the past three years, we have developed (a) a MRI-compatible ultrahigh resolution gamma ray detector and associated readout electronics, (b) a theoretical approach for modeling the effect of strong magnetic field on SPECT image quality, and (c) a maximum-likelihood (ML) based reconstruction routine with correction for the MR-induced distortion. With this support, we have also constructed a four-head MR-compatible SPECT system and tested the system inside a 3-T clinical MR-scanner located on UI campus. The experimental results obtained with this system have clearly demonstrated that sub-500um spatial resolution can be achieved with a SPECT system operated inside a 3-T MRI scanner. During the past three years, we have accomplished most of the major objectives outlined in the original proposal. These research efforts have laid out a solid foundation the development of future MR-compatible SPECT systems for both pre-clinical and clinical imaging applications.

  4. Nuclear phosphoproteome analysis of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation reveals system-wide phosphorylation of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Schwämmle, Veit; Sidoli, Simone; Dai, Jie; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Mandrup, Susanne; Jensen, Ole N

    2017-03-01

    Adipocytes (fat cells) are important endocrine and metabolic cells critical for systemic insulin sensitivity. Both adipose excess and insufficiency are associated with adverse metabolic function. Adipogenesis is the process whereby preadipocyte precursor cells differentiate into lipid-laden mature adipocytes. This process is driven by a network of transcriptional regulators (TRs). We hypothesized that protein PTMs, in particular phosphorylation, play a major role in activating and propagating signals within TR networks upon induction of adipogenesis by extracellular stimulus. We applied MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics to monitor the alteration of nuclear proteins during the early stages (4 h) of preadipocyte differentiation. We identified a total of 4072 proteins including 2434 phosphorylated proteins, a majority of which were assigned as regulators of gene expression. Our results demonstrate that adipogenic stimuli increase the nuclear abundance and/or the phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in gene expression, cell organization, and oxidation-reduction pathways. Furthermore, proteins acting as negative modulators involved in negative regulation of gene expression, insulin stimulated glucose uptake, and cytoskeletal organization showed a decrease in their nuclear abundance and/or phosphorylation levels during the first 4 h of adipogenesis. Among 288 identified TRs, 49 were regulated within 4 h of adipogenic stimulation including several known and many novel potential adipogenic regulators. We created a kinase-substrate database for 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by investigating the relationship between protein kinases and protein phosphorylation sites identified in our dataset. A majority of the putative protein kinases belong to the cyclin-dependent kinase family and the mitogen-activated protein kinase family including P38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, suggesting that these kinases act as orchestrators of early adipogenesis.

  5. Design considerations and experimental results for MRI systems using HTS magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Ben

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using high temperature superconductors (HTS) magnets have been designed and constructed, with detailed results of their performance now available. Features of REBCO and BSCCO conductors are described as they pertain to use in high homogeneity magnets, with emphasis placed on the practical use of these conductors in magnets. Methods of coil winding are discussed, in particular the differences between pancake and layer winding techniques. Design considerations for HTS magnets are presented in light of the difficulties presented by quench in these magnets, but also in terms of the features of HTS magnets afforded by their high operating temperatures, namely robust cryogen free operation and the potential to use unshielded gradient coils. Drawing on two example MRI systems, namely a 3 T BSCCO brain imaging magnet developed in Japan and a 1.5 T REBCO orthopaedic imaging system developed in New Zealand, the report details real-world stability and homogeneity of HTS-MRI systems, in particular with regards to the screening current effects observed in these systems. It is concluded that, apart from conductor cost, there are currently no technical obstacles to use of HTS-MRI systems.

  6. A MRI-COMPATIBLE SYSTEM FOR WHISKER STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Li, Limin; Weiss, Craig; Talk, Andrew C.; Disterhoft, John F.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a system for whisker stimulation designed for functional studies in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environments. This system, which incorporates real-time optical monitoring of the vibration stimulus, can generate well-controlled and reproducible whisker deflections with amplitudes up to 2 mm and frequencies up to 75 Hz, suitable for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of animals. Whiskers on either or both sides of the head can be stimulated selectively during fMRI experiments without removing the subject from the magnet. With a user-friendly graphical interface of a computer, a user can conveniently control both the whisker vibration and gating of the MR imager, and synchronize the stimulation with the fMRI acquisition to ensure precise timing of the stimulus presentation. This whisker stimulation system should facilitate a wide variety of fMRI investigations of the neural systems mediating sensory information from the whiskers. PMID:22322316

  7. An MRI-Compatible Robotic System With Hybrid Tracking for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Guion, Peter; Singh, Anurag K.; Kaushal, Aradhana; Ménard, Cynthia; Pinto, Peter A.; Camphausen, Kevin; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the development, evaluation, and first clinical trials of the access to the prostate tissue (APT) II system—a scanner independent system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transrectal prostate interventions. The system utilizes novel manipulator mechanics employing a steerable needle channel and a novel six degree-of-freedom hybrid tracking method, comprising passive fiducial tracking for initial registration and subsequent incremental motion measurements. Targeting accuracy of the system in prostate phantom experiments and two clinical human-subject procedures is shown to compare favorably with existing systems using passive and active tracking methods. The portable design of the APT II system, using only standard MRI image sequences and minimal custom scanner interfacing, allows the system to be easily used on different MRI scanners. PMID:22009867

  8. A practical introduction to the hemodynamic analysis of the cardiovascular system with 4D Flow MRI.

    PubMed

    Pineda Zapata, J A; Delgado de Bedout, J A; Rascovsky Ramírez, S; Bustamante, C; Mesa, S; Calvo Betancur, V D

    2014-01-01

    The 4D Flow MRI technique provides a three-dimensional representation of blood flow over time, making it possible to evaluate the hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system both qualitatively and quantitatively. In this article, we describe the application of the 4D Flow technique in a 3T scanner; in addition to the technical parameters, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the technique and its possible clinical applications. We used 4D Flow MRI to study different body areas (chest, abdomen, neck, and head) in 10 volunteers. We obtained 3D representations of the patterns of flow and quantitative hemodynamic measurements. The technique makes it possible to evaluate the pattern of blood flow in large and midsize vessels without the need for exogenous contrast agents.

  9. Preliminary Evaluation of a MRI-compatible Modular Robotic System for MRI-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2010-09-26

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided robotic interventions have been introduced in order to advance prostate cancer detection and treatment. To overcome problems of such robotic interventions, we have been developing a pneumatically actuated MRI-compatible modular robotic system for MRI-guided transperineal prostate intervention and its interventional procedure. For system evaluation, a series of experiments have been conducted and this paper reports a needle insertion experiment using prostate phantom and patient mockup trials. The needle insertion experiment resulted in noticeable consistent error in one direction, which we will investigate further. Nonetheless, patient mockup experiences suggest that the modular robotic system and its interventional procedure are well integrated and implemented in clinical environment.

  10. Preliminary Evaluation of a MRI-compatible Modular Robotic System for MRI-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided robotic interventions have been introduced in order to advance prostate cancer detection and treatment. To overcome problems of such robotic interventions, we have been developing a pneumatically actuated MRI-compatible modular robotic system for MRI-guided transperineal prostate intervention and its interventional procedure. For system evaluation, a series of experiments have been conducted and this paper reports a needle insertion experiment using prostate phantom and patient mockup trials. The needle insertion experiment resulted in noticeable consistent error in one direction, which we will investigate further. Nonetheless, patient mockup experiences suggest that the modular robotic system and its interventional procedure are well integrated and implemented in clinical environment. PMID:21132087

  11. Assessment of dosimetric impact of system specific geometric distortion in an MRI only based radiotherapy workflow for prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, C.; Nordström, F.; Persson, E.; Brynolfsson, J.; Olsson, L. E.

    2017-04-01

    Dosimetric errors in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only radiotherapy workflow may be caused by system specific geometric distortion from MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on planned dose distribution and delineated structures for prostate patients, originating from this distortion. A method was developed, in which computer tomography (CT) images were distorted using the MRI distortion field. The displacement map for an optimized MRI treatment planning sequence was measured using a dedicated phantom in a 3 T MRI system. To simulate the distortion aspects of a synthetic CT (electron density derived from MR images), the displacement map was applied to CT images, referred to as distorted CT images. A volumetric modulated arc prostate treatment plan was applied to the original CT and the distorted CT, creating a reference and a distorted CT dose distribution. By applying the inverse of the displacement map to the distorted CT dose distribution, a dose distribution in the same geometry as the original CT images was created. For 10 prostate cancer patients, the dose difference between the reference dose distribution and inverse distorted CT dose distribution was analyzed in isodose level bins. The mean magnitude of the geometric distortion was 1.97 mm for the radial distance of 200–250 mm from isocenter. The mean percentage dose differences for all isodose level bins, were  ⩽0.02% and the radiotherapy structure mean volume deviations were  <0.2%. The method developed can quantify the dosimetric effects of MRI system specific distortion in a prostate MRI only radiotherapy workflow, separated from dosimetric effects originating from synthetic CT generation. No clinically relevant dose difference or structure deformation was found when 3D distortion correction and high acquisition bandwidth was used. The method could be used for any MRI sequence together with any anatomy of interest.

  12. Feasibility of imaging superficial palmar arch using micro-ultrasound, 7T and 3T magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pruzan, Alison N; Kaufman, Audrey E; Calcagno, Claudia; Zhou, Yu; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    AIM To demonstrate feasibility of vessel wall imaging of the superficial palmar arch using high frequency micro-ultrasound, 7T and 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS Four subjects (ages 22-50 years) were scanned on a micro-ultrasound system with a 45-MHz transducer (Vevo 2100, VisualSonics). Subjects’ hands were then imaged on a 3T clinical MR scanner (Siemens Biograph MMR) using an 8-channel special purpose phased array carotid coil. Lastly, subjects’ hands were imaged on a 7T clinical MR scanner (Siemens Magnetom 7T Whole Body Scanner) using a custom built 8-channel transmit receive carotid coil. All three imaging modalities were subjectively analyzed for image quality and visualization of the vessel wall. RESULTS Results of this very preliminary study indicated that vessel wall imaging of the superficial palmar arch was feasible with a whole body 7T and 3T MRI in comparison with micro-ultrasound. Subjective analysis of image quality (1-5 scale, 1: poorest, 5: best) from B mode, ultrasound, 3T SPACE MRI and 7T SPACE MRI indicated that the image quality obtained at 7T was superior to both 3T MRI and micro-ultrasound. The 3D SPACE sequence at both 7T and 3T MRI with isotropic voxels allowed for multi-planar reformatting of images and allowed for less operator dependent results as compared to high frequency micro-ultrasound imaging. Although quantitative analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between the three methods, the 7T Tesla trended to have better visibility of the vessel and its wall. CONCLUSION Imaging of smaller arteries at the 7T is feasible for evaluating atherosclerosis burden and may be of clinical relevance in multiple diseases. PMID:28298968

  13. [Immunologic assessment and acoustic "stressing situation" in an experimental system BALB/c mice, the Tsc-3T3 tumor].

    PubMed

    Favre, R; Grallan, B; Verrier, C; Serafino, X; Carcassonne, Y

    1982-01-18

    Previous results in Hamsters showed enhancement of tumor takes in animals exposed to acoustic aggression. Since this phenomenon could be due to immunodepression, we investigated whether this was the case in a better defined system of inbred BALB/c Mice. The results show that in these conditions, the tumor graft could not transgress a minor histocompatibility antigen nor decrease the protective effects of polyoma virus against tumor challenge and that all the immune tests investigated were unaltered.

  14. A new MRI grading system for chondromalacia patellae.

    PubMed

    Özgen, Ali; Taşdelen, Neslihan; Fırat, Zeynep

    2017-04-01

    Background Chondromalacia patellae is a very common disorder. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used to investigate patellar cartilage lesions, there is no descriptive MRI-based grading system for chondromalacia patellae. Purpose To propose a new MRI grading system for chondromalacia patellae with corresponding high resolution images which might be useful in precisely reporting and comparing knee examinations in routine daily practice and used in predicting natural course and clinical outcome of the patellar cartilage lesions. Material and Methods High resolution fat-saturated proton density (FS PD) images in the axial plane with corresponding T2 mapping images were reviewed. A detailed MRI grading system covering the deficiencies of the existing gradings has been set and presented on these images. Two experienced observers blinded to clinical data examined 44 knee MR images and evaluated patellar cartilage changes according to the proposed grading system. Inter- and intra-rater validity testing using kappa statistics were calculated. Results A descriptive and detailed grading system with corresponding FS PD and T2 mapping images has been presented. Inter-rater agreement was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.89). Intra-rater agreements were 0.83 (95% CI, 0.74-0.91) for observer A and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.70-0.88) for observer B (k-values). Conclusion We present a new MRI grading system for chondromalacia patellae with corresponding images and good inter- and intra-rater agreement which might be useful in reporting and comparing knee MRI examinations in daily practice and may also have the potential for using more precisely predicting prognosis and clinical outcome of the patients.

  15. Design and performance evaluation of a whole-body Ingenuity TF PET–MRI system

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, H; Ojha, N; Morich, M; Griesmer, J; Hu, Z; Maniawski, P; Ratib, O; Izquierdo-Garcia, D; Fayad, Z A; Shao, L

    2014-01-01

    The Ingenuity TF PET–MRI is a newly released whole-body hybrid PET–MR imaging system with a Philips time-of-flight GEMINI TF PET and Achieva 3T X-series MRI system. Compared to PET–CT, modifications to the positron emission tomography (PET) gantry were made to avoid mutual system interference and deliver uncompromising performance which is equivalent to the standalone systems. The PET gantry was redesigned to introduce magnetic shielding for the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Stringent electromagnetic noise requirements of the MR system necessitated the removal of PET gantry electronics to be housed in the PET–MR equipment room. We report the standard NEMA measurements for the PET scanner. PET imaging and performance measurements were done at Geneva University Hospital as described in the NEMA Standards NU2-2007 manual. The scatter fraction (SF) and noise equivalent count rate (NECR) measurements with the NEMA cylinder (20 cm diameter) were repeated for two larger cylinders (27 cm and 35 cm diameter), which better represent average and heavy patients. A NEMA/IEC torso phantom was used for overall assessment of image quality. The transverse and axial resolution near the center was 4.7 mm. Timing and energy resolution of the PET–MR system were measured to be 525 ps and 12%, respectively. The results were comparable to PET–CT systems demonstrating that the effect of design modifications required on the PET system to remove the harmful effect of the magnetic field on the PMTs was negligible. The absolute sensitivity of this scanner was 7.0 cps kBq−1, whereas SF was 26%. NECR measurements performed with cylinders having three different diameters, and image quality measurements performed with IEC phantom yielded excellent results. The Ingenuity TF PET–MRI represents the first commercial whole-body hybrid PET–MRI system. The performance of the PET subsystem was comparable to the GEMINI TF PET–CT system using phantom and patient studies. It is conceived

  16. Bidimensional MRI-based navigation system using a PID controller.

    PubMed

    Tamaz, Samer; Gourdeau, Richard; Martel, Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of using 2D real-time control to navigate ferromagnetic entities in an MRI bore for novel medical interventions is assessed. Preliminary experimental results confirm that a simple PID controller can be suitable for several applications where targeting out-of-reach locations within the cardiovascular system is essential.

  17. Localised hyperthermia in rodent models using an MRI-compatible high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Chenchen; Nofiele, Joris; Staruch, Robert; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; Chatzinoff, Yonatan; Ranjan, Ashish; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Localised hyperthermia in rodent studies is challenging due to the small target size. This study describes the development and characterisation of an MRI-compatible high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system to perform localised mild hyperthermia treatments in rodent models. Material and methods The hyperthermia platform consisted of an MRI-compatible small animal HIFU system, focused transducers with sector-vortex lenses, a custom-made receive coil, and means to maintain systemic temperatures of rodents. The system was integrated into a 3T MR imager. Control software was developed to acquire images, process temperature maps, and adjust output power using a proportional-integral-derivative feedback control algorithm. Hyperthermia exposures were performed in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in a rodent model (n = 9). During heating, an ROI was assigned in the heated region for temperature control and the target temperature was 42 °C; 30 min mild hyperthermia treatment followed by a 10-min cooling procedure was performed on each animal. Results 3D-printed sector-vortex lenses were successful at creating annular focal regions which enables customisation of the heating volume. Localised mild hyperthermia performed in rats produced a mean ROI temperature of 42.1 ± 0.3 °C. The T10 and T90 percentiles were 43.2 ± 0.4 °C and 41.0 ± 0.3 °C, respectively. For a 30-min treatment, the mean time duration between 41–45 °C was 31.1 min within the ROI. Conclusions The MRI-compatible HIFU system was successfully adapted to perform localised mild hyperthermia treatment in rodent models. A target temperature of 42 °C was well-maintained in a rat thigh model for 30 min. PMID:26540488

  18. The potential of 3T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis, staging, and follow-up of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marcus C; de Graaf, Pim; Brisse, Hervé J; Galluzzi, Paolo; Göricke, Sophia L; Moll, Annette C; Munier, Francis L; Popovic, Maja Beck; Moulin, Alexandre P; Binaghi, Stefano; Castelijns, Jonas A; Maeder, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the value of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing, staging, and follow-up of retinoblastoma during eye-saving treatment. We have included informative retinoblastoma cases scanned on a 3T MRI system from a retrospective retinoblastoma cohort from 2009 through 2013. We show that high-resolution MRI has the potential to detect small intraocular seeds, hemorrhage, and metastatic risk factors not visible with fundoscopy (e.g., optic nerve invasion and choroidal invasion), and treatment response. Unfortunately, however, the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution MRI is not perfect, especially for subtle intraocular seeds or minimal postlaminar optic nerve invasion. The most important application of MRI is the detection of metastatic risk factors, as these cannot be found by fundoscopy and ultrasound.

  19. [A wireless communication system for interventional MRI].

    PubMed

    Güttler, F V; Rump, J; Seebauer, C; Teichgräber, U

    2011-01-01

    The available MR-compatible communication systems, which are typically designed for diagnostic exams, are mostly based on tubular sound transmission. In other settings, modern commercially available communication systems with ear protection allow wireless communication in noisy environments. The application of MR-compatible wireless headsets in interventional radiology precludes tube contact with sterile surfaces and hindrance of the interventionalist's range of motion. The system introduced here allows wireless communication within the scanner room without influencing MR image quality.

  20. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoming; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype.

  1. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Actuated MRI-Compatible Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B.; Iordachita, Iulian; Guion, Peter; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the design, development, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility evaluation of an actuated transrectal prostate robot for MRI-guided needle intervention in the prostate. The robot performs actuated needle MRI-guidance with the goals of providing (i) MRI compatibility, (ii) MRI-guided needle placement with accuracy sufficient for targeting clinically significant prostate cancer foci, (iii) reducing interventional procedure times (thus increasing patient comfort and reducing opportunity for needle targeting error due to patient motion), (iv) enabling real-time MRI monitoring of interventional procedures, and (v) reducing the opportunities for error that arise in manually actuated needle placement. The design of the robot, employing piezo-ceramic-motor actuated needle guide positioning and manual needle insertion, is reported. Results of a MRI compatibility study show no reduction of MRI signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) with the motors disabled. Enabling the motors reduces the SNR by 80% without RF shielding, but SNR is only reduced by 40% to 60% with RF shielding. The addition of radio-frequency shielding is shown to significantly reduce image SNR degradation caused by the presence of the robotic device. An accuracy study of MRI-guided biopsy needle placements in a prostate phantom is reported. The study shows an average in-plane targeting error of 2.4 mm with a maximum error of 3.7 mm. These data indicate the system’s needle targeting accuracy is similar to that obtained with a previously reported manually actuated system, and is sufficient to reliably sample clinically significant prostate cancer foci under MRI-guidance. PMID:23326181

  3. Comparisons between the 35 mm Quadrature Surface Resonator at 300 K and the 40 mm High-Temperature Superconducting Surface Resonator at 77 K in a 3T MRI Imager

    PubMed Central

    Song, Manli; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Ji; Lin, In-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to compare the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the 40 mm High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) surface resonator at 77 K and the 35 mm commercial quadrature (QD) surface resonator at 300 K in a 3 Tesla (T) MRI imager. To aquire images for the comparison, we implemented a phantom experiment using the 40 mm diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) HTS surface resonator, the 35 mm commercial QD surface resonator and the 40 mm professionally-made copper surface resonator. The HTS surface resonator at 77 K provided a 1.43-fold SNR gain over the QD surface resonator at 300 K and provided a 3.84-fold SNR gain over the professionally-made copper surface resonator at 300 K on phantom images. The results agree with the predictions, and the difference between the predicted SNR gains and measured SNR gains is 1%. Although the geometry of the HTS surface resonator is different from the QD surface resonator, its SNR is still higher. The results demonstrate that a higher image quality can be obtained with the HTS surface resonator at 77 K. With the HTS surface resonator, the SNR can be improved, suggesting that the HTS surface resonator is a potentially helpful diagnostic tool for MRI imaging in various applications. PMID:25812124

  4. A novel NIH/3T3 duplex feeder system to engineer corneal epithelial sheets with enhanced cytokeratin 15-positive progenitor populations.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Hideyuki; Shimmura, Shigeto; Higa, Kazunari; Yoshida, Satoru; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Shimazaki, Jun; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2008-07-01

    Corneal epithelial cell sheets co-cultivated with feeder cells are used to reconstruct the ocular surface in stem cell-depleted eyes. The present study was conducted to investigate the optimal method of using feeder cells in the interest of preserving progenitor cells in cultivated sheets. We compared the phenotype and secondary colony forming efficiency (CFE) of cell sheets that were engineered using 3T3 feeder cells as a separate layer or as a contact layer. We also devised a novel "duplex feeder" system that consists of two separate layers of feeder cells. After cells reached confluence, cells were cultured at the air-liquid interface to allow full stratification. Stratified sheets were then analyzed using immunohistochemistry and secondary colony formation. Contact feeder cultures and duplex feeder cultures yielded epithelial sheets with small, cuboid basal cells with strong expression of keratin (K)3, K12, and K 15. Furthermore, only duplex feeder layers reproduced the basal K 15, suprabasal K12 limbal phenotype where epithelial stem cells reside. A similar effect was observed when cornea stroma-derived progenitor cells were used as feeder cells. Duplex feeder sheets also produced significantly more secondary colonies than cells dissociated from single layer sheets, suggesting that the duplex feeder system produces transplantable sheets with a higher yield of progenitor cells.

  5. Superconductors Enable Lower Cost MRI Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The future looks bright, light, and green, especially where aircraft are concerned. The division of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program called the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project is aiming to reach new heights by 2025-2035, improving the efficiency and environmental impact of air travel by developing new capabilities for cleaner, quieter, and more fuel efficient aircraft. One of the many ways NASA plans to reach its aviation goals is by combining new aircraft configurations with an advanced turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) system. Jeff Trudell, an engineer at Glenn Research Center, says, "The TeDP system consists of gas turbines generating electricity to power a large number of distributed motor-driven fans embedded into the airframe." The combined effect increases the effective bypass ratio and reduces drag to meet future goals. "While room temperature components may help reduce emissions and noise in a TeDP system, cryogenic superconducting electric motors and generators are essential to reduce fuel burn," says Trudell. Superconductors provide significantly higher current densities and smaller and lighter designs than room temperature equivalents. Superconductors are also able to conduct direct current without resistance (loss of energy) below a critical temperature and applied field. Unfortunately, alternating current (AC) losses represent the major part of the heat load and depend on the frequency of the current and applied field. A refrigeration system is necessary to remove the losses and its weight increases with decreasing temperature. In 2001, a material called magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered to be superconducting. The challenge, however, has been learning to manufacture MgB2 inexpensively and in long lengths to wind into large coils while meeting the application requirements.

  6. Ultra-low field MRI food inspection system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagoe, Satoshi; Toyota, Hirotomo; Hatta, Junichi; Ariyoshi, Seiichiro; Tanaka, Saburo

    2016-11-01

    We develop an ultra-low field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using a high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (HTS-SQUID) for food inspection. A two-dimensional (2D)-MR image is reconstructed from the grid processing raw data using the 2D fast Fourier transform method. In a previous study, we combined an LC resonator with the ULF-MRI system to improve the detection area of the HTS-SQUID. The sensitivity was improved, but since the experiments were performed in a semi-open magnetically shielded room (MSR), external noise was a problem. In this study, we develop a compact magnetically shielded box (CMSB), which has a small open window for transfer of a pre-polarized sample. Experiments were performed in the CMSB and 2D-MR images were compared with images taken in the semi-open MSR. A clear image of a disk-shaped water sample is obtained, with an outer dimension closer to that of the real sample than in the image taken in the semi-open MSR. Furthermore, the 2D-MR image of a multiple cell water sample is clearly reconstructed. These results show the applicability of the ULF-MRI system in food inspection.

  7. Simulation of spin dynamics: a tool in MRI system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöcker, Tony; Vahedipour, Kaveh; Shah, N. Jon

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a routine diagnostic tool in the clinics and the method of choice in soft-tissue contrast medical imaging. It is an important tool in neuroscience to investigate structure and function of the living brain on a systemic level. The latter is one of the driving forces to further develop MRI technology, as neuroscience especially demands higher spatiotemporal resolution which is to be achieved through increasing the static main magnetic field, B0. Although standard MRI is a mature technology, ultra high field (UHF) systems, at B0 >= 7 T, offer space for new technical inventions as the physical conditions dramatically change. This work shows that the development strongly benefits from computer simulations of the measurement process on the basis of a semi-classical, nuclear spin-1/2 treatment given by the Bloch equations. Possible applications of such simulations are outlined, suggesting new solutions to the UHF-specific inhomogeneity problems of the static main field as well as the high-frequency transmit field.

  8. Simultaneous Non-Invasive Assessment of Systemic and Coronary Endothelial Function Iantorno et al: Cardiac MRI and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael; Krishnaswamy, Rupa; Soleimanifard, Sahar; Steinberg, Angela; Stuber, Matthias; Gerstenblith, Gary; Weiss, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Normal endothelial function is a measure of vascular health and dysfunction a predictor of coronary events. Nitric Oxide (NO)-mediated coronary artery endothelial function (CEF), as assessed by vasomotor reactivity during isometric handgrip exercise (IHE), was recently quantified noninvasively with MRI. Because the internal mammary artery (IMA) is often visualized during coronary MRI we propose the strategy of simultaneously assessing systemic and coronary endothelial function noninvasively by MRI during IHE. Methods and Results Changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) and blood flow (BF) in the right coronary artery (RCA) and the IMA in 25 CAD patients and 26 healthy subjects during IHE were assessed using 3T MRI. In 8 healthy subjects a NO synthase inhibitor was infused to evaluate the role of NO in the IMA-IHE response. Inter-observer IMA-IHE reproducibility was good for CSA (R=0.91) and BF (R=0.91). In healthy subjects, CSA and BF of the IMA increased during IHE and these responses were significantly attenuated by L-NMMA (p<0.01 vs. placebo). In CAD patients, the RCA did not dilate with IHE and dilation of the IMA was less than that of the healthy subjects (p=0.01). The BF responses of both the RCA and IMA to IHE were also significantly reduced in CAD patients. Conclusions MRI-detected IMA responses to IHE primarily reflect NO-dependent endothelial function, are reproducible and reduced in CAD patients. Endothelial function in both coronary and systemic (IMA) arteries can now be measured noninvasively with the same imaging technique and promises novel insights into systemic and local factors affecting vascular health. PMID:26919997

  9. Development of a BALB/c 3T3 neutral red uptake cytotoxicity test using a mainstream cigarette smoke exposure system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke toxicity has traditionally been assessed using the particulate fraction under submerged culture conditions which omits the vapour phase elements from any subsequent analysis. Therefore, methodologies that assess the full interactions and complexities of tobacco smoke are required. Here we describe the adaption of a modified BALB/c 3T3 neutral red uptake (NRU) cytotoxicity test methodology, which is based on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) protocol for in vitro acute toxicity testing. The methodology described takes into account the synergies of both the particulate and vapour phase of tobacco smoke. This is of particular importance as both phases have been independently shown to induce in vitro cellular cytotoxicity. Findings The findings from this study indicate that mainstream tobacco smoke and the gas vapour phase (GVP), generated using the Vitrocell® VC 10 smoke exposure system, have distinct and significantly different toxicity profiles. Within the system tested, mainstream tobacco smoke produced a dilution IC50 (dilution (L/min) at which 50% cytotoxicity is observed) of 6.02 L/min, whereas the GVP produced a dilution IC50 of 3.20 L/min. In addition, we also demonstrated significant dose-for-dose differences between mainstream cigarette smoke and the GVP fraction (P < 0.05). This demonstrates the importance of testing the entire tobacco smoke aerosol and not just the particulate fraction, as has been the historical preference. Conclusions We have adapted the NRU methodology based on the ICCVAM protocol to capture the full interactions and complexities of tobacco smoke. This methodology could also be used to assess the performance of traditional cigarettes, blend and filter technologies, tobacco smoke fractions and individual test aerosols. PMID:24935030

  10. A robotic assistant system for cardiac interventions under MRI guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Wood, Bradford J.; Horvath, Keith A.; Kapoor, Ankur

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we present a surgical assistant system for implanting prosthetic aortic valve transapically under MRI guidance, in a beating heart. The system integrates an MR imaging system, a robotic system, as well as user interfaces for a surgeon to plan the procedure and manipulate the robot. A compact robotic delivery module mounted on a robotic arm is used for delivering both balloon-expandable and self-expanding prosthesis. The system provides different user interfaces at different stages of the procedure. A compact fiducial pattern close to the volume of interest is proposed for robot registration. The image processing and the transformation recovery methods using this fiducial in MRI are presented. The registration accuracy obtained by using this compact fiducial is comparable to the larger multi-spherical marker registration method. The registration accuracy using these two methods is less than 0.62+/-0.50 deg (mean +/- std. dev.) and 0.63+/-0.72 deg (mean +/- std. dev.), respectively. We evaluated each of the components and show that they can work together to form a complete system for transapical aortic valve replacement.

  11. Semi-blind independent component analysis of fMRI based on real-time fMRI system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinyue; Zhang, Hang; Zhao, Xiaojie; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2013-05-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a type of neurofeedback tool that enables researchers to train individuals to actively gain control over their brain activation. Independent component analysis (ICA) based on data-driven model is seldom used in real-time fMRI studies due to large time cost, though it has been very popular to offline analysis of fMRI data. The feasibility of performing real-time ICA (rtICA) processing has been demonstrated by previous study. However, rtICA was only applied to analyze single-slice data rather than full-brain data. In order to improve the performance of rtICA, we proposed semi-blind real-time ICA (sb-rtICA) for our real-time fMRI system by adding regularization of certain estimated time courses using the experiment paradigm information to rtICA. Both simulated and real-time fMRI experiment were conducted to compare the two approaches. Results from simulated and real full-brain fMRI data demonstrate that sb-rtICA outperforms rtICA in robustness, computational time and spatial detection power. Moreover, in contrast to rtICA, the first component estimated by sb-rtICA tends to be the target component in more sliding windows.

  12. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  13. Robotic system for MRI-guided prostate biopsy: feasibility of teleoperated needle insertion and ex vivo phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Seifabadi, Reza; Song, Sang-Eun; Krieger, Axel; Cho, Nathan Bongjoon; Tokuda, Junichi; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) combined with robotic assistance has the potential to improve on clinical outcomes of biopsy and local treatment of prostate cancer. Methods We report the workspace optimization and phantom evaluation of a five Degree of Freedom (DOF) parallel pneumatically actuated modular robot for MRI-guided prostate biopsy. To shorten procedure time and consequently increase patient comfort and system accuracy, a prototype of a MRI-compatible master–slave needle driver module using piezo motors was also added to the base robot. Results Variable size workspace was achieved using appropriate link length, compared with the previous design. The 5-DOF targeting accuracy demonstrated an average error of 2.5mm (STD=1.37mm) in a realistic phantom inside a 3T magnet with a bevel-tip 18G needle. The average position tracking error of the master–slave needle driver was always below 0.1mm. Conclusion Phantom experiments showed sufficient accuracy for manual prostate biopsy. Also, the implementation of teleoperated needle insertion was feasible and accurate. These two together suggest the feasibility of accurate fully actuated needle placement into prostate while keeping the clinician supervision over the task. PMID:21698389

  14. Central nervous system MRI and cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Cadieu, Romain; Peron, Marilyne; Le Ven, Florent; Kerdraon, Sébastien; Boutet, Claire; Mansourati, Jacques; Ben Salem, Douraied

    2017-02-01

    As the population ages and indications for MRI increase, it is estimated that 50 to 75% of patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) - pacemaker (PM) or implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD) - will need an MRI during their CIED's lifetime. Three categories of materials are defined: MRI compatible, MRI non-compatible, and MRI conditional. MRI compatible CIEDs without electrodes have been developed, but do not allow battery changes, so that they are exclusively indicated for patients whose life expectancy is less than that of the battery (6-7years). For MRI conditional CIEDs, all manufacturers publish restrictions. These restrictions can relate to the patient (size, position in the MRI, body temperature), the MRI parameters (magnetic field), or the examination in itself (gradients, specific absorption rate, duration, isocenter). The neuroradiologist can expect to be confronted with the issue of MRI in patients with a CIED. The purpose of this review is to provide them with updated information on MRI and CIEDs.

  15. A novel acoustically quiet coil for neonatal MRI system

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Christopher M.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Loew, Wolfgang; Tkach, Jean A.; Pratt, Ronald G.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    MRI acoustic exposure has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in preterm and term infants. To mitigate this risk, a novel acoustically quiet coil was developed to reduce the sound pressure level experienced by neonates during MR procedures. The new coil has a conventional high-pass birdcage RF design, but is built on a framework of sound abating material. We evaluated the acoustic and MR imaging performance of the quiet coil and a conventional body coil on two small footprint NICU MRI systems. Sound pressure level and frequency response measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level, reported for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 82.2 dBA for the acoustically quiet coil, and 91.1 dBA for the conventional body coil. The sound pressure level values measured for the acoustically quiet coil were consistently lower, 9 dBA (range 6-10 dBA) quieter on average. The acoustic frequency response of the two coils showed a similar harmonic profile for all imaging sequences. However, the amplitude was lower for the quiet coil, by as much as 20 dBA. PMID:26457072

  16. A novel acoustically quiet coil for neonatal MRI system.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Christopher M; Giaquinto, Randy O; Loew, Wolfgang; Tkach, Jean A; Pratt, Ronald G; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Merhar, Stephanie L; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2015-08-01

    MRI acoustic exposure has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in preterm and term infants. To mitigate this risk, a novel acoustically quiet coil was developed to reduce the sound pressure level experienced by neonates during MR procedures. The new coil has a conventional high-pass birdcage RF design, but is built on a framework of sound abating material. We evaluated the acoustic and MR imaging performance of the quiet coil and a conventional body coil on two small footprint NICU MRI systems. Sound pressure level and frequency response measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level, reported for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 82.2 dBA for the acoustically quiet coil, and 91.1 dBA for the conventional body coil. The sound pressure level values measured for the acoustically quiet coil were consistently lower, 9 dBA (range 6-10 dBA) quieter on average. The acoustic frequency response of the two coils showed a similar harmonic profile for all imaging sequences. However, the amplitude was lower for the quiet coil, by as much as 20 dBA.

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of the Reticuloendothelial System Function with Dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Choi, Hoon; Zhou, Rong; Chen, I-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES) function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO) using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling. Materials and Methods Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles (0.5, 3 or 10 mg Fe/kg). Association parameter, Kin, dissociation parameter, Kout, and elimination constant, Ke, derived from dynamic data with two-compartment model, were used to describe active binding to Kupffer cells and extrahepatic clearance. The clodrosome and liposome were utilized to deplete macrophages and block the RES function to evaluate the capability of the kinetic parameters for investigation of macrophage function and density. Results The two-compartment model provided a good description for all data and showed a low sum squared residual for all mice (0.27±0.03). A lower Kin, a lower Kout and a lower Ke were found after clodrosome treatment, whereas a lower Kin, a higher Kout and a lower Ke were observed after liposome treatment in comparison to saline treatment (P<0.005). Conclusion Dynamic SPIO-enhanced MR imaging with two-compartment modeling can provide information on RES function on both a cell number and receptor function level. PMID:25090653

  18. A novel manipulation method of human body ownership using an fMRI-compatible master-slave system.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masayuki; Salomon, Roy; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Kober, Tobias; Rognini, Giulio; Nabae, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Akio; Blanke, Olaf; Higuchi, Toshiro

    2014-09-30

    Bodily self-consciousness has become an important topic in cognitive neuroscience aiming to understand how the brain creates a unified sensation of the self in a body. Specifically, full body illusion (FBI) in which changes in bodily self-consciousness are experimentally introduced by using visual-tactile stimulation has led to improve understanding of these mechanisms. This paper introduces a novel approach to the classic FBI paradigm using a robotic master-slave system which allows us to examine interactions between action and the sense of body ownership in behavioral and MRI experiments. In the proposed approach, the use of the robotic master-slave system enables unique stimulation in which experimental participants can administer tactile cues on their own back using active self-touch. This active self-touch has never been employed in FBI experiments and it allows to test the role of sensorimotor integration and agency (the feeling of control over our actions) in FBI paradigms. The objective of this study is to propose a robotic-haptic platform allowing a new FBI paradigm including the active self-touch in MRI environments. This paper, first, describes the design concept and the performance of the prototype device in the fMRI environment (for 3T and 7T MRI scanners). In addition, the prototype device is applied to a classic FBI experiment, and we verify that the use of the prototype device succeeded in inducing the FBI. These results indicate that the proposed approach has a potential to drive advances in our understanding of human body ownership and agency by allowing novel manipulation and paradigms.

  19. Incorporating MRI structural information into bioluminescence tomography: system, heterogeneous reconstruction and in vivo quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Xue, Huadan; Lei, Jing; Wang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Ming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Combining two or more imaging modalities to provide complementary information has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic biomedical research. By incorporating the structural information provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the ill poseness nature of bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be reduced significantly, thus improve the accuracies of reconstruction and in vivo quantification. In this paper, we present a small animal imaging system combining multi-view and multi-spectral BLT with MRI. The independent MRI-compatible optical device is placed at the end of the clinical MRI scanner. The small animal is transferred between the light tight chamber of the optical device and the animal coil of MRI via a guide rail during the experiment. After the optical imaging and MRI scanning procedures are finished, the optical images are mapped onto the MRI surface by interactive registration between boundary of optical images and silhouette of MRI. Then, incorporating the MRI structural information, a heterogeneous reconstruction algorithm based on finite element method (FEM) with L 1 normalization is used to reconstruct the position, power and region of the light source. In order to validate the feasibility of the system, we conducted experiments of nude mice model implanted with artificial light source and quantitative analysis of tumor inoculation model with MDA-231-GFP-luc. Preliminary results suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of the prototype system. PMID:24940545

  20. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  1. 3T3 cells in adipocytic conversion.

    PubMed

    O'Shea Alvarez, M S

    1991-01-01

    3T3 are murine cells of an established heteroploid cellular line. Some clones of this cellular line, when cultured under adequate conditions differentiate into adipocytes. During the process of differentiation, the cells undergo a change from the elongated fibroblastic shape to a round or oval form and accumulate small drops of lipids within their cytoplasma. These lipid drops fuse into one large drop which displaces the nucleus towards the periphery, giving the cell the aspect of a mature adipocyte of white adipose tissue. The cells not only change their morphology, but they also present important biochemical changes. They show a simultaneous increase in triglyceride synthesis and activity of lipogenic enzymes. There is also an increase in the response of the activity of various hormones and the de novo synthesis of the receptors to such hormones, as insulin and ACTH. During the process of differentiation important changes occur in the synthesis of various proteins, such as actin, tubulin, and other proteins which also make up the cellular cytoskeleton, forming part of the lipid transportation within the adipose cell. The adipocytic differentiation of 3T3 cells depends on adipogenic serum factors used in the supplementary culture medium. These adipogenic factors seem to play an important role in the development of adipose tissue. There are hormones, chemical agents and serum factors which modulate adipocytic differentiation. The clone must be susceptible to adipocytic differentiation, it must reach a quiescent state and find itself in adipogenic conditions for the 3T3 cells to differentiate into adipocytes. It must also carry out an DNA synthesis which is an expression of the new phenotype. The differentiation of 3T3 cells in terminal. The fact that these cells present an adipocytic conversion under physiologic conditions and with adipogenic hormones which exist in the whole animal has been demonstrated. All of these characteristics show that the 3T3 cells may be

  2. Effects of spin-lock field direction on the quantitative measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame (T1ρ) in a clinical MRI system

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the direction of spin-lock field, either parallel or antiparallel to the rotating magnetization, has any effect on the spin-lock MRI signal and further on the quantitative measurement of T1ρ, in a clinical 3 T MRI system. Methods: The effects of inverted spin-lock field direction were investigated by acquiring a series of spin-lock MRI signals for an American College of Radiology MRI phantom, while the spin-lock field direction was switched between the parallel and antiparallel directions. The acquisition was performed for different spin-locking methods (i.e., for the single- and dual-field spin-locking methods) and for different levels of clinically feasible spin-lock field strength, ranging from 100 to 500 Hz, while the spin-lock duration was varied in the range from 0 to 100 ms. Results: When the spin-lock field was inverted into the antiparallel direction, the rate of MRI signal decay was altered and the T1ρ value, when compared to the value for the parallel field, was clearly different. Different degrees of such direction-dependency were observed for different spin-lock field strengths. In addition, the dependency was much smaller when the parallel and the antiparallel fields are mixed together in the dual-field method. Conclusions: The spin-lock field direction could impact the MRI signal and further the T1ρ measurement in a clinical MRI system.

  3. BOLD contrast on a 3 T magnet: detectability of the motor areas.

    PubMed

    Nakai, T; Matsuo, K; Kato, C; Okada, T; Moriya, T; Isoda, H; Takehara, Y; Sakahara, H

    2001-01-01

    To predict the potential and the limitations of functional MRI (fMRI) with a very high field magnet, the detectability and reproducibility of activation were evaluated by comparing the activation induced by a sequential finger movement task at 1.5 T with that at 3 T. The detectability of the premotor area, supplementary motor area (SMA), and ipsilateral sensorimotor area (SM1) showed significant improvement at 3 T. On the other hand, the detectability of contralateral SM1 was not significantly different between 1.5 and 3 T. The degree of activation was proportional to task demand in the ipsilateral SM1 and SMA, whereas that in the contralateral SM1 and SMA was not. FMRI with a 3 T magnet has greater potential for detection of neuronal activation as a functional network. These observations indicated that task demand and static magnetic field strength should be considered in interpretation of fMRI data for clinical usage.

  4. Computed Tomography and MRI of the Hepatobiliary System and Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Angela J

    2016-05-01

    MRI and computed tomographic (CT) imaging are becoming more common in the diagnosis of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disorders in small animals. With the advent of multislice CT scanners, sedated examinations in veterinary patients are feasible increasing the use of this imaging modality. CT and MRI provide additional information for dogs and cats with hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases because of lack of superimposition of structures, operator dependence, and through intravenous contrast administration. This added value provides more information for diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical planning.

  5. Integration of X-ray and MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhifei

    X-ray fluoroscopic imaging provides two-dimensional (2D) projection images with high temporal and spatial resolutions, while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the ability to image any plane in 3D space with excellent soft tissue contrast and powerful physiological information. Integration of these two complementary imaging modalities can greatly benefit numerous image-guided minimally invasive procedures. At Stanford, an x-ray/MR hybrid system has been developed by placing an x-ray tube and detector inside the magnet of an open-bore interventional MR scanner in a configuration without requiring patient movement. However, the proximity of the two systems can cause one to degrade the performance of the other. The influence on the x-ray system by the MR system mainly results from its magnetic field at the location of the x-ray tube. If the magnetic field is parallel to the axis of the tube, it can change the size and shape of the x-ray focal spot by affecting the trajectories of the primary electrons, and increase the tube output by confining the backscattered electrons. If the magnetic field is misaligned with the tube axis, the electron beam can be deflected. These effects are studied analytically, numerically and experimentally. Experimental data agree well with theoretic analysis and computer simulations. Modifications to the x-ray tube are proposed to make it more robust for working in a misaligned magnetic field. The impact on the MR system from the x-ray system stems from the x-ray detector placed underneath the patient table near the MR imaging volume. Magnetic components inside the detector can be magnetized in the magnetic field and create an additional magnetic field that degrades the field homogeneity of the MR system. We use rare-earth permanent magnets located proximate to the detector to compensate for the unwanted field. The strengths and locations of the magnets are optimized with the measured detector field and the MR image quality is

  6. WE-EF-BRD-02: Battling Maxwell’s Equations: Physics Challenges and Solutions for Hybrid MRI Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, P.

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  7. [Mechanical Shimming Method and Implementation for Permanent Magnet of MRI System].

    PubMed

    Xue, Tingqiang; Chen, Jinjun

    2015-03-01

    A mechanical shimming method and device for permanent magnet of MRI system has been developed to meet its stringent homogeneity requirement without time-consuming passive shimming on site, installation and adjustment efficiency has been increased.

  8. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-12-21

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards.

  9. An improved MRI guided ultrasound system for superficial tumor hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Shen, Guofeng; Su, Zhiqiang; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Hao

    2017-03-01

    Among many methods in tumor treatment, ultrasound hyperthermia is characterized by non-invasiveness, and it has been proven very effective for clinical treatment. But the problem of monitoring temperature limits its development. MRI-based temperature mapping techniques are safe compared with invasive methods and have been applied to detect temperature changes for a variety of applications. Among these techniques, the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method is relatively advanced. With a temperature measuring experiment and experiment conducted on tumors inside rabbit legs, the effectiveness of PRF method has been proved. This paper is to introduce an MRI guided ultrasound superficial tumor hyperthermia instrument based on PRF method.

  10. Genetically controlled MRI contrast mechanisms and their prospects in systems neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Westmeyer, Gil G; Jasanoff, Alan

    2007-07-01

    Application of MRI contrast agents to neural systems research is complicated by the need to deliver agents past the blood-brain barrier or into cells, and the difficulty of targeting agents to specific brain structures or cell types. In the future, these barriers may be wholly or partially overcome using genetic methods for producing and directing MRI contrast. Here we review MRI contrast mechanisms that have used gene expression to manipulate MRI signal in cultured cells or in living animals. We discuss both fully genetic systems involving endogenous biosynthesis of contrast agents, and semi-genetic systems in which expressed proteins influence the localization or activity of exogenous contrast agents. We close by considering which contrast-generating mechanisms might be most suitable for applications in neuroscience, and we ask how genetic control machinery could be productively combined with existing molecular agents to enable next-generation neuroimaging experiments.

  11. Simulation of the expected performance of INSERT: A new multi-modality SPECT/MRI system for preclinical and clinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Fiorini, C.; Butt, A. D.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Trigilio, P.; Nemeth, G.; Major, P.; Erlandsson, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2014-01-01

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (INtegrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus, that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems such as 3 T MRI with 59 cm bore diameter. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes will be developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging, the second one dedicated to clinical imaging. The basic building block of the SPECT detector ring is a small 5 cm×5 cm gamma camera, based on the well-established Anger architecture with a continuous scintillator readout by an array of silicon photodetectors. Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM) are being considered as possible scintillator readout, considering that the detector choice plays a predominant role for the final performance of the system, such as energy and spatial resolution, as well as the useful field of view of the camera. Both solutions are therefore under study to evaluate their performances in terms of field of view (FOV), spatial and energy resolution. Preliminary simulations for both the preclinical and clinical systems have been carried out to evaluate resolution and sensitivity.

  12. Octopus visual system: a functional MRI model for detecting neuronal electric currents without a BOLD confound

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia; Lu, Hanbing; Shigeno, Shuichi; Tan, Li-Hai; Yang, Yihong; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite the efforts that have been devoted to detecting the transient magnetic fields generated by neuronal firing, the conclusion that a functionally relevant signal can be measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is still controversial. For human studies of neuronal current MRI (nc-MRI), the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) effect remains an irresolvable confound. For tissue studies where hemoglobin is removed, natural sensory stimulation is not possible. This study investigates the feasibility of detecting a physiologically induced nc-MRI signal in vivo in a BOLD-free environment. Methods The cephalopod mollusc Octopus bimaculoides has vertebrate-like eyes, large optic lobes (OLs) and blood that does not contain hemoglobin. Visually evoked potentials were measured in the octopus retina and OL by electroretinogram and local field potential. nc-MRI scans were conducted at 9.4 Tesla to capture these activities. Results Electrophysiological recording detected strong responses in the retina and OL in vivo; however, nc-MRI failed to demonstrate any statistically significant signal change with a detection threshold of 0.2° for phase and 0.2% for magnitude. Experiments in a dissected eye-OL preparation yielded similar results. Conclusion These findings in a large hemoglobin-free nervous system suggest that sensory evoked neuronal magnetic fields are too weak for direct detection with current MRI technology. PMID:24301336

  13. Systemic inflammatory response and downmodulation of peripheral CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells in patients undergoing radiofrequency thermal ablation for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Anna Maria; Morosini, Monica; Passadore, Ileana; Cascina, Alessandro; Draghi, Paola; Dore, Roberto; Rossi, Sandro; Pozzi, Ernesto; Meloni, Federica

    2009-07-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is a local tumor-destructing technique that can potentially modulate the host immune response through mechanisms that are not clearly defined. We assessed whether RFTA could affect multiple systemic inflammatory and immunological parameters, including CD25+Foxp+ cells, in patients with primary or metastatic lung tumors. Three days after RFTA, a moderate and temporary systemic inflammatory response developed, as demonstrated by the increase in peripheral neutrophils and monocytes and in plasma levels of proinflammatory chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, eotaxin, and interleukin[IL]-8) and acute phase reactants (complement C3 and C4, serum amyloid, alpha1 antichymotrypsin, and C-reactive protein). Moreover, we found a concomitant release of the anti-inflammatory factor IL-10. Thirty days after RFTA, a significant reduction in CD25+Foxp3+ counts with an increase in CD4+ T-cell proliferation and number of interferon-gamma-secreting cells was observed. The reduction in CD25+Foxp3+ cells lasted up to 90 days after treatment. The use of RFTA in lung cancer patients has an immunomodulatory activity: it induces a self-limiting systemic inflammation early and later a reduction of circulating CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs. In addition to tumor ablation, downmodulation of this regulatory subset might be an important mechanism involved in the long-term clinical efficacy of RFTA.

  14. Microcomputer-based image processing system for CT/MRI scans: II. Expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, John C. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.; Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Ho, Wai-Chin

    1991-06-01

    A microcomputer-based image processing system is used to digitize and process serial sections of CT/MRI scan and reconstruct three-dimensional images of brain structures and brain lesions. The images grabbed also serve as templates and different vital regions with different risk values are also traced out for 3D reconstruction. A knowledge-based system employing rule-based programming has been built to help identifying brain lesions and to help planning trajectory for operations. The volumes of the lesions are also automatically determined. Such system is very useful for medical skills archival, tumor size monitoring, survival and outcome forecasting, and consistent neurosurgical planning.

  15. Design and Preliminary Accuracy Studies of an MRI-Guided Transrectal Prostate Intervention System

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Csoma, Csaba; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Guion, Peter; Singh, Anurag K.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a novel system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided transrectal prostate interventions, such as needle biopsy, fiducial marker placement, and therapy delivery. The system utilizes a hybrid tracking method, comprised of passive fiducial tracking for initial registration and subsequent incremental motion measurement along the degrees of freedom using fiber-optical encoders and mechanical scales. Targeting accuracy of the system is evaluated in prostate phantom experiments. Achieved targeting accuracy and procedure times were found to compare favorably with existing systems using passive and active tracking methods. Moreover, the portable design of the system using only standard MRI image sequences and minimal custom scanner interfacing allows the system to be easily used on different MRI scanners. PMID:18044553

  16. Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system input terminated noise seismic response adjusted test : StreckeisenSTS2-low and high gain, Guralp CMG3T and Geotech GS13 seismometers.

    SciTech Connect

    Rembold, Randy Kai; Hart, Darren M.; Harris, James Mark

    2008-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested, evaluated and reported on the Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system with active Fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication in SAND2008-. One test, Input Terminated Noise, allows us to characterize the self-noise of the Smart24 system. By computing the power spectral density (PSD) of the input terminated noise time series data set and correcting for the instrument response of different seismometers, the resulting spectrum can be compared to the USGS new low noise model (NLNM) of Peterson (1996), and determine the ability of the matched system of seismometer and Smart24 to be quiet enough for any general deployment location. Four seismometer models were evaluated: the Streckeisen STS2-Low and High Gain, Guralp CMG3T and Geotech GS13 models. Each has a unique pass-band as defined by the frequency band of the instrument corrected noise spectrum that falls below the new low-noise model.

  17. Robotic Prostate Biopsy in Closed MRI Scanner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    and robot control. The functions of the device will be tested in phantom studies at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  Demonstrated integrated...system in 3T MRI at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. See Reference [3].  Demonstrated needle placement in phantoms under real-time MR image guidance...workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the

  18. A 3T Sodium and Proton Composite Array Breast Coil

    PubMed Central

    Kaggie, Joshua D.; Hadley, J. Rock; Badal, James; Campbell, John R.; Park, Daniel J.; Parker, Dennis L.; Morrell, Glen; Newbould, Rexford D.; Wood, Ali F.; Bangerter, Neal K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine whether a sodium phased array would improve sodium breast MRI at 3T. The secondary objective was to create acceptable proton images with the sodium phased array in place. Methods A novel composite array for combined proton/sodium 3T breast MRI is compared to a coil with a single proton and sodium channel. The composite array consists of a 7-channel sodium receive array, a larger sodium transmit coil, and a 4-channel proton transceive array. The new composite array design utilizes smaller sodium receive loops than typically used in sodium imaging, uses novel decoupling methods between the receive loops and transmit loops, and uses a novel multi-channel proton transceive coil. The proton transceive coil reduces coupling between proton and sodium elements by intersecting the constituent loops to reduce their mutual inductance. The coil used for comparison consists of a concentric sodium and proton loop with passive decoupling traps. Results The composite array coil demonstrates a 2–5x improvement in SNR for sodium imaging and similar SNR for proton imaging when compared to a simple single-loop dual resonant design. Conclusion The improved SNR of the composite array gives breast sodium images of unprecedented quality in reasonable scan times. PMID:24105740

  19. Multimodal imaging with hybrid semiconductor detectors Timepix for an experimental MRI-SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajicek, J.; Jakubek, J.; Burian, M.; Vobecky, M.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical applications are being based on multimodal imaging systems (MIS), including anatomical (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT) techniques to provide complex information in a single image. CT with one of the scintigraphic methods (PET or SPECT) is nowadays a combination of choice for clinical practice and it is mostly used in cardiography and tumour diagnostics. Combination with MRI is also being implemented as no radiation dose is imparted to the patient and it is possible to gain higher structural resolution of soft tissues (brain imaging). A major disadvantage of such systems is inability to operate scintillators with photomultipliers (used for detection of γ rays) in presence of high magnetic fields. In this work we present the application of the semiconductor pixel detector for SPECT method in combination with MR imaging. We propose a novel approach based on MRI compatible setup with CdTe pixel sensor Timepix and non-conductive collimator. Measurements were performed on high proton-density (PD) phantom (1H) with an embedded radioisotopic source inside the shielded RF coil by MRI animal scanner (4.7 T). Our results pave the way for a combined MRI-SPECT system. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  20. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  1. Development of an outdoor MRI system for measuring flow in a living tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Akiyoshi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    An outdoor MRI system for noninvasive, long-term measurements of sap flow in a living tree in its natural environment has been developed. An open-access, 0.2 T permanent magnet with a 160 mm gap was combined with a radiofrequency probe, planar gradient coils, electromagnetic shielding, several electrical units, and a waterproofing box. Two-dimensional cross-sectional images were acquired for a ring-porous tree, and the anatomical structures, including xylem and phloem, were identified. The MRI flow measurements demonstrated the diurnal changes in flow velocity in the stem on a per-pixel basis. These results demonstrate that our outdoor MRI system is a powerful tool for studies of water transport in outdoor trees.

  2. MRI-compatible transurethral ultrasound system for the treatment of localized prostate cancer using rotational control.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rajiv; Baker, Nicole; Choy, Vanessa; Boyes, Aaron; Tang, Kee; Bradwell, David; Bronskill, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy is a potential minimally invasive treatment for localized prostate cancer offering precise targeting of tissue within the gland, short treatment times, and the capability to quantify the spatial heating pattern delivered during therapy. A significant challenge in MRI-guided ultrasound therapy is the design and construction of MRI-compatible equipment capable of operation in a closed-bore MR imager. We describe a prototype system developed for MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy and characterize the performance of the different components including the heating applicator design, rotational motor, and radio frequency electronics. The ultrasound heating applicator described in this study incorporates a planar transducer and is capable of producing high intensity ultrasound energy in a localized region of tissue. Results demonstrated that the heating applicator exhibits excellent MRI-compatibility, enabling precise MR temperature measurements to be acquired as close as 6 mm from the device. Simultaneous imaging and rotational motion was also possible during treatment using a motor based on piezoelectric actuators. Heating experiments performed in both phantoms and in a canine model with the prototype system verified the capability to perform simultaneous MR imaging and therapy delivery with this system. Real-time control over therapy using MR temperature measurements acquired during heating can be implemented to achieve precise patterns of thermal damage within the prostate gland. The technical feasibility of using the system developed in this study for MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy in a closed-bore MR imager has been demonstrated.

  3. An optically coupled system for quantitative monitoring of MRI-induced RF currents into long conductors.

    PubMed

    Zanchi, Marta G; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio-frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed light-emitting-diode transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions.

  4. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  5. Investigations into Thermally Mediated Drug Delivery Using a Preclinical System for MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staruch, Robert; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the use of a preclinical system for MRI-guided focused ultrasound to achieve MRI-controlled hyperthermia and thermally-mediated drug delivery in vivo. Here we report results from ten rabbits, where a focused ultrasound (FUS) beam was scanned in a circular trajectory to heat 10-15 mm diameter regions in normal thigh to 43 °C for 20-30 minutes. MRI thermometry was used for closed-loop feedback control to achieve temporally and spatially uniform heating. Lyso-thermosensitive pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (ThermoDox®, Celsion Corporation, Columbia, MD) was infused intravenously during hyperthermia, and the tissue doxorubicin concentration was measured by the fluorescence intensity of homogenized tissue samples from heated and unheated thigh, obtained 2 hours after heating. Closed-loop control of FUS hyperthermia using MRI thermometry achieved temperature distributions with mean, T90 and T10 of 42.9 °C, 41.0 °C and 44.8 °C across the 10 mm diameter target, varying ±0.9 °C (SD) over 20 min. Drug concentrations in heated regions were, on average 15.3±8.1 (SD) times higher than in the unheated contralateral thigh. The results show the feasibility of using MRI-controlled FUS hyperthermia for preclinical studies of thermally mediated drug delivery with temperature-sensitive liposomes.

  6. In vivo-in vitro comparison of acute respiratory tract toxicity using human 3D airway epithelial models and human A549 and murine 3T3 monolayer cell systems.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula G; Vogel, Sandra; Hess, Annemarie; Kolle, Susanne N; Ma-Hock, Lan; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2013-02-01

    The usefulness of in vitro systems to predict acute inhalation toxicity was investigated. Nineteen substances were tested in three-dimensional human airway epithelial models, EpiAirway™ and MucilAir™, and in A549 and 3T3 monolayer cell cultures. IC(50) values were compared to rat four-hour LC(50) values classified according to EPA and GHS hazard categories. Best results were achieved with a prediction model distinguishing toxic from non-toxic substances, with satisfactory specificities and sensitivities. Using a self-made four-level prediction model to classify substances into four in vitro hazard categories, in vivo-in vitro concordance was mediocre, but could be improved by excluding substances causing pulmonary edema and emphysema in vivo. None of the test systems was outstanding, and there was no evidence that tissue or monolayer systems using respiratory tract cells provide an added value. However, the test systems only reflected bronchiole epithelia and alveolar cells and investigated cytotoxicity. Effects occurring in other cells by other mechanisms could not be recognised. Further work should optimise test protocols and expand the set of substances tested to define applicability domains. In vivo respiratory toxicity data for in vitro comparisons should distinguish different modes of action, and their relevance for human health effects should be ensured.

  7. Skeletal age assessment in children using an open compact MRI system.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yasuhiko; Kono, Saki; Tamada, Daiki; Uchiumi, Tomomi; Kose, Katsumi; Miyagi, Ryo; Yamabe, Eiko; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    MRI may be a noninvasive and alternative tool for skeletal age assessment in children, although few studies have reported on this topic. In this article, skeletal age was assessed over a wide range of ages using an open, compact MRI optimized for the imaging of a child's hand and wrist, and its validity was evaluated. MR images and their three-dimensional segmentation visualized detailed skeletal features of each bone in the hand and wrist. Skeletal age was then independently scored from the MR images by two raters, according to the Tanner-Whitehouse Japan system. The skeletal age assessed by MR rating demonstrated a strong positive correlation with chronological age. The intrarater and inter-rater reproducibilities were significantly high. These results demonstrate the validity and reliability of skeletal age assessment using MRI.

  8. Ultra-low field T1 vs. T1rho at 3T and 7T: study of rotationally immobilized protein gels and animal brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Inglis, Ben; Barr, Ian; Clarke, John

    2015-03-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines operating in static fields of typically 1.5 T or 3 T can capture information on slow molecular dynamics utilizing the so-called T1rho technique. This technique, in which a radiofrequency (RF) spin-lock field is applied with microtesla amplitude, has been used, for example, to determine the onset time of stroke in studies on rats. The long RF pulse, however, may exceed the specific absorption rate (SAR) limit, putting subjects at risk. Ultra-low-field (ULF) MRI, based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), directly detects proton signals at a static magnetic field of typically 50-250 μT. Using our ULF MRI system with adjustable static field of typically 55 to 240 μT, we systematically measured the T1 and T2 dispersion profiles of rotationally immobilized protein gels (bovine serum albumin), ex vivo pig brains, and ex vivo rat brains with induced stroke. Comparing the ULF results with T1rho dispersion obtained at 3 T and 7 T, we find that the degree of protein immobilization determines the frequency-dependence of both T1 and T1rho. Furthermore, T1rho and ULF T1 show similar results for stroke, suggesting that ULF MRI may be used to image traumatic brain injury with negligible SAR. This research was supported by the Henry H. Wheeler, Jr. Brain Imaging Center and the Donaldson Trust.

  9. The value of tandem CSF/MRI evaluation for predicting disseminated disease in childhood central nervous system neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Pang, Judy; Banerjee, Anuradha; Tihan, Tarik

    2008-03-01

    Leptomeningeal spread of childhood primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms, also known as leptomeningeal disease (LMD), significantly affects prognosis and treatment. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered critical for diagnosis of LMD. It has been suggested that either CSF cytology or spinal MRI alone would miss LMD in up to 18% of children with CNS neoplasms. To determine the rate of LMD and the concordance of these two tests at our institution, we analyzed the results of concurrent CSF cytology and spinal MRI (tandem CSF/MRI) performed at the UCSF Pediatric Neuro-oncology Division. We identified all patients who underwent tandem CSF and MRI analysis during their treatment between 1990 and 2005. There were 127 tandem analyses from 78 patients, of which 115 were concordant. Among the remaining 12 discordant tandem analyses, spinal MRI was positive and CSF was negative for tumor in 8 patients, while CSF was positive and spinal MRI was normal in four others. In all discordant cases, positive spinal MRI was often associated with aggressive disease. Positive CSF cytology correlated with aggressive disease only in one patient who had evidence of disseminated intracranial tumor on MRI. In the absence of intracranial tumor spread or LMD on MRI, a positive CSF cytology did not correlate with aggressive disease or recurrence. Even though the number of cases is limited, our findings suggest that a positive CSF cytology with no other corroborating evidence of tumor spread or recurrence should be interpreted with caution.

  10. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between

  11. MRI renaissance.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S

    1997-12-01

    A few years ago, magnetic resonance imaging was healthcare's version of a foreign sports car-flashy, expensive and impractical. Now, after years in the doldrums, sales of MRI systems are roaring back. An aging fleet of MRI scanners due for replacement and a hearty increase in doctors' use of the versatile imaging tools are combining to fuel the surge in demand, vendors and customers say.

  12. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  13. Repeated dexamphetamine treatment alters the dopaminergic system and increases the phMRI response to methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Schrantee, Anouk; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Bouet, Valentine; Hesseling, Peter; Meerhoff, Gideon F.; de Bruin, Kora M.; Koeleman, Jan; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Desfosses, Emilie; Galineau, Laurent; Gozzi, Alessandro; Dauphin, François; Gsell, Willy; Booij, Jan; Lucassen, Paul J.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Dexamphetamine (AMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that is used both recreationally and as medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated exposure to AMPH can induce damage to nerve terminals of dopamine (DA) neurons. We here assessed the underlying neurobiological changes in the DA system following repeated AMPH exposure and pre-treated rats with AMPH or saline (4 times 5 mg/kg s.c., 2 hours apart), followed by a 1-week washout period. We then used pharmacological MRI (phMRI) with a methylphenidate (MPH) challenge, as a sensitive and non-invasive in-vivo measure of DAergic function. We subsequently validated the DA-ergic changes post-mortem, using a.o. high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and autoradiography. In the AMPH pre-treated group, we observed a significantly larger BOLD response to the MPH challenge, particularly in DA-ergic brain areas and their downstream projections. Subsequent autoradiography studies showed that AMPH pre-treatment significantly reduced DA transporter (DAT) density in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens, whereas HPLC analysis revealed increases in the DA metabolite homovanillic acid in the CPu. Our results suggest that AMPH pre-treatment alters DAergic responsivity, a change that can be detected with phMRI in rats. These phMRI changes likely reflect increased DA release together with reduced DAT binding. The ability to assess subtle synaptic changes using phMRI is promising for both preclinical studies of drug discovery, and for clinical studies where phMRI can be a useful tool to non-invasively investigate DA abnormalities, e.g. in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28241065

  14. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Cole, Gregory; Li, Gang; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alexander; Tokuda, Junichi; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fischer, Gregory S

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure.

  15. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Cole, Gregory; Li, Gang; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alexander; Tokuda, Junichi; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure. PMID:26412962

  16. Visualization of suspicious lesions in breast MRI based on intelligent neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Lange, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2006-05-01

    Intelligent medical systems based on supervised and unsupervised artificial neural networks are applied to the automatic visualization and classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI. These systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogenity of the cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal the malignant, benign and normal kinetic signals and and provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  17. MR Scanner Systems Should Be Adequately Characterized in Diffusion-MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Marco; Sghedoni, Roberto; Iacconi, Chiara; Iori, Mauro; Traino, Antonio Claudio; Guerrisi, Maria; Mascalchi, Mario; Toschi, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Breast imaging represents a relatively recent and promising field of application of quantitative diffusion-MRI techniques. In view of the importance of guaranteeing and assessing its reliability in clinical as well as research settings, the aim of this study was to specifically characterize how the main MR scanner system-related factors affect quantitative measurements in diffusion-MRI of the breast. In particular, phantom acquisitions were performed on three 1.5 T MR scanner systems by different manufacturers, all equipped with a dedicated multi-channel breast coil as well as acquisition sequences for diffusion-MRI of the breast. We assessed the accuracy, inter-scan and inter-scanner reproducibility of the mean apparent diffusion coefficient measured along the main orthogonal directions () as well as of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI)-derived mean diffusivity (MD) measurements. Additionally, we estimated spatial non-uniformity of (NU) and MD (NUMD) maps. We showed that the signal-to-noise ratio as well as overall calibration of high strength diffusion gradients system in typical acquisition sequences for diffusion-MRI of the breast varied across MR scanner systems, introducing systematic bias in the measurements of diffusion indices. While and MD values were not appreciably different from each other, they substantially varied across MR scanner systems. The mean of the accuracies of measured and MD was in the range [−2.3%,11.9%], and the mean of the coefficients of variation for and MD measurements across MR scanner systems was 6.8%. The coefficient of variation for repeated measurements of both and MD was < 1%, while NU and NUMD values were <4%. Our results highlight that MR scanner system-related factors can substantially affect quantitative diffusion-MRI of the breast. Therefore, a specific quality control program for assessing and monitoring the performance of MR scanner systems for diffusion-MRI of the breast is

  18. Design, Development, and Evaluation of a Master-Slave Surgical System for Breast Biopsy under Continuous MRI*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Roys, Steven; Tan, U-Xuan; Philip, Mathew; Richard, Howard; Gullapalli, Rao; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast in cancer diagnosis compared to other imaging modalities. However, the strong magnetic field inside the MRI bore along with limited scanner bore size poses significant challenges. Since current approaches in breast biopsy using MR images is primarily a blind targeting approach, it is necessary to develop a MRI-compatible robot that can avoid multiple needle insertions into the breast tissue. This MRI-compatible robotic system could potentially lead to improvement in the targeting accuracy and reduce sampling errors. A master-slave surgical system has been developed comprising of a MRI-compatible slave robot which consists of one piezo motor and five pneumatic cylinders connected by long pneumatic transmission lines. The slave robot follows the configuration of the master robot, which provides an intuitive manipulation interface for the physician and operates inside the MRI bore to adjust the needle position and orientation and perform needle insertion task. Based on the MRI experiments using the slave robot, there was no significant distortion in the images and hence the slave robot can be safely operated inside the MRI with minimal loss in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Ex vivo and in vivo experiments have been conducted to evaluate the performance of the master-slave surgical system. PMID:25313266

  19. Open-Access, Low-Magnetic-Field MRI System for Lung Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Tsai, Leo L.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Patz, Samuel; Ruset, Iullian C.; Hersman, F. William

    2009-01-01

    An open-access magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system is being developed for use in research on orientational/gravitational effects on lung physiology and function. The open-access geometry enables study of human subjects in diverse orientations. This system operates at a magnetic flux density, considerably smaller than the flux densities of typical other MRI systems, that can be generated by resistive electromagnet coils (instead of the more-expensive superconducting coils of the other systems). The human subject inhales air containing He-3 or Xe-129 atoms, the nuclear spins of which have been polarized by use of a laser beam to obtain a magnetic resonance that enables high-resolution gas space imaging at the low applied magnetic field. The system includes a bi-planar, constant-current, four-coil electromagnet assembly and associated electronic circuitry to apply a static magnetic field of 6.5 mT throughout the lung volume; planar coils and associated circuitry to apply a pulsed magnetic-field-gradient for each spatial dimension; a single, detachable radio-frequency coil and associated circuitry for inducing and detecting MRI signals; a table for supporting a horizontal subject; and electromagnetic shielding surrounding the electromagnet coils.

  20. Uncertainty in anticipation of uncomfortable rectal distension is modulated by the autonomic nervous system--a fMRI study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Amandine; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Pellissier, Sonia; Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; de Micheaux, Hugo Lafaye; Tack, Jan; Dantzer, Cécile; Delon-Martin, Chantal; Bonaz, Bruno

    2015-02-15

    The human brain responds both before and during the application of aversive stimuli. Anticipation allows the organism to prepare its nociceptive system to respond adequately to the subsequent stimulus. The context in which an uncomfortable stimulus is experienced may also influence neural processing. Uncertainty of occurrence, timing and intensity of an aversive event may lead to increased anticipatory anxiety, fear, physiological arousal and sensory perception. We aimed to identify, in healthy volunteers, the effects of uncertainty in the anticipation of uncomfortable rectal distension, and the impact of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and anxiety-related psychological variables on neural mechanisms of anticipation of rectal distension using fMRI. Barostat-controlled uncomfortable rectal distensions were preceded by cued uncertain or certain anticipation in 15 healthy volunteers in a fMRI protocol at 3T. Electrocardiographic data were concurrently registered by MR scanner. The low frequency (LF)-component of the heart rate variability (HRV) time-series was extracted and inserted as a regressor in the fMRI model ('LF-HRV model'). The impact of ANS activity was analyzed by comparing the fMRI signal in the 'standard model' and in the 'LF-HRV model' across the different anticipation and distension conditions. The scores of the psychological questionnaires and the rating of perceived anticipatory anxiety were included as covariates in the fMRI data analysis. Our experiments led to the following key findings: 1) the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) is the only activation site that relates to uncertainty in healthy volunteers and is directly correlated to individual questionnaire score for pain-related anxiety; 2) uncertain anticipation of rectal distension involved several relevant brain regions, namely activation of sgACC and medial prefrontal cortex and deactivation of amygdala, insula, thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, supplementary

  1. A graphics processing unit accelerated motion correction algorithm and modular system for real-time fMRI.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Hampson, Michelle; Qiu, Maolin; Bhawnani, Jitendra; Constable, R Todd; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2013-07-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) has recently gained interest as a possible means to facilitate the learning of certain behaviors. However, rt-fMRI is limited by processing speed and available software, and continued development is needed for rt-fMRI to progress further and become feasible for clinical use. In this work, we present an open-source rt-fMRI system for biofeedback powered by a novel Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated motion correction strategy as part of the BioImage Suite project ( www.bioimagesuite.org ). Our system contributes to the development of rt-fMRI by presenting a motion correction algorithm that provides an estimate of motion with essentially no processing delay as well as a modular rt-fMRI system design. Using empirical data from rt-fMRI scans, we assessed the quality of motion correction in this new system. The present algorithm performed comparably to standard (non real-time) offline methods and outperformed other real-time methods based on zero order interpolation of motion parameters. The modular approach to the rt-fMRI system allows the system to be flexible to the experiment and feedback design, a valuable feature for many applications. We illustrate the flexibility of the system by describing several of our ongoing studies. Our hope is that continuing development of open-source rt-fMRI algorithms and software will make this new technology more accessible and adaptable, and will thereby accelerate its application in the clinical and cognitive neurosciences.

  2. MINIPILOT SOLAR SYSTEM: DESIGN/OPERATION OF SYSTEM AND RESULTS OF NON-SOLAR TESTING AT MRI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to this project, MRI had carried out work for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the conceptual design of a solar system for solid waste disposal and a follow-on project to study the feasibility of bench-scale testing of desorption of organics from soil with destr...

  3. A parallel FDTD scheme for electromagnetic analysis and design of MRI system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Trakic, Adnan; Xia, Ling; Crozier, Stuart; Liu, Feng; Bialkowski, Marek

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a parallel-computing FDTD simulator for electromagnetic analysis and design applications in Magnetic Resonance Imaging system. It is intended to be a complete, high-performance FDTD model of an MRI system including all temporal RF and low-frequency field generating units and electrical models of the patient. The developed MRI-dedicated FDTD algorithm is adapted to a parallel computing architecture with the MPI library. Its capabilities are illustrated in two distinct, large-scale field problems. One concerns the interaction of RF-fields with human tissue at high magnitude fields. The other includes the characterization of the temporal eddy currents induced in the cryostat vessel during gradient switching. The presented examples demonstrate the computational efficiency and extended analyses available due to the parallel FDTD framework.

  4. Gradiometer pick-up coil design for a low field SQUID-MRI system.

    PubMed

    Seton, H C; Hutchison, J M; Bussell, D M

    1999-05-01

    We describe the use of liquid helium-cooled (4.2 K) gradiometer coils and a DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) preamplifier to improve the SNR of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.01 T. Gradiometer windings are used both to reduce lossy interactions with the MRI system's room temperature magnet and gradient coils and also to reject interference from more distant sources, which reduces the need for RF shielding. We have tested both axial and planar (figure-of-eight) gradiometer configurations. The figure-of-eight gradiometer has a more rapid fall-off in sensitivity with increasing distance from its windings than the axial gradiometer, but this is compensated for by reduced lossy interactions and improved interference rejection. We have used the system to image the human arm.

  5. Benchmark IMRT evaluation of a Co-60 MRI-guided radiation therapy system.

    PubMed

    Wooten, H Omar; Rodriguez, Vivian; Green, Olga; Kashani, Rojano; Santanam, Lakshmi; Tanderup, Kari; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H Harold

    2015-03-01

    A device for MRI-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) that uses cobalt-60 sources to deliver intensity modulated radiation therapy is now commercially available. We investigated the performance of the treatment planning and delivery system against the benchmark recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 119 for IMRT commissioning and demonstrated that the device plans and delivers IMRT treatments within recommended confidence limits and with similar accuracy as linac IMRT.

  6. Functional MRI of the Olfactory System in Conscious Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hao; Pustovyy, Oleg M.; Waggoner, Paul; Beyers, Ronald J.; Schumacher, John; Wildey, Chester; Barrett, Jay; Morrison, Edward; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2014-01-01

    We depend upon the olfactory abilities of dogs for critical tasks such as detecting bombs, landmines, other hazardous chemicals and illicit substances. Hence, a mechanistic understanding of the olfactory system in dogs is of great scientific interest. Previous studies explored this aspect at the cellular and behavior levels; however, the cognitive-level neural substrates linking them have never been explored. This is critical given the fact that behavior is driven by filtered sensory representations in higher order cognitive areas rather than the raw odor maps of the olfactory bulb. Since sedated dogs cannot sniff, we investigated this using functional magnetic resonance imaging of conscious dogs. We addressed the technical challenges of head motion using a two pronged strategy of behavioral training to keep dogs' head as still as possible and a single camera optical head motion tracking system to account for residual jerky movements. We built a custom computer-controlled odorant delivery system which was synchronized with image acquisition, allowing the investigation of brain regions activated by odors. The olfactory bulb and piriform lobes were commonly activated in both awake and anesthetized dogs, while the frontal cortex was activated mainly in conscious dogs. Comparison of responses to low and high odor intensity showed differences in either the strength or spatial extent of activation in the olfactory bulb, piriform lobes, cerebellum, and frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate the viability of the proposed method for functional imaging of the olfactory system in conscious dogs. This could potentially open up a new field of research in detector dog technology. PMID:24466054

  7. Intra-coil interactions in split gradient coils in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fangfang; Freschi, Fabio; Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Repetto, Maurizio; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    An MRI-LINAC system combines a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) to provide image-guided radiotherapy for targeting tumors in real-time. In an MRI-LINAC system, a set of split gradient coils is employed to produce orthogonal gradient fields for spatial signal encoding. Owing to this unconventional gradient configuration, eddy currents induced by switching gradient coils on and off may be of particular concern. It is expected that strong intra-coil interactions in the set will be present due to the constrained return paths, leading to potential degradation of the gradient field linearity and image distortion. In this study, a series of gradient coils with different track widths have been designed and analyzed to investigate the electromagnetic interactions between coils in a split gradient set. A driving current, with frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, was applied to study the inductive coupling effects with respect to conductor geometry and operating frequency. It was found that the eddy currents induced in the un-energized coils (hereby-referred to as passive coils) positively correlated with track width and frequency. The magnetic field induced by the eddy currents in the passive coils with wide tracks was several times larger than that induced by eddy currents in the cold shield of cryostat. The power loss in the passive coils increased with the track width. Therefore, intra-coil interactions should be included in the coil design and analysis process.

  8. Comparison of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and Doppler ultrasound in the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Naik, K S; Ward, J; Irving, H C; Robinson, P J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCEMR) with Doppler ultrasound (US) in the assessment of portal venous anatomy and to analyse the causes of discrepancy. Over a 1 year period, 97 patients undergoing assessment prior to hepatic surgery underwent imaging of the liver and portal venous system using US with colour and spectral Doppler and MRI with axial T2 weighted spin echo (SE) and coronal oblique T1 weighted rapid gradient echo (GRE) imaging before and immediately after bolus injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol kg-1). When the US and MRI findings were discrepant, the images were reviewed by two observers and compared with surgical findings. US and DCEMR were concordant in 90 patients (portal vein patent in 80, occluded in 10). In three patients with cirrhosis and gross ascites the portal vein was reported as occluded on US and patent on MRI; surgery confirmed the MRI findings. In one patient the portal vein was patient on US but not on MRI, but there was a 3 week interval between the examinations. In three patients the portal vein was patent on US, but MRI detected occlusion of intrahepatic portal vein branches in two, and encasement of an intrahepatic branch in the third case. Spontaneous splenorenal shunts were seen in 15 patients only on MRI; varices were seen in 39 patients on MRI and in 22 patients on US. Both US and DCEMR contribute to the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system. MRI provides additional information over US in assessing intrahepatic portal branches and detecting varices and splenorenal shunts, and is recommended for all surgical candidates and in patients with abnormal portal venous anatomy and equivocal US findings.

  9. R1 changes in the human placenta at 3 T in response to a maternal oxygen challenge protocol.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Emma; Hawkins, Lauren; Morris, David M; Myers, Jenny; Sibley, Colin P; Johnstone, Edward D; Naish, Josephine H

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen-enhanced MRI non-invasively monitors placental oxygenation in-vivo. This technique has been demonstrated at 1.5 Tesla (T) in healthy pregnancies. The aim of this study was to investigate whether findings are comparable at 3T. Nine pregnant volunteers underwent MRI at 3T. Scans obtained R1 (1/T1) measures from T1 maps under air, followed by a dynamic series breathing 100% oxygen. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between dR1 and gestation (P = 0.0008, r = -0.90, Pearson correlation test). The effect of the field strength was not significant within regression analysis. Placental Oxygen-Enhanced MRI at 3T gives comparable results to those previously obtained at 1.5T.

  10. MR/PET or PET/MRI: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Beyer, Thomas; Moser, Ewald

    2013-02-01

    After the very successful clinical introduction of combined PET/CT imaging a decade ago, a hardware combination of PET and MR is following suit. Today, three different approaches towards integrated PET/MR have been proposed: (1) a triple-modality system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT installed in adjacent rooms, (2) a tandem system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT in a co-planar installation with a joint patient handling system, and (3) a fully-integrated system with a whole-body PET system mounted inside a 3T MRI system. This special issue of MAGMA brings together contributions from key experts in the field of PET/MR, PET/CT and CT. The various papers share the author's perspectives on the state-of-the-art PET/MR imaging with any of the three approaches mentioned above. In addition to several reviews discussing advantages and challenges of combining PET and MRI for clinical diagnostics, first clinical data are also presented. We expect this special issue to nurture future improvements in hardware, clinical protocols, and efficient post-processing strategies to further assess the diagnostic value of combined PET/MR imaging. It remains to be seen whether a so-called "killer application" for PET/MRI will surface. In that case PET/MR is likely to excel in pre-clinical and selected research applications for now. This special issue helps the readers to stay on track of this exciting development.

  11. Liquid-state carbon-13 hyperpolarization generated in an MRI system for fast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A. B.; Berner, S.; Schimpf, W.; Müller, C.; Lickert, T.; Schwaderlapp, N.; Knecht, S.; Skinner, J. G.; Dost, A.; Rovedo, P.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J. -B.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) tracers dramatically increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor metabolism non-invasively and in vivo. Their production, however, requires an extra polarizing device (polarizer) whose complexity, operation and cost can exceed that of an MRI system itself. Furthermore, the lifetime of HP tracers is short and some of the enhancement is lost during transfer to the application site. Here, we present the production of HP tracers in water without an external polarizer: by Synthesis Amid the Magnet Bore, A Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment (SAMBADENA) is achieved within seconds, corresponding to a hyperpolarization of ∼20%. As transfer of the tracer is no longer required, SAMBADENA may permit a higher polarization at the time of detection at a fraction of the cost and complexity of external polarizers. This development is particularly promising in light of the recently extended portfolio of biomedically relevant para-hydrogen-tracers and may lead to new diagnostic applications. PMID:28262691

  12. Liquid-state carbon-13 hyperpolarization generated in an MRI system for fast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. B.; Berner, S.; Schimpf, W.; Müller, C.; Lickert, T.; Schwaderlapp, N.; Knecht, S.; Skinner, J. G.; Dost, A.; Rovedo, P.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J.-B.

    2017-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) tracers dramatically increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor metabolism non-invasively and in vivo. Their production, however, requires an extra polarizing device (polarizer) whose complexity, operation and cost can exceed that of an MRI system itself. Furthermore, the lifetime of HP tracers is short and some of the enhancement is lost during transfer to the application site. Here, we present the production of HP tracers in water without an external polarizer: by Synthesis Amid the Magnet Bore, A Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment (SAMBADENA) is achieved within seconds, corresponding to a hyperpolarization of ~20%. As transfer of the tracer is no longer required, SAMBADENA may permit a higher polarization at the time of detection at a fraction of the cost and complexity of external polarizers. This development is particularly promising in light of the recently extended portfolio of biomedically relevant para-hydrogen-tracers and may lead to new diagnostic applications.

  13. MR safety and imaging of neuroform stents at 3T.

    PubMed

    Nehra, Arvind; Moran, Christopher J; Cross, Dewitte T; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2004-10-01

    The Neuroform stent is a self-expanding nitinol stent designed for use in wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Heating and imaging artifacts were evaluated by using a porcine carotid artery aneurysm model in a 3T MR system. A suspended Neuroform stent was tested for deflection. No heating was measured, and no evidence of deflection of the stent was found. Imaging artifacts were minimal. MR imaging in patients with Neuroform stent-treated aneurysms is safe and feasible.

  14. Glabridin Alleviates the Toxic Effects of Methylglyoxal on Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 Cells by Increasing Expression of the Glyoxalase System and Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling and Protecting Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Mi; Suh, Kwang Sik; Kim, Yu Jin; Hong, Soo Min; Park, So Yong; Chon, Suk

    2016-01-13

    Methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to the pathogenesis of age- and diabetes-associated complications. The present study investigated the effects of glabridin on MG-induced cytotoxicity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with glabridin in the presence of MG, and markers of mitochondrial function and oxidative damage were examined. Pretreatment of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells with glabridin prevented MG-induced cell death, the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxides, cardiolipin peroxidation, and the production of inflammatory cytokines. The soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGEs)/RAGE ratio increased upon MG treatment, but less so after pretreatment with glabridin, which also increased the level of reduced glutathione and the activities of glyoxalase I and heme oxygenase-1, all of which were reduced by MG. In addition, glabridin elevated the level of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2. These findings suggest that glabridin protects against MG-induced cell damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and increasing MG detoxification. Pretreatment of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells with glabridin reduced MG-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, the nitric oxide level significantly increased upon glabridin pretreatment. Together, these data show that glabridin may potentially serve to prevent the development of diabetic bone disease associated with MG-induced oxidative stress.

  15. Diagnosis of early-stage rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced MR images at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Korogi, Yukunori

    2013-01-01

    Forty-one consecutive unclassified arthritis patients with polyarthralgia including wrist joint were evaluated with 3-T MRI as possible early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA). After prospective follow-up, 21 of 41 patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Synovitis was detected in all 21 RA patients (sensitivity=100%) with postcontrast MRI and in 14 patients (67%) with unenhanced MRI when none of them fulfilled ACR diagnostic criteria. Fat-suppressed intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) image showed high detection rate of synovitis and bone erosion, whereas FIESTA image clearly delineated joint fluid and bone trabeculae. MRI at 3 T is a potentially powerful tool for discriminating and managing early-stage RA patients.

  16. A recently developed MRI scoring system for hand osteoarthritis: its application in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Ramonda, Roberta; Favero, Marta; Vio, Stefania; Lacognata, Carmelo; Frallonardo, Paola; Belluzzi, Elisa; Campana, Carla; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Angelini, Federico; Piccoli, Antonio; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to apply the recently proposed Oslo hand osteoarthritis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system to evaluate MRI findings in a cohort of patients affected by long-standing erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA). Eleven female EHOA patients (median 59 [interquartile range 62-52] years, disease duration 9.5 [interquartile range 13-3.75] years) underwent MRI (1.5 T) of the dominant hand, and synovitis, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), joint space narrowing, osteophytes, cysts, malalignment, and erosions were scored using the Oslo scoring system. Intra- and inter-reader reliability were assessed. The patients also underwent X-ray examination, and bone features were evaluated using the same scoring system. Pain and tenderness were assessed during a physical examination. Spearman's non-parametric test was used to analyze the correlations between variables. MRI intra- and inter-reader reliability were found between good and moderate for many features. No statistical differences were found between the radiographs and MRI with regard to detection of JSN, malalignment, and bone erosions. Synovitis was detected in 39.8 % of the 80 joints examined (in a mild form in 80 %), erosions were found in 51.1 %, and BMLs were identified in 20.5 and 23.9 % at the distal and the proximal side, respectively. BMLs at both the proximal and distal ends were correlated with tender joints (BML distal p = 0.0013, BML proximal p = 0.012). The presence of synovitis was correlated with tenderness (p = 0.004) and erosions at both the distal and proximal joints (p = 0.004). The presence of erosions correlated with tender joints (p < 0.01) and the mean visual analog scale (VAS) score (distal p = 0.03, proximal p = 0.01). Synovitis and BMLs were correlated with clinical symptoms in our patients affected with long-standing EHOA.

  17. Electron contamination modeling and reduction in a 1 T open bore inline MRI-linac system

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Kolling, S.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Crozier, S.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: A potential side effect of inline MRI-linac systems is electron contamination focusing causing a high skin dose. In this work, the authors reexamine this prediction for an open bore 1 T MRI system being constructed for the Australian MRI-Linac Program. The efficiency of an electron contamination deflector (ECD) in purging electron contamination from the linac head is modeled, as well as the impact of a helium gas region between the deflector and phantom surface for lowering the amount of air-generated contamination. Methods: Magnetic modeling of the 1 T MRI was used to generate 3D magnetic field maps both with and without the presence of an ECD located immediately below the MLC’s. Forty-seven different ECD designs were modeled and for each the magnetic field map was imported into Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations including the linac head, ECD, and a 30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3} water phantom located at isocenter. For the first generation system, the x-ray source to isocenter distance (SID) will be 160 cm, resulting in an 81.2 cm long air gap from the base of the ECD to the phantom surface. The first 71.2 cm was modeled as air or helium gas, with the latter encased between two windows of 50 μm thick high density polyethlyene. 2D skin doses (at 70 μm depth) were calculated across the phantom surface at 1 × 1 mm{sup 2} resolution for 6 MV beams of field size of 5 × 5, 10 × 10, and 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}. Results: The skin dose was predicted to be of similar magnitude as the generic systems modeled in previous work, 230% to 1400% ofD {sub max} for 5 × 5 to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Inclusion of the ECD introduced a nonuniformity to the MRI imaging field that ranged from ∼20 to ∼140 ppm while the net force acting on the ECD ranged from ∼151 N to ∼1773 N. Various ECD designs were 100% efficient at purging the electron contamination into the ECD magnet banks; however, a small percentage were scattered back into the beam and continued to the phantom

  18. Mechanisms and prevention of thermal injury from gamma radiosurgery headframes during 3T MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Marcus C; Wiant, David B; Gersh, Jacob A; Dolesh, Wendy; Ding, X; Best, Ryan C M; Bourland, J D

    2012-07-05

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regularly used for stereotactic imaging of Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery patients for GK treatment planning. MRI-induced thermal injuries have occurred and been reported for GK patients with attached metallic headframes. Depending on the specific MR imaging and headframe conditions, a skin injury from MRI-induced heating can potentially occur where the four headframe screws contact the skin surface of the patient's head. Higher MR field strength has a greater heating potential. Two primary heating mechanisms, electromagnetic induction and the antenna effect, are possible. In this study, MRI-induced heating from a 3T clinical MRI scanner was investigated for stereotactic headframes used in gamma radiosurgery and neurosurgery. Using melons as head phantoms, optical thermometers were used to characterize the temperature profile at various points of the melon headframe composite as a function of two 3T MR pulse sequence protocols. Different combinations of GK radiosurgery headframe post and screw designs were tested to determine best and worst combinations for MRI-induced heating. Temperature increases were measured for all pulse sequences tested, indicating that the potential exists for MRI-induced skin heating and burns at the headframe attachment site. This heating originates with electromagnetic induction caused by the RF fields inducing current in a loop formed by the headframe, mounting screws, and the region of the patient's head located between any of the two screws. This induced current is then resistively dissipated, with the regions of highest resistance, located at the headframe screw-patient head interface, experiencing the most heating. Significant heating can be prevented by replacing the metallic threads holding the screw with electrically insulated nuts, which is the heating prevention and patient safety recommendation of the GK manufacturer. Our results confirm that the manufacturer's recommendation to use

  19. EEG-fMRI based information theoretic characterization of the human perceptual decision system.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Dirk; Porcaro, Camillo; Mayhew, Stephen D; Bagshaw, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    The modern metaphor of the brain is that of a dynamic information processing device. In the current study we investigate how a core cognitive network of the human brain, the perceptual decision system, can be characterized regarding its spatiotemporal representation of task-relevant information. We capitalize on a recently developed information theoretic framework for the analysis of simultaneously acquired electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging data (fMRI) (Ostwald et al. (2010), NeuroImage 49: 498-516). We show how this framework naturally extends from previous validations in the sensory to the cognitive domain and how it enables the economic description of neural spatiotemporal information encoding. Specifically, based on simultaneous EEG-fMRI data features from n = 13 observers performing a visual perceptual decision task, we demonstrate how the information theoretic framework is able to reproduce earlier findings on the neurobiological underpinnings of perceptual decisions from the response signal features' marginal distributions. Furthermore, using the joint EEG-fMRI feature distribution, we provide novel evidence for a highly distributed and dynamic encoding of task-relevant information in the human brain.

  20. ISPMER: Integrated system for combined PET, MRI, and electrophysiological recording in somatosensory studies in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yen-Yu; Chen, You-Yin; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Chang, Chen; Jaw, Fu-Shan

    2007-10-01

    The present study developed an integrated system for use in combined PET, MRI, and electrophysiological recording in somatosensory studies in rats, called ISPMER. A stereotaxic frame was designed for animal positioning that could be used in all three measurement modalities, and its dimensions complied with the gold standard of the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. A graphical user interface was developed for analyzing the data using several signal processing algorithms. This integrated system provides a novel interface for the recording and processing of three-dimensional neuronal signals in three modalities.

  1. Effective Connectivity Modeling for fMRI: Six Issues and Possible Solutions Using Linear Dynamic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jason F.; Pillai, Ajay; Chen, Kewei; Horwitz, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of directionally specific or causal interactions between regions in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data has proliferated. Here we identify six issues with existing effective connectivity methods that need to be addressed. The issues are discussed within the framework of linear dynamic systems for fMRI (LDSf). The first concerns the use of deterministic models to identify inter-regional effective connectivity. We show that deterministic dynamics are incapable of identifying the trial-to-trial variability typically investigated as the marker of connectivity while stochastic models can capture this variability. The second concerns the simplistic (constant) connectivity modeled by most methods. Connectivity parameters of the LDSf model can vary at the same timescale as the input data. Further, extending LDSf to mixtures of multiple models provides more robust connectivity variation. The third concerns the correct identification of the network itself including the number and anatomical origin of the network nodes. Augmentation of the LDSf state space can identify additional nodes of a network. The fourth concerns the locus of the signal used as a “node” in a network. A novel extension LDSf incorporating sparse canonical correlations can select most relevant voxels from an anatomically defined region based on connectivity. The fifth concerns connection interpretation. Individual parameter differences have received most attention. We present alternative network descriptors of connectivity changes which consider the whole network. The sixth concerns the temporal resolution of fMRI data relative to the timescale of the inter-regional interactions in the brain. LDSf includes an “instantaneous” connection term to capture connectivity occurring at timescales faster than the data resolution. The LDS framework can also be extended to statistically combine fMRI and EEG data. The LDSf framework is a promising foundation for effective connectivity

  2. Definition of metabolism-dependent xenobiotic toxicity with co-cultures of human hepatocytes and mouse 3T3 fibroblasts in the novel integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture (IdMOC) experimental system: results with model toxicants aflatoxin B1, cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Li, Albert P; Uzgare, Aarti; LaForge, Yumiko S

    2012-07-30

    The integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture system (IdMOC) allows the co-culturing of multiple cell types as physically separated cells interconnected by a common overlying medium. We report here the application of IdMOC with two cell types: the metabolically competent primary human hepatocytes, and a metabolically incompetent cell line, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, in the definition of the role of hepatic metabolism on the cytotoxicity of three model toxicants: cyclophosphamide (CPA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB) and tamoxifen (TMX). The presence of hepatic metabolism in IdMOC with human hepatocytes was demonstrated by the metabolism of the P450 isoform 3A4 substrate, luciferin-IPA. The three model toxicants showed three distinct patterns of cytotoxic profile: TMX was cytotoxic to 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes, with slightly lower cytotoxicity towards both 3T3 cells and hepatocytes in the IdMOC. AFB was selective toxic towards the human hepatocytes and relatively noncytotoxic towards 3T3 cells both in the presence and absence of the hepatocytes. CPA cytotoxicity to the 3T3 cells was found to be significantly enhanced by the presence of the hepatocytes, with the cytotoxicity dependent of the number of hepatocytes, and with the cytotoxicity attenuated by the presence of a non-specific P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole. We propose here the following classification of toxicants based on the role of hepatic metabolism as defined by the human hepatocyte-3T3 cell IdMOC assay: type I: direct-acting cytotoxicants represented by TMX as indicated by cytotoxicity in 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes; type II: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity represented by AFB1 with effects localized within the site of metabolic activation (i. e. hepatocytes); and type III: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity with metabolites that can diffuse out of the hepatocytes to cause toxicity in cells distal from the site of metabolism, as exemplified by CPA.

  3. Development of Ultra-low Field SQUID-MRI System with an LC Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Toyota, H.; Kawagoe, S.; Hatta, J.; Tanaka, S.

    We are developing an Ultra-Low Field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS)-rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) for food inspection. The advantage of the ULF MRI system is that non-magnetic contaminants, which are difficult to be detected by a magnetic sensor, can be detected and localized. The system uses HTS-SQUID with high sensitivity that is independent of frequency, because the signal frequency is reduced in ULF. However the detection area of HTS-SQUID is difficult to be increased. Therefore, we studied to increase the detection area using an LC resonator. The LC resonator is composed of a coil (22.9 mH, Φ40 mm inner diameter) and a capacitor (the setting resonance frequency of 1890 Hz). The signal is detected by a copper wound coil of the resonator, and transferred to HTS-SQUID that inductively coupled to the coil immersed in liquid nitrogen at 77 K. We combined the LC resonator with the ULF MRI system, and obtained the 2D-MR images. The signal detector, with the SQUID and the LC resonator, provided a 1.5 times larger detection area. The size of 2D-MR image was near the size of the actual sample. Then we obtained 2D-MR images by a filtered back projection (FBP) method and a 2D-fast fourier transform (FFT) method. In the 2D-FFT method, the pixel size of the image was smaller than that of image by FBP method. As a result, the quality of the 2D-MR image by 2D-FFT method has been improved. There results suggested that the system we are proposing is feasible.

  4. Effect of a computer-aided diagnosis system on radiologists' performance in grading gliomas with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Kevin Li-Chun; Tsai, Ruei-Je; Teng, Yu-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on quantitative intensity features with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) were evaluated by examining radiologists' performance in grading gliomas. The acquired MRI database included 71 lower-grade gliomas and 34 glioblastomas. Quantitative image features were extracted from the tumor area and combined in a CAD system to generate a prediction model. The effect of the CAD system was evaluated in a two-stage procedure. First, a radiologist performed a conventional reading. A sequential second reading was determined with a malignancy estimation by the CAD system. Each MR image was regularly read by one radiologist out of a group of three radiologists. The CAD system achieved an accuracy of 87% (91/105), a sensitivity of 79% (27/34), a specificity of 90% (64/71), and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.89. In the evaluation, the radiologists’ Az values significantly improved from 0.81, 0.87, and 0.84 to 0.90, 0.90, and 0.88 with p = 0.0011, 0.0076, and 0.0167, respectively. Based on the MR image features, the proposed CAD system not only performed well in distinguishing glioblastomas from lower-grade gliomas but also provided suggestions about glioma grading to reinforce radiologists’ confidence rating. PMID:28158235

  5. Effect of a computer-aided diagnosis system on radiologists' performance in grading gliomas with MRI.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Kevin Li-Chun; Tsai, Ruei-Je; Teng, Yu-Chuan; Lo, Chung-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The effects of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on quantitative intensity features with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) were evaluated by examining radiologists' performance in grading gliomas. The acquired MRI database included 71 lower-grade gliomas and 34 glioblastomas. Quantitative image features were extracted from the tumor area and combined in a CAD system to generate a prediction model. The effect of the CAD system was evaluated in a two-stage procedure. First, a radiologist performed a conventional reading. A sequential second reading was determined with a malignancy estimation by the CAD system. Each MR image was regularly read by one radiologist out of a group of three radiologists. The CAD system achieved an accuracy of 87% (91/105), a sensitivity of 79% (27/34), a specificity of 90% (64/71), and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.89. In the evaluation, the radiologists' Az values significantly improved from 0.81, 0.87, and 0.84 to 0.90, 0.90, and 0.88 with p = 0.0011, 0.0076, and 0.0167, respectively. Based on the MR image features, the proposed CAD system not only performed well in distinguishing glioblastomas from lower-grade gliomas but also provided suggestions about glioma grading to reinforce radiologists' confidence rating.

  6. Single-unit recordings in the macaque face patch system reveal limitations of fMRI MVPA.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Julien; de Berker, Archy Otto; Tsao, Doris Ying

    2015-02-11

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of fMRI data has become an important technique for cognitive neuroscientists in recent years; however, the relationship between fMRI MVPA and the underlying neural population activity remains unexamined. Here, we performed MVPA of fMRI data and single-unit data in the same species, the macaque monkey. Facial recognition in the macaque is subserved by a well characterized system of cortical patches, which provided the test bed for our comparison. We showed that neural population information about face viewpoint was readily accessible with fMRI MVPA from all face patches, in agreement with single-unit data. Information about face identity, although it was very strongly represented in the populations of units of the anterior face patches, could not be retrieved from the same data. The discrepancy was especially striking in patch AL, where neurons encode both the identity and viewpoint of human faces. From an analysis of the characteristics of the neural representations for viewpoint and identity, we conclude that fMRI MVPA cannot decode information contained in the weakly clustered neuronal responses responsible for coding the identity of human faces in the macaque brain. Although further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between information decodable from fMRI multivoxel patterns versus single-unit populations for other variables in other brain regions, our result has important implications for the interpretation of negative findings in fMRI multivoxel pattern analyses.

  7. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  8. Extraction of the human cerebral ventricular system from MRI: inclusion of anatomical knowledge and clinical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Aamer; Hu, Qingmao; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.

    2004-04-01

    The human cerebral ventricular system is a complex structure that is essential for the well being and changes in which reflect disease. It is clinically imperative that the ventricular system be studied in details. For this reason computer assisted algorithms are essential to be developed. We have developed a novel (patent pending) and robust anatomical knowledge-driven algorithm for automatic extraction of the cerebral ventricular system from MRI. The algorithm is not only unique in its image processing aspect but also incorporates knowledge of neuroanatomy, radiological properties, and variability of the ventricular system. The ventricular system is divided into six 3D regions based on the anatomy and its variability. Within each ventricular region a 2D region of interest (ROI) is defined and is then further subdivided into sub-regions. Various strict conditions that detect and prevent leakage into the extra-ventricular space are specified for each sub-region based on anatomical knowledge. Each ROI is processed to calculate its local statistics, local intensity ranges of cerebrospinal fluid and grey and white matters, set a seed point within the ROI, grow region directionally in 3D, check anti-leakage conditions and correct growing if leakage occurs and connects all unconnected regions grown by relaxing growing conditions. The algorithm was tested qualitatively and quantitatively on normal and pathological MRI cases and worked well. In this paper we discuss in more detail inclusion of anatomical knowledge in the algorithm and usefulness of our approach from clinical perspective.

  9. Design and Fabrication of an MRI-Compatible, Autonomous Incubation System.

    PubMed

    Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Xu, Huihui

    2015-10-01

    Tissue engineers have long sought access to an autonomous, imaging-compatible tissue incubation system that, with minimum operator handling, can provide real-time visualization and quantification of cells, tissue constructs, and organs. This type of screening system, capable of operating noninvasively to validate tissue, can overcome current limitations like temperature shock, unsustainable cellular environments, sample contamination, and handling/stress. However, this type of system has been a major challenge, until now. Here, we describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of an innovative, autonomous incubation system that is compatible with a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Termed the e-incubator (patent pending; application number: 13/953,984), this microcontroller-based system is integrated into an MRI scanner and noninvasively screens cells and tissue cultures in an environment where temperature, pH, and media/gas handling are regulated. The 4-week study discussed herein details the continuous operation of the e-incubator for a tissue-engineered osteogenic construct, validated by LIVE/DEAD(®) cell assays and histology. The evolving MR quantitative parameters of the osteogenic construct were used as biomarkers for bone tissue engineering and to further validate the quality of the product noninvasively before harvesting. Importantly, the e-incubator reliably facilitates culturing cells and tissue constructs to create engineered tissues and/or investigate disease therapies.

  10. Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum M.) sprout treated with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) improved anti-adipogenic activity associated with the oxidative stress system in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Park, Kee-Jai; Yoon, Bo-Ra; Lim, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Ok-Hwan

    2013-01-11

    Buckwheat sprouts contain various bioactive compounds including rutin which have a number of biological activities. We have previously shown that buckwheat sprouts (TBWE) treated with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) significantly increased the amount of phenolics and the antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of TBWE on anti-adipogenesis and pro-oxidant enzyme in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We also evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of TBWE in adipocytes by using the nitroblue tetrazolium assay. Our data showed that TBWE markedly inhibited adipocyte differentiation and ROS production in 3T3-L1 cells compared with control groups. Moreover, TBWE has strongly shown the inhibition of adipogenic transcription factor as well as pro-oxidant enzymes. Together, we demonstrate that the MeJA treatment significantly increased the amount of phenolic compound, resulting in the suppression of adipogenesis and ROS production in the 3T3-L1 cells. These findings indicate that TBWE has the potential for anti-adipogenesis activity with anti-oxidative properties.

  11. Multi-Channel RF System for MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Thermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yak, Nicolas; Asselin, Matthew; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy is an approach to treating localized prostate cancer which targets precise deposition of thermal energy within a confined region of the gland. This treatment requires a system incorporating a heating applicator with multiple planar ultrasound transducers and associated RF electronics to control individual elements independently in order to achieve accurate 3D treatment. We report the design, construction, and characterization of a prototype multi-channel system capable of controlling 16 independent RF signals for a 16-element heating applicator. The main components are a control computer, microcontroller, and a 16-channel signal generator with 16 amplifiers, each incorporating a low-pass filter and transmitted/reflected power detection circuit. Each channel can deliver from 0.5 to 10 W of electrical power and good linearity from 3 to 12 MHz. Harmonic RF signals near the Larmor frequency of a 1.5 T MRI were measured to be below -30 dBm and heating experiments within the 1.5 T MR system showed no significant decrease in SNR of the temperature images. The frequency and power for all 16 channels could be changed in less than 250 ms, which was sufficiently rapid for proper performance of the control algorithms. A common backplane design was chosen which enabled an inexpensive, modular approach for each channel resulting in an overall system with minimal footprint.

  12. Solid cryogen: a cooling system for future MgB2 MRI magnet.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipak; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Qiu, Wenbin; Jie, Hyunseock; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Maeda, Minoru; Tomsic, Mike; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Jung Ho

    2017-03-02

    An efficient cooling system and the superconducting magnet are essential components of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. Herein, we report a solid nitrogen (SN2) cooling system as a valuable cryogenic feature, which is targeted for easy usability and stable operation under unreliable power source conditions, in conjunction with a magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting magnet. The rationally designed MgB2/SN2 cooling system was first considered by conducting a finite element analysis simulation, and then a demonstrator coil was empirically tested under the same conditions. In the SN2 cooling system design, a wide temperature distribution on the SN2 chamber was observed due to the low thermal conductivity of the stainless steel components. To overcome this temperature distribution, a copper flange was introduced to enhance the temperature uniformity of the SN2 chamber. In the coil testing, an operating current as high as 200 A was applied at 28 K (below the critical current) without any operating or thermal issues. This work was performed to further the development of SN2 cooled MgB2 superconducting coils for MRI applications.

  13. Solid cryogen: a cooling system for future MgB2 MRI magnet

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipak; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Qiu, Wenbin; Jie, Hyunseock; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Maeda, Minoru; Tomsic, Mike; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Jung Ho

    2017-01-01

    An efficient cooling system and the superconducting magnet are essential components of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. Herein, we report a solid nitrogen (SN2) cooling system as a valuable cryogenic feature, which is targeted for easy usability and stable operation under unreliable power source conditions, in conjunction with a magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting magnet. The rationally designed MgB2/SN2 cooling system was first considered by conducting a finite element analysis simulation, and then a demonstrator coil was empirically tested under the same conditions. In the SN2 cooling system design, a wide temperature distribution on the SN2 chamber was observed due to the low thermal conductivity of the stainless steel components. To overcome this temperature distribution, a copper flange was introduced to enhance the temperature uniformity of the SN2 chamber. In the coil testing, an operating current as high as 200 A was applied at 28 K (below the critical current) without any operating or thermal issues. This work was performed to further the development of SN2 cooled MgB2 superconducting coils for MRI applications. PMID:28251984

  14. Integrated navigation and control software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Fischer, Gregory S.; DiMaio, Simon P.; Gobbi, David G.; Csoma, Csaba; Mewes, Philip W.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A software system to provide intuitive navigation for MRI-guided robotic transperineal prostate therapy is presented. In the system, the robot control unit, the MRI scanner, and the open-source navigation software are connected together via Ethernet to exchange commands, coordinates, and images using an open network communication protocol, OpenIGTLink. The system has six states called “workphases” that provide the necessary synchronization of all components during each stage of the clinical workflow, and the user interface guides the operator linearly through these workphases. On top of this framework, the software provides the following features for needle guidance: interactive target planning; 3D image visualization with current needle position; treatment monitoring through real-time MR images of needle trajectories in the prostate. These features are supported by calibration of robot and image coordinates by fiducial-based registration. Performance tests show that the registration error of the system was 2.6 mm within the prostate volume. Registered real-time 2D images were displayed 1.97 s after the image location is specified. PMID:19699057

  15. Solid cryogen: a cooling system for future MgB2 MRI magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dipak; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Qiu, Wenbin; Jie, Hyunseock; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Maeda, Minoru; Tomsic, Mike; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Jung Ho

    2017-03-01

    An efficient cooling system and the superconducting magnet are essential components of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. Herein, we report a solid nitrogen (SN2) cooling system as a valuable cryogenic feature, which is targeted for easy usability and stable operation under unreliable power source conditions, in conjunction with a magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting magnet. The rationally designed MgB2/SN2 cooling system was first considered by conducting a finite element analysis simulation, and then a demonstrator coil was empirically tested under the same conditions. In the SN2 cooling system design, a wide temperature distribution on the SN2 chamber was observed due to the low thermal conductivity of the stainless steel components. To overcome this temperature distribution, a copper flange was introduced to enhance the temperature uniformity of the SN2 chamber. In the coil testing, an operating current as high as 200 A was applied at 28 K (below the critical current) without any operating or thermal issues. This work was performed to further the development of SN2 cooled MgB2 superconducting coils for MRI applications.

  16. fMRI mapping of the visual system in the mouse brain with interleaved snapshot GE-EPI.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Arun; Christie, Isabel N; Solomon, Samuel G; Wells, Jack A; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2016-06-10

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in mice is increasingly prevalent, providing a means to non-invasively characterise functional abnormalities associated with genetic models of human diseases. The predominant stimulus used in task-based fMRI in the mouse is electrical stimulation of the paw. Task-based fMRI in mice using visual stimuli remains underexplored, despite visual stimuli being common in human fMRI studies. In this study, we map the mouse brain visual system with BOLD measurements at 9.4T using flashing light stimuli with medetomidine anaesthesia. BOLD responses were observed in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the superior colliculus and the primary visual area of the cortex, and were modulated by the flashing frequency, diffuse vs focussed light and stimulus context. Negative BOLD responses were measured in the visual cortex at 10Hz flashing frequency; but turned positive below 5Hz. In addition, the use of interleaved snapshot GE-EPI improved fMRI image quality without diminishing the temporal contrast-noise-ratio. Taken together, this work demonstrates a novel methodological protocol in which the mouse brain visual system can be non-invasively investigated using BOLD fMRI.

  17. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing.

  18. [3 Tesla MRI: successful results with higher field strengths].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, F; Grosu, D; Mohr, C; Purdy, D; Salem, K; Scott, K T; Stoeckel, B

    2004-01-01

    pancreas. The ability to increase resolution for musculoskeletal imaging has provided previously unseen detail. Bone structure, cartilage, and tendons and ligaments can be clearly visualized and pathology more easily detected due to an increased image quality. As the increase in field strength continues, a push to look at 7T has begun. The design philosophy is to keep the system as similar as possible, while changing only the frequency-dependent components. To date, both animal and human imaging have been performed on a whole body 7T scanner. Results show promise for both detailed imaging and functional MRI, but the road ahead is too long to be able to predict where it will end. The move toward higher field strengths is an exciting adventure in which 3T plays the role of trailblazer.

  19. Measuring local flow velocities and biofilm structure in biofilm systems with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Goll, Danile; Horn, Harald

    2003-11-20

    The characterization of substrate transport in the bulk phase and in the biofilm matrix is one of the problems which has to be solved for the verification of biofilm models. Additionally, the surface structure of biofilms has to be described with appropriate parameters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the promising methods for the investigation of transport phenomena and structure in biofilm systems. The MRI technique allows the noninvasive determination of flow velocities and biofilm structures with a high resolution on the sub-millimeter scale. The presented investigations were carried out for defined heterotrophic biofilms which were cultivated in a tube reactor at a Reynolds number of 2000 and 8000 and a substrate load of 6 and 4 g/m2d glucose. Magnetic resonance imaging provides both structure data of the biofilm surface and flow velocities in the bulk phase and at the bulk/biofilm interface. It is shown that the surface roughness of the biofilms can be determined in one experiment for the complete cross section of the test tubes both under flow and stagnant conditions. Furthermore, the local shear stress was calculated from the measured velocity profiles. In the investigated biofilm systems the local shear stress at the biofilm surface was up to 3 times higher compared to the mean wall shear stress calculated on the base of the mean flow velocity.

  20. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  1. Augmented-reality visualization in iMRI operating room: system description and preclinical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Frank; Khamene, Ali; Bascle, Benedicte; Vogt, Sebastian; Rubino, Gregory

    2002-05-01

    We developed an augmented reality system targeting image guidance for surgical procedures. The surgeon wears a video- see-through head mounted display that provides him with a stereo video view of the patient. The live video images are augmented with graphical representations of anatomical structures that are segmented from medical image data. The surgeon can see, e.g., a tumor in its actual location inside the patient. This in-situ visualization, where the computer maps the image information onto the patient, promises the most direct, intuitive guidance for surgical procedures. In this paper, we describe technical details of the system and its installation in UCLA's iMRI operating room. We added instrument tracking to the capabilities of our system to prepare it for minimally invasive procedures. We discuss several pre-clinical phantom experiments that support the potential clinical usefulness of augmented reality guidance.

  2. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  3. Prototype positron emission tomography insert with electro-optical signal transmission for simultaneous operation with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcott, Peter; Kim, Ealgoo; Hong, Keyjo; Lee, Brian J.; Grant, Alexander M.; Chang, Chen-Ming; Glover, Gary; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI data shows promise to provide powerful capabilities to study disease processes in human subjects, guide the development of novel treatments, and monitor therapy response and disease progression. A brain-size PET detector ring insert for an MRI system is being developed that, if successful, can be inserted into any existing MRI system to enable simultaneous PET and MRI images of the brain to be acquired without mutual interference. The PET insert uses electro-optical coupling to relay all the signals from the PET detectors out of the MRI system using analog modulated lasers coupled to fiber optics. Because the fibers use light instead of electrical signals, the PET detector can be electrically decoupled from the MRI making it partially transmissive to the RF field of the MRI. The SiPM devices and low power lasers were powered using non-magnetic MRI compatible batteries. Also, the number of laser-fiber channels in the system was reduced using techniques adapted from the field of compressed sensing. Using the fact that incoming PET data is sparse in time and space, electronic circuits implementing constant weight codes uniquely encode the detector signals in order to reduce the number of electro-optical readout channels by 8-fold. Two out of a total of sixteen electro-optical detector modules have been built and tested with the entire RF-shielded detector gantry for the PET ring insert. The two detectors have been tested outside and inside of a 3T MRI system to study mutual interference effects and simultaneous performance with MRI. Preliminary results show that the PET insert is feasible for high resolution simultaneous PET/MRI imaging for applications in the brain.

  4. Interventional CT and MRI: a challenge for safety and cost reduction in the health care system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenemeyer, Dietrich H.; Seibel, Rainer M.

    1995-10-01

    For increasing safety in guidance techniques of endoscopes and instruments, fast radiologic imaging should be integrated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computer tomography (CT) and electron beam tomography (EBT) scanners permit transparency of the operative field; CT and EBT can be combined with fluoroscopy and ultrasound units. MRI avoids x ray exposure, but entails the possibility for 3 D localization. Open access and keyhole imaging allows nearly real time guidance of instruments. Combining minimally invasive techniques using endoscopes and tomographic guidance these technologies improve surgical access and reduce complications. This offers a safe access into the body and leads to the new field of interventional and surgical tomography. Important cost reduction for health care systems is possible, especially in the outpatient treatment of common diseases like disk herniation, back and tumor pain, metastasis, or arteriosclerosis. For realizing a long term cost reduction effect, these techniques have to be integrated in a quality management combining prevention, modern diagnosis, minimal access techniques and, if necessary, hospital stay with maximal access treatments as well as rehabilitation and secondary/tertiary prevention.

  5. Mn enhancement and respiratory gating for in utero MRI of the embryonic mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Deans, Abby E; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Berrios-Otero, César A; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2008-06-01

    The mouse is the preferred model organism for genetic studies of mammalian brain development. MRI has potential for in utero studies of mouse brain development, but has been limited previously by challenges of maximizing image resolution and contrast while minimizing artifacts due to physiological motion. Manganese (Mn)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) studies have demonstrated central nervous system (CNS) contrast enhancement in mice from the earliest postnatal stages. The purpose of this study was to expand MEMRI to in utero studies of the embryonic CNS in combination with respiratory gating to decrease motion artifacts. We investigated MEMRI-facilitated CNS segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) analysis in wild-type mouse embryos from midgestation, and explored effects of Mn on embryonic survival and image contrast. Motivated by observations that MEMRI provided an effective method for visualization and volumetric analysis of embryonic CNS structures, especially in ventral regions, we used MEMRI to examine Nkx2.1 mutant mice that were previously reported to have ventral forebrain defects. Quantitative MEMRI analysis of Nkx2.1 knockout mice demonstrated volumetric changes in septum (SE) and basal ganglia (BG), as well as alterations in hypothalamic structures. This method may provide an effective means for in utero analysis of CNS phenotypes in a variety of mouse mutants.

  6. Functional evaluation of communication speed for an interactive telesurgery system with open MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Yasushi; Kuwata, Shigeki; Nakano, Hirohiko; Nakamura, Hitonobu; Kawasaki, Hikaru; Tamura, Shinichi; Ochi, Takahiro

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is firstly to define system configuration for an interactive telesurgery with open MRI, and secondly to elucidate optimum bandwidths of B-ISDN in the standpoint view of functionality to cost ratio. The test bed of B-ISDN network was established between Osaka University Hospital (OUH) and Kawasaki Hospital (KH). The interactive telesurgery has divided into three phases. Phase 1 is to transfer DICOM data of a patient from KH to OUH where image files are archived for data processing. Phase 2 is to make interactive videoconferencing with simultaneous sharing of the DICOM images. Phase 3 is to assist surgical navigation from OUH to KW with open MRI images and three dimensional images overlay. In order to satisfy these functions of the three phases and optimize running cost and functionality, the survey were made and the results were summarized as functional requirements. By using scalable bandwidths control, the optimum bandwidths in each phase were decided. The data obtained indicate functional requirements for telesurgical operations and will provide the basis for future challenging tele-robotic surgery which is under developing in our project between OUH and KH.

  7. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, Alessio; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2017-01-16

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image quality. This opens a new set of opportunities for neuroscience, allowing investigators to map the human cortex at an unprecedented level of detail. In this review, we present recent work that capitalizes on the increased signal-to-noise ratio available at ultra-high field and discuss the theoretical advances with a focus on sensory and motor systems neuroscience. Further, we review research performed at sub-millimeter spatial resolution and discuss the limits and the potential of ultra-high field imaging for structural and functional imaging in human cortex. The increased spatial resolution achievable at ultra-high field has the potential to unveil the fundamental computations performed within a given cortical area, ultimately allowing the visualization of the mesoscopic organization of human cortex at the functional and structural level.

  8. Travelling wave magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, F.; Martin, R.; Marrufo, O.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2013-08-01

    Waveguides have been successfully used to generate magnetic resonance images at 7 T with whole-body systems. The bore diameter limits the magnetic resonance signal transmitted because its specific cut-off frequency is greater than the majority of resonant frequencies in magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. This restriction can be overcome by using a parallel-plate waveguide whose cut-off frequency is zero for the transverse electromagnetic modes and it can propagate any frequency. To study the potential benefits of travelling-wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 3 T, we compare numerical simulations of the principal mode propagation for a parallel-plate waveguide filled with a cylindrical phantom and two surface coils for all simulations at 1.5 T, 3 T, 4.7, 7 T, and 9.4 T. The principal mode shows very little variation of the field magnitude along the propagation direction at 3 T when compared to other higher resonant frequencies. Unlike the standard method for travelling-wave magnetic resonance imaging, a parallel-plate waveguide prototype was built and used together with a whole-body birdcage coil for signal transmission and a pair of circular coils for reception. Experimental B1 mapping was computed to investigate the feasibility of this approach and, the point spread function method was used to measure the imager performance. Human leg images were acquired to experimentally validate this approach. The numerical magnetic field and specific absorption rate of a simulated leg were computed and results are within the safety limits. The B1 mapping and point spread function results showed that it is possible to conduct travelling-wave imaging experiments with good imager performance. Human leg images were also obtained with the whole-body birdcage coil for comparison purposes. The simulated and in vivo travelling-wave results of the human leg correspond very well for the signal received. A similar image signal-to-noise ratio was observed for the

  9. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Faisal; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Kanesan, Jeevan

    2015-01-01

    A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT), principal component analysis (PCA), and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF) kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients' benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%). Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities from the

  10. Simultaneous fMRI-PET of the opioidergic pain system in human brain.

    PubMed

    Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Catana, Ciprian; Hooker, Jacob M; Dougherty, Darin D; Knudsen, Gitte M; Wang, Danny J J; Chonde, Daniel B; Rosen, Bruce R; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian

    2014-11-15

    MRI and PET provide complementary information for studying brain function. While the potential use of simultaneous MRI/PET for clinical diagnostic and disease staging has been demonstrated recently; the biological relevance of concurrent functional MRI-PET brain imaging to dissect neurochemically distinct components of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal has not yet been shown. We obtained sixteen fMRI-PET data sets from eight healthy volunteers. Each subject participated in randomized order in a pain scan and a control (nonpainful pressure) scan on the same day. Dynamic PET data were acquired with an opioid radioligand, [(11)C]diprenorphine, to detect endogenous opioid releases in response to pain. BOLD fMRI data were collected at the same time to capture hemodynamic responses. In this simultaneous human fMRI-PET imaging study, we show co-localized responses in thalamus and striatum related to pain processing, while modality specific brain networks were also found. Co-localized fMRI and PET signal changes in the thalamus were positively correlated suggesting that pain-induced changes in opioid neurotransmission contribute a significant component of the fMRI signal change in this region. Simultaneous fMRI-PET provides unique opportunities allowing us to relate specific neurochemical events to functional hemodynamic activation and to investigate the impacts of neurotransmission on neurovascular coupling of the human brain in vivo.

  11. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; DiMaio, Simon P.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intraprostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. MRI compatibility of the robot has been evaluated under 3T MRI using standard prostate imaging sequences and average SNR loss is limited to 5%. Needle alignment accuracy of the robot under servo pneumatic control is better than 0.94 mm rms per axis. The complete system workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design, the system integration, and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system. PMID:21057608

  12. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gregory S; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Dimaio, Simon P; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intraprostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. MRI compatibility of the robot has been evaluated under 3T MRI using standard prostate imaging sequences and average SNR loss is limited to 5%. Needle alignment accuracy of the robot under servo pneumatic control is better than 0.94 mm rms per axis. The complete system workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design, the system integration, and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system.

  13. Pneumatically Operated MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gregory S; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Mewes, Philip W; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-06-13

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. The strong magnetic field prevents the use of conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intra-prostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. The robot performs needle insertion under real-time 3T MR image guidance; workspace requirements, MR compatibility, and workflow have been evaluated on phantoms. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system.

  14. Rapid Prototyping of Inspired Gas Delivery System for Pulmonary MRI Research

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Fredrick Roscoe; Geier, Eric T.; Asadi, Amran K.; Sá, Rui Carlos; Prisk, G. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Specific ventilation imaging (SVI) is a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method for determining the regional distribution of inspired air in the lungs, useful for the assessment of pulmonary function in medical research. This technique works by monitoring the rate of magnetic resonance signal change in response to a series of imposed step changes in inspired oxygen concentration. The current SVI technique requires a complex system of tubes, valves, and electronics that are used to supply and rapidly switch inspired gases while subjects are imaged, which makes the technique difficult to translate into the clinical setting. This report discusses the design and implementation of custom three-dimensional (3D) printed hardware that greatly simplifies SVI measurement of lung function. Several hardware prototypes were modeled using computer-aided design software and printed for evaluation. After finalization of the design, the new delivery system was evaluated based on O2 and N2 concentration step responses and validated against the current SVI protocol. The design performed rapid switching of supplied gas within 250 ms and consistently supplied the desired concentration of O2 during operation. It features a reduction in the number of commercial hardware components, from five to one, and a reduction in the number of gas lines between the operator’s room and the scanner room, from four to one, as well as a substantially reduced preparation time from 25 to 5 min. 3D printing is well suited to the design of inexpensive custom MRI compatible hardware, making it particularly useful in imaging-based research. PMID:27917393

  15. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurélien; Raynaud, Jean-Sébastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit; Docagne, Fabian; Defer, Gilles; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuroinflammation.

  16. Development of a combined multifrequency MRI-DOT system for human breast imaging using a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, David; Liu, Ning; Unlu, Burcin; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Su, Min-Ying; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity among women with early diagnosis being vital to successful treatment. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is an emerging medical imaging modality that provides information that is complementary to current screening modalities such as MRI and mammography, and may improve the specificity in determining cancer malignancy. Using high-resolution anatomic images as a priori information improves the accuracy of DOT. Measurements are presented characterizing the performance of our system. Preliminary data is also shown illustrating the use of a priori MRI data in phantom studies.ä

  17. Safety of magnetic resonance imaging of patients with a new Medtronic EnRhythm MRI SureScan pacing system: clinical study design

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Richard; Kanal, Emanuel; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Bello, David; Luechinger, Roger; Jenniskens, Inge; Hull, Michael; Sommer, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of patients with implanted cardiac devices is currently considered hazardous due to potential for electromagnetic interference to the patient and pacemaker system. With approximately 60 million MRI scans performed worldwide per year, an estimated majority of pacemaker patients may develop an indication for an MRI during the lifetime of their pacemakers, suggesting that safe use of pacemakers in the MRI environment would be clinically valuable. A new pacing system (Medtronic EnRhythm MRI™ SureScan™ and CapSureFix MRI™ leads) has been designed and pre-clinically tested for safe use in the MRI environment. The EnRhythm MRI study is designed to confirm the safety and efficacy of this new pacing system. Methods The EnRhythm MRI study is a prospective, randomized controlled, unblinded clinical trial to confirm the safety and efficacy of MRI at 1.5 Tesla in patients implanted with a specifically designed pacemaker and lead system. The patients have standard indications for dual chamber pacemaker implantation. Successfully implanted patients are randomized in a 2:1 ratio to undergo MRI (MRI group) or to have no MRI scan (control group) at 9–12 weeks after pacemaker system implantation. Magnetic resonance (MR) scanning includes 14 head and lumbar scan sequences representing clinically relevant scans while maximizing the gradient slew rate up to 200 T/m/s, and/or the transmitted radiofrequency (RF) power up to SAR (specific absorption rate) levels of 2 W/kg body weight (upper limit of normal operating mode). Full interrogation of all device information and sensing and capture function are measured at device implantation, every follow-up and before and immediately after MRI in the MRI group and at the same time points in the control group. Complete pacemaker and lead evaluations are also done at one week and one month after the scan for the MRI and control group patients. The primary endpoint is safe and successful

  18. Impact of the MRI-based Navigation System Constraints on the Step Response Using a PID Controller.

    PubMed

    Tamaz, Samer; Martel, Sylvain

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the identification and the study of the impact of a real-time MRI-based propulsion and tracking system constraints on the step response using a discrete PID controller. A simplified model for such a system accounts for these constraints such as the time delay, the sampling period, and the blood velocity. This application is intended for minimally invasive operations within the human cardiovascular system.

  19. The endocannabinoid system and emotional processing: a pharmacological fMRI study with ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; van Hell, Hendrika H; Jager, Gerry; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F; Jansma, J Martijn

    2013-12-01

    Various psychiatric disorders such as major depression are associated with abnormalities in emotional processing. Evidence indicating involvement of the endocannabinoid system in emotional processing, and thus potentially in related abnormalities, is increasing. In the present study, we examined the role of the endocannabinoid system in processing of stimuli with a positive and negative emotional content in healthy volunteers. A pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted with a placebo-controlled, cross-over design, investigating effects of the endocannabinoid agonist ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on brain function related to emotional processing in 11 healthy subjects. Performance and brain activity during matching of stimuli with a negative ('fearful faces') or a positive content ('happy faces') were assessed after placebo and THC administration. After THC administration, performance accuracy was decreased for stimuli with a negative but not for stimuli with a positive emotional content. Our task activated a network of brain regions including amygdala, orbital frontal gyrus, hippocampus, parietal gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and regions in the occipital cortex. THC interacted with emotional content, as activity in this network was reduced for negative content, while activity for positive content was increased. These results indicate that THC administration reduces the negative bias in emotional processing. This adds human evidence to support the hypothesis that the endocannabinoid system is involved in modulation of emotional processing. Our findings also suggest a possible role for the endocannabinoid system in abnormal emotional processing, and may thus be relevant for psychiatric disorders such as major depression.

  20. An fMRI-compatible force measurement system for the evaluation of the neural correlates of step initiation

    PubMed Central

    de Lima-Pardini, Andrea Cristina; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Machado; Coelho, Daniel Boari; Boffino, Catarina Costa; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; de Oliveira Souza, Carolina; Brant, Rachael; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Cardoso, Ellison Fernando; Teixeira, Luis Augusto; Cohen, Rajal G.; Horak, Fay Bahling; Amaro, Edson

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of brain correlates of postural control is limited by the technical difficulties in performing controlled experiments with currently available neuroimaging methods. Here we present a system that allows the measurement of anticipatory postural adjustment of human legs to be synchronized with the acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The device is composed of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible force sensors able to measure the level of force applied by both feet. We tested the device in a group of healthy young subjects and a group of elderly subjects with Parkinson’s disease using an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) experiment design. In both groups the postural behavior inside the magnetic resonance was correlated to the behavior during gait initiation outside the scanner. The system did not produce noticeable imaging artifacts in the data. Healthy young people showed brain activation patterns coherent with movement planning. Parkinson’s disease patients demonstrated an altered pattern of activation within the motor circuitry. We concluded that this force measurement system is able to index both normal and abnormal preparation for gait initiation within an fMRI experiment. PMID:28230070

  1. An fMRI-compatible force measurement system for the evaluation of the neural correlates of step initiation.

    PubMed

    de Lima-Pardini, Andrea Cristina; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Machado; Coelho, Daniel Boari; Boffino, Catarina Costa; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; de Oliveira Souza, Carolina; Brant, Rachael; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Cardoso, Ellison Fernando; Teixeira, Luis Augusto; Cohen, Rajal G; Horak, Fay Bahling; Amaro, Edson

    2017-02-23

    Knowledge of brain correlates of postural control is limited by the technical difficulties in performing controlled experiments with currently available neuroimaging methods. Here we present a system that allows the measurement of anticipatory postural adjustment of human legs to be synchronized with the acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The device is composed of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible force sensors able to measure the level of force applied by both feet. We tested the device in a group of healthy young subjects and a group of elderly subjects with Parkinson's disease using an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) experiment design. In both groups the postural behavior inside the magnetic resonance was correlated to the behavior during gait initiation outside the scanner. The system did not produce noticeable imaging artifacts in the data. Healthy young people showed brain activation patterns coherent with movement planning. Parkinson's disease patients demonstrated an altered pattern of activation within the motor circuitry. We concluded that this force measurement system is able to index both normal and abnormal preparation for gait initiation within an fMRI experiment.

  2. Effects of haloperidol and aripiprazole on the human mesolimbic motivational system: A pharmacological fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Bolstad, Ingeborg; Andreassen, Ole A; Groote, Inge; Server, Andres; Sjaastad, Ivar; Kapur, Shitij; Jensen, Jimmy

    2015-12-01

    The atypical antipsychotic drug aripiprazole is a partial dopamine (DA) D2 receptor agonist, which differentiates it from most other antipsychotics. This study compares the brain activation characteristic produced by aripiprazole with that of haloperidol, a typical D2 receptor antagonist. Healthy participants received an acute oral dose of haloperidol, aripiprazole or placebo, and then performed an active aversive conditioning task with aversive and neutral events presented as sounds, while blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was carried out. The fMRI task, targeting the mesolimbic motivational system that is thought to be disturbed in psychosis, was based on the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) animal model - a widely used test of therapeutic potential of antipsychotic drugs. In line with the CAR animal model, the present results show that subjects given haloperidol were not able to avoid more aversive than neutral task trials, even though the response times were shorter during aversive events. In the aripiprazole and placebo groups more aversive than neutral events were avoided. Accordingly, the task-related BOLD-fMRI response in the mesolimbic motivational system was diminished in the haloperidol group compared to the placebo group, particularly in the ventral striatum, whereas the aripiprazole group showed task-related activations intermediate of the placebo and haloperidol groups. The current results show differential effects on brain function by aripiprazole and haloperidol, probably related to altered DA transmission. This supports the use of pharmacological fMRI to study antipsychotic properties in humans.

  3. Dynamic MRI-based computer aided diagnostic systems for early detection of kidney transplant rejection: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostapha, Mahmoud; Khalifa, Fahmi; Alansary, Amir; Soliman, Ahmed; Gimel'farb, Georgy; El-Baz, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    Early detection of renal transplant rejection is important to implement appropriate medical and immune therapy in patients with transplanted kidneys. In literature, a large number of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) systems using different image modalities, such as ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide imaging, have been proposed for early detection of kidney diseases. A typical CAD system for kidney diagnosis consists of a set of processing steps including: motion correction, segmentation of the kidney and/or its internal structures (e.g., cortex, medulla), construction of agent kinetic curves, functional parameter estimation, diagnosis, and assessment of the kidney status. In this paper, we survey the current state-of-the-art CAD systems that have been developed for kidney disease diagnosis using dynamic MRI. In addition, the paper addresses several challenges that researchers face in developing efficient, fast and reliable CAD systems for the early detection of kidney diseases.

  4. A study on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based radiation treatment planning of intracranial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, T.; Jans, H.-S.; Pervez, N.; Stavrev, P.; Fallone, B. G.

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning procedure for intracranial lesions. The method relies on (a) distortion correction of raw magnetic resonance (MR) images by using an adaptive thresholding and iterative technique, (b) autosegmentation of head structures relevant to dosimetric calculations (scalp, bone and brain) using an atlas-based software and (c) conversion of MR images into computed tomography (CT)-like images by assigning bulk CT values to organ contours and dose calculations performed in Eclipse (Philips Medical Systems). Standard CT + MRI-based and MRI-only plans were compared by means of isodose distributions, dose volume histograms and several dosimetric parameters. The plans were also ranked by using a tumor control probability (TCP)-based technique for heterogeneous irradiation, which is independent of radiobiological parameters. For our 3 T Intera MRI scanner (Philips Medical Systems), we determined that the total maximum image distortion corresponding to a typical brain study was about 4 mm. The CT + MRI and MRI-only plans were found to be in good agreement for all patients investigated. Following our clinical criteria, the TCP-based ranking tool shows no significant difference between the two types of plans. This indicates that the proposed MRI-based treatment planning procedure is suitable for the radiotherapy of intracranial lesions.

  5. High performance MRI simulations of motion on multi-GPU systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MRI physics simulators have been developed in the past for optimizing imaging protocols and for training purposes. However, these simulators have only addressed motion within a limited scope. The purpose of this study was the incorporation of realistic motion, such as cardiac motion, respiratory motion and flow, within MRI simulations in a high performance multi-GPU environment. Methods Three different motion models were introduced in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging SIMULator (MRISIMUL) of this study: cardiac motion, respiratory motion and flow. Simulation of a simple Gradient Echo pulse sequence and a CINE pulse sequence on the corresponding anatomical model was performed. Myocardial tagging was also investigated. In pulse sequence design, software crushers were introduced to accommodate the long execution times in order to avoid spurious echoes formation. The displacement of the anatomical model isochromats was calculated within the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) kernel for every timestep of the pulse sequence. Experiments that would allow simulation of custom anatomical and motion models were also performed. Last, simulations of motion with MRISIMUL on single-node and multi-node multi-GPU systems were examined. Results Gradient Echo and CINE images of the three motion models were produced and motion-related artifacts were demonstrated. The temporal evolution of the contractility of the heart was presented through the application of myocardial tagging. Better simulation performance and image quality were presented through the introduction of software crushers without the need to further increase the computational load and GPU resources. Last, MRISIMUL demonstrated an almost linear scalable performance with the increasing number of available GPU cards, in both single-node and multi-node multi-GPU computer systems. Conclusions MRISIMUL is the first MR physics simulator to have implemented motion with a 3D large computational load on a single computer

  6. Towards systems neuroscience of ADHD: A meta-analysis of 55 fMRI studies

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Samuele; Kelly, Clare; Chabernaud, Camille; Proal, Erika; Di Martino, Adriana; Milham, Michael P.; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Objective To perform a comprehensive meta-analysis of task-based functional MRI studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Method PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, Web of Science, ERIC, CINHAL, and NeuroSynth were searched for studies published through 06/30/2011. Significant differences in activation of brain regions between individuals with ADHD and comparisons were detected using activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis (p<0.05, corrected). Dysfunctional regions in ADHD were related to seven reference neuronal systems. We performed a set of meta-analyses focused on age groups (children; adults), clinical characteristics (history of stimulant treatment; presence of psychiatric comorbidities), and specific neuropsychological tasks (inhibition; working memory; vigilance/attention). Results Fifty-five studies were included (39 in children, 16 in adults). In children, hypoactivation in ADHD vs. comparisons was found mostly in systems involved in executive functions (frontoparietal network) and attention (ventral attentional network). Significant hyperactivation in ADHD vs. comparisons was observed predominantly within the default, ventral attention, and somatomotor networks. In adults, ADHD-related hypoactivation was predominant in the frontoparietal system, while ADHD-related hyperactivation was present in the visual, dorsal attention, and default networks. Significant ADHD-related dysfunction largely reflected task features and was detected even in the absence of comorbid mental disorders or history of stimulant treatment. Conclusions A growing literature provides evidence of ADHD-related dysfunction within multiple neuronal systems involved in higher-level cognitive functions but also in sensorimotor processes, including the visual system, and in the default network. This meta-analytic evidence extends early models of ADHD pathophysiology focused on prefrontal-striatal circuits. PMID:22983386

  7. Co-Registration of MEG and ULF MRI using a 7 channel low-Tc SQUID system

    SciTech Connect

    Magnelind, Per E; Sandin, Jan H; Volegov, Petr L; Matlashov, Andrei N; Owens, Tuba; Gomez, John J; Espy, Michelle A

    2010-01-01

    In human brain imaging, e.g. pre-surgical mapping, it is highly desired to obtain images with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, no single imaging device is capable of producing both a high spatial resolution anatomical image and a high temporal resolution functional image. During the last couple of years significant efforts have been directed towards magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in fields comparable to the Earth's field, i.e. microtesla fields, or lower fields. The fields in this range are called ultra-low fields (ULF). Interestingly, the idea of magnetic resonance at microtesla fields is more than 50 years old. In ULF MR it is essential to use pre-polarization to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal from the precessing spins, since the magnetization from the measurement field alone is very small. Even with the present level of prepolarization the ULF images are not as highly resolved as their high-field counterparts. By using a 7 channel system equipped with low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) to perform both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG), it is possible to coregister a lower resolution ULF MR image and an MEG image obtained during one run. Thereby, the MEG data is aligned to the ULF MR image after performing a calibration run with a phantom. The ULF MR image can then be used to align the MEG data onto a high-field MR image. Recently, our group presented the first brain images obtained by ULF MRI. The MR imaging was combined with an MEG session performed a posteriori. The subject's head was moved in between the MRI run and the MEG run and no reference coils were used to quantify the translation. The main reason for the translation of the head was to improve the coverage of the auditory evoked response. In this paper, we report interleaved ULF MRI and MEG measurements co-registered in the same system.

  8. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  9. Design of a Teleoperated Needle Steering System for MRI-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Seifabadi, Reza; Iordachita, Iulian; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2012-12-31

    Accurate needle placement plays a key role in success of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy. During percutaneous interventions, the prostate gland rotates and deforms which may cause significant target displacement. In these cases straight needle trajectory is not sufficient for precise targeting. Although needle spinning and fast insertion may be helpful, they do not entirely resolve the issue. We propose robot-assisted bevel-tip needle steering under MRI guidance as a potential solution to compensate for the target displacement. MRI is chosen for its superior soft tissue contrast in prostate imaging. Due to the confined workspace of the MRI scanner and the requirement for the clinician to be present inside the MRI room during the procedure, we designed a MRI-compatible 2-DOF haptic device to command the needle steering slave robot which operates inside the scanner. The needle steering slave robot was designed to be integrated with a previously developed pneumatically actuated transperineal robot for MRI-guided prostate needle placement. We describe design challenges and present the conceptual design of the master and slave robots and the associated controller.

  10. Design of a Teleoperated Needle Steering System for MRI-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Seifabadi, Reza; Iordachita, Iulian; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Accurate needle placement plays a key role in success of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy. During percutaneous interventions, the prostate gland rotates and deforms which may cause significant target displacement. In these cases straight needle trajectory is not sufficient for precise targeting. Although needle spinning and fast insertion may be helpful, they do not entirely resolve the issue. We propose robot-assisted bevel-tip needle steering under MRI guidance as a potential solution to compensate for the target displacement. MRI is chosen for its superior soft tissue contrast in prostate imaging. Due to the confined workspace of the MRI scanner and the requirement for the clinician to be present inside the MRI room during the procedure, we designed a MRI-compatible 2-DOF haptic device to command the needle steering slave robot which operates inside the scanner. The needle steering slave robot was designed to be integrated with a previously developed pneumatically actuated transperineal robot for MRI-guided prostate needle placement. We describe design challenges and present the conceptual design of the master and slave robots and the associated controller. PMID:24649480

  11. Activation of Visuomotor Systems during Visually Guided Movements: A Functional MRI Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellermann, Jutta M.; Siegal, Joel D.; Strupp, John P.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-04-01

    The dorsal stream is a dominant visuomotor pathway that connects the striate and extrastriate cortices to posterior parietal areas. In turn, the posterior parietal areas send projections to the frontal primary motor and premotor areas. This cortical pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the transformation of a visual input into the appropriate motor output. In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the entire brain to determine the patterns of activation that occurred while subjects performed a visually guided motor task. In nine human subjects, fMRI data were acquired on a 4-T whole-body MR system equipped with a head gradient coil and a birdcage RF coil using aT*2-weighted EPI sequence. Functional activation was determined for three different tasks: (1) a visuomotor task consisting of moving a cursor on a screen with a joystick in relation to various targets, (2) a hand movement task consisting of moving the joystick without visual input, and (3) a eye movement task consisting of moving the eyes alone without visual input. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based activation maps of each subject were generated using period cross-correlation statistics. Subsequently, each subject's brain was normalized to Talairach coordinates, and the individual maps were compared on a pixel by pixel basis. Significantly activated pixels common to at least four out of six subjects were retained to construct the final functional image. The pattern of activation during visually guided movements was consistent with the flow of information from striate and extrastriate visual areas, to the posterior parietal complex, and then to frontal motor areas. The extensive activation of this network and the reproducibility among subjects is consistent with a role for the dorsal stream in transforming visual information into motor behavior. Also extensively activated were the medial and lateral cerebellar structures, implicating the cortico

  12. Dopaminergic system and dream recall: An MRI study in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    De Gennaro, Luigi; Lanteri, Olimpia; Piras, Fabrizio; Scarpelli, Serena; Assogna, Francesca; Ferrara, Michele; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the role of the dopamine system [i.e., subcortical-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network] in dreaming, by studying patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) as a model of altered dopaminergic transmission. Subcortical volumes and cortical thickness were extracted by 3T-MR images of 27 PD patients and 27 age-matched controls, who were asked to fill out a dream diary upon morning awakening for one week. PD patients do not substantially differ from healthy controls with respect to the sleep, dream, and neuroanatomical measures. Multivariate correlational analyses in PD patients show that dopamine agonist dosage is associated to qualitatively impoverished dreams, as expressed by lower bizarreness and lower emotional load values. Visual vividness (VV) of their dream reports positively correlates with volumes of both the amygdalae and with thickness of the left mPFC. Emotional load also positively correlates with hippocampal volume. Beside the replication of our previous finding on the role of subcortical nuclei in dreaming experience of healthy subjects, this represents the first evidence of a specific role of the amygdala-mPFC dopaminergic network system in dream recall. The association in PD patients between higher dopamine agonist dosages and impoverished dream reports, however, and the significant correlations between VV and mesolimbic regions, however, provide an empirical support to the hypothesis that a dopamine network plays a key role in dream generation. The causal relation is however precluded by the intrinsic limitation of assuming the dopamine agonist dosage as a measure of the hypodopaminergic state in PD. Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Self-gated radial MRI for respiratory motion compensation on hybrid PET/MR systems.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Robert; Fürst, Sebastian; Dregely, Isabel; Forman, Christoph; Hutter, Jana Maria; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Nekolla, Stephan; Kiefer, Berthold; Schwaiger, Markus; Hornegger, Joachim; Block, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Accurate localization and uptake quantification of lesions in the chest and abdomen using PET imaging is challenging due to the respiratory motion during the exam. The advent of hybrid PET/MR systems offers new ways to compensate for respiratory motion without exposing the patient to additional radiation. The use of self-gated reconstructions of a 3D radial stack-of-stars GRE acquisition is proposed to derive a high-resolution MRI motion model. The self-gating signal is used to perform respiratory binning of the simultaneously acquired PET raw data. Matching mu-maps are generated for every bin, and post-reconstruction registration is performed in order to obtain a motion-compensated PET volume from the individual gates. The proposed method is demonstrated in-vivo for three clinical patients. Motion-corrected reconstructions are compared against ungated and gated PET reconstructions. In all cases, motion-induced blurring of lesions in the liver and lung was substantially reduced, without compromising SNR as it is the case for gated reconstructions.

  14. Application of extracellular gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents and the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Heverhagen, J T; Krombach, G A; Gizewski, E

    2014-07-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious, sometimes fatal disease. Findings in recent years have shown that a causal association between gadolinium containing contrast media and NSF is most likely. Therefore, the regulatory authorities have issued guidelines on the use of gadolinium-containing contrast media which have reduced the number of new cases of NSF to almost zero. However, it is for precisely this reason that the greatest care must still be taken to ensure that these guidelines are complied with. The most important factors are renal function, the quantity of gadolinium administered and coexisting diseases such as inflammation. All of these factors crucially influence the quantity of gadolinium released from the chelat in the body. This free gadolinium is thought to be the trigger for NSF. Other important factors are the stability of the gadolinium complex and furthermore the route of its elimination from the body. Partial elimination via the liver might be an additional protective mechanism. In conclusion, despite the NSF risk, contrast-enhanced MRI is a safe diagnostic procedure which can be used reliably and safely even in patients with severe renal failure, and does not necessarily have to be replaced by other methods.

  15. An iterative method for coil sensitivity estimation in multi-coil MRI systems.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qiang; Li, Zhaohui; Song, Kaikai; Li, Feng

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an iterative coil sensitivity estimation method for multi-coil MRI systems. The proposed method works with coil images in the magnitude image domain. It determines a region of support (RoS), a region being composed of the same type of tissues, by a region growing algorithm, which makes use of both intensities and intensity gradients of pixels. By repeating this procedure, it can determine multiple regions of support, which together cover most of the concerned image area. The union of these regions of support provides a rough estimate of the sensitivity of each coil through dividing the intensities of pixels by the average intensity inside every region of support. The obtained rough coil sensitivity estimate is further approached with the product of multiple low-order polynomials, rather than a single one. The product of these polynomials provides a smooth estimate of the sensitivity of each coil. With the obtained sensitivities of coils, it can produce a better reconstructed image, which determines more correct regions of support and yields preciser estimates of the sensitivities of coils. In other words, the method can be iteratively implemented to improve the estimation performance. The proposed method was verified through both simulated data and clinical data from different body parts. The experimental results confirm the superiority of our method to some conventional methods.

  16. Specificity of stimulus-evoked fMRI responses in the mouse: the influence of systemic physiological changes associated with innocuous stimulation under four different anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Aileen; Schlegel, Felix; Seuwen, Aline; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) in mice has become an attractive tool for mechanistic studies, for characterizing models of human disease, and for evaluation of novel therapies. Yet, controlling the physiological state of mice is challenging, but nevertheless important as changes in cardiovascular parameters might affect the hemodynamic readout which constitutes the basics of the fMRI signal. In contrast to rats, fMRI studies in mice report less robust brain activation of rather widespread character to innocuous sensory stimulation. Anesthesia is known to influence the characteristics of the fMRI signal. To evaluate modulatory effects imposed by the anesthesia on stimulus-evoked fMRI responses, we compared blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) signal changes to electrical hindpaw stimulation using the four commonly used anesthetics isoflurane, medetomidine, propofol and urethane. fMRI measurements were complemented by assessing systemic physiological parameters throughout the experiment. Unilateral stimulation of the hindpaw elicited widespread fMRI responses in the mouse brain displaying a bilateral pattern irrespective of the anesthetic used. Analysis of magnitude and temporal profile of BOLD and CBV signals indicated anesthesia-specific modulation of cerebral hemodynamic responses and differences observed for the four anesthetics could be largely explained by their known effects on animal physiology. Strikingly, independent of the anesthetic used our results reveal that fMRI responses are influenced by stimulus-induced cardiovascular changes, which indicate an arousal response, even to innocuous stimulation. This may mask specific fMRI signal associated to the stimulus. Hence, studying the processing of peripheral input in mice using fMRI techniques constitutes a major challenge and adapted paradigms and/or alternative fMRI readouts should also be considered when studying sensory processing in mice.

  17. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  18. Safety of active implantable devices during MRI examinations: a finite element analysis of an implantable pump.

    PubMed

    Büchler, Philippe; Simon, Anne; Burger, Jürgen; Ginggen, Alec; Crivelli, Rocco; Tardy, Yanik; Luechinger, Roger; Olsen, Sigbjørn

    2007-04-01

    The goal of this study was to propose a general numerical analysis methodology to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-safety of active implants. Numerical models based on the finite element (FE) technique were used to estimate if the normal operation of an active device was altered during MRI imaging. An active implanted pump was chosen to illustrate the method. A set of controlled experiments were proposed and performed to validate the numerical model. The calculated induced voltages in the important electronic components of the device showed dependence with the MRI field strength. For the MRI radiofrequency fields, significant induced voltages of up to 20 V were calculated for a 0.3T field-strength MRI. For the 1.5 and 3.0OT MRIs, the calculated voltages were insignificant. On the other hand, induced voltages up to 11 V were calculated in the critical electronic components for the 3.0T MRI due to the gradient fields. Values obtained in this work reflect to the worst case situation which is virtually impossible to achieve in normal scanning situations. Since the calculated voltages may be removed by appropriate protection circuits, no critical problems affecting the normal operation of the pump were identified. This study showed that the proposed methodology helps the identification of the possible incompatibilities between active implants and MR imaging, and can be used to aid the design of critical electronic systems to ensure MRI-safety.

  19. Experimental MRI-SPECT insert system with Hybrid Semiconductor detectors Timepix for MR animal scanner Bruker 47/20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajicek, J.; Burian, M.; Soukup, P.; Novak, V.; Macko, M.; Jakubek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Multimodal medical imaging based on Magnetic Resonance is mainly combinated with one of the scintigraphic method like PET or SPECT. These methods provide functional information whereas magnetic resonance imaging provides high spatial resolution of anatomical information or complementary functional information. Fusion of imaging modalities allows researchers to obtain complimentary information in a single measurement. The combination of MRI with SPECT is still relatively new and challenging in many ways. The main complication of using SPECT in MRI systems is the presence of a high magnetic field therefore (ferro)magnetic materials have to be eliminated. Furthermore the application of radiofrequency fields within the MR gantry does not allow for the use of conductive structures such as the common heavy metal collimators. This work presents design and construction of an experimental MRI-SPECT insert system and its initial tests. This unique insert system consists of an MR-compatible SPECT setup with CdTe pixelated sensors Timepix tungsten collimators and a radiofrequency coil. Measurements were performed on a gelatine and tissue phantom with an embedded radioisotopic source (57Co 122 keV γ ray) inside the RF coil by the Bruker BioSpec 47/20 (4.7 T) MR animal scanner. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  20. A motorized ultrasound system for MRI-ultrasound fusion guided prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: This study presents MoTRUS, a motorized transrectal ultrasound system, to enable remote navigation of a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe during da Vinci assisted prostatectomy. MoTRUS not only provides a stable platform to the ultrasound probe, but also allows the physician to navigate it remotely while sitting on the da Vinci console. This study also presents phantom feasibility study with the goal being intraoperative MRI-US image fusion capability to bring preoperative MR images to the operating room for the best visualization of the gland, boundaries, nerves, etc. Method: A two degree-of-freedom probe holder is developed to insert and rotate a bi-plane transrectal ultrasound transducer. A custom joystick is made to enable remote navigation of MoTRUS. Safety features have been considered to avoid inadvertent risks (if any) to the patient. Custom design software has been developed to fuse pre-operative MR images to intraoperative ultrasound images acquired by MoTRUS. Results: Remote TRUS probe navigation was evaluated on a patient after taking required consents during prostatectomy using MoTRUS. It took 10 min to setup the system in OR. MoTRUS provided similar capability in addition to remote navigation and stable imaging. No complications were observed. Image fusion was evaluated on a commercial prostate phantom. Electromagnetic tracking was used for the fusion. Conclusions: Motorized navigation of the TRUS probe during prostatectomy is safe and feasible. Remote navigation provides physician with a more precise and easier control of the ultrasound image while removing the burden of manual manipulation of the probe. Image fusion improved visualization of the prostate and boundaries in a phantom study.

  1. Mry, a trans-acting positive regulator of the M protein gene of Streptococcus pyogenes with similarity to the receptor proteins of two-component regulatory systems.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Casal, J; Caparon, M G; Scott, J R

    1991-01-01

    In the Streptococcus pyogenes M6 strain D471, an insertion of the conjugative transposon Tn916 into a region 2 kb upstream of the promoter of emm6 (the structural gene for the M protein) rendered the strain M negative (M. G. Caparon and J. R. Scott, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:8677-8681, 1987). In the present work, we show that this insertion mutation, mry-1, is 244 bp upstream of an open reading frame encoding a protein we call Mry. This protein is visible on a gel after transcription and translation in vitro. We have developed a technique for complementation analysis in S. pyogenes and have used it to show that the wild-type mry gene is dominant to two mutant alleles. This dominance indicates that Mry acts in trans as a positive regulator of the emm6 gene. The translated DNA sequence of mry has two regions of similarity to the motif common to the receptor protein of two-component regulatory systems. In addition, the N terminus of Mry has two regions resembling a helix-turn-helix motif. Mry does not appear to be a global regulator of virulence determinants in the group A streptococcus because there is no effect of the mry-1 mutation on production of the hyaluronic acid capsule or streptokinase. Images PMID:1849511

  2. Effect of insulating layer material on RF-induced heating for external fixation system in 1.5 T MRI system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Kainz, Wolfgang; Qian, Songsong; Wu, Wen; Chen, Ji

    2014-09-01

    The radio frequency (RF)-induced heating is a major concern when patients with medical devices are placed inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. In this article, numerical studies are applied to investigate the potentials of using insulated materials to reduce the RF heating for external fixation devices. It is found that by changing the dielectric constant of the insulation material, the RF-induced heating at the tips of devices can be altered. This study indicates a potential technique of developing external fixation device with low MRI RF heating.

  3. Monitoring fractional anisotropy in developing rabbit brain using MR diffusion tensor imaging at 3T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jao, Jo-Chi; Yang, Yu-Ting; Hsiao, Chia-Chi; Chen, Po-Chou

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factional anisotropy (FA) in various regions of developing rabbit brain using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR DTI) at 3 T. A whole-body clinical MR imaging (MRI) scanner with a 15-channel high resolution knee coil was used. An echo-planar-imaging (EPI)-DTI pulse sequence was performed. Five 5 week-old New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits underwent MRI once per week for 24 weeks. After scanning, FA maps were obtained. ROIs (regions of interests) in the frontal lobe, parietal & temporal lobe, and occipital lobe were measured. FA changes with time were evaluated with a linear regression analysis. The results show that the FA values in all lobes of the brain increased linearly with age. The ranking of FA values was FA(frontal lobe) < FA(parietal & temporal lobe) > FA(occipital lobe). There was significant difference (p < 0.05) among these lobes. FA values are associated with the nerve development and brain functions. The FA change rate could be a biomarker to monitor the brain development. Understanding the FA values of various lobes during development could provide helpful information to diagnosis the abnormal syndrome earlier and have a better treatment and prognosis. This study established a brain MR-DTI protocol for rabbits to investigate the brain anatomy during development using clinical MRI. This technique can be further applied to the pre-clinical diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and follow-up of brain lesions.

  4. WE-G-17A-09: Novel Magnetic Shielding Design for Inline and Perpendicular Integrated 6 MV Linac and 1.0 T MRI Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Ma, B; Kuang, Y; Diao, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The influence of fringe magnetic fields delivered by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the beam generation and transportation in Linac is still a major challenge for the integration of linear accelerator and MRI (Linac-MRI). In this study, we investigated an optimal magnetic shielding design for Linac-MRI and further characterized the beam trajectory in electron gun. Methods: Both inline and perpendicular configurations were analyzed in this study. The configurations, comprising a Linac-MRI with a 100cm SAD and an open 1.0 T superconductive magnet, were simulated by the 3D finite element method (FEM). The steel shielding around the Linac was included in the 3D model, the thickness of which was varied from 1mm to 20mm, and magnetic field maps were acquired with and without additional shielding. The treatment beam trajectory in electron gun was evaluated using OPERA 3d SCALA with and without shielding cases. Results: When Linac was not shielded, the uniformity of diameter sphere volume (DSV) (30cm) was about 5 parts per million (ppm) and the fringe magnetic fields in electron gun were more than 0.3 T. With shielding, the magnetic fields in electron gun were reduced to less than 0.01 T. For the inline configuration, the radial magnetic fields in the Linac were about 0.02T. A cylinder steel shield used (5mm thick) altered the uniformity of DSV to 1000 ppm. For the perpendicular configuration, the Linac transverse magnetic fields were more than 0.3T, which altered the beam trajectory significantly. A 8mm-thick cylinder steel shield surrounding the Linac was used to compensate the output losses of Linac, which shifted the magnetic fields' uniformity of DSV to 400 ppm. Conclusion: For both configurations, the Linac shielding was used to ensure normal operation of the Linac. The effect of magnetic fields on the uniformity of DSV could be modulated by the shimming technique of the MRI magnet. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  5. Visual Cortex Plasticity Following Peripheral Damage To The Visual System: fMRI Evidence.

    PubMed

    Lemos, João; Pereira, Daniela; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Over the last two decades, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful research method to investigate cortical visual plasticity. Abnormal fMRI response patterns have been occasionally detected in the visually deprived cortex of patients with bilateral retinal diseases. Controversy remains whether these observations indicate structural reorganization of the visual cortex or unmasking of previously silent cortico-cortical connections. In optic nerve diseases, there is weak evidence showing that early visual cortex seems to lack reorganization, while higher-order visual areas undergo plastic changes which may contribute to optimise visual function. There is however accumulating imaging evidence demonstrating trans-synaptic degeneration of the visual cortex in patients with disease of the anterior visual pathways. This may preclude the use of restorative treatments in these patients. Here, we review and update the body of fMRI evidence on visual cortical plasticity.

  6. Dense, shape‐optimized posterior 32‐channel coil for submillimeter functional imaging of visual cortex at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Grigorov, Filip; van der Kouwe, Andre J.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Keil, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Functional neuroimaging of small cortical patches such as columns is essential for testing computational models of vision, but imaging from cortical columns at conventional 3T fields is exceedingly difficult. By targeting the visual cortex exclusively, we tested whether combined optimization of shape, coil placement, and electronics would yield the necessary gains in signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR) for submillimeter visual cortex functional MRI (fMRI). Method We optimized the shape of the housing to a population‐averaged atlas. The shape was comfortable without cushions and resulted in the maximally proximal placement of the coil elements. By using small wire loops with the least number of solder joints, we were able to maximize the Q factor of the individual elements. Finally, by planning the placement of the coils using the brain atlas, we were able to target the arrangement of the coil elements to the extent of the visual cortex. Results The combined optimizations led to as much as two‐fold SNR gain compared with a whole‐head 32‐channel coil. This gain was reflected in temporal SNR as well and enabled fMRI mapping at 0.75 mm resolutions using a conventional GRAPPA‐accelerated gradient echo echo planar imaging. Conclusion Integrated optimization of shape, electronics, and element placement can lead to large gains in SNR and empower submillimeter fMRI at 3T. Magn Reson Med 76:321–328, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26218835

  7. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil's microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1(+) near-field with the trapezoidal shape.

  8. Magnetic microparticle steering within the constraints of an MRI system: proof of concept of a novel targeting approach.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Martel, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a magnetic microparticle steering approach that relies on improved gradient coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems. A literature review exposes the motivation and advantages of this approach and leads to a description of the requirements for a set of dedicated steering gradient coils in comparison to standard imaging coils. An experimental set-up was developed to validate the mathematical models and the hypotheses arising from this targeting modality. Magnetite Fe(3)O(4) microparticles (dia. 10.9 microm) were steered in a Y-shaped 100 microm diameter microchannel between a Maxwell pair (dB/dz = 443 mT/m) located in the center of an MRI bore with 0.525 m/s mean fluid velocity (ten times faster than in arterioles with same diameter). Experimental results based on the percentage of particles retrieved at the targeted outlet show that the mathematical models developed provide an order of magnitude estimate of the magnetic gradient strengths required. Furthermore, these results establish a proof of concept of microparticle steering using magnetic gradients within an MRI bore for applications in the human cardiovascular system.

  9. Design and implementation of a simple multinuclear MRI system for ultra high-field imaging of animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hoon; Ha, YongHyun; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Felder, Jörg; Möllenhoff, Klaus; Shah, N. Jon

    2016-12-01

    Non-proton MRI has recently garnered gathering interest with the increased availability of ultra high-field MRI system. Assuming the availability of a broadband RF amplifier, performing multinuclear MR experiments essentially requires additional hardware, such as an RF resonator and a T/R switch for each nucleus. A double- or triple-resonant RF probe is typically constructed using traps or PIN-diode circuits, but this approach degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality compared to a single-resonant coil and this is a limiting factor. In this work, we have designed the required hardware for multinuclear MR imaging experiments employing six single-resonant coil sets and a purpose-built animal bed; these have been implemented into a home-integrated 9.4 T preclinical MRI scanner. System capabilities are demonstrated by distinguishing concentration differences and sensitivity of X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy without SNR penalty for any nuclei, no subject interruption and no degradation of the static shim conditions.

  10. An open-access, very-low-field MRI system for posture-dependent 3He human lung imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, L. L.; Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2008-08-01

    We describe the design and operation of an open-access, very-low-field, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system for in vivo hyperpolarized 3He imaging of the human lungs. This system permits the study of lung function in both horizontal and upright postures, a capability with important implications in pulmonary physiology and clinical medicine, including asthma and obesity. The imager uses a bi-planar B0 coil design that produces an optimized 65 G (6.5 mT) magnetic field for 3He MRI at 210 kHz. Three sets of bi-planar coils produce the x, y, and z magnetic field gradients while providing a 79-cm inter-coil gap for the imaging subject. We use solenoidal Q-spoiled RF coils for operation at low frequencies, and are able to exploit insignificant sample loading to allow for pre-tuning/matching schemes and for accurate pre-calibration of flip angles. We obtain sufficient SNR to acquire 2D 3He images with up to 2.8 mm resolution, and present initial 2D and 3D 3He images of human lungs in both supine and upright orientations. 1H MRI can also be performed for diagnostic and calibration reasons.

  11. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil’s microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1+ near-field with the trapezoidal shape. PMID:25892746

  12. An Open-Access, Very-Low-Field MRI System for Posture-Dependent 3He Human Lung Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, L. L.; Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of an open-access, very-low-field, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system for in-vivo hyperpolarized 3He imaging of the human lungs. This system permits the study of lung function in both horizontal and upright postures, a capability with important implications in pulmonary physiology and clinical medicine, including asthma and obesity. The imager uses a bi-planar B0 coil design that produces an optimized 65 G (6.5 mT) magnetic field for 3He MRI at 210 kHz. Three sets of bi-planar coils produce the x, y, and z magnetic field gradients while providing a 79-cm inter-coil gap for the imaging subject. We use solenoidal Q-spoiled RF coils for operation at low frequencies, and are able to exploit insignificant sample loading to allow for pre-tuning/matching schemes and for accurate pre-calibration of flip angles. We obtain sufficient SNR to acquire 2D 3He images with up to 2.8 mm resolution, and present initial 2D and 3D 3He images of human lungs in both supine and upright orientations. 1H MRI can also be performed for diagnostic and calibration reasons. PMID:18550402

  13. Breast dosimetry in transverse and longitudinal field MRI-Linac radiotherapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, S. R.; Esmaeeli, A. D.; Pouladian, M.; Sardari, D.; Bagheri, S.; Monfared, A. S.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In the framework of developing the integration of a MRI-Linac system, configurations of MRI-Linac units were simulated in order to improve the dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using transverse and longitudinal magnetic field geometries of Lorentz force for both medial and lateral tangential fields. Methods: In this work, the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized to compare dose distributions in breast radiotherapy for Linac-MR systems in the transverse and longitudinal geometries within humanoid phantoms across a range of magnetic field strengths of 0.5 and 1.5 T. The dose increment due to scattering from the coils was investigated for both geometries as well. Computed tomography images of two patients were used for MC simulations. One patient had intact breast while the other was mastectomized. In the simulations, planning and methods of chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical planning. Results: In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the lateral spread of secondary electrons to the lung, heart, and contralateral organs, which reduced the mean dose of the ipsilateral lung and heart by means of 17.2% and 6% at 1.5 T, respectively. The transverse configuration exhibits a significant increase in tissue interface effects, which increased dose buildup in the entrance regions of the lateral and medial tangent beams to the planning target volume (PTV) and improved dose homogeneity within the PTV. The improved relative average homogeneity index for two patients to the PTV at magnetic field strength of 1.5 T with respect to no magnetic field case evaluated was 11.79% and 34.45% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. In both geometries, the simulations show significant mean dose reductions in the contralateral breast and chest wall skin, respectively, by a mean of 16.6% and 24.9% at 0.5 T and 17.2% and 28.1% at 1.5 T in the transverse geometry, and 10.56% and 14.6% at 0.5 T and 11.3% and

  14. Comparison of Muscle BOLD Responses to Arterial Occlusion at 3T and 7T

    PubMed Central

    Towse, Theodore F.; Childs, Benjamin T.; Sabin, Shea A.; Bush, Emily C.; Elder, Christopher P.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of muscle BOLD (mBOLD) imaging at 7T by comparing the changes in R2* of muscle at 3 and 7T in response to a brief period of tourniquet-induced ischemia. Methods Eight subjects (3 male), aged 29.5 ± 6.1 years (mean ± standard deviation, SD), 167.0 ± 10.6 cm tall with a body mass of 62.0 ± 18.0 kg, participated in the study. Subjects reported to the lab on four separate occasions including a habituation session, two MRI scans, and in a subset of subjects, a session during which changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation were quantified using Doppler ultrasound (U/S) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) respectively. For statistical comparisons between 3T and 7T, R2* rate constants were calculated as R2* = 1/T2*. Results The mean pre-occlusion R2* value was greater at 7T than at 3T (60.16 ± 2.95 vs 35.17 ± 0.35 s−1 respectively, p <0.001). Also, the mean ΔR2*END and ΔR2*POST values were greater for 7T than for 3T (−2.36 ± 0.25 vs. −1.24 ± 0.39 s−1, respectively, Table 1). Conclusion Muscle BOLD contrast at 7T is as much as six-fold greater than at 3T. In addition to providing greater SNR and CNR, 7T mBOLD studies may offer further advantages in the form of greater sensitivity to pathological changes in the muscle microcirculation. PMID:25884888

  15. Identifying brain systems for gaze orienting during reading: fMRI investigation of the Landolt paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hillen, Rebekka; Günther, Thomas; Kohlen, Claudia; Eckers, Cornelia; van Ermingen-Marbach, Muna; Sass, Katharina; Scharke, Wolfgang; Vollmar, Josefine; Radach, Ralph; Heim, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Landolt reading paradigm was created in order to dissociate effects of eye movements and attention from lexical, syntactic, and sub-lexical processing. While previous eye-tracking and behavioral findings support the usefulness of the paradigm, it remains to be shown that the paradigm actually relies on the brain networks for occulomotor control and attention, but not on systems for lexical/syntactic/orthographic processing. Here, 20 healthy volunteers underwent fMRI scanning while reading sentences (with syntax) or unconnected lists of written stimuli (no syntax) consisting of words (with semantics) or pseudowords (no semantics). In an additional “Landolt reading” condition, all letters were replaced by closed circles, which should be scanned for targets (Landolt's rings) in a reading-like fashion from left to right. A conjunction analysis of all five conditions revealed the visual scanning network which involved bilateral visual cortex, premotor cortex, and superior parietal cortex, but which did not include regions for semantics, syntax, or orthography. Contrasting the Landolt reading condition with all other regions revealed additional involvement of the right superior parietal cortex (areas 7A/7P/7PC) and postcentral gyrus (area 2) involved in deliberate gaze shifting. These neuroimaging findings demonstrate for the first time that the linguistic and orthographic brain network can be dissociated from a pure gaze-orienting network with the Landolt paradigm. Consequently, the Landolt paradigm may provide novel insights into the contributions of linguistic and non-linguistic factors on reading failure e.g., in developmental dyslexia. PMID:23908615

  16. A canine model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head induced by MRI guided argon helium cryotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Huawu; Jiang, Honglei; Liu, Ming; Tian, Jing; Hu, Na; Sun, Shui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to identify the reliability of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) modeling established by MRI guided argon helium cryotherapy system in beagles. Methods: A total of 15 beagles were used to establish the ONFH model. The left femoral heads of the beagles received two cycles of argon helium freezing-thawing under MRI guidance and were considered as experimental group while the right femoral heads received only one cycle of argon helium freezing-thawing and were considered as the control group. X-ray, MRI, general shape and histological examinations were performed so as to identify the effect of modeling. Results: At 4 week after modeling, MRI showed obvious bilateral hip joint effusion and marked femoral head bone marrow high signal. At 8 week after surgery, abnormal signal appeared in bilateral femoral heads. T1WI showed irregular patchy low signal, T2WI showed irregular mixed signals and the joint capsule effusion showed long T1 and T2 changes. Twelve weeks after operation, T1WI showed a low signal strip with clear boundary and T2WI showed intermediate signal. The changes of the left femoral heads were significant while compared with those of the right sides. The lacunae rates of femoral heads in the experimental group at 4, 8, and 12 week after surgery (40.75 ± 3.77, 57.46 ± 4.01, 50.27 ± 2.98) were higher than those in control group (30.08 ± 3.61, 49.43 ± 2.82, 40.56 ± 2.73). Conclusion: Canine model of ONFH was successfully established using an argon helium cryotherapy system. PMID:26550205

  17. Auditory Verb Perception Recruits Motor Systems in the Developing Brain: An fMRI Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Karin Harman; Maouene, Josita

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated neural activation patterns during verb processing in children, using fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Preschool children (aged 4-6) passively listened to lists of verbs and adjectives while neural activation was measured. Findings indicated that verbs were processed differently than adjectives, as the verbs…

  18. Quantitative Clinical Evaluation of a Simultaneous PETI MRI Breast Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer D. J.; Schlyer, D.J.

    2013-04-03

    A prototype simultaneous PET-MRI breast scanner has been developed for conducting clinical studies with the goal of obtaining high resolution anatomical and functional information in the same scan which can lead to faster and better diagnosis, reduction of unwanted biopsies, and better patient care.

  19. Influence of Acoustic Overstimulation on the Central Auditory System: An Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Study.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Tomasz; Cieśla, Katarzyna; Rusiniak, Mateusz; Piłka, Adam; Lewandowska, Monika; Pluta, Agnieszka; Skarżyński, Henryk; Skarżyński, Piotr H

    2016-11-28

    BACKGROUND The goal of the fMRI experiment was to explore the involvement of central auditory structures in pathomechanisms of a behaviorally manifested auditory temporary threshold shift in humans. MATERIAL AND METHODS The material included 18 healthy volunteers with normal hearing. Subjects in the exposure group were presented with 15 min of binaural acoustic overstimulation of narrowband noise (3 kHz central frequency) at 95 dB(A). The control group was not exposed to noise but instead relaxed in silence. Auditory fMRI was performed in 1 session before and 3 sessions after acoustic overstimulation and involved 3.5-4.5 kHz sweeps. RESULTS The outcomes of the study indicate a possible effect of acoustic overstimulation on central processing, with decreased brain responses to auditory stimulation up to 20 min after exposure to noise. The effect can be seen already in the primary auditory cortex. Decreased BOLD signal change can be due to increased excitation thresholds and/or increased spontaneous activity of auditory neurons throughout the auditory system. CONCLUSIONS The trial shows that fMRI can be a valuable tool in acoustic overstimulation studies but has to be used with caution and considered complimentary to audiological measures. Further methodological improvements are needed to distinguish the effects of TTS and neuronal habituation to repetitive stimulation.

  20. Influence of Acoustic Overstimulation on the Central Auditory System: An Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolak, Tomasz; Cieśla, Katarzyna; Rusiniak, Mateusz; Piłka, Adam; Lewandowska, Monika; Pluta, Agnieszka; Skarżyński, Henryk; Skarżyński, Piotr H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of the fMRI experiment was to explore the involvement of central auditory structures in pathomechanisms of a behaviorally manifested auditory temporary threshold shift in humans. Material/Methods The material included 18 healthy volunteers with normal hearing. Subjects in the exposure group were presented with 15 min of binaural acoustic overstimulation of narrowband noise (3 kHz central frequency) at 95 dB(A). The control group was not exposed to noise but instead relaxed in silence. Auditory fMRI was performed in 1 session before and 3 sessions after acoustic overstimulation and involved 3.5–4.5 kHz sweeps. Results The outcomes of the study indicate a possible effect of acoustic overstimulation on central processing, with decreased brain responses to auditory stimulation up to 20 min after exposure to noise. The effect can be seen already in the primary auditory cortex. Decreased BOLD signal change can be due to increased excitation thresholds and/or increased spontaneous activity of auditory neurons throughout the auditory system. Conclusions The trial shows that fMRI can be a valuable tool in acoustic overstimulation studies but has to be used with caution and considered complimentary to audiological measures. Further methodological improvements are needed to distinguish the effects of TTS and neuronal habituation to repetitive stimulation. PMID:27893698

  1. Neuro-cognitive system dysfunction and symptom sets: A review of fMRI studies in youth with conduct problems.

    PubMed

    Blair, R J R; Veroude, K; Buitelaar, J K

    2016-10-26

    In this paper, we review fMRI work on neuro-cognitive systems that are considered to be dysfunctional in individuals with conduct problems (i.e., individuals with Conduct Disorder (CD), Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) or antisocial behavior without formal clinical diagnosis). These are: empathy, the acute threat response, reinforcement-based decision-making, response inhibition and the Default Mode Network. Evidence regarding the Default Mode Network is somewhat inconsistent and its functional role/the symptom sets consequent on its dysfunction remain underspecified. However, dysfunctions in the other four neuro-cognitive systems are associated with symptom sets seen in individuals with conduct problems.

  2. Simultaneous dual frequency 1H and 19F open coil imaging of arthritic rabbit knee at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Franklin D; Wallace, Kirk D; Schmieder, Anne H; Caruthers, Shelton D; Pham, Christine T N; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The combination of sensitive magnetic resonance techniques with a selective site-targeted nanoparticle contrast agent has a demonstrated utility for molecular imaging studies. By detecting a unique signature of the contrast agent, this approach can be employed to identify specific bio-molecular markers and observe cellular-level processes within a large and complex organism (e.g., in vivo rabbit). The objective of the present investigation was to design, fabricate and characterize a radio-frequency (RF) coil for the dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) simultaneous collection of both nuclei images in a 3T field, in order to facilitate studies of arthritic knee degradation in rabbits. The coil supports both transmit and receive modes. The supporting activities included: 1) establishing a technical database for calculating the required coil parameters, 2) selection of a favorable coil geometry, and 3) adaption of existing RF measurement techniques to the design, development and electrical evaluation of the coil. The coil is used in conjunction with a Philips Medical Systems clinical MRI scanner, requiring all RF simultaneous dual frequency ((1)H and (19)F) coils to operate in both transmit and receive modes. A commercial version of SPICE (simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis) was used to estimate significant operational parameters prior to fabricating the imaging coil. Excellent images were obtained with the fabricated coil and no operational problems were observed that would limit the use of other coil geometries and field strengths.

  3. [Experimental evaluation of the occupational exposure to static magnetic fields on a 3 T magnetic resonance scanner].

    PubMed

    Moro, Luca; Alabiso, Francesco; Parisoli, Francesco; Frigerio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The recent postponement until 31 October 2013 of the deadline for transposition of the EU Directive 2004/40/EC, concerning the minimum health requirementsfor the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields between 0 and 300 GHz, keeps on suspending the Italian law which was aimed to implement the EU regulations on the occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields, including those generated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) units. Waiting for the revision of the exposure limits proposed by the EU Directive taking into account results from new studies and evolution of knowledge, the time-weighted values of static magnetic field proposed by the Italian Ministry of Health (D.M 02/08/91) still survive as limits for worker's exposure. The comparison between the proposed thresholds and the time required to position patients allows to calculate how long the MRI staff can stay at different values of static magnetic field, i.e. the maximum workload of each worker. In order to evaluate more accurately how many time the members of MRI staff are near the magnet bore and the real value of worker's exposure to the static magnetic field during the handling of patients, a teslameter Metrolab THM1176-PDA was used. Personal exposure measurements on the radiologists and the radiographers who worked on a 3 T GE Healthcare Discovery 750 MR were carried out during the positioning of self-sufficient and collaborative patients. The sensor was worn at the chest level on the side that was nearest to the magnet bore. Results show wide variations occurring between individual working procedures concerning the handling of patients, especially during the initial position phase. The mean values of the time spent by radiographers inside the magnet room (B > 0.5 mT) to place the patient and to take him outside at the end of the exam were respectively 220 and 127 seconds. The mean value of the time spent by radiologists was 162 seconds when they had to insert a peripheral

  4. Understanding Intentions of Others Reflects Evoked Responses in the Human Mirror Neuron System: Evidence From Combined fMRI and EEG Repetition Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    analyzed in Cartool (version 3.32). Epochs of analysis were visually inspected for oculomotor (saccades, and blinks), muscles, and other artifacts...rendered on the MNI/McGill average standard brain as supplied by Cartool . Then transformation between the MNI coordinate system and that of Talairach and...Tournoux was performed with Cartool . Anatomical labeling was ascertained LONI. 4. RESULTS 3.1. Functional MRI results Functional MRI

  5. Estimation of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) of CO2 and liquid n-alkane systems using an improved MRI technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Song, Yongchen; Zhao, Yuechao; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-02-01

    Minimum miscible pressure (MMP) of gas and oil system is a key parameter for the injection system design of CO2 miscible flooding. Some industrial standard approaches such as the experiment using a rising bubble apparatus (RBA), the slim tube tests (STT), the pressure-density diagram (PDD), etc. have been applied for decades to determine the MMP of gas and oil. Some theoretical or experiential calculations of the MMP were also applied to the gas-oil miscible system. In the present work, an improved technique based on our previous research for the estimation of the MMP by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was proposed. This technique was then applied to the CO2 and n-alkane binary and ternary systems to observe the mixing procedure and to study the miscibility. MRI signal intensities, which represent the proton concentration of n-alkane in both the hydrocarbon rich phase and the CO2 rich phase, were plotted as a reference for determining the MMP. The accuracy of the MMP obtained by using this improved technique was enhanced comparing with the data obtained from our previous works. The results also show good agreement with other established techniques (such as the STT) in previous published works. It demonstrates increases of MMPs as the temperature rise from 20 °C to 37.8 °C. The MMPs of CO2 and n-alkane systems are also found to be proportional to the carbon number in the range of C10 to C14.

  6. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback.

    PubMed

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI sensor interface is integrated into an MRI robot control system. By leveraging the complementary features of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation, a pneumatically actuated haptic master robot is also developed to render force associated with needle placement interventions to the clinician. An aluminum load cell is implemented and calibrated to close the impedance control loop of the master robot. A force-position control algorithm is developed to control the hybrid actuated system. Teleoperated needle insertion is demonstrated under live MR imaging, where the slave robot resides in the scanner bore and the user manipulates the master beside the patient outside the bore. Force and position tracking results of the master-slave robot are demonstrated to validate the tracking performance of the integrated system. It has a position tracking error of 0.318mm and sine wave force tracking error of 2.227N.

  7. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI sensor interface is integrated into an MRI robot control system. By leveraging the complementary features of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation, a pneumatically actuated haptic master robot is also developed to render force associated with needle placement interventions to the clinician. An aluminum load cell is implemented and calibrated to close the impedance control loop of the master robot. A force-position control algorithm is developed to control the hybrid actuated system. Teleoperated needle insertion is demonstrated under live MR imaging, where the slave robot resides in the scanner bore and the user manipulates the master beside the patient outside the bore. Force and position tracking results of the master-slave robot are demonstrated to validate the tracking performance of the integrated system. It has a position tracking error of 0.318mm and sine wave force tracking error of 2.227N. PMID:25126446

  8. A multichannel speech enhancement method for functional MRI systems using a distributed microphone array.

    PubMed

    Milani, Ali A; Kannan, Govind; Panahi, Issa M S; Briggs, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Multichannel speech enhancement has been shown to be an effective method to decrease speech distortion introduced during speech enhancement, especially in environments like MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) which have a distributed noise source. However, these methods suffer from high computational complexity which makes them almost impractical. The use of subband filtering has been suggested to reduce this complexity but the performance of the existing subband methods deteriorate as the number of subbands increases. In this paper we introduce a new multichannel speech enhancement algorithm based on subband adaptive filtering that works for higher number of subbands at a lower complexity. The real-world experiments demonstrate the performance of the new scheme in an MRI room.

  9. Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2009-01-01

    A new gradiometer scheme uses middle loops as sensing elements in lowfield superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This design of a second order gradiometer increases its sensitivity and makes it more uniform, compared to the conventional side loop sensing scheme with a comparable matching SQUID. The space between the two middle loops becomes the imaging volume with the enclosing cryostat built accordingly.

  10. Feasibility study of contaminant detection for food with ULF-NMR/MRI system using HTS-SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Tsunaki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Abe, Takayuki; Hatta, Junichi; Tanaka, Saburo

    2013-11-01

    We have developed an ultra-low frequency (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system utilizing an HTS-SQUID for an application of contaminant detection in food and drink. In the system, a permanent magnet of 1.1 T was used to pre-polarize protons in a water sample. We measured NMR signals from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as stainless steel (SUS304), aluminum, and glass balls using the system. In the case that the contaminant was the SUS304 ball, the NMR signal intensity was reduced compared to that from the sample without the contaminant due to the remnant field of the contaminant. One-dimensional (1D) MRIs of the samples were also acquired to detect non-magnetic contaminants. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect various contaminants in foods.

  11. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana L.; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D.; Smart, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. Materials and Methods An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10–100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50–100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse’s temperature approached the set target. Conclusion The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality. PMID:27806062

  12. Real-Time Image Reconstruction and Display System for MRI Using a High-Speed Personal Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haishi, Tomoyuki; Kose, Katsumi

    1998-09-01

    A real-time NMR image reconstruction and display system was developed using a high-speed personal computer and optimized for the 32-bit multitasking Microsoft Windows 95 operating system. The system was operated at various CPU clock frequencies by changing the motherboard clock frequency and the processor/bus frequency ratio. When the Pentium CPU was used at the 200 MHz clock frequency, the reconstruction time for one 128 × 128 pixel image was 48 ms and that for the image display on the enlarged 256 × 256 pixel window was about 8 ms. NMR imaging experiments were performed with three fast imaging sequences (FLASH, multishot EPI, and one-shot EPI) to demonstrate the ability of the real-time system. It was concluded that in most cases, high-speed PC would be the best choice for the image reconstruction and display system for real-time MRI.

  13. Real-time image reconstruction and display system for MRI using a high-speed personal computer.

    PubMed

    Haishi, T; Kose, K

    1998-09-01

    A real-time NMR image reconstruction and display system was developed using a high-speed personal computer and optimized for the 32-bit multitasking Microsoft Windows 95 operating system. The system was operated at various CPU clock frequencies by changing the motherboard clock frequency and the processor/bus frequency ratio. When the Pentium CPU was used at the 200 MHz clock frequency, the reconstruction time for one 128 x 128 pixel image was 48 ms and that for the image display on the enlarged 256 x 256 pixel window was about 8 ms. NMR imaging experiments were performed with three fast imaging sequences (FLASH, multishot EPI, and one-shot EPI) to demonstrate the ability of the real-time system. It was concluded that in most cases, high-speed PC would be the best choice for the image reconstruction and display system for real-time MRI.

  14. SU-E-J-205: Dose Distribution Differences Caused by System Related Geometric Distortion in MRI-Guided Radiation Treatment System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, J; Wen, Z; Marshall, S; Court, L; Ibbott, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has superb soft tissue contrast but is also known for geometric distortions. The concerns and uncertainty about MRI’s geometric distortion have contributed to the hesitation of using only MRI for simulation in radiation therapy. There are two major categories of geometric distortion in MRI; system related and patient related. In this presentation, we studied the impact of system-related geometric distortion on dose distribution in a digital body phantom under an MR-Linac environment. Methods: Residual geometric distortion (after built-in geometric correction) was modeled based on phantom measurements of the system-related geometric distortions of a MRI scanner of a combined MR guided Radiation Therapy (MRgRT) system. A digital oval shaped phantom (40×25 cm) as well as one ellipsoid shaped tumor volume was created to simulate a simplified human body. The simulated tumor volume was positioned at several locations between the isocenter and the body surface. CT numbers in HUs that approximate soft tissue and tumor were assigned to the respective regions in the digital phantom. To study the effect of geometric distortion caused by system imperfections, an IMRT plan was optimized with the distorted image set with the B field. Dose distributions were re-calculated on the undistorted image set with the B field (as in MR-Linac). Results: The maximum discrepancies in both body contour and tumor boundary was less than 2 mm, which leads to small dose distribution change. For the target in the center, coverage was reduced from 98.8% (with distortion) to 98.2%; for the other peripheral target coverage was reduced from 98.4% to 95.9%. Conclusion: System related geometric distortions over the 40×25 area were within 2mm and the resulted dosimetric effects were minor for the two tumor locations in the phantom. Patient study will be needed for further investigation. The authors received a corporate research grant from Elekta.

  15. A low-cost and versatile system for projecting wide-field visual stimuli within fMRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Greco, V.; Frijia, F.; Mikellidou, K.; Montanaro, D.; Farini, A.; D’Uva, M.; Poggi, P.; Pucci, M.; Sordini, A.; Morrone, M. C.; Burr, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed and tested a custom-made magnetic-imaging-compatible visual projection system designed to project on a very wide visual field (~80°). A standard projector was modified with a coupling lens, projecting images into the termination of an image fiber. The other termination of the fiber was placed in the 3-T scanner room with a projection lens, which projected the images relayed by the fiber onto a screen over the head coil, viewed by a participant wearing magnifying goggles. To validate the system, wide-field stimuli were presented in order to identify retinotopic visual areas. The results showed that this low-cost and versatile optical system may be a valuable tool to map visual areas in the brain that process peripheral receptive fields. PMID:26092392

  16. A low-cost and versatile system for projecting wide-field visual stimuli within fMRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Greco, V; Frijia, F; Mikellidou, K; Montanaro, D; Farini, A; D'Uva, M; Poggi, P; Pucci, M; Sordini, A; Morrone, M C; Burr, D C

    2016-06-01

    We have constructed and tested a custom-made magnetic-imaging-compatible visual projection system designed to project on a very wide visual field (~80°). A standard projector was modified with a coupling lens, projecting images into the termination of an image fiber. The other termination of the fiber was placed in the 3-T scanner room with a projection lens, which projected the images relayed by the fiber onto a screen over the head coil, viewed by a participant wearing magnifying goggles. To validate the system, wide-field stimuli were presented in order to identify retinotopic visual areas. The results showed that this low-cost and versatile optical system may be a valuable tool to map visual areas in the brain that process peripheral receptive fields.

  17. An Open-Source Hardware and Software System for Acquisition and Real-Time Processing of Electrophysiology during High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, Patrick L.; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (< 0.6 uV p-p input noise), electromagnetic compatibility for MRI (tested up to 7 Tesla), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7 Tesla examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3 Tesla fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level. PMID:18761038

  18. Hybrid Adiabatic-Rectangular Pulse Train for Effective Saturation of Magnetization within the Whole Heart at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Oesingmann, Niels; McGorty, KellyAnne

    2009-01-01

    Uniform T1-weighting is a major challenge for first-pass cardiac perfusion MRI at 3T. Previously proposed adiabatic B1-insensitive rotation (BIR-4) pulse and standard and tailored pulse trains of three non-selective pulses have been important developments but each pulse has limitations at 3T. As an extension of the tailored pulse train, we developed a hybrid pulse train by synergistically combining two non-selective rectangular RF pulses and an adiabatic half-passage pulse, in order to achieve effective saturation of magnetization within the heart, while remaining within clinically acceptable specific absorption rate (SAR) limits. The standard pulse train, tailored pulse train, hybrid pulse train, and BIR-4 pulse train were evaluated through numerical, phantom, and in vivo experiments. Among the four saturation pulses, only the hybrid pulse train yielded residual magnetization < 2% of equilibrium magnetization in the heart, while remaining within clinically acceptable SAR limits for multi-slice first-pass cardiac perfusion MRI at 3T. PMID:19785021

  19. High-speed 3T MR spectroscopic imaging of prostate with flyback echo-planar encoding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Xu, Duan; Hurd, Ralph E; Kelley, Douglas A C; Pauly, John M; Kurhanewicz, John; Nelson, Sarah J; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2007-06-01

    Prostate MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) at 3T may provide two-fold higher spatial resolution over 1.5T, but this can result in longer acquisition times to cover the entire gland using conventional phase-encoding. In this study, flyback echo-planar readout trajectories were incorporated into a Malcolm Levitt's composite-pulse decoupling sequence (MLEV)-point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) to accelerate the acquisition of large array (16 x 16 x 8), high spatial (0.154 cm(3)) resolution MRSI data by eight-fold to just 8.5 minutes. Artifact free, high-quality MRSI data was obtained in nine prostate cancer patients. Easy data reconstruction and the robustness of the flyback echo-planar encoding make this technique particularly suitable for the clinical setting. The short acquisition time provided by this method reduces the 3T prostate MRI/MRSI exam time, allows longer repetition times, and/or allows the acquisition of additional MR acquisitions within the same exam.

  20. An Overdetermined System of Transform Equations in Support of Robust DCE-MRI Registration With Outlier Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Adam; Balter, James; Feng, Mary; Cao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative hepatic perfusion parameters derived by fitting dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liver to a pharmacokinetic model are prone to errors if the dynamic images are not corrected for respiratory motion by image registration. The contrast-induced intensity variations in pre- and postcontrast phases pose challenges for the accuracy of image registration. We propose an overdetermined system of transformation equations between the image volumes in the DCE-MRI series to achieve robust alignment. In this method, we register each volume to every other volume. From the transforms produced by all pairwise registrations, we constructed an overdetermined system of transform equations that was solved robustly by minimizing the L1/2-norm of the residuals. This method was evaluated on a set of 100 liver DCE-MRI examinations from 35 patients by examining the area under spikes appearing in the voxel time–intensity curves. The robust alignment procedure significantly reduced the area under intensity spikes compared with unregistered volumes (P<.001) and volumes registered to a single reference phase (P<.001). Our registration procedure provides a larger number of reliable time–intensity curve samples. The additional reliable samples in the precontrast baseline are important for calculating the postcontrast signal enhancement and thereby for converting intensity to contrast concentration. On the intensity ramp, retained samples help to better describe the uptake dynamics, providing a better foundation for parameter estimation. The presented method also simplifies the analysis of data sets with many patients by eliminating the need for manual intervention during registration.

  1. An MRI-compatible three-axis focused ultrasound system for performing drug delivery studies in small animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Chau, Anthony; Kukic, Aleksandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an MRI-compatible focused-ultrasound system for preclinical research in small animal models capable of delivering exposures with high spatial precision in a closed-bore clinical imager. A computer-controlled, non-magnetic, 3-axis positioning system was developed using ceramic actuators and linear encoders to position a focused-ultrasound transducer within a clinical MR scanner. Registration between ultrasound and MRI coordinates involves sonicating a tissue-mimicking ultrasound phantom and measuring the centroid of the thermal focal zone with MR thermometry. Linear distances of 5 cm with a positioning resolution of 0.1 mm were achieved for each axis. The system was operated successfully in MR imagers from different vendors at both 1.5 and 3.0 T, and simultaneous motion and imaging was possible without any mutual interference or imaging artifacts. Initial experiments involving opening of the blood-brain barrier at specific targets within the brain suggest a targeting accuracy of 0.4 mm.

  2. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  3. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  4. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the shoulder uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  5. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  6. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  7. A fully automated system for quantification of background parenchymal enhancement in breast DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ufuk Dalmiş, Mehmet; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Borelli, Cristina; Vreemann, Suzan; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) observed in breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been identified as an important biomarker associated with risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, we present a fully automated framework for quantification of BPE. We initially segmented fibroglandular tissue (FGT) of the breasts using an improved version of an existing method. Subsequently, we computed BPEabs (volume of the enhancing tissue), BPErf (BPEabs divided by FGT volume) and BPErb (BPEabs divided by breast volume), using different relative enhancement threshold values between 1% and 100%. To evaluate and compare the previous and improved FGT segmentation methods, we used 20 breast DCE-MRI scans and we computed Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values with respect to manual segmentations. For evaluation of the BPE quantification, we used a dataset of 95 breast DCE-MRI scans. Two radiologists, in individual reading sessions, visually analyzed the dataset and categorized each breast into minimal, mild, moderate and marked BPE. To measure the correlation between automated BPE values to the radiologists' assessments, we converted these values into ordinal categories and we used Spearman's rho as a measure of correlation. According to our results, the new segmentation method obtained an average DSC of 0.81 0.09, which was significantly higher (p<0.001) compared to the previous method (0.76 0.10). The highest correlation values between automated BPE categories and radiologists' assessments were obtained with the BPErf measurement (r=0.55, r=0.49, p<0.001 for both), while the correlation between the scores given by the two radiologists was 0.82 (p<0.001). The presented framework can be used to systematically investigate the correlation between BPE and risk in large screening cohorts.

  8. Segmentation of fat in MRI using a preparatory pair of rectangular RF pulses of opposite direction.

    PubMed

    Yee, Seonghwan

    2016-05-01

    A radiofrequency (RF) pulse-based MRI method is introduced as a novel fat (or water) segmentation method that, unlike the mostly used Dixon's method, does not depend on the echo times. A pair of rectangular RF pulses of opposite direction, when the duration of its rectangular pulse and the off-resonance of its carrier frequency are set to specific values, is proposed as a preparatory RF pulse to be used for the quantitative fat segmentation. The optimal duration of its rectangular pulse and its specific off-resonance were first determined theoretically. Then, such pair of rectangular pulses of opposite direction (PROD pulse) was applied in imaging a few phantoms and volunteers. During the imaging experiments, MRI images were dynamically acquired with the PROD pulse while its carrier frequency was varied in a predefined off-resonance range. By analyzing the dynamically acquired signal changes, the theoretical properties of the PROD pulse were confirmed and the utility of the PROD pulse for the fat segmentation was verified. All MRI scans were performed in a clinical 3T system. The PROD pulse, if the duration of each rectangular pulse was set to 1.66ms and its carrier frequency was set to a specific off-resonance (e.g. ±223.5Hz, or -670.5Hz) in 3T, was effective in optimally modulating MRI signals to be used for the fat-water segmentation. Therefore, the PROD pulse can successfully be used as a preparatory RF pulse in MRI to achieve effective fat (or water) segmentation in MRI.

  9. Whole-body MRI as an unconventional diagnostic tool in a pediatric patient with systemic infection

    PubMed Central

    Picco, Paolo; Pala, Giovanna; Rizzo, Francesca; Damasio, Beatrice; Buoncompagni, Antonella; Martini, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a tickborne infection usually manifesting as fever, malaise, cytopenia, spleen enlargement, and hepatitis. Herein, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with HGA whose whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed an unusual picture characterized by small, widespread punctuate millimetric nodules, hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on STIR sequences. This firstly reported finding may represent an alternative tool for identifying atypical infectious diseases. PMID:25535572

  10. Japan Meteorological Agency/Meteorological Research Institute-Coupled Prediction System version 1 (JMA/MRI-CPS1) for operational seasonal forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaya, Yuhei; Yasuda, Tamaki; Fujii, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Soga, Taizo; Mori, Hirotoshi; Hirai, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Ichiro; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimpo, Akihiko; Kamachi, Masafumi; Ose, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the operational seasonal prediction system of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the Japan Meteorological Agency/Meteorological Research Institute-Coupled Prediction System version 1 (JMA/MRI-CPS1), which was in operation at JMA during the period between February 2010 and May 2015. The predictive skill of the system was assessed with a set of retrospective seasonal predictions (reforecasts) covering 30 years (1981-2010). JMA/MRI-CPS1 showed reasonable predictive skill for the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, comparable to the skills of other state-of-the-art systems. The one-tiered approach adopted in JMA/MRI-CPS1 improved its overall predictive skills for atmospheric predictions over those of the two-tiered approach of the previous uncoupled system. For 3-month predictions with a 1-month lead, JMA/MRI-CPS1 showed statistically significant skills in predicting 500-hPa geopotential height and 2-m temperature in East Asia in most seasons; thus, it is capable of providing skillful seasonal predictions for that region. Furthermore, JMA/MRI-CPS1 was superior overall to the previous system for atmospheric predictions with longer (4-month) lead times. In particular, JMA/MRI-CPS1 was much better able to predict the Asian Summer Monsoon than the previous two-tiered system. This enhanced performance was attributed to the system's ability to represent atmosphere-ocean coupled variability over the Indian Ocean and the western North Pacific from boreal winter to summer following winter El Niño events, which in turn influences the East Asian summer climate through the Pacific-Japan teleconnection pattern. These substantial improvements obtained by using an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model underpin its success in providing more skillful seasonal forecasts on an operational basis.

  11. Neuroradiologic applications of dynamic MR angiography at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Hemant; Ivancevic, Marko K; Dudek, Nancy; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Geerts, Liesbeth; Hoogeveen, R; Mukherji, S K; Chenevert, Thomas L

    2009-02-01

    Four-dimensional time-resolved MR angiography (4D-MRA) using keyhole imaging techniques is a new method of performing contrastenhanced vascular imaging. Combining parallel imaging and keyhole imaging techniques, it is possible to obtain dynamic MRA scans up to 60 times faster, thereby achieving subsecond sampling of the contrast hemodynamics. Furthermore, imaging at 3 T gives higher signal, thus affording higher spatial resolution and allowing dynamic 3D MRA to approach the diagnostic performance of conventional digital subtraction angiography. This article presents the authors' clinical experience using 4D-MRA to evaluate various vascular abnormalities in the brain, spine, orbits, and neck at 3 T, demonstrates the imaging findings of this novel technique, and discusses its advantages and use in current neuroradiology practice.

  12. Neural systems underlying lexical competition: an eye tracking and fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Righi, Giulia; Blumstein, Sheila E; Mertus, John; Worden, Michael S

    2010-02-01

    The present study investigated the neural bases of phonological onset competition using an eye tracking paradigm coupled with fMRI. Eighteen subjects were presented with an auditory target (e.g., beaker) and a visual display containing a pictorial representation of the target (e.g., beaker), an onset competitor (e.g., beetle), and two phonologically and semantically unrelated objects (e.g., shoe, hammer). Behavioral results replicated earlier research showing increased looks to the onset competitor compared to the unrelated items. fMRI results showed that lexical competition induced by shared phonological onsets recruits both frontal structures and posterior structures. Specifically, comparison between competitor and no-competitor trials elicited activation in two nonoverlapping clusters in the left IFG, one located primarily within BA 44 and the other primarily located within BA 45, and one cluster in the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG) extending into the posterior superior temporal gyrus. These results indicate that the left IFG is sensitive to competition driven by phonological similarity and not only to competition among semantic/conceptual factors. Moreover, they indicate that the SMG is not only recruited in tasks requiring access to lexical form but is also recruited in tasks that require access to the conceptual representation of a word.

  13. Neural Systems Underlying Lexical Competition: An Eyetracking and fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Righi, Giulia; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Mertus, John; Worden, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the neural bases of phonological onset competition using an eye tracking paradigm coupled with fMRI. Eighteen subjects were presented with an auditory target (e.g. beaker) and a visual display containing a pictorial representation of the target (e.g. beaker), an onset competitor (e.g. beetle), and two phonologically and semantically unrelated objects (e.g. shoe, hammer). Behavioral results replicated earlier research showing increased looks to the onset competitor compared to the unrelated items. fMRI results showed that lexical competition induced by shared phonological onsets recruits both frontal structures and posterior structures. Specifically, comparison between competitor and no-competitor trials elicited activation in two non-overlapping clusters in the left IFG, one located primarily within BA 44 and the other primarily located within BA 45, and one cluster in the left supramarginal gyrus extending into the posterior-superior temporal gyrus. These results indicate that the left IFG is sensitive to competition driven by phonological similarity and not only to competition among semantic/conceptual factors. Moreover, they indicate that the SMG is not only recruited in tasks requiring access to lexical form but is also recruited in tasks that require access to the conceptual representation of a word. PMID:19301991

  14. A novel computer-aided diagnosis system for breast MRI based on feature selection and ensemble learning.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Li, Zhe; Chu, Jinghui

    2017-03-06

    Breast cancer is a common cancer among women. With the development of modern medical science and information technology, medical imaging techniques have an increasingly important role in the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, we propose an automated computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) framework for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The scheme consists of an ensemble of several machine learning-based techniques, including ensemble under-sampling (EUS) for imbalanced data processing, the Relief algorithm for feature selection, the subspace method for providing data diversity, and Adaboost for improving the performance of base classifiers. We extracted morphological, various texture, and Gabor features. To clarify the feature subsets' physical meaning, subspaces are built by combining morphological features with each kind of texture or Gabor feature. We tested our proposal using a manually segmented Region of Interest (ROI) data set, which contains 438 images of malignant tumors and 1898 images of normal tissues or benign tumors. Our proposal achieves an area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.9617, which outperforms most other state-of-the-art breast MRI CADx systems. Compared with other methods, our proposal significantly reduces the false-positive classification rate.

  15. Vaspin promotes 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Wu, Jine; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Liping; Han, Wenqi; Lv, Ying; Sun, Chaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Vaspin, a novel adipocyte factor secreted from visceral adipose tissues, is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and can regulate glucose and lipid metabolism, increase insulin sensitivity, and suppress inflammation; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Proliferation and maladaptive differentiation are important pathological mechanisms underlying obesity. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of vaspin on the proliferation and differentiation of preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells and to explore the likely mechanisms responsible for 3T3-L1 differentiation. Vaspin was added to cultured 3T3-L1 cells, and the differentiation of adipocytes was evaluated using Oil Red O staining. The AKT signaling pathway and specific differentiation factors related to the differentiation of preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells, peroxisome proliferator-activated γ and the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family, were evaluated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses during the early phase of differentiation. Additionally, adiponectin mRNA, interleukin-6 mRNA (IL-6 mRNA), and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) protein levels were measured in the differentiated adipocytes. The results indicated that vaspin promotes the intracellular accumulation of lipids and increases differentiation-related factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, C/EBPα, and free fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, vaspin (200 ng/mL) increased the mRNA and protein levels of C/EBPβ, peroxisome proliferator-activated γ, C/EBPα, and FABP4. Moreover, compared with the control, significantly smaller eight-day differentiated adipocytes were observed, and these cells exhibited decreased IL-6 mRNA and increased GLUT4 mRNA levels; these results also indicated the potential of vaspin to promote the insulin-mediated AKT signaling pathway during the early phase of differentiation. In conclusion

  16. Flagellated Magnetotactic Bacteria as Controlled MRI-trackable Propulsion and Steering Systems for Medical Nanorobots Operating in the Human Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Sylvain; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Lu, Zhao; Pouponneau, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Although nanorobots may play critical roles for many applications in the human body such as targeting tumoral lesions for therapeutic purposes, miniaturization of the power source with an effective onboard controllable propulsion and steering system have prevented the implementation of such mobile robots. Here, we show that the flagellated nanomotors combined with the nanometer-sized magnetosomes of a single Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) can be used as an effective integrated propulsion and steering system for devices such as nanorobots designed for targeting locations only accessible through the smallest capillaries in humans while being visible for tracking and monitoring purposes using modern medical imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Through directional and magnetic field intensities, the displacement speeds, directions, and behaviors of swarms of these bacterial actuators can be controlled from an external computer. PMID:19890435

  17. An MRI guided system for prostate laser ablation with treatment planning and multi-planar temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng; Agarwal, Harsh; Bernardo, Marcelino; Seifabadi, Reza; Turkbey, Baris; Partanen, Ari; Negussie, Ayele; Glossop, Neil; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is often over treated with standard treatment options which impact the patients' quality of life. Laser ablation has emerged as a new approach to treat prostate cancer while sparing the healthy tissue around the tumor. Since laser ablation has a small treatment zone with high temperature, it is necessary to use accurate image guidance and treatment planning to enable full ablation of the tumor. Intraoperative temperature monitoring is also desirable to protect critical structures from being damaged in laser ablation. In response to these problems, we developed a navigation platform and integrated it with a clinical MRI scanner and a side firing laser ablation device. The system allows imaging, image guidance, treatment planning and temperature monitoring to be carried out on the same platform. Temperature sensing phantoms were developed to demonstrate the concept of iterative treatment planning and intraoperative temperature monitoring. Retrospective patient studies were also conducted to show the clinical feasibility of the system.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of a low-frequency transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system in a primate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Livingstone, Margaret; Barış Top, Can; Sutton, Jonathan; Todd, Nick; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated thermal ablation and skull-induced heating with a 230 kHz transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) system in nonhuman primates. We evaluated real-time acoustic feedback and aimed to understand whether cavitation contributed to the heating and the lesion formation. In four macaques, we sonicated thalamic targets at acoustic powers of 34-560 W (896-7590 J). Tissue effects evaluated with MRI and histology were compared to MRI-based temperature and thermal dose measurements, acoustic emissions recorded during the experiments, and acoustic and thermal simulations. Peak temperatures ranged from 46 to 57 °C, and lesions were produced in 5/8 sonicated targets. A linear relationship was observed between the applied acoustic energy and both the focal and brain surface heating. Thermal dose thresholds were 15-50 cumulative equivalent minutes at 43 °C, similar to prior studies at higher frequencies. Histology was also consistent with earlier studies of thermal effects in the brain. The system successfully controlled the power level and maintained a low level of cavitation activity. Increased acoustic emissions observed in 3/4 animals occurred when the focal temperature rise exceeded approximately 16 °C. Thresholds for thermally-significant subharmonic and wideband emissions were 129 and 140 W, respectively, corresponding to estimated pressure amplitudes of 2.1 and 2.2 MPa. Simulated focal heating was consistent with the measurements for sonications without thermally-significant acoustic emissions; otherwise it was consistently lower than the measurements. Overall, these results suggest that the lesions were produced by thermal mechanisms. The detected acoustic emissions, however, and their association with heating suggest that cavitation might have contributed to the focal heating. Compared to earlier work with a 670 kHz TcMRgFUS system, the brain surface heating was substantially reduced and the focal heating was higher with this

  19. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  20. Preclinical MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound: A Review of Systems and Current Practices.

    PubMed

    Ellens, Nicholas P K; Partanen, Ari

    2017-01-01

    Effective preclinical research is a vital component in the development of MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) and its translation to clinic. In this review, we seek to outline the challenges at hand for effective preclinical research, survey different solutions, and underline best practices. Furthermore, we summarize efforts to build and characterize dedicated preclinical MRgFUS equipment, including lab prototypes and available commercial products. Finally, we discuss constraints and considerations specific to using clinical MRgFUS equipment in preclinical research. Specifically, we examine additional hardware that has been used to adapt clinical MRgFUS equipment to better position, constrain, and image preclinical subjects, as well as software solutions that have been used to extend the potential and capabilities of clinical devices.

  1. An accurate heart beat detection method in the EKG recorded in fMRI system.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung Suk; Chung, Jun-Young; Yoon, Hyo Woon; Park, HyunWook

    2007-01-01

    The simultaneous recording of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) provides an efficient signal for the high spatiotemporal brain mapping because each modality provides complementary information. The peak detection in the EEG signal measured in the MR scanner is necessary for removal of the ballistocardiac artifact. Especially, it would be affected by the quality of the EKG signal and the variation of the heart beat rate. Therefore, we propose the peak detection method using a K-teager energy operator (K-TEO) as well as further refinement processes in order to detect precise peaks. We applied this technique to the analysis of simulation waves with random noise and abrupt heat beat changes.

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  3. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  4. NOTE: MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Moman, Maaike R.; van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J.; Duiveman, Ed; van Schelven, Leonard J.; de Leeuw, Hendrik; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Moerland, Marinus A.

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible.

  5. MRI endoscopy using intrinsically localized probes

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, Shashank; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is traditionally performed with fixed externally applied gradient magnetic fields and is hence intrinsically locked to the laboratory frame of reference (FoR). Here a method for high-resolution MRI that employs active, catheter-based, tiny internal probes that utilize the spatial properties of the probe itself for localization is proposed and demonstrated at 3 T. Because these properties are intrinsic to the probe, they move with it, transforming MRI from the laboratory FoR to the FoR of the device itself, analogous to an endoscope. The “MRI endoscope” can utilize loop coils and loopless antennas with modified sensitivity, in combination with adiabatic excitation by the device itself, to restrict the MRI sensitivity to a disk-shaped plane a few mm thick. Excitation with the MRI endoscope limits the eddy currents induced in the sample to an excited volume whose size is orders of magnitude below that excited by a conventional body MRI coil. Heat testing shows maximum local temperature increases of <1 °C during MRI, within regulatory guidelines. The method is demonstrated in a kiwifruit, in intact porcine and rabbit aortas, and in an atherosclerotic human iliac artery specimen, with in-plane resolution as small as 80 μm and 1.5–5 mm slice thickness. PMID:19378751

  6. Osteogenic gene expression of murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells under cyclic tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, C. T.; Chen, C. C.; Cheong, U.-I.; Liu, S. L.; Huang, T. H.

    2014-08-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can promote cell proliferation. The remodeling ability of the tension side of orthodontic teeth affects post-orthodontic stability. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the osteogenic effects of LLLT on osteoblast-like cells treated with a simulated tension system that provides a mechanical tension regimen. Murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured in a Flexcell strain unit with programmed loads of 12% elongation at a frequency of 0.5 Hz for 24 and 48 h. The cultured cells were treated with a low-level diode laser using powers of 5 J and 10 J. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The expression of osteogenic genes (type I collagen (Col-1), osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), bone morphologic protein (BMP-2), and bone morphologic protein (BMP-4)) in MC3T3-E1 cells was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The proliferation rate of tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells under 5 J and 10 J LLLT increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05). Prominent mineralization of the MC3T3-E1 cells was visible using a von Kossa stain in the 5 J LLLT group. Osteogenic genes (Col-1, OC, OPG and BMP-2) were significantly expressed in the MC3T3-E1 cells treated with 5 J and 10 J LLLT (p < 0.05). LLLT in tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells showed synergistic osteogenic effects, including increases in cell proliferation and Col-1, OPN, OC, OPG and BMP-2 gene expression. LLLT might be beneficial for bone remodeling on the tension side of orthodontics.

  7. Standardized quantitative measurements of wrist cartilage in healthy humans using 3T magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zink, Jean-Vincent; Souteyrand, Philippe; Guis, Sandrine; Chagnaud, Christophe; Fur, Yann Le; Militianu, Daniela; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Guye, Maxime; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To quantify the wrist cartilage cross-sectional area in humans from a 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset and to assess the corresponding reproducibility. METHODS: The study was conducted in 14 healthy volunteers (6 females and 8 males) between 30 and 58 years old and devoid of articular pain. Subjects were asked to lie down in the supine position with the right hand positioned above the pelvic region on top of a home-built rigid platform attached to the scanner bed. The wrist was wrapped with a flexible surface coil. MRI investigations were performed at 3T (Verio-Siemens) using volume interpolated breath hold examination (VIBE) and dual echo steady state (DESS) MRI sequences. Cartilage cross sectional area (CSA) was measured on a slice of interest selected from a 3D dataset of the entire carpus and metacarpal-phalangeal areas on the basis of anatomical criteria using conventional image processing radiology software. Cartilage cross-sectional areas between opposite bones in the carpal region were manually selected and quantified using a thresholding method. RESULTS: Cartilage CSA measurements performed on a selected predefined slice were 292.4 ± 39 mm2 using the VIBE sequence and slightly lower, 270.4 ± 50.6 mm2, with the DESS sequence. The inter (14.1%) and intra (2.4%) subject variability was similar for both MRI methods. The coefficients of variation computed for the repeated measurements were also comparable for the VIBE (2.4%) and the DESS (4.8%) sequences. The carpus length averaged over the group was 37.5 ± 2.8 mm with a 7.45% between-subjects coefficient of variation. Of note, wrist cartilage CSA measured with either the VIBE or the DESS sequences was linearly related to the carpal bone length. The variability between subjects was significantly reduced to 8.4% when the CSA was normalized with respect to the carpal bone length. CONCLUSION: The ratio between wrist cartilage CSA and carpal bone length is a highly reproducible standardized

  8. MRI: are you playing your system like a fiddle or a Stradivarius? Where we are headed and how to keep up.

    PubMed

    Carroll-Callahan, Catherine M; Andersson, Lars A

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Raymond Damadian performed the first human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in 1977. Unveiled from behind the research curtain, MRI technology was introduced to the clinical environment by the mid 1980s. Most academic and largehospitals lined up right away and purchased their first scanners as soon as they became available. The race began, and the MRI learning process at radiology departments all over the world started. As with any growing technology, came a surge of competition--manufacturers as well as imaging facilities. MRI technology flooded the medical community, since it provided enormous benefits for patients and doctors. It was like a rocket launching with scientists and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) researching, creating and contributing to the advancement of clinical science and forever improved diagnoses. Radiologists at UCLA predict that most of today's procedures currently falling under research will flourish in the clinical setting within the next 5 years. The rise of PET technology and the ability to fuse metabolic images with an anatomical MRI map will undoubtedly prove invaluable for staging of pathology, treatment planning and tracking, especially when the disease is present within soft tissue, like the brain. Another sign that MRI is a healthy addition to medical imaging is the increasing number of MRI reimbursement codes. However, Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance companies are also scrutinizing more and paying less today than they did yesterday. There will always be certain myths about how bigger is always better. That's not to say system enhancements and advancements are not essential to medical imaging, but the needs and budgets differ for each facility. Regardless of site needs or budget, it is imperative that all facilities utilize the equipment they have to their maximum potential. The new "bells and whistles" might not be needed to stay competitive. Innovative technology continues to be available as long as

  9. MR-compatibility assessment of the first preclinical PET-MRI insert equipped with digital silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Dueppenbecker, P. M.; Gebhardt, P.; Goldschmidt, B.; Schug, D.; Kiessling, F.; Schulz, V.

    2015-03-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) with its high sensitivity in combination with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) providing anatomic information with good soft-tissue contrast is considered to be a promising hybrid imaging modality. However, the integration of a PET detector into an MRI system is a challenging task since the MRI system is a sensitive device for external disturbances and provides a harsh environment for electronic devices. Consequently, the PET detector has to be transparent for the MRI system and insensitive to electromagnetic disturbances. Due to the variety of MRI protocols imposing a wide range of requirements regarding the MR-compatibility, an extensive study is mandatory to reliably assess worst-case interference phenomena between the PET detector and the MRI scanner. We have built the first preclinical PET insert, designed for a clinical 3 T MRI, using digital silicon photomultipliers (digital SiPM, type DPC 3200-22, Philips Digital Photon Counting). Since no thorough interference investigation with this new digital sensor has been reported so far, we present in this work such a comprehensive MR-compatibility study. Acceptable distortion of the B0 field homogeneity (volume RMS = 0.08 ppm, peak-to-peak value = 0.71 ppm) has been found for the PET detector installed. The signal-to-noise ratio degradation stays between 2-15% for activities up to 21 MBq. Ghosting artifacts were only found for demanding EPI (echo planar imaging) sequences with read-out gradients in Z direction caused by additional eddy currents originated from the PET detector. On the PET side, interference mainly between the gradient system and the PET detector occurred: extreme gradient tests were executed using synthetic sequences with triangular pulse shape and maximum slew rate. Under this condition, a relative degradation of the energy (⩽10%) and timing (⩽15%) resolution was noticed. However, barely measurable performance deterioration occurred when morphological MRI

  10. MR-compatibility assessment of the first preclinical PET-MRI insert equipped with digital silicon photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Dueppenbecker, P M; Gebhardt, P; Goldschmidt, B; Schug, D; Kiessling, F; Schulz, V

    2015-03-21

    PET (positron emission tomography) with its high sensitivity in combination with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) providing anatomic information with good soft-tissue contrast is considered to be a promising hybrid imaging modality. However, the integration of a PET detector into an MRI system is a challenging task since the MRI system is a sensitive device for external disturbances and provides a harsh environment for electronic devices. Consequently, the PET detector has to be transparent for the MRI system and insensitive to electromagnetic disturbances. Due to the variety of MRI protocols imposing a wide range of requirements regarding the MR-compatibility, an extensive study is mandatory to reliably assess worst-case interference phenomena between the PET detector and the MRI scanner. We have built the first preclinical PET insert, designed for a clinical 3 T MRI, using digital silicon photomultipliers (digital SiPM, type DPC 3200-22, Philips Digital Photon Counting). Since no thorough interference investigation with this new digital sensor has been reported so far, we present in this work such a comprehensive MR-compatibility study. Acceptable distortion of the B0 field homogeneity (volume RMS = 0.08 ppm, peak-to-peak value = 0.71 ppm) has been found for the PET detector installed. The signal-to-noise ratio degradation stays between 2-15% for activities up to 21 MBq. Ghosting artifacts were only found for demanding EPI (echo planar imaging) sequences with read-out gradients in Z direction caused by additional eddy currents originated from the PET detector. On the PET side, interference mainly between the gradient system and the PET detector occurred: extreme gradient tests were executed using synthetic sequences with triangular pulse shape and maximum slew rate. Under this condition, a relative degradation of the energy (⩽10%) and timing (⩽15%) resolution was noticed. However, barely measurable performance deterioration occurred when morphological MRI

  11. Design of a conduction-cooled 9.4 T REBCO magnet for whole-body MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Iwai, Sadanori; Otani, Yasumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Nomura, Shunji; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Ueda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, So; Ishiyama, Atsushi; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2016-10-01

    A project on the development of REBa2Cu3O7-δ (REBCO) magnets for ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was started in 2013. Since REBCO-coated conductors feature high mechanical strength under tensile stress and high critical current density, use of REBCO coils would allow superconducting magnets to be made smaller and lighter than conventional ones. In addition, a conduction-cooled superconducting magnet is simpler to use than one cooled by a liquid helium bath because the operation and maintenance of the cryogenic system become simpler, without the need to handle cryogenic fluid. Superconducting magnets for MRI require homogeneous, stable magnetic fields. The homogeneity of the magnetic field is highly dependent on the coil shape and position. Moreover, in REBCO magnets, the screening-current-induced magnetic field, which changes the magnetic field distribution of the magnet, is one of the critical issues. In order to evaluate the magnetic field homogeneity and the screening-current-induced magnetic field, a 1 T model magnet and some test coils were fabricated. From an evaluation of the 1 T model magnet, it was found that the main reason for magnetic field inhomogeneity was the tolerances in the z-axis positions of the coils, and therefore, it is important to control the gap between the single pancakes. In addition, we have already demonstrated the generation of an 8.27 T central magnetic field at 10 K with a small test coil. The screening-current-induced magnetic field was 0.43 T and was predictable by using an electromagnetic field simulation program. These results were reflected in the design of a conduction-cooled 9.4 T REBCO magnet for whole-body MRI systems. The magnet was composed of six main coils and two active shield coils. The total conductor length was 581 km, and the stored energy was 293 kJ. The field inhomogeneity was 24 ppm peak to peak and 3 ppm volume-root-mean-square (VRMS) for a 500 mm diameter spherical volume (DSV). The axial

  12. Comparison of brain MRI and 18F-FDG PET in the differential diagnosis of multiple system atrophy from Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyum-Yil; Choi, Choong G; Kim, Jae S; Lee, Myoung C; Chung, Sun J

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) in the differentiation of multiple system atrophy (MSA) from Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty-five patients with MSA (23 MSA-P and 12 MSA-C) and 17 patients with PD were included in this study. Overall correct diagnosis rates between clinical and imaging diagnosis among MSA-P, MSA-C, and PD patients were 80% for visual MRI analysis, 88.5% for visual (18)F-FDG PET analysis, and 84.3% for SPM-supported analysis of (18)F-FDG PET. The sensitivity of brain MRI, and visual and SPM analysis of (18)F-FDG PET in differentiating MSA from PD was 72.7%, 90.9%, and 95.5%, respectively, the specificity was 100% for each imaging analysis, the positive predictive value was 100% for each imaging analysis, and the negative predictive value was 60%, 81.8%, and 90%, respectively. Our results suggest that brain MRI and (18)F-FDG PET are diagnostically useful in differentiating MSA (MSA-P and MSA-C) from PD, and indicate that (18)F-FDG PET has a tendency toward higher sensitivity compared to brain MRI, but a larger longitudinal study including pathological data will be required to confirm our findings.

  13. Coronary MR Angiography at 3T During Diastole and Systole

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Ahmed M.; Herzka, Daniel A.; Ustun, Ali O.; Desai, Milind Y.; Locklin, Julia; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Stuber, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of end-systolic imaging on quality of right coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in comparison to diastolic and to study the effect of RR interval variability on image quality. Materials and Methods The right coronary artery (RCA) of 10 normal volunteers was imaged at 3T using parallel imaging (sensitivity encoding [SENSE]). Navigator-gated three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo was used three times: 1) end-systolic short acquisition (SS): 35-msec window; 2) diastolic short (DS): middiastolic acquisition using 35-msec window; and 3) diastolic long (DL): 75-msec diastolic acquisition window. Vectorcardiogram (VCG) data was used to analyze RR variability. Vessel sharpness, length, and diameter were compared to each other and correlated with RR variability. Blinded qualitative image scores of the images were compared. Results Quantitative and qualitative parameters were not significantly different and showed no significant correlation with RR variability. Conclusion Imaging the RCA at 3T during the end-systolic rest period using SENSE is possible without significant detrimental effect on image quality. Breaking away from the standard of imaging only during diastole can potentially improve image quality in tachycardic patients or used for simultaneous imaging during both periods in a single scan. PMID:17896391

  14. Aspartame downregulates 3T3-L1 differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Park, Jeongeun; Kim, Eunjung

    2014-10-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used as an alternate for sugar in several foods and beverages. Since aspartame is 200 times sweeter than traditional sugar, it can give the same level of sweetness with less substance, which leads to lower-calorie food intake. There are reports that consumption of aspartame-containing products can help obese people lose weight. However, the potential role of aspartame in obesity is not clear. The present study investigated whether aspartame suppresses 3T3-L1 differentiation, by downregulating phosphorylated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (p-PPARγ), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), which are critical for adipogenesis. The 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured and differentiated for 6 d in the absence and presence of 10 μg/ml of aspartame. Aspartame reduced lipid accumulation in differentiated adipocytes as evidenced by Oil Red O staining. qRT-PCR analysis showed that the PPARγ, FABP4, and C/EBPα mRNA expression was significantly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the induction of p-PPARγ, PPARγ, SREBP1, and adipsin was markedly reduced in the aspartame-treated adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that aspartame may be a potent substance to alter adipocyte differentiation and control obesity.

  15. Cannabidiol promotes browning in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Yun, Jong Won

    2016-05-01

    Recruitment of the brown-like phenotype in white adipocytes (browning) and activation of existing brown adipocytes are currently being investigated as a means to combat obesity. Thus, a wide variety of dietary agents that contribute to browning of white adipocytes have been identified. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychotropic phytocannabinoid of Cannabis sativa, on induction of browning in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. CBD enhanced expression of a core set of brown fat-specific marker genes (Ucp1, Cited1, Tmem26, Prdm16, Cidea, Tbx1, Fgf21, and Pgc-1α) and proteins (UCP1, PRDM16, and PGC-1α). Increased expression of UCP1 and other brown fat-specific markers contributed to the browning of 3T3-L1 adipocytes possibly via activation of PPARγ and PI3K. In addition, CBD increased protein expression levels of CPT1, ACSL, SIRT1, and PLIN while down-regulating JNK2, SREBP1, and LPL. These data suggest possible roles for CBD in browning of white adipocytes, augmentation of lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of lipogenesis. In conclusion, the current data suggest that CBD plays dual modulatory roles in the form of inducing the brown-like phenotype as well as promoting lipid metabolism. Thus, CBD may be explored as a potentially promising therapeutic agent for the prevention of obesity.

  16. Characterization of hyaluronate binding proteins isolated from 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus transformed 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, E.A.; Moore, D.; Hayden, L.J.

    1987-06-02

    A hyaluronic acid binding fraction was purified from the supernatant media of both 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus (MSV) transformed 3T3 cultures by hyaluronate and immunoaffinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved the hyaluronate affinity-purified fraction into three major protein bands of estimated molecular weight (M/sub r,e/) 70K, 66K, and 56K which contained hyaluronate binding activity and which were termed hyaluronate binding proteins (HABP). Hyaluronate affinity chromatography combined with immunoaffinity chromatography, using antibody directed against the larger HABP, allowed a 20-fold purification of HABP. Fractions isolated from 3T3 supernatant medium also contained additional binding molecules in the molecular weight range of 20K. This material was present in vanishingly small amounts and was not detected with a silver stain or with (/sup 35/S)methionine label. The three protein species isolated by hyaluronate affinity chromatography (M/sub r,e/ 70K, 66K, and 56K) were related to one another since they shared antigenic determinants and exhibited similar pI values. In isocratic conditions, HABP occurred as aggregates of up to 580 kilodaltons. Their glycoprotein nature was indicated by their incorporation of /sup 3/H-sugars. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay showed they were antigenically distinct from other hyaluronate binding proteins such as fibronectin, cartilage link protein, and the hyaluronate binding region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The results are discussed with regard both to the functional significance of hyaluronate-cell surface interactions in transformed as well as normal cells and to the relationship of HABP to other reported hyaluronate binding proteins.

  17. Neural systems for social cognition in Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY): evidence from fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Swaab, Hanna; Baas, Daan; de Haan, Edward; Kahn, René S.; Aleman, André

    2012-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a chromosomal condition (47, XXY) that may help us to unravel gene–brain behavior pathways to psychopathology. The phenotype includes social cognitive impairments and increased risk for autism traits. We used functional MRI to study neural mechanisms underlying social information processing. Eighteen nonclinical controls and thirteen men with XXY were scanned during judgments of faces with regard to trustworthiness and age. While judging faces as untrustworthy in comparison to trustworthy, men with XXY displayed less activation than controls in (i) the amygdala, which plays a key role in screening information for socio-emotional significance, (ii) the insula, which plays a role in subjective emotional experience, as well as (iii) the fusiform gyrus and (iv) the superior temporal sulcus, which are both involved in the perceptual processing of faces and which were also less involved during age judgments in men with XXY. This is the first study showing that KS can be associated with reduced involvement of the neural network subserving social cognition. Studying KS may increase our understanding of the genetic and hormonal basis of neural dysfunctions contributing to abnormalities in social cognition and behavior, which are considered core abnormalities in psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. PMID:21737434

  18. Neural systems for social cognition in Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY): evidence from fMRI.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sophie; Swaab, Hanna; Baas, Daan; de Haan, Edward; Kahn, René S; Aleman, André

    2012-08-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a chromosomal condition (47, XXY) that may help us to unravel gene-brain behavior pathways to psychopathology. The phenotype includes social cognitive impairments and increased risk for autism traits. We used functional MRI to study neural mechanisms underlying social information processing. Eighteen nonclinical controls and thirteen men with XXY were scanned during judgments of faces with regard to trustworthiness and age. While judging faces as untrustworthy in comparison to trustworthy, men with XXY displayed less activation than controls in (i) the amygdala, which plays a key role in screening information for socio-emotional significance, (ii) the insula, which plays a role in subjective emotional experience, as well as (iii) the fusiform gyrus and (iv) the superior temporal sulcus, which are both involved in the perceptual processing of faces and which were also less involved during age judgments in men with XXY. This is the first study showing that KS can be associated with reduced involvement of the neural network subserving social cognition. Studying KS may increase our understanding of the genetic and hormonal basis of neural dysfunctions contributing to abnormalities in social cognition and behavior, which are considered core abnormalities in psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

  19. 3T MR Guided in bore transperineal prostate biopsy: A Comparison of robotic and manual needle-guidance templates

    PubMed Central

    Tilak, Gaurie; Tuncali, Kemal; Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Fennessy, Fiona; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the utility of a robotic needle-guidance template device as compared to a manual template for in-bore 3T transperineal MR-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods This two-arm mixed retrospective-prospective study included 99 cases of targeted transperineal prostate biopsies. The biopsy needles were aimed at suspicious foci noted on multiparametric 3T MRI using manual template (historical control) as compared with a robotic template. The following data was obtained: the accuracy of average and closest needle placement to the focus, histologic yield, percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples, complication rate, and time to complete the procedure. Results 56 cases were performed using the manual template, and 43 cases were performed using the robotic template. The mean accuracy of the best needle placement attempt was higher in the robotic group (2.39 mm) than the manual group (3.71 mm, p<0.027). The mean core procedure time was shorter in the robotic (90.82min) than the manual group (100.63min, p<0.030). Percentage of cancer volume in positive core samples was higher in robotic group (p<0.001). Cancer yields and complication rates were not statistically different between the two sub-groups (p = 0.557 and p=0.172 respectively). Conclusion The robotic needle-guidance template helps accurate placement of biopsy needles in MRI-guided core biopsy of prostate cancer. PMID:25263213

  20. Saturation Power Dependence of Amide Proton Transfer (APT) Image Contrasts in Human Brain Tumors and Strokes at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuna; Wen, Zhibo; Huang, Fanheng; Lu, Shilong; Wang, Xianlong; Hu, Shuguang; Zu, Donglin; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2011-01-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is capable of detecting mobile cellular proteins and peptides in tumor and monitoring pH effects in stroke, through the saturation transfer between irradiated amide protons and water protons. In this work, four healthy subjects, eight brain tumor patients (four with high-grade glioma; one with lung cancer metastasis; three with meningioma), and four stroke patients (average 4.3 ± 2.5 days after the onset of the stroke) were scanned at 3T, using different radiofrequency saturation powers. The APT effect was quantified using the magnetization-transfer-ratio (MTR) asymmetry at 3.5 ppm with respect to the water resonance. At a saturation power of 2 μT, the measured APT-MRI signal of the normal brain tissue was almost zero, due to the contamination of the negative conventional MTR asymmetry. This irradiation power caused an optimal hyperintense APT-MRI signal in the tumor and an optimal hypointense signal in the stroke, compared to the normal brain tissue. The results suggest that the saturation power of 2 μT is ideal for APT imaging of these two pathologies at 3T with the existing clinical hardware. PMID:21394783

  1. Technical Note: Building a combined cyclotron and MRI facility: Implications for interference

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Mark B. M.; Kuijer, Joost P. A.; Ridder, Jan Willem de; Perk, Lars R.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: With the introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems, it has become more likely that the cyclotron and MRI systems will be located close to each other. This study considered the interference between a cyclotron and a superconducting MRI system. Methods: Interactions between cyclotrons and MRIs are theoretically considered. The main interference is expected to be the perturbation of the magnetic field in the MRI due to switching on or off the magnetic field of the cyclotron. MR imaging is distorted by a dynamic spatial gradient of an external inplane magnetic field larger than 0.5-0.04 {mu}T/m, depending on the specific MR application. From the design of a cyclotron, it is expected that the magnetic fringe field at large distances behaves as a magnetic dipolar field. This allows estimation of the full dipolar field and its spatial gradients from a single measurement. Around an 18 MeV cyclotron (Cyclone, IBA), magnetic field measurements were performed on 5 locations and compared with calculations based upon a dipolar field model. Results: At the measurement locations the estimated and measured values of the magnetic field component and its spatial gradients of the inplane component were compared, and found to agree within a factor 1.1 for the magnetic field and within a factor of 1.5 for the spatial gradients of the field. In the specific case of the 18 MeV cyclotron with a vertical magnetic field and a 3T superconducting whole body MR system, a minimum distance of 20 m has to be considered to prevent interference. Conclusions: This study showed that a dipole model is sufficiently accurate to predict the interference of a cyclotron on a MRI scanner, for site planning purposes. The cyclotron and a whole body MRI system considered in this study need to be placed more than 20 m apart, or magnetic shielding should be utilized.

  2. Pneumatically Operated MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Mewes, Philip W.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. The strong magnetic field prevents the use of conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intra-prostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. The robot performs needle insertion under real-time 3T MR image guidance; workspace requirements, MR compatibility, and workflow have been evaluated on phantoms. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system. PMID:21686038

  3. Conduction cooled magnet design for 1.5 T, 3.0 T and 7.0 T MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Tanvir; Yao, Zhen; Doll, David; Tomsic, Michael; Martens, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Main magnets for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are largely constructed with low temperature superconducting material. Most commonly used superconductors for these magnets are niobium-titanium (NbTi). Such magnets are operated at 4.2 K by being immersed in a liquid helium bath for long time operation. As the cost of liquid helium has increased threefold in the last decade and the market for MRI systems is on average increasing by more than 7% every year, there is a growing demand for an alternative to liquid helium. Superconductors such as magnesium-diboride (MgB2) and niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) demonstrate superior current carrying quality at higher critical temperatures than 4.2 K. In this article, electromagnetic designs for conduction cooled main magnets over the range of medium field strengths (1.5 T) to ultrahigh field strengths (7.0 T) are presented. These designs are achieved by an improved functional approach coming from a series of developments by the present research group and using properties of the state-of-the-art second generation MgB2 wires and Nb3Sn wires developed by Hyper Tech Research Inc. The MgB2 magnet designs operated at different field strengths demonstrate excellent homogeneity and shielding properties at an operating temperature of 10 K. At ultrahigh field, the high current density on Nb3Sn allowed by the larger magnetic field on wire helps to reduce the superconductor volume in comparison with high field NbTi magnet designs. This allows for a compact magnet design that can operate at a temperature of 8 K. Overall, the designs created show promise in the development of conduction cooled dry magnets that would reduce dependence on helium.

  4. Case Study of Ecstatic Meditation: fMRI and EEG Evidence of Self-Stimulating a Reward System

    PubMed Central

    Hagerty, Michael R.; Isaacs, Julian; Brasington, Leigh; Fetz, Eberhard E.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first neural recording during ecstatic meditations called jhanas and test whether a brain reward system plays a role in the joy reported. Jhanas are Altered States of Consciousness (ASC) that imply major brain changes based on subjective reports: (1) external awareness dims, (2) internal verbalizations fade, (3) the sense of personal boundaries is altered, (4) attention is highly focused on the object of meditation, and (5) joy increases to high levels. The fMRI and EEG results from an experienced meditator show changes in brain activity in 11 regions shown to be associated with the subjective reports, and these changes occur promptly after jhana is entered. In particular, the extreme joy is associated not only with activation of cortical processes but also with activation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the dopamine/opioid reward system. We test three mechanisms by which the subject might stimulate his own reward system by external means and reject all three. Taken together, these results demonstrate an apparently novel method of self-stimulating a brain reward system using only internal mental processes in a highly trained subject. PMID:23738149

  5. Contribution of the motor system to the perception of reachable space: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, Angela; Coello, Yann; Edwards, Martin G; Delepoulle, Samuel; Endo, Satoshi; Wing, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigates the neural correlates of reachability judgements. In a block design experiment, 14 healthy participants judged whether a visual target presented at different distances in a virtual environment display was reachable or not with the right hand. In two control tasks, they judged the colour or the relative position of the visual target according to flankers. Contrasting the activations registered in the reachability judgement task and in the control tasks, we found activations in the frontal structures, and in the bilateral inferior and superior parietal lobe, including the precuneus, and the bilateral cerebellum. This fronto-parietal network including the cerebellum overlaps with the brain network usually activated during actual motor production and motor imagery. In a following event-related design experiment, we contrasted brain activations when targets were rated as 'reachable' with those when they were rated as 'unreachable'. We found activations in the left premotor cortex, the bilateral frontal structures, and the left middle temporal gyrus. At a lower threshold, we also found activations in the left motor cortex, and in the bilateral cerebellum. Given that reaction time increased with target distance in reachable space, we performed a subsequent parametric analysis that revealed a related increase of activity in the fronto-parietal network including the cerebellum. Unreachable targets did not show similar activation, and particularly in regions associated to motor production and motor imagery. Taken together, these results suggest that dynamical motor representations used to determine what is reachable are also part of the perceptual process leading to the distinct representation of peripersonal and extrapersonal spaces.

  6. Battlefield MRI

    DOE PAGES

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  7. Ultrasound associated uptake of chitosan nanoparticles in MC3T3-E1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junyi

    Chitosan is a natural linear polysaccharide that has been well known for its applications in drug delivery system due to its unique physicochemical and biological properties. However, challenges still remain for it to become a fully realized therapeutic agent. In this study, we investigated the uptake of chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) under the ultrasound stimulation, using a model cell culture system (MC3T3-E1 mouse pre-osteoblasts). The CNP were fabricated by an ionic gelation method and were lyophilized prior to characterization and delivery to cells. Particle size and zeta potential were measured using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS); the efficiency of chitosan complexation was measured using the ninhydrin assay. Cytotoxicity was examined by neutral red assay within 48 hours after delivery. The effect of ultrasound (US) on the efficiency of nanoparticle delivery to the MC3T3-E1 cells was examined at 1MHz and at either 1 or 2 W/cm2. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated-CNP were used to visualize the internalized particles within the cytosol. The uptake of FITC-CNP exhibits a dose and time dependent effect, a strong FITC fluorescence was detected at the concentration of 500microg/mL under fluorescence microscope. Ultrasound assisted uptake of FITC-CNP performed a significant positive effect at 2W/cm2 with 60s of ultrasound exposure time. CNP displayed a slightly decrease in cell viability from 25microg/mL to 100microg/mL, while higher concentration of CNP facilitates the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Less than 10% of reduction in cell viability was observed for US at 1W/cm2 and 2W/cm2 with 30s and 60s of exposure time, which suggest a mild effect of US to MC3T3-E1 cell line.

  8. Imaging of prostate cancer: a platform for 3D co-registration of in-vivo MRI ex-vivo MRI and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orczyk, Clément; Mikheev, Artem; Rosenkrantz, Andrew; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Rusinek, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: Multi-parametric MRI is emerging as a promising method for prostate cancer diagnosis. prognosis and treatment planning. However, the localization of in-vivo detected lesions and pathologic sites of cancer remains a significant challenge. To overcome this limitation we have developed and tested a system for co-registration of in-vivo MRI, ex-vivo MRI and histology. Materials and Methods: Three men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (ages 54-72, PSA levels 5.1-7.7 ng/ml) were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent 3T multi-parametric MRI that included T2W, DCEMRI, and DWI prior to robotic-assisted prostatectomy. Ex-vivo multi-parametric MRI was performed on fresh prostate specimen. Excised prostates were then sliced at regular intervals and photographed both before and after fixation. Slices were perpendicular to the main axis of the posterior capsule, i.e., along the direction of the rectal wall. Guided by the location of the urethra, 2D digital images were assembled into 3D models. Cancer foci, extra-capsular extensions and zonal margins were delineated by the pathologist and included in 3D histology data. A locally-developed software was applied to register in-vivo, ex-vivo and histology using an over-determined set of anatomical landmarks placed in anterior fibro-muscular stroma, central. transition and peripheral zones. The mean root square distance across corresponding control points was used to assess co-registration error. Results: Two specimens were pT3a and one pT2b (negative margin) at pathology. The software successfully fused invivo MRI. ex-vivo MRI fresh specimen and histology using appropriate (rigid and affine) transformation models with mean square error of 1.59 mm. Coregistration accuracy was confirmed by multi-modality viewing using operator-guided variable transparency. Conclusion: The method enables successful co-registration of pre-operative MRI, ex-vivo MRI and pathology and it provides initial evidence

  9. Sodium MRI.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Sodium ((23)Na) imaging has a place somewhere between (1)H-MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Like MRS it potentially provides information on metabolic processes, but only one single resonance of ionic (23)Na is observed. Therefore pulse sequences do not need to code for a chemical shift dimension, allowing (23)Na images to be obtained at high resolutions as compared to MRS. In this chapter the biological significance of sodium in the brain will be discussed, as well as methods for observing it with (23)Na-MRI. Many vital cellular processes and interactions in excitable tissues depend on the maintenance of a low intracellular and high extracellular sodium concentration. Healthy cells maintain this concentration gradient at the cost of energy. Leaky cell membranes or an impaired energy metabolism immediately leads to an increase in cytosolic total tissue sodium. This makes sodium a biomarker for ischemia, cancer, excessive tissue activation, or tissue damage as might be caused by ablation therapy. Special techniques allow quantification of tissue sodium for the monitoring of disease or therapy in longitudinal studies or preferential observation of the intracellular component of the tissue sodium. New methods and high-field magnet technology provide new opportunities for (23)Na-MRI in clinical and biomedical research.

  10. The 3T3-L1 adipocyte glycogen proteome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycogen is a branched polysaccharide of glucose residues, consisting of α-1-4 glycosidic linkages with α-1-6 branches that together form multi-layered particles ranging in size from 30 nm to 300 nm. Glycogen spatial conformation and intracellular organization are highly regulated processes. Glycogen particles interact with their metabolizing enzymes and are associated with a variety of proteins that intervene in its biology, controlling its structure, particle size and sub-cellular distribution. The function of glycogen in adipose tissue is not well understood but appears to have a pivotal role as a regulatory mechanism informing the cells on substrate availability for triacylglycerol synthesis. To provide new molecular insights into the role of adipocyte glycogen we analyzed the glycogen-associated proteome from differentiated 3T3-L1-adipocytes. Results Glycogen particles from 3T3-L1-adipocytes were purified using a series of centrifugation steps followed by specific elution of glycogen bound proteins using α-1,4 glucose oligosaccharides, or maltodextrins, and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified regulatory proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, RACK1 and protein phosphatase 1 glycogen targeting subunit 3D. Evidence was also obtained for a regulated subcellular distribution of the glycogen particle: metabolic and mitochondrial proteins were abundant. Unlike the recently analyzed hepatic glycogen proteome, no endoplasmic proteins were detected, along with the recently described starch-binding domain protein 1. Other regulatory proteins which have previously been described as glycogen-associated proteins were not detected, including laforin, the AMPK beta-subunit and protein targeting to glycogen (PTG). Conclusions These data provide new molecular insights into the regulation of glycogen-bound proteins that are associated with the maintenance, organization and localization of the adipocyte glycogen particle. PMID:23521774

  11. Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Hryniw, Natalia; Hansen, Jon A; Kesler, Leigh A; Li, Frank

    2011-01-27

    A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

  12. Real-time MRI of the temporomandibular joint at 15 frames per second-A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Sebastian; Gersdorff, Nikolaus; Wassmann, Torsten; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Joseph, Arun A; Buergers, Ralf; Frahm, Jens

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel method for real-time MRI of TMJ function at high temporal resolution and with two different contrasts. Real-time MRI was based on undersampled radial fast low angle shot (FLASH) acquisitions with iterative image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion. Real-time MRI movies with T1 contrast were obtained with use of a radiofrequency-spoiled FLASH sequence, while movies with T2/T1 contrast employed a gradient-refocused FLASH version. TMJ function was characterized in 40 randomly selected volunteers by sequential 20s acquisitions of both the right and left joint during voluntary opening and closing of the mouth (in a medial, central and lateral oblique sagittal section perpendicular to the long axis of the condylar head). All studies were performed on a commercial MRI system at 3T using the standard head coil, while online reconstruction was achieved with a bypass computer fully integrated into the MRI system. As a first result, real-time MRI studies of the right and left TMJ were successfully performed in all 40 subjects (80 joints) within a total examination time per subject of only 15min. Secondly, at an in-plane resolution of 0.75mm and 5mm section thickness, the achieved temporal resolution was 66.7ms per image or 15 frames per second. Thirdly, both T1-weighted and T2/T1-weighted real-time MRI movies provided information about TMJ function such as disc position, condyle mobility and disc-condyle relationship. While T1 contrast offers a better delineation of structures during rapid jaw movements, T2/T1 contrast was rated superior for characterizing the articular disc. In conclusion, the proposed real-time MRI method may become a robust and efficient tool for the clinical assessment of TMJ function.

  13. A Fabry-Perot Interferometry Based MRI-Compatible Miniature Uniaxial Force Sensor for Percutaneous Needle Placement.

    PubMed

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Furlong, Cosme; Fischer, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgical procedures, taking advantage of the high soft tissue contrast and real-time imaging of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are developing rapidly. However, it is crucial to maintain tactile force feedback in MRI-guided needle-based procedures. This paper presents a Fabry-Perot interference (FPI) based system of an MRI-compatible fiber optic sensor which has been integrated into a piezoelectrically actuated robot for prostate cancer biopsy and brachytherapy in 3T MRI scanner. The opto-electronic sensing system design was minimized to fit inside an MRI-compatible robot controller enclosure. A flexure mechanism was designed that integrates the FPI sensor fiber for measuring needle insertion force, and finite element analysis was performed for optimizing the correct force-deformation relationship. The compact, low-cost FPI sensing system was integrated into the robot and calibration was conducted. The root mean square (RMS) error of the calibration among the range of 0-10 Newton was 0.318 Newton comparing to the theoretical model which has been proven sufficient for robot control and teleoperation.

  14. A Fabry-Perot Interferometry Based MRI-Compatible Miniature Uniaxial Force Sensor for Percutaneous Needle Placement

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Furlong, Cosme; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgical procedures, taking advantage of the high soft tissue contrast and real-time imaging of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are developing rapidly. However, it is crucial to maintain tactile force feedback in MRI-guided needle-based procedures. This paper presents a Fabry-Perot interference (FPI) based system of an MRI-compatible fiber optic sensor which has been integrated into a piezoelectrically actuated robot for prostate cancer biopsy and brachytherapy in 3T MRI scanner. The opto-electronic sensing system design was minimized to fit inside an MRI-compatible robot controller enclosure. A flexure mechanism was designed that integrates the FPI sensor fiber for measuring needle insertion force, and finite element analysis was performed for optimizing the correct force-deformation relationship. The compact, low-cost FPI sensing system was integrated into the robot and calibration was conducted. The root mean square (RMS) error of the calibration among the range of 0–10 Newton was 0.318 Newton comparing to the theoretical model which has been proven sufficient for robot control and teleoperation. PMID:25126153

  15. Neural Response during the Activation of the Attachment System in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder: An fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are characterized by emotional instability, impaired emotion regulation and unresolved attachment patterns associated with abusive childhood experiences. We investigated the neural response during the activation of the attachment system in BPD patients compared to healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven female patients with BPD without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 17 healthy female controls matched for age and education were telling stories in the scanner in response to the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), an eight-picture set assessment of adult attachment. The picture set includes theoretically-derived attachment scenes, such as separation, death, threat and potential abuse. The picture presentation order is designed to gradually increase the activation of the attachment system. Each picture stimulus was presented for 2 min. Analyses examine group differences in attachment classifications and neural activation patterns over the course of the task. Unresolved attachment was associated with increasing amygdala activation over the course of the attachment task in patients as well as controls. Unresolved controls, but not patients, showed activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the rostral cingulate zone (RCZ). We interpret this as a neural signature of BPD patients' inability to exert top-down control under conditions of attachment distress. These findings point to possible neural mechanisms for underlying affective dysregulation in BPD in the context of attachment trauma and fear.

  16. Neural Response during the Activation of the Attachment System in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are characterized by emotional instability, impaired emotion regulation and unresolved attachment patterns associated with abusive childhood experiences. We investigated the neural response during the activation of the attachment system in BPD patients compared to healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven female patients with BPD without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 17 healthy female controls matched for age and education were telling stories in the scanner in response to the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), an eight-picture set assessment of adult attachment. The picture set includes theoretically-derived attachment scenes, such as separation, death, threat and potential abuse. The picture presentation order is designed to gradually increase the activation of the attachment system. Each picture stimulus was presented for 2 min. Analyses examine group differences in attachment classifications and neural activation patterns over the course of the task. Unresolved attachment was associated with increasing amygdala activation over the course of the attachment task in patients as well as controls. Unresolved controls, but not patients, showed activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the rostral cingulate zone (RCZ). We interpret this as a neural signature of BPD patients’ inability to exert top-down control under conditions of attachment distress. These findings point to possible neural mechanisms for underlying affective dysregulation in BPD in the context of attachment trauma and fear. PMID:27531977

  17. MRI analysis of the ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs: a comparison with rigid internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we analyzed the efficacy of the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs, with particular emphasis on its effects on degenerative intervertebral disc disease. Methods We retrospectively compared the MRIs of 54 patients who had previously undergone either rigid internal fixation of the lumbar spine or ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation for the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. All patients had received preoperative and 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI scans of the lumbar spine with acquisition of both routine and diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The upper-segment discs of the fusion were subjected to Pfirrmann grading, and the lumbar intervertebral discs in the DWI sagittal plane were manually drawn; the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was measured. Results ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group measured at the 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI studies were increased compared to the preoperative ADC values. The ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group at 24 months postoperatively were significantly different from the preoperative values (P < 0.05). At 24 months, the postoperative ADC values were significantly different between the rigid fixation group and the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group (P < 0.05). Conclusion MRI imaging findings indicated that the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system can prevent or delay the degeneration of intervertebral discs. PMID:24898377

  18. Menaquinone-7 regulates gene expression in osteoblastic MC3T3E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Hironobu; Saijoh, Kiyofumi; Otsuki, Takemi; Tomita, Masafumi; Fukunaga, Masao; Sunami, Shigeo

    2007-02-01

    Previous study has shown that the vitamin K2 analog menaquinone-7 (MK-7) induces expression of the osteoblast-specific genes osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of NFkappaB, and its ligand. Since MK-7 may also regulate osteoblast cell function, we examined the expression of osteoblast genes regulated by MK-7 administration. Differences between gene expression in control and MK-7-administered MC3T3E1 cells were analyzed using the suppression subtractive hybridization method. After 24 h of MK-7 administration, genes upregulated by MK-7 included tenascin C and BMP2. Genes downregulated by MK-7 administration included biglycan and butyrophilin. Real-time PCR showed a marked increase in tenascin C. When the protein level was examined using Western blot analysis, tenascin C was higher in MK-7-administered cells than in control cells. These results indicated that MK-7 affected the cellular function of osteoblastic MC3T3E1 cells. Considering BMP2 mRNA expression was higher in MK-7-administered cells than in control cells, the effect of MK-7 administration on the signal transduction system was examined. Western blot analysis showed that cells administered MK-7 displayed a higher phosphorylated Smad1 level than control cells. Because MC3T3E1 cells have a nuclear binding receptor for MK-7, this result might indicate an indirect effect of MK-7 through BMP2 production.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress suppresses lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Hiranaka, Natsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yui, Tomoo; Akanuma, Masayoshi; Kanazawa, Kaoru; Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Lipin-1 involves lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and inflammation. ► Adipose lipin-1 expression is reduced in obesity. ► ER stress suppresses lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ► Activation of PPAR-γ recovers ER stress-induced lipin-1 reduction. -- Abstract: Lipin-1 plays crucial roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation in adipocytes. In obesity, adipose lipin-1 mRNA expression is decreased and positively correlated with systemic insulin sensitivity. Amelioration of the lipin-1 depletion might be improved dysmetabolism. Although some cytokines such as TNF-α and interleukin-1β reduces adipose lipin-1 expression, the mechanism of decreased adipose lipin-1 expression in obesity remains unclear. Recently, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity. Here we investigated the role of ER stress on the lipin-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We demonstrated that lipin-1 expression was suppressed by the treatment with ER stress inducers (tunicamycin and thapsigargin) at transcriptional level. We also showed that constitutive lipin-1 expression could be maintained by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ recovered the ER stress-induced lipin-1 suppression. These results suggested that ER stress might be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity through lipin-1 depletion.

  20. [MRI of the prostate: optimization of imaging protocols].

    PubMed

    Rouvière, O

    2006-02-01

    This article details the imaging protocols for prostate MRI and the influence on image quality of each particular setting: type of coils to be used (endorectal or external phased-array coils?), patient preparation, type of sequences, spatial resolution parameters. The principle and technical constraints of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI are also presented, as well as the predictable changes due to the introduction of high-field strength (3T) scanners.

  1. MRI of plants and foods.

    PubMed

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  2. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  3. Quantifying human high-energy phosphate metabolite concentrations at 3T with partial volume and sensitivity corrections

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Gabr, Refaat E.; Schär, Michael; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Practical noninvasive methods for measuring absolute metabolite concentrations are key to assessing depletion of myocardial metabolite pools which occurs with several cardiac diseases including infarction and heart failure. Localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers unique noninvasive access to many metabolites, but is often confounded by nonuniform sensitivity and partial volume effects in the large, poorly-defined voxels commonly used for detecting low-concentration metabolites with surface coils. These problems are exacerbated at higher magnetic field-strengths by greater radio frequency (RF) field inhomogeneity and differences in RF penetration with heteronuclear concentration referencing. An example is the 31P measurement of cardiac adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) concentrations, which although central to cardiac energetics, have not been measured at field-strengths above 1.5T. Here, practical acquisition and analysis protocols are presented for quantifying [PCr] and [ATP] with one-dimensionally resolved surface coil spectra and concentration referencing at 3T. The effects of non-uniform sensitivity and partial tissue volumes are addressed at 3T by applying MRI-based three-dimensional sensitivity-weighting and tissue segmentation. The method is validated at 3T in phantoms of different sizes and concentrations, and used to measure [PCr] and [ATP] in healthy subjects. In calf-muscle (n=8), [PCr]=24.7±3.4 (mean±SD) and [ATP]=5.7±1.3 µmol/g wet wt, while [PCr]=10.4±1.5 and [ATP]=6.0±1.1 µmol/g in heart (n=18), consistent with previous reports at lower fields. The method enables for the first time, the efficient, semi-automated quantification of high energy phosphate metabolites in humans at 3T with non-uniform excitation and detection. PMID:23729378

  4. MGH-USC Human Connectome Project datasets with ultra-high b-value diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiuyun; Witzel, Thomas; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Van Horn, John D; Drews, Michelle K; Somerville, Leah H; Sheridan, Margaret A; Santillana, Rosario M; Snyder, Jenna; Hedden, Trey; Shaw, Emily E; Hollinshead, Marisa O; Renvall, Ville; Zanzonico, Roberta; Keil, Boris; Cauley, Stephen; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Tisdall, Dylan; Buckner, Randy L; Wedeen, Van J; Wald, Lawrence L; Toga, Arthur W; Rosen, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    The MGH-USC CONNECTOM MRI scanner housed at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is a major hardware innovation of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The 3T CONNECTOM scanner is capable of producing a magnetic field gradient of up to 300 mT/m strength for in vivo human brain imaging, which greatly shortens the time spent on diffusion encoding, and decreases the signal loss due to T2 decay. To demonstrate the capability of the novel gradient system, data of healthy adult participants were acquired for this MGH-USC Adult Diffusion Dataset (N=35), minimally preprocessed, and shared through the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging Image Data Archive (LONI IDA) and the WU-Minn Connectome Database (ConnectomeDB). Another purpose of sharing the data is to facilitate methodological studies of diffusion MRI (dMRI) analyses utilizing high diffusion contrast, which perhaps is not easily feasible with standard MR gradient system. In addition, acquisition of the MGH-Harvard-USC Lifespan Dataset is currently underway to include 120 healthy participants ranging from 8 to 90 years old, which will also be shared through LONI IDA and ConnectomeDB. Here we describe the efforts of the MGH-USC HCP consortium in acquiring and sharing the ultra-high b-value diffusion MRI data and provide a report on data preprocessing and access. We conclude with a demonstration of the example data, along with results of standard diffusion analyses, including q-ball Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) reconstruction and tractography.

  5. MRI Meets MPI: a bimodal MPI-MRI tomograph.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Lother, Steffen; Rückert, Martin A; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Fidler, Florian; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic particle imaging (MPI) constitutes a novel biomedical imaging technique for tracking superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vivo, unlike magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it cannot provide anatomical background information. Until now these two modalities have been performed in separate scanners and image co-registration has been hampered by the need to reposition the sample in both systems as similarly as possible. This paper presents a bimodal MPI-MRI-tomograph that combines both modalities in a single system.MPI and MRI images can thus be acquired without moving the sample or replacing any parts in the setup. The images acquired with the presented setup show excellent agreement between the localization of the nanoparticles in MPI and the MRI background data. A combination of two highly complementary imaging modalities has been achieved.

  6. "Eyes Open - Eyes Closed" EEG/fMRI data set including dedicated "Carbon Wire Loop" motion detection channels.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Johan; Pampel, André; van Someren, Eus; Ramautar, Jennifer; van der Werf, Ysbrand; Gomez-Herrero, German; Lepsien, Jöran; Hellrung, Lydia; Hinrichs, Hermann; Möller, Harald; Walter, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This data set contains electroencephalography (EEG) data as well as simultaneous EEG with functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG/fMRI) data. During EEG/fMRI, the EEG cap was outfitted with a hardware-based add-on consisting of carbon-wire loops (CWL). These yielded six extra׳CWL׳ signals related to Faraday induction of these loops in the main magnetic field "Measurement and reduction of motion and ballistocardiogram artefacts from simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings" (Masterton et al., 2007) [1]. In this data set, the CWL data make it possible to do a direct regression approach to deal with the BCG and specifically He artifact. The CWL-EEG/fMRI data in this paper has been recorded on two MRI scanners with different Helium pump systems (4 subjects on a 3 T TIM Trio and 4 subjects on a 3T VERIO). Separate EEG/fMRI data sets have been recorded for the helium pump ON as well as the helium pump OFF conditions. The EEG-only data (same subjects) has been recorded for a motion artifact-free reference EEG signal outside of the scanner. This paper also links to an EEGlab "EEGLAB: an open source toolbox for analysis of single-trial EEG dynamics including independent component analysis" (Delorme and Makeig, 2004) [2] plugin to perform a CWL regression approach to deal with the He pump artifact, as published in the main paper "Carbon-wire loop based artifact correction outperforms post-processing EEG/fMRI corrections-A validation of a real-time simultaneous EEG/fMRI correction method" (van der Meer et al., 2016) [3].

  7. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  8. Age-related dedifferentiation of learning systems: an fMRI study of implicit and explicit learning.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Nancy A; Cabeza, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    Abundant research finds that in young adults explicit learning (EL) is more dependent on the medial temporal lobes (MTL) whereas implicit learning (IL) is more dependent on the striatum. Using fMRI, we investigated age differences in each task and whether this differentiation is preserved in older adults. Results indicated that, while young recruited the MTL for EL and striatum for IL, both activations were significantly reduced in older adults. Additionally, results indicated that older adults recruited the MTL for IL, and this activation was significantly greater in older compared with young adults. A significant Task × Age interaction was found in both regions-with young preferentially recruiting the MTL for EL and striatum for IL, and older adults showing no preferential recruit for either task. Finally, young adults demonstrated significant negative correlations between activity in the striatum and MTL during both the EL and IL tasks. These correlations were attenuated in older adults. Taken together results support dedifferentiation in aging across memory systems.

  9. A new MRI-compatible optical fiber tactile sensor for use in minimally invasive robotic surgery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Roozbeh; Dargahi, Javad; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Cecere, Renzo

    2010-09-01

    In conventional open surgery, using finger palpation, surgeons can distinguish between different types of tissues. However, in the current commercially available minimally invasive robotic surgery (MIRS) systems, direct tactile feedback is negligible. In the present paper, based on a novel concept, a new bend-type optical fiber tactile sensor is proposed, designed, simulated, fabricated, and tested. In both dynamic and static loading conditions, the proposed tactile sensor measures forces interacting between tissues and surgical tools whether they are distributed contact forces or concentrated contact forces, or even if these forces are in combination. As a result, the sensor can identify the size and the position of blood vessels or of abnormal tissues, one of which could be a tumorous lump within normal tissues. In addition, the static force measurement provided by the sensor allows surgeons to maintain contact stability in any static interactions between surgical tools and tissues while at the same time avoiding tissue damage because of excessive contact force. In the meantime, because the sensor is based uniquely on optical fibers, it is insensitive to electromagnetic fields. As a result, it is compatible with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) devices, which are currently in widespread use in surgical operating rooms.

  10. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  11. A Novel MRI-compatible Tactile Stimulator for Cortical Mapping of Foot Sole Pressure Stimuli with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ying; Manor, Brad; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Chai, Yufeng; Lipsitz, Lewis; Peng, Chung-Kang; Novak, Vera; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Foot sole somatosensory feedback is critical to motor control and declines with aging and disease. To enable study of cortical networks underlying foot sole somatosensation we developed a pneumatic tactile stimulator capable of producing 1-DOF oscillations with preset waveform, frequency (≤10 Hz), force magnitude (5-500 N), duty cycle (20%-100%) and contacted surface area over which pressures are applied to the foot sole. Image tests (anatomical/functional/field map) of a phantom demonstrated that the device is compatible with 3T MRI. GRE-EPI images of seven healthy young adults using a typical block-designed 1Hz sinusoidal stimulation protocol revealed significant activation contralaterally within the primary somatosensory cortex and paracentral gyrus, and bilaterally within the secondary somatosensory cortex. The stimulation system may therefore serve as a research tool to study functional brain networks involved in the perception and modulation of foot sole somatosensation and its relationship to motor control. PMID:22678849

  12. An fMRI investigation of the fronto-striatal learning system in women who exhibit eating disorder behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Celone, Kim A.; Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Ross, Robert S.; Pratt, Elizabeth M.; Stern, Chantal E.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we sought to examine whether the fronto-striatal learning system, which has been implicated in bulimia nervosa, would demonstrate altered BOLD activity during probabilistic category learning in women who met subthreshold criteria for bulimia nervosa (Sub-BN). Sub-BN, which falls within the clinical category of Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS), is comprised of individuals who demonstrate recurrent binge eating, efforts to minimize their caloric intake and caloric retention, and elevated levels of concern about shape, weight, and/or eating, but just fail to meet the diagnostic threshold for bulimia nervosa (BN). fMRI data were collected from eighteen women with subthreshold-BN (Sub-BN) and nineteen healthy control women group-matched for age, education and body mass index (MC) during the weather prediction task. Sub-BN participants demonstrated increased caudate nucleus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation during the learning of probabilistic categories. Though the two subject groups did not differ in behavioral performance, over the course of learning, Sub-BN participants showed a dynamic pattern of brain activity differences when compared to matched control participants. Regions implicated in episodic memory, including the medial temporal lobe (MTL), retrosplenial cortex, middle frontal gyrus, and anterior and posterior cingulate cortex showed decreased activity in the Sub-BN participants compared to MCs during early learning which was followed by increased involvement of the DLPFC during later learning. These findings demonstrate that women with Sub-BN demonstrate differences in fronto-striatal learning system activity, as well as a distinct functional pattern between fronto-striatal and MTL learning systems during the course of implicit probabilistic category learning. PMID:21419229

  13. 4D-Imaging of the Lung: Reproducibility of Lesion Size and Displacement on Helical CT, MRI, and Cone Beam CT in a Ventilated Ex Vivo System

    SciTech Connect

    Biederer, Juergen Dinkel, Julien; Remmert, Gregor; Jetter, Siri; Nill, Simeon; Moser, Torsten; Bendl, Rolf; Thierfelder, Carsten; Fabel, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe; Bock, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata; Hartmann, Guenter; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) imaging is a key to motion-adapted radiotherapy of lung tumors. We evaluated in a ventilated ex vivo system how size and displacement of artificial pulmonary nodules are reproduced with helical 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and linac-integrated cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Four porcine lungs with 18 agarose nodules (mean diameters 1.3-1.9 cm), were ventilated inside a chest phantom at 8/min and subject to 4D-CT (collimation 24 x 1.2 mm, pitch 0.1, slice/increment 24x10{sup 2}/1.5/0.8 mm, pitch 0.1, temporal resolution 0.5 s), 4D-MRI (echo-shared dynamic three-dimensional-flash; repetition/echo time 2.13/0.72 ms, voxel size 2.7 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, temporal resolution 1.4 s) and linac-integrated 4D-CBCT (720 projections, 3-min rotation, temporal resolution {approx}1 s). Static CT without respiration served as control. Three observers recorded lesion size (RECIST-diameters x/y/z) and axial displacement. Interobserver- and interphase-variation coefficients (IO/IP VC) of measurements indicated reproducibility. Results: Mean x/y/z lesion diameters in cm were equal on static and dynamic CT (1.88/1.87; 1.30/1.39; 1.71/1.73; p > 0.05), but appeared larger on MRI and CBCT (2.06/1.95 [p < 0.05 vs. CT]; 1.47/1.28 [MRI vs. CT/CBCT p < 0.05]; 1.86/1.83 [CT vs. CBCT p < 0.05]). Interobserver-VC for lesion sizes were 2.54-4.47% (CT), 2.29-4.48% (4D-CT); 5.44-6.22% (MRI) and 4.86-6.97% (CBCT). Interphase-VC for lesion sizes ranged from 2.28% (4D-CT) to 10.0% (CBCT). Mean displacement in cm decreased from static CT (1.65) to 4D-CT (1.40), CBCT (1.23) and MRI (1.16). Conclusions: Lesion sizes are exactly reproduced with 4D-CT but overestimated on 4D-MRI and CBCT with a larger variability due to limited temporal and spatial resolution. All 4D-modalities underestimate lesion displacement.

  14. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Di; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average

  15. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  16. Primary central nervous system lymphoma with lymphomatosis cerebri in an immunocompetent child: MRI and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun K; Sharma, Punit; Suman, Sudhir K C; Faizi, Nauroze A; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is extremely rare in immunocompetent children. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) findings of such a case in a 14-year old immunocompetent boy. In this patient, PCNSL was associated with lymphomatosis cerebri. Familiarity with the findings of this rare condition will improve the diagnostic confidence of the nuclear radiologist and avoid misdiagnosis.

  17. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Motorized Needle Guide Template for MRI-guided Targeted Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare; Zhang, Elizabeth; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the problems of limited needle insertion accuracy and human error in the use of a conventional needle guide template in MRI-guided prostate intervention, we developed a motorized MRI-compatible needle guide template that resembles a TRUS-guided prostate template. The motorized template allows automated, gapless needle guidance in a 3T MRI scanner with minimal changes in the current clinical procedure. To evaluate the impact of the motorized template on MRI, signal-to-noise ratio and distortion were measured under various system configurations. A maximum of 44% signal-to-noise ratio decrease was found when the ultrasonic motors were running, and a maximum of 0.4% image distortion was observed due to the presence of the motorized template. To measure needle insertion accuracy, we performed four sets of five random target needle insertions mimicking four biopsy procedures, which resulted in an average in-plane targeting error of 0.94 mm with a standard deviation of 0.34 mm. The evaluation studies indicated that the presence and operation of the motorized template in the MRI bore creates insignificant image degradation, and provides submillimeter targeting accuracy. The automated needle guide that is directly controlled by navigation software eliminates human error so that the safety of the procedure can be improved. PMID:23335658

  18. MR system operator: recommended minimum requirements for performing MRI in human subjects in a research setting.

    PubMed

    Calamante, Fernando; Faulkner, William H; Ittermann, Bernd; Kanal, Emanuel; Kimbrell, Vera; Owman, Titti; Reeder, Scott B; Sawyer, Anne M; Shellock, Frank G; van den Brink, Johan S

    2015-04-01

    This article is intended to provide guidelines for the minimum level of safety and operational knowledge that an MR system operator should exhibit in order to safely perform an MR procedure in a human subject in a research setting. This article represents the position of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) regarding this important topic and was developed by members of this society's MR Safety Committee.

  19. 4 Tesla Whole Body MRI MRSI System for Investigation of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    tools for data processing. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Magnetic resonance imaging, gulf war syndrome, alzheimer’s disease , 9 brain 16. PRICE...imaging system fully dedicated to study neurodegenerative disorders of the brain, including Alzheimer’s disease , Parkinson’s disease, Posttraumatic...resolution (0.5 x 0.4 x 2mm) Turbo Spin Echo image showing subfieldshave found that certain diseases, such as of the hippocampus Alzheimer’s disease and

  20. Interventional MRI-guided local delivery of agents into swine bile duct walls using MR-compatible needle-integrated balloon catheter system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Bai, Zhibin; Shi, Yaoping; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Yonggang; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of interventional MRI-guided local agent delivery into pig common bile duct (CBD) walls using a newly designed MR-compatible, needle-integrated balloon catheter system. We first designed a needle-integrated balloon catheter system that comprised of a 22 G MR-compatible Chiba biopsy needle and a conventional 12 mm × 2 cm balloon catheter. Under fluoroscopy guidance, a custom needle-balloon system was positioned in the target CBD via a transcholecystic access. T1-weighted MRI was used to localize and reposition the needle-balloon system in the target. A 0.5 mL mixture of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) and trypan blue dye as well as 5-fluorouracil was delivered into the CBD wall through the needle-balloon system. Post-infusion T1-weighted MRI was obtained and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of CBD walls of pre- and post-MGd-blue infusions were compared by a paired t-test. In addition, post-infusion x-ray cholangiography was achieved to evaluate the potential injuries of CBDs by the needle-balloon system. Subsequent histologic analysis was performed to correlate and confirm the imaging findings. A post-infusion cholangiogram did not show any extravasation of contrast agent, indicating no procedure-related damage to the CBDs. MRI demonstrated clear enhancement of the target bile duct walls infused with MGd-trypan blue dye with average penetration depth of 4.7 ± 1.2 mm and an average MGd perfusion length of 21 ± 1.5 mm in the bile ducts and their surrounding tissues. The average CNR of the post-infusion bile ducts was significant higher than that of the pre-infusion bile ducts (110.6 ± 22 versus 5.7 ± 2.8, p < 0.0001). Histology depicted the blue dye staining and red fluorescence of MGd through the target CBD walls, which was well correlated with the imaging findings. It is feasible to use the new MR-compatible, needle-integrated balloon catheter system for intrabiliary

  1. Design and Application of a New Automated Fluidic Visceral Stimulation Device for Human fMRI Studies of Interoception

    PubMed Central

    Gassert, Roger; Wanek, Johann; Michels, Lars; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the brain centers that mediate the sensory-perceptual processing of visceral afferent signals arising from the body (i.e., interoception) is useful both for characterizing normal brain activity and for understanding clinical disorders related to abnormal processing of visceral sensation. Here, we report a novel closed-system, electrohydrostatically driven master–slave device that was designed and constructed for delivering controlled fluidic stimulations of visceral organs and inner cavities of the human body within the confines of a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The design concept and performance of the device in the MRI environment are described. In addition, the device was applied during a functional MRI (fMRI) investigation of visceral stimulation related to detrusor distention in two representative subjects to verify its feasibility in humans. System evaluation tests demonstrate that the device is MR-compatible with negligible impact on imaging quality [static signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss <2.5% and temporal SNR loss <3.5%], and has an accuracy of 99.68% for flow rate and 99.27% for volume delivery. A precise synchronization of the stimulus delivery with fMRI slice acquisition was achieved by programming the proposed device to detect the 5 V transistor–transistor logic (TTL) trigger signals generated by the MRI scanner. The fMRI data analysis using the general linear model analysis with the standard hemodynamic response function showed increased activations in the network of brain regions that included the insula, anterior and mid-cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices, and thalamus in response to increased distension pressure on viscera. The translation from manually operated devices to an MR-compatible and MR-synchronized device under automatic control represents a useful innovation for clinical neuroimaging studies of human interoception. PMID:27551646

  2. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-3T - Minimum age and service conditions (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  3. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-3T - Private activity bond limit (temporary).

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  4. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-3T - Minimum age and service conditions (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

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  5. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-3T - Minimum age and service conditions (temporary).

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  6. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-3T - Minimum age and service conditions (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

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  7. 26 CFR 1.162-3T - Materials and supplies (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

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  8. 26 CFR 1.162-3T - Materials and supplies (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

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  9. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder. 178.45... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.45 Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 3T cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a minimum water capacity...

  10. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder. 178.45... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.45 Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 3T cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a minimum water capacity...

  11. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

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  12. 49 CFR 178.45 - Specification 3T seamless steel cylinder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  13. 26 CFR 1.6043-3T - Returns regarding liquidation, dissolution, termination, or substantial contraction of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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  14. 26 CFR 1.921-3T - Temporary regulations; Foreign sales corporation general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... corporation general rules. 1.921-3T Section 1.921-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... States § 1.921-3T Temporary regulations; Foreign sales corporation general rules. (a) Exclusion—(1..., shall be determined in the same manner as if the FSC were a foreign corporation which had not elected...

  15. The utility of superparamagnetic contrast agents in MRI: theoretical consideration and applications in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Bjørnerud, Atle; Johansson, Lars

    2004-11-01

    This review will discuss the in vivo physical chemical relaxation properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Various parameters such as size, magnetization, compartmentalization and water exchange effects and how these alter the behavior of the iron oxide particles in an in vitro vs an in vivo situation with special reference to the cardiovascular system will be exemplified. Furthermore, applications using iron oxide particles for vascular, perfusion and viability imaging as well as assessment of the inflammatory status of a given tissue will be discussed.

  16. Micro-MRI-based image acquisition and processing system for assessing the response to therapeutic intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilić, B.; Ladinsky, G. A.; Saha, P. K.; Wehrli, F. W.

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is the cause of over 1.5 million bone fractures annually. Most of these fractures occur in sites rich in trabecular bone, a complex network of bony struts and plates found throughout the skeleton. The three-dimensional structure of the trabecular bone network significantly determines mechanical strength and thus fracture resistance. Here we present a data acquisition and processing system that allows efficient noninvasive assessment of trabecular bone structure through a "virtual bone biopsy". High-resolution MR images are acquired from which the trabecular bone network is extracted by estimating the partial bone occupancy of each voxel. A heuristic voxel subdivision increases the effective resolution of the bone volume fraction map and serves a basis for subsequent analysis of topological and orientational parameters. Semi-automated registration and segmentation ensure selection of the same anatomical location in subjects imaged at different time points during treatment. It is shown with excerpts from an ongoing clinical study of early post-menopausal women, that significant reduction in network connectivity occurs in the control group while the structural integrity is maintained in the hormone replacement group. The system described should be suited for large-scale studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in subjects with metabolic bone disease.

  17. SU-E-I-84: MRI Relaxation Properties of a Pre-Clinical Hypoxia-Sensitive MRI Contrast Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Wilson, G; Chavez, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A possible hypoxia-sensitive MRI agent, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), has been tried to image oxygen level in proton-based MRI (Kodibagkar et al, NMR Biomed, 2008). The induced changes of T1 (or R1) value by the HMDSO as the oxygenation level changes are the principle that the hypoxia agent is based on: the R1 increases as the oxygen level increases. However, as reported previously, the range of R1 values (0.1–0.3 s-1, corresponding to 3–10 s of T1) is not in the range where a regular MRI technique can easily detect the change. In order for this agent to be widely applied in an MRI environment, more relaxation properties of this agent, including T1 in the rotating frame (T1rho) and T2, need to be explored. Here, the relaxation properties of this agent are explored. Methods: A phantom was made with HMDSO, water and mineral oil, each of which was prepared with oxygen and nitrogen, and was imaged in a 3T MRI system. The T1 properties were explored by the inversion recovery (TR=3000ms, TE=65ms) while varying the inversion time (TI), and also by the fast-field-echo (TR=2 ms, TE=2.8ms) while varying the flip angle (FA). T1rho was explored with a 5-pulse spin-locking technique (TR=5000ms, TE=10ms, spin-lock field=500Hz) while varying the spin-lock duration. T2 was explored with multi-shot TSE (TR=2500ms) while varying TE. Results: With the variable FA and TI, the signals of HMDSO with oxygen and nitrogen change in a similar way and do not respond well by the change of oxygen level, which confirms the large T1 value of HMDSO. The T1rho and T2, however, have a better sensitivity. Conclusion: For the possible pre-clinical hypoxia MRI agent (HMDSO), the detection of T1 (or R1) changes may be more challenging than the detection of other relaxation properties, particularly T2, as the oxygen level changes.

  18. How specifically are action verbs represented in the neural motor system: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Wessel O; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-12-01

    Embodied accounts of language processing suggest that sensorimotor areas, generally dedicated to perception and action, are also involved in the processing and representation of word meaning. Support for such accounts comes from studies showing that language about actions selectively modulates the execution of congruent and incongruent motor responses (e.g., Glenberg & Kaschak, 2002), and from functional neuroimaging studies showing that understanding action-related language recruits sensorimotor brain areas (e.g. Hauk, Johnsrude, & Pulvermueller, 2004). In the current experiment we explored the basis of the neural motor system's involvement in representing words denoting actions. Specifically, we investigated whether the motor system's involvement is modulated by the specificity of the kinematics associated with a word. Previous research in the visual domain indicates that words denoting basic level category members lacking a specific form (e.g., bird) are less richly encoded within visual areas than words denoting subordinate level members (e.g., pelican), for which the visual form is better specified (Gauthier, Anderson, Tarr, Skudlarski, & Gore, 1997). In the present study we extend these findings to the motor domain. Modulation of the BOLD response elicited by verbs denoting a general motor program (e.g., to clean) was compared to modulation elicited by verbs denoting a more specific motor program (e.g., to wipe). Conform with our hypothesis, a region within the bilateral inferior parietal lobule, typically serving the representation of action plans and goals, was sensitive to the specificity of motor programs associated with the action verbs. These findings contribute to the growing body of research on embodied language representations by showing that the concreteness of an action-semantic feature is reflected in the neural response to action verbs.

  19. Human lung-derived mature mast cells cultured alone or with mouse 3T3 fibroblasts maintain an ultrastructural phenotype different from that of human mast cells that develop from human cord blood cells cultured with 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, A. M.; Furitsu, T.; Estrella, P.; Ishizaka, T.

    1991-01-01

    Culture systems designed to maintain or develop human mast cells have proved difficult, yet these systems would provide valuable resources for future investigations of human mast cell biology. Cocultures of either isolated mature human lung mast cells (Levi-Schaffer et al., J Immunol 1987, 139:494-500) or human cord blood mononuclear cells (Furitsu, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1989, 86:10039-10043) with 3T3 embryonic mouse skin fibroblasts have implicated fibroblasts as an important factor in the successful maintenance and development of human mast cells in vitro. The authors cultured isolated, mature human lung mast cells either with or without 3T3 cells for 1 month and examined their ultrastructural phenotype. Mast cell viability in each circumstance was equivalent, but mast cell yield was improved in the presence of 3T3 cells. The ultrastructural phenotype was identical in both culture systems. Mast cells were shown to maintain the phenotype of their in vivo lung counterparts (ie, scroll granules predominanted, and numerous lipid bodies were present). This ultrastructural phenotype differs from that of mast cells that develop in cocultures of human cord blood cells and 3T3 cells, where developing mast cells with crystalline granules and few lipid bodies prevail, a phenotype much like that of human skin mast cells in vivo (Furitsu, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1989, 86:10039-10043). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1750506

  20. Simulation and analysis of the interactions between split gradient coils and a split magnet cryostat in an MRI-PET system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Sanchez-Lopez, Hector; Poole, Michael; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-09-01

    Splitting a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet into two halves can provide a central region to accommodate other modalities, such as positron emission tomography (PET). This approach, however, produces challenges in the design of the gradient coils in terms of gradient performance and fabrication. In this paper, the impact of a central gap in a split MRI system was theoretically studied by analysing the performance of split, actively-shielded transverse gradient coils. In addition, the effects of the eddy currents induced in the cryostat on power loss, mechanical vibration and magnetic field harmonics were also investigated. It was found, as expected, that the gradient performance tended to decrease as the central gap increased. Furthermore, the effects of the eddy currents were heightened as a consequence of splitting the gradient assembly into two halves. An optimal central gap size was found, such that the split gradient coils designed with this central gap size could produce an engineering solution with an acceptable trade-off between gradient performance and eddy current effects. These investigations provide useful information on the inherent trade-offs in hybrid MRI imaging systems.

  1. Effect of pycnogenol on glucose transport in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Hyun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2010-08-01

    Pycnogenol, a procyanidins-enriched extract of Pinus maritima bark, possesses antidiabetic properties, which improves the altered parameters of glucose metabolism that are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Since the insulin-stimulated antidiabetic activities of natural bioactive compounds are mediated by GLUT4 via the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and/or p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) pathway, the effects of pycnogenol were examined on the molecular mechanism of glucose uptake by the glucose transport system. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with various concentrations of pycnogenol, and glucose uptake was examined using a non-radioisotope enzymatic assay and by molecular events associated with the glucose transport system using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results show that pycnogenol increased glucose uptake in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and increased the relative abundance of both GLUT4 and Akt mRNAs through the PI3K pathway in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, pycnogenol restored the PI3K antagonist-induced inhibition of glucose uptake in the presence of wartmannin, an inhibitor of the PI3K. Overall, these results indicate that pycnogenol may stimulate glucose uptake via the PI3K dependent tyrosine kinase pathways involving Akt. Further the results suggest that pycnogenol might be useful in maintaining blood glucose control.

  2. Minimum Field Strength Simulator for Proton Density Weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiyi; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a framework for simulating low-field proton-density weighted MRI acquisitions based on high-field acquisitions, which could be used to predict the minimum B0 field strength requirements for MRI techniques. This framework would be particularly useful in the evaluation of de-noising and constrained reconstruction techniques. Materials and Methods Given MRI raw data, lower field MRI acquisitions can be simulated based on the signal and noise scaling with field strength. Certain assumptions are imposed for the simulation and their validity is discussed. A validation experiment was performed using a standard resolution phantom imaged at 0.35 T, 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T. This framework was then applied to two sample proton-density weighted MRI applications that demonstrated estimation of minimum field strength requirements: real-time upper airway imaging and liver proton-density fat fraction measurement. Results The phantom experiment showed good agreement between simulated and measured images. The SNR difference between simulated and measured was ≤ 8% for the 1.5T, 3T, and 7T cases which utilized scanners with the same geometry and from the same vendor. The measured SNR at 0.35T was 1.8- to 2.5-fold less than predicted likely due to unaccounted differences in the RF receive chain. The predicted minimum field strength requirements for the two sample applications were 0.2 T and 0.3 T, respectively. Conclusions Under certain assumptions, low-field MRI acquisitions can be simulated from high-field MRI data. This enables prediction of the minimum field strength requirements for a broad range of MRI techniques. PMID:27136334

  3. Targeting Accuracy, Procedure Times and User Experience of 240 Experimental MRI Biopsies Guided by a Clinical Add-On Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Harald; Riedel, Tim; Garnov, Nikita; Thörmer, Gregor; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives MRI is of great clinical utility for the guidance of special diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The majority of such procedures are performed iteratively ("in-and-out") in standard, closed-bore MRI systems with control imaging inside the bore and needle adjustments outside the bore. The fundamental limitations of such an approach have led to the development of various assistance techniques, from simple guidance tools to advanced navigation systems. The purpose of this work was to thoroughly assess the targeting accuracy, workflow and usability of a clinical add-on navigation solution on 240 simulated biopsies by different medical operators. Methods Navigation relied on a virtual 3D MRI scene with real-time overlay of the optically tracked biopsy needle. Smart reference markers on a freely adjustable arm ensured proper registration. Twenty-four operators – attending (AR) and resident radiologists (RR) as well as medical students (MS) – performed well-controlled biopsies of 10 embedded model targets (mean diameter: 8.5 mm, insertion depths: 17-76 mm). Targeting accuracy, procedure times and 13 Likert scores on system performance were determined (strong agreement: 5.0). Results Differences in diagnostic success rates (AR: 93%, RR: 88%, MS: 81%) were not significant. In contrast, between-group differences in biopsy times (AR: 4:15, RR: 4:40, MS: 5:06 min:sec) differed significantly (p<0.01). Mean overall rating was 4.2. The average operator would use the system again (4.8) and stated that the outcome justifies the extra effort (4.4). Lowest agreement was reported for the robustness against external perturbations (2.8). Conclusions The described combination of optical tracking technology with an automatic MRI registration appears to be sufficiently accurate for instrument guidance in a standard (closed-bore) MRI environment. High targeting accuracy and usability was demonstrated on a relatively large number of procedures and operators. Between

  4. Integrated speech enhancement for functional MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Nishank; Milani, Ali A; Panahi, Issa; Briggs, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated speech enhancement (SE) method for the noisy MRI environment. We show that the performance of SE system improves considerably when the speech signal dominated by MRI acoustic noise at very low SNR is enhanced in two successive stages using two-channel SE methods followed by a single-channel post processing SE algorithm. Actual MRI noisy speech data are used in our experiments showing the improved performance of the proposed SE method.

  5. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  6. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  7. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  8. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  9. Quantification of human high-energy phosphate metabolite concentrations at 3 T with partial volume and sensitivity corrections.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Gabr, Refaat E; Schär, Michael; Weiss, Robert G; Bottomley, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    Practical noninvasive methods for the measurement of absolute metabolite concentrations are key to the assessment of the depletion of myocardial metabolite pools which occurs with several cardiac diseases, including infarction and heart failure. Localized MRS offers unique noninvasive access to many metabolites, but is often confounded by nonuniform sensitivity and partial volume effects in the large, poorly defined voxels commonly used for the detection of low-concentration metabolites with surface coils. These problems are exacerbated at higher magnetic field strengths by greater radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneity and differences in RF penetration with heteronuclear concentration referencing. An example is the (31)P measurement of cardiac adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) concentrations, which, although central to cardiac energetics, have not been measured at field strengths above 1.5 T. Here, practical acquisition and analysis protocols are presented for the quantification of [PCr] and [ATP] with one-dimensionally resolved surface coil spectra and concentration referencing at 3 T. The effects of nonuniform sensitivity and partial tissue volumes are addressed at 3 T by the application of MRI-based three-dimensional sensitivity weighting and tissue segmentation. The method is validated in phantoms of different sizes and concentrations, and used to measure [PCr] and [ATP] in healthy subjects. In calf muscle (n = 8), [PCr] = 24.7 ± 3.4 and [ATP] = 5.7 ± 1.3 µmol/g wet weight, whereas, in heart (n = 18), [PCr] = 10.4 ± 1.5 and [ATP] = 6.0 ± 1.1 µmol/g wet weight (all mean ± SD), consistent with previous reports at lower fields. The method enables, for the first time, the efficient, semi-automated quantification of high-energy phosphate metabolites in humans at 3 T with nonuniform excitation and detection.

  10. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  11. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7 Tesla fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N.; Hamalainen, Matti S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Object To map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we utilized the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7 Tesla fMRI compared to 3 Tesla and the time efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1 mm-isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). Results The delineated Pearson’s correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Conclusion Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson’s disease and other motor disorders. PMID:27126248

  12. Bloch-Siegert B1-Mapping Improves Accuracy and Precision of Longitudinal Relaxation Measurements in the Breast at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Whisenant, Jennifer G; Dortch, Richard D; Grissom, William; Kang, Hakmook; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    Variable flip angle (VFA) sequences are a popular method of calculating T1 values, which are required in a quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). B1 inhomogeneities are substantial in the breast at 3 T, and these errors negatively impact the accuracy of the VFA approach, thus leading to large errors in the DCE-MRI parameters that could limit clinical adoption of the technique. This study evaluated the ability of Bloch-Siegert B1 mapping to improve the accuracy and precision of VFA-derived T1 measurements in the breast. Test-retest MRI sessions were performed on 16 women with no history of breast disease. T1 was calculated using the VFA sequence, and B1 field variations were measured using the Bloch-Siegert methodology. As a gold standard, inversion recovery (IR) measurements of T1 were performed. Fibroglandular tissue and adipose tissue from each breast were segmented using the IR images, and the mean T1 was calculated for each tissue. Accuracy was evaluated by percent error (%err). Reproducibility was assessed via the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the mean difference and repeatability coefficient (r). After B1 correction, %err significantly (P < .001) decreased from 17% to 8.6%, and the 95% CI and r decreased from ±94 to ±38 milliseconds and from 276 to 111 milliseconds, respectively. Similar accuracy and reproducibility results were observed in the adipose tissue of the right breast and in both tissues of the left breast. Our data show that Bloch-Siegert B1 mapping improves accuracy and precision of VFA-derived T1 measurements in the breast.

  13. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  14. NOTE: Cardiac phase-specific shimming (CPSS) for SSFP MR cine imaging at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubach, Miriam R.; Bornstedt, Axel; Hombach, Vinzenz; Merkle, Nico; Schär, Michael; Spiess, Jochen; Nienhaus, Gerd U.; Rasche, Volker

    2009-10-01

    The application of steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) techniques at 3 T systems is still limited by their sensitivity to magnetic field inhomogeneities. Especially during imaging of the heart, the arising signal voids and distortions in the myocardium currently often limit the diagnostic value of the resulting images. Dedicated shim systems providing higher order shimming capabilities have been applied to improve the field homogeneity across the heart. In this study, the potential benefit of applying a cardiac phase-specific shim (CPSS) was investigated. The cardiac phase dependence of the magnetic field distortions over the heart was assessed and the potential gain in field homogeneity by CPSS was evaluated. CPSS was successfully applied in volunteers and yielded significant improvement in the main magnetic field homogeneity over the entire cardiac cycle.

  15. Novel magnetomechanical MR compatible vibrational device for producing kinesthetic illusion during fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Sarah J.; Borreggine, Kristin; Heilman, Jeremiah; Griswold, Mark; Walter, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Functional MRI (fMRI) can provide insights into the functioning of the sensorimotor system, which is of particular interest in studying people with movement disorders or chronic pain conditions. This creates a demand for manipulanda that can fit and operate within the environment of a MRI scanner. Here, the authors present a magnetomechanical device that delivers a vibrotactile sensation to the skin with a force of approximately 9 N. Methods: MRI compatibility of the device was tested in a 3 T scanner using a phantom to simulate the head. Preliminary investigation into the effectiveness of the device at producing cortical and subcortical activity was also conducted with a group of seven healthy subjects. The vibration was applied to the right extensor carpi ulnaris tendon to induce a kinesthetic illusion of flexion and extension of the wrist. Results: The MRI compatibility tests showed the device did not produce image artifacts and the generated electromagnetic field did not disrupt the static magnetic field of the scanner or its operation. The subject group results showed activity in the contralateral putamen, premotor cortex, and dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex. Ipsilaterally, there was increased activity in the superior and inferior parietal lobules. Areas that activated bilaterally included the thalamus, anterior cingulate, secondary somatosensory areas (S2), temporal lobes, and visual association areas. Conclusions: This device offers an effective tool with precise control over the vibratory stimulus, delivering higher forces than some other types of devices (e.g., piezoelectric actuators). It can be useful for investigating sensory systems and sensorimotor integration. PMID:24320459

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  17. Non-Invasive Evaluation of the GABAergic/Glutamatergic System in Autistic Patients Observed by MEGA-Editing Proton MR Spectroscopy Using a Clinical 3 Tesla Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harada, Masafumi; Taki, Masako M.; Nose, Ayumi; Kubo, Hitoshi; Mori, Kenji; Nishitani, Hiromu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Amino acids related to neurotransmitters and the GABAergic/glutamatergic system were measured using a 3 T-MRI instrument in 12 patients with autism and 10 normal controls. All measurements were performed in the frontal lobe (FL) and lenticular nuclei (LN) using a conventional sequence for n-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and glutamate (Glu), and the…

  18. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  19. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  20. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1-LPA6) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA1 and LPA5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA1.

  1. Standardized Reporting of Prostate MRI: Comparison of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) Version 1 and Version 2

    PubMed Central

    Tewes, Susanne; Mokov, Nikolaj; Hartung, Dagmar; Schick, Volker; Peters, Inga; Schedl, Peter; Pertschy, Stefanie; Wacker, Frank; Voshage, Götz; Hueper, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Objective of our study was to determine the agreement between version 1 (v1) and v2 of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) for evaluation of multiparametric prostate MRI (mpMRI) and to compare their diagnostic accuracy, their inter-observer agreement and practicability. Material and Methods mpMRI including T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCE) of 54 consecutive patients, who subsequently underwent MRI-guided in-bore biopsy were re-analyzed according to PI-RADS v1 and v2 by two independent readers. Diagnostic accuracy for detection of prostate cancer (PCa) was assessed using ROC-curve analysis. Agreement between PI-RADS versions and observers was calculated and the time needed for scoring was determined. Results MRI-guided biopsy revealed PCa in 31 patients. Diagnostic accuracy for detection of PCa was equivalent with both PI-RADS versions for reader 1 with sensitivities and specificities of 84%/91% (AUC = 0.91 95%CI[0.8–1]) for PI-RADS v1 and 100%/74% (AUC = 0.92 95% CI[0.8–1]) for PI-RADS v2. Reader 2 achieved similar diagnostic accuracy with sensitivity and specificity of 74%/91% (AUC = 0.88 95%CI[0.8–1]) for PI-RADS v1 and 81%/91% (AUC = 0.91 95%CI[0.8–1]) for PI-RADS v2. Agreement between scores determined with different PI-RADS versions was good (reader 1: κ = 0.62, reader 2: κ = 0.64). Inter-observer agreement was moderate with PI-RADS v2 (κ = 0.56) and fair with v1 (κ = 0.39). The time required for building the PI-RADS score was significantly lower with PI-RADS v2 compared to v1 (24.7±2.3 s vs. 41.9±2.6 s, p<0.001). Conclusion Agreement between PI-RADS versions was high and both versions revealed high diagnostic accuracy for detection of PCa. Due to better inter-observer agreement for malignant lesions and less time demand, the new PI-RADS version could be more practicable for clinical routine. PMID:27657729

  2. The impact of ultra-high field MRI on Cognitive and Computational Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Federico; Yacoub, Essa; Kemper, Valentin; Moerel, Michelle; Uludag, Kamil; De Weerd, Peter; Ugurbil, Kamil; Goebel, Rainer; Formisano, Elia

    2017-04-07

    The ability to measure functional brain responses non-invasively with ultra high field MRI (7 T and above) represents a unique opportunity in advancing our understanding of the human brain. Compared to lower fields (3 T and below), ultra high field MRI has an increased sensitivity, which can be used to acquire functional images with greater spatial resolution, and greater specificity of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal to the underlying neuronal responses. Together, increased resolution and specificity enable investigating brain functions at a submillimeter scale, which so far could only be done with invasive techniques. At this mesoscopic spatial scale, perception, cognition and behavior can be probed at the level of fundamental units of neural computations, such as cortical columns, cortical layers, and subcortical nuclei. This represents a unique and distinctive advantage that differentiates ultra high from lower field imaging and that can foster a tighter link between fMRI and computational modeling of neural networks. So far, functional brain mapping at submillimeter scale has focused on the processing of sensory information and on well-known systems for which extensive information is available from invasive recordings in animals. It remains an open challenge to extend this methodology to uniquely human functions and, more generally, to systems for which animal models may be problematic. To succeed, the possibility to acquire high-resolution functional data with large spatial coverage, the availability of computational models of neural processing as well as accurate biophysical modeling of neurovascular coupling at mesoscopic scale all appear necessary.

  3. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  4. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  5. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20 to 40 minutes. top of page Contrast material For some MRI exams, a contrast material called gadolinium will need to be injected into a vein in the arm. While contrast material sometimes improves the MRI images, during pregnancy the ...

  6. WE-B-BRD-00: MRI for Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  7. Evaluation of the PI-RADS Scoring System for Classifying mpMRI Findings in Men with Suspicion of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georg; Kremser, Christian; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Jaschke, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the ESUR scoring system (PI-RADS) for multiparametric MRI of the prostate in clinical routine and to define a reliable way to generate an overall PI-RADS score. Methods. Retrospective analysis of all patients with a history of negative prebiopsies, who underwent 3 Tesla multiparametric MRI from October 2011 to April 2013 (n = 143): PI-RADS scores for each single modality were defined. To generate the overall PI-RADS score, an algorithm based approach summing up each single-modality score to a sum-score was compared to a more subjective approach, weighting the single modalities dependent on the radiologist's impression. Because of ongoing cancer suspicion 73 patients underwent targeted mpMRI-ultrasound image fusion rebiopsy. For this group thresholds for tumor incidences and malignancy were calculated. Results. 39 (53%) out of 73 targeted rebiopsies were cancer positive. The PI-RADS score correlated well with tumor incidence (AUC of 0.86, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.94) and malignancy (AUC 0.84, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.99). Regarding the sum-score a threshold of ≥10 turned out to be reliable for cancer detection (sensitivity 90%, specificity 62%) and for ≥13 for indicating higher malignancy (Gleason ≥4 + 3) (sensitivity 80%, specificity 86%). To generate the overall PI-RADS score, the use of an algorithm based approach was more reliable than that of the approach based on the radiologist's impression. Conclusion. The presented scoring system correlates well with tumor incidence and malignancy. To generate the overall PI-RADS score, it seems to be advisable to use an algorithm based instead of a subjective approach. PMID:24396825

  8. Ultrasound stimulation increases proliferation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical stimulation of bone increases bone mass and fracture healing, at least in part, through increases in proliferation of osteoblasts and osteoprogenitor cells. Researchers have previously performed in vitro studies of ultrasound-induced osteoblast proliferation but mostly used fixed ultrasound settings and have reported widely varying and inconclusive results. Here we critically investigated the effects of the excitation parameters of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation on proliferation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells in monolayer cultures. Methods We used a custom-designed ultrasound exposure system to vary the key ultrasound parameters—intensity, frequency and excitation duration. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded in 12-well cell culture plates. Unless otherwise specified, treated cells, in groups of three, were excited twice for 10 min with an interval of 24 h in between after cell seeding. Proliferation rates of these cells were determined using BrdU and MTS assays 24 h after the last LIPUS excitation. All data are presented as the mean ± standard error. The statistical significance was determined using Student's two-sample two-tailed t tests. Results Using discrete LIPUS intensities ranging from 1 to 500 mW/cm2 (SATA, spatial average-temporal average), we found that approximately 75 mW/cm2 produced the greatest increase in osteoblast proliferation. Ultrasound exposures at higher intensity (approximately 465 mW/cm2) significantly reduced proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells, suggesting that high-intensity pulsed ultrasound may increase apoptosis or loss of adhesion in these cells. Variation in LIPUS frequency from 0.5 MHz to 5 MHz indicated that osteoblast proliferation rate was not frequency dependent. We found no difference in the increase in proliferation rate if LIPUS was applied for 30 min/day or 10 min/day, indicating a habituation response. Conclusion This study concludes that a short-term stimulation with optimum intensity

  9. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  10. Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids released through the cytochrome P-450 pathway regulate 3T6 fibroblast growth.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Diana; Moreno, Juan José

    2006-12-01

    Eicosanoids participate in the regulation of cellular proliferation. Thus, we observed that prostaglandin E(2) interaction with membrane receptors is involved in the control of 3T6 fibroblast growth induced by serum. However, our results suggested that another arachidonic acid pathway might be implicated in these events. Our results show that 3T6 fibroblasts synthesized hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) such as 12-HETE through the cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) pathway. However, 3T6 fibroblasts did not produce leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), and lipoxygenase inhibitors and LT antagonists failed to inhibit 3T6 fibroblast growth induced by FBS. In contrast, we observed that CYP450 inhibitors such as SKF-525A, 17-octadecynoic acid, 1-aminobenzotriazole, and 6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanoic acid reduced 12(S)-HETE levels, 3T6 fibroblast growth, and DNA synthesis induced by FBS. The impairment of DNA synthesis and 3T6 fibroblast growth induced by SKF-525A were reversed by exogenous addition of HETEs. Moreover, we report that 5-HETE, 12(S)-HETE, and 15(S)-HETE are mitogenic on 3T6 fibroblast in the absence of another growth factor, and this effect was dependent on the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway. In conclusion, our results show that HETEs, probably produced by CYP450, are involved in the control of 3T6 fibroblast growth.

  11. 26 CFR 1.509(a)-3T - Broadly, publicly supported organizations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Broadly, publicly supported organizations (temporary). 1.509(a)-3T Section 1.509(a)-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE..., adversely affect the status of the organization as normally meeting the one-third support test for any...

  12. MRI: update on technology diffusion and acquisition.

    PubMed

    Hoppszallern, S; Hughes, C; Zimmerman, R A

    1991-04-01

    Over the past three years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become accepted as a valuable diagnostic tool, and its applications continue to expand. During this time, the number of units installed in the United States doubled. By 1990 about 2,000 MRI units were in place in the United States and nearly 20 percent of the MRI-installed base was mobile, according to a research study conducted by the Hadley Hart Group (Chicago) and Drew Consultants, Inc. (Concord, MA). With the introduction of the prospective payment system, many hospitals were hesitant to spend limited capital on new technology, such as MRI. At the same time, freestanding diagnostic imaging centers were on the rise. Some hospitals and entrepreneurs who foresaw the potential of MRI in health care pioneered its use in the clinical setting. Hospitals began to examine new partnership arrangements and alternative forms of financing, so that they too could offer MRI services. By the end of 1988, the majority of hospitals offering MRI services did not own their own unit and about 40 percent of the hospitals offering MRI services were in a mobile configuration according to the Hadley Hart Group. While the technology has been diffused into 100-bed hospitals via mobile service vendors in some parts of the country, many medium-sized and large hospitals also have entered the MRI services market in this fashion. In the larger hospitals, the patient demand or need for the service often would justify acquisition of MRI, but the expense of the technology, and in many areas restrictive state health planning policies, modified purchase of MRI systems by hospitals. Mobile service vendors offered hospitals a way to startup MRI services in a limited fashion without a major capital expenditure and its associated risk. As hospitals gain experience with mobile MRI and achieve or exceed their early utilization projections, administrators are reevaluating the need to expand services to a full-time fixed site. Early fixed

  13. Quantifying fat and lean muscle in the lower legs of women with knee osteoarthritis using two different MRI systems.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Karen; Davison, Michael J; Noseworthy, Michael; Adachi, Jonathan D; Maly, Monica R

    2016-06-01

    Decreased muscle mass and increased fat mass are commonly seen in the thighs of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Despite the role of calf muscles in activities of daily living and knee mechanics, little work has investigated calf changes in knee OA. Unlike the thigh, muscle and fat in the lower leg can be imaged using a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. We aimed to assess agreement between subcutaneous fat, intermuscular fat (IMF), intramuscular fat (intraMF), and lean muscle volumes acquired using a peripheral 1.0T as compared to a reference whole-body 3.0T MRI scanner. A calf MRI scan from each scanner was acquired from twenty women >55 years with knee OA. The different tissues were segmented on each of ten axial slices for every participant using SliceOmatic 5.0 (Tomovision, Magog, QC). Tissue volumes were determined for each outcome. Agreement between tissue volumes from the two scanners was assessed using intraclass correlation (ICC(2,1)) coefficients, standard error, and Bland-Altman plots. Agreement between tissue volumes was strong to very strong, with ICCs ranging from 0.842 to 0.991 for all outcomes. However, wide confidence intervals for IMF and intraMF suggest there is less confidence in agreement with segmentation of images from the 1.0T scanner generally underestimating fat volume relative to the 3.0T scanner. The 3.0T's superior between-tissue contrast likely resulted in more accurate segmentation of IMF and intraMF compared to the 1.0T scanner. Comparisons of tissue volume between studies using different scanners/sequences should be interpreted cautiously.

  14. Regulation of Na+-H+ exchange in normal NIH-3T3 cells and in NIH-3T3 cells expressing the ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, N.E.; Knapik, J.; Strebel, F.; Tarpley, W.G.; Gorman, R.R.

    1989-04-01

    Our laboratory and others have demonstrated that Na+-H+ exchange can be regulated by two different pathways; one that is mediated by an inositol trisphosphate-stimulated increase in intracellular calcium activity, and one that is mediated by an increase in protein kinase C activity. To determine whether one of these pathways is more important than the other, or whether one pathway is physiologically relevant, we employed normal NIH-3T3 cells (3T3 cells) and NIH-3T3 cells expressing the EJ human bladder ras oncogene (EJ cells). The EJ cells were chosen because they provide a genetic model that does not exhibit serum- or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated inositol trisphosphate release or Ca2+ mobilization. It was found that serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange was more pronounced in EJ cells than in control 3T3 cells. As expected, serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in 3T3 cells was inhibited by chelating intracellular Ca2+ with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator quin2, by the intracellular Ca2+ antagonist 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), and by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine. In contrast, these agents did not inhibit serum- or PDGF-stimulated Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells. Activators of protein kinase C (e.g., 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol or biologically active phorbol esters) were found to stimulate Na+-H+ exchange in EJ cells to the same extent as serum. However, these agents were considerably less effective than serum in control 3T3 cells. Despite these findings, PDGF did not stimulate diacylglycerol levels in EJ cells.

  15. SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in tissue from Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis patients: Release of free Gd from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jerrold L.; Chandra, Subhash; Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Joshua M.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (GBMCA) have been linked to a new disease, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), with skin and systemic toxicity and death in certain patients with renal failure. Due to widespread use of GBMCA in diagnostic MRI, it is essential to study their excretion, metabolism, and target sites in cells and tissues. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used for imaging Gd isotopes in relation to calcium distributions in histologic sections of human tissues. SIMS imaging revealed two types of Gd localization in skin biopsies of patients who received GBMCA. The Gd was present in micrometer size deposits in association with calcium, and in detectable amounts in a more diffuse cellular distribution. Only the Gd-containing deposits associated with Ca and P were detectable using SEM/EDS. As only insoluble deposits remain in the biopsy tissues after aqueous and organic solvent processing of the tissue, our observations support release of free Gd from the GBMCA and selective localization of insoluble Gd in the target tissue from patients with NSF. This study opens new novel applications of SIMS for characterization of the safety of GBMCA.

  16. Functional MRI of Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients Using Novel MR-Compatible Hand Robots.

    PubMed

    Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Konstas, Angelos A; Astrakas, Loukas G; Singhal, Aneesh B; Moskowitz, Michael A; Rosen, Bruce R; Tzika, A Aria

    2008-09-27

    We monitored brain activation after chronic stroke by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a novel MR-compatible, hand-induced, robotic device (MR_CHIROD). We evaluated 60 fMRI datasets on a 3 T MR system from five right-handed patients with left-sided stroke >/=6 months prior and mild to moderate hemiparesis. Patients trained the paretic right hand at approximately 75% of maximum strength with an exercise ball for 1 hour/day, 3 days/week for 4 weeks. Multi-level fMRI data were acquired before, during training, upon completion of training, and after a non-training period using parallel imaging employing GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisitions (GRAPPA) while the participant used the MR_CHIROD. Training increased the number of activated sensorimotor cortical voxels, indicating functional cortical plasticity in chronic stroke patients. The effect persisted four weeks after training completion, indicating the potential of rehabilitation in inducing cortical plasticity in chronic stroke patients.

  17. Preliminary validation of the Knee Inflammation MRI Scoring System (KIMRISS) for grading bone marrow lesions in osteoarthritis of the knee: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Dean; Buller, M; Wichuk, Stephanie; McDougall, Dave; Lambert, Robert GW; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2017-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow lesions (BML) are an MRI feature of osteoarthritis (OA) offering a potential target for therapy. We developed the Knee Inflammation MRI Scoring System (KIMRISS) to semiquantitatively score BML with high sensitivity to small changes, and compared feasibility, reliability and responsiveness versus the established MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS). Methods KIMRISS incorporates a web-based graphic overlay to facilitate detailed regional BML scoring. Observers scored BML by MOAKS and KIMRISS on sagittal fluid-sensitive sequences. Exercise 1 focused on interobserver reliability in Osteoarthritis Initiative observational data, with 4 readers (two experienced/two new to KIMRISS) scoring BML in 80 patients (baseline/1 year). Exercise 2 focused on responsiveness in an open-label trial of adalimumab, with 2 experienced readers scoring BML in 16 patients (baseline/12 weeks). Results Scoring time was similar for KIMRISS and MOAKS. Interobserver reliability of KIMRISS was equivalent to MOAKS for BML status (ICC=0.84 vs 0.79), but consistently better than MOAKS for change in BML: Exercise 1 (ICC 0.82 vs 0.53), Exercise 2 (ICC 0.90 vs 0.32), and in new readers (0.87–0.92 vs 0.32–0.51). KIMRISS BML was more responsive than MOAKS BML: post-treatment BML improvement in Exercise 2 reached statistical significance for KIMRISS (SRM −0.69, p=0.015), but not MOAKS (SRM −0.12, p=0.625). KIMRISS BML also more strongly correlated to WOMAC scores than MOAKS BML (r=0.80 vs 0.58, p<0.05). Conclusions KIMRISS BML scoring was highly feasible, and was more reliable for assessment of change and more responsive to change than MOAKS BML for expert and new readers. PMID:28123780

  18. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  19. T1 characteristics of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis on 3T MRI—a predictor of early interstitial change?

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Matthew; Kershaw, Lucy; Semple, Scott; Schembri, Nicola; Chin, Calvin; Murchison, John T.; Hirani, Nik; van Beek, Edwin J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is routinely used for diagnosis and characterisation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The technique however has limited sensitivity in detection and monitoring of early fibrotic changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate T1 characteristics in the radiologically diseased lung parenchyma in IPF patient compared to apparently normal parenchyma in both interstitial lung disease (ILD) patients and healthy volunteers and to investigate the feasibility of the technique in prediction of early fibrotic lung changes that may not be visible on CT. Methods Ten patients with IPF underwent high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the same day of attendance. 3T MRI was repeated in seven patients with IPF to test the reproducibility of results. The control group included healthy volunteers (n=10). A modified look-locker inversion-recovery (MOLLI) sequence (124×192 acquisition matrix; 8 mm slice) was performed during a 15–20 s breathhold in a single slice. The position of MR slice was pre-selected where there was CT evidence of normal and fibrotic lung. MOLLI imaging was performed prior to the contrast administration, and at 15, 25, 30 and 35 min post Gadolinium. The imaging data were then processed with a curve-fitting technique to estimate T1 values. T1 values of the apparent fibrotic and normal lung in IPF patients and normal lung were compared. Results Fibrotic lung had a higher pre-contrast T1 than either morphologically normal lung in ILD patients or control lung (P=0.02) in healthy volunteers (1309±123, 1069±71, and 1011±172 ms, respectively). Morphologically normal lung T1 and control lung T1 were not significantly different pre-contrast, however, at 10 min after administration of Gadolinium, control lung had a significantly shorter T1 than either fibrotic or morphologically normal lung (494±34, 670±63, and 619±41 ms, respectively; P=0.001). T1 for fibrotic lung continued to

  20. Quantifiable Imaging Biomarkers for Evaluation of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament Using 3-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katharine J.; Surowiec, Rachel K.; Ho, Charles P.; Devitt, Brian M.; Fripp, Jurgen; Smith, W. Sean; Spiegl, Ulrich J.; Dornan, Grant J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2 and T2 star (T2*) mapping, have been used to evaluate ligamentous tissue in vitro and to identify significant changes in structural integrity of a healing ligament. These studies lay the foundation for a clinical study that uses quantitative mapping to evaluate ligaments in vivo, particularly the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To establish quantitative mapping as a clinical tool for identifying and evaluating chronic or acute PCL injuries, T2 and T2* values first must be determined for an asymptomatic population. Purpose: To quantify T2 and T2* mapping properties, including texture variables (entropy, variance, contrast, homogeneity), of the PCL in an asymptomatic population. It was hypothesized that biomarker values would be consistent throughout the ligament, as measured across 3 clinically relevant subregions (proximal, middle, and distal thirds) in the asymptomatic cohort. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Unilateral knee MRI scans were acquired for 25 asymptomatic subjects with a 3.0-T MRI system using T2 and T2* mapping sequences in the sagittal plane. The PCL was manually segmented and divided into thirds (proximal, middle, and distal). Summary statistics for T2 and T2* values were calculated. Intra- and interrater reliability was assessed across 3 raters to 2 time points. Results: The asymptomatic PCL cohort had mean T2 values of 36.7, 29.2, and 29.6 ms in the distal, middle, and proximal regions, respectively. The distal PCL exhibited significantly higher mean, variance, and contrast and lower homogeneity of T2 values than the middle and proximal subregions (P < .05). T2* results exhibited substantial positive skew and were therefore presented as median and quartile (Q) values. Median T2* values were 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.8-8.9 ms), 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 7.0-8.5 ms), and 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.4-8.2 ms) in the distal, middle, and proximal subregions

  1. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Bruce E; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-11-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed.

  2. Increased Oxidative Stress in Cultured 3T3-L1 Cells was Attenuated by Berberine Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Fen; Yasui, Naomi; Negishb, Hiroko; Kishimoto, Aya; Sun, Jian-Ning; Ikeda, Katsumi

    2015-06-01

    The 3T3-L1 cell line is one of the most well-characterized and reliable models for studying adipocytes. Increased oxidative stress in accumulated fat was found in 3T3-L1 cells. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, could suppress fat deposition in 3T3-L1 cells; however, whether berberine suppresses increased oxidative stress is not well known. In this study, we observed the effect of berberine on increased oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 cells. 3T3-L1 cells were cultured and treated with berberine (5-20 μM) from day 3 to day 8. We confirmed that berberine markedly inhibited fat accumulation and lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and decreased triglyceride content. Berberine inhibited increased oxidative stress in 3T3-L1 cells by suppressing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene expression and GPx activity. Berberine also markedly reduced adipokines secreted by adipocytes, including leptin and resistin.

  3. Inhibitory effect of apocynin on methylglyoxal-mediated glycation in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kwang Sik; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Young Seol; Choi, Eun Mi

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG), a highly reactive metabolite of hyperglycemia, can enhance protein glycation, oxidative stress or inflammation. The present study investigated the effects of apocynin on the mechanisms associated with MG toxicity in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Pretreatment of MC3T3-E1 cells with apocynin prevented the MG-induced protein glycation and formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide in MC3T3-E1 cells. In addition, apocynin increased glutathione levels and restored the activity of glyoxalase I inhibited by MG. These findings suggest that apocynin provide a protective action against MG-induced cell damage by reducing oxidative stress and by increasing the MG detoxification system. Apocynin treatment decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 induced by MG. Additionally, the nitric oxide level reduced by MG was significantly increased by apocynin. These findings indicate that apocynin might exert its therapeutic effects via upregulation of glyoxalase system and antioxidant activity. Taken together, apocynin may prove to be an effective treatment for diabetic osteopathy.

  4. Interface- and discontinuity-aware numerical schemes for plasma 3-T radiation diffusion in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William W. Scannapieco, Anthony J.

    2015-11-01

    A set of numerical schemes is developed for two- and three-dimensional time-dependent 3-T radiation diffusion equations in systems involving multi-materials. To resolve sub-cell structure, interface reconstruction is implemented within any cell that has more than one material. Therefore, the system of 3-T radiation diffusion equations is solved on two- and three-dimensional polyhedral meshes. The focus of the development is on the fully coupling between radiation and material, the treatment of nonlinearity in the equations, i.e., in the diffusion terms and source terms, treatment of the discontinuity across cell interfaces in material properties, the formulations for both transient and steady states, the property for large time steps, and second order accuracy in both space and time. The discontinuity of material properties between different materials is correctly treated based on the governing physics principle for general polyhedral meshes and full nonlinearity. The treatment is exact for arbitrarily strong discontinuity. The scheme is fully nonlinear for the full nonlinearity in the 3-T diffusion equations. Three temperatures are fully coupled and are updated simultaneously. The scheme is general in two and three dimensions on general polyhedral meshes. The features of the scheme are demonstrated through numerical examples for transient problems and steady states. The effects of some simplifications of numerical schemes are also shown through numerical examples, such as linearization, simple average of diffusion coefficient, and approximate treatment for the coupling between radiation and material.

  5. Identifying effective connectivity parameters in simulated fMRI: a direct comparison of switching linear dynamic system, stochastic dynamic causal, and multivariate autoregressive models

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jason F.; Chen, Kewei; Pillai, Ajay S.; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The number and variety of connectivity estimation methods is likely to continue to grow over the coming decade. Comparisons between methods are necessary to prune this growth to only the most accurate and robust methods. However, the nature of connectivity is elusive with different methods potentially attempting to identify different aspects of connectivity. Commonalities of connectivity definitions across methods upon which base direct comparisons can be difficult to derive. Here, we explicitly define “effective connectivity” using a common set of observation and state equations that are appropriate for three connectivity methods: dynamic causal modeling (DCM), multivariate autoregressive modeling (MAR), and switching linear dynamic systems for fMRI (sLDSf). In addition while deriving this set, we show how many other popular functional and effective connectivity methods are actually simplifications of these equations. We discuss implications of these connections for the practice of using one method to simulate data for another method. After mathematically connecting the three effective connectivity methods, simulated fMRI data with varying numbers of regions and task conditions is generated from the common equation. This simulated data explicitly contains the type of the connectivity that the three models were intended to identify. Each method is applied to the simulated data sets and the accuracy of parameter identification is analyzed. All methods perform above chance levels at identifying correct connectivity parameters. The sLDSf method was superior in parameter estimation accuracy to both DCM and MAR for all types of comparisons. PMID:23717258

  6. Reduced Functional Connectivity within the Mesocorticolimbic System in Substance Use Disorders: An fMRI Study of Puerto Rican Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Posner, Jonathan; Amira, Leora; Algaze, Antonio; Canino, Glorisa; Duarte, Cristiane S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the mesocorticolimbic reward system (MCLS) and its relationship with impulsivity and substance use disorders (SUD) have largely focused on individuals from non-minority backgrounds. This represents a significant gap in the literature particularly for minority populations who are disproportionately affected by the consequences of SUD. Using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI), we examined the coherence of neural activity, or functional connectivity, within the brain’s MCLS in 28 young adult Puerto Ricans (ages 25–27) who were part of a population-based cohort study. Half of the sample lived in San Juan, Puerto Rico; the other half lived in the South Bronx, New York. At each of the two sites, half of the sample had a history of a SUD. Relative to those without SUD, individuals with SUD had decreased connectivity between the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and several regions within the MCLS. This finding was true irrespective of study site (i.e., San Juan or South Bronx). Reduced connectivity within the MCLS was also associated with higher self-reported levels of impulsivity. Path analysis suggested a potential mechanism linking impulsivity, the MCLS, and SUD: impulsivity, potentially by chronically promoting reward seeking behaviors, may contribute to decreased MCLS connectivity, which in turn, may confer vulnerability for SUD. Expanding upon prior studies suggesting that alterations within the MCLS underlie SUD, our findings suggest that such alterations are also related to impulsivity and are present in a high-risk young minority population. PMID:27252633

  7. Molecular MRI differentiation between primary central nervous system lymphomas and high-grade gliomas using endogenous protein-based amide proton transfer MR imaging at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shanshan; Yu, Hao; Wang, Xianlong; Lu, Shilong; Li, Yufa; Feng, Lyujin; Zhang, Yi; Heo, Hye-Young; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wen, Zhibo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To show the ability of using the amide-proton-transfer-weighted (APTW) MRI signals as imaging biomarkers to differentiate primary central-nervous-system lymphomas (PCNSLs) from high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Methods Eleven patients with lymphomas and 21 patients with HGGs were examined. Magnetization-transfer (MT) spectra over an offset range of ±6 ppm and the conventional MT ratio (MTR) at 15.6 ppm were acquired. The APTW signals, total chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer signal (integral between 0 and 5 ppm, CESTtotal), and MTR signal were obtained and compared between PCNSLs and HGGs. The diagnostic performance was assessed with the receiver-operating-characteristic-curve analysis. Results The PCNSLs usually showed more homogeneous APTW hyperintensity (spatially compared to the normal brain tissue) than the HGGs. The APTWmax, APTWmax-min, and CESTtotal signal intensities were significantly lower (P < 0.05, 0.001, and 0.05, respectively), while the APTWmin and MTR were significantly higher (both P < 0.01) in PCNSL lesions than in HGG lesions. The APTW values in peritumoral oedema were significantly lower for PCNSLs than for HGGs (P < 0.01). APTWmax-min had the highest area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (0.963) and accuracy (94.1%) in differentiating PCNSLs from HGGs. Conclusions The protein-based APTW signal would be a valuable MRI biomarker by which to identify PCNSLs and HGGs presurgically. PMID:25925361

  8. Active form Notch4 promotes the proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Peng-Yeh; Tsai, Chong-Bin; Tseng, Min-Jen

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Notch4IC modulates the ERK pathway and cell cycle to promote 3T3-L1 proliferation. ► Notch4IC facilitates 3T3-L1 differentiation by up-regulating proadipogenic genes. ► Notch4IC promotes proliferation during the early stage of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. ► Notch4IC enhances differentiation during subsequent stages of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue is composed of adipocytes, which differentiate from precursor cells in a process called adipogenesis. Many signal molecules are involved in the transcriptional control of adipogenesis, including the Notch pathway. Previous adipogenic studies of Notch have focused on Notch1 and HES1; however, the role of other Notch receptors in adipogenesis remains unclear. Q-RT-PCR analyses showed that the augmentation of Notch4 expression during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was comparable to that of Notch1. To elucidate the role of Notch4 in adipogenesis, the human active form Notch4 (N4IC) was transiently transfected into 3T3-L1 cells. The expression of HES1, Hey1, C/EBPδ and PPARγ was up-regulated, and the expression of Pref-1, an adipogenic inhibitor, was down-regulated. To further characterize the effect of N4IC in adipogenesis, stable cells expressing human N4IC were established. The expression of N4IC promoted proliferation and enhanced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells compared with those of control cells. These data suggest that N4IC promoted proliferation through modulating the ERK pathway and the cell cycle during the early stage of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis and facilitated differentiation through up-regulating adipogenic genes such as C/EBPα, PPARγ, aP2, LPL and HSL during the middle and late stages of 3T3-L1 adipogenesis.

  9. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method.

  10. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI at ultra-high field: artifact prevention and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Jorge, João; Grouiller, Frédéric; Ipek, Özlem; Stoermer, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Figueiredo, Patrícia; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Gruetter, Rolf

    2015-01-15

    The simultaneous recording of scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can provide unique insights into the dynamics of human brain function, and the increased functional sensitivity offered by ultra-high field fMRI opens exciting perspectives for the future of this multimodal approach. However, simultaneous recordings are susceptible to various types of artifacts, many of which scale with magnetic field strength and can seriously compromise both EEG and fMRI data quality in recordings above 3T. The aim of the present study was to implement and characterize an optimized setup for simultaneous EEG-fMRI in humans at 7 T. The effects of EEG cable length and geometry for signal transmission between the cap and amplifiers were assessed in a phantom model, with specific attention to noise contributions from the MR scanner coldheads. Cable shortening (down to 12 cm from cap to amplifiers) and bundling effectively reduced environment noise by up to 84% in average power and 91% in inter-channel power variability. Subject safety was assessed and confirmed via numerical simulations of RF power distribution and temperature measurements on a phantom model, building on the limited existing literature at ultra-high field. MRI data degradation effects due to the EEG system were characterized via B0 and B1(+) field mapping on a human volunteer, demonstrating important, although not prohibitive, B1 disruption effects. With the optimized setup, simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions were performed on 5 healthy volunteers undergoing two visual paradigms: an eyes-open/eyes-closed task, and a visual evoked potential (VEP) paradigm using reversing-checkerboard stimulation. EEG data exhibited clear occipital alpha modulation and average VEPs, respectively, with concomitant BOLD signal changes. On a single-trial level, alpha power variations could be observed with relative confidence on all trials; VEP detection was more limited, although

  11. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  12. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  13. Ratiometric MRI sensors based on core-shell nanoparticles for quantitative pH imaging.

    PubMed

    Okada, Satoshi; Mizukami, Shin; Sakata, Takao; Matsumura, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2014-05-21

    Ratiometric MRI sensors consist of paramagnetic cores and pH-sensitive polymer shells. The core-shell nanostructure enables the coexistence of two incompatible NMR relaxation properties in one particle. The sensors show pH sensitivity in transverse relaxivity (r2 ), but not in longitudinal relaxivity (r1 ). Quantitative pH imaging is achieved by measuring the r2 /r1 value with a clinical 3 T MRI scanner.

  14. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jidi; Dowling, Jason; Pichler, Peter; Menk, Fred; Rivest-Henault, David; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-04-01

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor’s 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs. The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT.

  15. Dynamic diffusion tensor measurements in muscle tissue using Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Baete, Steven H.; Cho, Gene; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    When diffusion biomarkers display transient changes, i.e. in muscle following exercise, traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) methods lack temporal resolution to resolve the dynamics. This paper presents an MRI method for dynamic diffusion tensor acquisitions on a clinical 3T scanner. This method, SL-MEDITATE (Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique) achieves a high temporal resolution (4s) (1) by rapid diffusion encoding through the acquisition of multiple echoes with unique diffusion sensitization and (2) by limiting the readout to a single line volume. The method is demonstrated in a rotating anisotropic phantom, in a flow phantom with adjustable flow speed, and in in vivo skeletal calf muscle of healthy volunteers following a plantar flexion exercise. The rotating and flow-varying phantom experiments show that SL-MEDITATE correctly identifies the rotation of the first diffusion eigenvector and the changes in diffusion tensor parameter magnitudes, respectively. Immediately following exercise, the in vivo mean diffusivity (MD) time-courses show, before the well-known increase, an initial decrease which is not typically observed in traditional DTI. In conclusion, SL-MEDITATE can be used to capture transient changes in tissue anisotropy in a single line. Future progress might allow for dynamic DTI when combined with appropriate k-space trajectories and compressed sensing reconstruction. PMID:25900166

  16. Functional expression of 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Takao; Kaneshige, Kota; Kurosaki, Teruko; Nishio, Hiroaki

    2010-05-28

    In the previous study, we reported the gene expression for proteins related to the function of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and elucidated the expression patterns of 5-HT{sub 2} receptor subtypes in mouse osteoblasts. In the present study, we evaluated the possible involvement of 5-HT receptor subtypes and its inactivation system in MC3T3-E1 cells, an osteoblast cell line. DOI, a 5-HT{sub 2A} and 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor selective agonist, as well as 5-HT concentration-dependently increased proliferative activities of MC3T3-E1 cells in their premature period. This effect of 5-HT on cell proliferation were inhibited by ketanserin, a 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor specific antagonist. Moreover, both DOI-induced cell proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1 and 2 proteins were inhibited by PD98059 and U0126, selective inhibitors of MEK in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with fluoxetine, a 5-HT specific re-uptake inhibitor which inactivate the function of extracellular 5-HT, significantly increased the proliferative activities of MC3T3-E1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Our data indicate that 5-HT fill the role for proliferation of osteoblast cells in their premature period. Notably, 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor may be functionally expressed to regulate mechanisms underlying osteoblast cell proliferation, at least in part, through activation of ERK/MAPK pathways in MC3T3-E1 cells.

  17. Prostate tissue ablation with MRI guided transurethral therapeutic ultrasound and intraoperative assessment of the integrity of the neurovascular bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Sokka, Sham; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the precision of prostate tissue ablation with MRI guided therapeuticultrasound by intraoperative objective assessment of the neurovascular bundle in canines in-vivo. METHODS: In this ongoing IACUC approved study, eight male canines were scanned in a clinical 3T Achieva MRI scanner (Philips) before, during, and after ultrasound therapy with a prototype MR-guided ultrasound therapy system (Philips). The system includes a therapy console to plan treatment, to calculate real-time temperature maps, and to control ultrasound exposures with temperature feedback. Atransurethral ultrasound applicator with eight transducer elements was used to ablate canine prostate tissue in-vivo. Ablated prostate tissue volumes were compared to the prescribed target volumes to evaluate technical effectiveness. The ablated volumes determined by MRI (T1, T2, diffusion, dynamic contrast enhanced and 240 CEM43 thermal dose maps) were compared to H&E stained histological slides afterprostatectomy. Potential nerve damage of the neurovascular bundle was objectively assessed intraoperativelyduring prostatectomy with a CaverMap Surgical Aid nerve stimulator (Blue Torch Medical Technologies). RESULTS: Transurethral MRI -guided ultrasound therapy can effectively ablate canine prostate tissue invivo. Coronal MR-imaging confirmed the correct placement of the HIFU transducer. MRI temperature maps were acquired during HIFU treatment, and subsequently used for calculating thermal dose. Prescribed target volumes corresponded to the 240 CEM43 thermal dose maps during HIFU treatment in all canines. Ablated volumes on high resolution anatomical, diffusion weighted, and contrast enhanced MR images matched corresponding histological slides after prostatectomy. MRI guidance with realtime temperature monitoring showed no damage to surrounding tissues, especially to the neurovascular bundle (assessed intra-operatively with a nerve stimulator) or to the rectum wall. CONCLUSIONS: Our study

  18. Diagnosis of Nerve Root Compromise of the Lumbar Spine: Evaluation of the Performance of Three-dimensional Isotropic T2-weighted Turbo Spin-Echo SPACE Sequence at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jinkyeong; Jung, Joon-Yong; Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Jin-Sung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Ha, Kee-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the performance of three-dimensional (3D) isotropic T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequence on a 3T system, for the evaluation of nerve root compromise by disc herniation or stenosis from central to extraforaminal location of the lumbar spine, when used alone or in combination with conventional two-dimensional (2D) TSE sequence. Materials and Methods Thirty-seven patients who had undergone 3T spine MRI including 2D and 3D sequences, and had subsequent spine surgery for nerve root compromise at a total of 39 nerve levels, were analyzed. A total of 78 nerve roots (48 symptomatic and 30 asymptomatic sites) were graded (0 to 3) using different MRI sets of 2D, 3D (axial plus sagittal), 3D (all planes), and combination of 2D and 3D sequences, with respect to the nerve root compromise caused by posterior disc herniations, lateral recess stenoses, neural foraminal stenoses, or extraforaminal disc herniations; grading was done independently by two readers. Diagnostic performance was compared between different imaging sets using the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. Results There were no statistically significant differences (p = 0.203 to > 0.999) in the ROC curve area between the imaging sets for both readers 1 and 2, except for combined 2D and 3D (0.843) vs. 2D (0.802) for reader 1 (p = 0.035), and combined 2D and 3D (0.820) vs. 3D including all planes (0.765) for reader 2 (p = 0.049). Conclusion The performance of 3D isotropic T2-weighted TSE sequence of the lumbar spine, whether axial plus sagittal images, or all planes of images, was not significantly different from that of 2D TSE sequences, for the evaluation of nerve root compromise of the lumbar spine. Combining 2D and 3D might possibly improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with either one. PMID:28096733

  19. Design of a 3T preamplifier which stability is insensitive to coil loading.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueming; Fischer, Elmar; Korvink, Jan G; Gruschke, Oliver; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), preamplifiers are needed to amplify signals obtained from MRI receiver coils. Under various loading conditions of the corresponding receiver coils, preamplifiers see different source impedance at their input and may become unstable. Therefore preamplifiers which stability is not sensitive to coil loading are desirable. In this article, a coil-loading-insensitive preamplifier for MRI is presented, derived from an unstable preamplifier. Different approaches to improve stability were used during this derivation. Since a very low noise factor is essential for MRI preamplifiers, noise contributions from passive components in the MRI preamplifier have to be considered during the stabilization process. As a result, the initially unstable preamplifier became stable with regard to coil loading, while other MRI requirements, as the extremely low noise factor, were still fulfilled. The newly designed preamplifier was manufactured, characterized and tested in the MRI spectrometer. Compared to a commercially available preamplifier, the newly designed preamplifier has similar imaging performance but other advantages like smaller size and better stability. Furthermore, presented stabilization approaches can be generalized to stabilize other unstable low-noise amplifiers.

  20. Improved localisation for 2-hydroxyglutarate detection at 3T using long-TE semi-LASER.

    PubMed

    Berrington, Adam; Voets, Natalie L; Plaha, Puneet; Larkin, Sarah J; Mccullagh, James; Stacey, Richard; Yildirim, Muhammed; Schofield, Christopher J; Jezzard, Peter; Cadoux-Hudson, Tom; Ansorge, Olaf; Emir, Uzay E

    2016-06-01

    2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) has emerged as a biomarker of tumour cell IDH mutations that may enable the differential diagnosis of glioma patients. At 3 Tesla, detection of 2-HG with magnetic resonance spectroscopy is challenging because of metabolite signal overlap and a spectral pattern modulated by slice selection and chemical shift displacement. Using density matrix simulations and phantom experiments, an optimised semi-LASER scheme (TE = 110 ms) improves localisation of the 2-HG spin system considerably compared to an existing PRESS sequence. This results in a visible 2-HG peak in the in vivo spectra at 1.9 ppm in the majority of IDH mutated tumours. Detected concentrations of 2-HG were similar using both sequences, although the use of semi-LASER generated narrower confidence intervals. Signal overlap with glutamate and glutamine, as measured by pairwise fitting correlation was reduced. Lactate was readily detectable across glioma patients using the method presented here (mean CLRB: (10±2)%). Together with more robust 2-HG detection, long TE semi-LASER offers the potential to investigate tumour metabolism and stratify patients in vivo at 3T.

  1. Improved localisation for 2-hydroxyglutarate detection at 3T using long-TE semi-LASER

    PubMed Central

    Berrington, Adam; Voets, Natalie L.; Plaha, Puneet; Larkin, Sarah J.; Mccullagh, James; Stacey, Richard; Yildirim, Muhammed; Schofield, Christopher J.; Jezzard, Peter; Cadoux-Hudson, Tom; Ansorge, Olaf; Emir, Uzay E.

    2016-01-01

    2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) has emerged as a biomarker of tumour cell IDH mutations that may enable the differential diagnosis of glioma patients. At 3 Tesla, detection of 2-HG with magnetic resonance spectroscopy is challenging because of metabolite signal overlap and a spectral pattern modulated by slice selection and chemical shift displacement. Using density matrix simulations and phantom experiments, an optimised semi-LASER scheme (TE = 110 ms) improves localisation of the 2-HG spin system considerably compared to an existing PRESS sequence. This results in a visible 2-HG peak in the in vivo spectra at 1.9 ppm in the majority of IDH mutated tumours. Detected concentrations of 2-HG were similar using both sequences, although the use of semi-LASER generated narrower confidence intervals. Signal overlap with glutamate and glutamine, as measured by pairwise fitting correlation was reduced. Lactate was readily detectable across glioma patients using the method presented here (mean CLRB: (10±2)%). Together with more robust 2-HG detection, long TE semi-LASER offers the potential to investigate tumour metabolism and stratify patients in vivo at 3T. PMID:27547821

  2. Enhanced CCR5+/CCR3+ T helper cell ratio in patients with active cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Freutel, S; Gaffal, E; Zahn, S; Bieber, T; Tüting, T; Wenzel, J

    2011-10-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is characterized by enhanced interferon α (IFNα) levels in serum and in tissue. Since IFNα promotes a Th1-biased immune response, we hypothesized that a Th1-associated chemokine receptor profile should be a typical finding in patients with active CLE. Therefore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from patients with different CLE subsets (n = 15), healthy controls (n = 13) and patients under immunotherapy with IFNα (n = 7). T helper cells were analysed by flow cytometry for the expression of the chemokines receptor CCR5, indicative for Th1 cells, and of CCR3, indicating Th2. In addition, intracellular levels of the type I IFN-inducible MxA protein were measured. Patients with widespread active CLE skin lesions had a significantly increased expression of CCR5, whereas expression of CCR3 was decreased when compared with healthy controls. MxA expression was significantly enhanced in all investigated CLE subtypes, with the highest levels in patients with widespread skin lesions. The enhanced CCR5/CCR3 ratio closely correlated with the MxA levels in peripheral lymphocytes and with disease activity. Our analyses revealed that active CLE is associated with a systemic type I IFN effect that appears to induce a shift towards a Th1-associated chemokine receptor profile. The CCR5/CCR3 T-helper cell ratio might therefore represent an indirect marker for the disease activity in CLE.

  3. Contributed Review: Nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jonathan Fordham, Edmund J.

    2014-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general.

  4. Contributed review: nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Fordham, Edmund J

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general.

  5. Water uptake patterns and root system architecture of Zea mays in a natural soil under influence of drought stress monitored by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Steffen; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Seidler, Christina; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Vereecken, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The interface between roots and soil plays a key role in water transport in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Continuum (SPAC). The transport which changes with the degree of dehydration is influenced by both the hydraulic conductivity of roots and the soil. One important factor in plant growth is the amount of available water in the soil, which correlates directly with soil texture. Water uptake of plant roots and water uptake patterns in soil can be monitored using non-invasive 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In a preceding study the effect of root water uptake and uniform desiccation patterns under drought conditions were observed for Ricinus communis grown in a model medium (Pohlmeier et al. 2008). Continuing these studies, the new aspect is the determination of water uptake patterns and root system architecture in a natural soil. The general challenge of MRI in soils are the inherent fast relaxation times T2* and T2 of the soil matrix. With the use of conventional sequences only water in macropores can be determined. The loss of sensitivity can be overcome by MRI sequences with sufficiently short detection times. In this work we employed and assessed two methods: SPI (Single Point Imaging) detects the T2* relaxation with a dead time of < 0.05 ms and SE3D (Spin Echo 3D) probes T2,eff with an echo time of about 0.8 ms. Zea mays, planted in a cylindrical container filled with a natural soil was completely sealed after 4 weeks of growth to avoid evaporation, so water loss took place via transpiration only. The water content of the soil was determined gravimetrically and by means of MRI each 2nd day over a period of 14 days. Furthermore a SEMS (Spin Echo Multi Slice) sequence was used to visualize the growth of root system architecture. This study shows that SPI3D and SE3D are feasible for the determination of water content in a natural soil up to a certain detection limit. We observed quite uniform water uptake patterns during drying of the soil until water

  6. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    PubMed Central

    Burke, B; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2010-01-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts. PMID:20071754

  7. Using an achiasmic human visual system to quantify the relationship between the fMRI BOLD signal and neural response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Pinglei; Purington, Christopher J; Tjan, Bosco S

    2015-01-01

    Achiasma in humans causes gross mis-wiring of the retinal-fugal projection, resulting in overlapped cortical representations of left and right visual hemifields. We show that in areas V1-V3 this overlap is due to two co-located but non-interacting populations of neurons, each with a receptive field serving only one hemifield. Importantly, the two populations share the same local vascular control, resulting in a unique organization useful for quantifying the relationship between neural and fMRI BOLD responses without direct measurement of neural activity. Specifically, we can non-invasively double local neural responses by stimulating both neuronal populations with identical stimuli presented symmetrically across the vertical meridian to both visual hemifields, versus one population by stimulating in one hemifield. Measurements from a series of such doubling experiments show that the amplitude of BOLD response is proportional to approximately 0.5 power of the underlying neural response. Reanalyzing published data shows that this inferred relationship is general. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09600.001 PMID:26613411

  8. Sensitivity to temporal modulation rate and spectral bandwidth in the human auditory system: fMRI evidence.

    PubMed

    Overath, Tobias; Zhang, Yue; Sanes, Dan H; Poeppel, David

    2012-04-01

    Hierarchical models of auditory processing often posit that optimal stimuli, i.e., those eliciting a maximal neural response, will increase in bandwidth and decrease in modulation rate as one ascends the auditory neuraxis. Here, we tested how bandwidth and modulation rate interact at several loci along the human central auditory pathway using functional MRI in a cardiac-gated, sparse acquisition design. Participants listened passively to both narrowband (NB) and broadband (BB) carriers (1/4- or 4-octave pink noise), which were jittered about a mean sinusoidal amplitude modulation rate of 0, 3, 29, or 57 Hz. The jittering was introduced to minimize stimulus-specific adaptation. The results revealed a clear difference between spectral bandwidth and temporal modulation rate: sensitivity to bandwidth (BB > NB) decreased from subcortical structures to nonprimary auditory cortex, whereas sensitivity to slow modulation rates was largest in nonprimary auditory cortex and largely absent in subcortical structures. Furthermore, there was no parametric interaction between bandwidth and modulation rate. These results challenge simple hierarchical models, in that BB stimuli evoked stronger responses in primary auditory cortex (and subcortical structures) rather than nonprimary cortex. Furthermore, the strong preference for slow modulation rates in nonprimary cortex demonstrates the compelling global sensitivity of auditory cortex to modulation rates that are dominant in the principal signals that we process, e.g., speech.

  9. Common neural systems associated with the recognition of famous faces and names: an event-related fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Kristy A; Seidenberg, Michael; Woodard, John L; Durgerian, Sally; Zhang, Qi; Gross, William L; Gander, Amelia; Guidotti, Leslie M; Antuono, Piero; Rao, Stephen M

    2010-04-01

    Person recognition can be accomplished through several modalities (face, name, voice). Lesion, neurophysiology and neuroimaging studies have been conducted in an attempt to determine the similarities and differences in the neural networks associated with person identity via different modality inputs. The current study used event-related functional-MRI in 17 healthy participants to directly compare activation in response to randomly presented famous and non-famous names and faces (25 stimuli in each of the four categories). Findings indicated distinct areas of activation that differed for faces and names in regions typically associated with pre-semantic perceptual processes. In contrast, overlapping brain regions were activated in areas associated with th