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Sample records for 3-week observation period

  1. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme.

    PubMed

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius; Masiulis, Nerijus; Aagaard, Per; Dargeviciute, Gintare; Brazaitis, Marius

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving a progressive increase in load impact with respect to the number of jumps performed, drop (platform) height, squat depth amplitude, and addition of weights. Maximal concentric and isometric knee extensor strength were assessed immediately before and 10 min after each training session. Voluntary and 100 Hz-stimulation-evoked torque decreased acutely after each training session relative to pre-exercise values (P < 0.05) but recovered before the subsequent training session. Post-exercise plasma creatine kinase activity increased from 162.2 ± 56.2 IU · l(-1) to 284.3 ± 116.3 IU · l(-1) at 48 h after the first training session (P < 0.05) and remained marginally elevated throughout the training period. The present results indicate that detrimental muscle damage can be avoided with drop-jump training even with the gradual introduction of more demanding exercise induced by increasing the volume, intensity, and muscle stretch amplitude. These findings suggest that the human neuromuscular system is highly adaptable to progressively varied loading demands during stretch-shortening exercise training.

  2. Phase I/II trial of definitive carbon ion radiotherapy for prostate cancer: evaluation of shortening of treatment period to 3 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Nomiya, T; Tsuji, H; Maruyama, K; Toyama, S; Suzuki, H; Akakura, K; Shimazaki, J; Nemoto, K; Kamada, T; Tsujii, H

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new shortened 3-week treatment schedule of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for prostate cancer. Methods: Beginning in May 2010, patients with T1b–T3bN0M0, histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma were enrolled in the phase II trial of CIRT. Patients received 51.6 GyE in 12 fractions over 3 weeks (protocol 1002). The primary end point was defined as the incidence of late adverse events that were evaluated based on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Biochemical failure was determined using the Phoenix definition (nadir +2.0 ng ml−1). Results: Forty-six patients were enrolled, and all patients were included in the analysis. The number of low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients was 12 (26%), 9 (20%), and 25 (54%), respectively. The median follow-up period of surviving patients was 32.3 months. Two patients had intercurrent death without recurrence, and the remaining 44 patients were alive at the time of this analysis. In the analysis of late toxicities, grade 1 (G1) rectal haemorrhage was observed in 3 (7%) patients. The incidence of G1 haematuria was observed in 6 (13%) patients, and G1 urinary frequency was observed in 17 (37%) patients. No ⩾G2 late toxicities were observed. In the analysis of acute toxicities, 2 (4%) patients showed G2 urinary frequency, and no other G2 acute toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The new shortened CIRT schedule over 3 weeks was considered as feasible. The analysis of long-term outcome is warranted. PMID:24722181

  3. Reduced-Sodium Lunches Are Well-Accepted by Uninformed Consumers Over a 3-Week Period and Result in Decreased Daily Dietary Sodium Intakes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Anke M; Kremer, Stefanie; van Stipriaan, Willeke L; Noort, Martijn W J; de Vries, Jeanne H M; Temme, Elisabeth H M

    2015-10-01

    -sodium foods over a 3-week period was well accepted by the uninformed participants in an experimental real-life canteen setting. The reduced-sodium foods did not trigger compensation behavior during the remainder of the day in the intervention group compared with the control group, as reflected by 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Therefore, offering reduced-sodium foods without explicitly informing consumers of the sodium reduction can contribute to daily sodium intake reduction. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocrine response to masturbation-induced orgasm in healthy men following a 3-week sexual abstinence.

    PubMed

    Exton, M S; Krüger, T H; Bursch, N; Haake, P; Knapp, W; Schedlowski, M; Hartmann, U

    2001-11-01

    This current study examined the effect of a 3-week period of sexual abstinence on the neuroendocrine response to masturbation-induced orgasm. Hormonal and cardiovascular parameters were examined in ten healthy adult men during sexual arousal and masturbation-induced orgasm. Blood was drawn continuously and cardiovascular parameters were constantly monitored. This procedure was conducted for each participant twice, both before and after a 3-week period of sexual abstinence. Plasma was subsequently analysed for concentrations of adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisol, prolactin, luteinizing hormone and testosterone concentrations. Orgasm increased blood pressure, heart rate, plasma catecholamines and prolactin. These effects were observed both before and after sexual abstinence. In contrast, although plasma testosterone was unaltered by orgasm, higher testosterone concentrations were observed following the period of abstinence. These data demonstrate that acute abstinence does not change the neuroendocrine response to orgasm but does produce elevated levels of testosterone in males.

  5. Bone-anchored hearing implant loading at 3 weeks: stability and tolerability after 6 months.

    PubMed

    Faber, Hubert T; Dun, Catharina A J; Nelissen, Rik C; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Hol, Myrthe K S

    2013-01-01

    To clinically evaluate the performance of a titanium percutaneous bone-anchored hearing implant (BAHI) using a 3-week healing period. Short-term implant survival, stability changes, and skin reactions are evaluated from the initial implantation to 6 months postimplantation. Thirty patients eligible for a BAHI were included in an open, prospective clinical investigation. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis (RFA) at the time of implantation and at 10 days; at 3, 6, and 12 weeks; and at 6 months after placement of the implant. Sound processor fitting was performed 3 weeks after implantation. Skin reactions were evaluated according to the Holgers classification. One implant was lost 3 days after implantation because of poor bone quality. No implant loss occurred in the remaining 29 patients (96.7%). The mean ISQ value at the time of implantation was 67.1 (range, 44-71). Compared with baseline, there was a significant dip of -2.2 ISQ units at 10 days (mean, 65.7; p = 0.0093). There was a positive change in mean ISQ compared with baseline over the subsequent visits. No reduction in mean ISQ values was observed after implant loading. Skin reactions were observed incidentally (mean over all visits, 9.7%) and were generally mild (Holgers Grade 1; mean 9.0%). An adverse skin reaction (Holgers Grade 2) was observed only once (mean, 0.7%). The current study suggests that loading the implant and 6-mm abutment with the sound processor at 3 weeks is safe. The stability of the implant as measured by ISQ values had reached its baseline value within 3 weeks after implantation. The degree of stability was not affected by implant loading. Only mild skin reactions were observed incidentally. This study supports the use of early loading at 3 weeks as current practice in healthy adults with good bone quality; thus, these adults can benefit from the rehabilitation of their hearing at an earlier stage.

  6. The international seismological observing period in Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engdahl, E.R.; Bergman, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    The International Seismological Observing Period (ISOP) is a specific time interval designated for enhanced international cooperation in the collection and dissemination of observatory measurements from the global seismographic network. The primary purpose of the ISOP is to strengthen the international infrastructure that supports current seismological practice and increase the cooperation among nations that operate seismological observatories. Measurements, reported by the existing global network and compiled by agencies such as the International Seismological Centre (ISC), are providing new information about earthquakes and the structure of the Earth of fundamental importance to the Earth sciences. However, these data represent but a small fraction of the information contained in the seismograms. One of the goals of the ISOP is to collect improved sets of data. In particular, the measurement and reporting of later-arriving phases, during a fixed ISOP period, from earthquakes selected for detailed observation by the cooperating stations will be encouraged. The use of advanced, digital instrumentation provides an unprecedented opportunity for enhancing the methods of seismogram interpretation and seismic parameter extraction, by the implementation of digital processing methods at seismic observatories worldwide. It must be ensured that this new information will be available to the entire seismological community. It is believed that this purpose is best served with an ISOP that promotes increased on-site processing at digital stations in Africa and elsewhere. Improvements in seismology require truly international cooperation and the educational aspects of seismological practice form one of the goals of the ISOP. Thus, workshops will be needed in Africa to train analysts in ISOP procedures and to introduce them to modern techniques and applications of the data. Participants will, thus, benefit from theoretical results and practical experience that are of direct

  7. Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

  8. Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

  9. Optimizing observing sequence design for periodic and non-periodic phenomena : a Bayesian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Knight, Russell

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we report on our progress on addressing these issues. We have developed an approximate expression for the uniformity of phase coverage that can be used when scheduling to assess candidate sample times. We describe the results obtained using this estimator, and compare them with detailed simulations. We describe our progress and plans for integrating optimizing criteria for both periodic and non-periodic observations into a single observation sequence.

  10. Optimizing observing sequence design for periodic and non-periodic phenomena : a Bayesian approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Knight, Russell

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we report on our progress on addressing these issues. We have developed an approximate expression for the uniformity of phase coverage that can be used when scheduling to assess candidate sample times. We describe the results obtained using this estimator, and compare them with detailed simulations. We describe our progress and plans for integrating optimizing criteria for both periodic and non-periodic observations into a single observation sequence.

  11. Origin of Observed Periodic Components in Astrophysical Masers' Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siparov, S.; Samodurov, V.; Laptev, G.

    2017-01-01

    Further analysis of data previously obtained during the monitoring observations of 49 astrophysical water (22 GHz) masers shows that in some cases the intensity of an individual component of the maser spectrum changes periodically, on timescales of tens of minutes. It is argued that this variation cannot be the effect of instrumental errors, weather conditions or interstellar medium instabilities, because only a single feature of the maser spectrum fluctuates but not the whole spectrum. The suggested interpretation of this effect is based on the optic-metrical parametric resonance produced by gravitational radiation emitted by short-period binary stars, with the examples of such binaries sufficing the conditions given.

  12. Saturn's planetary period oscillations observed during 10 years of Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provan, Gabrielle; Andrews, David; Cowley, Stanley; Dougherty, Michele

    2014-05-01

    Planetary period oscillations (PPOs) with periods close to Saturn's rotational period are ubiquitous throughout Saturn's magnetospheric system. Here we review the observational studies of PPOs determined from magnetospheric magnetic field data throughout the Cassini mission to date. As first shown using radio data, two oscillatory systems are present, one associated with the northern polar region and the other with the southern. We show that within the northern (southern) open-field polar region only the northern (southern) PPO oscillations are detected. However, within the equatorial 'core' region of Saturn's magnetosphere (dipole L ≤ 12), the two oscillations are superposed and interfere. The PPO periods are shown to lie in the range ~10.6 to 10.8 h, are persistently shorter north than south to date, and undergo a strong seasonal cycle together with the oscillation amplitudes. We discuss these observations in relation to theoretical models that have been proposed to explain them, and emphasize the importance of continued measurement of their properties during the Cassini solstice mission.

  13. Aerosol classification using EARLINET measurements for an intensive observational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network) organized an intensive observation period during summer 2012. This campaign aimed at the provision of advanced observations of physical and chemical aerosol properties, at the delivery of information about the 3D distribution of European atmospheric aerosols, and at the monitoring of Saharan dust intrusions events. EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) participated in the ACTRIS campaign through the addition of measurements according to the EARLINET schedule as well as daily lidar-profiling measurements around sunset by 11 selected lidar stations for the period from 8 June - 17 July. EARLINET observations during this almost two-month period are used to characterize the optical properties and vertical distribution of long-range transported aerosol over the broader area of Mediterranean basin. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, Angstrom exponents) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on EARLINET observations of frequently observed aerosol types is used to classify aerosols into seven separate types. The summertime Mediterranean basin is prone to African dust aerosols. Two major dust events were studied. The first episode occurred from the 18 to 21 of the June and the second one lasted from 28 June to 6 July. The lidar ratio within the dust layer was found to be wavelength independent with mean values of 58±14 sr at 355 nm and 57±11 sr at 532 nm. For the particle linear depolarization ratio, mean values of 0.27±0.04 at 532 nm have been found. Acknowledgements. The financial support for EARLINET in the ACTRIS Research Infrastructure Project by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 654169 and previously under grant agreement no. 262254 in the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. The Search for Periodic Components in Observational Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, R. V.

    2014-09-01

    This review is devoted to the problem of searching for periodicities in observational data using periodograms based on the general statistical likelihood ratio test and special variants of it, including the classical Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Primary emphasis is on the problem of estimating the statistical significance of the periodicities detected in this manner. We assume that a universal solution of this problem exists involving an effective method in which the periodogram is regarded as a random process (or random field), while an approximation for the required "false alarm probability" is constructed by a generalized Rice method. Besides a unified method for determining the expected noise levels (or significance levels) of these periodograms, we also examine some important special cases with different models of periodic signals (linear and nonlinear). The false alarm probability associated with an observed signal is approximated in most cases by a formula of the type , where z is the observed maximum readout in the periodogram and P is an algebraic polynomial with coefficients that depend on the conditions of the problem. We also examine the problem of separating composite signals with several frequencies from noise. In this case correct analysis of the data requires the use of so-called multifrequency periodograms based on models of signals containing several periodic components. We show that a complete solution to this problem requires construction of 2n-1 such periodograms, where n is the total number of possible frequencies. Finally, we describe some program packages that we have developed which make it easier to perform practical frequency analysis of series using this theory.

  15. Earthquake nucleation mechanisms and periodic loading: Models, Experiments, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, K.; Brinkman, B.; Tsekenis, G.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Uhl, J.

    2010-12-01

    The project has two main goals: (a) Improve the understanding of how earthquakes are nucleated ¬ with specific focus on seismic response to periodic stresses (such as tidal or seasonal variations) (b) Use the results of (a) to infer on the possible existence of precursory activity before large earthquakes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for the nucleation of earthquakes, including frictional nucleation (Dieterich 1987) and fracture (Lockner 1999, Beeler 2003). We study the relation between the observed rates of triggered seismicity, the period and amplitude of cyclic loadings and whether the observed seismic activity in response to periodic stresses can be used to identify the correct nucleation mechanism (or combination of mechanisms). A generalized version of the Ben-Zion and Rice model for disordered fault zones and results from related recent studies on dislocation dynamics and magnetization avalanches in slowly magnetized materials are used in the analysis (Ben-Zion et al. 2010; Dahmen et al. 2009). The analysis makes predictions for the statistics of macroscopic failure events of sheared materials in the presence of added cyclic loading, as a function of the period, amplitude, and noise in the system. The employed tools include analytical methods from statistical physics, the theory of phase transitions, and numerical simulations. The results will be compared to laboratory experiments and observations. References: Beeler, N.M., D.A. Lockner (2003). Why earthquakes correlate weakly with the solid Earth tides: effects of periodic stress on the rate and probability of earthquake occurrence. J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth 108, 2391-2407. Ben-Zion, Y. (2008). Collective Behavior of Earthquakes and Faults: Continuum-Discrete Transitions, Evolutionary Changes and Corresponding Dynamic Regimes, Rev. Geophysics, 46, RG4006, doi:10.1029/2008RG000260. Ben-Zion, Y., Dahmen, K. A. and J. T. Uhl (2010). A unifying phase diagram for the dynamics of sheared solids

  16. ISO spectroscopic observations of short-period comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, J.; Encrenaz, Th.; Lellouch, E.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Altieri, B.; Leech, K.; Salama, A.; Griffin, M. J.; de Graauw, Th.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Knacke, R.; Brooke, T. Y.

    1999-03-01

    Two Infrared Space Observatory programmes (guaranteed time and open time) were devoted to high-resolution spectroscopic observations of short-period comets. 22P/Kopff was observed on October-December 1996 with SWS and LWS. Due to the weakness of the object, only the ν3 ro-vibrational lines of water were detected, with SWS. Comet 103P/Hartley 2 was observed close to its perihelion (at 1.04 AU from Sun and 0.82 AU from Earth) on January 1998 with SWS, LWS and CAM. The bands of H2O and CO2 at 2.7 and 4.3 μm are detected, with [CO2]/[H2O] = 10 %. The 2.7 μm band of H2O is observed with a high signal-to-noise ratio with SWS, which permits to evaluate the rotational temperature of water to 16-20 K and its ortho-to-para ratio to ~ 2.7, corresponding to a spin temperature of ~ 35 K. The 5-17 μm spectrum of comet Hartley 2 observed with CAM-CVF shows the 9-12 μm signature of silicates. Silicate emission around 10 μm is present at a level of about 20 % of the continuum, with a peak at 11.3 μm indicative of crystalline silicates. This is the first time crystalline silicates are found in a short-period comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiter-family comet P/Hartley 2, presumably originating from the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt, are compared to those of comet Hale-Bopp which came from the Oort cloud.

  17. 313 new asteroid rotation periods from Palomar Transient Factory observations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Ting-Chang; Waszczak, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Prince, Thomas A.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason

    2014-06-10

    A new asteroid rotation period survey has been carried out by using the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Twelve consecutive PTF fields, which covered an area of 87 deg{sup 2} in the ecliptic plane, were observed in the R band with a cadence of ∼20 minutes during 2013 February 15-18. We detected 2500 known asteroids with a diameter range of 0.5 km ≤D ≤ 200 km. Of these, 313 objects had highly reliable rotation periods and exhibited the 'spin barrier' at ∼2 hr. In contrast to the flat spin-rate distribution of the asteroids with 3 km ≤D ≤ 15 km shown by Pravec et al., our results deviated somewhat from a Maxwellian distribution and showed a decrease at the spin rate greater than 5 rev day{sup –1}. One superfast rotator candidate and two possible binary asteroids were also found in this work.

  18. Strong postmidnight equatorial ionospheric anomaly observations during magnetically quiet periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke; Moldwin, Mark B.; Sahai, Yogeshwar; de Jesus, Rodolfo

    2009-12-01

    We have examined the quiet time equatorial electrodynamics of the ionosphere in the postmidnight sector using satellite, GPS total electron content (TEC) and ionosonde data. ROCSAT-1 vertical drift data are used to estimate the equatorial ionosphere electrodynamics, TOPEX altimeter and GPS TEC are used to obtain the density structure of the ionosphere. Ionosonde data measure the postmidnight F layer height as function of local time. We analyzed 4 years (2001-2004) of quiet time (Kp ≤ 3) observations in the postmidnight sector. We found that very strong equatorial ionospheric anomalies (EIAs) in the postmidnight (0100-0500 LT) sector during magnetically quiet periods are common and are capable of disrupting satellite communication and navigation systems. The coordinated multi-instrument observations clearly demonstrate that these strong EIAs are not simply the EIAs observed in earlier local time sectors that have corotated into the postmidnight sector as has been suggested by previous studies. We demonstrate that they are triggered by a reversed vertically upward drift, which is suggested to be generated by thermospheric neutral wind through F region dynamo. This clearly demonstrates that the Earth's postmidnight ionosphere is dynamic even in magnetically quiet periods contrary to simple theoretical model predictions.

  19. Weekly vs. Every-3-Week Paclitaxel and Carboplatin for Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, John K; Brady, Mark F; Penson, Richard T; Huang, Helen; Birrer, Michael J; Walker, Joan L; DiSilvestro, Paul A; Rubin, Stephen C; Martin, Lainie P; Davidson, Susan A; Huh, Warner K; O'Malley, David M; Boente, Matthew P; Michael, Helen; Monk, Bradley J

    2016-02-25

    A dose-dense weekly schedule of paclitaxel (resulting in a greater frequency of drug delivery) plus carboplatin every 3 weeks or the addition of bevacizumab to paclitaxel and carboplatin administered every 3 weeks has shown efficacy in ovarian cancer. We proposed to determine whether dose-dense weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin would prolong progression-free survival as compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin administered every 3 weeks among patients receiving and those not receiving bevacizumab. We prospectively stratified patients according to whether they elected to receive bevacizumab and then randomly assigned them to receive either paclitaxel, administered intravenously at a dose of 175 mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3 weeks, plus carboplatin (dose equivalent to an area under the curve [AUC] of 6) for six cycles or paclitaxel, administered weekly at a dose of 80 mg per square meter, plus carboplatin (AUC, 6) for six cycles. The primary end point was progression-free survival. A total of 692 patients were enrolled, 84% of whom opted to receive bevacizumab. In the intention-to-treat analysis, weekly paclitaxel was not associated with longer progression-free survival than paclitaxel administered every 3 weeks (14.7 months and 14.0 months, respectively; hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74 to 1.06; P=0.18). Among patients who did not receive bevacizumab, weekly paclitaxel was associated with progression-free survival that was 3.9 months longer than that observed with paclitaxel administered every 3 weeks (14.2 vs. 10.3 months; hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P=0.03). However, among patients who received bevacizumab, weekly paclitaxel did not significantly prolong progression-free survival, as compared with paclitaxel administered every 3 weeks (14.9 months and 14.7 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.20; P=0.60). A test for interaction that assessed homogeneity

  20. Photoelectric UBV observations and period study of AK Herculis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, N. S.

    2003-09-01

    New photoelectric UBV observations of the W Ursae Majoris-type eclipsing binary AK Her are presented. The system exhibits many phenomena such as O'Connell effect, unequal depth, phase shift and different duration in secondary eclipse due to its totality, which have been studied. O'Connell effect-duration relation may be exist. The (O-C) curve has been obtained and the new light elements have been calculated. The analysis of the minima-times data of the system reveals possible sinusoidal orbital period variation (LITE). The study of the (O-C) curve, the light curves, O'Connell effect and the duration effect have led to that the system is likely a case which undergoes cyclic around the marginal contact state conservatively with mass transfers between its components, i.e. in TRO mode.

  1. The observed periods of AP and BP stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, F. A.; Renson, P.

    1998-02-01

    A catalogue of all the periods up to now proposed for the variations of CP2, CP3, and CP4 stars is presented. The main identifiers (HD and HR), the proper name, the variable-star name, and the spectral type and peculiarity are given for each star as far as the coordinates at 2000.0 and the visual magnitude. The nature of the observed variations (light, spectrum, magnetic field, etc.) is presented in a codified way. The catalogue is arranged in three tables: the bulk of the data, i.e. those referring to CP2, CP3, and CP4 stars, are given in Table 1, while the data concerning He-strong stars are given in Table 2 and those for eclipsing or ellipsoidal variables are collected in Table 3. Notes are also provided at the end of each table, mainly about duplicities. The catalogue contains data on 364 CP stars and is updated to 1996, October 31. This research has made use of the SIMBAD database, operated at CDS, Strasbourg, France.

  2. SDO/AIA observations of periodic and quasi-periodic phenomenon associated with an EUV jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Richard; Verth, Gary; Erdelyi, Robertus; Srivastava, Abhi

    2013-04-01

    It has long been advocated that explosive magnetic activity is responsible for the mass-balance in the solar atmosphere, supplying the corona and the solar wind with heated plasma. The explosive events are thought to be the result of emerging bi-polar (EB) regions reconnecting with pre-existing, open fields, with the size of the EB's (i.e., granular, super-granular) being related to size of the resulting feature (i.e., spicules, EUV/X-ray jets). Recent evidence has suggested a deeper relationship between spicules and EUV jets (Sterling et al., 2010). We present here observations of a EUV jet observed with SDO/AIA close to a southern coronal hole. The jet can be considered as a 'Blowout jet' (using the terminology of Moore et al., 2010), launching vast amounts of chromospheric plasma into the atmosphere along with hotter material. The hotter part of the jet appears to be composed of multiple, (quasi-)periodic ejections that individually resemble fast moving (>100 km/s) spicules. The multiple ejections appear crucial for distributing the hotter material high into the corona, possibly suggesting that larger EUV/X-ray are composed of many smaller spicule-like events. Although the event is close to the limb, evidence for reconnection at the chromospheric level is provided. Further, evidence for helicity (or torsional motion) and the presence of slow and fast Magnetohydrodynamic waves is given, with the wave mode excitation likely due to the reconnection process. Exploiting the observed wave motion, we also use magneto-seismological techniques to determine local plasma parameters with sub-resolution accuracy along one of the jets unique features.

  3. Observation of periodic orbits on curved two-dimensional geometries.

    PubMed

    Avlund, M; Ellegaard, C; Oxborrow, M; Guhr, T; Søndergaard, N

    2010-04-23

    We measure elastomechanical spectra for a family of thin shells. We show that these spectra can be described by a "semiclassical" trace formula comprising periodic orbits on geodesics, with the periods of these orbits consistent with those extracted from experiment. The influence of periodic orbits on spectra in the case of two-dimensional curved geometries is thereby demonstrated, where the parameter corresponding to Planck's constant in quantum systems involves the wave number and the curvature radius. We use these findings to explain the marked clustering of levels when the shell is hemispherical.

  4. Observations on the cortical silent period in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Der Werf, Y D; Berendse, H W; van Someren, E J W; Stoffers, D; Stam, C J; Wolters, E Ch

    2007-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a tool in the neurosciences to study motor functions and nervous disorders, amongst others. Single pulses of TMS applied over the primary motor cortex lead to a so-called cortical silent period in the recording from the corresponding muscle, i.e. a period of approximately 100ms with no muscle activity. We here show that in Parkinson's disease (PD), this cortical silent period in some cases is interrupted by short bursts of EMG activity. We describe in detail these interruptions in two patients with PD. These interruptions may number up to 3 per cortical silent period and show a consistent frequency across trials and hemispheres within a given patient; the two patients described here do differ, however, in the time-delay of the interruptions and hence the induced frequency. For one patient, the frequency of the interruptions proved to be around 13 Hz, the other patient showed a frequency of around 17 Hz. The results corroborate earlier findings of cortical oscillations elicited by pulses of TMS and may be related to abnormal oscillatory activity found in the cortical-subcortical motor system in PD.

  5. Comparative energetics of the observed and simulated global circulation during the special observing periods of FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, E. C.; Baker, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Energetics of the observed and simulated global circulation are evaluated in the zonal spectral domain for the special observing periods of FGGE. The study utilizes GLA analyses of FGGE observational data and parallel simulation experiments. There are noticeable differences in energy transformations between the observation and simulation during SOP-1. These include the baroclinic conversion C(n) by the zonal mean motion and short-wave disturbances, and the nonlinear wave-wave interaction L(n) at the long and short waves. The energy transformations of the short-wave disturbances are much more intense in the simulated circulation than in the observation. However, good agreement is noted in the conversion and dissipation of kinetic energy in the large- and cyclone-wave range n = 1-10. Spectral distributions of global energy transformations at the long- and cyclone-wave range indicate that the SOP-2 simulation agrees more closely with the observed fields than the SOP-1 simulation. Other pertinent points of energetics diagnosis are also included in the discussion.

  6. Intensive Foreign Language Learning Reveals Effects on Categorical Perception of Sibilant Voicing After Only 3 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nynne Thorup; Sørensen, Stine Derdau; McGregor, William B.; Wallentin, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    Models of speech learning suggest that adaptations to foreign language sound categories take place within 6 to 12 months of exposure to a foreign language. Results from laboratory language training show effects of very targeted training on nonnative speech contrasts within only 1 to 4 weeks of training. Results from immersion studies are inconclusive, but some suggest continued effects on nonnative speech perception after 6 to 8 years of experience. We investigated this apparent discrepancy in the timing of adaptation to foreign speech sounds in a longitudinal study of foreign language learning. We examined two groups of Danish language officer cadets learning either Arabic (Modern Standard Arabic and Egyptian Arabic) or Dari (Afghan Farsi) through intensive multifaceted language training. We conducted two experiments (identification and discrimination) with the cadets who were tested four times: at the start (T0), after 3 weeks (T1), 6 months (T2), and 19 months (T3). We used a phonemic Arabic contrast (pharyngeal vs. glottal frication) and a phonemic Dari contrast (sibilant voicing) as stimuli. We observed an effect of learning on the Dari learners’ identification of the Dari stimuli already after 3 weeks of language training, which was sustained, but not improved, after 6 and 19 months. The changes in the Dari learners’ identification functions were positively correlated with their grades after 6 months. We observed no other learning effects at the group level. We discuss the results in the light of predictions from speech learning models. PMID:27551355

  7. Intensive Foreign Language Learning Reveals Effects on Categorical Perception of Sibilant Voicing After Only 3 Weeks.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Horn, Nynne Thorup; Sørensen, Stine Derdau; McGregor, William B; Wallentin, Mikkel

    2015-12-01

    Models of speech learning suggest that adaptations to foreign language sound categories take place within 6 to 12 months of exposure to a foreign language. Results from laboratory language training show effects of very targeted training on nonnative speech contrasts within only 1 to 4 weeks of training. Results from immersion studies are inconclusive, but some suggest continued effects on nonnative speech perception after 6 to 8 years of experience. We investigated this apparent discrepancy in the timing of adaptation to foreign speech sounds in a longitudinal study of foreign language learning. We examined two groups of Danish language officer cadets learning either Arabic (Modern Standard Arabic and Egyptian Arabic) or Dari (Afghan Farsi) through intensive multifaceted language training. We conducted two experiments (identification and discrimination) with the cadets who were tested four times: at the start (T0), after 3 weeks (T1), 6 months (T2), and 19 months (T3). We used a phonemic Arabic contrast (pharyngeal vs. glottal frication) and a phonemic Dari contrast (sibilant voicing) as stimuli. We observed an effect of learning on the Dari learners' identification of the Dari stimuli already after 3 weeks of language training, which was sustained, but not improved, after 6 and 19 months. The changes in the Dari learners' identification functions were positively correlated with their grades after 6 months. We observed no other learning effects at the group level. We discuss the results in the light of predictions from speech learning models.

  8. Large-Scale periodic solar velocities: An observational study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmer, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of large-scale solar velocities were made using the mean field telescope and Babcock magnetograph of the Stanford Solar Observatory. Observations were made in the magnetically insensitive ion line at 5124 A, with light from the center (limb) of the disk right (left) circularly polarized, so that the magnetograph measures the difference in wavelength between center and limb. Computer calculations are made of the wavelength difference produced by global pulsations for spherical harmonics up to second order and of the signal produced by displacing the solar image relative to polarizing optics or diffraction grating.

  9. Enhancement of ARM surface meteorological observations during the fall 1996 water vapor intensive observation period.

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, S. J.; Splitt, M. E.; Lesht, B. M.; Environmental Research; Univ.of Oklahoma; Univ. of Utah

    2000-03-01

    This work describes in situ moisture sensor comparisons that were performed in conjunction with the first Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period (IOP) conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site during September of 1996. Two Raman lidars, two Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometers, (AERIs), and a suite of 13 microwave radiometers were assembled at the CART site during the IOP, and in situ measurements were used for calibration and verification. In addition, this work was meant to help assess the current observing strategy in an effort to make improvements to the routine continuous measurements. To accomplish these goals, verification of the in situ measurements was required. Therefore, a laboratory intercomparison of the in situ moisture sensors (nine capacitive chip relative humidity sensors and four chilled mirror sensors) was performed at the Oklahoma Mesonet temperature and relative humidity testing and calibration facility. Tests were conducted both before and after the instruments were used in the IOP, making it possible to detect instrument problems prior to the IOP and to determine if instrument failure or drift occurred during the IOP.

  10. Effect of Antimicrobials Used in Regenerative Endodontic Procedures on 3-week-old Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Tagelsir, Azza; Yassen, Ghaeth H; Gomez, Grace F; Gregory, Richard L

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of various antimicrobials used in endodontic regeneration on a 3-week-old Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. E. faecalis biofilm was grown on standardized dentin samples for 3 weeks. Infected dentin samples were randomized into 8 experimental groups (n = 8) and treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), 500 mg/mL of double antibiotic paste (DAP, equal portions of metronidazole and ciprofloxacin), low dilutions of DAP (1 or 0.1 mg/mL loaded into a methylcellulose vehicle system), sterile saline, or placebo paste (only methylcellulose) for 7 days. The other experimental groups were treated with 1.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) or 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) solutions for 5 minutes. After the assigned treatments, the bacterial biofilms were detached from dentin, spiral plated, and quantified using an automated counting machine. Permutation tests followed by Sidak post hoc multiple comparisons were used for statistical analyses (α = 0.05). The infected dentin treated with 1.5% NaOCl or 500 mg/mL of DAP provided complete eradication of bacterial biofilm. Furthermore, the infected dentin treated with 2% CHX, Ca(OH)2, or 1 mg/mL of DAP had a comparable antibiofilm effect, but they were not able to completely eradicate bacterial biofilm. No significant difference in the antibiofilm effect was observed between 500 mg/mL of DAP, Ca(OH)2, 1.5% NaOCl, and 2% CHX. At least 1 mg/mL of DAP in a methylcellulose vehicle system is required to eliminate a substantial amount of E. faecalis biofilm. Furthermore, the antibiofilm effects of 1.5% NaOCl and 2% CHX irrigation solutions were comparable with that of 500 mg/mL of DAP and Ca(OH)2. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Initiation With a 2- to 3-Week Compared With a 6-Week Postpartum Visit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Melissa J; Hou, Melody Y; Hsia, Jennifer K; Cansino, Catherine D; Melo, Juliana; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate whether a department policy changing the scheduling of the postpartum visit from 6 weeks to 2-3 weeks after delivery is associated with higher long-acting reversible contraception initiation at the postpartum visit. We conducted a quasiexperimental before-after study to evaluate long-acting reversible contraception initiation, specifically an intrauterine device or contraceptive implant, at the postpartum visit between women scheduled for follow-up at 6 weeks (before policy change) and 2-3 weeks after delivery (after policy change). Secondary outcomes included postpartum visit completion, overall contraception initiation at the postpartum visit, overall contraceptive use at 6 months after delivery, and repeat pregnancies by 6 months postpartum. We obtained delivery and postpartum information using the electronic medical record and contacted participants 3 and 6 months after delivery to assess contraception use and repeat pregnancies. We enrolled 586 participants between December 2014 and November 2015, of whom 512 women (256 in each cohort) continued to meet eligibility criteria after delivery. Long-acting reversible contraception initiation rates at the postpartum visit were lower in the 2- to 3-week (16.5%, 95% CI 12.2-21.8) compared with the 6-week group (31.1%, 95% CI 25.2-37.7, P<.01), primarily as a result of patient and health care provider preferences for delaying intrauterine device insertion to a later visit. More women completed a scheduled 2- to 3-week postpartum visit (90.2%, 95% CI 86.0-93.3) compared with a 6-week visit (81.6%, 95% CI 76.4-85.9, P<.01). Deferral of any contraception initiation was higher in the 2- to 3-week group (27.3%, 95% CI 21.9-33.4) compared with the 6-week group (15.8%, 95% CI 11.5-21.4, P<.01), but there were no differences in overall contraceptive use patterns at 6 months postpartum. No intrauterine device perforations or expulsions were observed in women who underwent insertion at 2-3 weeks postpartum. Five

  12. Pathogenesis of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus isolate (US/Iowa/18984/2013) in 3-week-old weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Madson, D M; Magstadt, D R; Arruda, P H E; Hoang, H; Sun, D; Bower, L P; Bhandari, M; Burrough, E R; Gauger, P C; Pillatzki, A E; Stevenson, G W; Wilberts, B L; Brodie, J; Harmon, K M; Wang, C; Main, R G; Zhang, J; Yoon, K J

    2014-11-07

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is associated with clinical diarrhea in naïve swine of all ages. This report describes timing of antibody generation and disease progression following infection with a US PEDV isolate by assessing fecal viral shedding, morphometric analysis of intestinal lesions, and magnitude of immunohistochemical staining. Sixty-three, 3-week-old pigs were randomly allocated into control (n=27) and challenged (n=36) groups. Challenged pigs were administered 1 mL of 1 × 10(3) PFU/mL of US/Iowa/18984/2013 PEDV isolate by oro-gastric gavage. Three control and four challenged pigs were necropsied on days post-inoculation (dpi) 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and weekly thereafter, until study termination on dpi 35. Clinical disease, fecal shedding, body weight, and temperature were monitored during the study period. Diarrhea was observed in challenged pigs beginning for some on dpi 2, affecting a majority of pigs by dpi 6 and subsiding by dpi 10. Average daily gain was significantly lower (P<0.001) for one week post-infection in challenged pigs. PEDV was detected in feces by PCR on dpi 1 and continued in a subset of pigs until dpi 24. PEDV-specific antigen was detected in villous enterocytes of challenged pigs by immunohistochemistry (IHC) on dpi 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14. Microscopic lesions included severe diffuse atrophic enteritis with significantly reduced (P<0.001) villous length observed on dpi 3, 4, and 7. Under the conditions of this study, fecal shedding of PEDV and IHC staining can precede and continue beyond the observation of clinical signs, thus increasing the risk of viral transmission.

  13. Ovarian Features after 2 Weeks, 3 Weeks and 4 Weeks Transdermal Testosterone Gel Treatment and Their Associated Effect on IVF Outcomes in Poor Responders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung-Hoon; Ahn, Jun-Woo; Moon, Jei-Won; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Chae, Hee-Dong; Kang, Byung-Moon

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of of transdermal testosterone gel (TTG) on controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) and IVF outcomes and ovarian morphology according to pretreatment duration in poor responders. A total of 120 women were recruited for this pilot study. They were randomized into control, 2 weeks, 3 weeks or 4 weeks TTG treatment groups. For three TTG treatment groups, 12.5 mg TTG was applied daily for 2 weeks, 3 weeks or 4 weeks in preceding period of study stimulation cycle. After 3 weeks of TTG pretreatment, significant increase of antral follicle count (AFC) and significant decreases of mean follicular diameter (MFD) and resistance index (RI) value of ovarian stromal artery were observed (p=0.026, p<0.001, p<0.01, respectively). The total dose of rhFSH administered for COS significantly decreased after 3 and 4 weeks TTG treatment both compared with control group (p<0.001, p<0.001). The numbers of oocytes retrieved and mature oocytes were significanty higher in 3 and 4 weeks TTG treatment groups than control group (p<0.001, p<0.001 in the number of oocytes retrieved; p<0.001, p<0.001 in the number of mature oocytes). The clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate were increased only in 4 weeks TTG treatment group compared with control group (p=0.030 and p=0.042, respectively). These data demonstrated that TTG pretreatment for 3 to 4 weeks increases AFC and ovarian stromal blood flow, thereby potentially improving the ovarian response to COS and IVF outcome in poor responders undergoing IVF/ICSI. PMID:25949183

  14. A 3-week dietary bioequivalence study in preweaning farm piglets of two sources of docosahexaenoic acid produced from two different organisms.

    PubMed

    Fedorova-Dahms, Irina; Thorsrud, Bjorn A; Bailey, Eileen; Salem, Norman

    2014-03-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) are components of human breast milk and commonly added to infant formula. The first DHA-containing algal oil for infant formulas was DHASCO® produced from the microalgae Crypthecodinium cohnii. Recently, new DHA-rich oil was obtained from the microalgae Schizochytrium sp., herein named DHASCO-B. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the bioequivalence of DHASCO-B to DHASCO when administered in a blend with ARA oil and the potential effects after 3weeks' administration in milk replacer formula to preweaning farm piglets. DHASCO-B and DHASCO were added to formula at concentrations 0.32% and 0.96% DHA (% of total fatty acids). There were no test article-related effects of any diet on piglet growth and development (clinical observations, body weight, food consumption), or clinical pathology parameters (hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation and urinalysis). In addition, there were no adverse effects at terminal necropsy (macro- and microscopic pathology evaluations). DHA content in plasma, RBC, heart, liver and brain showed dose-related accumulation and confirmed no differences between corresponding DHASCO-B and DHASCO groups. Therefore, dietary exposure to DHASCO-B and DHASCO was well tolerated by the preweaning piglets during the 3-week dosing period right after birth and DHASCO-B and DHASCO were bioequivalent.

  15. Observation of a Short Period Quasi-periodic Pulsation in Solar X-Ray, Microwave, and EUV Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the multiwavelength analysis of a 13 s quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) observed in hard X-ray (12–300 keV) and microwave (4.9–34 GHz) emissions during a C-class flare that occurred on 2015 September 21. Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 304 and 171 Å images show an emerging loop/flux tube (L1) moving radially outward, which interacts with the preexisting structures within the active region (AR). The QPP was observed during the expansion of and rising motion of L1. The Nobeyama Radioheliograph microwave images in 17/34 GHz channels reveal a single radio source that was co-spatial with a neighboring loop (L2). In addition, using AIA 304 Å images, we detected intensity oscillations in the legs of L2 with a period of about 26 s. A similar oscillation period was observed in the GOES soft X-ray flux derivative. This oscillation period seems to increase with time. We suggest that the observed QPP is most likely generated by the interaction between L2 and L3 observed in the AIA hot channels (131 and 94 Å). The merging speed of loops L2 and L3 was ∼35 km s‑1. L1 was destroyed possibly by its interaction with preexisting structures in the AR, and produced a cool jet with the speed of ∼106–118 km s‑1 associated with a narrow CME (∼770 km s‑1). Another mechanism of the QPP in terms of a sausage oscillation of the loop (L2) is also possible.

  16. Periodization

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Daniel S.; Reiman, Michael P.; Walker, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinicians are constantly faced with the challenge of designing training programs for injured and noninjured athletes that maximize healing and optimize performance. Periodization is a concept of systematic progression—that is, resistance training programs that follow predictable patterns of change in training variables. The strength training literature is abundant with studies comparing periodization schemes on uninjured, trained, and untrained athletes. The rehabilitation literature, however, is scarce with information about how to optimally design resistance training programs based on periodization principles for injured athletes. The purpose of this review is to discuss relevant training variables and methods of periodization, as well as periodization program outcomes. A secondary purpose is to provide an anecdotal framework regarding implementation of periodization principles into rehabilitation programs. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1979 to 2009 was implemented with the keywords periodization, strength training, rehabilitation, endurance, power, hypertrophy, and resistance training with the Boolean term AND in all possible combinations in the English language. Each author also undertook independent hand searching of article references used in this review. Results: Based on the studies researched, periodized strength training regimens demonstrate improved outcomes as compared to nonperiodized programs. Conclusions: Despite the evidence in the strength training literature supporting periodization programs, there is a considerable lack of data in the rehabilitation literature about program design and successful implementation of periodization into rehabilitation programs. PMID:23015982

  17. [Effect of Chinese herb medicine compound on bone loss in rats under 3 weeks simulated weightlessness: preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Hu, Su-min; Tong, Hai-ying; Fu, Qian; Yang, Jia; Gao, Xue-min; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of Chinese herb medicine compound on bone lose in rats under 3 weeks simulated weightlessness, and to observe the synergistic action of other ingredients in the compound on calcium. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: control group, tail-suspend group, tail-suspend and medicine group which took Chinese herb medicine compound (contains Radix Rehmanniae Praeparata, Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae, Radix Astragali, Radix Angelicae Sinensis, Concha Ostreae prepared by acetic acid) by gastric administration. After 3 weeks simulated weightlessness, serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC), bone mechanical properties (MEC) were observed. At the end of the experiment, serum Ca and P increased significantly (P<0.01), BMD and BMC of posterior body decreased significantly (P< 0.01) in tail suspend rats, compared with in the control group. In rats of tail suspended and medicine group, the increase degree of serum Ca and P were smaller, BMD and BMC of posterior body increased significantly (P<0.01 or 0.05), and MEC also tend to increase. Bone mass of posterior body lose significantly, with mechanical property significantly decrease in rats after 3 weeks simulated weightlessness. Chinese herb medicine compound is effective to prevent the change of bone. Simple calcium supplement can not prevent simulated weightlessness induced bone loss, therefore other ingredients in the compound may perform synergistic action to calcium (Concha Ostreae prepared by acetic acid).

  18. Quasi-periodic pulsations with varying period in multi-wavelength observations of an X-class flare

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-10

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ∼24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  19. Validation of a 6-hour observation period for cocaine body stuffers

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Maria; Buchanan, Jennie; Heard, Kennon

    2010-01-01

    Often, patients are brought in to the emergency room after ingesting large amounts of cocaine in an attempt to conceal it. This act is known as “body stuffing.” The observation period required to recognize potential toxic side effects in these patients is not well described in the literature. We sought to validate a treatment algorithm for asymptomatic cocaine body stuffers utilizing a 6-hour observation period by observing the clinical course of cocaine body stuffers over a 24-hour period. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients evaluated for witnessed or suspected stuffing over two years utilizing a standardized protocol. 106 patients met final inclusion criteria as adult cocaine stuffers. No patients developed life-threatening symptoms and no patients died during observation. In our medical setting, stuffers could be discharged after a 6- hour observation period if there was either complete resolution or absence of clinical symptoms. PMID:20825819

  20. Dawn-dusk difference of periodic oxygen EUV dayglow variations at Venus observed by Hisaki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, Kei; Seki, Kanako; Terada, Naoki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kimura, Tomoki; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Murakami, Go; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tao, Chihiro; Leblanc, François; Yoshikawa, Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    We report a dawn-dusk difference of periodic variations of oxygen EUV dayglow (OII 83.4 nm, OI 130.4 nm and OI 135.6 nm) in the upper atmosphere of Venus observed by the Hisaki spacecraft in 2015. Observations show that the periodic dayglow variations are mainly controlled by the solar EUV flux. Additionally, we observed characteristic ∼1 day and ∼4 day periodicities in the OI 135.6 nm brightness. The ∼1 day periodicity was dominant on the duskside while the ∼4 day periodicity was dominant on the dawnside. Although the driver of the ∼1 day periodicity is still uncertain, we suggest that the ∼4 day periodicity is caused by gravity waves that propagate from the middle atmosphere. The thermospheric subsolar-antisolar flow and the gravity waves dominantly enhance eddy diffusion on the dawnside, and the eddy diffusion coefficient changes every ∼4 days due to large periodic modulations of wind velocity of the super-rotating atmosphere. Since the ∼4 day modulations on the dawnside are not continuously observed, it is possible that there is an intermittent coupling between the thermosphere and middle atmosphere due to variations of wave source altitudes. Moreover, if there are variations of the wind velocity in the mesosphere or lower thermosphere, it is possible that gravity waves occasionally propagate to the thermosphere even on the duskside due to periodic disappearance of the critical level and the ∼4 day periodic O atomic modulations occur. Thus, our observations imply that the ∼4 day periodicity of the EUV dayglow may reflect the dynamics of the middle atmosphere of Venus. We also examined the effects of the solar wind on the dayglow variations by shifting the solar wind measurements from earth to Venus. We did not find clear correlations between them. However, since there are no local measurements of the solar wind at Venus, the effect of the solar wind on the dayglow is still uncertain.

  1. Archive of observations of periodic comet Crommelin made during its 1983-84 apparition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z. (Editor); Aronsson, M.

    1985-01-01

    This is an archive of 680 reduced observations of Periodic Comet Crommelin made during its 1984 apparition. The archive integrates reports by members of the eight networks of the International Halley Watch (IHW) and presents the results of a trial run designed to test the preparedness of the IHW organization for the current apparition of Periodic Comet Halley.

  2. Marine stratocumulus cloud parameters from GOES during the 1987 FIRE intensive field observation period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David F.; Heck, Patrick W.; Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.

    1989-01-01

    GOES was used to perform the Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observations (IFO) from June 29 to July 19, 1987. Preliminary results of an analysis of GOES data covering most of the IFO period are discussed. The large-scale cloud-field characteristics are derived, and then related to a longer period of measurements and to surface observations. Some preliminary point measurements taken from the surface are compared to regional-scale cloud parameters derived from satellite radiances.

  3. 29 CFR 3.3 - Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages. 3.3 Section 3.3 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON PUBLIC BUILDING OR PUBLIC WORK FINANCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES § 3.3 Weekly...

  4. From Gene to Protein: A 3-Week Intensive Course in Molecular Biology for Physical Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeau, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a 3-week intensive molecular biology methods course based upon fluorescent proteins, which is successfully taught at the McGill University to advanced undergraduates and graduates in physics, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, and medicine. No previous knowledge of biological terminology or methods is expected, so…

  5. 29 CFR 3.3 - Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Weekly statement with respect to payment of wages. 3.3 Section 3.3 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON PUBLIC BUILDING OR PUBLIC WORK FINANCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES § 3.3 Weekly statement...

  6. From Gene to Protein: A 3-Week Intensive Course in Molecular Biology for Physical Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeau, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a 3-week intensive molecular biology methods course based upon fluorescent proteins, which is successfully taught at the McGill University to advanced undergraduates and graduates in physics, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, and medicine. No previous knowledge of biological terminology or methods is expected, so…

  7. Preventive analgesia is associated with reduced pain disability 3 weeks but not 6 months after major gynecologic surgery by laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joel; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2004-07-01

    Most studies of preemptive or preventive analgesia restrict outcomes to pain and analgesic consumption in the acute postoperative period. The potential longer-term effects on these and other domains of functioning have received little empirical attention. The purpose of this study was to follow up patients who had received general anesthesia plus epidural fentanyl and lidocaine before (group 1) or after (group 2) incision or general anesthesia plus a sham epidural (group 3). Patients were contacted approximately 3 weeks and 6 months after surgery. A follow-up pain questionnaire and the McGill Pain Questionnaire were administered by telephone. The Mental Health Inventory and Pain Disability Index were mailed to patients, completed, and mailed back. One hundred thirty-one of the 141 patients (93%) were reached 3 weeks after surgery (n = 41, n = 48, and n = 42 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively), and 109 (77%) were reached at 6 months (n = 35, n = 37, and n = 37 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Multivariate analysis of covariance indicated that that even after controlling for age and presence or absence of preoperative pain, Pain Disability Index scores (mean +/- SD) at the first follow-up were significantly lower in group 1 (17.3 +/-12.8) and group 2 (18.1 +/-17.0) compared with group 3 (26.3 +/- 18.3). McGill Pain Questionnaire and Mental Health Inventory scores did not differ significantly among the groups. There were no significant differences at the 6-month follow-up. The short-term beneficial effects of preventive epidural analgesia translated into less pain disability 3 weeks after surgery. Progress in understanding the processes involved in postsurgical recovery and the risk factors for chronic postsurgical pain would be aided by baseline and postsurgical measures of relevant psychological, emotional, and physical variables.

  8. Torsional oscillations and observed rotational period variations in early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, J.; Mikulášek, Z.; Henry, G. W.; Kurfürst, P.; Karlický, M.

    2017-01-01

    Some chemically peculiar stars in the upper main sequence show rotational period variations of unknown origin. We propose that these variations are a consequence of the propagation of internal waves in magnetic rotating stars that lead to the torsional oscillations of the star. We simulate the magnetohydrodynamic waves and calculate resonant frequencies for two stars that show rotational variations: CU Vir and HD 37776. We provide updated analyses of rotational period variations in these stars and compare our results with numerical models. For CU Vir, the length of the observed rotational period cycle, Π=67.6(5) yr, can be well reproduced by the models, which predict a cycle length of 51 yr. However, for HD 37776, the observed lower limit of the cycle length, Π ≥ 100 yr, is significantly longer than the numerical models predict. We conclude that torsional oscillations provide a reasonable explanation at least for the observed period variations in CU Vir.

  9. The Trend in the Observation of Legacy Long Period Variable Stars (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, R.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) A decrease in the number of observers of the Legacy Long Period Variable Stars has been noted by the AAVSO. Amongst the observing community there is the perception that observers collecting digital data is making up for this gap. Data from the annual President's report (2002-2013) and the AAVSO International Data Base for the years 1993, 2003, and 2013 were analyzed. For the period of 2002 to 2013 the total number of observers remained fairly constant (816 ± 97) with a large bump in 2011. The number of observations has slowly declined since 2007 though there has recently been an increase in the number of observations. From the AID data the number of observations reached a maximum in 2003 and has slowly declined afterwards. These trends as well as other information gleamed from the data will be present and discussed.

  10. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of Four Ultrashort-Period Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents light curve solutions of our observations of four new ultrashort-period eclipsing binaries with MS components. Two of them have periods almost at the upper limit (0.22 days) of the ultrashort-period binaries, while the periods of around 0.18 days of CSS J171508.5+350658 and CSS J214633.8+120016 are amongst the shortest known orbital periods. CSS J171410.0+445850, CSS J214633.8+120016 and CSS J224326.0+154532 are overcontact binaries with fillout factors around 0.25 while CSS J171508.5+350658 is a semidetached system. The two targets with shortest periods consist of M dwarfs.

  11. Solar wind plasma periodicities observed at 1 AU by IMP 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paularena, K. I.; Szabo, A.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    The IMP 8 spacecraft has been in Earth orbit since 1973, gathering plasma data over one complete 22-year solar cycle. These data are being examined to look for periodicities at time scales ranging from several hours to the entire span of the data set. A 1.3-year periodicity in the radial speed observed by IMP 8 and Voyager 2 has already been reported for the years from 1987 to 1993. The periodogram method, useful for unevenly sampled data such as the IMP 8 plasma data, has been used to search for other periods. It is interesting to note that the 13-year period is not present in the out-of-the-ecliptic component of the velocity (Vz), although a 1-year period is very obvious both visually and on the periodogram. Both components show a very strong peak associated with the 11-year solar cycle variation. This work will be extended to the thermal speed (a measure of the wind's temperature) and density, although the frequent correlations between these parameters and the velocity are expected to cause similar results. Additionally, the fine resolution data will be examined for shorter time periods than are visible using the hourly average data which are appropriate for longer periods. A comparison with periods observed at other spacecraft may also be made.

  12. Solar wind plasma periodicities observed at 1 AU by IMP 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paularena, K. I.; Szabo, A.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    The IMP 8 spacecraft has been in Earth orbit since 1973, gathering plasma data over one complete 22-year solar cycle. These data are being examined to look for periodicities at time scales ranging from several hours to the entire span of the data set. A 1.3-year periodicity in the radial speed observed by IMP 8 and Voyager 2 has already been reported for the years from 1987 to 1993. The periodogram method, useful for unevenly sampled data such as the IMP 8 plasma data, has been used to search for other periods. It is interesting to note that the 13-year period is not present in the out-of-the-ecliptic component of the velocity (Vz), although a 1-year period is very obvious both visually and on the periodogram. Both components show a very strong peak associated with the 11-year solar cycle variation. This work will be extended to the thermal speed (a measure of the wind's temperature) and density, although the frequent correlations between these parameters and the velocity are expected to cause similar results. Additionally, the fine resolution data will be examined for shorter time periods than are visible using the hourly average data which are appropriate for longer periods. A comparison with periods observed at other spacecraft may also be made.

  13. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in young cryptogenic ischemic stroke: A 3-week ECG Holter monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Sanak, Daniel; Hutyra, Martin; Kral, Michal; Bartkova, Andrea; Zapletalova, Jana; Fedorco, Marian; Veverka, Tomas; Vindis, David; Dornak, Tomas; Skala, Tomas; Skoloudik, David; Taborsky, Milos; Kanovsky, Petr

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is known very frequent cause of ischemic stroke. Undetected paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) is thus often considered a possible cause of cryptogenic ischemic stroke (CIS). The aim of this prospective study was to detect PAF using ECG Holter monitoring and determinate whether prolongation of the Holter monitoring to 3 weeks would increase the detection rates of PAF in young CIS patients ≤ 50 years. The study set consisted of IS patients ≤ 50 years enrolled in the HISTORY (Heart and Ischemic STrOke Relationship studY) study (NCT01541163). CIS was defined according to the TOAST criteria including the absence of ultrasonographic or angiographic signs of atherosclerosis, vasculitis or dissection. Admission ECG, serum levels of high sensitive Troponin T (hs TnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), markers of thrombophilia, transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and 24-hour ECG-Holter monitoring were performed in all patients. In case of negative 24-h ECG Holter, an additional 3-weeks monitoring was done. Of the 105 enrolled patients ≤ 50 years, 95 (90%) were identified as cryptogenic (49 males, mean age 39.1 ± 8.2 years). All CIS patients had normal admission ECG. In total, PAF was detected in 9 (9.5%, 95% CI: 3.5% - 17.8%) patients; in two during 24-h ECG Holter and in seven during 3-weeks Holter monitoring. Patients with PAF had more frequently elevated admission hs TnT and NT-proBNP levels (P - 0.0001). PAF was detected in 9.5% of young CIS patients and 3-weeks ECG Holter monitoring increased the detection rate.

  14. Cloud parameters derived from GOES during the 1987 marine stratocumulus FIRE Intensive Field Observation (IFO) period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David F.; Minnis, Patrick; Harrison, Edwin F.

    1990-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) is well suited for observations of the variations of clouds over many temporal and spatial scales. For this reason, GOES data taken during the Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observations (IFO) (June 29 to July 19, 1987, Kloessel et al.) serve several purposes. One facet of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) is improvement of the understanding of cloud parameter retrievals from satellite-observed radiances. This involves comparisons of coincident satellite cloud parameters and high resolution data taken by various instruments on other platforms during the IFO periods. Another aspect of FIRE is the improvement of both large- and small-scale models of stratocumulus used in general circulation models (GCMs). This may involve, among other studies, linking the small-scale processes observed during the IFO to the variations in large-scale cloud fields observed with the satellites during the IFO and Extended Time Observation (ETO) periods. Preliminary results are presented of an analysis of GOES data covering most of the IFO period. The large scale cloud-field characteristics are derived, then related to a longer period of measurements. Finally, some point measurements taken from the surface are compared to regional scale cloud parameters derived from satellite radiances.

  15. Estimating the Period and Q of the Chandler Wobble from Observations and Models of its Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, R. S.; Nastula, J.

    2012-12-01

    Any irregularly shaped solid body rotating about some axis that is not aligned with its figure axis will freely wobble as it rotates. For the Earth, this free wobble is known as the Chandler wobble in honor of S. C. Chandler, Jr. who first observed it in 1891. Unlike the forced wobbles of the Earth, such as the annual wobble, whose periods are the same as the periods of the forcing mechanisms, the period of the free Chandler wobble is a function of the internal structure and rheology of the Earth, and its decay time constant, or quality factor Q, is a function of the dissipation mechanism(s), like mantle anelasticity, that are acting to dampen it. Improved estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble can therefore be used to improve our understanding of these properties of the Earth. Here, estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble are obtained by finding those values that minimize the power within the Chandler band of the difference between observed and modeled polar motion excitation spanning 1962-2010. Atmosphere, ocean, and hydrology models are used to model the excitation caused by both mass and motion variations within these global geophysical fluids. Direct observations of the excitation caused by mass variations as determined from GRACE time varying gravitational field measurements are also used. The resulting estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble will be presented along with a discussion of the robustness of the estimates.

  16. Estimating the Period and Q of the Chandler Wobble from Observations and Models of its Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, R. S.; Nastula, J.

    2014-12-01

    Any irregularly shaped solid body rotating about some axis that is not aligned with its figure axis will freely wobble as it rotates. For the Earth, this free wobble is known as the Chandler wobble in honor of S. C. Chandler, Jr. who first observed it in 1891. Unlike the forced wobbles of the Earth, such as the annual wobble, whose periods are the same as the periods of the forcing mechanisms, the period of the free Chandler wobble is a function of the internal structure and rheology of the Earth, and its decay time constant, or quality factor Q, is a function of the dissipation mechanism(s), like mantle anelasticity, that are acting to dampen it. Improved estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble can therefore be used to improve our understanding of these properties of the Earth. Here, estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble are obtained by finding those values that minimize the power within the Chandler band of the difference between observed and modeled polar motion excitation spanning 1962-2010. Atmosphere, ocean, and hydrology models are used to model the excitation caused by both mass and motion variations within these global geophysical fluids. Direct observations of the excitation caused by mass variations as determined from GRACE time varying gravitational field measurements are also used. The resulting estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble will be presented along with a discussion of the robustness of the estimates.

  17. Examining Periodic Solar-Wind Density Structures Observed in the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of small-scale, periodic, solar-wind density enhancements (length scales as small as approximately equals 1000 Mm) observed in images from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) aboard STEREO-A. We discuss their possible relationship to periodic fluctuations of the proton density that have been identified at 1 AU using in-situ plasma measurements. Specifically, Viall, Kepko, and Spence examined 11 years of in-situ solar-wind density measurements at 1 AU and demonstrated that not only turbulent structures, but also nonturbulent, periodic density structures exist in the solar wind with scale sizes of hundreds to one thousand Mm. In a subsequent paper, Viall, Spence, and Kasper analyzed the alpha-to-proton solar-wind abundance ratio measured during one such event of periodic density structures, demonstrating that the plasma behavior was highly suggestive that either temporally or spatially varying coronal source plasma created those density structures. Large periodic density structures observed at 1 AU, which were generated in the corona, can be observable in coronal and heliospheric white-light images if they possess sufficiently high density contrast. Indeed, we identify such periodic density structures as they enter the HI field of view and follow them as they advect with the solar wind through the images. The smaller, periodic density structures that we identify in the images are comparable in size to the larger structures analyzed in-situ at 1 AU, yielding further evidence that periodic density enhancements are a consequence of coronal activity as the solar wind is formed.

  18. Esthetic restorations: observations and insights gained over a 5-year period demonstrated with three case reports.

    PubMed

    Obama, Tadakazu

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two prosthodontically treated patient cases that were observed over a period of at least 5 years after treatment. The evaluation, diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment stages were critically reviewed and reassessed from different perspectives. The conclusions drawn from this evaluation were subsequently implemented in a third clinical case. To ensure the long-term success of a restoration, certain biologic and mechanical principles must be observed, and the appropriate prosthodontic treatment must be chosen accordingly.

  19. First observations of W Virginis stars with K2: detection of period doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, E.; Molnár, L.; Jurkovic, M. I.; Smolec, R.; Moskalik, P. A.; Pál, A.; Szabados, L.; Szabó, R.

    2017-02-01

    We present the first analysis of W Vir stars observed by the Kepler space telescope in the K2 mission. Clear cycle-to-cycle variations were detected in the light curves of KT Sco and the globular cluster member M80-V1. While the variations in the former star seem to be irregular on the short time-scale of the K2 data, the latter appears to experience period doubling in its pulsation. Ground-based colour data confirmed that both stars are W Vir-type pulsators, while a comparison with historical photometric time series data revealed drastic period changes in both stars. For comparison we reexamine ground-based observations of W Vir, the prototype of the class, and conclude that it shows period doubling instead of mode beating. These results support the notion that non-linear dynamics plays an important role in the pulsation of W Virginis-type stars.

  20. LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSIENT QUASI-PERIODIC RADIO EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R.

    2013-09-20

    We report low-frequency observations of quasi-periodic, circularly polarized, harmonic type III radio bursts whose associated sunspot active regions were located close to the solar limb. The measured periodicity of the bursts at 80 MHz was ≈5.2 s, and their average degree of circular polarization (dcp) was ≈0.12. We calculated the associated magnetic field B (1) using the empirical relationship between the dcp and B for the harmonic type III emission, and (2) from the observed quasi-periodicity of the bursts. Both the methods result in B ≈ 4.2 G at the location of the 80 MHz plasma level (radial distance r ≈ 1.3 R{sub ☉}) in the active region corona.

  1. Spurious One-Month and One-Year Periods in Visual Observations of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Visual observations of variable stars, when time-series analyzed with some algorithms such as DC-DFT in vstar, show spurious periods at or close to one synodic month (29.5306 days), and also at about a year, with an amplitude of typically a few hundredths of a magnitude. The one-year periods have been attributed to the Ceraski effect, which was believed to be a physiological effect of the visual observing process. This paper reports on time-series analysis, using DC-DFT in vstar, of visual observations (and in some cases, V observations) of a large number of stars in the AAVSO International Database, initially to investigate the one-month periods. The results suggest that both the one-month and one-year periods are actually due to aliasing of the stars' very low-frequency variations, though they do not rule out very low-amplitude signals (typically 0.01 to 0.02 magnitude) which may be due to a different process, such as a physiological one. Most or all of these aliasing effects may be avoided by using a different algorithm, which takes explicit account of the window function of the data, and/or by being fully aware of the possible presence of and aliasing by very low-frequency variations.

  2. Periodic waves in the lower thermosphere observed by OI630 nm airglow images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, I.; Medeiros, A. F.; Vadas, S. L.; Wrasse, C. M.; Takahashi, H.; Buriti, R. A.; Leite, D.; Filgueira, S.; Bageston, J. V.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Gobbi, D.

    2016-02-01

    Periodic wave structures in the thermosphere have been observed at São João do Cariri (geographic coordinates: 36.5° W, 7.4° S; geomagnetic coordinates based on IGRF model to 2015: 35.8° E, 0.48° N) from September 2000 to November 2010 using OI630.0 nm airglow images. During this period, which corresponds to almost one solar cycle, characteristics of 98 waves were studied. Similarities between the characteristics of these events and observations at other places around the world were noted, primarily the spectral parameters. The observed periods were mostly found between 10 and 35 min; horizontal wavelengths ranged from 100 to 200 km, and phase speed from 30 to 180 m s-1. These parameters indicated that some of the waves, presented here, are slightly faster than those observed previously at low and middle latitudes (Indonesia, Carib and Japan), indicating that the characteristics of these waves may change at different places. Most of observed waves have appeared during magnetically quiet nights, and the occurrence of those waves followed the solar activity. Another important characteristic is the quasi-monochromatic periodicity that distinguish them from the single-front medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) that have been observed previously over the Brazilian region. Moreover, most of the observed waves did not present a phase front parallel to the northeast-southwest direction, which is predicted by the Perkins instability process. It strongly suggests that most of these waves must have had different generation mechanisms from the Perkins instability, which have been pointed out as being a very important mechanism for the generation of MSTIDs in the lower thermosphere.

  3. Distortion of the seismic radiation pattern in a long period band: Absence of clear node observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Kumagai, H.

    2015-12-01

    Sakai et al. (2014, 10th ASC) estimated the source amplitudes in a long-period band of 50 - 100 s using broadband seismic records of earthquakes that occurred in the Philippine and Indonesia, and showed that the source amplitudes fell within a constant band against the moment magnitudes (Mw). Long-period waveforms are thought to be less influenced by structural heterogeneities, and the radiation pattern in a long-period band may not be distorted. However, the results of Sakai et al. (2014) suggest that the nodes are not clearly observed in the long-period band. In this study, we analyzed seismic data from the Japan broadband seismograph network (F-net), which is denser than the networks in the Philippine and Indonesia, and carried out numerical tests using synthetic waveforms to investigate the characteristics of long-period wavefields. We used earthquakes that occurred in Japan with Mw between 4 and 8 since 2003, and estimated their source amplitudes in a long-period band of 50 - 100 s using waveform data from F-net. In each event, we calculated the ratios of the minimum source amplitude to other source amplitudes. We found that the ratios for most of events had values ranging up to roughly 10 regardless of their moment magnitudes and the nodes were also not clearly observed in the F-net data. Using the discrete wavenumber method, we calculated synthetic seismograms assuming uniform station distributions with horizontal intervals of 50 and 100 km as well as the Philippine and F-net station distributions. We assumed an earthquake located in the center of the distributed stations, and systematically changed the dip, strike, and rake angels. We estimated the source amplitudes in the long-period band from the seismograms synthesized with these different fault angles. Our numerical tests indicated that the ratios of the source amplitudes become larger as the density of stations is higher and the ratios depend on the mechanisms. These estimated ratios were larger than

  4. Statistical properties of quasi-periodic pulsations in white-light flares observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, C. E.; Armstrong, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Broomhall, A.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We embark on a study of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the decay phase of white-light stellar flares observed by Kepler. Out of the 1439 flares on 216 different stars detected in the short-cadence data using an automated search, 56 flares are found to have pronounced QPP-like signatures in the light curve, of which 11 have stable decaying oscillations. No correlation is found between the QPP period and the stellar temperature, radius, rotation period and surface gravity, suggesting that the QPPs are independent of global stellar parameters. Hence they are likely to be the result of processes occurring in the local environment. There is also no significant correlation between the QPP period and flare energy, however there is evidence that the period scales with the QPP decay time for the Gaussian damping scenario, but not to a significant degree for the exponentially damped case. This same scaling has been observed for MHD oscillations on the Sun, suggesting that they could be the cause of the QPPs in those flares. Scaling laws of the flare energy are also investigated, supporting previous reports of a strong correlation between the flare energy and stellar temperature/radius. A negative correlation between the flare energy and stellar surface gravity is also found.

  5. Observation of quasi-periodic solar radio bursts associated with propagating fast-mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, C. R.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.; White, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Radio emission observations from the Learmonth and Bruny Island radio spectrographs are analysed to determine the nature of a train of discrete, periodic radio "sparks" (finite-bandwidth, short-duration isolated radio features) which precede a type II burst. We analyse extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging from SDO/AIA at multiple wavelengths and identify a series of quasi-periodic rapidly-propagating enhancements, which we interpret as a fast wave train, and link these to the detected radio features. Methods: The speeds and positions of the periodic rapidly propagating fast waves and the coronal mass ejection (CME) were recorded using running-difference images and time-distance analysis. From the frequency of the radio sparks the local electron density at the emission location was estimated for each. Using an empirical model for the scaling of density in the corona, the calculated electron density was used to obtain the height above the surface at which the emission occurs, and the propagation velocity of the emission location. Results: The period of the radio sparks, δtr = 1.78 ± 0.04 min, matches the period of the fast wave train observed at 171 Å, δtEUV = 1.7 ± 0.2 min. The inferred speed of the emission location of the radio sparks, 630 km s-1, is comparable to the measured speed of the CME leading edge, 500 km s-1, and the speeds derived from the drifting of the type II lanes. The calculated height of the radio emission (obtained from the density) matches the observed location of the CME leading edge. From the above evidence we propose that the radio sparks are caused by the quasi-periodic fast waves, and the emission is generated as they catch up and interact with the leading edge of the CME. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  6. IMAGING AND SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-07-01

    We explore the quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in a solar flare observed by Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, Solar Dynamics Observatory, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) on 2014 September 10. QPPs are identified as the regular and periodic peaks on the rapidly varying components, which are the light curves after removing the slowly varying components. The QPPs display only three peaks at the beginning on the hard X-ray emissions, but 10 peaks on the chromospheric and coronal line emissions, and more than seven peaks (each peak corresponds to a type III burst on the dynamic spectra) at the radio emissions. A uniform quasi-period of about 4 minutes is detected among them. AIA imaging observations exhibit that the 4-minute QPPs originate from the flare ribbon and tend to appear on the ribbon front. IRIS spectral observations show that each peak of the QPPs tends to a broad line width and a red Doppler velocity at C i, O iv, Si iv, and Fe xxi lines. Our findings indicate that the QPPs are produced by the non-thermal electrons that are accelerated by the induced quasi-periodic magnetic reconnections in this flare.

  7. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modelling during Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Haoyu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in the spring of 2003 in Colorado, USA. Initial forward model validation work is concentrating on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. This paper will focus on the ability of forward Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) modelling, combined with snowpack measurements to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th Intensive Observing Period (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike the earlier IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. Observations of upwelling and downwelling tree radiobrightness will be used to formulate a simple model for the effect of trees within the field of view. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo s Ground- Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7). These analyses will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  8. Observed changes of temperature extremes in Serbia over the period 1961 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruml, Mirjana; Gregorić, Enike; Vujadinović, Mirjam; Radovanović, Slavica; Matović, Gordana; Vuković, Ana; Počuča, Vesna; Stojičić, Djurdja

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of spatiotemporal changes of temperature extremes in Serbia, based on 18 ETCCDI indices, was performed using daily minimum and maximum temperature observations from 26 meteorological stations over the period 1961-2010. The observation period was divided into two sub-periods (1961-1980 and 1981-2010) according to the results of the sequential Mann-Kendall test. Temporal trends were evaluated by a least-squares linear regression method. The average annual minimum temperature displayed a mixed pattern of increasing, decreasing, and no trends over 1961-1980 and a significant increasing trend over 1981-2010 across the whole country, with a regionally averaged rate of 0.48 °C per decade. The average annual maximum temperature showed a decreasing trend during 1961-1980 and a significant increasing trend at all stations during 1981-2010, with a regionally averaged rate of 0.56 °C per decade. Hot indices exhibited a general cooling tendency until 1980 and a warming tendency afterwards, with the most pronounced trends in the number of summer and tropical days during the first period and in the frequency of warm days and nights in the second. Cold indices displayed a mostly warming tendency over the entire period, with the most remarkable increase in the lowest annual maximum temperature and the number of ice days during the first period and in the frequency of cool nights during the second. At most stations, the diurnal temperature range showed a decrease until 1980 and no change or a slight increase afterwards. The lengthening of the growing season was much more pronounced in the later period. The computed correlation coefficient between the annual temperature indices and large-scale circulation features revealed that the East Atlantic pattern displayed much stronger association with examined indices than the North Atlantic Oscillation and East Atlantic/West Russia pattern.

  9. EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TRAPPED, ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS: THE ORIGIN OF THE OBSERVED MASS-PERIOD RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2012-12-01

    The large number of observed exoplanets ({approx}>700) provides important constraints on their origin as deduced from the mass-period diagram of planets. The most surprising features in the diagram are (1) the (apparent) pileup of gas giants at a period of {approx}500 days ({approx}1 AU) and (2) the so-called mass-period relation, which indicates that planetary mass is an increasing function of orbital period. We construct the evolutionary tracks of growing planets at planet traps in evolving protoplanetary disks and show that they provide a good physical understanding of how these observational properties arise. The fundamental feature of our model is that inhomogeneities in protoplanetary disks give rise to multiple (up to 3) trapping sites for rapid (type I) planetary migration of planetary cores. The viscous evolution of disks results in the slow radial movement of the traps and their cores from large to small orbital periods. In our model, the slow inward motion of planet traps is coupled with the standard core accretion scenario for planetary growth. As planets grow, type II migration takes over. Planet growth and radial movement are ultimately stalled by the dispersal of gas disks via photoevaporation. Our model makes a number of important predictions: that distinct sub-populations of planets that reflect the properties of planet traps where they have grown result in the mass-period relation, that the presence of these sub-populations naturally explains a pileup of planets at {approx}1 AU, and that evolutionary tracks from the ice line do put planets at short periods and fill an earlier claimed {sup p}lanet desert{sup -}a sparse population of planets in the mass-semimajor axis diagram.

  10. Determination of solar wind elemental abundances from M/Q observations during three periods in 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, S.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1983-10-01

    Mass spectra in the range 2 ≤ M/Q ≤ 3 provided by a high resolution mode of the ISEE-3 Plasma Composition Experiment were evaluated for three selected periods during early 1980. The observed Ne/O ratios are compatible with estimated solar abundance ratios. In two of the three periods, the He/Ne-ratios agree with the Apollo foil results. Freezing-in temperatures for oxygen are similar to those obtained by other groups. Possible reasons for an unexpectedly high flux at M/Q = 2.4 are discussed.

  11. Observation of periodic waves in a pulse-coupled neural network.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J L; Ritter, D

    1993-08-01

    A pulse-coupled neural network was implemented, for the first time to our knowledge, in a hybrid electro-optical laboratory demonstration system. Dynamic coherent traveling-wave patterns were observed that repeated their spatial patterns at each locality with a period that depended on the local input pattern and strength. Coherence and periodicity were maintained far beyond the physical limits of the linking receptive fields, suggesting a new mechanism for information transmission in a network with limited local connectivity. With no linking, the output became chaotic because the relative phases increased linearly in time.

  12. Observations of long-period Cepheids between l = 294 and 331 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayzeck, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Photoelectric and spectroscopic observations of long-period Cepheids, as well as 21-cm profiles in the directions of these young stars, are presented for the Crux-Centaurus-Circinus-Norma section of the Milky Way. The UBV data have been used to revise periods and light-curve parameters and ultimately to calculate the distances of these stars. From the spectroscopic information velocity estimates have been made. Finally, the stellar velocities have been compared with H I gas motions detected along the same line of sight. These results are briefly discussed with a view to understanding the spiral structure of the region.

  13. Observations of long-period Cepheids between l = 294 and 331 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayzeck, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Photoelectric and spectroscopic observations of long-period Cepheids, as well as 21-cm profiles in the directions of these young stars, are presented for the Crux-Centaurus-Circinus-Norma section of the Milky Way. The UBV data have been used to revise periods and light-curve parameters and ultimately to calculate the distances of these stars. From the spectroscopic information velocity estimates have been made. Finally, the stellar velocities have been compared with H I gas motions detected along the same line of sight. These results are briefly discussed with a view to understanding the spiral structure of the region.

  14. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR FLARE LOOPS WITH SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Mao, X. J.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-20

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to {gamma}-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s{sup -1}, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be {approx}10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  15. Imaging Observations of Quasi-periodic Pulsations in Solar Flare Loops with SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. T.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mao, X. J.

    2012-08-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to γ-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s-1, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be ~10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  16. Experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a brillouin cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yingchun; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhongxuan; Tang, Xin; Lin, Chengyou; Chen, Zhaoyang

    2017-06-01

    It has been an important research subject to find new nonlinear optical phenomena. In this paper, we report the experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a super long single-mode standard fiber with external optical feedback provided by the fiber end. The end facet reflection provides an analogous Fabry-Perot stimulated Brillouin resonator cavity. By increasing the pump power to exceed stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold, we observed light structures exhibiting extremely rich temporal-pulse characteristics that had never been reported in literature before, including supercontinuum background generation, the localization of periodic optical structure formation, fission, and compression. These optical structures are of period-doubling distribution and have different recurrence rates. What is more interesting is that we have observed sets of low frequency bipolar cycle-pulse trains that is often seen in the electrical field and hardly seen in pure optical system. Real-time specification of dynamical temporal regimes of laser operation may bring new insight into rich underlying nonlinear physics of practical fiber cavity systems. Therefore, some new nonlinear optical phenomena have been observed.

  17. Simultaneous observation of whistlers and emissions during a geomagnetically quiet period at low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, K. K.; Singh, A. K.; Lalmani

    2011-02-01

    A unique night-time natural electromagnetic disturbances in the VLF/ELF range received during a magnetically quite period at a low latitude Indian ground station, Jammu (geomag. lat. 19°26' N, L=1.17) has been reported. During the routine observation of VLF waves at Jammu, whistlers and different types of VLF/ELF emissions such as whistlers of varying dispersion confined to a small band limited frequency range, hisslers, pulsing hiss, discrete chorus emissions of rising and falling tones with multiple bands, oscillating tone discrete emission, whistler-triggered hook and discrete chorus risers emissions, etc. have been observed simultaneously during the quiet period on a single night. Such type of unique simultaneous observations has never been reported from any of the low latitude ground stations and this is the first observation of its kind. The results are discussed in the light of recorded features of whistlers and emissions. Generation and propagation mechanism are discussed briefly. Plasma parameters are further derived from the dispersion analysis of nighttime whistlers and emissions recorded simultaneously during magnetically quiet periods.

  18. Corticospinal adaptations and strength maintenance in the immobilized arm following 3 weeks unilateral strength training.

    PubMed

    Pearce, A J; Hendy, A; Bowen, W A; Kidgell, D J

    2013-12-01

    Cross-education strength training has being shown to retain strength and muscle thickness in the immobilized contralateral limb. Corticospinal mechanisms have been proposed to underpin this phenomenon; however, no transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) data has yet been presented. This study used TMS to measure corticospinal responses following 3 weeks of unilateral arm training on the contralateral, immobilize arm. Participants (n = 28) were randomly divided into either immobilized strength training (Immob + train) immobilized no training (Immob) or control. Participants in the immobilized groups had their nondominant arm rested in a sling, 15 h/day for 3 weeks. The Immob + train group completed unilateral arm curl strength training, while the Immob and control groups did not undertake training. All participants were tested for corticospinal excitability, strength, and muscle thickness of both arms. Immobilization resulted in a group x time significant reduction in strength, muscle thickness and corticospinal excitability for the untrained limb of the Immob group. Conversely, no significant change in strength, muscle thickness, or corticospinal excitability occurred in the untrained limb of the Immob + train group. These results provide the first evidence of corticospinal mechanisms, assessed by TMS, underpinning the use of unilateral strength training to retain strength and muscle thickness following immobilization of the contralateral limb.

  19. Drifting Quasi-Periodic Modulation of the Fast Magnetosonic Mode: Van Allen Probe Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Kurth, W. S.; Wygant, J. R.; MacDonald, E.

    2014-12-01

    The fast magnetosonic mode is one of the dominant wave modes in the Earth's radiation belts. These waves influence the ring current by scattering ions in energy in the 10's of keV range, and are believed to be a heat source for radiation belt electrons. The fast magnetosonic mode observed around the Earth's inner equatorial magnetosphere sometimes exhibits quasi-periodic modulation as detected by the Van Allen probes. During each modulation the wave frequency exhibits a strong drifting (dispersive) signature characterized by a rising tone. Each tone is composed of harmonics with spacing close to the proton cyclotron frequency. The tones are band limited in frequency and mainly observed above the 20th harmonic of the local proton cyclotron frequency. We observe this modulation mainly outside the plasmapause, but it has also been observed to penetrate down to 1.5 RE. The modulation is observed up to magnetic latitudes of ±17º, at all magnetic local times, but its signatures are more pronounced on the dayside. For events where lower frequency ULF waves are detected, the period of the ULF wave is about twice the modulation period of the fast magnetosonic mode, suggesting strong wave-wave interactions. The modulation period varies from 50 to 200 s and its duration ranges from 0.2 to 3 h, with the maximum duration limited by the spacecraft orbit. We hypothesize that the rising tone is produced by changing Alfven velocities created by steepened density fluctuations due to plasma modification by an underlying ULF wave.

  20. Observation of five-minute-period gravity waves in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, R. T.; Goode, Philip R.; Hill, Henry A.

    1983-01-01

    Vertically propagating traveling waves have been observed in the solar photosphere. These waves have a period of 278 ± 41 seconds and a vertical phase velocity of about 2 km s-1. It is noted that these waves also have approximately the same period as the well-studied five-minute-period acoustic mode, which is evanescent in the photosphere. The only consistent interpretation of the traveling waves implies that they are gravity waves. About half the time the gravity waves are outgoing, while the remainder of the time they are ingoing. The data were collected by Stebbins et al. (1980) to study the vertical structure of the photosphere. They examined velocity pertubations at nine altitudes in the photosphere using a Doppler shift technique. The current work represents a reanalysis of that data which uncovered the five-minute-period traveling waves. The mean velocity amplitude of disturbances at a given altitude, as registered in the observed Doppler shift, was found to be directly proportional to the mean velocity amplitude at the base of the photosphere. This was the expected relationship between the velocity amplitudes. It was not expected that the standard deviation of the velocity amplitude at a particular altitude would be independent of the velocity amplitude at the base of the photosphere. In addition, the phase difference between velocities at different altitudes is, unexpectedly, inversely proportional to the velocity amplitude at any altitude. These two traits of the data are consistent with a five-minute-period nonacoustic traveling wave being superimposed on the five-minute-period acoustic mode. This supposition is borne out by a detailed examination of the data in the complex plane of amplitude and phase and by a calculation of the power spectrum of the traveling waves as a function of their vertical wavenumber (see Hill et al., 1982).

  1. Substorms observations during two geomagnetically active periods in March 2012 and March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, V.; Despirak, I.; Kozelov, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work two events of strong geomagnetic activity were examined: the period 7-17 March 2012, which is one of the most disturbed periods during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24, and the severe geomagnetic storm on 17-20 March 2015. During the first period four consecutive magnetic storms occurred on 7, 9, 12, and 15 March. These storms were caused by Sheath, MC and HSS, and the detailed scenarios for the storms were different. The second event is a storm of fourth level with Kp = 8, the strongest one during the last four years, the so-called "St. Patrick's Day 2015 Event". A geomagnetic storm of such intensity was observed in September 2011. Our analysis was based on the 10-s sampled IMAGE magnetometers data, the 1-min sampled OMNI solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data and observations of the Multiscale Aurora Imaging Network (MAIN) in Apatity. The particularities in the behaviours of substorms connected with different storms during these two interesting strongly disturbed periods are discussed.

  2. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  3. Period doubling observed in the circadian photosynthetic rhythm of the prokaryotic cyanobacterium Cyanothece RF-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Tsu-Chiang; Cheng, Da-Long

    2005-03-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous biological clock that governs biochemical phenomena or behavior in organisms. The Cyanothece RF-1 is the first prokaryote shown to exhibit circadian nitrogen-fixing rhythm. The observation of the circadian photosynthetic rhythm of this strain was recently reported by the authors. In this work, the dissolved-oxygen variation in the culture of Cyanothece RF-1 was recorded, which would reveal the photosynthetic activity of the strain. For a culture of about 1x10^8 cells/ml in concentration, a period-doubling pattern was clearly displayed in the circadian photosynthetic rhythm signals. The mechanism corresponding to this nonlinear effect will be discussed. These results represent the first observation of the period doubling in the circadian rhythm of a prokaryotic cyanobacterium.

  4. Recurrence times and periodicities in 4U 1608-52 as observed by Vela 5B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lochner, James C.; Roussel-Dupre, Diane

    1994-01-01

    We report on the Vela 5B 10 year history of the soft X-ray transient 4U 1608-52, and on the characteristics of its soft X-ray outbursts. The Vela 5B satellite observed the four known outbursts in 1975, 1977, and 1979, and four new outbursts in 1970 and 1971, altering the recurrence pattern of outbursts from this source. One of the 1970 outbursts is symmetric in its intensity profile, while the two outbursts in 1971 have short exponential profiles separated by 80 days. Despite suggestive recurrence periods of approximately 85 and approximately 150 days evident in the time intervals between the outbursts, there is no single statistically significant recurrence time on which the outbursts recur consistently. In the 1970 symmetric event, there is evidence for a period of either 4.10 or 5.19 days. Drawing upon the analogy with SU Ursa Majoris dwarf novae, we suggest that the short period is orbital and any longer period would be associated with a precession period of the accretion disk.

  5. Calibration of Hipparcos Long Period Variable Start Fields Using Multi-Color CCD Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Mattei, Janet; Benson, Priscilla J.; Reyes, Adriana

    The first set of 4-color AAVSO CCD finder charts has been prepared using the 0.9-m telescope at Kitt peak national Observatory in Arizona. The stars selected were northern long period variable stars observed with the Hipparcos astrometric satellite, since multicolor photometry was needed on these stars to calibrate and reduce the photometric and astrometric data obtained by the satellite. We describe the criteria in choosing the stars for which to prepare CCD finder charts, the observation process, and the reduction of the CCD to obtain 4-color CCD magnitude sequences to use in the creation of AAVSO finder charts.

  6. Summer weather characteristics and periodicity observed over the period 1888-2013 in the region of Belgrade, Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujović, Dragana; Todorović, Nedeljko; Paskota, Mira

    2017-02-01

    With the goal of finding summer climate patterns in the region of Belgrade (Serbia) over the period 1888-2013, different techniques of multivariate statistical analysis were used in order to analyze the simultaneous changes of a number of climatologic parameters. An increasing trend of the mean daily minimum temperature was detected. In the recent decades (1960-2013), this increase was much more pronounced. The number of days with the daily minimum temperature greater or equal to 20 °C also increased significantly. Precipitation had no statistically significant trend. Spectral analysis showed a repetitive nature of the climatologic parameters which had periods that roughly can be classified into three groups, with the durations of the following: (1) 6 to 7 years, (2) 10 to 18 years, and (3) 21, 31, and 41 years. The temperature variables mainly had one period of repetitiveness of 5 to 7 years. Among other variables, the correlations of regional fluctuations of the temperature and precipitation and atmospheric circulation indices were analyzed. The North Atlantic oscillation index had the same periodicity as that of the precipitation, and it was not correlated to the temperature variables. Atlantic multidecadal oscillation index correlated well to the summer mean daily minimum and summer mean temperatures. The underlying structure of the data was analyzed by principal component analysis, which detected the following four easily interpreted dimensions: More sunshine-Higher temperature, Precipitation, Extreme heats, and Changeable summer.

  7. [Test for the determination of physical fitness 3 weeks after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, M; Burkart, F

    1975-12-01

    In a consecutive group of 125 patients three weeks after myocardial infarction an ergometer bicycle test was performed in order to obtain an objective assesment of the physical fitness. The patients were exercised on 3 different workloads during a total time of six minutes. It was attempted to reach the training heart rate which was calculated from the resting heart rate plus 60% of the maximum increase, the maximal heart rate being "215-age in years". The Physical Work Capacity (PWC) was compared with the fitness of on age correlated control group. We could show that the PWC at hospital discharge, i.e. 3 weeks after myocardial infarction, was 79.6 +/- 23% of the normal value. Three weeks later it had improved by another 9%. A positive correlation with the CPJ of Norris and with the degree of physical activity prior to the acute illness could be demonstrated.

  8. Overview of the first HyMeX special observation period over Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivančan-Picek, Branka; Tudor, Martina; Horvath, Kristian; Stanešić, Antonio; Ivatek-Šahdan, Stjepan

    2016-12-01

    The HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiment (HyMeX) is intended to improve the capabilities of predicting high-impact weather events. Within its framework, the aim of the first special observation period (SOP1), 5 September to 6 November 2012, was to study heavy precipitation events and flash floods. Here, we present high-impact weather events over Croatia that occurred during SOP1. Particular attention is given to eight intense observation periods (IOPs), during which high precipitation occurred over the eastern Adriatic and Dinaric Alps. During the entire SOP1, the operational model forecasts generally well represented medium intensity precipitation, but heavy precipitation was frequently underestimated by the ALADIN model at an 8 km grid spacing and was overestimated at a higher resolution (2 km grid spacing). During IOP2, intensive rainfall occurred over a wider area around the city of Rijeka in the northern Adriatic. The short-range maximum rainfall totals were the largest ever recorded at the Rijeka station since the beginning of measurements in 1958. The rainfall amounts measured in intervals of 20, 30 and 40 min were exceptional, with return periods that exceeded a thousand, a few hundred and one hundred years, respectively. The operational precipitation forecast using the ALADIN model at an 8 km grid spacing provided guidance regarding the event but underestimated the rainfall intensity. An evaluation of numerical sensitivity experiments suggested that the forecast was slightly enhanced by improving the initial conditions through variational data assimilation. The operational non-hydrostatic run at a 2 km grid spacing using a configuration with the ALARO physics package further improved the forecast. This article highlights the need for an intensive observation period in the future over the Adriatic region to validate the simulated mechanisms and improve numerical weather predictions via data assimilation and model improvements in descriptions

  9. Saturn's Ionospheric Clock(s): A Concept for Generating and Maintaining Saturn's Observed Magnetospheric Periodicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2010-12-01

    Saturn’s 10.X hour periodicity, observed throughout the magnetosphere, remains a mystery. It has been observed in many regions, modulating many phenomena. During the Cassini mission most observations have shown a period at about 10.8 hours, expressed in Saturn kilometric radiation from the high latitude auroral zone, in magnetic field components (both equatorial and high latitude) from 3 to 12 Rs, in current sheet encounters in the outer magnetosphere and magnetotail, in energetic neutral atom emission from the equatorial magnetosphere, and in plasma and energetic particles throughout the magnetosphere. More recently, various authors have shown at least two dominant periods expressed (in SKR and in magnetic field components), with slightly different values in the southern and northern hemispheres. The cause of this behavior is still not accounted for. Although loosely associated with Saturn’s rotation, the variability in the period precludes a direct connection with Saturn’s interior (e.g., a magnetic anomaly). Other candidates that have been discussed by others are an ionospheric source (conductivity anomaly), a perturbation in the cold plasma circulation pattern, a magnetospheric cam, asymmetric ring current particle pressure, and/or a natural frequency of the magnetosphere (cavity mode or traveling wave front of some sort). In this paper we present a concept that derives its energy from the subcorotating cold, dense plasma (which exhibits a rotation period on the order of 13 to 14 hours throughout L-shells between ~3 and 20), but is triggered by a process linked with the ionosphere. Key components of the model include significant slippage between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere (with the ionosphere rotating at the expressed period in each hemisphere, only slightly more slowly than the planet interior), subcorotating cold dense plasma with a source in the inner magnetosphere, predominantly radial transport of the cold dense plasma in the rotational

  10. Management of Toxoplasmic Retinochoroiditis during Pregnancy, Postpartum Period and Lactation: Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Moneta-Wielgoś, Joanna; Kęcik, Dariusz; Borkowski, Piotr Karol

    2015-01-01

    Background During pregnancy and labor, the immune response is physiologically impaired and women are more susceptible to infections. Since many drugs may have potentially adverse effects on the fetus and newborn, less aggressive treatment regimens should be considered in pregnant and lactating patients. The aim of our study was to present the management of toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis during pregnancy, postpartum period, and lactation. Material/Methods A retrospective study was undertaken of the clinical records of 24 women during pregnancy, postpartum period, and lactation who were referred in the years 1994–2014 to the Department of Zoonoses and Tropical Diseases or the Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Warsaw for toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis. The diagnosis was based on the typical ophthalmoscopic picture, confirmed by serological testing using an ELISA method. Results A total of 28 attacks of toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis were observed in 24 patients during pregnancy, postpartum period, and lactation. The choice of treatment was guided by the character and location of the inflammatory lesion and the gestational age. Topical (steroidal/nonsteroidal eye drops) and systemic treatments with spiramycin or azithromycin, Fansidar (pyrimethamine 25 mg/sulfadoxine 500 mg), and prednisone were used. Conclusions Management of toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis during pregnancy, postpartum period, or lactation must be individualized and guided by the gestational age and location of the active lesion. Women of childbearing age with toxoplasma ocular lesions should be informed by their doctors about possible active recurrences during pregnancy and followed carefully by an ophthalmologist when pregnant. PMID:25711713

  11. Infrared Spectroscopic Observations of the Secondary Stars of Short-period Sub-gap Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Ryan T.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Tappert, Claus; Howell, Steve B.

    2011-02-01

    We present K-band spectroscopy of short-period, "sub-gap" cataclysmic variable (CV) systems obtained using ISAAC on the Very Large Telescope. We show the infrared (IR) spectra for nine systems below the 2-3 hr period gap: V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, WX Hyi, V893 Sco, RZ Leo, and TY PsA. We are able to clearly detect the secondary star in all but WX Hyi, V893 Sco, and TY PsA. We present the first direct detection of the secondary stars of V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, and determine new spectral classifications for EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, and RZ Leo. We find that the CO band strengths of all but Z Cha appear normal for their spectral types, in contrast to their longer period cousins above the period gap. This brings the total number of CVs and pre-CVs with moderate resolution (R >~ 1500) IR spectroscopy to 61 systems: 19 pre-CVs, 31 non-magnetic systems, and 11 magnetic or partially magnetic systems. We discuss the trends seen in the IR abundance patterns thus far and highlight a potential link between anomalous abundances seen in the IR with the C IV/N V anomaly seen in the ultraviolet. We present a compilation of all systems with sufficient resolution IR observations to assess the CO band strengths and, by proxy, obtain an estimate on the C abundance on the secondary star.

  12. Comparison of Sunphotometric Measurements During the Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalsky, J. J.; Schmid, B.; Halthore, R. N.; Pavloski, C. F.; Ackerman, T. P.; Beauharnois, M. C.; Harrison, L. C.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    In the Fall of 1997 the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program held an intensive observation period (IOP) to study atmospheric aerosols using in situ and remote sensing techniques at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. As part of this experiment five automated, tracking sunphotometers were present to measure total column aerosol optical depth over the three-week period. which included many clear days or parts of days that were clear. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO 1993) has recommended a comparison of tracking sunphotometers to assess the ability of different instruments to arrive at similar aerosol optical depths. It was further recommended that the comparison be staged at a clean mountain site. In fact, this comparison has not occurred, but the comparison that we describe in this paper is representative of what contemporary instruments may accomplish in an environment more typical of sites where aerosols measurements will be required. The measurements were made over the period 15 September to 5 October 1997. The aerosol loading varied from extremely clean to moderately turbid conditions. In the next section the instruments will be described along with a brief explanation of the calibration techniques. The third section contains the results compared graphically on moderately turbid and fairly clean days and in a table representing the whole period. The paper ends with a section of discussion and a summary of the results.

  13. "Zipper-like" periodic magnetosonic waves: Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and magnetospheric multiscale observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Wygant, J.; Breneman, A.; Thaller, S.; Funsten, H. O.; Mitchell, D. G.; Manweiler, J. W.; Torbert, R. B.; Le Contel, O.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Andriopoulou, M.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-02-01

    An interesting form of "zipper-like" magnetosonic waves consisting of two bands of interleaved periodic rising-tone spectra was newly observed by the Van Allen Probes, the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), and the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) missions. The two discrete bands are distinct in frequency and intensity; however, they maintain the same periodicity which varies in space and time, suggesting that they possibly originate from one single source intrinsically. In one event, the zipper-like magnetosonic waves exhibit the same periodicity as a constant-frequency magnetosonic wave and an electrostatic emission, but the modulation comes from neither density fluctuations nor ULF waves. A statistical survey based on 3.5 years of multisatellite observations shows that zipper-like magnetosonic waves mainly occur on the dawnside to noonside, in a frequency range between 10 fcp and fLHR. The zipper-like magnetosonic waves may provide a new clue to nonlinear excitation or modulation process, while its cause still remains to be fully understood.

  14. Observations of Very-Long-Period Tremor at the Tatun Volcano Group, Northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Y.; Lin, C.; Konstantino, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group lies at the northern tip of Taiwan and is only 15 km north of the capital Taipei, which has more than seven million inhabitants. To examine the possibility of both volcanic and seismic activity in the future, a dense seismic array consisting of 8 stations equipped with both broad-band and short-period sensors has been installed in Tatun area since 2003. In addition to common volcano-tectonic earthquakes, we have observed a variety of volcanoseismic signals such as tornillos, short duration monochromatic events and long duration spasmodic bursts from the short-period seismic data. Further examination of broadband seismic data shows that there also were some very-long-period (VLP) volcanic signals, which are often reported at some active volcanoes in the world. Based on the polarization and travel-time of the VLP signals recorded at 4 broadband stations, the source of VLP seismic signals was located at a depth around 2.0 km. These observations put into doubt the long-standing suggestion that the Tatun volcanoes are extinct and prompt for a thorough assessment of the volcanic hazard for this area.

  15. Confrontation Between a Quantized Periods of Some Exo-planetary Systems and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Morcos, Abd

    2012-07-01

    Confrontation Between a Quantized Periods of Some Exo-planetary Systems and Observations A.B. Morcos Corot and Kepler were designed to detect Earth-like extra solar planets. The orbital elements and periods of these planets will contain some uncertainties. Many theoretical treatments depend on the idea of quantization were done aiming to find orbital elements of these exoplenets. In the present work, as an extension of previous works, the periods of some extoplanetary systems are calculated by using a simple derived formula. The orbital velocities of some of them are predicted . A comparison between the calculated and observed data is done References 1-J.M. Barnothy , the stability of the Solar System and of small Stellar Systems . (Y.Kazai edn,IAU,1974). 2-L.Nottale,Fractal Space-Time and Microphysics,Towards a Theory of Scale Relativity,( World Scientific, London,1994). 3-L. Nottale, A&A Lett. 315, L9 (1996). 4-L. Nottale, G. Schumacher and J. Gay, A&A , 322, 1018 , (1997). 5-L. Nottale, A&A , 361, 379 (2000). 6-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9807186v1, (1998). 7-A.G. Agnese and R.Festa, arXiv:astro-ph/9910534v2. (1999). 8- A.B.Morcos, MG 12 , France (2009). 9- A.B.Morcs, Cospar 38 , Bremen , Germany (2010)

  16. Observations of Quasi-Periodic Whistler Mode Waves by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospodarsky, George; Wilkinson, Darrelle; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig; Santolik, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    Observed in Earth's inner magnetosphere, quasi-periodic whistler mode emissions (QP) are electromagnetic waves in the frequency range from a few hundred Hz to a few kHz that exhibit a periodic modulation (typically a few minutes) of their wave intensity. These waves were first detected at high latitude ground stations, but more recently have been observed by a number of spacecraft, including the twin Van Allen Probes. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument simultaneously measures the vector wave magnetic field and electric field, allowing wave propagation parameters, such as wave normal angle and Poynting vector, to be obtained. Almost four years of Van Allen Probes data have been examined and a statistical survey of the occurrence and properties of the QP emissions has been performed. The QP emissions were found to have periods ranging from 1 to 16 minutes with events lasting from less than 1 hour up to 6 hours. Some events were detected on successive orbits and a number of events were simultaneously detected by both spacecraft, even during large spacecraft separations, providing an opportunity to investigate the source and propagation properties of these waves.

  17. Observing and Modeling Long-Period Tidal Variations in Polar Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.; Dickman, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    By exchanging angular momentum with the solid Earth, ocean tides cause the Earth's rotation to change. While hydrodynamic tide models have been used to study the effect of ocean tides on polar motion, it is shown here that none of the published models can fully account for the observed variations. An empirical ocean tide model is therefore determined by fitting periodic terms at the tidal frequencies to polar motion excitation observations, from which atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic effects were removed. While the empirical ocean tide model does fully account for allof the observed tidal power, tests indicate that the model may not have completely converged. So better models of the effects of ocean tides on polar motion are still needed, both dynamical and empirical.

  18. Observing and Modeling Long-Period Tidal Variations in Polar Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard S.; Dickman, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    By exchanging angular momentum with the solid Earth, ocean tides cause the Earth's rotation to change. While hydrodynamic tide models have been used to study the effect of ocean tides on polar motion, it is shown here that none of the published models can fully account for the observed variations. An empirical ocean tide model is therefore determined by fitting periodic terms at the tidal frequencies to polar motion excitation observations, from which atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic effects were removed. While the empirical ocean tide model does fully account for allof the observed tidal power, tests indicate that the model may not have completely converged. So better models of the effects of ocean tides on polar motion are still needed, both dynamical and empirical.

  19. Seasonal and Interannual Variability of Short Period Lamb Waves Observed over South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, S.; Gerhardt, D.

    2009-12-01

    A meteor radar system was installed at Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in 2001 and became fully operational in 2002. This radar has operated nearly continuously since and is providing horizontal wind measurements in four separate azimuth directions. This feature provides the ability to determine the zonal wavenumber and direction of propagation for the observed perturbations. With multiple years of observations we have the opportunity to investigate the coherent seasonal structure of the large scale observations over South Pole. These include the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal oscillations which are large during the summer months as well as both eastward and westward propagating planetary waves. Throughout the year short period (8-14) hour oscillations are present and have been associated with Lamb Waves. In this paper we present a spatial and temporal analysis of these planetary waves.

  20. HST Observations of a Large-Amplitude, Long-Period Trojan: (11351) Leucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Levison, Harold F.; Buie, Marc W.; Grundy, William M.

    2016-10-01

    (11351) Leucus (1997 TS25) is a Trojan that is notable for having one of the longest known rotation periods of any small body, T=514 h. A possible cause for this long period would be the existence of a tidally locked binary similar to the already-known long period binary Trojan, (617) Patroclus. If this were the case, the system would become tidally circularized in a time short compared to the age of the solar system. In such a case, the components would be separated by ~0.18 arcsec at lightcurve maximum, resolvable by WFC3. We carried out observations in June 2016, coordinated with groundbased observations to schedule near a maximum to test whether (11351) Leucus is binary. We describe the results of these observations.Observations of (11351) Leucus are of particular interest because it is a target of the Lucy mission, a Discovery mission currently in phase A and one of five that may be selected in early 2017. Searches for binary Trojans also offer multiple scientific benefits independent of mission status. Orbit-derived mass and density can be used to constrain planetary migration models. Low density is characteristic of bodies found in the dynamically cold Kuiper Belt, a remnant of the solar system's protoplanetary disk. Only one undisputed density has been measured in the Trojans, that of the binary (617) Patroclus, which has a low density of 0.8 g/cm3, similar to the low densities found in the Kuiper Belt. Slow rotators offer a set of targets that are tidally evolved systems and therefore are among the most attractive potential targets for an HST search.

  1. SOHO/SWAN OBSERVATIONS OF SHORT-PERIOD SPACECRAFT TARGET COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Combi, M. R.; Lee, Y.; Patel, T. S.; Maekinen, J. T. T.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quemerais, E.

    2011-04-15

    SWAN, the Solar Wind ANisotropies all-sky hydrogen Ly{alpha} camera on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft that makes all-sky images of interplanetary neutral hydrogen, has an ongoing campaign to make special observations of comets, both short- and long-period ones, in addition to the serendipitous observations of comets as part of the all-sky monitoring program. We report here on a study of several short-period comets that were detected by SWAN: 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (1998 and 2005 apparitions), 19P/Borrelly (2001 apparition), 81P/Wild 2 (1997 apparition), and 103P/Hartley 2 (1997 apparition). SWAN observes comets over long continuous stretches of their visible apparitions and therefore provides excellent temporal coverage of the water production. For some of the observations we are also able to analyze an entire sequence of images over many days to several weeks/months using our time-resolved model and extract daily average water production rates over continuous periods of several days to months. The short-term (outburst) and long-term behavior can be correlated with other observations. The overall long-term variation is examined in light of seasonal effects seen in the pre- to post-perihelion differences. For 21P/Giacobini-Zinner and 81P/Wild 2 the activity variations over each apparition were more continuously monitored but nonetheless consistent with previous observations. For 19P/Borrelly we found a very steep variation of water production rates, again consistent with some previous observations, and a variation over six months around perihelion that was reasonably consistent with the spin-axis model of Schleicher et al. and the illumination of the main active areas. During the 1997-1998 apparition of 103P/Hartley 2, the target comet of the EPOXI mission (the Deep Impact extended mission), we found a variation with heliocentric distance ({approx}r{sup -3.6}) that was almost as steep as 19P/Borrelly and, given the small measured radius near

  2. SOHO/SWAN Observations of Short-period Spacecraft Target Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, M. R.; Lee, Y.; Patel, T. S.; Mäkinen, J. T. T.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quémerais, E.

    2011-04-01

    SWAN, the Solar Wind ANisotropies all-sky hydrogen Lyα camera on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft that makes all-sky images of interplanetary neutral hydrogen, has an ongoing campaign to make special observations of comets, both short- and long-period ones, in addition to the serendipitous observations of comets as part of the all-sky monitoring program. We report here on a study of several short-period comets that were detected by SWAN: 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (1998 and 2005 apparitions), 19P/Borrelly (2001 apparition), 81P/Wild 2 (1997 apparition), and 103P/Hartley 2 (1997 apparition). SWAN observes comets over long continuous stretches of their visible apparitions and therefore provides excellent temporal coverage of the water production. For some of the observations we are also able to analyze an entire sequence of images over many days to several weeks/months using our time-resolved model and extract daily average water production rates over continuous periods of several days to months. The short-term (outburst) and long-term behavior can be correlated with other observations. The overall long-term variation is examined in light of seasonal effects seen in the pre- to post-perihelion differences. For 21P/Giacobini-Zinner and 81P/Wild 2 the activity variations over each apparition were more continuously monitored but nonetheless consistent with previous observations. For 19P/Borrelly we found a very steep variation of water production rates, again consistent with some previous observations, and a variation over six months around perihelion that was reasonably consistent with the spin-axis model of Schleicher et al. and the illumination of the main active areas. During the 1997-1998 apparition of 103P/Hartley 2, the target comet of the EPOXI mission (the Deep Impact extended mission), we found a variation with heliocentric distance (~r -3.6) that was almost as steep as 19P/Borrelly and, given the small measured radius near aphelion, this places a

  3. Periodicity in the spatial-temporal earthquake distributions for the Pacific region: observation and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasorova, Elena; Levin, Boris

    2014-05-01

    In the course of the last century a cyclic increasing and decreasing of the Earth's seismic activity (SA) was marked. The variations of the SA for the events with M>=7.0 from 1900 up to date were under study. The two subsets of the worldwide NEIC (USGS) catalog were used: USGS/NEIC from 1973 to 2012 and catalog of the significant worldwide earthquakes (2150 B.C. - 1994 A.D.), compiled by USGS/NEIC from the NOAA agency. The preliminary standardization of magnitudes and elimination of aftershocks from list of events was performed. The entire period of observations was subdivided into 5-year intervals. The temporal distributions of the earthquake (EQ) density and released energy density were calculated separately for the Southern hemisphere (SH), and for the Northern hemisphere (NH) and for eighteen latitudinal belts: 90°-80°N, 80°-70°N, 70°-60°N, 60°-50°N and so on (the size of each belt is equal to 10°). The periods of the SA was compared for different latitudinal belts of the Earth. The peaks and decays of the seismicity do not coincide in time for different latitudinal belts and especially for the belts located in NH and SH. The peaks and decays of the SA for the events (with M>=8) were marked in the temporal distributions of the EQ for all studied latitudinal belts. The two-dimension distributions (over latitudes and over time) of the EQ density and released energy density highlighted that the periods of amplification of the SA are equal to 30-35 years approximately. Next, we check the existence of a non-random component in the EQ occurrence between the NH and the SH. All events were related to the time axis according to their origin time. We take into consideration the set of the EQs in the studied catalog as the sequence of events if each event may have only one of two possible outcome (occurrence in the NH or in the SH). A nonparametric run test was used for testing of hypothesis about an existence the nonrandom component in the examined sequence of

  4. On quasi-periodic variations of low-energy cosmic rays observed near earth.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Karel; Langer, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) may partially, especially at high altitudes, contribute to the dosimetric characteristics. Along with irregular CR variations as Forbush decreases and solar particle events are, the quasi-periodic variations may be of some relevance too. A very short review (with references to original papers) of the present knowledge of various types of such variations is presented, namely (i) diurnal wave, (ii) ~27 d variability due to the solar rotation, (iii) Rieger-type periodicity, and (iv) quasi-biennial oscillations as well as waves on longer time scales related to solar activity and to polarity of magnetic field of the Sun. Variability is illustrated in measurements of secondary CR on the ground including the high-altitude observations at Lomnický štít. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Observations of 20-day period meridional current oscillations in the upper ocean along the Pacific Equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Knox, Robert A.; Luther, Douglas S.

    1988-01-01

    Prominent oscillations of the meridional current, with a mean period of approximately 20 days, is observed in the upper ocean from May 1979 to October 1985 using moored current measurements along the Pacific equator at 95, 110, 124, 140, and 152 deg W, as well as off (but near) the equator at 110 and 140 deg W. The fluctuations are relatively narrowband in frequency. A 95 percent statistically significant peak in the power spectra of the meridional current occurs at 110, 124, and 140 deg W, but not at 95 and 152 deg W where the spectral peaks are smaller. The dominant wave period decreases by about 4 percent from 110 to 140 deg W. The wave amplitude decreases with depth, and the wave is essentially confined to the upper 80 m. The penetration depth of the oscillation is greatest at 110 deg W and least at 140 deg W.

  6. Observations of 20-day period meridional current oscillations in the upper ocean along the Pacific Equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Knox, Robert A.; Luther, Douglas S.

    1988-01-01

    Prominent oscillations of the meridional current, with a mean period of approximately 20 days, is observed in the upper ocean from May 1979 to October 1985 using moored current measurements along the Pacific equator at 95, 110, 124, 140, and 152 deg W, as well as off (but near) the equator at 110 and 140 deg W. The fluctuations are relatively narrowband in frequency. A 95 percent statistically significant peak in the power spectra of the meridional current occurs at 110, 124, and 140 deg W, but not at 95 and 152 deg W where the spectral peaks are smaller. The dominant wave period decreases by about 4 percent from 110 to 140 deg W. The wave amplitude decreases with depth, and the wave is essentially confined to the upper 80 m. The penetration depth of the oscillation is greatest at 110 deg W and least at 140 deg W.

  7. Estimation of excitation temperature by duty ratio of observed period in non-equilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Muraoka, Sumihiro; Nihei, Takashi; Abe, Seiya

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the excitation temperature of atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium (cold) plasma using a line-pair method. An atmospheric cold plasma was intermittently generated using a quartz tube, a rare gas, and a foil electrode by applying high-voltage alternating current. Because the plasma occurred intermittently, an interval appeared between each generated plasma bullet. We assessed the time-averaged effective intensity from the observed intensity at each wavelength measured using a spectrometer. When the exposure time of the spectrometer is longer than the observed period of the plasma emission light, the time-averaged effective intensity at each wavelength decreases because it includes the interval with no plasma emission light. The difference in intensity between wavelengths changes with frequency, because changing the frequency changes the interval between plasma bullets. Consequently, even if the plasma electron temperature does not depend on the frequency of the applied voltage, the excitation temperature estimated from the difference in intensity changes with the frequency. The plasma electron temperature can be estimated from the duty ratio of the observed period of plasma emission light, and we estimated the electron temperature in the helium and argon cold plasmas to be 1.0 eV.

  8. Observational survey of the puzzling star HD 179821: Photometric variations and period analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Coroller, H.; Lèbre, A.; Gillet, D.; Chapellier, E.

    2003-03-01

    From new photometric observations (UBVRI), we present the characteristic features of the light variations of the evolved star HD 179821 (= SAO 124414 = IRAS 19114+0002). Our data, collected through 1999 and 2000, have been combined together with previous photometric measurements available in the literature. Thus, a long term V-light curve (gathering more than 10 years of observations for HD 179821) has been composed. We have analysed it with the Fourier transform method. Two main frequencies are present in the resulting power spectrum, reflecting a dominant bimodal pulsator behavior. A long term phenomenon is also found, but it is not possible to decide whether it is periodic. The Fourier analysis has also been applied on two other filters (U and B) and confirms the detected frequencies. On the basis of our period analysis, we discuss the nature of HD 179821: low-mass post-AGB star or high-mass star. based on observations carried out at the Observatoire de Haute Provence, France, operated by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS).

  9. Multi-instrument observations of sub-minute quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominique, Marie; Zhukov, Andrei; Dolla, Laurent

    2017-08-01

    Since a decade, quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) have been regularly reported to be observed in EUV and SXR during solar flares, while they were previously mostly observed in HXR and radio wavelengths. These new detections can be credited to a new generation of EUV space radiometers (SDO/EVE, PROBA2/LYRA, etc.) that significantly enhanced the instrument performances in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and time resolution. These new instruments allow us to perform statistical analysis of QPPs, which could ultimately help solving the long-debated question of their origin. However, recently, the methods (mainly the way to pre-process data and to account for the noise) used to detect QPPs in those wavelengths were questioned. In this presentation, we will discuss our current understanding of QPPs and the difficulties inherent to their detection. I will particularly address the sub-minute QPPs in the EUV and analyze them in the broader picture of multi-wavelength detection. How do they compare to the pulsations observed in other wavelength ranges? Are sub-minute QPPs and QPPs with longer periods produced by the same processes? What can we learn from the analysis of QPPs? Possible answers to these questions will be presented and discussed.

  10. Subarcsecond bright points and quasi-periodic upflows below a quiescent filament observed by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Zhang, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The new Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission provides high-resolution observations of UV spectra and slit-jaw images (SJIs). These data have become available for investigating the dynamic features in the transition region (TR) below the on-disk filaments. Aims: The driver of "counter-streaming" flows along the filament spine is still unknown yet. The magnetic structures and the upflows at the footpoints of the filaments and their relations with the filament mainbody have not been well understood. We study the dynamic evolution at the footpoints of filaments in order to find some clues for solving these questions. Methods: Using UV spectra and SJIs from the IRIS, along with coronal images and magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we present the new features in a quiescent filament channel: subarcsecond bright points (BPs) and quasi-periodic upflows. Results: The BPs in the TR have a spatial scale of about 350-580 km and lifetimes of more than several tens of minutes. They are located at stronger magnetic structures in the filament channel with a magnetic flux of about 1017-1018 Mx. Quasi-periodic brightenings and upflows are observed in the BPs, and the period is about 4-5 min. The BP and the associated jet-like upflow comprise a "tadpole-shaped" structure. The upflows move along bright filament threads, and their directions are almost parallel to the spine of the filament. The upflows initiated from the BPs with opposite polarity magnetic fields have opposite directions. The velocity of the upflows in the plane of sky is about 5-50 km s-1. The emission line of Si IV 1402.77 Å at the locations of upflows exhibits obvious blueshifts of about 5-30 km s-1, and the line profile is broadened with the width of more than 20 km s-1. Conclusions: The BPs seem to be the bases of filament threads, and the upflows are able to convey mass for the dynamic balance of the filament. The "counter-streaming" flows in previous observations

  11. Observation of gamma rays with a 4.8 hour periodicity from CYG X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Energetic (E35 MeV) Gamma rays were observed from Cyg X-3 with the SAS-2 Gamma ray telescope. They are modulated at the 4.8 sup h period observed in the X-ray and infrared regions, and within the statistical error are in phase with this emission. The flux above 100 MeV has an average value of (4.4 + or - 1.1)x 10 to the -6 power/sq cm/sec. If the distance to Cyg X-3 is 10 kpcs, this flux implies a luminosity of more than 10 to the 37th power ergs/s if the radiation is isotropic and about 10 to the 36th power ergs/s if the radiation is restricted to a cone of one steradian, as it might be in a pulsar.

  12. Quasi-periodic frequency fluctuations observed during coronal radio sounding experiments 1991-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Anatoli; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, Lev; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, Igor; Bird, Michael; Paetzold, Martin

    Recent coronal radio sounding experiments with the ESA spacecraft Mars Express (MEX), Venus Express (VEX) and Rosetta (ROS) have provided a large volume of observational data supporting the presence of a quasi-periodic component (QPC) in frequency fluctuation spectra during solar conjunction. Further evidence for the QPC, first seen in data from the MEX conjunction in 2004, was found later in data from the MEX conjunctions in 2006 and 2008/09, as well as the VEX and ROS conjunctions in 2006. The QPC is detected with an occurrence frequency ≈ 18% (83.3 hours of the total 462.7 hours of data). In some cases the temporal spectra reveal two lines: the main QPC and its second harmonic. The average frequency of the spectral density maximum is νmax ≈ 5.5 mHz (corresponding QPC fluctuation period ≈ 3 min) at solar offset distances R < 8 Rs. The QPC spectral density maximum Gmax reaches an average factor of 2.88 above the background level G0 . The bandwidth of the spectral line ∆ν ≈ νmax . At larger solar distances (R > 8 Rs) the fluctuation frequency of the mean spectral density maximum is νmax ≈ 4.3 mHz (period ≈ 4 min). Both the fractional spectral line bandwidth ∆ν/νmax and the excess of spectral density Gmax above background are nearly unchanged from their values nearer the Sun. A reanalysis of earlier coronal sounding data obtained with the Ulysses (1991, 1995) and Galileo (1996/97) spacecraft has verified the existence of the QPC. Typical fluctuation periods lie between 4 and 5 min, but the QPC occurrence rate (12%) is smaller than that observed for MEX-VEX-ROS. This may be associated with the lower received signal level of Ulysses and Galileo compared to the ESA spacecraft. The Ulysses coronal sounding experiments in 1995 provided an interesting possibility to observe the QPC at high solar latitudes. Preliminary results show that the QPC frequency can reach νmax = 6-7 mHz at heliolatitudes 60° -80° .

  13. The Relationship Between Pain Catastrophizing and Outcomes of a 3-Week Comprehensive Pain Rehabilitation Program.

    PubMed

    Craner, Julia R; Sperry, Jeannie A; Evans, Michele M

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE : Pain catastrophizing is an important predictor of functioning and disability among individuals with chronic pain, and modification of catastrophic interpretations of pain is a proposed treatment mechanism of pain rehabilitation. The purpose of the current study is to examine the relationship between changes in catastrophic thinking and treatment outcomes for a large sample of patients with chronic pain. METHODS : 648 adult patients with chronic pain completed a 3-week intensive outpatient comprehensive pain rehabilitation program. Measures of pain severity, pain-related life interference, depression, and pain catastrophizing were completed at admission and discharge. RESULTS : Consistent with prior research, pain catastrophizing was associated with several negative pain-related outcomes. Results of a within-subjects mediational analysis indicated that pain catastrophizing not only improved during the treatment program, but also accounted for a significant portion of the variance in the reduction of pain severity, pain interference, and depression at the end of treatment. CONCLUSIONS : This study adds further support to the position that pain catastrophizing has a detrimental role in adaptation to chronic pain, and that this construct can be successfully modified in treatment to improve patient outcomes. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Carbon dioxide embolism in a 3-week-old neonate during laparoscopic pyloromyotomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kudsi, Omar Yusef; Jones, Sarah A; Brenn, B Randall

    2009-04-01

    Laparoscopic pyloromyotomy has gained popularity in the treatment of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. This is the first case report of carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. We describe a case of carbon dioxide embolism in a 3-week-old neonate during laparoscopic pyloromyotomy by injection of carbon dioxide into a patent umbilical vein. The diagnosis of carbon dioxide embolism was made on the basis of the abrupt decrease in end-tidal CO(2), sudden decreased Spo(2), hypotension, and cyanosis. Portable x-ray with the clinical presentation was sufficient for a diagnosis of carbon dioxide embolism. Treatment included termination of CO(2) insufflation, placing the patient in Durant's position, and adequate resuscitation as necessary. Despite the fact that the insufflation pressure was in the recommended range, a carbon dioxide embolism was thought to be caused by injection of carbon dioxide into a patent umbilical vein. Although laparoscopic pyloromyotomy has demonstrated to be a safe and effective procedure, this is a serious and rare complication causing prolonged length of stay and skewed hospital charges.

  15. From gene to protein: A 3-week intensive course in molecular biology for physical scientists.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Jay L

    2009-07-01

    This article describes a 3-week intensive molecular biology methods course based upon fluorescent proteins, which is successfully taught at the McGill University to advanced undergraduates and graduates in physics, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, and medicine. No previous knowledge of biological terminology or methods is expected, so the material could readily be adapted to earlier undergraduates or students in other fields. The course emphasizes hands-on experience with one half-hour of lecture and 3 and a half hours of laboratory 4 days per week, for a total of 39 hours. The materials are simple and low in cost and all software used is free, making the budget accessible to small universities and community colleges that possess basic teaching wet labs. Conceptual understanding is reinforced with lab reports and an independent final paper on a subject of the student's choice. The final paper describes a possible thesis project, not necessarily the student's own, with assessment based upon grasping of key concepts and methods of molecular biology.

  16. Significant reversibility of alcoholic brain shrinkage within 3 weeks of abstinence.

    PubMed

    Trabert, W; Betz, T; Niewald, M; Huber, G

    1995-08-01

    Chronic alcoholism is often associated with brain shrinkage or atrophy. During recent years, it has been demonstrated that this shrinkage is, at least in part, reversible when abstinence is maintained. There are different hypotheses concerning the mechanisms for this reversibility, but many questions are still open. Especially the time conditions for these reversible changes are subject of discussion. Twenty-eight male patients with severe alcohol dependence were investigated in a computed tomographic study at the beginning of abstinence and 3 weeks later. Planimetric evaluation of 5 selected slices revealed a significant decrease in liquor areas and an increase of brain volume. The densitometric analysis showed an increase in brain tissue density. In a multiple regression approach it was shown that the reversibility was mostly influenced by the age of the patients. Our results support neither the hypothesis of an increase in brain water as the most important principle for reversibility in alcoholic brain shrinkage nor the hypothesis of augmented dendritic growth. Other mechanisms like reduced (during chronic intoxication) and normalized (during abstinence) cerebral hemoperfusion have to be considered as possible mechanisms for the reversibility of alcoholic brain shrinkage.

  17. Growth hormone response to the GABA-B agonist baclofen in 3-week abstinent alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Saliha; Esel, Ertugrul; Turan, Tayfun; Kula, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) dysfunction is a known feature of alcoholism. We investigated GABA-B receptor activity in 3-week abstinent alcoholics using the growth hormone (GH) response to baclofen, a GABA-B receptor agonist. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between GABA-B receptor activity and alcohol withdrawal. GH response to baclofen was measured in alcohol-dependent males without depression (n = 22) who were on day 21 of alcohol abstinence and in healthy control male subjects (n = 23). After 20mg baclofen was given orally to the subjects, blood samples for GH assay were obtained every 30 min for the subsequent 150 min. The patients were divided into two subgroups (continuing withdrawal and recovered withdrawal subgroups) according to their withdrawal symptom severity scores on day 21 of alcohol cessation. Baclofen administration significantly altered GH secretion in the controls, but not in the patients. When GH response to baclofen was assessed as DeltaGH, it was lower in the patients with continuing withdrawal symptoms than in the controls and in the recovered withdrawal group. Impaired GH response to baclofen in all patients mainly pertained to the patients whose withdrawal symptoms partly continued. Our results suggest that reduced GABA-B receptor activity might be associated with longer-term alcohol withdrawal symptoms in alcoholic patients.

  18. Observations and predictions of eclipse times by astronomers in the pre-telescopic period.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. M.

    Eclipses of the Sun and Moon are among the most impressive of celestial events. It is therefore unsurprising that they have played an important role in the astronomy and astrology of most early cultures. Many hundreds of references to eclipses are found in the writings of the chroniclers and astronomers of the pre-telescopic world. In particular, the astronomers of Babylon, Ancient Greece, the Islamic Near East. Later Medieval and Renaissance Europe, China, and Japan, recorded a large number of observations and predictions of the time of an eclipse. The present study contains an extensive compilation of all known timed reports of eclipse observations and predictions made by astronomers in the pre-telescopic period. By performing a basic analysis of the recorded times, it has been possible to trace the gradual development of the techniques used by the astronomers to observe and predict eclipses. In order to conduct this analysis, it has been necessary to investigate a number of other problems including the dating of damaged observational accounts, the units of time used by the early astronomers, and the methods by which the Babylonians predicted eclipses. Many of these questions have not previously been answered. Therefore, the results of this study provide important information regarding the astronomies of these early cultures.

  19. The French component of the FENNEC Saharan Climate project 2011 Special Observing Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Kocha, C.; Lavaysse, C.; Schepanski, K.; Chazette, P.; Bock, O.; Marticorena, B.; Tulet, P.; Pelon, J.; Marnas, F.; Mokhtari, M.; Lafore, J.-P.; Roehrig, R.; Koulali Idrissi, A.; Tsamalis, C.; Chedin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The central Sahara has one of the most extreme climates on Earth. During the northern summer months, a large low pressure system caused by intense solar heating develops over a huge, largely uninhabited expanse of northern Mali, southern Algeria and eastern Mauritania. This Saharan heat low plays a pivotal role in the West African Monsoon. Based on this, the interested French, British and German communities have decided to propose the FENNEC project which aims at (i) characterizing the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer, (ii) evaluating its representation in regional and global models, and (iii) improving "aerosol" products issued from space-borne observations. A key element of this programme was the organization of an international field campaign in June 2011 over the Saharan heat low region, which will include both ground-based and airborne detachments. The Special Observing Period component of FENNEC-France included the implementation of the SAFIRE Falcon 20 to conduct research on the atmospheric boundary layer and the dust cycle of the Sahara, the installation of a remote sensing station in southern Spain, equipped with a backscatter lidar and a sunphotometer, to study the transport of desert dust to Europe, as well as a couple of GPS stations installed in southern Morocco to investigate the moisture inflow from the Atlantic Ocean into the Sahara. For the first time, the ALADIN and AROME models (5 and 24 km grid spacing, respectively) have been implemented operationally to provide forecasts of dust events over the Sahara and parts of the Sahel in June 2011 to assist in planning for airborne operations. This effort was complemented by the forecasts made with the Meso-NH model (5 and 20 km resolution). During the SOP period, the ground-based, airborne and space-borne observations have documented the evolution of dynamic properties of thermodynamic and the atmospheric boundary layer Saharan Africa (Mauritania and Mali) during the installation phase of the Saharan

  20. Distribution of long-period comets: comparison between simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouchard, M.; Rickman, H.; Froeschlé, Ch.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: This paper is devoted to a comparison between observations and simulations of the so-called Oort spike formed by the "new" observable long-period comets. Methods: The synthetic distributions of observable comets come from the propagation of a huge sample of objects during the age of the solar system that were initially in a proto-Oort cloud, which was flattened around the ecliptic and had perihelia in the region of Uranus and Neptune. For the known new long-period comets, two samples were used, one that is assumed to be complete, and the comets of the other exclusively come from the Warsaw catalog of comets. The original orbital energy of the comets in this catalog is more reliable. Results: Considering comets with a perihelion distance smaller than 4 AU, for which one of our samples of known comets can be assumed to be complete, the comparison shows small but significant differences in the orbital energy distribution and in the proportion of retrograde comets. When we extend the limiting perihelion distance to 10 AU, the observed samples are obviously strongly incomplete. The synthetic distribution showsthat the number of observable comets per year and per perihelion distance unit is ∝q1.09 for q< 4 AU and ∝q2.13 for 6 6 AU comes from comets that were already within the Jupiter-Saturn barrier (q< 15 AU) at their previous perihelion passage (which we call creepers and Kaib and Quinn creepers), with original semi-major axes generally smaller than 20 000 AU. Conclusions: To explain the small but significant differences between our synthetic sample and the known comets for a perihelion distance smaller than 4 AU, different hypotheses are proposed: a still erroneous value of the original orbital energy in the observed sample, a higher density of low-mass stars in the actual solar neighborhood, a ninth planet, and obviously the initial population of objects from which the synthetic distributions are derived.

  1. Fasciola gigantica: the in vitro effects of artesunate as compared to triclabendazole on the 3-weeks-old juvenile.

    PubMed

    Tansatit, Tawewan; Sahaphong, Somphong; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Viyanant, Vithoon; Sobhon, Prasert

    2012-05-01

    The in vitro effect of artesunate (ATS) on the 3-week-old juveniles of Fasciola gigantica was compared with triclabendazole (TCZ) by incubating the parasites in M-199 medium containing the drugs at concentrations of 20, 40, and 80 μg/ml for 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24h. The anthelmintic activities of these drugs were evaluated based on the relative motility value (RM) and the alterations of the tegument as observed by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The RM values of TCZ-treated flukes decreased significantly from 6 to 24h for all dosages. For ATS-treated flukes, RM value decreased markedly from 12 to 24h, but the rates of decline were less than TCZ at the same doses. When observed by SEM, the tegument showed similar sequence of morphological changes after treatments with both drugs, comprising of swelling of tegumental ridges, followed by blebbing and later rupturing of the blebs, leading to erosion and lesion, and disruption of the tegument. When examined by TEM, ultrastructural changes in the tegument and associated structures after treatments with TCZ and ATS were similar which comprised of swelling, blebbing of the tegument, dilation of basal infoldings, and depolymerization of the microtrabecular network. After a longer incubation time, the tegument was completely sloughed off and the tegument cell bodies became necrotic. Additionally, in ATS-treated flukes, mitochondria showed severe swelling, rupturing of outer membrane, and their interior filled with flocculent materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Deciphering IR Excess Observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope in Short Period Interacting Cataclysmic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Howard; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Ciardi, David; Hoard, Don; Howell, Steve; Stefaniak, Linda; Thomas, , Beth

    2006-03-01

    During the first year of the Spitzer Space Telescope Observing Program for Students and Teachers, our team observed a small sample of short orbital period interacting white dwarf binaries. Our scientific investigation was aimed at detection and characterization of the low mass, cool, brown dwarf-like mass donors in these systems. We used the Infrared Array Camera to obtain photometric observations of the polars EF Eri, GG Leo, V347 Pav, and RX J0154.0-5947 at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns. In all our targets, we detected excess emission in the 3-8 micron region over that expected from a brown dwarf alone. One of the exciting discoveries we made with our IRAC observations is that the star EF Eri was found to be unexpectedly bright in the mid-IR (compared to its 2MASS magnitudes). This fact highlights an opportunity for us to observe EF Eri with the IRS as a follow-up proposal. EF Eri has a flux level of ~700 ?Jy at 8 microns. Thus, we are asking for time to obtain IRS data for only this star, our brightest source. We plan to obtain SL1 (7.4-14.5 microns) and SL2 (5.2-8.7 microns) spectroscopy only. We know the IRAC fluxes so our integration toies are well constrained and the spectral region covered by SL1, SL2 will yield sufficient S/N to differentiate between cool dust (rising BB like spectrum with PAH and other molecular features allowing us to determine dust size, temperature, and disk extent) and a T type dwarf showing characteristic spectral signatures and a falling Rayleigh-Jeans tail.

  3. Estimating interevent time distributions from finite observation periods in communication networks.

    PubMed

    Kivelä, Mikko; Porter, Mason A

    2015-11-01

    A diverse variety of processes-including recurrent disease episodes, neuron firing, and communication patterns among humans-can be described using interevent time (IET) distributions. Many such processes are ongoing, although event sequences are only available during a finite observation window. Because the observation time window is more likely to begin or end during long IETs than during short ones, the analysis of such data is susceptible to a bias induced by the finite observation period. In this paper, we illustrate how this length bias is born and how it can be corrected without assuming any particular shape for the IET distribution. To do this, we model event sequences using stationary renewal processes, and we formulate simple heuristics for determining the severity of the bias. To illustrate our results, we focus on the example of empirical communication networks, which are temporal networks that are constructed from communication events. The IET distributions of such systems guide efforts to build models of human behavior, and the variance of IETs is very important for estimating the spreading rate of information in networks of temporal interactions. We analyze several well-known data sets from the literature, and we find that the resulting bias can lead to systematic underestimates of the variance in the IET distributions and that correcting for the bias can lead to qualitatively different results for the tails of the IET distributions.

  4. Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed periods - 1986 Sundial observations and model results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, B. G.; Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Foster, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    F-region incoherent scatter radar drift observations from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F observations from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed periods. The observations are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run that involved a sharp increase in the polar cap potential drop followed by a subsequent decrease. The zonal disturbance electric field pattern is latitude independent, and the corresponding amplitudes change approximately as L exp n (where n is about 1.5). The meridional electric field patterns and amplitudes have larger latitudinal variations. The mid-, low, and equatorial electric fields from the Rice Convection Model are in good agreement with previous results from the semianalytic, Senior-Blanc (1987) model. Also discussed are three physical mechanisms (over-shielding, fossil winds, and magnetic reconfiguration) that contribute to the long lasting (1-2 h) equatorial zonal electric field perturbations associated with a sudden northward turning of the IMF. It is predicted that the penetration of high latitude electric fields to low latitudes should, in general, be closely related to the rate of motion of the shielding layer and the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora.

  5. Estimating interevent time distributions from finite observation periods in communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelä, Mikko; Porter, Mason A.

    2015-11-01

    A diverse variety of processes—including recurrent disease episodes, neuron firing, and communication patterns among humans—can be described using interevent time (IET) distributions. Many such processes are ongoing, although event sequences are only available during a finite observation window. Because the observation time window is more likely to begin or end during long IETs than during short ones, the analysis of such data is susceptible to a bias induced by the finite observation period. In this paper, we illustrate how this length bias is born and how it can be corrected without assuming any particular shape for the IET distribution. To do this, we model event sequences using stationary renewal processes, and we formulate simple heuristics for determining the severity of the bias. To illustrate our results, we focus on the example of empirical communication networks, which are temporal networks that are constructed from communication events. The IET distributions of such systems guide efforts to build models of human behavior, and the variance of IETs is very important for estimating the spreading rate of information in networks of temporal interactions. We analyze several well-known data sets from the literature, and we find that the resulting bias can lead to systematic underestimates of the variance in the IET distributions and that correcting for the bias can lead to qualitatively different results for the tails of the IET distributions.

  6. Understanding the hydrological functioning of headwater streams using periodic observations of river flow state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufort, Aurélien; Leblois, Etienne; Pella, Hervé; Datry, Thibault; Sauquet, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Due to their upstream position in river networks, many headwater streams (HS) experience recurrent flow cessation and/or drying events. They have many ecological values since they are located at the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and contribute to good status of rivers (sediment flux, input of organic matter…). However, the understanding of HS remains limited because gauging stations are preferentially located along perennial rivers and, consequently, the proportion of intermittent rivers (IR) is highly underestimated. In France, the observation network ONDE ("Observatoire National Des Etiages", in French) was designed by ONEMA to complement discharge data from the conventional French River Flow Monitoring network (HYDRO) to better understand HS dynamics. ONDE provides visual observations of flow state at 3300 sites along river channels located throughout France since 2012. One observation is made every month between April and October and the frequency of observations may increase during drought period to 4 visits / month. One of the following flow states is assigned at each observation: "flowing", "no flow" or "dry". The objective of this work is to combine and valorize information from both networks in order to describe the hydrological functioning of headwater streams at a regional scale. A special attention is given to characterize spatial distribution and frequency of flow intermittence and to explore how flow intermittence patterns are related to environmental drivers. A first analyze of the ONDE network indicated that 35% of sites have shown that at least one zero-flow event between 2012 and 2016 against only 8% with the HYDRO database considering gauging stations as intermittent when the mean number of zero flows ≥ 5 days/year. The proportion of zero-flow events for 93 ONDE sites was higher than 50%. Conversely, no drying events were observed for 1680 sites (50 %) during the observation period. These dry events mainly occurs during

  7. "Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the ARM 2003 Aerosol Intensive Observation Period"

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Michalsky, G. P. Anderson, J. Barnard, J. Delamere, C. Gueymard, S. Kato, P. Kiedron, A. McComiskey, and P. Ricchiazzi

    2006-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large intensive observation period (IOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this IOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky periods on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are less than 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 2%.

  8. Ajisai spin-axis precession and rotation-period variations from photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, N.; Shakun, L.; Burlak, N.; Korobeynikova, E.; Strakhova, S.; Melikyants, S.; Terpan, S.; Ryabov, A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of the spin parameters of Japanese Geodetic Satellite Ajisai. The satellite is spherical and equipped with 318 solar reflecting mirrors on its outer surface, which enables to use photometry for our purpose. In the present study, we have improved the method of the determination of all spin parameters of the satellite by fast photometry discussed in our earlier papers. Using a tracking telescope at the Astronomical Observatory of Odessa National University and a dedicated high-speed recording system, 279 Ajisai light curves were obtained over seven years (2009-2015). The temporal resolution is 20 msec and time measurement error no greater than 0.1 μ sec. The analysis of a sequence of multiple specular glints enabled us to update the model of the arrangement and orientation of the mirrors and to apply this model to determine the inertial rotation period and spin-axis orientation for each pass of the satellite. The secular decrease and periodic variation in the spinning rate, as well as the spin-axis precession pattern known from the SLR-observations (Kucharski et al., 2010a, 2013) have been obtained independently. New spin-axis nutation-precession parameters obtained in this study adequately confirm the empirical model by Kucharski et al. (2016). The method for photometric determination of the Ajisai spin parameters discussed here has the same level of accuracy as the SLR method, and thus, it can be widely used by observatories not fitted out with sophisticated laser ranging equipment.

  9. Periodic behaviors in the observed vertical column abundances of atmospheric hydroxyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Elizabeth Beaver; Burnett, Clyde R.; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The data base for the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) for Fritz Peak Observatory, Colorado (40 N, 105 W), now extends from 1976 through 1988 and is composed of 8849 independent data sets, averaging about 15 percent uncertainty and 20-minute time resolution each. The dominant solar zenith angle (chi) dependence of the OH abundance is characterized by an empirical curve, N(88), which has been updated from N(82) to include all valid data from 1980 through 1988. The chi-dependence of the OH abundance has been, to a first order, removed from the data base by a normalization procedure in which each data point is divided by the N(88,AM) value for the corresponding solar zenith angle. The resulting normalized OH values may then be examined for other systematic effects, particularly for periodic variations. Observations have also been made at Boca Raton, Florida (26 N, 80 W) and at Truk, Federated States of Micronesia (7 N, 152 E). These data bases are much less extensive and, as such, are less amenable to analysis for periodic behaviors. Some comparisons with the Colorado data may be made, however.

  10. Evaporation over land surfaces - First results from HAPEX-MOBILHY Special Observing Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Jean-Claude; Goutorbe, Jean-Paul; Bessemoulin, Pierre; Perrier, Alain; Becker, Francois

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from the May 7-July 15, 1986 Special Observing Period (SOP) of the HAPEX-MOBILHY program, which examines the hydrological budget and evaporation flux at the scale of a 10,000 sq km GCM grid square to determine soil moisture, surface-energy budgets, and surface hydrology. The SOP used two highly instrumented remote sensing aircraft to obtain detailed measurements of atmospheric fluxes and surface properties. It is noted that the measurements are reliable at spatially local and short time scales, as well as on the monthly time scale. The data base obtained may be used in parametrization schemes against which land-surface water budgets can be tested.

  11. Substorms observations over Apatity during geomagnetic storms in the period 2012 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Werner, Rolf; Despirak, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-07-01

    In this work we studied substorms, generated during enhanced geomagnetic activity in the period 2012 - 2016. Observations of the Multiscale Aurora Imaging Network (MAIN) in Apatity have been used. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters were judged by the 1-min sampled OMNI data base. Substorm onset and further development were verified by the 10-s sampled data of IMAGE magnetometers and by data of the all-sky camera at Apatity. Subject of the study were substorms occurred during geomagnetic storms. The so-called "St. Patrick's day 2015 event" (17-21 March 2015), the events on 17-18 March 2013 and 7-17 March 2012 (a chain of events generated four consecutive storms) which were among the events of strongest geomagnetic activity during the current solar cycle 24, were part of the storms under consideration. The behavior of the substorms developed during different phases of the geomagnetic storms was discussed.

  12. Observation of stimulated emission in an ultrashort-period nonsymmetric GaAs/AlAs superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Litovchenko, V. G.; Korbutyak, D. V.; Bercha, A. I.; Kryuchenko, Yu. V.; Krylyuk, S. G.; Grahn, H. T.; Hey, R.; Ploog, K. H.

    2001-06-25

    Nonsymmetric short-period GaAs/AlAs superlattices, for which the well thickness is at least a factor of 2 larger than the barrier thickness, have been shown to exhibit a direct band gap for any well thickness. These superlattices are characterized by an enhanced intensity of the luminescence as compared to their symmetric indirect-gap counterparts with the same well width, and, thus, may be used as light-emitting devices, in particular, as low-threshold lasers in the red visible spectrum. This conjecture is supported by the observation of stimulated emission at T=80K for a GaAs/AlAs superlattice with six monolayers well and three monolayers barrier width. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Observation of spontaneous polarization misalignments in periodically poled crystals using second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yu-Yi; Zhuo, Zong-Yan; Lee, Ming-Yin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Wu, Pei-Chun; Huang, Chin-Jie; Chan, Ming-Che; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lin, Yen-Yin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2011-06-06

    Periodically poled crystal (PPC) is a key component for nonlinear optical applications. Its poling quality relies largely on successful domain inversion and the alignment of spontaneous polarization (SP) vectors in each domain. Here we report the unexpected observation of bulk second harmonic generation (SHG) in PPC when excitation propagating along its optical axis. Based on its tensorial nature, SHG is highly sensitive to the orientation of SP, and therefore the misalignment of SP in each domain of PPC can be revealed noninvasively by SHG microscopy. This nonlinear imaging modality provides optical sectioning capability with 3D sub-micrometer resolution, so it will be useful for in situ investigation of poling quality in PPC.

  14. Cancer incidence among asbestos-exposed chemical industry workers: An extended observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Hilt, B.; Andersen, A.; Rosenberg, J.; Langard, S. )

    1991-01-01

    A previous study on the incidence of cancer in a cohort of 286 asbestos-exposed electrochemical industry workers observed from 1953 through 1980 has been extended with another 8 years of follow-up. The incidence of cancer was derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway, and the expected figures were calculated by a life table method. During the extended follow-up period from 1981 through 1988, among the cohort members there were 12 new cancer cases versus 14.2 expected (SIR 85, 95% CI 44-158). In a lightly exposed sub-cohort, the extended follow-up revealed 4 cases of lung cancer or pleural mesothelioma (ICD, 7th revision 162-163) versus 1.6 cases expected (SIR 256, 95% CI71-654). In a heavily exposed sub-cohort, the corresponding figures were 3 and 0.5 (SIR 588, 95% CI 118-1,725).

  15. Observation of Exchange Anisotropy in Single-Phase Layer-Structured Oxides with Long Periods

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Guopeng; Sun, Shujie; Wang, Jianlin; Peng, Ranran; Lin, Yue; Zhai, Xiaofang; Fu, Zhengping; Lu, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable exchange bias effect arising from the temperature-dependent interaction among the ferromagnetic-like cluster glasses and antiferromagnetic regions was observed in a newly developed single-phase multiferroic compound of Bi10Fe6Ti3O30 which has a nine-layer Aurivillius structure. Inhomogeneous distribution of magnetic Fe ions inside this long-period layered structure was experimentally identified via the atomic level imaging. The results confirmed the presence of the short-range magnetic ordering (the cluster glassy state) and the canted antiferromagnetism, and then the direct interaction among them was further confirmed. Finding of this new single-phase material accompanying this remarkable exchange bias effect would be beneficial to both basic physics understanding and the potential device development. PMID:26487509

  16. Observations of deep long-period (DLP) seismic events beneath Aleutian arc volcanoes; 1989-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.A.; Stihler, S.D.; White, R.A.; Moran, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Between October 12, 1989 and December 31, 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 162 deep long-period (DLP) events beneath 11 volcanic centers in the Aleutian arc. These events generally occur at mid- to lower-crustal depths (10-45 km) and are characterized by emergent phases, extended codas, and a strong spectral peak between 1.0 and 3.0 Hz. Observed wave velocities and particle motions indicate that the dominant phases are P- and S-waves. DLP epicenters often extend over broad areas (5-20 km) surrounding the active volcanoes. The average reduced displacement of Aleutian DLPs is 26.5 cm2 and the largest event has a reduced displacement of 589 cm2 (or ML2.5). Aleutian DLP events occur both as solitary events and as sequences of events with several occurring over a period of 1-30 min. Within the sequences, individual DLPs are often separated by lower-amplitude volcanic tremor with a similar spectral character. Occasionally, volcano-tectonic earthquakes that locate at similar depths are contained within the DLP sequences.At most, Aleutian volcanoes DLPs appear to loosely surround the main volcanic vent and occur as part of background seismicity. A likely explanation is that they reflect a relatively steady-state process of magma ascent over broad areas in the lower and middle portions of the crust. At Mount Spurr, DLP seismicity was initiated by the 1992 eruptions and then slowly declined until 1997. At Shishaldin Volcano, a short-lived increase in DLP seismicity occurred about 10 months prior to the April 19, 1999 eruption. These observations suggest a link between eruptive activity and magma flux in the mid- to lower-crust and uppermost mantle.

  17. Modelling of Observed Deformation in Lithosphere-Asthenosphere System During Aseismic Periods in Seismically Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Subrata Kr; Sen, Sanjay

    2017-04-01

    Occurrence of earthquakes in seismically active regions is repetitive in nature. Two major seismic events are separated by a long aseismic periods which were supposed to be static in nature even in a few decades ago. But, regular geodetic observations indicate that there are small ground deformations ( strain of the order of 10 - 6 or even smaller ) during these aseismic periods. Such deformations may be looked upon as the effects of the tectonic forces generated by the mantle convection on the lithosphere - asthenosphere system. In the present paper, a mathematical model has been developed incorporating in it, the essential features of the mechanism of the observed ground deformations under the action of such tectonic forces. The lithosphere - asthenosphere system has been represented by a multi - layered elastic / viscoelastic model. A vertical strike slip fault is taken to be situated either in the elastic / viscoelastic layers or in the viscoelastic half space which slips suddenly when the accumulated stress near the fault due to the action of the tectonic forces exceeds the frictional and cohesive forces across the fault. Suitable boundary conditions have been introduced noting that the strains at the surfaces of separation remain continuous under the action of the tectonic forces. Mathematical techniques have been developed for the solution of the resulting boundary value problem. Exact solutions for displacement, stresses and strains in the layers and in the half space are obtained both before and after the fault slip. The rate of stress accumulation in the near region obtained from this solution may be utilized in finding out the time to the next major seismic event and thus the results are expected to be useful in formulating an effective programme of earthquake prediction.

  18. Observing and Modeling the Optical Counterparts of Short-Period Binary Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Joshua

    In this dissertation, I explore the subject of short-period binary millisecond pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and radio follow-up teams, and present observations of fields containing eight recently discovered short-period (Porb < 1 d) binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. The goal of these observations was to detect the optical counterparts of the binaries and, for the best-suited counterparts detected, to observe the photometric variation of the companion that happens over the course of the orbit in various filters. The hope was to then use the light curves to model the systems and obtain constraints on the mass of the neutron stars which are likely to be some of the most massive neutron stars in the galaxy. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, I present the fully orbital phase-resolved B, V , and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135, for which I employ the ELC model of Orosz & Hauschildt (2000) to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744 I find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio observations to be MNS > 1.75 solar masses; at the 3-sigma level. I also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object which I interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (Mc > 0.1 solar masses), I propose that similar

  19. Changes in ENACW observed in the Bay of Biscay over the period 1975-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Gesteira, M.; deCastro, M.; Santos, F.; Álvarez, I.; Costoya, X.

    2013-08-01

    Trends in Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW) were calculated in the Bay of Biscay over the period 1975-2010 using the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) package. This approach, which reanalyzes data from different sources, allows obtaining information beneath the sea surface on a fine 0.5°×0.5° grid with 40 vertical layers, providing a complete view of the different hydrographic processes in the area. ENACW, which was associated to salinity and temperature values corresponding to the density interval 27.0-27.2 kg m-3, was observed to warm and salinificate in most of the area at a maximum rate of 0.11 °C per decade and 0.03 psu per decade, respectively. Trends are more intense in the middle part of the Bay and near the northeastern boundary. The origin of the changes in ENACW observed inside the Bay of Biscay is not due to local effects. Actually, trends seem to be related to changes in the subpolar mode of ENACW (ENACWsp), affecting a wider North Atlantic area. The highest trends (0.3 °C per decade in temperature and 0.05 psu per decade in salinity) were observed north of the bay, especially at the shallow area that stretches from Brest to Ireland, which is characterized by deep winter mixing. The dependence of changes in ENACW on the two main modes of variability over the North Atlantic (NAO and EA) was also analyzed. Trends in salinity and temperature showed to be consistent with changes observed in EA. In addition, air temperature and precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) balance showed to contribute to warming and salinification of ENACW.

  20. Heart rate and blood pressure responses during hypoxic cycles of a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in patients at risk for or with mild COPD.

    PubMed

    Faulhaber, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Haider, Thomas; Linser, Tobias; Netzer, Nikolaus; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on heart rate and blood pressure responses during a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in COPD patients. Sixteen participants with COPD symptoms were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or control group and completed a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program (five sessions per week, each consisting of three to five breathing cycles, each cycle lasting 3-5 minutes with 3-minute breaks between cycles). During the breathing cycles, the hypoxia group received hypoxic air (inspired fraction of oxygen 15%-12%), whereas the control group received normal air (sham hypoxia). During the breaks, all participants breathed normoxic room air. Arterial oxygen saturation, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during the normoxic and hypoxic/sham hypoxic periods. For each breathing cycle, changes from normoxia to hypoxia/sham hypoxia were calculated, and changes were averaged for each of the 15 sessions and for each week. Changes in arterial oxygen saturation were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences in weeks 1, 2, and 3. During the course of the intermittent hypoxia application, no between-group differences were detected for blood pressure or rate pressure product values. Changes in heart rate were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences only in week 3. Averages over all 15 sessions were significantly higher in the hypoxia group for heart rate and rate pressure product, and tended to be increased for systolic blood pressure. The applied intermittent hypoxia breathing program resulted in specific and moderate heart rate and blood pressure responses, and did not provoke a progressive increase in blood pressure during the hypoxic cycles in the course of the application.

  1. Observation of Geometric Parametric Instability Induced by the Periodic Spatial Self-Imaging of Multimode Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Tonello, Alessandro; Barthélémy, Alain; Couderc, Vincent; Shalaby, Badr Mohamed; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal mode coupling in highly multimode physical systems permits new routes for exploring complex instabilities and forming coherent wave structures. We present here the first experimental demonstration of multiple geometric parametric instability sidebands, generated in the frequency domain through resonant space-time coupling, owing to the natural periodic spatial self-imaging of a multimode quasi-continuous-wave beam in a standard graded-index multimode fiber. The input beam was launched in the fiber by means of an amplified microchip laser emitting sub-ns pulses at 1064 nm. The experimentally observed frequency spacing among sidebands agrees well with analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The first-order peaks are located at the considerably large detuning of 123.5 THz from the pump. These results open the remarkable possibility to convert a near-infrared laser directly into a broad spectral range spanning visible and infrared wavelengths, by means of a single resonant parametric nonlinear effect occurring in the normal dispersion regime. As further evidence of our strong space-time coupling regime, we observed the striking effect that all of the different sideband peaks were carried by a well-defined and stable bell-shaped spatial profile.

  2. Search for periodicity in the observational data by means of artificial neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, R.

    2012-05-01

    The possibility of application of artificial neural networks is considered for two classical model problems of observational data reduction: (i) the identification of periodic oscillations in noisy time series and (ii) assessment of the frequency of this oscillation (on the existing time series). On the inputs of the neural networks the values of the time series are given, and on the output, respectively, we have either an indicatior of the presence of signal (from 0 to 1), or the assessment of its frequency. It is shown that the theoretical limit, which a neural network can achieve in the training to solve such problems, corresponds to the Bayesian theory of estimation and testing of statistical hypotheses. Training of the neural network was carried out with a help of means of open-source package FANN. The best results were achieved using the algorithm Cascade2, which allows finding the optimal number of network neurons (not just the weight of the connection between them). In comparison with traditional methods based on the periodogram, which require long calculations, the trained neural network works almost instantly. Thus, artificial neural networks are very promising for the processing of large data sets. However, the threshold of signal detection so far failed to bring to Bayesian theoretical limit. In addition, it is not yet possible to train the neural network to analyze time-series with arbitrarily-uneven distribution of observations. This indicates on a need for further investigations to improve the efficiency of the method.

  3. Distal Radius Fractures Do Not Displace following Splint or Cast Removal in the Acute, Postreduction Period: A Prospective, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Foster, Brock D; Sivasundaram, Lakshmanan; Heckmann, Nathanael; Pannell, William C; Alluri, Ram K; Ghiassi, Alidad

    2017-02-01

    Background Displacement of distal radius fractures has been previously described in the literature; however, little is known about fracture displacement following splint or cast removal at the initial clinic visit following reduction and immobilization. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for fracture displacement following splint or cast removal and physical examination in the acute postinjury period. Methods All patients with a closed distal radius fracture who presented to our orthopedic hand clinic within 3 weeks of injury were prospectively enrolled in our study. Standard wrist radiographs were obtained prior to splint or cast removal. A second wrist series was obtained following physical exam and application of immobilization at the end of the clinic visit. Radiographic parameters for displacement were measured by two independent reviewers and included dorsal angulation, radial inclination, articular step-off, radial height, and ulnar variance. Displacement was assessed using predefined, radiographic criteria for displacement. Results A total of 64 consecutive patients were enrolled over a period of 12 weeks. Of these, 37.5% were classified as operative according to American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons guidelines and 37.5% met LaFontaine instability criteria. For each fracture, none of the five measurements exceeded the predefined clinically or statistically significant criteria for displacement. Conclusion Splint removal in the acute postinjury period did not result in distal radius fracture displacement. Clinicians should feel comfortable removing splints and examining underlying soft tissue in the acute setting for patients with distal radius fractures after closed reduction. Level of Evidence Level II, prospective comparative study.

  4. Observed ozone exceedances in Italy: statistical analysis and modelling in the period 2002-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falasca, Serena; Curci, Gabriele; Candeloro, Luca; Conte, Annamaria; Ippoliti, Carla

    2017-04-01

    concentrations. On the other hand, high-temperature events have similar duration and higher mean temperature with respect to recent years, pointing out that temperature is not the only driver of high-ozone events. The statistical model confirms a significant impact of the meteorological variables (positive for temperature and pressure, negative for humidity and wind speed) on the probability of ozone events. Significant predictors are also the altitude (negative) and the number of inhabitants (positive). The decreasing observed recent trend is explained by the introduction of the Euro regulations, rather than natural variability. However, we find an inversion of trend for the more recent period under Euro6 (from September 2014), but we cautionary wait a confirmation from additional data at least for the year 2016.

  5. Detection of residual jeopardized myocardium 3 weeks after myocardial infarction by exercise testing with thallium-201 mycardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.D.; Schwartz, K.M.; Logic, J.R.; Sheffield, L.T.; Kansal, S.; Roitman, D.I.; Mantle, J.A.; Russell, R.O.; Rackley, C.E.; Rogers, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    The usefulness of thallium-201 (Tl-201) exercise myocardial scintigraphy in identifying patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (MVCAD) and residual jeopardized myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) was evaluated in 32 patients 3 weeks after MI. All patients underwent (1) limited multilead submaximal treadmill testing, (2) thallium-201 (Tl) myocardial scintigraphy at end-exercise and at rest, and (3) coronary and left ventricular angiography. Tl-201 perfusion defects were categorized as either reversible (ischemia) or irreversible (scar). The conventional exercise test was designated positive if there was ST depression > = 1mm and/or angina. Jeopardized myocardium (JEP) was defined angiographically as a segment of myocardium with normal or hypokinetic wall motion supplied by a significantly stenotic major coronary artery. MVCAD was defined as two or more significantly stenotic coronary arteries. Significant coronary stenosis was categorized as either 50 to 69% diameter narrowing or > = 70% diameter narrowing, thereby yielding, respectively, two subgroups each of jeopardized myocardium (JEP-50 and JEP-70) and MVCAD (MV-50 and MV-70). Clinical findings of angina, heart failure or ventricular arrhythmias during the late convalescent period after MI occurred in four of 10 patients (40%) with MV-50, five of 16 (31%) with MV-70, four of 10 (40%) with JEP-50 and five of 18 (28%) with JEP-70, and thus were insensitive for detecting MVCAD and JEP. Reversible ischemia and/or a positive conventional exercise test occurred in five of 10 patients (50%) with MV-50, 13 of 16 (81%) with MV-70, four of 10 (40%) with JEP-50 and 15 of 18 (83%) with JEP-70. All eight patients with both Tl-201 reversible ischemia and a positive conventional exercise test had JEP-70. In 30 of 31 patients (97%) with angiographic asynergy, Tl-201 scar was detected. No complications were associated with exercise testing.

  6. 2-Weekly versus 3-weekly docetaxel to treat castration-resistant advanced prostate cancer: a randomised, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Harmenberg, Ulrika; Joensuu, Timo; McDermott, Ray; Hervonen, Petteri; Ginman, Claes; Luukkaa, Marjaana; Nyandoto, Paul; Hemminki, Akseli; Nilsson, Sten; McCaffrey, John; Asola, Raija; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Laestadius, Fredrik; Tasmuth, Tiina; Sandberg, Katinka; Keane, Maccon; Lehtinen, Ilari; Luukkaala, Tiina; Joensuu, Heikki

    2013-02-01

    Docetaxel administered every 3 weeks is a standard treatment for castration-resistant advanced prostate cancer. We hypothesised that 2-weekly administration of docetaxel would be better tolerated than 3-weekly docetaxel in patients with castration-resistant advanced prostate cancer, and did a prospective, multicentre, randomised, phase 3 study to compare efficacy and safety. Eligible patients had advanced prostate cancer (metastasis, a prostate-specific-antigen test result of more than 10·0 ng/mL, and WHO performance status score of 0-2), had received no chemotherapy (except with estramustine), had undergone surgical or chemical castration, and had been referred to a treatment centre in Finland, Ireland, or Sweden. Enrolment and treatment were done between March 1, 2004, and May 31, 2009. Randomisation was done centrally and stratified by centre and WHO performance status score of 0-1 vs 2. Patients were assigned 75 mg/m(2) docetaxel intravenously on day 1 of a 3-week cycle, or 50 mg/m(2) docetaxel intravenously on days 1 and 15 of a 4-week cycle. 10 mg oral prednisolone was administered daily to all patients. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure (TTTF). We assessed data in the per-protocol population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00255606. 177 patients were randomly assigned to the 2-weekly docetaxel group and 184 to the 3-weekly group. 170 patients in the 2-weekly group and 176 in the 3-weekly group were included in the analysis. The 2-weekly administration was associated with significantly longer TTTF than was 3-weekly administration (5·6 months, 95% CI 5·0-6·2 vs 4·9 months, 4·5-5·4; hazard ratio 1·3, 95% CI 1·1-1·6, p=0·014). Grade 3-4 adverse events occurred more frequently in the 3-weekly than in the 2-weekly administration group, including neutropenia (93 [53%] vs 61 [36%]), leucopenia (51 [29%] vs 22 [13%]), and febrile neutropenia (25 [14%] vs six [4%]). Neutropenic infections were reported more

  7. Wave-Wave Interactions in the Stratosphere: Observations during Quiet and Active Wintertime Periods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anne K.; Gille, John C.; Lyjak, Lawrence V.

    1984-02-01

    Using satellite data from the Nimbus 7 LIMS instrument, a previous study by Smith showed that interactions among planetary waves 1, 2 and 3 in the stratosphere were significant during January 1979. That month was characterized by an exceptionally large wave 1 amplitude in the stratosphere. The present study extends the analysis to the period November 1978-March 1979 to determine the conditions under which wave-wave interactions have a significant effect on variations in wave activity and on wave-mean flow interactions. A quantitative measure of how wave-wave interactions affect the wave activity of zonal waves 1 and 2 is obtained from the potential enstrophy budget.The results demonstrate that the relative importance of wave-wave versus wave-mean flow interactions depends on the magnitude of the eddy mean wind and potential vorticity relative to the zonal means. When the zonal mean wind is weak, a relatively small amplitude wave tends to behave nonlinearly, whereas when the mean wind is strong, only large amplitude waves are significantly nonlinear. In the 1978-79 winter, the zonal mean wind was weaker and wave-wave interactions were more important in middle and late winter than during November-December.Further evidence is presented that the vacillation between waves 1 and 2, which has been observed in the winter stratosphere of both hemispheres, is as strongly influenced by wave-wave interactions in the stratosphere as by variations in the forcing from the troposphere.

  8. A Long Period Eclipsing Binary Project - Five Years of Observations at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlin, P.; Sundman, A.

    1982-06-01

    The star HO 161387 first caught our eyes when we were reading an article on ~ Aurigae stars by K. O. Wright in Vistas in Astronomy No. 12. This was some 8 or 9 years ago. Aurigae stars are eclipsing binaries formed by a cool supergiant K star and a very much smaller and holter mainsequence (more or less normal) B star. Out of eclipse the B star dominates the blue spectral region, but a pure K-type spectrum is found in eclipse. The drastic spectral changes lor HO 161387 can be seen in Fig 1c and 1d. Periods for these binaries are in the range of 2 to 10 years. The general benefit 01 ~ Aurigae star studies is the possibility of direct determination 01 physical parameters of the components such as masses and radii. In practice, what one does observe is the change in radial velocity of the stars as they orbit around their common centre 01 gravity and the change in magnitude as the light from the B star is eclipsed by the K supergiant. There is also the possibility of studying the structure of the atmosphere of a K supergiant manifested by spectral changes occurring as the point light of the B star shines through the outer parts of the K star c1ose to the total eclipse. Besides Aurigae itsell only the stars 31 and 32 Cygni have been studied in greater detail.

  9. Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period: Optical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Michalsky, J.; Slater, D.; Barnard, J.; Halthore, R.; Liljegren, J.; Holben, B.; Eck, T.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P.; hide

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1997 the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program conducted an intensive Observation Period (IOP) to study water vapor at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among the large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring solar transmittance in the 0.94-micrometer water vapor absorption band. As one of the steps in the CWV retrievals the aerosol component is subtracted from the total transmittance, in the 0.94-micrometer band. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers are presented elsewhere. We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. Without attempting to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy we found the CWV to agree within 0.13 cm (rms) for CWV values ranging from 1 to 5 cm. Preliminary results obtained when using the same updated radiative transfer model with updated spectroscopy for all instruments will also be shown. Comparisons to the microwave radiometer results will be included in the comparisons.

  10. Concentric waves and short-period oscillations observed in the ionosphere after the 2013 Moore EF5 tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Michi; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubota, Minoru; Ishii, Mamoru

    2013-11-01

    We detected clear concentric waves and short-period oscillations in the ionosphere after an Enhanced Fujita scale (EF)5 tornado hit Moore, Oklahoma, U.S., on 20 May 2013 using dense wide-coverage ionospheric total electron content (TEC) observations in North America. These concentric waves were nondispersive, with a horizontal wavelength of ~120 km and a period of ~13 min. They were observed for more than 7 h throughout North America. TEC oscillations with a period of ~4 min were also observed to the south of Moore for more than 8 h. A comparison between the TEC observations and infrared cloud image from the GOES satellite indicates that the concentric waves and short-period oscillations are caused by supercell-induced atmospheric gravity waves and acoustic resonances, respectively. This observational result provides the first clear evidence of a severe meteorological event causing atmospheric waves propagating upward in the upper atmosphere and reaching the ionosphere.

  11. 3-week hiking holidays at moderate altitude do not impair cardiac function in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mair, Johannes; Hammerer-Lercher, Angelika; Mittermayr, Markus; Klingler, Anton; Humpeler, Egon; Pachinger, Otmar; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2008-01-11

    We studied the influence of a 3-week hiking vacation at moderate altitude on cardiac pump and endocrine function. 18 males (mean age: 55 years, range 36-60) with metabolic syndrome participated in a 3-week structured guided hiking vacation program (4 times per week at 55-65% of maximal heart rate, total exercise time 29 h). Echocardiography, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), NT-proBNP, and endothelin-1 measurements were performed at baseline in Innsbruck (576 m a.s.l., Austria), on the first day at moderate altitude (Obertauern, 1700 m a.s.l., Austria), after 3 weeks in Obertauern, and at follow-up in Innsbruck. We found no adverse cardiovascular effects and no significant changes in echocardiographic measures of systolic or diastolic function, estimated systolic pulmonary artery pressure, exercise capacities, BNP and NT-proBNP, or endothelin-1 concentrations. The blood pressure at rest significantly decreased from baseline to follow-up.

  12. Observations of long-period oscillations of the solar active regions in the visible and UV spectral intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Chernov, Ya. O.

    2016-12-01

    The variation of intensity in spectral line wings, which was obtained from observations of the patrol telescope at the Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station of the Pulkovo Observatory, Russian Academy of Science (KMAS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space observatory, are considered. A series of observations lasting a few hours near the solar active regions, in which both short- and longperiod oscillations were observed simultaneously during 2014-2015, are analyzed. It is found out that oscillations with a period of 3-5 min can exist at one time and in one place with oscillations with a period of about 100 min. The amplitude of long-period oscillations can be comparable with that for short-period oscillations. The conditions for excitation of the wave processes are considered. Oscillations with a period of 100 min have a weak dependence on the area of the active region.

  13. Echocardiography and passive leg raising in the postoperative period: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    El Hadouti, Yasser; Valencia, Lucía; Becerra, Angel; Rodríguez-Pérez, Aurelio; Vincent, Jean L

    2017-07-15

    Signs of hypovolaemia are frequent in the postoperative period, but not all patients need or respond to fluid administration. An increase in cardiac output (CO) after passive leg raising (PLR) has been demonstrated to be useful as a volume response predictor in non-surgical, spontaneously breathing patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography after PLR to predict fluid responsiveness in post-surgical patients. A prospective observational study. A tertiary hospital between January and July 2015. Fifty-one spontaneously breathing postoperative patients with suspected hypovolaemia (arterial hypotension, oliguria, tachycardia or delayed capillary refill) were considered for the study. Demographic and personal data were collected, as well as heart rate variations, mean arterial pressure during PLR and after administering 500 ml of Ringer's lactate solution. CO was measured by transthoracic echocardiography. The primary outcome was measurement of CO before and after PLR and Ringer's lactate administration. Forty-one patients were included in the study (six patients were excluded because of a poor echocardiographic window and four because of misalignment of the Doppler and outflow tract of the left ventricle). Twenty-two patients (54%) were considered responders to fluid therapy, with an increase of stroke volume greater than or equal to 15% after 500 ml lactated Ringer's infusion. The highest area under the curve was found for an increase in CO (0.91 ± 0.05; 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 0.97). An increase in CO greater than 11% after the PLR manoeuvre predicts a volume response with 68% sensitivity and 100% specificity. This is the first study showing that measurement of CO after PLR can predict volume response in spontaneously breathing postoperative patients.

  14. IS COMPTON COOLING SUFFICIENT TO EXPLAIN EVOLUTION OF OBSERVED QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN OUTBURST SOURCES?

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak E-mail: chakraba@bose.res.in

    2015-01-01

    In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the α parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

  15. [Observational study of black carbon aerosol during straw-burning period].

    PubMed

    Wu, De-xia; Wei, Qing-nong; Wei, Jian-li; Liu, Shi-sheng; Feng, Wei-wei

    2008-12-01

    Black carbon aerosol (BC) has been measured at three sites in Hefei City during May and June, 2007. Analyzing these real-time BC data, the concentration characters and the sources of black carbon aerosol can be found. The average concentrations of BC in normal period and straw-burning period are 4.85 microg/m3 and 8.38 microg/m3, respectively. The significant difference shows that the straw-burning is one of the main sources. The correlation coefficients between daily average concentration of BC and PM10 is 0.74, while the values of BC/PM10 in normal period and straw-burning period are 4.7% and 7.9%, respectively. Through comparing to the BC concentration during straw-burning period in 2004, the results indicated that pollution of BC has reduced after straw-burning was forbidden by the government.

  16. No Adverse Effects After Radioiodine Treatment at 3 Weeks of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Radacic-Aumiler, Matea; Kraljickovic, Iva; Edeljic-Turk, Viktorija; Makar-Ausperger, Ksenija; Likic, Robert; Simic, Iveta

    2016-12-01

    Radioactive iodine is used for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Because it accumulates in the fetal thyroid, its administration during pregnancy may cause severe and potentially irreversible hypothyroidism in neonates, with consequent mental retardation, and it is contraindicated during the whole pregnancy. We present a case of a pregnant woman inadvertently treated with 1 mCi (37 MBq) of I in the earliest period of pregnancy and subsequently gave birth to a male infant without signs or symptoms of hypothyroidism or any other damage. This case illustrates that when radioactive iodine administration happens around the third week of gestation pregnancy outcome can be normal.

  17. An assessment of the FGGE satellite observing system during SOP-1. [Special Observing Period in First GARP Global Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Kalnay, E.; Baker, W. E.; Atlas, R.

    1982-01-01

    The sensitivity of a Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences global objective analysis cycle to the addition of FGGE level II-b data is assessed. The GOAS system comprises a predictive continuity provided by a model first-guess forecast integrated from a previous forecast and updated by data gathered in the interim. FGGE data originated in the Jan.-Mar. 1979 period and were acquired by rawinsondes, pilot balloons, surface stations, satellites, ships, and drifting buoys deployed during SOP-1. Focussing on 2-5 and 8-day forecasts, comparisons were made of the 6 hr forecast error at the 300 mb height in three experiments using all, no-satellite (NOSAT), and without rawinsondes or pilot balloons modes. Larger errors occurred in the case of NOSAT, while significant corrections to the GOAS predictions were noted using all the FGGE data. It was concluded that all forecasts were improved by inclusion of full FGGE data sets, including forecasting beyond one week.

  18. The effects of 3 weeks of rTMS treatment on P200 amplitude in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung Mook; Jang, Kyoung-Mi; Jang, Kuk In; Um, Yoo Hyun; Kim, Myung-Sun; Kim, Do-Won; Shin, Dongkyoo; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2014-08-08

    Previous studies have reported that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces neuronal plasticity in the brain. Although event-related potential (ERP) is an exploration tool, the rTMS effects on ERPs in patients with major depression have not been fully explored. We demonstrated that rTMS treatment induces changes in brain function in patients with medication-resistant major depression using the ERP. Eighteen patients with medication-resistant major depression (five males and 13 females) participated in this study. The patients received rTMS treatment for 3 weeks. All patients completed clinical scales, including the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (SAI, TAI), Ruminative Response Scale, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ), as well as the ERP auditory oddball task, at their first visit (baseline) and at the 3-week visit (3-weeks). The HAM-D, HAM-A, BDI, SAI, and "blaming others" scale of the CERQ decreased significantly after rTMS treatment. In ERP auditory oddball task, when FP1, FP2, FZ, FCZ, CZ, and PZ channels were analyzed, P200 amplitudes showed a main effect for time of measurement and increased after 3 weeks of rTMS treatment. Standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography showed significant activation in the left middle frontal gyrus by 3 weeks of rTMS treatment. The results suggest that relatively longer rTMS treatment induces changes in brain function in patients with medication-resistant major depression, which can be identified using ERP.

  19. Clinical and biochemical effects of a 3-week program of diet combined with spa therapy in obese and diabetic patients: a pilot open study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Adamczyk, Przemysław; Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Giannitti, Chiara; Urso, Renato; Tołodziecki, Michał; Ponikowska, Irena

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemias, and type 2 diabetes. Spa therapy has long been used for treating obesity and its comorbidities. Enlargement of adipose tissue has been linked to a dysregulation of adipokine secretion and adipose tissue inflammation. Adipokines are currently investigated as potential drug targets in these conditions. Our primary aim was to assess the clinical efficacy of a 3-week program of diet combined with spa therapy in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes. The secondary aim was to examine whether this combined program influences the response of serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, visfatin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Fifty obese males were enrolled and 21 of these featured a type 2 diabetes. During the 3-week period of the study, the patients were on a 1,000-kcal diet and were involved in mineral bath and total body's mud-pack applications (15 procedures). Patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of the therapy for clinical and biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycemia, and adipokines). We showed that a 3-week program of spa therapy in obese patients induced significant decrease of body weight, body mass index, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, glycemia, and serum levels of leptin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. So, a cycle of mud-bath therapy associated with a controlled diet may be a promising treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes decreasing body weight and many risk factors for atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome.

  20. Periodicities in X-Ray Binaries from Swift/BAT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbet, R.; Markwardt, C.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Palmer, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Sato, G.; Tueller, J.; Swift/Bat Survey Team

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift has accumulatedextensive light curves for 265 sources (not including GRBs) in the energy range 14 to 200 keV. We present here a summary of searches for periodic modulation in the flux from X-ray binaries. Our results include: determination of the orbital periods of IGR J16418-4532 and IGR J16320-4751; the disappearance of a previously known 9.6 day period in 4U 2206+54; the detection of a 5 hour period in the symbiotic X-ray binary 4U 1954+31, which might be the slowest neutron star rotation period yet discovered; and the detection of flares in the supergiant system 1E 1145.1-6141 which occur at both periastron and apastron passage with nearly equal amplitude. We compare techniques of weighting data points in power spectra and present a method related to the semi-weighted mean which, unlike conventional weighting, works well over a wide range of source brightness.

  1. Simultaneous observations of periodic non-Io decametric radio emission by ground radio telescope URAN-2 and STEREO/WAVES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantzusenko, A.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Periodic bursts of the non-Io component of Jovian decametric radio emission (non-Io DAM) is observed as (1) series of arc-like radio bursts with negative frequency drift which reoccur with 1.5% longer period than the Jovian magnetosphere rotation rate, (2) series of bursts with positive frequency drift which reoccur with Jupiter's rotation period and (3) periodic non-arc like radio features [1, 2]. These bursts are typically detected during several Jupiter rotations in decametric frequency range from 4 MHz to 12 - 16 MHz between 300° and 60° of CML. We present simultaneous observations of the periodic non-Io controlled DAM performed by the WAVES radio experiment onboard the two STEREO spacecraft and the groundbased radio telescope URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. URAN-2 with an effective area of about 30000 m2 consists of 512 broadband crossed dipoles and equipped with the high performance digital radio spectrometer with polarization measurement capability. During the observation campaign Sep., 2012 - Apr., 2013 URAN-2 recorded a large amount of Jovian DAM events with the high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100 ms) in a frequency range 8-32 MHz. In the same time the two spatially separated STEREO spacecraft was able to observe DAM in the frequency range up to 16 MHz. The first analysis of the acquired stereoscopic observations is presented. In particular, we show one episode when the periodic non-arc DAM was recorded together with long lasting Jovian narrow band (NB) emissions. These NB emission was observed at the high frequency cutoff of DAM and can be interpreted as propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jovian ionosphere [3]. We discuss the possible relations between the observed NB events and the periodic non-Io controlled Jovian decametric radio emission.

  2. Wave-wave interactions in the stratosphere - Observations during quiet and active wintertime periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. K.; Gille, J. C.; Lyjak, L. V.

    1984-01-01

    Smith (1983) has demonstrated that wave-wave interactions among planetary waves 1, 2, and 3 were important during the month of January 1979, a period characterized by extremely large wave 1 amplitudes in the stratosphere. In the present investigation, the same analysis is applied to the period November 1978 through March 1979 with the aim to determine the conditions under which wave-wave interactions were important. Attention is given to enstrophy budget calculations, the wave 1/wave 2 vacillation, a quantitative measure of wave-wave interactions, and examples of wave-wave interactions during several periods. It is found that the vacillation between waves 1 and 2 has no clear relationship to the tropopause forcing as represented by the 300 mb amplitude.

  3. Quantization and symmetry in periodic coverage patterns with applications to earth observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical approaches based on an idealized physical model and concepts from number theory show that in periodic coverage patterns, uniquely defined by their revolution numbers R (orbital) and N (rotational), the subnodal points are earth-fixed, and they divide the equator into R equal segments of length s. The ascending subsatellite trace crosses each point once (only) each period. The descending subnodal points coincide with the ascending points if the integers N and R have like parity, and bisect the intervals between them if opposite. The interval between consecutive unidirectional crossings is Ns. Symmetries extend the equatorial results to all parallels of latitude. Complete periodic patterns of traces exhibit an overall symmetry, with trace intersections confined to discrete coordinate values which are quantized in longitude (basic s-unit) and symmetric in latitude.

  4. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of ABI-007, albumin-bound paclitaxel, administered every 3 weeks in Japanese patients with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Noboru; Yamada, Yasuhide; Mukohara, Toru; Minami, Hironobu; Tamura, Tomohide

    2010-05-01

    ABI-007 is a novel Cremophor EL-free nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel. This Phase I study was designed to evaluate tolerability and determine recommended dose for Japanese patients when ABI-007 was administered in every-3-week schedule. Pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel was also assessed. Patients with advanced solid tumors refractory to standard therapy received a 30 min intravenous infusion of ABI-007 every 3 weeks without pre-medications at 200, 260 or 300 mg/m(2), respectively. Tolerability and recommended dose were determined by the standard '3 + 3' rule. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed, despite the dose escalation. In another cohort, 260 mg/m(2) was re-evaluated and resulted in no dose-limiting toxicity. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was reported for the majority of patients (n = 8) but no incidence of febrile neutropenia. Non-hematological toxicities were generally mild except for Grade 3 sensory neuropathy (n = 3). Pharmacokinetic study demonstrated the area under the curve of paclitaxel increased with increasing the dosage, and comparable pharmacokinetic parameters to the western population. Partial response was observed in three non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two of whom had received docetaxel-containing chemotherapy prior to the study. ABI-007 administered in every-3-week schedule was well tolerated up to 300 mg/m(2), and recommended dose was determined at 260 mg/m(2) in consideration of efficacy, toxicities and similarity of pharmacokinetic profile in western studies. Additional studies of single-agent ABI-007 as well as platinum-based combinations, particularly in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, are warranted.

  5. Coronal quasi-periodic fast-propagating magnetosonic waves observed by SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng

    Coronal quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves are scare in previous studies due to the relative low temporal and spatial resolution of past telescopes. Recently, they are detected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Here, two cases of QFP waves are presented. The analysis results indicate that QFP waves are tightly associated with the associated flares. It is indicate that QFP waves and the associated flares are possibly driven by the same physic process such as quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection process in producing flares.

  6. Observation of energy cascade creating periodic shock waves in a resonator.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2010-03-01

    Nonlinear excitation of periodic shock waves in high-amplitude standing waves was studied from measurements of the acoustic intensity. A gas column of atmospheric air in a cylindrical resonator was driven sinusoidally by an oscillating piston at the fundamental resonance frequency. Acoustic pressure and axial acoustic particle velocity were simultaneously measured and decomposed into the Fourier components, from which the intensity associated with each of the oscillating modes in the resonator was determined. This letter reports the energy cascade from the driven mode to the second harmonic in the periodic shock waves in the resonator.

  7. Low systemic absorption and good tolerability of pimecrolimus, administered as 1% cream (Elidel) in infants with atopic dermatitis--a multicenter, 3-week, open-label study.

    PubMed

    Staab, Doris; Pariser, David; Gottlieb, Alice B; Kaufmann, Roland; Eichenfield, Laurence F; Langley, Richard G; Scott, Graham; Ebelin, Marie-Eve; Barilla, Denise; Schmidli, Heinz; Burtin, Pascale

    2005-01-01

    Pimecrolimus cream 1%, a nonsteroid inhibitor of inflammatory cytokines, offers an alternative to corticosteroids in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Here we evaluate pimecrolimus blood concentrations and tolerability to pimecrolimus cream 1% in 22 infants below 2 years of age with atopic dermatitis (10-92% body surface area affected at baseline). Efficacy was assessed as a secondary objective. Pimecrolimus cream 1% was applied twice daily for 3 weeks. Blood concentrations were low, typically (96% of total 100 concentrations measured) below 2 ng/mL, the majority (71%) remaining below 0.5 ng/mL. The highest concentration observed was 2.26 ng/mL. At steady state, there was no indication of accumulation. Pimecrolimus was well tolerated locally and systemically, with no serious adverse events recorded. Most adverse events recorded (35 in 17/22 patients) were typical of the young pediatric population studied, of mild to moderate severity, and not considered to be study-medication related, with the exception of four local adverse effects limited to the site of cream application. No clinically relevant change was observed in physical examination, vital signs, or laboratory safety parameters. A rapid onset of therapeutic effect was observed within the first four days of treatment. Pimecrolimus cream 1% is well tolerated in infants 3 to 23 months of age treated for 3 weeks, and results in minimal systemic exposure.

  8. Sequentially Observed Periodic Surveys of Management Compartments to Monitor Red-cockaded Woodpecker Populations

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Hooper; H. David Muse

    1989-01-01

    Management of the red-cockaded woodpeckcer (Picoides borealis) requires knowledge of size and trend of individual poulations. Periodic entry into management compartments for thinning and regeneration of stands provides considerable information on individual cavity trees and colonies. The statistical rationale and formulas for using this information...

  9. How the Initial Thinking Period Affects Student Argumentation during Peer Instruction: Students' Experiences versus Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Kjetil L.; Hansen, Gabrielle; Stav, John B.

    2016-01-01

    The authors have compared students discussing multiple-choice quizzes during peer instruction with and without the initial thinking period before discussion. Video clips of students engaged in peer discussion in groups of three of varying group combinations, a total of 140 different students in all, were compared to students' own experiences…

  10. Retrospective observation of mental disorders during postpartum period: Results from the Singapore mental health study.

    PubMed

    Sagayadevan, Vathsala; Lee, Siau Pheng; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi; Chen, Helen; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2015-12-16

    The perinatal period has been identified as a period of vulnerability for various disorders (particularly anxiety and depressive disorders), which have been associated with negative outcomes for both mother and infant. The current study utilized data from the Singapore Mental Health Study (SMHS) to examine the temporal relationship between mental disorders and the perinatal period, as well as associated risk factors. Life table estimation method was used to derive the estimated hazard rate for any mood or anxiety disorders following pregnancy. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between socio-demographic factors and onset of mental disorders after the first pregnancy. Among women with children (n = 2278), 1.5 % were found to have an onset of any mental disorder (i.e., mood disorders, anxiety disorders, alcohol use disorders), within 2 years after pregnancy. A peak in hazard rate was noted at approximately 1 year following pregnancy for anxiety disorders but not mood disorders. Women who were married, employed and physically healthy were less likely to have had developed any mental disorder. The prevalence of mental disorders during pregnancy and postpartum was found to be low among women with children in our community sample, with increased vulnerability following delivery. The results offer some insight into the occurrence of mental disorders during the perinatal period among women in Singapore.

  11. How the Initial Thinking Period Affects Student Argumentation during Peer Instruction: Students' Experiences versus Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Kjetil L.; Hansen, Gabrielle; Stav, John B.

    2016-01-01

    The authors have compared students discussing multiple-choice quizzes during peer instruction with and without the initial thinking period before discussion. Video clips of students engaged in peer discussion in groups of three of varying group combinations, a total of 140 different students in all, were compared to students' own experiences…

  12. Evaluation of two observational pain assessment scales during the anaesthesia recovery period in Chinese surgical older adults.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Li; Li, Li; Liu, Yao-Wei; Herr, Keela

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale and the Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators in Chinese older adults post surgery during the anaesthesia recovery period. Pain assessment in older surgical patients is complicated by factors such as anaesthesia and opioid administration. Although observational pain behavioural assessment tools have been validated for those unable to self-report, research on their application during the anaesthesia recovery period is limited. A prospective correlational design. Ninety-three older patients admitted for scheduled abdominal surgery were recruited in a university-affiliated hospital. The two observational scales were used to conduct pain assessments during the anaesthesia recovery period. On the first and the third postoperative day, participants recalled their pain intensity during the recovery period using the Numeric Rating Scale or the Faces Pain Scale-Revised. The internal consistency reliability of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale and the Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators was 0·81 and 0·69 respectively. The correlation between scores of the two observational scales was 0·95. The recalled self-reports of pain intensity were significantly correlated. The correlation of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale and patients' recalled self-reports was 0·55, 0·54, and the correlation between the Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators and the two recalled pain scores was both 0·60. Both the two observational scales had good reliability and validity when used to assess pain in Chinese surgical older adults during the anaesthesia recovery period. Observational pain scales can be useful as a tool for patients unable to self-report. Accurate use of one of the observational pain tools can help identify pain during the anaesthesia recovery period, when patients are unable to self-report, to support effective pain management during this period. © 2014

  13. Meridional Circulation Cells Observed In The Upper Troposphere Over Suriname During The Monsoon Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuin, P.; Kelder, H.

    Since September 1999, weekly balloon sondes are released at tropical Paramaribo sta- tion (5.8N 55.2W), located at the northern coast of South America. The station lies approximately in the middle of the annual migration range of the ITCZ, and therefore experiences either a northeast or a southeast trade wind regime (ITCZ respectively to the south, north). The wet season corresponds with the period of northeasterly trade winds (December-July) and is normally interrupted by a short dry period (February- March) when the ITCZ lies farthest to the south. During this monsoon period a sys- tematic return flow to higher latitudes can be detected, centered around 12 km (200 hPa), which seems to constitute the upper branch of the Hadley cell. However, this upper branch of the Hadley cell seems to be flanked above and below by southward flow. On closer inspection, these meridional sub-cells persist in a domain of negative potential vorticity, brought about by the horizontal gradient in zonal wind near the Equator as the northern subtropical jet reaches its southern-most point. As predicted by Stevens (1982), this inertially unstable domain responds with vertically sctacked meridional flow cells, in order to restore a minimum horizontal shear in zonal wind near the Equator. These meridional cells continuously exhibit alternating periods of growth and decay, on a time-scale consistent with inertial instability. Their meridional extent is from the Equator to approcimately 10-12 degrees North, such that Paramaribo (at 5.8N) witnesses approximately the maximal merinional wind velocity near the cen- ter of these cells. Due to their persistent recurring nature in the monsoon period, they leave a signature on the water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere, which shows a dry layer sandwithced between wetter layers - with a spatial distribution similar to the sub-cellular flow.

  14. Perfusion index assessment during transition period of newborns: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sezin; Ergenekon, Ebru; Aktas, Selma; Beken, Serdar; Altuntas, Nilgun; Kazanci, Ebru; Kulali, Ferit; Hirfanoglu, Ibrahim M; Onal, Esra; Turkyilmaz, Canan; Koc, Esin; Atalay, Yildiz

    2016-10-07

    Perfusion index (PI) is becoming a part of clinical practice in neonatology to monitor peripheral perfusion noninvasively. Hemodynamic and respiratory changes occur in newborns during the transition period after birth in which peripheral perfusion may be affected. Tachypnea is a frequent symptom during this period. While some tachypneic newborns get well in less than 6 h and diagnosed as "delayed transition", others get admitted to intensive care unit which transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN) being the most common diagnosis among them. We aimed to compare PI of neonates with TTN and delayed transition with controls, and assess its value on discrimination of delayed transition and TTN. Neonates with gestational age between 37 and 40 weeks who were born with elective caesarian section were included. Eligible neonates were monitored with Masimo Set Radical7 pulse-oximeter (Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA, USA). Postductal PI, oxygen saturation and heart rate were manually recorded every 10 s for 3 min for two defined time periods as 10(th) minute and 1(st) hour. Axillary temperature were also recorded. Newborn infants were grouped as control, delayed transition, and TTN. Forty-nine tachypneic (TTN; 21, delayed transition; 28) and 30 healthy neonates completed the study. PI values were similar between three groups at both periods. There were no correlation between PI and respiratory rate, heart rate, and temperature. PI assessment in maternity unit does not discriminate TTN from delayed transitional period in newborns which may indicate that peripheral perfusion is not severely affected in either condition.

  15. IUE observations of periodic comets Tempel-2, Kopff, and Tempel-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; Festou, Michel C.

    1992-01-01

    We summarize the results of observations made between 10 Jun. - 18 Dec. 1988 with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUS) of comet P/Tempel-2 during its 1988 appearance. The derived water production rate and relative gas/dust ratio are compared with those of P/Halley, observed with IUE in 1985-86, and other potential Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) target comets, P/Kopff and P/Tempel-1, both observed with IUE in 1983.

  16. Observer variability in posture assessment from video recordings: The effect of partly visible periods.

    PubMed

    Trask, Catherine; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Rostami, Mehdi; Heiden, Marina

    2017-04-01

    Observers rank partly visible postures on video frames differently than fully visible postures, but it's not clear if this is due to differences in observer perception. This study investigated the effect of posture visibility on between-observer variability in assessments of trunk and arm posture. Trained observers assessed trunk and arm postures from video recordings of 84 pulp mill shifts using a work sampling approach; postures were also categorized as 'fully' or 'partly' visible. Between-worker, between-day, and between-observer variance components and corresponding confidence intervals were calculated. Although no consistent gradient was seen for the trunk, right upper arm posture showed smaller between-observer variance when all observers rated a posture as fully visible. This suggests that, partly-visible data, especially when observers disagree as to the level of visibility, introduces more between-observer variability when compared to fully visible data. Some previously-identified differences in daily posture summaries may be related to this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The efficacy and tolerability of a sunitinib 3-week administration schedule in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Neri, B; Vannini, A; Tassi, R; Brugia, M; Rangan, S; Rediti, M; Cerullo, C

    2012-01-01

    Sunitinib, an orally multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor and standard first-line treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, is usually administered on a 6-week schedule. Toxicities reported with this drug are usually of moderate grade, which results in good treatment tolerability and patients' compliance. However, in some cases high-grade or prolonged toxicities require temporary treatment interruption or dose adjustment, possibly resulting in reduced treatment efficacy. We describe three cases of metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients (a 53-year-old male, a 70-year-old woman, and a 65-year-old woman) who received a shortened 3-week sunitinib administration schedule, 2 weeks daily administration followed by 1 week of rest (2/1) due to toxicities developed on the classic 6-week schedule, which would have required a temporary treatment interruption or a dose reduction. Treatment was generally well tolerated with manageable toxicities. A 3-week administration schedule of sunitinib may represent a valid alternative for managing toxicity while maintaining the planned dose intensity over a 6-weeks period of time. Sunitinib may thus be administered using a flexible dosing schedule to meet individual patient needs, achieving better tolerability and maintaining significant response to treatment.

  18. INDICATIONS OF A LUNAR SYNODICAL PERIOD IN THE SUNSHINE OBSERVATIONS FOR BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, AND COLUMBIA, MISSOURI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    sunchine is observed between New Moon and First Quarter and between Full Moon and Last Quarter while above average sunshine occurs between First...Quarter and Full Moon and between Last Quarter and New Moon. Data from other stations will be studied to determine whether similar departures are observed at other locations. (Author)

  19. Body composition changes in men and women after 2-3 weeks of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Kodama, A. M.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Price, D. C.; Newsom, B. D.

    1976-01-01

    Several parameters of body composition were measured in eight men before and after 14 days of continuous recumbency, and in eight women before and after 17 days of recumbency. The parameters measured included body weight, body water, body potassium, plasma volume, and plasma protein concentrations. From these, values were derived for body fat content, lean body mass, body mass, and circulating plasma proteins. In general, the men and women responded similarly to continuous recumbency. Characteristically, there was significant reduction of plasma volume and body potassium in both groups. The women showed a significant reduction in circulating plasma protein, entirely in the albumin fraction; a similar change was observed in the men. The women, but not the men, showed a significant increase in circulating fibrinogen. Both men and women lost body cell mass, while body fat content remained the same or tended to increase slightly. It is expected that similar changes would occur in weightlessness. It is further concluded that women should tolerate the weightlessness of space flight physiologically as well as men.

  20. Body composition changes in men and women after 2-3 weeks of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Kodama, A. M.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Price, D. C.; Newsom, B. D.

    1976-01-01

    Several parameters of body composition were measured in eight men before and after 14 days of continuous recumbency, and in eight women before and after 17 days of recumbency. The parameters measured included body weight, body water, body potassium, plasma volume, and plasma protein concentrations. From these, values were derived for body fat content, lean body mass, body mass, and circulating plasma proteins. In general, the men and women responded similarly to continuous recumbency. Characteristically, there was significant reduction of plasma volume and body potassium in both groups. The women showed a significant reduction in circulating plasma protein, entirely in the albumin fraction; a similar change was observed in the men. The women, but not the men, showed a significant increase in circulating fibrinogen. Both men and women lost body cell mass, while body fat content remained the same or tended to increase slightly. It is expected that similar changes would occur in weightlessness. It is further concluded that women should tolerate the weightlessness of space flight physiologically as well as men.

  1. Estimating the period and Q of the Chandler Wobble from observations and models of its excitation (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, R.; Nastula, J.

    2015-08-01

    Any irregularly shaped solid body rotating about some axis that is not aligned with its figure axis will freely wobble as it rotates. For the Earth, this free wobble is known as the Chandler wobble in honor of S.C. Chandler, Jr. who first observed it in 1891. Unlike the forced wobbles of the Earth, such as the annual wobble, whose periods are the same as the periods of the forcing mechanisms, the period of the free Chandler wobble is a function of the internal structure and rheology of the Earth, and its decay time constant, or quality factor Q, is a function of the dissipation mechanism(s), like mantle anelasticity, that are acting to dampen it. Improved estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble can therefore be used to improve our understanding of these properties of the Earth. Here, estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble are obtained by finding those values that minimize the power within the Chandler band of the difference between observed and modeled polar motion excitation spanning 1962- 2010. Atmosphere, ocean, and hydrology models are used to model the excitation caused by both mass and motion variations within these global geophysical fluids. Direct observations of the excitation caused by mass variations as determined from GRACE time varying gravitational field measurements are also used. The resulting estimates of the period and Q of the Chandler wobble will be presented along with a discussion of the robustness of the estimates.

  2. Observation of self-assembled periodic nano-structures induced by femtosecond laser in both ablation and deposition regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingzhen; Zhang, Haitao; Her, Tsing-Hua

    2008-02-01

    We observed the spontaneous formation of periodic nano-structures in both femtosecond laser ablation and deposition. The former involved 400-nm femtosecond pulses from a 250-KHz regenerated amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser and periodic nanocracks and the nano-structure are in the form of periodic nanocracks in the substrate, the latter applied an 80-MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator with pulse energy less than half nanojoule in a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition configuration and tungsten nanogratings grow heterogeneously on top of the substrates. These two observed periodic nanostructures have opposite orientations respecting to laser polarization: the periodic nanocracks are perpendicular to, whereas the deposited tungsten nanogratings are parallel to laser polarization direction. By translating the substrate respecting to the laser focus, both the periodic nanocrack and tungsten nanograting extend to the whole scanning range. The deposited tungsten nanogratings possess excellent uniformity on both the grating period and tooth length. Both the attributes can be tuned precisely by controlling the laser power and scanning speed. Furthermore, we discovered that the teeth of transverse tungsten nanogratings are self aligned along their axial direction during multiple scanning with appropriate offset between scans. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating large-area one-dimensional grating by exploiting such unique property. These distinct phenomena of nanocracks and tungsten nanogratings indicate different responsible mechanisms.

  3. Variation of Acoustic Cutoff Period with Height in the Solar Atmosphere: Theory versus Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Konkol, P.; Wiśniewska, A.

    2016-08-01

    Recently Wiśniewska et al. demonstrated observationally how the acoustic cutoff frequency varies with height in the solar atmosphere including the upper photosphere and the lower and middle chromosphere, and showed that the observational results cannot be accounted for by the existing theoretical formulas for the acoustic cutoff. In order to reproduce the observed variation of the cutoff with atmospheric height, numerical simulations of impulsively generated acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere are performed, and the spectral analysis of temporal wave profiles is used to compute numerically changes of the acoustic cutoff with height. Comparison of the numerical results with the observational data shows good agreement, which clearly indicates that the obtained results may be used to determine the structure of the background solar atmosphere.

  4. Spatial log-periodic oscillations of first-passage observables in fractals.

    PubMed

    Akkermans, Eric; Benichou, Olivier; Dunne, Gerald V; Teplyaev, Alexander; Voituriez, Raphael

    2012-12-01

    For transport processes in geometrically restricted domains, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) admits a general scaling dependence on space parameters for diffusion, anomalous diffusion, and diffusion in disordered or fractal media. For transport in self-similar fractal structures, we obtain an expression for the source-target distance dependence of the MFPT that exhibits both the leading power-law behavior, depending on the Hausdorff and spectral dimension of the fractal, as well as small log-periodic oscillations that are a clear and definitive signal of the underlying fractal structure. We also present refined numerical results for the Sierpinski gasket that confirm this oscillatory behavior.

  5. Observation of a periodic pattern in the persistent-current fields of the superconducting HERA magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Brueck, H.; Gall, D.; Krzywinski, J.; Meinke, R.; Preissner, H. , Hamburg ); Halemeyer, M.; Schmueser, P.; Stolzenburg, C. . 2. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik); Stiening, R. ); ter Avest, D.; van de Klundert, L.J.M. (Technische Hogeschool Twente, Enschede (Netherlands

    1991-05-01

    The time dependence of persistent current multipoles in superconducting magnets is still unexplained. The decay is too large to be accounted for by flux creep and it does not show the expected dependence on temperature. Furthermore the decay is influenced by a preceding field sweep in the magnet, it becomes more pronounced if the magnet was previously excited to its maximum field. For a detailed study of the decay mechanism a special sensor has been developed which allows to record small sexupole components in superconducting dipole magnets. During an experimental study of the time dependence of a HERA dipole it was found that the sextupole field exhibits a sinusoidal structure along the axis of the magnet. A similar periodic structure was found for the main dipole field with the help of a nuclear magnetic resonance probe. The wavelength of the periodic pattern is compatible with the transposition pitch of the Rutherford-type cable in the magnet coils. The structure was found to exist in all HERA dipoles measured afterwards and also in a superconducting coil without iron yoke. With a specially developed 2 cm long pickup coil it was found that all accessible multipole components in dipole and quadrupole magnets are modulated along their axis. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  6. [The academic trend of Oriental medicine during the Japanese colonial period as observed through the publication of medical books].

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Il

    2006-06-01

    This thesis examines the academical trend of Oriental Medicine in the Japanese colonial period observed through medical books published during the Japanese colonial period. This is a period in which Western Medicine was introduced, and due to the lean-to-one-side policy by the Japanese, Western Medicine became the mainstream medical science while Oriental Medicine was pushed to the outskirts. Even after all this, the academic activity was flourishing during this period compared to any other periods. This article is divided into various chapters each with its own theme in order to understand the academic trend of Oriental Medicine during the Japanese colonial period. Focusing on the publication of medical books, this article is divided and observed according to various themes such as the study of Dong-Eui-Bo-Gam (see text), the study of Bang-Yak-Hap-Pyeun (see text), the study of Sang-Han-Ron (see text), the study of Sa-sang (see text) constitutional medicine, the study of Eui-Hak-Ip-Mun (see text), the study about Bu-Yang-Ron (see text), On-Bo-Ron (see text), and pediatrics, compromise between Western and Oriental Medicine, the study of experience medicine, the study of acupuncture and moxibustion, and etc.

  7. Family Interaction in the Newborn Period: Some Findings, Some Observations, and Some Unresolved Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parke, Ross D.

    This paper presents two studies which explored the manner in which the father interacts with his newborn infant and compared paternal and maternal interaction patterns. In contrast to earlier studies, a direct observational approach was employed that permitted a detailed specification of father behaviors in the presence of the newborn. In the…

  8. Daytime Raman lidar measurements of water vapor during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Goldsmith, J.E.M.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the importance of water vapor, the ARM program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its CART (Cloud And Radiation Testbed) site. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. These IOPs provided an excellent opportunity to compare measurements from other systems with those made by the CART Raman lidar. This paper addresses primarily the daytime water vapor measurements made by the lidar system during the second of these IOPs.

  9. Seasonal and Lunar Month Periods Observed in Natural Neutron Flux at High Altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenkin, Yuri; Alekseenko, Victor; Cai, Zeyu; Cao, Zhen; Cattaneo, Claudio; Cui, Shuwang; Giroletti, Elio; Gromushkin, Dmitry; Guo, Cong; Guo, Xuewen; He, Huihai; Liu, Ye; Ma, Xinhua; Shchegolev, Oleg; Vallania, Piero; Vigorito, Carlo; Zhao, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Air radon concentration measurement is useful for research on geophysical effects, but it is strongly sensitive to site geology and many geophysical and microclimatic processes such as wind, ventilation, air humidity and so on inducing very big fluctuations on the concentration of radon in air. On the contrary, monitoring the radon concentration in soil by measuring the thermal neutron flux reduces environmental effects. In this paper, we report some experimental results on the natural thermal neutron flux as well as on the concentration of air radon and its variations at 4300 m asl. These results were obtained with unshielded thermal neutron scintillation detectors (en-detectors) and radon monitors located inside the ARGO-YBJ experimental hall. The correlation of these variations with the lunar month and 1-year period is undoubtedly confirmed. A method for earthquake prediction provided by a global net of en-detectors is currently under study.

  10. On the periodicity of symbolic observations of piecewise smooth discrete-time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramadge, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the behavior of discrete-time systems composed of a set of smooth transition maps coupled by a quantized feedback function. The feedback function partitions the state space into disjoint regions and assigns a smooth transition function to each region. The main result is that under a constraint on the norm of the derivative of the transition maps, a bounded state trajectory with limit points in the interior of the switching regions leads to a region index sequence that is eventually periodic. Under these assumptions, it is shown that eventually the feedback function is determined by a finite state automaton. A similar result is proved in the case of finite state dynamic feedback.

  11. Effect of 3 weeks treatment with yohimbine on salivary secretion in healthy volunteers and in depressed patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants.

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, H; Schmitt, L; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1992-01-01

    The effect of yohimbine treatment (4 mg three times daily) for 3 weeks on salivary secretion was investigated. In healthy volunteers, acute administration of yohimbine increased salivary volume within 1 h to a similar extent before and at the end of the treatment period. In depressed patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants (and exhibiting a reduced salivary flow), yohimbine also acutely increased salivary volume. In contrast, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist failed to modify resting values measured in the morning (i.e. 10 and 14 h after the last administration in healthy volunteers and depressed patients respectively). This result indicates that alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists may have a potential therapeutic use in the treatment of dry mouth caused by tricyclic antidepressant drugs. PMID:1362888

  12. Observing exoplanets from the planet Earth: How our revolution around the Sun affects the detection of 1-year periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borin, Federico; Poretti, Ennio; Borsa, Francesco; Rainer, Monica

    2017-08-01

    We analysed a selected sample of exoplanets with orbital periods close to 1 year to study the effects of the spectral window on the data, affected by the 1 y-1 aliasing due to the Earth motion around the Sun. We pointed out a few cases where a further observational effort would largely improve the reliability of the orbital solutions.

  13. A single administration of methamphetamine to mice early in the light period decreases running wheel activity observed during the dark period.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Watabe, Kaname; Kubo, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tatsuta, Tomohiro; Morita, Yoshio; Takemura, Motohiko

    2012-01-06

    Repeated intermittent administration of amphetamines acutely increases appetitive and consummatory aspects of motivated behaviors as well as general activity and exploratory behavior, including voluntary running wheel activity. Subsequently, if the drug is withdrawn, the frequency of these behaviors decreases, which is thought to be indicative of dysphoric symptoms associated with amphetamine withdrawal. Such decreases may be observed after chronic treatment or even after single drug administrations. In the present study, the effect of acute methamphetamine (METH) on running wheel activity, horizontal locomotion, appetitive behavior (food access), and consummatory behavior (food and water intake) was investigated in mice. A multi-configuration behavior apparatus designed to monitor the five behaviors was developed, where combined measures were recorded simultaneously. In the first experiment, naïve male ICR mice showed gradually increasing running wheel activity over three consecutive days after exposure to a running wheel, while mice without a running wheel showed gradually decreasing horizontal locomotion, consistent with running wheel activity being a positively motivated form of natural motor activity. In experiment 2, increased horizontal locomotion and food access, and decreased food intake, were observed for the initial 3h after acute METH challenge. Subsequently, during the dark phase period decreased running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion were observed. The reductions in running wheel activity and horizontal locomotion may be indicative of reduced dopaminergic function, although it remains to be seen if these changes may be more pronounced after more prolonged METH treatments. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Regional Changes in Earths Color and Texture as Observed From Space Over a 15-Year Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Guangyu; Di Girolamo, Larry; Diner, David J.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Mueller, Kevin J.; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-01-01

    Earth-observing satellites provide global observations of many geophysical variables. As these variables are derived from measured radiances, the underlying radiance data are the most reliable sources of information for change detection. Here, we identify statistically significant trends in the color and spatial texture of the Earth as viewed from multiple directions from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), which has been sampling the angular distribution of scattered sunlight since 2000. Globally, our results show that the Earth has been appearing relatively bluer (up to 1.6 % per decade from both nadir and oblique views) and smoother (up to 1.5 % per decade only from oblique views) over the past 15 years. The magnitude of the global blueing trends is comparable to that of uncertainties in radiometric calibration stability. Regional shifts in color and texture, which are significantly larger than global means, are observed, particularly over polar regions, along the boundaries of the subtropical highs, the tropical western Pacific, Southwestern Asia, and Australia. We demonstrate that the large regional trends cannot be explained either by uncertainties in radiometric calibration or variability in total or spectral solar irradiance; hence, they reflect changes internal to the Earths climate system. The 15-year-mean true color composites and texture images of the Earth at both nadir and oblique views are also presented for the first time.

  15. Cassini Observations of Saturn's Nightside UV Auroral Oval: In Situ Evidence of its Periodic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunce, E. J.; Grodent, D. C.; Provan, G.; Jinks, S.; Cowley, S. W.; Andrews, D. J.; Arridge, C. S.; Badman, S. V.; Dougherty, M. K.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years we have benefitted greatly from the first in-orbit multi-wavelength images of Saturn's polar atmosphere from the Cassini spacecraft. Specifically, images obtained from the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board the Cassini spacecraft provide an excellent view of the planet's auroral emissions, which in turn give an account of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and dynamics within the system. However, obtaining a simultaneous view of the auroral regions with measurements of the magnetic field and plasma populations at high-latitudes is more difficult to routinely achieve. Here we present an unusual example, during Revolution 99 in 2009, where UVIS images the entire northern UV auroral oval while Cassini traverses the magnetic flux tubes connecting to the auroral oval on the nightside sampling the related magnetic field and particle signatures present. We will discuss the relationship of the field-aligned currents (derived from the magnetic field), radio waves, and associated plasma electron and ion signatures to the properties of the auroral oval. The motion of the auroral oval evident in the UVIS images will be discussed in the context of the "planetary period oscillations" and previous field-aligned current studies.Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado/ESA/University of Liege/University of Leicester

  16. OBSERVING EVOLUTION IN THE SUPERGRANULAR NETWORK LENGTH SCALE DURING PERIODS OF LOW SOLAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Rast, Mark P.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-20

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of {approx}0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of 'extreme' solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  17. Observing Evolution in the Supergranular Network Length Scale During Periods of Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.; Hock, Rachel A.; Rast, Mark P.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2011-03-01

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. The distribution of magnetic elements in the lanes that from the network affects, and reflects, the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Suns' interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of ~0.5 Mm in the supergranular emission length scale occurs when comparing observation cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the data sets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-scale flux emergence, offering insight into times of "extreme" solar minimum and general behavior such as the phasing and cross-dependence of different components of the spectral irradiance. Given that the modulation of the supergranular scale imprints itself in variations of the Suns' spectral irradiance, as well as in the mass and energy transport into the entire outer atmosphere, this preliminary investigation is an important step in understanding the impact of the quiet Sun on the heliospheric system.

  18. Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength Observations of OJ 287 During the Periodic Optical Outburst in 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Seta, Hiromi; Isobe, N.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Yaji, Yuichi; Arai, Akira; Fukuhara, Masayuki; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Koichiro; Sasada, Mahito; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Tosaki, Tomoka; Uemura, Makoto; Anderhub, Hans; Antonelli, L.A.; Antoranz, Pedro; Backes, Michael; Baixeras, Carmen; Balestra, Silvia; Barrio, Juan Abel; Bastieri, Denis; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

    2011-12-01

    Suzaku observations of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray observations of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either observation. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both observations, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.

  19. Plasma-wave observations at Uranus from Voyager 2. Progress report for period ending February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Gurnett, D.A.; Kurth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Poynter, R.L.

    1986-03-26

    Radio emissions from Uranus were detected by the Voyager 2 plasma-wave instrument about 5 days before closest approach at frequencies of 31.1 and 56.2 khz. The bow shock was identified by an abrupt broadband burst of electrostatic turbulence about 10 hours before closest approach at a radial distance of 23.5 ru. Once inside of the magnetosphere, strong whistler mode hiss and chorus emissions were observed at radial distances less than about 8 R/sub u/, in the same region where the energetic-particle instruments detected intense fluxes of energetic electrons. A variety of other plasma waves, such as (f sub c) electron-cyclotron waves, were also observed in this same region. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive events that are interpreted as impacts of micron-sized dust particles on the spacecraft. The maximum impact rate was about 20 to 30 impacts/sec, and the north-south thickness of the impact region was about 4000 km. This paper presents an overview of the principal results from the plasma-wave instrument, starting with the first detection of radio emissions from Uranus, and ending a few days after closest approach.

  20. Incidence of cancer among ferrochromium and ferrosilicon workers: an extended observation period.

    PubMed Central

    Langård, S; Andersen, A; Ravnestad, J

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a cohort study on the incidence of cancers and crude death rates in ferrochromium and ferrosilicon workers. The whole cohort was observed from 1 January 1953 to 31 December 1985. Two sets of results are presented; one restricted to workers first employed before 1960 and one to workers first employed before 1965. The latter cohort consists of 1235 workers. The total mortality in the whole cohort was low (SMR = 81) as was the overall incidence of cancers (SIR = 84). There was an overall deficit of deaths and cases of cancer in the ferrosilicon group. An excess of lung cancer (SIR = 154) and cancer of the prostate (SIR = 151) was observed in the ferrochromium workers employed before 1965. Cancer of the kidney was also in excess (SIR = 273) in the ferrochromium group, with a mean "latency time" of 39 years. Two cases of malignant melanomas had occurred versus 0.19 expected in a small subgroup of workers in electrical shops and an electric power station. PMID:2310703

  1. Apparent rippling with honeycomb symmetry and tunable periodicity observed by scanning tunneling microscopy on suspended graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgi, A.; Nemes-Incze, P.; Szafranek, B.; Neumaier, D.; Geringer, V.; Liebmann, M.; Morgenstern, M.

    2016-11-01

    Suspended graphene is difficult to image by scanning probe microscopy due to the inherent van der Waals and dielectric forces exerted by the tip, which are not counteracted by a substrate. Here, we report scanning tunneling microscopy data of suspended monolayer graphene in constant-current mode, revealing a surprising honeycomb structure with amplitude of 50-200 pm and lattice constant of 10-40 nm. The apparent lattice constant is reduced by increasing the tunneling current I , but does not depend systematically on tunneling voltage V or scan speed vscan. The honeycomb lattice of the rippling is aligned with the atomic structure observed on supported areas, while no atomic corrugation is found on suspended areas down to the resolution of about 3 -4 pm. We rule out that the honeycomb structure is induced by the feedback loop using a changing vscan, that it is a simple enlargement effect of the atomic lattice, as well as models predicting frozen phonons or standing phonon waves induced by the tunneling current. Although we currently do not have a convincing explanation for the observed effect, we expect that our intriguing results will inspire further research related to suspended graphene.

  2. Weekly periodicities of aerosol properties observed at an urban location in India

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S K; Vinoj, V; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2011-07-01

    Multi-year (~7 years) observations of aerosol optical and microphysical properties were conducted at a tropical urban location in Bangalore, India. As a consequence of rapid urbanization, Bangalore presents high local atmospheric emissions, which makes it an interesting site to study the effect of anthropogenic activities on aerosol properties. It has been found that both column (aerosol optical depth, AOD) and ground-level measurements (black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol mass) exhibit a weekly cycle with low aerosol concentrations on weekends. In comparison to the weekdays, the weekend reductions of aerosol optical depth, black carbon and composite aerosol mass concentrations were ~15%, 25% and 24%, respectively. The magnitude of weekend reduction of black carbon is as much as ~1 μg m-3. The similarity in the weekly cycle between the column and surface measurements suggests that the aerosol column loading at this location is governed by local anthropogenic emissions. The strongest weekly cycle in composite aerosol mass concentration was observed in the super micron mass range (>1 μm). The weekly cycle of composite aerosol mass in the sub micron mass range (<1 μm) was weak in comparison to the super micron aerosol mass.

  3. Theory and observations: Model simulations of the period 1955-1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaksen, Ivar S. A.; Eckman, R.; Lacis, A.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Prather, M.; Pyle, J.; Rodhe, H.; Stordal, Frode; Stolarski, R. S.; Turco, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The main objective of the theoretical studies presented here is to apply models of stratospheric chemistry and transport in order to understand the processes that control stratospheric ozone and that are responsible for the observed variations. The model calculations are intended to simulate the observed behavior of atmospheric ozone over the past three decades (1955-1985), for which there exists a substantial record of both ground-based and, more recently, satellite measurements. Ozone concentrations in the atmosphere vary on different time scales and for several different causes. The models described here were designed to simulate the effect on ozone of changes in the concentration of such trace gases as CFC, CH4, N2O, and CO2. Changes from year to year in ultraviolet radiation associated with the solar cycle are also included in the models. A third source of variability explicitly considered is the sporadic introduction of large amounts of NO sub x into the stratosphere during atmospheric nuclear tests.

  4. Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K.; Evans, K.D. |; Melfi, S.H.; Goldsmith, J.E.

    1998-04-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.

  5. Tidally distorted exoplanets: Density corrections for short-period hot-Jupiters based solely on observable parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. R.; Watson, C. A.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Moulds, V.; Pollacco, D.; Wheatley, P. J.; Littlefair, S. P.

    2014-07-10

    The close proximity of short-period hot-Jupiters to their parent star means they are subject to extreme tidal forces. This has a profound effect on their structure and, as a result, density measurements that assume that the planet is spherical can be incorrect. We have simulated the tidally distorted surface for 34 known short-period hot-Jupiters, assuming surfaces of constant gravitational equipotential for the planet, and the resulting densities have been calculated based only on observed parameters of the exoplanet systems. Comparing these results to the density values, assuming the planets are spherical, shows that there is an appreciable change in the measured density for planets with very short periods (typically less than two days). For one of the shortest-period systems, WASP-19b, we determine a decrease in bulk density of 12% from the spherical case and, for the majority of systems in this study, this value is in the range of 1%-5%. On the other hand, we also find cases where the distortion is negligible (relative to the measurement errors on the planetary parameters) even in the cases of some very short period systems, depending on the mass ratio and planetary radius. For high-density gas planets requiring apparently anomalously large core masses, density corrections due to tidal deformation could become important for the shortest-period systems.

  6. Observations and modelling of winds and waves during the surface wave dynamics experiment. Report 2. Intensive observation period IOP-3, 25 February-9 March 1991. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, M.J.; Graber, H.C.; Jensen, R.E.; Donelan, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the compilation of observed and modelled wind, wave and current parameters during the third intensive observation period (IOP-3) from February 25 to March 9, 1991, of the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment. The measurements include wind speed and direction, wave heights and periods, air and sea temperatures, and atmospheric pressures from four directional wave buoys, two meteorological buoys, and several routinely operated buoys from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC). Examples of directional wave spectra obtained from two airborne radars and from a Swath ship are presented along with surface currents from airborne expendable current profilers (AXCP) and acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP). In addition, a summary of directional wave spectra is presented for this period. The model data include examples of wind fields from six numerical weather prediction models and the corresponding wave height maps as derived from the 3G-WAM ocean wave model. Estimated surface current velocities and directions from the Fleet Numerical Oceanographic Center (FNOC) model and selected satellite images of sea surface temperature fields are also presented for this time period.

  7. Millimeter and some near infra-red observations of short-period Miras and other AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Baas, F.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Stehle, R.; Josselin, E.; Tilanus, R. P. J.

    1999-12-01

    Millimeter observations of 48 oxygen- and 20 carbon-rich AGB Miras with periods shorter than 400 days are presented. In addition, observations of 14 O-rich and 15 C-stars with longer, or no known, periods have also been obtained. The detection statistics is as follows: in 12CO J=1-0 and 2-1 we observed 97 stars, and detected 66 in at least one line. We find 24 new detections in the 1-0 line, 38 new detections in the 2-1 line, and 29 stars have been detected for the first time in one or both lines. In 12CO J=3-2 we observed 14 stars and detected 11, with 4 new detections. In 13CO J=2-1, 3-2 we observed 2 stars and had one new detection. In HCN(1-0) we observed 5 carbon stars and detected 3, one new. In SO(6_5-5_4) we observed the same 5 stars and detected none. In CS(3-2) we observed 8 carbon stars and detected 3, all new. In SiO(3-2, v=0) we observed 34 O-rich stars and detected 25, all new except one. Near-infrared JHK photometry is presented for seven stars. For four stars it is the first NIR data published. The luminosity and dust mass loss rate are obtained for seven very red stars with unknown pulsation period from modelling the spectral energy distribution (SED) and IRAS LRS spectra. Thereby, a new IR supergiant is confirmed (AFGL 2968). For the rest of the sample, luminosity and distance are obtained in a variety of ways: using hipparcos parallaxes, period-luminosity and period-M_K-relations combined with apparent K magnitudes, and kinematic distances. The dust mass loss rate is obtained from model fitting of the SED (either from the literature, or presented in the present paper), or from the observed IRAS 60 mu m flux, corrected for the photospheric contribution. The gas mass loss rate is derived from the observed CO line intensities, as presented here, combined with existing literature data, if any. This allows the derivation of the dust-to-gas ratio. Our and literature CO J = 3-2 data has been used to calibrate the relation between mass loss rate and peak

  8. Diurnal-period currents trapped above Fieberling Guyot: observed characteristics and model comparisons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.A.; Brink, K.H.; Eriksen, C.C.

    1994-01-01

    Current measurements at depths of 19, 115, 264 and 464 m above the summit of Fieberling Guyot (32??28???N, 127??47???W) for 13 months in 1989 show that the diurnal tides are strongly amplified. The measured variances for K1, P1 and O1 at the 115 m depth were 810, 140 and 80 times larger than the variances of the respective estimated barotropic tides. The diurnal currents closer to the summit were also strongly amplified, through the variance ratios were 40-50% of the ratios observed at 115 m. The diurnal band currents were only amplified at the precise tidal frequencies; the bandwidth of the response was less than 0.0002 cph. The discrete character of the response suggests that only currents with large spatial scales will be amplified. The characteristics of the amplified diurnal currents are compared to those predicted by a model for Fieberling Guyot of seamount-trapped waves driven by the barotropic tide. The amplitudes of the responses at this one site on the seamount compare favourably to the predicted. ?? 1994.

  9. Long-period humidity variability in the Arctic atmosphere from upper-air observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurenko, A.; Khokhlova, A.

    2014-12-01

    Under climate change, atmospheric water content also tends to change. This gives rise to changes in the amount of moisture transferred, clouds and precipitation, as well as in hydrological regime. This work analyzes seasonal climatic characteristics of precipitated water in the Arctic atmosphere, by using 1972-2011 data from 55 upper-air stations located north of 60°N. Regions of maximum and minimum mean values and variability trends are determined. In the summer, water amount is shown to increase in nearly the whole of the latitudinal zone. The comparison with the similar characteristics of reanalysis obtained by the other authors shows a good agreement. Time variation in the atmosphere moisture transport crossing 70°N, which is calculated from observation data, is presented and compared with model results. The work is supported by the joint EC ERA.Net RUS and Russian Fundamental Research Fund Project "Arctic Climate Processes Linked Through the Circulation of the Atmosphere" (ACPCA) (project 12-05-91656-ЭРА_а).

  10. Long period seismic signals observed before the Caldera formation during the 2000 Miyake- jima volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohminato, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Ida, Y.; Fujita, E.

    2006-12-01

    During the 2000 Miyake-jima volcanic activity started on 26 June 2000, an intense earthquake swarm occurred initially beneath the southwest flank near the summit and gradually migrated west of the island. A volcanic earthquake activity in the island was reactivated beneath the summit, leading to a summit eruption with a significant summit subsidence on 8 July. We detected small but numerous number of long period (LP) seismic signals during these activities. Most of them include both 0.2 and 0.4 Hz components suggesting an existence of a harmonic oscillator. Some of them have dominant frequency peak at 0.2Hz (LP1), while others have one at 0.4 Hz (LP2). At the beginning of each waveform of both LP1 and LP2, an impulsive signal with a pulse-width of about 2 s is clearly identified. The major axis of the particle motion for the initial impulsive signal is almost horizontal suggesting a shallow source beneath the summit, while the inclined particle motion for the latter phase suggests deeper source beneath the island. For both LP1 and LP2, we can identify a clear positive correlation between the amplitude of the initial pulse and that of the latter phase. We conducted waveform inversions for the LP events assuming a point source and determined the locations and mechanisms simultaneously. We assumed three types of source mechanisms; three single forces, six moment tensor components, and a combination of moment tensor and single forces. We used AIC to decide the optimal solutions. Firstly, we applied the method to the entire waveform including both the initial pulse and the latter phase. The source type with a combination of moment tensor and single force components yields the minimum values of the AIC for both LP events. However, the spatial distribution of the residual errors tends to have two local minima. Considering the error distribution and the characteristic particle motions, it is likely that the source of the LP event consists of two different parts. We thus

  11. Chemical heterogeneity in the mantle from array observations of short period P, Pdiff and their coda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan

    I apply array processing techniques to study the slowness and coda of P/Pdiff for 1,371 shallow earthquakes (< 200 km) that occurred in Asia, South America. Tonga-Fiji, and Indonesia, and were recorded by the medium-aperture array, YKA, in Canada. The slowness analysis shows lateral variations in Earth structure at the base of the mantle across the north Pacific. I observe an Ultra-Low Velocity Zone (ULVZ) with up to 6% P velocity reduction in this region. The ULVZ can be explained as partial melt created by disaggregated mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORE) material that was subducted many millions of year ago beneath East Asia. It is currently being swept laterally towards the large, low shear velocity province (LLSVP) in the south-central Pacific by mantle convection currents. I also measure the coda decay rate (CDR) of the P/Pdiff energy. The radial variation of the CDR suggests that more fine-scale scatterers exist in the lowermost mantle compared to the mid-mantle. The CDR also has lateral variation, with the lowermost mantle beneath subduction regions having a smaller value (decays more slowly) than that corresponding to a nonsubduction region. The lateral variations of both the slowness and the CDRs at the base of the mantle support the hypothesis that mantle convection sweeps segregated subducted MORB laterally, due to the density and the melting temperature of the MORB, and it possibly accumulates to form the LLSVP. Synthetic simulations of Pdiff coda waves using a single scattering method also prefer the whole mantle scattering model with 1% dv/v in D". The synthetic tests also constrain other important properties of the lowermost mantle. A non-smooth CMB is indicated which leads to topographical scattering, and Qp for the lowermost mantle is estimated to be quite low at 150-250.

  12. Quasi-periodic outflows observed by the X-Ray Telescope onboard Hinode in the boundary of an active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li-Jia; Tian, Hui; He, Jian-Sen

    2010-12-01

    Persistent outflows have recently been detected at the boundaries of some active regions. Although these outflows are suggested to be possible sources of the slow solar wind, the nature of these outflows is poorly understood. Through an analysis of an image sequence obtained by the X-Ray Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft, we found that quasi-periodic outflows are present in the boundary of an active region. The flows are observed to occur intermittently, often with a period of 5-10 min. The projected flow speed can reach more than 200 km s-1, while its distribution peaks around 50 km s-1. This sporadic high-speed outflow may play an important role in the mass loading process of the slow solar wind. Our results may imply that the outflow of the slow solar wind in the boundary of the active region is intermittent and quasi-periodic in nature.

  13. Observation of a periodic runaway in the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Shayestehaminzadeh, Seyedmohammad E-mail: shayesteh@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Arnalds, Unnar B.; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Olafsson, Sveinn

    2015-11-15

    This paper reports the observation of a periodic runaway of plasma to a higher density for the reactive discharge of the target material (Ti) with moderate sputter yield. Variable emission of secondary electrons, for the alternating transition of the target from metal mode to oxide mode, is understood to be the main reason for the runaway occurring periodically. Increasing the pulsing frequency can bring the target back to a metal (or suboxide) mode, and eliminate the periodic transition of the target. Therefore, a pulsing frequency interval is defined for the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} discharge in order to sustain the plasma in a runaway-free mode without exceeding the maximum power that the magnetron can tolerate.

  14. Effect of 3 Weeks Use of Compression Garments on Stride and Impact Shock during a Fatiguing Run.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, A G; Priego-Quesada, J I; Aparicio, I; Giménez, J V; Llana-Belloch, S; Pérez-Soriano, P

    2015-10-01

    Excessive and prolonged exposure to impact acceleration during running is associated with increased injury rate. Acute use of compressive garments has been speculated to improve attenuation. However, it is unknown how longer interventions of compressive garments influence attenuation in running. 40 runners trained with compressive and placebo stockings for 3 weeks. Perception of comfort, stride parameters (rate, length) and impact acceleration (head and tibial peak acceleration, magnitude, acceleration rate and attenuation) were measured every 5 min during a fatigue run (30 min at 80% of the individual's maximal aerobic speed). Compressive stockings reduced tibial peak acceleration and magnitude compared to placebo stockings at every minute (p<0.05) except for the initial measurement (p>0.05). Moreover, compressive stockings led to a lower rate of increase in tibial peak acceleration (14%, p<0.005) and magnitude (16%, p<0.001) as a result of the development of fatigue compared to placebo stockings (24% and 26% increase, p=0.014 and p=0.003, respectively). Similar perception of comfort was reported for both garments. Training with compressive stockings for 3 weeks reduced impact acceleration and the rate of increase in acceleration compared to placebo stockings. These findings suggest that compressive stockings may play a protective role by reducing impact accelerations during running. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. X-RAY AND EUV OBSERVATIONS OF SIMULTANEOUS SHORT AND LONG PERIOD OSCILLATIONS IN HOT CORONAL ARCADE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2015-05-01

    We report decaying quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in the X-ray (6–12 keV) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels (131, 94, 1600, 304 Å) observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), respectively, during a C-class flare. The estimated periods of oscillation and decay time in the X-ray channel (6–12 keV) were about 202 and 154 s, respectively. A similar oscillation period was detected at the footpoint of the arcade loops in the AIA 1600 and 304 Å channels. Simultaneously, AIA hot channels (94 and 131 Å) reveal propagating EUV disturbances bouncing back and forth between the footpoints of the arcade loops. The period of the oscillation and decay time were about 409 and 1121 s, respectively. The characteristic phase speed of the wave is about 560 km s{sup −1} for about 115 Mm of loop length, which is roughly consistent with the sound speed at the temperature about 10–16 MK (480–608 km s{sup −1}). These EUV oscillations are consistent with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Doppler-shift oscillations interpreted as the global standing slow magnetoacoustic wave excited by a flare. The flare occurred at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops, where the magnetic topology was a 3D fan-spine with a null-point. Repetitive reconnection at this footpoint could have caused the periodic acceleration of non-thermal electrons that propagated to the opposite footpoint along the arcade and that are precipitating there, causing the observed 202 s periodicity. Other possible interpretations, e.g., the second harmonics of the slow mode, are also discussed.

  16. Imaging observation of quasi-periodic disturbances' amplitudes increasing with height in the polar region of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Priya, T. G.; Liu, Y.; Shen, Y. D.

    2014-08-01

    At present, there have been few extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations of spatial variations of the density perturbations due to the slow magnetoacoustic waves (SMWs) propagating along the solar coronal magnetic fields. In this paper, we present such observations taken from the polar region of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and investigate the amplitude of quasi-periodic propagating disturbances that increase with height in the lower corona (0-9 Mm over the solar limb). We statistically determined the following parameters associated with the disturbances: pressure scale height, period, and wavelength in AIA 171 Å, 193 Å, and 211 Å channels. The scale height and wavelength are dependent of temperature, while the period is independent of temperature. The acoustic velocities inferred from the scale height highly correlate with the ratios of wavelength to period, i.e., phase speeds. They provide evidence that the propagating disturbances in the lower corona are likely SMWs and the spatial variations in EUV intensity in the polar region likely reflects the density compressional effect by the propagating SMWs.

  17. ISEE 1 observations of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.; Anderson, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity was conducted by combining thermal ion observations made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the same satellite's plasma wave experiment. During periods in which the magnetic activity quiets, the two regions characterized by H(+):He(+):O(+) (isotropic) and H(+):O(+):He(+) (field-aligned) ion species distributions (in order of dominance) are separated by a new region in which low-energy H(+) and He(+) are found flowing along the magnetic field lines. At other times, following quieting magnetic activity, distributions having peak fluxes at 90 deg pitch angle are observed in this region.

  18. ISEE 1 observations of thermal plasma in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.; Anderson, R. R.

    1981-11-01

    An investigation of thermal plasma behavior in the vicinity of the plasmasphere during periods of quieting magnetic activity was conducted by combining thermal ion observations made with the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 with plasma density profiles obtained from plasma frequency measurements made with the same satellite's plasma wave experiment. During periods in which the magnetic activity quiets, the two regions characterized by H(+):He(+):O(+) (isotropic) and H(+):O(+):He(+) (field-aligned) ion species distributions (in order of dominance) are separated by a new region in which low-energy H(+) and He(+) are found flowing along the magnetic field lines. At other times, following quieting magnetic activity, distributions having peak fluxes at 90 deg pitch angle are observed in this region.

  19. Observations and Modeling of the Near Surface Vertical Structure of the Atmosphere in the Southern Appalachians during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) Extended Observing Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. M.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate, high resolution observations of precipitation accumulations and intensity in regions of complex terrain are largely unavailable, due to a lack of existing in situ observations and obstacles to remote sensing (radar and satellite observations) such as beam blockage and ground clutter. For the past six years, a high-elevation, high-density rain gauge network has been recording precipitation observations along ridgelines in the Pigeon River Basin in the Southern Appalachians. These longer term observations complement the 4-D database of observations, which are being collected in support of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) during the first field campaign after the launch of the GPM satellite, the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx). The observations focused on here are those at the near surface, within 2 kilometers of the ground level. The IPHEx extended observation period lasts until the end of 2014. This presentation will focus on ground-based measurements made by MicroRain Radars, disdrometers, radiometers, rain gauges, fog collectors and aerosol spectrometers among others during the spring, summer and fall of 2014. These measurements will be analyzed to provide information on the diurnal cycle of microphysical and dynamical processes and properties in the region, with an emphasis on describing the characteristics of local cloud and fog. These observations will be discussed in the context of previous findings based on observations and model results (stochastic column model and the Advanced Research Weather and Forecasting Model (WRF)). Specifically, this presentation will address whether the IPHEx observations support the hypothesis, validated for specific case studies in previous work, that Bergeron processes govern the enhancement of light rainfall in the Southern Appalachians through increased coalescence efficiency in stratiform rainfall due to the interactions with low level clouds and topography modulated fog. WRF

  20. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Hao-Yu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3& Intensive Observing Period (IOP3) period (Feb., 2003, dry snow) suggest that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  1. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Tedesco, M.; de Roo, R.; England, A. W.; Gu, H.; Pham, H.; Boprie, D.; Graf, T.; Koike, T.; Armstrong, R.; Brodzik, M.; Hardy, J.; Cline, D.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8~ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3rd Intensive Observing Period (IOP3) period (February, 2003, dry snow) suggest that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan's Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37~GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike in IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  2. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Hao-Yu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3& Intensive Observing Period (IOP3) period (Feb., 2003, dry snow) suggest that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  3. Effects of subsurface structures of source regions on long-period ground motions observed in the Tokyo Bay area, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetake, Tomiichi

    2017-05-01

    We compared the long-period ground motion observed in the Tokyo Bay area during two shallow M6.7 earthquakes that occurred in northern Nagano Prefecture, Japan, on March 12, 2011, and November 22, 2014. The magnitudes, focal depths, and source mechanisms of these events were almost identical, but their seismograms were quite different. Significant long-period later arrivals with a predominant period of 5 s were recognized in the velocity traces of the 2011 event, but there were no such remarkable later arrivals in the 2014 event traces. The ground motions at stations located outside the basin area were studied as incident waves to the Kanto Basin. A large wave packet with a predominant period of 5 s was recognized in the velocity traces of the 2011 event, but there was no significant wave packet in the 2014 event traces. Based on particle motion, this wave packet was hypothesized to be a Rayleigh wave. The source regions of the two events have quite different subsurface structures. The different characteristics in long-period ground motion in the Tokyo Bay area during the two events were due to different Rayleigh wave excitations in the source regions.

  4. VI-Band Follow-Up Observations of Ultra-Long-Period Cepheid Candidates in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I.-Ling; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-long-period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding ≈ 80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ˜ 1 to ˜ 3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color-magnitude diagram and the Period-Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be {{μ }M31,ULPC}=24.30+/- 0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.

  5. Quasi-periodic Fluctuations and Chromospheric Evaporation in a Solar Flare Ribbon Observed by Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Daw, Adrian N.; Inglis, Andrew R.

    2016-10-01

    The Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) obtained rapid cadence (11.2 s) EUV stare spectra of an M7.3 flare ribbon in AR 12036 on 2014 April 18. Quasi-periodic (P ≈ 75.6 ± 9.2 s) intensity fluctuations occurred in emission lines of O iv, Mg vi, Mg vii, Si vii, Fe xiv, and Fe xvi during the flare's impulsive rise, and ended when the maximum intensity in Fe xxiii was reached. The profiles of the O iv-Fe xvi lines reveal that they were all redshifted during most of the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, while the Fe xxiii profile revealed multiple components including one or two highly blueshifted ones. This indicates that the flare underwent explosive chromospheric evaporation during its impulsive rise. Fluctuations in the relative Doppler velocities were seen, but their amplitudes were too subtle to extract significant quasi-periodicities. RHESSI detected 25-100 keV hard-X-ray sources in the ribbon near the EIS slit's pointing position during the peaks in the EIS intensity fluctuations. The observations are consistent with a series of energy injections into the chromosphere by nonthermal particle beams. Electron densities derived with Fe xiv (4.6 × 1010 cm-3) and Mg vii (7.8 × 109 cm-3) average line intensity ratios during the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, combined with the radiative loss function of an optically thin plasma, yield radiative cooling times of 32 s at 2.0 × 106 K, and 46 s at 6.3 × 105 K (about half the quasi-period); assuming Fe xiv's density for Fe xxiii yields a radiative cooling time of 103 s (13 times the quasi-period) at 1.4 × 107 K.

  6. Quasi-Periodic Fluctuations and Chromospheric Evaporation in a Solar Flare Ribbon Observed by Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Daw, Adrian N.; Inglis, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) obtained rapid cadence (11.2 s) EUV stare spectra of an M7.3 flare ribbon in AR 12036 on 2014 April 18. Quasi-periodic (P approx. = 75.6 +/- 9.2 s) intensity fluctuations occurred in emission lines of O IV, Mg VI, Mg VII, Si VII, Fe XIV, and Fe XVI during the flare's impulsive rise, and ended when the maximum intensity in Fe XXIII was reached. The profiles of the O IV- Fe XVI lines reveal that they were all redshifted during most of the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, while the Fe XXIII profile revealed multiple components including one or two highly blueshifted ones. This indicates that the flare underwent explosive chromospheric evaporation during its impulsive rise. Fluctuations in the relative Doppler velocities were seen, but their amplitudes were too subtle to extract significant quasi-periodicities. RHESSI detected 25-100 keV hard-X-ray sources in the ribbon near the EIS slit's pointing position during the peaks in the EIS intensity fluctuations. The observations are consistent with a series of energy injections into the chromosphere by nonthermal particle beams. Electron densities derived with Fe XIV (4.6 x 10(exp 10) per cu cm) and Mg VII (7.8 x 10(exp 9) per cu cm) average line intensity ratios during the interval of quasi-periodic intensity fluctuations, combined with the radiative loss function of an optically thin plasma, yield radiative cooling times of 32 s at 2.0 x 10(exp 6) K, and 46 s at 6.3 x 10(exp 5) K (about half the quasi-period); assuming Fe XIV's density for Fe XXIII yields a radiative cooling time of 10(exp 3) s (13 times the quasi-period) at 1.4 x 10(exp 7) K.

  7. Testing the asymptotic relation for period spacings from mixed modes of red giants observed with the Kepler mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysschaert, B.; Beck, P. G.; Corsaro, E.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Aerts, C.; Arentoft, T.; Kjeldsen, H.; García, R. A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Degroote, P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Dipole mixed pulsation modes of consecutive radial order have been detected for thousands of low-mass red-giant stars with the NASA space telescope Kepler. These modes have the potential to reveal information on the physics of the deep stellar interior. Aims: Different methods have been proposed to derive an observed value for the gravity-mode period spacing, the most prominent one relying on a relation derived from asymptotic pulsation theory applied to the gravity-mode character of the mixed modes. Our aim is to compare results based on this asymptotic relation with those derived from an empirical approach for three pulsating red-giant stars. Methods: We developed a data-driven method to perform frequency extraction and mode identification. Next, we used the identified dipole mixed modes to determine the gravity-mode period spacing by means of an empirical method and by means of the asymptotic relation. In our methodology we consider the phase offset, ɛg, of the asymptotic relation as a free parameter. Results: Using the frequencies of the identified dipole mixed modes for each star in the sample, we derived a value for the gravity-mode period spacing using the two different methods. These values differ by less than 5%. The average precision we achieved for the period spacing derived from the asymptotic relation is better than 1%, while that of our data-driven approach is 3%. Conclusions: Good agreement is found between values for the period spacing derived from the asymptotic relation and from the empirical method. The achieved uncertainties are small, but do not support the ultra-high precision claimed in the literature. The precision from our data-driven method is mostly affected by the differing number of observed dipole mixed modes. For the asymptotic relation, the phase offset, ɛg, remains ill defined, but enables a more robust analysis of both the asymptotic period spacing and the dimensionless coupling factor. However, its estimation might

  8. The reconstruction of air pressure in Gdańsk in the period of instrumental observations, 1739-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipiak, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the paper is to characterise the details of reconstruction of air pressure in Gdańsk in the whole period of regular instrumental records spanning the period 1739-2012. Gdańsk pressure series has been reconstructed by joining air pressure observations of 15 local shorter series. The entire instrumental series can be divided into three sub-periods: the Early Observers period, lasting to 1806, the First Meteorological Networks, covering the years from 1807 to 1875 and Modern Measurements begun in 1876. During the first period, observations were made from two to four times per day, sometimes even at midnight. In the 19th century and up to 1945 thrice-daily barometer readings were a standard, in the last few decades the density of data is much denser. A serious gap in the original daily data exists for the period 1849-1875, where it appears that no original source of data have survived. Selected data are presented in the form of five-day or monthly averages. Numerous errors made probably during the re-writing of original observers' data by their assistants were discovered during digitalization. Despite this the quality of observations can be regarded as good. Data have been corrected to provide a monthly-mean measure of atmospheric pressure in the unit of hPa at standard conditions, i.e. standard gravity, 0 °C and at sea level. Some inconsistencies may still arise as the procedure of the homogenization of air temperature is not completed and in case of a few oldest series air temperature was estimated. Numerous breakpoints were identified in the homogenisation of the series and they cannot be always linked to known causes. A reasonably detailed station history has been compiled by incorporating metadata contained in various written sources. These metadata have facilitated the homogenisation of the data series. Mean annual atmospheric pressure in Gdańsk in period 1739-2012 calculated on the basis of homogenized series was 1014.9 hPa. Mean seasonal

  9. Studies on the pH value of abomasal contents in dairy cows during the first 3 weeks after calving.

    PubMed

    Van Winden, S C L; Müller, K E; Kuiper, R; Noordhuizen, J P T M

    2002-04-01

    The pH value of the abomasal contents in adult cattle is normally constant and has a value of 2. Abomasal contents with pH values of 5.5 and higher could give rise to bacterial fermentation with subsequent gas production. The accumulation of gas is thought to form a key event in the pathogenesis of abomasal displacement. The aim of the present study was to determine the pH values of abomasal contents of dairy cows in the first 3 weeks after calving. The pH of the abomasal contents was, over several days. higher than the pH value of the abomasal juice in mid-lactation cows. The highest pH values were measured on day 14 after calving, thereafter the pH declined. Possible explanations for the rise in the pH value of the abomasal contents are discussed.

  10. A case study of the characteristics of intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods (IPDP) observed on February 19, 2013 using conjugate ground-satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, C. W.; Bortnik, J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Spence, H. E.

    2016-12-01

    In order to understand generation and propagation mechanism of intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods (IPDP), we investigated the characteristics of IPDP using a conjugate observation with the ground induction magnetometer located at Athabasca (ATH, L = 4.3) in Canada and the Van Allen Probes (RBSP-A and B). We found a conjugate IPDP event observed at ATH and RBSP-A from 0740 to 0820 UT in the frequency range of 0.3 to 0.7 Hz on February 19, 2013. Electro-Magnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves were observed at RBSP-A with similar frequencies to the IPDP at ATH while its footprint was located near ATH. In this interval, ATH was at 0 LT and RBSP-A was in the midnight sector at L 5.5-6. According to geomagnetic indices, AL index suddenly decreased to -250 nT from 0 nT, exhibiting a typical substorm signature, and the Dst index did not show any significant variations, meaning that this event did not occur in the geomagnetic storm period. As a preliminary result, electron density profile and upper hybrid frequency variations at RBSP-A suddenly dropped at 0820 UT, indicating that RBSP-A passed through the plasmapause. At the same time, these wave activities were no longer observed at ATH and RBSP-A. In addition, GOES-15 (1.5 MLT west from ATH) detected the dispersionless particle injections during the event interval, but not at GOES-13 (2.5 MLT east from ATH). These results suggest that its source region is inside of the plasmapause and very localized in space. We identified the spectral characteristics for IPDP waves using the ground stations and the satellites. We also investigated energetic particle distributions observed at RBSP-A and GOES-15, in order to identify their pitch angle scattering, wave-particle interaction and particle injection.

  11. Short-period cyclic loading system for in situ X-ray observation of anelastic properties at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    To determine the anelastic properties of materials of the Earth's interior, a short-period cyclic loading system was installed for in situ X-ray radiographic observation under high pressure to the multi-anvil deformation DIA press at the bending magnet beam line BL04B1 at SPring-8. The hydraulic system equipped with a piston controlled by a solenoid was designed so as to enable producing smooth sinusoidal stress in a wide range of oscillation period from 0.2 to 100 s and generating variable amplitudes. Time resolved X-ray radiography imaging of the sample and reference material provides their strain as a function of time during cyclic loading. A synchrotron X-ray radiation source allows us to resolve their strain variation with time even at the short period (<1 s). The minimum resolved strain is as small as 10-4, and the shortest oscillation period to detect small strain is 0.5 s. Preliminary experimental results exhibited that the new system can resolve attenuation factor Q-1 at upper mantle conditions. These results are in quantitative agreement with previously reported data obtained at lower pressures.

  12. Investigation of the Activity of the Nucleus of Seyfert Galaxy NGC 7469 during the Observation Period from 1990 TO 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolkova, L. S.; Artamonov, B. P.

    We combine many published photometrical observations of the Seyfert Galaxy (SG) NGC 7469 and also new results from Hubble Space Telescope which can be used for future research of some properties of the activity of the nuclear of the SG. A drift of the activity maximum from 1997 to 1998 is observed with an increased of the wave length similarly to some blazars in radio range. Analyzing the surface photometry according to data obtained both at the Maidanak observatory and HST data an intensity asymmetry at the SG central region image is observed at different periods. The existence of a second component might be supposed. The radius of the active region itself inside the SG kernel is 40-50 parsec.

  13. TESTING THE NO-HAIR THEOREM WITH OBSERVATIONS IN THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. III. QUASI-PERIODIC VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsen, Tim; Psaltis, Dimitrios E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu

    2011-01-01

    According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely described by their masses and spins. An observational test of the no-hair theorem can be performed by measuring at least three different multipole moments of the spacetime of a black hole and verifying whether their values are consistent with the unique combinations of the Kerr solution. In this paper, we study quasi-periodic variability observed in the emission from black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum as a test of the no-hair theorem. We derive expressions for the Keplerian and epicyclic frequencies in a quasi-Kerr spacetime, in which the quadrupole moment is a free parameter in addition to mass and spin. We show that, for moderate spins, the Keplerian frequency is practically independent of small deviations of the quadrupole moment from the Kerr value, while the epicyclic frequencies exhibit significant variations. We apply this framework to quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries in two different scenarios. In the case that a pair of QPOs can be identified as the fundamental g- and c-modes in the accretion disk, we show that the no-hair theorem can be tested in conjunction with an independent mass measurement. If pairs of oscillations are identified with non-parametric resonance of dynamical frequencies in the accretion disk, then testing the no-hair theorem also requires an independent measurement of the black hole spin. In addition, we argue that VLBI observations of Sgr A* may test the no-hair theorem through a combination of imaging observations and the detection of quasi-periodic variability.

  14. A 3-week multimodal intervention involving high-intensity interval training in female cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Joachim; Lindner, Nathalie; Reuss-Borst, Monika; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Sperlich, Billy

    2016-02-01

    To compare the effects of a 3-week multimodal rehabilitation involving supervised high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on female breast cancer survivors with respect to key variables of aerobic fitness, body composition, energy expenditure, cancer-related fatigue, and quality of life to those of a standard multimodal rehabilitation program. A randomized controlled trial design was administered. Twenty-eight women, who had been treated for cancer were randomly assigned to either a group performing exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (LMIE; n = 14) or a group performing high-intensity interval training (HIIT; n = 14) as part of a 3-week multimodal rehabilitation program. No adverse events related to the exercise were reported. Work economy improved following both HIIT and LMIE, with improved peak oxygen uptake following LMIE. HIIT reduced mean total body fat mass with no change in body mass, muscle or fat-free mass (best P < 0.06). LMIE increased muscle and total fat-free body mass. Total energy expenditure (P = 0.45) did not change between the groups, whereas both improved quality of life to a similar high extent and lessened cancer-related fatigue. This randomized controlled study demonstrates that HIIT can be performed by female cancer survivors without adverse health effects. Here, HIIT and LMIE both improved work economy, quality of life and cancer-related fatigue, body composition or energy expenditure. Since the outcomes were similar, but HIIT takes less time, this may be a time-efficient strategy for improving certain aspects of the health of female cancer survivors.

  15. Thoracic irradiation in 3weeks for limited-stage small cell lung cancer: Is twice a day fractionation really needed?

    PubMed

    Turgeon, G A; Souhami, L; Kopek, N; Hirsh, V; Ofiara, L; Faria, S L

    2017-04-01

    Many Canadian institutions treat limited-disease small cell lung cancer with 40Gy in 15 fractions delivered once-a-day in 3weeks concomitantly with chemotherapy. This regimen is convenient and seems to be effective. Here, we report and compare with a literature review the outcomes of patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated in our institution with this hypofractionated regimen. From January 2004 to December 2012, patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated curatively with platinum-based chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a dose of 40Gy in 16 fractions once-a-day were eligible for this review. Sixty-eight patients fit the analysis criteria, including ten patients with small pleural effusion. The median age was 66years old. After a median follow-up of 77months for those alive, the median survival was 28months. At 3 and 5years respectively, the locoregional control rates were 67 and 64%, while the overall survival rates were 40 and 35%. Prophylaxis cranial irradiation was delivered to 68% of the patients. Grade 2 and 3 acute esophagitis occurred in respectively 49 and 9% of the patients. There was no grade 4 radiation-induced toxicity. All patients, except for one, completed their thoracic irradiation course without interruption. Once-a-day hypofractionated radiation with concurrent chemotherapy followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation is a practical regimen. Based on our experience and the published literature, it appears to be similarly effective as regimens using twice-daily fractionation in 3weeks, or once-daily in 6 to 7weeks with higher radiotherapy doses. Further prospective comparisons of hypofractionation with the current recommendations are needed. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of Cold Plasma Treatment and Safety in Disinfecting 3-week Root Canal Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinglong; Sun, Ke; Ye, Guopin; Liang, Yongdong; Pan, Hong; Wang, Guomin; Zhao, Yijiao; Pan, Jie; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Although endodontic infection is caused by multi-bacteria species, Enterococcus faecalis is usually isolated in chronic apical periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanical safety of cold plasma therapy in disinfecting 3-week E. faecalis biofilms. Teeth with 3-week E. faecalis biofilm were treated with AC argon/oxygen (Ar/O2) cold plasma for various treatment times and compared with those treated with Ca(OH)2, 2% chlorhexidine gel, and Ca(OH)2/chlorhexidine for a week. Antimicrobial efficacy was assessed by colony-forming unit method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess the morphologic changes of E. faecalis biofilm by plasma. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to confirm the viability of the biofilm after the plasma treatment. Microhardness and roughness changes of root canal dentin caused by plasma were verified with Vickers Hardness Tester and 3D Profile Measurement Laser Microscope, respectively. There were no detectable live bacteria after 12 minutes of cold plasma treatment. This was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy results. Microhardness and roughness of root canal dentin showed no significant difference after plasma treatment. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma is an effective therapy in endodontics for its strong sterilization effect on fully matured biofilm within a few minutes. Meanwhile, it has an accepted mechanical safety for its low temperature and not affecting the microhardness and roughness of root canal dentin significantly. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cluster observations of quasi-periodic impulsive signatures in the dayside northern lobe: High-latitude flux transfer events?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, S. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Kistler, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a series of quasi-periodic reversals in GSM B(sub Z) observed by the four Cluster spacecraft in the northern dayside lobe poleward of the cusp on 23 February 2001. During an interval of about 35 min, multiple reversals (negative to positive) in B(sub Z) of approximately 1-min duration with an approximate 8-min recurrence time were observed. The individual structures do not resemble low-latitude flux transfer events (FTE) [Russell and Elphic, 1979] but the 8-min recurrence frequency suggests that intermittent reconnection may be occurring .Measurements (appropriately lagged) of the solar wind at ACE show that the IMF was southward-oriented with a strong B(sub X) and that a modest dynamic pressure increased as the events started. The multi-point observations afforded by the Cluster spacecraft were used to infer the motion (direction and speed) of the observed magnetic field reversals. The associated currents were also calculated and they are consistent with the spatial confinement of the observed magnetic field reversals. We propose that the observed reversals are due to flux tubes reconnecting with closed field lines on the dayside. Ancillary data from the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) and Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) instruments were used to develop a physical picture of the reversals.

  18. Observations and Modelling of the Pre-flare Period of the 29 March 2014 X1 Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, M. M.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Mackay, D. H.; Dacie, S.; Long, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    On 29 March 2014, NOAA Active Region (AR) 12017 produced an X1 flare that was simultaneously observed by an unprecedented number of observatories. We have investigated the pre-flare period of this flare from 14:00 UT until 19:00 UT using joint observations made by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Spectral lines providing coverage of the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the corona were analysed to investigate pre-flare activity within the AR. The results of the investigation have revealed evidence of strongly blue-shifted plasma flows, with velocities up to 200 km s^{-1}, being observed 40 minutes prior to flaring. These flows are located along the filament present in the active region and are both spatially discrete and transient. In order to constrain the possible explanations for this activity, we undertake non-potential magnetic field modelling of the active region. This modelling indicates the existence of a weakly twisted flux rope along the polarity inversion line in the region where a filament and the strong pre-flare flows are observed. We then discuss how these observations relate to the current models of flare triggering. We conclude that the most likely drivers of the observed activity are internal reconnection in the flux rope, early onset of the flare reconnection, or tether-cutting reconnection along the filament.

  19. Current state of the Altai glaciers (Russia) and trends over the period of instrumental observations 1952-2008.

    PubMed

    Narozhniy, Yuriy; Zemtsov, Valeriy

    2011-09-01

    Results of research into climate and glacier dynamics in the Altai Mountains (Russia) over the period of instrumental observations (1952-2008) are presented in this article. About 1030 glaciers with a total area of 805 km2 and volume of 42.5 km3 have been recorded in the Altai Region. The average summer air temperature in different regions of the Altai has increased during the study period from about 0.2 degrees C (Aktru) to 1.1 degrees C (Akkem). The annual atmospheric precipitation rate has also increased, by 8-10%. Since 1952, the glacier area in different regions of the Altai has decreased by 9-27%, and volume by 12-24%. By 2008, as a result of degradation, the total number of glaciers was 953 with an area of 724 km2 and volume of 38 km3.

  20. Observation of a periodic array of flux-closure quadrants in strained ferroelectric PbTiO3 films

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Y. L.; Zhu, Y. L; Ma, Xiuliang; ...

    2015-05-01

    Nanoscale ferroelectrics are expected to exhibit various exotic domain configurations, such as the full flux-closure pattern that is well known in ferromagnetic materials. Here we observe not only the atomic morphology of the flux-closure quadrant but also a periodic array of flux closures in ferroelectric PbTiO3 films, mediated by tensile strain on a GdScO3 substrate. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we directly visualize an alternating array of clockwise and counterclockwise flux closures, whose periodicity depends on the PbTiO3 film thickness. In the vicinity of the core, the strain is sufficient to rupture the lattice, with strain gradients up tomore » 109 per meter. We found engineering strain at the nanoscale may facilitate the development of nanoscale ferroelectric devices.« less

  1. Torque Ripple Suppression Control Based on the Periodic Disturbance Observer with a Complex Vector Representation for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadano, Yugo; Akiyama, Takao; Nomura, Masakatsu; Ishida, Muneaki

    This paper introduces a method for torque ripple suppression control involving the use of the periodic disturbance observer. By using the Fourier transform (or rotating coordinate transform and a low-pass filter), the torque ripple component, which is synchronized with the motor rotation, can easily be obtained owing to its periodic variations. With the new control method, a suppression control system synchronized with the torque ripple frequency can be built. Further, by using the system identification technique, the model system from compensating current value to torque detection value can be expressed as a speed-adjustable one-dimension complex vector in rotating coordinates. This method is suitable for an adjustable-speed drive, and the control parameters and reference model can be adjusted automatically. The most important feature of this method is its excellent performance for mechanical resonance suppression caused by torque ripple. This paper presents analysis and experimental results that validate the method.

  2. New observations of displacement steps associated with volcano seismic long-period events, constrained by step table experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thun, Johannes; Lokmer, Ivan; Bean, Christopher J.

    2015-05-01

    Long-period (LP) volcano seismic events often precede volcanic eruptions and are viewed with considerable interest in hazard assessment. They are usually thought to be associated with resonating fluid-filled conduits although alternative models involving material failure have recently been proposed. Through recent field experiments, we uncovered a step-like displacement component associated with some LP events, outside the spectral range of the typically narrow-band analysis for this kind of event. Bespoke laboratory experiments with step tables show that steps of the order of a few micrometers can be extracted from seismograms, where long-period noise is estimated and removed with moving median filters. Using these constraints, we observe step-like ground deformation in LP recordings near the summits of Turrialba and Etna Volcanoes. This represents a previously unobserved static component in the source time history of LP events, with implications for the underlying source process.

  3. Direct observation of periodic swelling and collapse of polymer chain induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Takenaka, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Ryushi

    2013-11-21

    By utilizing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), we directly observed the self-oscillating behavior of a polymer chain induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. We succeeded in measuring self-oscillations of the resonance frequency (Δf) and dissipation (ΔD), which originate in the self-oscillating behavior of the polymer chain on a gold surface induced by the BZ reaction. We synthesized a self-oscillating polymer chain with Ru as the catalyst of the BZ reaction and a chemical adsorption site, so as to directly observe its periodic swelling and collapse on the gold surface. Distinct self-oscillation of ΔD synchronized with the self-oscillation Δf was observed. The period of the Δf self-oscillation was about 400 s, and the induction time was about 6.5 h. In QCM-D measurements, we found that the peaks of Δf and ΔD oscillations did not coincide in time because the state of the Gaussian chain did not coincide with the maximum value of Δf. Moreover, examination of the relationship between Δf and ΔD revealed that their oscillatory waveforms were identical in frequency but differed in phase and amplitude.

  4. VI-band follow-up observations of ultra-long-period Cepheid candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I-Ling; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Kanbur, Shashi M.

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-long-period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding ≈80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ∼1 to ∼3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color–magnitude diagram and the Period–Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be μ{sub M31,ULPC}=24.30±0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the Period–Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.

  5. The growth of the oceanic boundary layer during the COARE intensive observational period: Large Eddy simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Skyllingstad, E.D.; Wijesekera, H.W.; Gregg, M.C.

    1995-03-01

    A principal goal of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) is to gain an understanding of the processes that control mixing in the upper 100 m of the western tropical Pacific warm pool. The warm pool is an important heat reservoir for the global ocean and is responsible for many of the observed climatic changes associated with El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. This water mass is highly sensitive to mixed-layer processes that are controlled by surface heat, salinity, and momentum fluxes. During most of the year, these fluxes are dominated by solar heating and occasional squalls that freshen the top of the mixed layer and force shallow mixing of about 10-20 m. From November to April, the usual weather pattern is frequently altered by westerly wind bursts that are forced by tropical cyclones and intraseasonal oscillations. These wind bursts generate a strong eastward surface current and can force mixing as deep as 100 m over a period of days. Observations from the intensive observation period (IOP) in COARE indicate that mixed-layer deepening is accompanied by strong turbulence dissipation at the mixed layer base. A short westerly wind burst occurred during the first leg of TOGA-COARE, and lasted about 4-5 days. During this period, the maximum winds were about 10 m s{sup -1}, and the resulting eastward surface flow was about 0.5 m s{sup -1}. The strength of this event was somewhat weaker than a typical westerly wind burst, but the mixed-layer structure and growth are similar to the more vigorous wind bursts discussed.

  6. Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe observed from ground and satellites in the period from 2003 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the study of aerosol variability in the period from 2003 to 2011 over Eastern Europe region with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET ground-based sunphotometer observations. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by the values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 except the period of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The first peak observed in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Sahara dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov Seas. The second peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Sahara dust and presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are observed in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in the central Ukraine, eastern Belarus, as well as Moscow, Nizhny Novgorod and Stavropol regions in Russia. The comparison of the fine mode AOT (particle radius < 0.3 μm) derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL from reflected polarized radiances with those recomputed from AERONET inversions was performed over a number of AERONET sites: over Kyiv and Sevastopol sites for the period of 2008-2009 and over Moscow, Minsk, Belsk, and Moldova sites for the period of 2005-2009. The correlation coefficients are 0.78 for Moscow, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.93 - Kyiv, 0.81 - Moldova and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites. The

  7. Search for a periodic signal from Cygnus X-3 usingmuons observed underground in the Frejus detector (4800 mwe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bareyre, P.; Barloutaud, R.; Becker, K. H.; Behr, L.; Berger, C.; Bland, R. W.; Chardin, G.; Daum, H. J.; Degrange, B.; Demski, S.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic signals from Cygnus X-3 in the ultra high energy range were recently reported by air shower arrays and attributed to gamma rays. Although gamma rays are expected to produce muon-poor showers, the preceding observations have stimulated similar studies based on underground muons. Two groups have claimed a significant underground signal coming from Cygnus X-3. The results are, however, extremely difficult to explain in the present framework of particle physics, and clearly need confirmation. The preliminary results obtained from the Frejus underground detector during its first 16 months of operation (March 1984 to June 1985) are presented.

  8. Experimental observation of optical bandgaps for surface electromagnetic waves in a periodically corrugated one-dimensional silicon nitride photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Michelotti, Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Dispersion curves of surface electromagnetic waves (SEWs) in 1D silicon nitride photonic crystals having periodic surface corrugations are considered. We experimentally demonstrate that a bandgap for SEWs can be obtained by fabricating a polymeric grating on the multilayered structure. Close to the boundary of the first Brillouin zone connected to the grating, we observe the splitting of the SEW dispersion curve into two separate branches and identify two regions of very low group velocity. The proper design of the structure allows the two folded branches to lie beyond the light line in a wide spectral range, thus doubling the density of modes available for SEWs and avoiding light scattering.

  9. Periodicity in the occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles derived from the C/NOFS observations in 2008-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Min; Kil, Hyosub; Kwak, Young-Sil; Park, Jaeheung; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Kim, Yong Ha

    2017-01-01

    The quasi-periodic occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles is understood in terms of seeding mechanisms in the bottomside F region. However, no quantitative investigation has been conducted to identify how often quasi-periodic bubbles occur. This study investigates the wave property in the bubble occurrence (or spacing between bubbles) using the measurements of the plasma density in 2008-2012 by the Planar Langmuir Probe on board the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. The wave property is investigated using the Lomb-Scargle periodograms derived from 664 segments of series of bubbles. In the majority of segments, the spacing between bubbles is represented by the combination of several wave components. Periodic bubbles whose property is represented by a few pronounced wave components are rare events. These results indicate that the spacing between bubbles is generally irregular. The manner of bubble occurrence does not show any notable variation with longitude and season. Because a consistent wave property does not exist in the occurrence of bubbles and the appearance of bubbles in the topside is affected by many factors, the manner of bubble occurrence in satellite observations does not provide a precise diagnostic of seeding mechanisms.

  10. Observational calibration of the projection factor of Cepheids. III. The long-period Galactic Cepheid RS Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, Pierre; Trahin, Boris; Bond, Howard E.; Gallenne, Alexandre; Szabados, Laszlo; Mérand, Antoine; Breitfelder, Joanne; Dailloux, Julien; Anderson, Richard I.; Fouqué, Pascal; Gieren, Wolfgang; Nardetto, Nicolas; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz

    2017-04-01

    The projection factor (p-factor) is an essential component of the classical Baade-Wesselink (BW) technique, which is commonly used to determine the distances to pulsating stars. It is a multiplicative parameter used to convert radial velocities into pulsational velocities. As the BW distances are linearly proportional to the p-factor, its accurate calibration for Cepheids is of critical importance for the reliability of their distance scale. We focus on the observational determination of the p-factor of the long-period Cepheid RS Pup (P = 41.5 days). This star is particularly important as this is one of the brightest Cepheids in the Galaxy and an analog of the Cepheids used to determine extragalactic distances. An accurate distance of 1910 ± 80 pc (± 4.2%) has recently been determined for RS Pup using the light echoes propagating in its circumstellar nebula. We combine this distance with new VLTI/PIONIER interferometric angular diameters, photometry, and radial velocities to derive the p-factor of RS Pup using the code Spectro-Photo-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars (SPIPS). We obtain p = 1.250 ± 0.064 ( ± 5.1%), defined for cross-correlation radial velocities. Together with measurements from the literature, the p-factor of RS Pup confirms the good agreement of a constant \\overline{p=\\meanp ± \\meanperr (± \\meanprelerr%)} model with the observations. We conclude that the p-factor of Cepheids is constant or mildly variable over a broad range of periods (3.7 to 41.5 days). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programs 093.D-0316(A), 094.D-0773(B), 096.D-0341(A) and 098.D-0067(A). Based in part on observations with the 1.3 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory.

  11. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Pardyjak, Eric; Mahrt, Larry; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  12. Emergencies and outcome in invasive out-of-hospital ventilation: An observational study over a 1-year period.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Sven; Matthes, Sandhya; Kietzmann, Ilona; Priegnitz, Christina; Hagmeyer, Lars; Randerath, Winfried

    2017-08-04

    The number of ventilated patients is further increasing which leads to an increasing number of patients with weaning failure. In Germany, the treatment of patients with invasive out-of-hospital becomes more and more common. The aim of the study was to observe the outcome, the frequency and character of emergencies of patients with invasive out-of-hospital ventilation. We conducted a prospective study over 1 year. Fifty-nine invasively ventilated patients living either at home or at nursing homes specialized in ventilator medicine were included. Forty-one (71%) of the patients were living in a nursing home. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was the most common underlying disease (52.5%). Duration of daily ventilation did not change over the 1-year period. 52.8% of the months went without a documented emergency. The most common emergencies were oxygen desaturation (29.6%), increase of secretion (12.2%) and dyspnea (8.7%). We found no difference in the frequency of emergencies between patients cared for in their own home compared with residential care. Ten patients died during the observation period. Fewer emergencies (P = .02, CI 0.03-0.85) was the only parameter associated with a reduced mortality. Frequency of emergencies as well as survival showed no difference regarding the way patients were cared for. In patients with invasive home mechanical ventilation survival for more than 1 year seems to be common. Only the rate of emergencies affected survival. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Eclipses in the Middle East from the Late Medieval Islamic Period to the Early Modern Period. Part 1: The observation of six lunar eclipses from the Late Medieval Islamic Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, S. Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of data obtained from observations of two sets of three lunar eclipses in the Late Medieval Islamic Period. The first trio consists of the lunar eclipses of 7 March 1262, 7 April 1270 and 24 January 1274, observed by Muḥyī al-Dīn al-Maghribī; from the Maragha Observatory (in north-western Iran), and the second includes those of 2 June and 26 November 1406, and 22 May 1407, observed by Jamshīd Ghiyāth al-Dīn al-Kāshī from Kāshān (in central Iran). The results are that al-Maghribī's values for the magnitudes of these eclipses agree excellently with modern data, and his values for the times when the maximum phases occurred agree to within five minutes with modern values. Al-Kāshī's values for the times of the maximum phases show a rather larger divergence from modern data, varying from about ten minutes to about one hour. The errors in all six values both astronomers computed from their own solar parameters for the longitude of the Sun at the instant of the opposition of the Moon to the Sun in these eclipses remain below ten minutes of arc. The motivation for doing these observations was to measure the lunar epicycle radius r in the Ptolemaic model. Al-Maghribī achieved r = 5;12 and al-Kāshī r ∼ 5;17,1 in terms of the radius of an orbit of R = 60 arbitrary units. It is argued that comparing with modern theory, neither of these two medieval values can be considered an improvement on Ptolemy's value of r = 5;15.

  14. FASTSAT-HSV01 synergistic observations of the magnetospheric response during active periods: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Joseph; Collier, Michael; Rowland, Douglas; Sigwarth, John; Boudreaux, Mark

    Understanding the complex processes within the inner magnetosphere of Earth particularly during storm periods requires coordinated observations of the particle and field environment using both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. In fact in order to gain a better understand-ing of our Heliophysics and potentially improve our space weather forecasting capabilities, new observation mission approaches and new instrument technologies which can provide both cost effective and robust regular observations of magnetospheric activity and other space weather related phenomenon are necessary. As part of the effort to demonstrate new instrument tech-niques and achieve necessary coordinated observation missions, NASA's Fast Affordable Sci-ence and Technology Satellite Huntsville 01 mission (FASTSAT-HSV01) scheduled for launch in 2010 will afford a highly synergistic solution which satisfies payload mission opportunities and launch requirements as well as contributing in the near term to our improved understanding of Heliophysics. NASA's FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft on the DoD Space Test Program-S26 (STP-S26) Mission is a multi-payload mission executed by the DoD Space Test Program (STP) at the Space Development and Test Wing (SDTW), Kirtland AFB, NM. and is an example of a responsive and economical breakthrough in providing new possibilities for small space technology-driven and research missions. FASTSAT-HSV is a unique spacecraft platform that can carry multiple small instruments or experiments to low-Earth orbit on a wide range of expendable launch vehicles for a fraction of the cost traditionally required for such missions. The FASTSAT-HSV01 mission allows NASA to mature and transition a technical capability to industry while increasing low-cost access to space for small science and technology (ST) payloads. The FASTSAT-HSV01 payload includes three NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) new technology built instruments that will study the terrestrial space environment and

  15. FASTSAT-HSV01 Synergistic Observations of the Magnetospheric Response During Active Periods: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, Joseph C.; Collier, Michael R.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Sigwarth, John B.; Boudreaux, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the complex processes within the inner magnetosphere of Earth particularly during storm periods requires coordinated observations of the particle and field environment using both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. In fact in order to gain a better understanding of our Heliophysics and potentially improve our space weather forecasting capabilities, new observation mission approaches and new instrument technologies which can provide both cost effective and robust regular observations of magnetospheric activity and other space weather related phenomenon are necessary. As part of the effort to demonstrate new instrument techniques and achieve necessary coordinated observation missions, NASA's Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite Huntsville 01 mission (FASTSAT-HSVOI) scheduled for launch in 2010 will afford a highly synergistic solution which satisfies payload mission opportunities and launch requirements as well as contributing iri the near term to our improved understanding of Heliophysics. NASA's FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft on the DoD Space Test Program-S26 (STP-S26) Mission is a multi-payload mission executed by the DoD Space Test Program (STP) at the Space Development and Test Wing (SDTW), Kirtland AFB, NM. and is an example of a responsive and economical breakthrough in providing new possibilities for small space technology-driven and research missions. FASTSAT-HSV is a unique spacecraft platform that can carry multiple small instruments or experiments to low-Earth orbit on a wide range of expendable launch vehicles for a fraction of the cost traditionally required for such missions. The FASTSAT-HSV01 mission allows NASA to mature and transition a technical capability to industry while increasing low-cost access to space for small science and technology (ST) payloads. The FASTSAT-HSV01 payload includes three NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) new technology built instruments that will study the terrestrial space environment and

  16. FASTSAT-HSV01 Synergistic Observations of the Magnetospheric Response During Active Periods: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, Joseph C.; Collier, Michael R.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Sigwarth, John B.; Boudreaux, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the complex processes within the inner magnetosphere of Earth particularly during storm periods requires coordinated observations of the particle and field environment using both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. In fact in order to gain a better understanding of our Heliophysics and potentially improve our space weather forecasting capabilities, new observation mission approaches and new instrument technologies which can provide both cost effective and robust regular observations of magnetospheric activity and other space weather related phenomenon are necessary. As part of the effort to demonstrate new instrument techniques and achieve necessary coordinated observation missions, NASA's Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite Huntsville 01 mission (FASTSAT-HSVOI) scheduled for launch in 2010 will afford a highly synergistic solution which satisfies payload mission opportunities and launch requirements as well as contributing iri the near term to our improved understanding of Heliophysics. NASA's FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft on the DoD Space Test Program-S26 (STP-S26) Mission is a multi-payload mission executed by the DoD Space Test Program (STP) at the Space Development and Test Wing (SDTW), Kirtland AFB, NM. and is an example of a responsive and economical breakthrough in providing new possibilities for small space technology-driven and research missions. FASTSAT-HSV is a unique spacecraft platform that can carry multiple small instruments or experiments to low-Earth orbit on a wide range of expendable launch vehicles for a fraction of the cost traditionally required for such missions. The FASTSAT-HSV01 mission allows NASA to mature and transition a technical capability to industry while increasing low-cost access to space for small science and technology (ST) payloads. The FASTSAT-HSV01 payload includes three NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) new technology built instruments that will study the terrestrial space environment and

  17. Repeated cocaine administration alters the expression of genes in corticolimbic circuitry after a 3-week withdrawal: a DNA macroarray study.

    PubMed

    Toda, Shigenobu; McGinty, Jacqueline F; Kalivas, Peter W

    2002-09-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants elicits behavioral and biochemical changes that are assumed to be mediated by alterations of gene expression in the brain. The changes in gene expression after 3 weeks of withdrawal from chronic cocaine treatment were evaluated in the nucleus accumbens core and shell, dorsal prefrontal cortex and caudate using a complementary DNA (cDNA) array. The level of mRNA encoded by several genes was identified as being up- or down-regulated in repeated cocaine versus saline subjects. The results from the cDNA array were subsequently confirmed at the protein level with immunoblotting. Of particular interest, parallel up-regulation in protein and mRNA was found for the adenosine A1 receptor in the accumbens core, neuroglycan C in the accumbens shell, and the GluR5 glutamate receptor subtype in dorsal prefrontal cortex. However, there was an increase in TrkB protein in the nucleus accumbens core of cocaine-treated rats without a corresponding alteration in mRNA. These changes of gene expression in corticolimbic circuitry may contribute to the psychostimulant-induced behavioral changes associated with addiction.

  18. Swimming performance changes during the final 3 weeks of training leading to the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Mujika, I; Padilla, S; Pyne, D

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of the swimming performance change during the final 3 weeks of training (F3T) leading to the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Olympic swimmers who took part in the same event or events at the Telstra 2000 Grand Prix Series in Melbourne, Australia, (26 - 27 August 2000), and 21 - 28 d later at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games (16 - 23 September 2000) were included in this analysis. A total of 99 performances (50 male, 49 female) were analysed. The overall performance improvement between pre- and post-F3T conditions for all swimmers was 2.18 +/- 1.50 % (p < 0.0001), (range - 1.14 % to 6.02 %). A total of 91 of the 99 analysed performances were faster after the F3T and only 8 were slower. The percentage improvement with F3T was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in males (2.57 +/- 1.45 %) than in females (1.78 +/- 1.45 %). In conclusion, the pre-Olympic F3T elicited a significant performance improvement of 2.57 % for male and 1.78 % for female swimmers at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The magnitude was similar for all competition events, and was achieved by swimmers from different countries and performance levels. These data provide a quantitative framework for coaches and swimmers to set realistic performance goals based on individual performance levels before the final training phase leading to important competitions.

  19. Posterior cervical spinal fusion in a 3-week-old infant with a severe subaxial distraction injury.

    PubMed

    Holland, Christopher M; Kebriaei, Meysam A; Wrubel, David M

    2016-03-01

    Unstable spinal injuries in the neonate pose particular challenges in the clinical and radiographic assessment as well as the surgical stabilization of the spine. In this report, the authors present the unfortunate case of a 3-week-old infant who suffered a severe subaxial cervical fracture dislocation with spinal cord injury that occurred as a result of nonaccidental trauma. Imaging demonstrated severe distraction at C5-6 and near-complete spinal cord transection resulting in quadri-paresis. Open surgical reduction was performed with noninstrumented posterior fusion augmented with split rib autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Postoperative imaging demonstrated progressive bony fusion at 2 months, and clinical examination findings progressed to a motor examination classification of ASIA C. At 2 years, the fusion mass is stable and cervical alignment is maintained. The patient remains flaccid in the bilateral lower extremities, but has movement with some dexterity in both hands. Follow-up MRI shows severe spinal cord injury with evidence of bilateral C-5 nerve root avulsions. This case represents the first report of spinal fusion in an infant of less than 1 month of age. Given the extreme young age of the patient, the diagnostic challenges as well as the mechanical and technical considerations of surgical fusion are discussed.

  20. High Angular Resolution Observations of Episodic Dust Emission from Long Period Variable Stars Twenty Years of Observations with the Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William

    2010-01-01

    Over the past twenty years the U. C. Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer has observed a number of Long Period Variable stars in the mid-infrared, obtaining information on the spatial distribution of dust around these stars with resolutions of the order of a few tens of milliarcseconds. The ISI is a heterodyne interferometer operating mostly at 11.15 microns, initially with two telescopes. In the last decade, it has been taking data regularly with three telescopes, thus obtaining visibility data on three baselines and also a closure phase. Over the course of the years, the ISI has been able to measure the physical properties of the dust shells surrounding these stars, in particular the inner radii of the dust shells, as well as the temperature and density distribution. For some stars, the ISI has also made precision measurements of their diameters in the mid-infrared. Closure phase measurements have revealed asymmetries in the dust distributions around many stars. Most surprisingly the ISI data has shown evidence for substantial changes in the amount of dust on time scales of 5-10 years, rather than being directly correlated with the stellar pulsation periods, which are of the order of one year. We discuss past results and new results from the ISI that highlight the dynamic environment around these stars.

  1. High Angular Resolution Observations of Episodic Dust Emission from Long Period Variable Stars Twenty Years of Observations with the Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William

    2010-01-01

    Over the past twenty years the U. C. Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer has observed a number of Long Period Variable stars in the mid-infrared, obtaining information on the spatial distribution of dust around these stars with resolutions of the order of a few tens of milliarcseconds. The ISI is a heterodyne interferometer operating mostly at 11.15 microns, initially with two telescopes. In the last decade, it has been taking data regularly with three telescopes, thus obtaining visibility data on three baselines and also a closure phase. Over the course of the years, the ISI has been able to measure the physical properties of the dust shells surrounding these stars, in particular the inner radii of the dust shells, as well as the temperature and density distribution. For some stars, the ISI has also made precision measurements of their diameters in the mid-infrared. Closure phase measurements have revealed asymmetries in the dust distributions around many stars. Most surprisingly the ISI data has shown evidence for substantial changes in the amount of dust on time scales of 5-10 years, rather than being directly correlated with the stellar pulsation periods, which are of the order of one year. We discuss past results and new results from the ISI that highlight the dynamic environment around these stars.

  2. Direct observational evidence of the influence of absorbing aerosols on surface energy partitioning during the monsoon onset period over Kanpur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. N.; Sarangi, C.

    2016-12-01

    Detailed understanding of the radiative impact of ambient aerosols on land-atmosphere energy interactions during the onset period over the Indian summer monsoon region (ISMR) is essential for improving spatiotemporal prediction of the Indian summer monsoon. Transportation of air masses influenced by biomass burning outbreaks in the Himalayan foothills to Kanpur, located in ISMR, during May 2016 provides a unique opportunity to investigate the influence of absorbing aerosols on the Bowen ratio. Collocated half hourly observations of aerosol properties, surface energy balance and fluxes and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes over Kanpur under clear sky conditions were used. During this period, increase in aerosol optical depth (AOD) was associated with decrease in single scattering albedo and increase in near surface PM2.5 concentrations indicating that the increase in columnar aerosol loading was primarily due to increase in absorbing aerosols near the surface. Our results show that the net radiation (NR) decreases by 130 Wm-2 per unit increase in AOD at the surface, most of which is due to interactions of aerosols with incoming shortwave radiation. Comparison of observed Bowen ratio for low- and high AOD scenarios illustrates that the increase in aerosol is associated with a reduction in the Bowen ratio for all values of NR. The decrease in sensible heat fluxes relative to the net radiation (SH/NR) per unit increase in AOD is 50 % during midday. We found that aerosol-induced stability in near surface temperature gradient suppresses energy dissipation by the sensible heat flux. Further, relative latent heat flux was found to increase 25 % per unit increase in AOD, mainly due to enhanced photosynthesis as a function of a greater fraction of diffuse radiation. This is evident from the more negative CO2 flux with AOD. Thus, this study provides the first observational evidence of the influence of absorbing aerosols on the Bowen ratio over this region of climatic importance.

  3. Ground-based observations during the period between two strong November 2004 storms attributed to steady magnetospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, J.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Ranta, A.; Kauristie, K.; MäKinen, S.; Kornilova, T. A.

    2008-03-01

    Strong geomagnetic storms are of great scientific interest because they drive the magnetosphere to an extreme state and result in nontypical magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The present study examines the ground-based signatures of the magnetosphere-ionosphere disturbances during the recovery phase of the very intense storm on 7-8 November 2004. The recovery phase took place under steady and slightly negative (˜-5 nT) values of the IMF Bz. We compare this event with previously documented storm recovery phases occurring under positive IMF Bz and accompanied by morning Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations. During the period studied in this article the strongest pulsation activity was recorded in the evening and midnight sectors of the Earth. We analyze observations from the Scandinavian multipoint ground-based instrumentation: (1) geomagnetic variations and pulsations, (2) auroras in visual wavelengths, and (3) energetic particle precipitation (riometer data). We show that several enhancements in electrojet, auroral, and energetic precipitation activity were recorded at auroral latitudes. The activations lasted 0.5-2 hours, and the associated negative magnetic field deviations were often more than 1000 nT. Only one of these activations shows typical substorm behavior (poleward expansion and geostationary particle injection). We demonstrate remarkably good correlation between the magnetic variations and cosmic noise absorption variations (in pulsations and slower variations) as well as between the optical auroras and cosmic noise absorption (Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies riometer system) both in time and in space. Thus the auroral precipitation revealed a very coherent behavior over a wide energy range (˜1-40 keV) during the analyzed period. The images acquired by the network of MIRACLE all-sky cameras show that the auroral distribution exhibited double oval configuration during our event. Double oval is often observed during so-called Steady Magnetospheric

  4. An overview of the lightning and atmospheric electricity observations collected in Southern France during the HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment (HyMeX), Special Observation Period 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defer, E.; Pinty, J.-P.; Coquillat, S.; Martin, J.-M.; Prieur, S.; Soula, S.; Richard, E.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P.; Thomas, R.; Rodeheffer, D.; Vergeiner, C.; Malaterre, F.; Pedeboy, S.; Schulz, W.; Farges, T.; Gallin, L.-J.; Ortéga, P.; Ribaud, J.-F.; Anderson, G.; Betz, H.-D.; Meneux, B.; Kotroni, V.; Lagouvardos, K.; Roos, S.; Ducrocq, V.; Roussot, O.; Labatut, L.; Molinié, G.

    2014-08-01

    The PEACH (Projet en Electricité Atmosphérique pour la Campagne HyMeX - the Atmospheric Electricity Project of HyMeX Program) project is the Atmospheric Electricity component of the HyMeX (Hydrology cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) experiment and is dedicated to the observation of both lightning activity and electrical state of continental and maritime thunderstorms in the area of the Mediterranean Sea. During the HyMeX SOP1 (Special Observation Period; 5 September-6 November 2012), four European Operational Lightning Locating Systems (OLLSs) (ATDNET, EUCLID, LINET, ZEUS) and the HyMeX Lightning Mapping Array network (HyLMA) were used to locate and characterize the lightning activity over the Southeastern Mediterranean at flash, storm and regional scales. Additional research instruments like slow antennas, video cameras, micro-barometer and microphone arrays were also operated. All these observations in conjunction with operational/research ground-based and airborne radars, rain gauges and in situ microphysical records aimed at characterizing and understanding electrically active and highly precipitating events over Southeastern France that often lead to severe flash floods. Simulations performed with Cloud Resolving Models like Meso-NH and WRF are used to interpret the results and to investigate further the links between dynamics, microphysics, electrification and lightning occurrence. A description of the different instruments deployed during the field campaign as well as the available datasets is given first. Examples of concurrent observations from radio frequency to acoustic for regular and atypical lightning flashes are then presented showing a rather comprehensive description of lightning flashes available from the SOP1 records. Then examples of storms recorded during HyMeX SOP1 over Southeastern France are briefly described to highlight the unique and rich dataset collected. Finally the next steps of the work required for the delivery of reliable

  5. Variations in Electron Content Ratio and Semi-thickness Ratio during LSA and MSA periods and some Cyclone Genesis Periods using COSMIC satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Gopal; Gupta, Manojit; Sen, Goutam Kumar

    2014-12-01

    In this study for the first time, COSMIC satellite data have been used to deduce values of ionospheric Electron Content Ratio (ECR) and Semi-thickness Ratio (Rtb) for Low Solar Activity (LSA) (2008) and Moderate Solar Activity (MSA) (2012) periods over the Indian low-latitude (15-30°N) region with 80-95°E longitude. These two ratios provide sensitive information about bottom and topside ionosphere for different geophysical conditions. Extraction of suspected patterns and discrepancies unfold that the deviations between ECR and Rtb values during LSA period are comparatively higher than that of MSA period when the diurnal variability in these two parameters is flatter along with the diurnal-dips during pre-noon hours. The correlative relationship of ECR exhibits low association with NmF2 and anti-correlation with HmF2, whereas its correlation with Rtb is extremely high. During Cyclone Genesis Period (CGP) strong dips in ECR and Rtb values with respect to pre and post CGP occurred which helps to take decisive conclusion about the ionospheric variations to be dominant through getting relatively higher Ne concentration in the bottom side part of the ionosphere.

  6. AROME-WMED, a real-time mesoscale model designed for the HyMeX Special Observation Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourrié, N.; Bresson, É.; Nuret, M.; Jany, C.; Brousseau, P.; Doerenbecher, A.; Kreitz, M.; Nuissier, O.; Sevault, E.; Bénichou, H.; Amodei, M.; Pouponneau, F.

    2015-02-01

    During autumn 2012 and winter 2013, two Special Observation Periods (SOPs) of the Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX) took place. For the preparatory studies and to support the instrument deployment during the field campaign, a dedicated version of the operational convective-scale AROME-France model was developed: the AROME-WMED model. It covers the western Mediterranean basin with a 48 h forecast range. It provided real time analyses and forecasts which were sent daily to the HyMeX operational centre to forecast high precipitation events and to help decision makers on the deployment of observation instruments. This paper presents the main features of this numerical weather prediction system in terms of data assimilation and forecast. Some specific data of the HyMeX SOP were assimilated in real time. The forecast skill of the AROME-WMED is then assessed with objective scores and compared to the operational AROME-France model, for both autumn 2012 (5 September to 6 November 2012) and winter 2013 (1 February to 15 March 2013) SOPs. The overall performance of AROME-WMED is good and similar to those of AROME-France for the 0 to 30 h common forecast range. The 24 to 48 h forecast range is of course less accurate but remains useful for scheduling observation deployment. The characteristics of parameters such as precipitation, temperature or humidity, are illustrated by one heavy precipitation case study that occurred over the south of Spain.

  7. The Effects of 3 Weeks of Uphill and Downhill Walking on Blood Lipids and Glucose Metabolism in Pre-Diabetic Men: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Marc; Gatterer, Hannes; Eder, Erika Maria; Dzien, Alexander; Somavilla, Matthias; Melmer, Andreas; Ebenbichler, Christoph; Müller, Tom; Burtscher, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of type 2 diabetes in persons at risk for diabetes is of utmost importance. Physical activity in general and even exercises at moderate intensities such as walking significantly reduce the risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. However, it is still a matter of debate whether lipids and glucose metabolism are differently affected by regular concentric (e.g., uphill walking) and eccentric (e.g., downhill walking) endurance exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of short-term (3 weeks) uphill and downhill walking on glucose metabolism and blood lipids in pre-diabetic middle-aged men in a real world setting. The study was designed as an investigator-initiated 2 group random selection pre-test post-test trial. Sixteen pre-diabetic men (age: 56.9 ± 5.1 years; BMI: 28.1 ± 2.3 kg·m-2) performed 9 uphill (n = 8) or 9 downhill (n = 8) walking sessions within 3 weeks. The primary outcomes were the markers of glucose metabolism and blood lipids measured before and after the training period. After uphill walking glucose tolerance (area under the curve of the oral glucose tolerance test: -43.25 ± 53.12 mg·dl-1; p = 0.05; effect size: 0.81), triglycerides (-48.75 ± 54.49 mg·dl-1; p = 0.036; effect size: 0.89), HDL-C (+7.86 ± 9.54 mg·dl-1; p = 0.05; effect size: 0.82) and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio (-0.58 ± 0.41; p = 0.012; effect size: 1.39) had significantly improved. No significant metabolic adaptations were found after downhill walking. However, when adjusted for estimated energy expenditure, uphill and downhill walking had equal effects on almost all metabolic parameters. Moreover, the magnitude of the baseline impairments of glucose tolerance was significantly related to the extent of change in both groups. Depending on the fitness level and individual preferences both types of exercise may be useful for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and disorders in lipid metabolism. Key points In contrast to downhill walking, 3

  8. Observations of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer and Morning Transitional Periods in Houston, Texas during the TexAQS II Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, B. M.; Clements, C. B.; Rappenglueck, B.

    2007-12-01

    High-temporal resolution tethersonde profiles taken during the TexAQS II field campaign in Houston were used to study the overnight development and progression of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) and the evolution of the convective boundary layer after sunrise. The measurements were made at the University of Houston campus, located approximately 4 km southeast of the downtown Houston central business district, and consisted of vertical profiles of potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, wind speed, wind direction, and ozone concentration. Profile heights averaged 250 m AGL with a few reaching 400 m AGL. Profiles were taken at approximately 30 min intervals throughout 4 nights during Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs), including both the evening and morning transitional periods. Tethersonde experiments also were performed during several additional morning break-up periods during the campaign. Preliminary results from the overnight experiments of Sept 7-8 and Sept 14-15, 2006 showed different NBL evolutions. Sept 7-8 exhibited a stronger and deeper inversion compared with Sept 14-15 when the inversion was weak with a fairly constant height throughout the night. The Sept 7-8 profiles showed elevated bluff-like structures in the virtual potential temperature profiles between 0300-0400 CDT, indicating neutral stability within the 40-90 m AGL level. And, just before sunrise a neutral layer with constant potential temperature developed between the surface and 75 m AGL reflecting horizontal cold air advection. Further analyses will be presented for other vertical profiles taken during the campaign, including the additional overnight profiles as well as the profiles taken during the morning transition to the convective boundary layer.

  9. Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe observed from ground and satellites in the period from 2003 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents some results of the study on aerosol variability in the period from 2003 to 2011 over the Eastern Europe region, with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based sun photometer observations. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2, except for in the period of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5 according to both retrievals. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The spring peak observed in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Saharan dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov seas. The autumn peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Saharan dust and the presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are observed in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in central Ukraine and eastern Belarus as well as Moscow region in Russia. The comparison of the AOT derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL with those recomputed from AERONET inversions for fine mode particles with radius < 0.3 μm was performed over several AERONET sites. The correlation coefficients for the POLDER/AERONET AOT retrieval comparisons are equal: 0.78 for Moscow site, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.81 - Moldova (period 2005-2009), 0.93 - Kyiv and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites (2008-2009). The deviations are

  10. Vertical structure of the wind field during the Special Observing Period I of the Global Weather Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paegle, J. N.; Paegle, J.; Zhen, Z.; Sampson, G.

    1986-01-01

    The vertical structure of the global atmosphere is analyzed for selected periods of the Special Observing Period I (SOP-I) for the Global Weather Experiment (GWE). The analysis consists of projection of the stream-function and velocity potential at 200 and 850 mb on spherical harmonics and of the wind and height fields on the normal modes of a linearized form of the primitive equations for a basic state at rest. The kinematic vertical structure is discussed in terms of correlation coefficients of the 200 mb and 850 mb winds and analysis of the internal and external normal modes of the primitive equations. The reliability of the results is checked by applying the same analysis methods to data sets obtained from three different institutions: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF), and Goddard Laboratory for the Atmospheres (GLA). It is found that, on a global basis, vertically reversing circulations are as important as the equivalent barotropic structures. For the verticaly reversing components, the gravity and mixed Rossby-gravity modes have contributions of the same order of magnitude as those of the Rossby modes in tropical latitudes.

  11. Variations in the Rotational Modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation and Their Relationship to Magnetic Periodicities Observed Before and Near Equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Groene, J. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), which is an intense radio emission generated at high latitudes in Saturn's magnetosphere, displays a strong rotationally driven modulation at two rates, one characteristic of radiation from the northern auroral zone, and the other from the southern auroral zone. During the period from about 2007 to 2009, Cassini observations show that the rotation rates were about 816 and 780 deg/day, corresponding to rotational periods of about 10.6 and 10.8 hr. However, as Saturn approached equinox in August 2009, the two rotation rates began to converge, and have since crossed in early 2010. This interchange of the rotational modulation rates of SKR in the two hemispheres potentially provides an important clue as to how angular momentum is transferred from the interior of Saturn to the magnetosphere. Using these measurements a new longitude system has been developed, one for the northern hemisphere and one for the southern hemisphere (SLS4-N and SLS4-S). These longitude systems are used to investigate similar variations in the rotational modulation of Saturn's magnetic field and field-aligned currents.

  12. The OmegaWhite survey for short-period variable stars - III: follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, S. A.; Woudt, P. A.; Groot, P. J.; Ramsay, G.; Toma, R.; Motsoaledi, M.; Crause, L. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; O'Donoghue, D.; Potter, S. B.; Sickafoose, A. A.; van Gend, C.; Worters, H. L.

    2017-02-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of short-period variables discovered in the OmegaWhite survey, a wide-field high-cadence g-band synoptic survey targeting the Galactic Plane. We have used fast photometry on the SAAO 1.0- and 1.9-m telescopes to obtain light curves of 27 variables, and use these results to validate the period and amplitude estimates from the OmegaWhite processing pipeline. Furthermore, 57 sources (44 unique, 13 with new light curves) were selected for spectroscopic follow-up using either the SAAO 1.9-m telescope or the Southern African Large Telescope. We find that many of these variables have spectra which are consistent with being δ Scuti-type pulsating stars. At higher amplitudes, we detect four possible pulsating white dwarf/subdwarf sources and an eclipsing cataclysmic variable. Due to their rarity, these targets are ideal candidates for detailed follow-up studies. From spectroscopy, we confirm the symbiotic binary star nature of two variables identified as such in the SIMBAD database. We also report what could possibly be the first detection of the `Bump Cepheid' phenomena in a δ Scuti star, with OW J175848.21-271653.7 showing a pronounced 22 per cent amplitude dip lasting 3 min during each pulsational cycle peak. However, the precise nature of this target is still uncertain as it exhibits the spectral features of a B-type star.

  13. Observation of atomic ordering of triple-period-A and -B type in GaAsBi

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Mingjian Luna, Esperanza; Trampert, Achim; Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea

    2014-07-28

    We report the observation of atomic ordering of triple-period (TP)-A and -B type in low temperature (LT) grown GaAsBi alloy using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition to previous reports, where only TP-A ordering was identified in III-V alloys, here, we confirm by electron diffraction, high-resolution (HR) TEM, and HR Z-contrast scanning TEM that two ordering variants coexists for LT-GaAsBi. We find that the TP-A ordering variant dominates over the TP-B variant. TP-A domains extend over 50–100 nm (projected lateral width) and are of higher perfection compared to TP-B domains. HR Z-contrast scanning TEM on different domains reveals a variation in the Bi occupancy in the (111) planes with triple period sequence. Since the formation of ordered phases has been directly linked to the occurrence of specific surface reconstructions, our results suggest a correlation between the TP-A and B type domains and the multiple stability of n × 3 and 3 × n reconstructions on the (001) surface of GaAsBi under low temperature growth.

  14. Spectral characteristics and meridional variations of energy transformations during the first and second special observation periods of FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, E. C.; Tanaka, H.

    1984-01-01

    The global features and meridional spectral energy transformation variations of the first and second special observation periods of the First Global GARP Experiment (FGGE) are investigated, together with the latitudinal distribution of the kinetic energy balance. Specific seasonal characteristics are shown by the spectral distributions of the global transformations between (1) zonal mean and eddy components of the available potential energy, (2) the zonal mean and eddy components of the kinetic energy, and (3) the available potential energy and the kinetic energy. Maximum kinetic energy production is found to occur at subtropical latitudes, with a secondary maximum at higher middle latitudes. Between these two regions, there is another region characterized by the adiabatic destruction of kinetic energy above the lower troposphere.

  15. Quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting magnetic white dwarfs. II. The asset of numerical modelling for interpreting observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busschaert, C.; Falize, É.; Michaut, C.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Mouchet, M.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Magnetic cataclysmic variables are close binary systems containing a strongly magnetized white dwarf that accretes matter coming from an M-dwarf companion. The high magnetic field strength leads to the formation of an accretion column instead of an accretion disk. High-energy radiation coming from those objects is emitted from the column close to the white dwarf photosphere at the impact region. Its properties depend on the characteristics of the white dwarf and an accurate accretion column model allows the properties of the binary system to be inferred, such as the white dwarf mass, its magnetic field, and the accretion rate. Aims: We study the temporal and spectral behaviour of the accretion region and use the tools we developed to accurately connect the simulation results to the X-ray and optical astronomical observations. Methods: The radiation hydrodynamics code Hades was adapted to simulate this specific accretion phenomena. Classical approaches were used to model the radiative losses of the two main radiative processes: bremsstrahlung and cyclotron. Synthetic light curves and X-ray spectra were extracted from numerical simulations. A fast Fourier analysis was performed on the simulated light curves. The oscillation frequencies and amplitudes in the X-ray and optical domains are studied to compare those numerical results to observational ones. Different dimensional formulae were developed to complete the numerical evaluations. Results: The complete characterization of the emitting region is described for the two main radiative regimes: when only the bremsstrahlung losses and when both cyclotron and bremsstrahlung losses are considered. The effect of the non-linear cooling instability regime on the accretion column behaviour is analysed. Variation in luminosity on short timescales (~1 s quasi-periodic oscillations) is an expected consequence of this specific dynamic. The importance of secondary shock instability on the quasi-periodic oscillation

  16. Clinical management of unruptured intracranial aneurysm in Germany: a nationwide observational study over a 5-year period (2005–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Walendy, Victor; Stang, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to provide nationwide age-standardised rates (ASR) on the usage of endovascular coiling and neurosurgical clipping for unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) treatment in Germany. Setting Nationwide observational study using the Diagnosis-Related-Groups (DRG) statistics for the years 2005–2009 (overall 83 million hospitalisations). Participants From 2005 to 2009, overall 39 155 hospitalisations with a diagnosis of UIA occurred in Germany. Primary outcome measures Age-specific and age-standardised hospitalisation rates for UIA with the midyear population of Germany in 2007 as the standard. Results Of the 10 221 hospitalisations with UIA during the observation period, 6098 (59.7%) and 4123 (40.3%) included coiling and clipping, respectively. Overall hospitalisation rates for UIA increased by 39.5% (95% CI 24.7% to 56.0%) and 50.4% (95% CI 39.6% to 62.1%) among men and women, respectively. In 2005, the ASR per 100 000 person years for coiling was 0.7 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.78) for men and 1.7 (95% CI 1.58 to 1.82) for women. In 2009, the ASR was 1.0 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.10) and 2.4 (95% CI 2.24 to 2.56), respectively. Similarly, the ASR for clipping in 2005 amounted to 0.6 (95% CI 0.52 to 0.68) for men and 1.1 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.20) for women. These rates increased in 2009 to 0.8 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.88) and 1.7 (95% CI 1.58 to 1.82), respectively. We observed a marked geographical variation of ASR for coiling and less pronounced for clipping. For the federal state of Saarland, the ASR for coiling was 5.64 (95% CI 4.76 to 6.52) compared with 0.68 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.88; per 100 000 person years) in Saxony-Anhalt, whereas, ASR for clipping were highest in Rhineland-Palatinate (2.48, 95% CI 2.17 to 4.75) and lowest in Saxony-Anhalt (0.52, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.70). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, we presented the first representative, nationwide analysis of the clinical management of UIA in Germany. The ASR increased markedly and showed

  17. An overview of the lightning and atmospheric electricity observations collected in southern France during the HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment (HyMeX), Special Observation Period 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defer, E.; Pinty, J.-P.; Coquillat, S.; Martin, J.-M.; Prieur, S.; Soula, S.; Richard, E.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P.; Thomas, R.; Rodeheffer, D.; Vergeiner, C.; Malaterre, F.; Pedeboy, S.; Schulz, W.; Farges, T.; Gallin, L.-J.; Ortéga, P.; Ribaud, J.-F.; Anderson, G.; Betz, H.-D.; Meneux, B.; Kotroni, V.; Lagouvardos, K.; Roos, S.; Ducrocq, V.; Roussot, O.; Labatut, L.; Molinié, G.

    2015-02-01

    The PEACH project (Projet en Electricité Atmosphérique pour la Campagne HyMeX - the Atmospheric Electricity Project of the HyMeX Program) is the atmospheric electricity component of the Hydrology cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX) experiment and is dedicated to the observation of both lightning activity and electrical state of continental and maritime thunderstorms in the area of the Mediterranean Sea. During the HyMeX SOP1 (Special Observation Period) from 5 September to 6 November 2012, four European operational lightning locating systems (ATDnet, EUCLID, LINET, ZEUS) and the HyMeX lightning mapping array network (HyLMA) were used to locate and characterize the lightning activity over the northwestern Mediterranean at flash, storm and regional scales. Additional research instruments like slow antennas, video cameras, microbarometer and microphone arrays were also operated. All these observations in conjunction with operational/research ground-based and airborne radars, rain gauges and in situ microphysical records are aimed at characterizing and understanding electrically active and highly precipitating events over southeastern France that often lead to severe flash floods. Simulations performed with cloud resolving models like Meso-NH and Weather Research and Forecasting are used to interpret the results and to investigate further the links between dynamics, microphysics, electrification and lightning occurrence. Herein we present an overview of the PEACH project and its different instruments. Examples are discussed to illustrate the comprehensive and unique lightning data set, from radio frequency to acoustics, collected during the SOP1 for lightning phenomenology understanding, instrumentation validation, storm characterization and modeling.

  18. Observations of late-type stars in the waver vapor radio line. II: The long-period variable RR Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berulis, I. I.; Lekht, E. E.; Munitsyn, V. A.; Rudnitskii, G. M.

    1998-05-01

    Results of observations of the Mira Ceti variable RR Aql in the 1.35-cm water-vapor line are presented. The observations were carried out on the 22-m radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory in 1980-1997 (JD 2444306-2445689 and 2446587-2450631). The observations are compared with published data on the visual light curve of RR Aql and its emission in the OH and H2O lines. Sixteen variability cycles of RR Aql (P = 394.78d) are covered. Profiles of the H2O maser emission lines for 81 epochs are presented. Beginning from 1989, a rise of the H2O maser activity in RR Aql was observed, especially soon after its visual maximum in September 1992, when the peak flux density in the H2O line exceeded 500 Jy. By the beginning of 1994, the maser intensity again faded to a level <100 Jy. As in a number of other Mira variables, RR Aql shows a correlation of the H2O line flux density with its brightness variations: in general, the maser intensity follows the optical variability with some phase lag. However, the delay (up to 200d, or nearly 0.5p) is longer than in other H2O-maser Mira variables (on average 0.1p-0.3p). A model is considered in which the maser variability is the result of the joint influence of a shock wave propagating in the circumstellar envelope and variability of the radio continuum of the stellar photosphere. There are indications that the variations of the integrated H2O line flux and mean radial velocity of the maser emission have a quasi-periodic character over a time scale of 14-15 years. Estimates of the distance to RR Aql are critically re-examined. A new estimate is obtained based on the M_V_P relationships: r = 400 pc.

  19. Subjective and objective observation of skin graft recovery on Indonesian local cat with different periods of transplantation time

    PubMed Central

    Erwin; Gunanti; Handharyani, Ekowati; Noviana, Deni

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The success of a skin graft in a cat is highly dependent on the granulation formed by the base of recipient bed. Granulation by the base of recipient bed will form after several days after injury. This research aimed to observe subjective and objective profile of skin graft recovery on forelimb of cats with different periods of donor skin placement. Materials and Methods: Nine male Indonesian local cats aged 1-2 years old, weighing 3-4 kg were divided into three groups. The first surgery for creating defect wound of 2 cm×2 cm in size was performed in the whole group. The wound was left for several days with the respective interval for each group, respectively: Group I (for 2 days), Group II (for 4 days), and Group III (for 6 days). In the whole group, the second surgery was done by the harvesting skin of thoracic area which then applied on recipient bed of respective groups. Result: The donor skin on Group II was accepted faster compared to Group I and Group III. The donor skin did not show color differences compared to surrounding skin, painless, bright red in bleeding test had faster both hair growth and drug absorption. Test toward the size of donor skin and the effect of drugs did not show a significant difference between each group. Conclusion: The observe subjective and objective profile of skin graft recovery on forelimb of cats on Group II were accepted faster compared to Group I and III. PMID:27284224

  20. Direct observation of single stationary-phase bacteria reveals a surprisingly long period of constant protein production activity

    PubMed Central

    Gefen, Orit; Fridman, Ofer; Ronin, Irine; Balaban, Nathalie Q.

    2014-01-01

    Exponentially growing bacteria are rarely found in the wild, as microorganisms tend to spend most of their lifetime at stationary phase. Despite this general prevalence of stationary-phase bacteria, they are as yet poorly characterized. Our goal was to quantitatively study this phase by direct observation of single bacteria as they enter into stationary phase and by monitoring their activity over several days during growth arrest. For this purpose, we devised an experimental procedure for starving single Escherichia coli bacteria in microfluidic devices and measured their activity by monitoring the production rate of fluorescent proteins. When amino acids were the sole carbon source, the production rate decreased by an order of magnitude upon entry into stationary phase. We found that, even while growth-arrested, bacteria continued to produce proteins at a surprisingly constant rate over several days. Our identification of this newly observed period of constant activity in nongrowing cells, designated as constant activity stationary phase, makes possible the conduction of assays that require constant protein expression over time, and are therefore difficult to perform under exponential growth conditions. Moreover, we show that exogenous protein expression bears no fitness cost on the regrowth of the population when starvation ends. Further characterization of constant activity stationary phase—a phase where nongrowing bacteria can be quantitatively studied over several days in a reproducible manner—should contribute to a better understanding of this ubiquitous but overlooked physiological state of bacteria in nature. PMID:24344288

  1. AROME-WMED, a real-time mesoscale model designed for the HyMeX special observation periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourrié, N.; Bresson, É.; Nuret, M.; Jany, C.; Brousseau, P.; Doerenbecher, A.; Kreitz, M.; Nuissier, O.; Sevault, E.; Bénichou, H.; Amodei, M.; Pouponneau, F.

    2015-07-01

    During autumn 2012 and winter 2013, two special observation periods (SOPs) of the HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiment (HyMeX) took place. For the preparatory studies and to support the instrument deployment during the field campaign, a dedicated version of the operational convective-scale Application of Research to Operations at Mesoscale (AROME)-France model was developed: the AROME-WMED (West Mediterranean Sea) model. It covers the western Mediterranean basin with a 48 h forecast range. It provided real-time analyses and forecasts which were sent daily to the HyMeX operational centre to forecast high-precipitation events and to help decision makers on the deployment of meteorological instruments. This paper presents the main features of this numerical weather prediction system in terms of data assimilation and forecast. Some specific data of the HyMeX SOP were assimilated in real time. The forecast skill of AROME-WMED is then assessed with objective scores and compared to the operational AROME-France model, for both autumn 2012 (05 September to 06 November 2012) and winter 2013 (01 February to 15 March 2013) SOPs. The overall performance of AROME-WMED is good for the first HyMeX special observation period (SOP1) (i.e. mean 2 m temperature root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.7 °C and mean 2 m relative humidity RMSE of 10 % for the 0-30 h forecast ranges) and similar to those of AROME-France for the 0-30 h common forecast range (maximal absolute difference of 2 m temperature RMSE of 0.2 °C and 0.21 % for the 2 m relative humidity); conversely, for the 24-48 h forecast range it is less accurate (relative loss between 10 and 12 % in 2 m temperature and relative humidity RMSE, and equitable threat score (ETS) for 24 h accumulated rainfall), but it remains useful for scheduling observation deployment. The characteristics of parameters, such as precipitation, temperature or humidity, are illustrated by one heavy precipitation case study that occurred

  2. Induced and pre-existing anti-polyethylene glycol antibody in a trial of every 3-week dosing of pegloticase for refractory gout, including in organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pegloticase, a PEGylated recombinant porcine uricase, is approved for treating refractory gout at a dose of 8 mg intravenous (IV) every 2 weeks. However, during phase 1 testing, pharmacokinetics supported less frequent dosing. Also, single doses of pegloticase unexpectedly induced antibodies (Ab) that bound to polyethylene glycol (PEG). We have conducted a phase 2 trial to evaluate every 3-week dosing, and to further define the Ab response to pegloticase. Organ transplant recipients were included, as they are prone to severe gout that is difficult to manage, and because treatment to prevent graft rejection might influence the immune response to pegloticase. Methods Plasma uricase activity (pUox), urate concentration (pUA), and clinical response were monitored during up to 5 infusions in 30 patients, including 7 organ transplant recipients. Depending on whether pUA <6 mg/dL was achieved and maintained, patients were classified as non (NR), persistent (PR), or transient (TR) responders. Ab to pegloticase and 10 kDa mPEG were monitored by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and specificity was further defined. Results We observed 17 PR, 12 TR, and 1 NR; 21 patients (16 PR, 5 TR) received all 5 infusions. Over the 15-week trial, pUA in PR averaged 1.0 ± 0.4 mg/dL; T½ for pUox was approximately 13 days, and area under the curve after dose 5 was approximately 30% higher than after dose 1. PR showed clinical benefit and in some, tophi resolved. In 11 of 12 TR, pUox fell rapidly and hyperuricemia recurred before dose 2. In all TR and NR, loss of response to pegloticase was accompanied by Ab to PEG, which was pre-existing in half of those who had no prior exposure to pegloticase. No PR, and 1 one out of 7 organ transplant recipients, had a sustained Ab response to pegloticase. Conclusions Every 3-week dosing is effective and may enhance the utility of pegloticase for treating refractory gout. Ab to PEG, which were pre-existing or induced by treatment

  3. Induced and pre-existing anti-polyethylene glycol antibody in a trial of every 3-week dosing of pegloticase for refractory gout, including in organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hershfield, Michael S; Ganson, Nancy J; Kelly, Susan J; Scarlett, Edna L; Jaggers, Denise A; Sundy, John S

    2014-03-07

    Pegloticase, a PEGylated recombinant porcine uricase, is approved for treating refractory gout at a dose of 8 mg intravenous (IV) every 2 weeks. However, during phase 1 testing, pharmacokinetics supported less frequent dosing. Also, single doses of pegloticase unexpectedly induced antibodies (Ab) that bound to polyethylene glycol (PEG). We have conducted a phase 2 trial to evaluate every 3-week dosing, and to further define the Ab response to pegloticase. Organ transplant recipients were included, as they are prone to severe gout that is difficult to manage, and because treatment to prevent graft rejection might influence the immune response to pegloticase. Plasma uricase activity (pUox), urate concentration (pUA), and clinical response were monitored during up to 5 infusions in 30 patients, including 7 organ transplant recipients. Depending on whether pUA <6 mg/dL was achieved and maintained, patients were classified as non (NR), persistent (PR), or transient (TR) responders. Ab to pegloticase and 10 kDa mPEG were monitored by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and specificity was further defined. We observed 17 PR, 12 TR, and 1 NR; 21 patients (16 PR, 5 TR) received all 5 infusions. Over the 15-week trial, pUA in PR averaged 1.0 ± 0.4 mg/dL; T½ for pUox was approximately 13 days, and area under the curve after dose 5 was approximately 30% higher than after dose 1. PR showed clinical benefit and in some, tophi resolved. In 11 of 12 TR, pUox fell rapidly and hyperuricemia recurred before dose 2. In all TR and NR, loss of response to pegloticase was accompanied by Ab to PEG, which was pre-existing in half of those who had no prior exposure to pegloticase. No PR, and 1 one out of 7 organ transplant recipients, had a sustained Ab response to pegloticase. Every 3-week dosing is effective and may enhance the utility of pegloticase for treating refractory gout. Ab to PEG, which were pre-existing or induced by treatment, caused rapid loss of efficacy and increased

  4. Climatology of Mid-Latitude Mstid Events Observed by the Demeter Satellite in the Period 2005-2010.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelier, J. J.; Nguyen, C. T.; Amory-Mazaudier, C. C.; Petitdidier, M.

    2015-12-01

    Using plasma measurements from the CNES DEMETER micro-satellite, we have performed a global survey of ionospheric disturbances observed at middle and low latitudes on the nightime part of the DEMETER orbit in the local time sector 21.30-22.30 LT. This study encompasses the 6 years of the satellite operations, from 2005 to 2010, including years of moderate magnetic activity of solar cycles 23 and 24 and the deep solar minimum in 2009-2010. We report in this poster a statistical analysis of MSTID events characterized by quasi-periodic variations of the O+ density observed below ~ 40° geomagnetic latitudes with wavelengths ranging from 350 to 700 km. Although detected in both hemispheres they occur predominantly at southern latitudes with a rather strong peak over the Pacific ocean. A detailed analysis has shown that these events may be sorted in 4 categories according to their latitudinal extent. Most of them are restricted to a latitude band between ~ 15° and 40° geomagnetic in North or South but some of them extend from mid latitudes in one hemisphere to low latitude in the other hemisphere, thus spanning equatorial regions up to 5-10°. The apparent negative correlation with magnetic activity seems to indicate that most of these events are driven by AGW originating from low altitude atmospheric levels and not triggered by auroral phenomena. We shall present the seasonal and inter-annual variations showing significant changes associated with solar activity. Our results will be compared to other ground-based or satellite observations and our investigation pointed out a strong effect of these MSTID and their parent AGW on the electrodynamics of the low latitude ionosphere.

  5. TIME DELAYS IN QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS OBSERVED DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15

    SciTech Connect

    Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Schmutz, W.; Zender, J.

    2012-04-10

    We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.

  6. Vaccination of cattle with a high dose of BCG vaccine 3 weeks after experimental infection with Mycobacterium bovis increased the inflammatory response, but not tuberculous pathology.

    PubMed

    Buddle, Bryce M; Shu, Dairu; Parlane, Natalie A; Subharat, Supatsak; Heiser, Axel; Hewinson, R Glyn; Vordermeier, H Martin; Wedlock, D Neil

    2016-07-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether BCG vaccination of cattle post-challenge could have an effect on a very early Mycobacterium bovis infection. Three groups of calves (n = 12/group) were challenged endobronchially with M. bovis and slaughtered 13 weeks later to examine for tuberculous lesions. One group had been vaccinated prophylactically with BCG Danish vaccine 21 weeks prior to challenge; a second group was vaccinated with a 4-fold higher dose of BCG Danish 3 weeks post-challenge and the third group, remained non-vaccinated. Vaccination prior to challenge induced only minimal protection with just a significant reduction in the lymph node lesion scores. Compared to the non-vaccinated group, BCG vaccination post-challenge produced no reduction in gross pathology and histopathology, but did result in significant increases in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, IL-12p40, IL-17A, IRF-5, CXCL9, CXCL10, iNOs, and TNF-α) in the pulmonary lymph nodes. Although there was no significant differences in the gross pathology and histopathology between the post-challenge BCG and non-vaccinated groups, the enhanced pro-inflammatory immune responses observed in the post-challenge BCG group suggest caution in the use of high doses of BCG where there is a possibility that cattle may be infected with M. bovis prior to vaccination.

  7. Optical extinction by upper tropospheric/stratospheric aerosols and clouds: GOMOS observations for the period 2002-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhellemont, F.; Fussen, D.; Mateshvili, N.; Tétard, C.; Bingen, C.; Dekemper, E.; Loodts, N.; Kyrölä, E.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Dalaudier, F.; Blanot, L.; Fanton D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Guirlet, M.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra, L.

    2010-08-01

    Although the retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficients from satellite remote measurements is notoriously difficult (in comparison with gaseous species) due to the lack of typical spectral signatures, important information can be obtained. In this paper we present an overview of the current operational nighttime UV/Vis aerosol extinction profile results for the GOMOS star occultation instrument, spanning the period from August 2002 to May 2008. Some problems still remain, such as the ones associated with incomplete scintillation correction and the aerosol spectral law implementation, but good quality extinction values are obtained at a wavelength of 500 nm. Typical phenomena associated with atmospheric particulate matter in the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) are easily identified: Polar Stratospheric Clouds, tropical subvisual cirrus clouds, background stratospheric aerosols, and post-eruption volcanic aerosols (with their subsequent dispersion around the globe). For the first time, we show comparisons of GOMOS 500 nm particle extinction profiles with the ones of other satellite occultation instruments (SAGE II, SAGE III and POAM III), of which the good agreement lends credibility to the GOMOS data set. Yearly zonal statistics are presented for the entire period considered. Time series furthermore convincingly show an important new finding: the sensitivity of GOMOS to the sulfate input by moderate volcanic eruptions such as Manam (2005) and Soufrière Hills (2006). Finally, PSCs are well observed by GOMOS and a first qualitative analysis of the data agrees well with the theoretical PSC formation temperature. Therefore, the importance of the GOMOS aerosol/cloud extinction profile data set is clear: a long-term data record of PSCs, subvisual cirrus, and background and volcanic aerosols in the UTLS region, consisting of hundreds of thousands of altitude profiles with near-global coverage, with the potential to fill the aerosol/cloud extinction data gap

  8. The quasi-biennial periodicity (QBP) in velocity and intensity helioseismic observations. The seismic QBP over solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Jiménez, A.; Roth, M.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We looked for signatures of quasi-biennial periodicity (QBP) over different phases of solar cycle by means of acoustic modes of oscillation. Low-degree p-mode frequencies are shown to be sensitive to changes in magnetic activity due to the global dynamo. Recently there has been reported evidence of two-year variations in p-mode frequencies. Methods: Long high-quality helioseismic data are provided by BiSON (Birmingham Solar Oscillation Network), GONG (Global Oscillation Network Group), GOLF (Global Oscillation at Low Frequency) and VIRGO (Variability of Solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillation) instruments. We determined the solar cycle changes in p-mode frequencies for spherical degree ℓ = 0, 1, 2 with their azimuthal components in the frequency range 2.5 mHz ≤ ν ≤ 3.5 mHz. Results: We found signatures of QBP at all levels of solar activity in the modes more sensitive to higher latitudes. The signal strength increases with latitude and the equatorial component also seems to be modulated by the 11-year envelope. Conclusions: The persistent nature of the seismic QBP is not observed in the surface activity indices, where mid-term variations are found only from time to time and mainly in periods of high activity. This feature, together with the latitudinal dependence, provides more evidence of a mechanism that is almost independent and different from the one that brings the active regions up to the surface. Therefore, these findings can be used to provide more constraints on dynamo models that consider a further cyclic component on top of the 11-year cycle.

  9. Observations of Atmospheric Nitrogen and Phosphorus Deposition During the Period of Algal Bloom Formation in Northern Lake Taihu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shuijing; Yang, Longyuan; Hu, Weiping

    2009-09-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Taihu occurred at the end of April 2007 and had crucial impacts on the livelihood of millions of people living there. Excessive nutrients may promote bloom formation. Atmospheric nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deposition appears to play an important role in algal bloom formation. Bulk deposition and rain water samples were collected respectively from May 1 to November 30, 2007, the period of optimal algal growth, to measure the bulk atmospheric deposition rate, wet deposition rate, and dry deposition rate for total nitrogen (TN; i.e., all species of nitrogen), and total phosphorus (TP; i.e., all species of phosphorus), in northern Lake Taihu, China. The trends of the bulk atmospheric deposition rate for TN and the wet deposition rate for TN showed double peaks during the observation period and distinct influence with plum rains and typhoons. Meanwhile, monthly bulk atmospheric deposition rates for TP showed little influence of annual precipitation. However, excessive rain may lead to high atmospheric N and P deposition rates. In bulk deposition samples, the average percentage of total dissolved nitrogen accounting for TN was 91.2% and changed little with time. However, the average percentage of total dissolved phosphorus accounting for TP was 65.6% and changed substantially with time. Annual bulk atmospheric deposition rates of TN and TP during 2007 in Lake Taihu were estimated to be 2,976 and 84 kg km-2 a-1, respectively. The results showed decreases of 34.4% and 78.7%, respectively, compared to 2002-2003. Annual bulk deposition load of TN for Lake Taihu was estimated at 6,958 t a-1 in 2007 including 4,642 t a-1 of wet deposition, lower than the values obtained in 2002-2003. This may be due to measures taken to save energy and emission control regulations in the Yangtze River Delta. Nevertheless, high atmospheric N and P deposition loads helped support cyanobacterial blooms in northern Lake Taihu during summer and autumn, the period

  10. A 3-week feed restriction after weaning as an alternative to a medicated diet: effects on growth, health, carcass and meat traits of rabbits of two genotypes.

    PubMed

    Alabiso, M; Di Grigoli, A; Mazza, F; Maniaci, G; Vitale, F; Bonanno, A

    2016-12-21

    Feed restriction after weaning is widely used in meat rabbit farms to promote health and reduce mortality, but this practice impacts negatively on rabbit growth and slaughter performance. This study compared a 3-week post-weaning feed restriction with ad libitum medicated feeding, evaluating effects on feed intake, growth, health, carcass and meat quality of rabbits of two genotypes: Italian White pure breed and Hycole hybrid×Italian White crossbred. A total of 512 rabbits at 36 days of age, of both sexes and two genotypes, were divided into four homogeneous groups assigned, from 36 to 57 days of age, to different feeding programmes (FP): restricted non-medicated (R-N), ad libitum non-medicated (L-N), restricted medicated (R-M) and ad libitum medicated (L-M). The diets were medicated with oxytetracycline (1540 mg/kg) and colistin sulphate (240 mg/kg). The restriction, performed by giving 70, 80 and 90 g/day of feed for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd week, was followed by ad libitum feeding in the successive 5 weeks, up to slaughter at 92 days of age. Restricted feeds were ingested at a level of 64% of the feed intake recorded in the ad libitum fed rabbits; it was significantly associated, regardless of medication and rabbit genotype, with a lower feed intake (-22 to -24 g dry matter/day) during the entire experiment, compensatory growth and a lower feed conversion ratio in the ad libitum period, and a lower final live weight (-150 g) than ad libitum feeding (P<0.001). During restriction, mortality was lower in the restricted rabbits (6.25%, 5.47% v. 12.5%, 14.8% for R-N, R-M, L-N and L-M; P<0.05), whereas in the ad libitum period mortality did not differ among the groups (9.23%, 9.90%, 11.0% and 4.59% for R-N, R-M, L-N and L-M). Dressing out percentage was not affected by FP or genotype; heavier carcasses were produced by rabbits fed ad libitum (+100 g; P<0.001) and crossbred rabbits (+122 g; P<0.001). Restriction did not alter meat quality, except for a tendency towards a

  11. Can the periodic spectral modulations observed in 236 Sloan Sky Survey stars be due to dark matter effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Fabrizio; Licata, Ignazio

    2017-09-01

    The search for dark matter (DM) is one of the most active and challenging areas of current research. Possible DM candidates are ultralight fields such as axions and weak interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Axions piled up in the center of stars are supposed to generate matter/DM configurations with oscillating geometries at a very rapid frequency, which is a multiple of the axion mass m B (Brito et al (2015); Brito et al (2016)). Borra and Trottier (2016) recently found peculiar ultrafast periodic spectral modulations in 236 main sequence stars in the sample of 2.5 million spectra of galactic halo stars of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (˜1% of main sequence stars in the F-K spectral range) that were interpreted as optical signals from extraterrestrial civilizations, suggesting them as possible candidates for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) program. We argue, instead, that this could be the first indirect evidence of bosonic axion-like DM fields inside main sequence stars, with a stable radiative nucleus, where a stable DM core can be hosted. These oscillations were not observed in earlier stellar spectral classes probably because of the impossibility of starting a stable oscillatory regime due to the presence of chaotic motions in their convective nuclei. The axion mass values, (50< {m}B< 2.4× {10}3) μ {eV}, obtained from the frequency range observed by Borra and Trottier, (0.6070< f< 0.6077) THz, agree with the recent theoretical results from high-temperature lattice quantum chromodynamics (Borsanyi et al (2016); Borsanyi et al (2016b)).

  12. Cosmogenic 7Be and 22Na in Finland: Production, observed periodicities and the connection to climatic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppänen, A.-P.; Usoskin, I. G.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Paatero, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents theoretical production calculations and time series analyses of two cosmogenic isotopes, 7Be and 22Na, from the four high-latitude stations of Kotka, Kajaani, Rovaniemi and Ivalo located in Finland. We used published results for 7Be but performed full simulations of the 22Na production in atmosphere. For the first time, lookup tables of 22Na production by cosmic rays in the atmosphere are presented. In conjunction with calculations using the new model of 22Na production, the 7Be/22Na ratios in the atmosphere were also calculated. The wavelet transform of the 7Be and 22Na time series revealed sets of periodicities in the 2.5-8 year range. The wavelet coherence method was used to study coherences between 7Be and 22Na and 7Be/22Na data and AO, NAO, AMO, QBO and SO teleconnection indices representing different climatic variations in Northern Europe. In the wavelet coherence analyses, the 7Be activities were found to be mainly modulated by NAO and AMO at an interannual scale, while 22Na activity was found to be less effected by climatic phenomena. The 7Be coherence with other indices was intermittent where the coherence with SO was limited to Ivalo data and in the case of QBO, to Kotka data. The 22Na data was not found to be in coherence with any of the studied indices. In the 7Be/22Na ratio a clear seasonal pattern was observed where low 7Be/22Na ratios were observed during summer and high ratios during winter. This was speculated to be caused by the height of atmospheric vertical mixing. During 2006-2011, the 7Be/22Na ratios from Kotka, Kajaani and Rovaniemi showed variance at synoptic time scales but were nearly identical at the seasonal scale. The 7Be/22Na ratio was proposed to be a radiochronometer to estimate residence times of aerosols carrying 7Be and 22Na.

  13. Intestinal stoma in patients with colorectal cancer from the perspective of 20-year period of clinical observation

    PubMed Central

    Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Woda, Łukasz P.; Tojek, Krzysztof; Jarmocik, Paweł; Jawień, Arkadiusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal stoma is a procedure most often performed in patients with colorectal cancer. Aim To identify the percentage of patients with colorectal cancer in which the intestinal stoma was performed. Material and methods We retrospectively analysed 443 patients treated during a 20-year period (1994–2013) due to colorectal cancer, in which the intestinal stoma was made during the first surgical intervention. Results In the second analysed decade, a significant decrease in the percentage of created stomas, definitive stomas in particular, was observed. Stomas were made significantly more often in patients with a tumour located in the rectum, the left half of the colon, and in patients undergoing urgent surgeries. An increased incidence of intestinal stomas was associated with a higher severity of illness and higher proportion of unresectable and non-radical procedures. The definitive stomas were significantly more often made in men and in patients with tumours located in the rectum, whereas temporary stomas were created significantly more often in patients undergoing urgent operations. Conclusions In the last decade (2004–2013) the number of intestinal stomas in patients operated due to colorectal cancer was significantly reduced. PMID:25960811

  14. Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period: Solar Transmittance Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Michalsky, J. J.; Slater, D. W.; Barnard, J. C.; Halthore, R. N.; Liljegren, J. C.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1997, during an Intensive Observation Period (IOP), the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program conducted a study of water vapor abundance measurement at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among a large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring total solar transmittance in the 0.94-gm water vapor absorption band and subtracting contributions due to Rayleigh, ozone and aerosol transmittances. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers has been presented elsewhere (Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 17, 2725-2728, 1999). We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. In a first round of comparison no attempt was made to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy. In the second round of comparison we used the same line-by-line code (which includes recently corrected H2O spectroscopy) to retrieve CAN from all four suntracking radiometers. This decreased the mean CWV by 8% or 13%. The spread of 8% in the solar radiometer results found when using the same model is an indication of the other-than-model uncertainties involved in determining CWV from solar transmittance measurements with current instrumentation.

  15. Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Observation Period (RCS-IOP) millimeter-wave radar calibration and data intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    During April 1994, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) and the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) fielded two millimeter-wave atmospheric radars in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Operation Period (RCS-IOP) experiment. The UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) operates simultaneously at 33.12 GHz and 94.92 GHz through a single antenna. The Penn State radar operates at 93.95 GHz and has separate transmitting and receiving antennas. The two systems were separated by approximately 75 meters and simultaneously observed a variety of cloud types at verticle incidence over the course of the experiment. This abstract presents some initial results from our calibration efforts. An absolute calibration of the UMass radar was made from radar measurements of a trihedral corner reflector, which has a known radar cross-section. A relative calibration of between the Penn State and UMass radars is made from the statistical comparison of zenith pointing measurements of low altitude liquid clouds. Attenuation is removed with the aid of radiosonde data, and the difference in the calibration between the UMass and Penn State radars is determined by comparing the ratio of 94-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity values to a model that accounts for parallax effects of the two antennas used in the Penn State system.

  16. In situ observations of the basal angiosperm Amborella trichopoda reveal a long fruiting cycle overlapping two annual flowering periods.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, Fanny; Pouteau, Robin; Jaffré, Tanguy; Marmey, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Amborella trichopoda is the sole living angiosperm species belonging to the sister lineage of all other extant flowering plants. In the last decade, the species has been the focus of many phylogenetic, genomic and reproductive biology studies, bringing new highlights regarding the evolution of flowering plants. However, little attention has been paid to in situ A. trichopoda populations, particularly to their fruiting cycle. In this study, an A. trichopoda population was observed during three annual flowering cycles. Individuals and branches were labeled in order to monitor the fruiting cycle precisely, from the flowering stage until the abscission of the fruit. Fruit exocarp was green during the first 9 months following flowering, turned red when the next flowering started a year later then remained on the branch during another year, between fruit ripping and abscission. Presence of fruits with two stages of maturity on shrubs was always noticed. Germination tests showed that seeds acquired their germination capacity 1 year after flowering, when fruits changed color. A. trichopoda's fruiting cycle is a long process overlapping two annual flowering periods. These results introduce a new model for flowering and fruiting cycles. The availability of mature seeds on shrubs for more than 1 year is likely to maximize opportunities to be dispersed, thus promoting the survival of this basal angiosperm.

  17. Changes in salivary cortisol and corticosteroid receptor-alpha mRNA expression following a 3-week multidisciplinary treatment program in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bonifazi, Marco; Suman, Anna Lisa; Cambiaggi, Caterina; Felici, Andrea; Grasso, Giovanni; Lodi, Leda; Mencarelli, Marzia; Muscettola, Michela; Carli, Giancarlo

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a 3-week residential multidisciplinary non-pharmacological treatment program (including individually prescribed aerobic exercise and cognitive-behavioral therapy) on fibromyalgia symptoms and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. Salivary and venous blood samples were collected from 12 female patients with fibromyalgia (age: 25-58) the day before and the day after the treatment period: saliva, eight times (every two hours from 0800 to 2200 h); venous blood, at 0800 h. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated and analyzed for glucocorticoid receptor-alpha (GR-alpha) mRNA expression by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, while the salivary cortisol concentration was determined by RIA. At the same time, pain and aerobic capacity were evaluated. Aerobic capacity improved at the end of the treatment program. The slope of the regression of salivary cortisol values on sampling time was steeper in all patients after treatment, indicating that the cortisol decline was more rapid. Concomitantly, the area under the cortisol curve "with respect to increase" (AUC(i)) was higher and there was a significant increase in GR-alpha mRNA expression in PBMC. The number of positive tender points, present pain, pain area and CES-D score were significantly reduced after the treatment, while the pressure pain threshold increased at most of the tender points. Our findings suggest that one of the active mechanisms underlying the effects of our treatment is an improvement of HPA axis function, consisting in increased resiliency and sensitivity of the stress system probably related to stimulation of GR-alpha synthesis by the components of the treatment.

  18. Phase I Clinical Trial of a Day-1, -3, -5 Every 3 WeeksPhase I Clinical Trial of Day-1, -3, -5 Every 3 Weeks Schedule with Titanocene Dichloride (MKT 5) in Patients with Advanced Cancer. (Phase I Study Group of the AIO of the German Cancer Society).

    PubMed

    Mross, K.; Robben-Bathe, P.; Edler, L.; Baumgart, J.; Berdel, W.E.; Fiebig, H.; Unger, C.

    2000-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Titanocene dichloride (TD) is an organometallic compound with antiproliferative properties in vitro and promising antitumor activity in preclinical in vivo models. The drug interferes with DNA, blocks the S/G(2) phase of the cell cycle and shows antiangiogenic properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of a 'split' dose administration schedule (days 1, 3, 5 q 3 weeks). PATIENTS AND METHOD: Patients with progressive advanced cancer and a creatinine clearance > 60 ml/min qualified for a treatment with TD after standard therapies (radio-, chemo-, hormone therapy) failed. A total of 10 patients (4 females, 6 males) with a median age of 58 (range 49-68) years were treated with 80 mg/m(2) TD at days 1, 3 and 5 (repeated at day 22). The drug was administered as light-protected infusion within 1 h. RESULTS: Significant side effects were as follows: nausea/vomiting, appetite loss, renal toxicity (elevation of serum creatinine and proteinuria) and liver toxicity (bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase elevation), but no myelosuppression. At the starting dose (3 x 80 = 240 mg/m(2) TD), renal (3 patients) or liver toxicity (1 patient) of grade 3 was judged as DLT. No further dose escalation was possible. No objective tumor remission was observed. CONCLUSION: The tolerability of TD cannot be improved by splitting the total dose in to three treatments every other day. Compared to previous phase I data using a 3-weekly and a 1-weekly schedule, the 'split' dose administration allowed no further increase of the total drug dose per treatment cycle. Thus, dose intensification by alterations of the application mode does not seem to be possible. Copyright 2000 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  19. The HyMeX Special Observation Period in Central Italy: Precipitation Measurements, Retrieval Techniques and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Petersen, Walt; Marzano, Frank Silvio; Baldini, Luca; Picciotti, Errico; Colantonio, Matteo; Barbieri, Stefano; Di Fabio, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Anagnostou, Emmanoil N..; Ferretti, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. The capability to predict such high-impact events remains weak because of the contribution of very fine-scale processes and their non-linear interactions with the larger scale processes. These societal and science issues motivate the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment, http://www.hymex.orgl) experimental programme. HyMeX aims at a better quantification and understanding of the water cycle in the Mediterranean with emphasis on intense events. The observation strategy of HyMEX is organized in a long-term (4 years) Enhanced Observation Periods (EOP) and short-term (2 months) Special Observation Periods (SOP). HyMEX has identified 3 main Mediterranean target areas: North-West (NW), Adriatic (A) and South-East (SE). Within each target area several hydrometeorological sites for heavy rainfall and flash flooding have been set up. The hydrometeorological sire in Central Italy (CI) is interested by both western and eastern fronts coming from the Atlantic Ocean and Siberia, respectively. Orographic precipitations play an important role due to the central Apennine range, which reaches nearly 3000 m (Gran Sasso peak). Moreover, convective systems commonly develop in CI during late summer and beginning of autumn, often causing localized hailstorms with cluster organized cells. Western fronts may heavily hit the Tiber basin crossing large urban areas (Rome), whereas eastern fronts can cause flash floods along the Adriatic coastline. Two major basins are involved within Cl region: Tiber basin (1000 km long) and its tributary Aniene and the Aterno-Pescara basin (300 km long). The first HyMeX SOP1.1 was carried out from Sept. till Nov. 2012 in the NW target area The Italian SOP1.1 was coordinated by the Centre of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, a city located in the CI heart. The CI area

  20. Trends and projections of temperature, precipitation, and snow cover during snow cover-observed period over southwestern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarenistanak, Mohammad; Dhorde, Amit G.; Kripalani, R. H.; Dhorde, Anargha A.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, tendencies in temperature, precipitation, and snow cover area over the southwestern part of Iran have been assessed. The research mainly focused on snow cover-observed period which included the months of December, January, February, March, and April in the area. This research has been divided into two parts. First part consists of an analysis of the trends in temperature, precipitation, and snow cover area during the above months. Trends in these parameters were tested by linear regression, and significance was determined by t test. Mann-Kendall rank test (MK test) was also employed to confirm the results of linear regression. Sequential Mann-Kendall test (SQ-MK test) was applied for change point detection in the series. For snow cover analysis, remote sensing images from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite with advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) sensor for the period 1987-2007 were used. The second part of the research involved future projections based on four models under B1 and A1B emission scenarios. The models used were centre national de recherches meteorologiques (CNRM), European Center Hamburg model (ECHAM), Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROCH) and United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMOC) under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR4. The analysis of temperature trends revealed a significant increase during February and April. Temperature projections showed that temperature may increase between 1.12 to 7.87 °C by 2100 in the study area. The results of precipitation series indicated that majority of the stations registered insignificant trends during the twentieth century. However, precipitation may decrease according to most of the models under both scenarios, but the decrease may not be large, except according to MIROCH model. The results of trend analysis of snow cover area indicated that no significant trends were detected by any statistical tests

  1. Nonluteal estrous cycles of 3-week duration are initiated by anovulatory luteinizing hormone peaks in African elephants.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, N; Critser, J K; Olson, D; Malven, P V

    1996-11-01

    Previous attempts to characterize the estrous cycle of elephants have yielded conflicting estimates of cycle length and LH profiles. In order to establish artificial breeding programs in this species, resolution of these issues is needed. Therefore, four female African elephants housed at the Indianapolis Zoo were studied for approximately 6 mo beginning in December 1994. Blood was collected weekly, and the serum was immediately analyzed for progesterone (P4). Whenever the weekly concentration of P4 was found to be low, blood was collected one or four times per day. All serum samples were assayed for LH, and the daily samples were assayed for P4 and estradiol. Transient increases of serum LH (designated as peaks) were observed four times in each of the four females. Of these 16 LH peaks, 8 were classified as ovulatory LH (ovLH) peaks and 8 were classified as anovulatory LH (anLH) peaks. Peaks designated ovLH averaged 3.60 +/- 0.67 ng/ml (mean +/- SEM); serum P4 measured during these peaks began to increase 2-3 days before each ovLH peak and continued to increase for several weeks thereafter, reaching a peak of 675 +/- 35 pg/ml. The eight other LH peaks, designated anLH peaks, were of similar (p > 0.05) magnitude averaging 3.07 +/- 0.72 ng/ml, but the serum concentration of P4 remained very low (< 80 pg/ml) during and for several weeks after these peaks. Six peaks designated anLH occurred an average of 12.2 +/- 1.4 days after serum P4 had declined below 80 pg/ml. In each elephant, there was a regular sequence in which each ovLH peak was followed by a luteal-active period lasting about 60 days and then about 12 days later by one anLH peak. Each anLH peak was followed 19-22 days later by one ovLH peak, but serum P4 remained at nonluteal levels throughout this interval between peaks. The authors propose to designate this interval after the anLH peak and before the next ovLH peak as a nonluteal (i.e., low P4) estrous cycle of only 3-wk duration. Following each short

  2. Detecting multiple periodicities in observational data with the multifrequency periodogram - I. Analytic assessment of the statistical significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2013-11-01

    We consider the `multifrequency' periodogram, in which the putative signal is modelled as a sum of two or more sinusoidal harmonics with independent frequencies. It is useful in cases when the data may contain several periodic components, especially when their interaction with each other and with the data sampling patterns might produce misleading results. Although the multifrequency statistic itself was constructed earlier, for example by G. Foster in his CLEANest algorithm, its probabilistic properties (the detection significance levels) are still poorly known and much of what is deemed known is not rigorous. These detection levels are nonetheless important for data analysis. We argue that to prove the simultaneous existence of all n components revealed in a multiperiodic variation, it is mandatory to apply at least 2n - 1 significance tests, among which most involve various multifrequency statistics, and only n tests are single-frequency ones. The main result of this paper is an analytic estimation of the statistical significance of the frequency tuples that the multifrequency periodogram can reveal. Using the theory of extreme values of random fields (the generalized Rice method), we find a useful approximation to the relevant false alarm probability. For the double-frequency periodogram, this approximation is given by the elementary formula (π/16)W2e- zz2, where W denotes the normalized width of the settled frequency range, and z is the observed periodogram maximum. We carried out intensive Monte Carlo simulations to show that the practical quality of this approximation is satisfactory. A similar analytic expression for the general multifrequency periodogram is also given, although with less numerical verification.

  3. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  4. Pulsations and Period Changes of the Non-Blazhko RR Lyrae Variable Y Oct Observed from Dome A, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihua; Fu, Jianning; Zong, Weikai; Wang, Lingzhi; Macri, Lucas M.; Wang, Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Cui, Xiangqun; Feng, Long-Long; Gong, Xuefei; Lawrence, Jon S.; Liu, Qiang; Luong-Van, Daniel; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Yang, Huigen; Yuan, Xiangyan; York, Donald; Xu, Zhou; Zhu, Zhenxi; Zhu, Zonghong

    2015-01-01

    During the operation of the Chinese Small Telescope Array (CSTAR) in Dome A of Antarctica in the years 2008, 2009, and 2010, large amounts of photometric data have been obtained for variable stars in the CSTAR field. We present here the study of one of six RR Lyrae variables, Y Oct, observed with CSTAR in Dome A, Antarctica. Photometric data in the i band were obtained in 2008 and 2010, with a duty cycle (defined as the fraction of time representing scientifically available data to CSTAR observation time) of about 44% and 52%, respectively. In 2009, photometric data in the g and r bands were gathered for this star, with a duty cycle of 65% and 60%, respectively. Fourier analysis of the data in the three bands only shows the fundamental frequency and its harmonics, which is characteristic of the non-Blazhko RR Lyrae variables. Values of the fundamental frequency and the amplitudes, as well as the total pulsation amplitude, are obtained from the data in the three bands separately. The amplitude of the fundamental frequency and the total pulsation amplitude in the g band are the largest, and those in the i band the smallest. Two-hundred fifty-one times of maximum are obtained from the three seasons of data, which are analyzed together with 38 maximum times provided in the GEOS RR Lyrae database. A period change rate of -0.96 ± 0.07 days Myr-1 is then obtained, which is a surprisingly large negative value. Based on relations available in the literature, the following physical parameters are derived: [Fe/H] = -1.41 ± 0.14, MV = 0.696 ± 0.014 mag, V-K = 1.182 ± 0.028 mag, log {{T}eff} = 3.802 ± 0.003 K, log g = 2.705 ± 0.004, log L/{{L}⊙ } = 1.625 ± 0.013, and log M/{{M}⊙ } = -0.240 ± 0.019.

  5. Pulsations and period changes of the non-Blazhko RR lyrae variable Y oct observed from Dome A, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Zhihua, Huang; Jianning, Fu; Weikai, Zong; Lingzhi, Wang; Zonghong, Zhu; M, Macri Lucas; Lifan, Wang; Ashley, Michael C. B.; S, Lawrence Jon; Daniel, Luong-Van; Xiangqun, Cui; Long-Long, Feng; Xuefei, Gong; Qiang, Liu; Huigen, Yang; Xiangyan, Yuan; Xu, Zhou; Zhenxi, Zhu; R, Pennypacker Carl; G, York Donald

    2015-01-01

    During the operation of the Chinese Small Telescope Array (CSTAR) in Dome A of Antarctica in the years 2008, 2009, and 2010, large amounts of photometric data have been obtained for variable stars in the CSTAR field. We present here the study of one of six RR Lyrae variables, Y Oct, observed with CSTAR in Dome A, Antarctica. Photometric data in the i band were obtained in 2008 and 2010, with a duty cycle (defined as the fraction of time representing scientifically available data to CSTAR observation time) of about 44% and 52%, respectively. In 2009, photometric data in the g and r bands were gathered for this star, with a duty cycle of 65% and 60%, respectively. Fourier analysis of the data in the three bands only shows the fundamental frequency and its harmonics, which is characteristic of the non-Blazhko RR Lyrae variables. Values of the fundamental frequency and the amplitudes, as well as the total pulsation amplitude, are obtained from the data in the three bands separately. The amplitude of the fundamental frequency and the total pulsation amplitude in the g band are the largest, and those in the i band the smallest. Two-hundred fifty-one times of maximum are obtained from the three seasons of data, which are analyzed together with 38 maximum times provided in the GEOS RR Lyrae database. A period change rate of −0.96 ± 0.07 days Myr{sup −1} is then obtained, which is a surprisingly large negative value. Based on relations available in the literature, the following physical parameters are derived: [Fe/H] = −1.41 ± 0.14, M{sub V} = 0.696 ± 0.014 mag, V−K = 1.182 ± 0.028 mag, logT{sub eff} = 3.802 ± 0.003 K, logg = 2.705 ± 0.004, logL/L{sub ⊙} = 1.625 ± 0.013, and logM/M{sub ⊙} = −0.240 ± 0.019.

  6. Phase I dose-escalation study of the thioxanthone SR271425 administered intravenously once every 3 weeks in patients with advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Priscila H.; High, Francine; Juniewicz, Paul; Shackleton, Gareth; Li, Jing; Boerner, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Summary This study was performed to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT), the recommended phase II dose and the pharmacokinetic profile for SR271425, given over 1 h every 3 weeks. The initial starting dose of SR271425 was 17 mg/m2. Patient selection was based on common phase I criteria as well as additional cardiac criteria. Thirty-eight patients were accrued to 16 dose levels from 17 to 1,320 mg/m2. Patient characteristics included 24 males and 14 females ages 35–78 with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 (ten patients), 1 (27) and 2 (1). Tumor types were typical for a phase I study. The maximum administered dose was 1,320 mg/m2 with two DLTs, both QTc grade 3 prolongation. No drug related hematological toxicity was noted. Grade 1 toxicities included rash, flushing, pruritus, weight loss, diarrhea, hypertension and fatigue. Grade 2 toxicities included yellow discoloration of the skin, nausea and vomiting. QTc prolongation and hyperbilirubinemia were the only grade 3 toxicities noted. No confirmed tumor response was observed; however, two patients had prolonged stable disease. Both Cend and area under the plasma concentration– time curve increased in a dose related manner. Plasma drug concentrations declined in a biphasic manner with a mean terminal elimination half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 h (±1.3). There was no change in clearance or volume of distribution over the dose range studied. Due to cardiac toxicity occurring with both the parent compound, SR233377, as well as this analog, this series of agents was abandoned from further clinical development. PMID:18449472

  7. Darbepoetin alfa 300 or 500 μg once every 3 weeks with or without intravenous iron in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Michael; Silberstein, Peter T; Webb, R Timothy; Averyanova, Svetlana; Ciuleanu, Tudor-Eliade; Shao, James; Bridges, Kenneth

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated efficacy and safety of darbepoetin alfa administered every 3 weeks (Q3W) at fixed doses of 300 or 500 μg with or without intravenous (IV) iron in treating anemia in patients receiving multicycle chemotherapy. This Phase 2, double-blind, 2 × 2 factorial study randomized patients to one of four treatment arms; darbepoetin alfa 300 μg (n = 62), darbepoetin alfa 300 μg plus IV iron (n = 60), darbepoetin alfa 500 μg (n = 60), or darbepoetin alfa 500 μg plus IV iron (n = 60). Patients had nonmyeloid malignancies, hemoglobin levels ≤10 g dL(-1), and no iron deficiency. Primary endpoint was achievement of target hemoglobin (≥11 g dL(-1)). Secondary endpoints included incidence of transfusions and change in Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Fatigue (FACT-F) score from baseline to end of study. Safety was evaluated by incidence of adverse events. No evidence of a statistically significant interaction between darbepoetin alfa dose received and IV iron usage was observed, therefore, results are provided separately comparing darbepoetin alfa doses and comparing IV iron usage groups. Similar proportions of patients receiving darbepoetin alfa 300 or 500 μg achieved target hemoglobin (75 and 78%, respectively); Kaplan-Meier median time to target hemoglobin was 10 and 8 weeks, respectively. More patients receiving IV iron (82%) than not receiving IV iron (72%) achieved hemoglobin target. Adverse events profiles were similar for darbepoetin alfa treatment groups. Transient anaphylactoid reactions were reported in two patients receiving IV iron. Darbepoetin alfa at 300 μg Q3W and 500 μg Q3W showed similar benefit, while added IV iron improved treatment response in these patients.

  8. Dynamics of CO2-exchange and C-budgets due to soil erosion: Insights from a 4 years observation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Garcia Alba, Juana; Augustin, Jürgen; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE-Germany is characterized by an increase in energy crop cultivation, like maize or sorghum. Both enhance lateral C fluxes by erosion and induce feedbacks on C dynamics of agroecosystems as a result of reduced wintertime plant cover and vigorous crop growth during summer. However, the actual impact of these phenomena on the CO2-sink/-source function of agricultural landscapes, is still not clear. Therefore, the interdisciplinary project "CarboZALF" was established in Dedelow/Prenzlau (NE-Germany) in 2009. Within the field experiment CarboZALF-D, CO2 fluxes for the soil-plant systems were monitored, covering typical landscape relevant soil states in respect to erosion and deposition, like Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol. Automated chamber systems, each consisting of four transparent chambers (2.5 m height, basal area 2.25 m2), were placed along gradients at both measurement sites. Monitored CO2 fluxes were gap-filled on a high-temporal resolution by modelling ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) based on parallel and continuous measurements of the CO2 exchange, soil and air temperatures as well as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Gap-filling was e.g. needed in case of chamber malfunctions and abrupt disturbances by farming practice. The monitored crop rotation was corn-winter wheat (2 a), sorghum-winter triticale and alfalfa (1.5 a). In our presentation we would like to show insights from a 4 years observation period, with prounounced differences between the eroded and the colluvial soil: The Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol showed higher flux rates for Reco, GPP and NEE compared to the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol. Site-specific NEE and C-balances were positively related to soil C-stocks as well as biomass production, and generated a minor C-sink in case of the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and a highly variable C-source in case of the

  9. Aerosol characterization and radiative properties over Kavaratti, a remote island in southern Arabian Sea from the period of observations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Piyushkumar N; Dumka, U C; Babu, K N; Mathur, A K

    2017-12-01

    Long-term measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) using sun/sky radiometer for a period of five years (2009-2014) from the remote island location at Kavaratti (KVT; 10.56°N, 72.64°E) in the southern Arabian sea have been analysed. Climatologically, AODs decrease from October to reach maximum of ~0.6 (at 500nm) in March, followed by a sudden fall towards May. Significant modulations of intra-seasonal timescales over this general pattern are noticed due to the changes in the relative strength of distinctively different sources. The corresponding changes in aerosol inversion parameters reveal the presence of coarse-mode aerosols during spring and fine-mode absorbing aerosols in autumn and winter months. An overall dominance of a mixed type of aerosols (~41%) with maximum in winter (~53%) was found via the AOD500 vs. Ångström exponent (α440-870) relationship, while biomass-burning aerosols or thick urban/industrial plumes contribute to ~19%. Spectral dependence of Ångström exponent and aerosol absorbing properties were used to identify the aerosol types and its modification processes. Based on air mass back trajectory analysis, we revealed that the advection of aerosols from Indian subcontinent and western regions plays a major role in modifying the optical properties of aerosols over the observational site. The shortwave aerosol direct radiative forcing estimated via SBDART model ranges from -11.00Wm(-2) to -7.38Wm(-2), -21.51Wm(-2) to -14.33Wm(-2) and 3.17Wm(-2) and 10.0Wm(-2) at top of atmosphere, surface and within the atmosphere, respectively. This atmospheric forcing translates into heating rate of 0.62-1.04Kday(-1). Furthermore, the vertical profiles of aerosols and heating rate exhibit significant increase in lower (during winter and autumn) and mid troposphere (during spring). This may cause serious climate implications over Kavaratti with further consequences on cloud microphysics and monsoon rainfall. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  10. Stable time patterns of railway suicides in Germany: comparative analysis of 7,187 cases across two observation periods (1995–1998; 2005–2008)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of fatalities on the European Union (EU) railways are suicides, representing about 60% of all railway fatalities. The aim of this study was to compare time patterns of suicidal behaviour on railway tracks in Germany between two observation periods (1995–1998 and 2005–2008) in order to investigate their stability and value in railway suicide prevention. Methods Cases were derived from the National Central Registry of person accidents on the German railway network (STABAG). The association of daytime, weekday and month with the mean number of suicides was analysed applying linear regression. Potential differences by observation period were assessed by adding observation period and the respective interaction terms into the linear regression. A 95% confidence interval for the mean number of suicides was computed using the t distribution. Results A total of 7,187 railway suicides were recorded within both periods: 4,102 (57%) in the first period (1995–1998) and 3,085 (43%) in the second (2005–2008). The number of railway suicides was highest on Mondays and Tuesdays in the first period with an average of 3.2 and 3.5 events and of 2.6 events on both days in the second period. In both periods, railway suicides were more common between 6:00 am and noon, and between 6:00 pm and midnight. Seasonality was only prominent in the period 1995–1998. Conclusions Over the course of two observation periods, the weekday and circadian patterns of railway suicides remained stable. Therefore, these patterns should be an integral part of railway suicide preventive measures, e.g. gatekeeper training courses. PMID:24498876

  11. Stable time patterns of railway suicides in Germany: comparative analysis of 7,187 cases across two observation periods (1995-1998; 2005-2008).

    PubMed

    Lukaschek, Karoline; Baumert, Jens; Erazo, Natalia; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-02-06

    The majority of fatalities on the European Union (EU) railways are suicides, representing about 60% of all railway fatalities. The aim of this study was to compare time patterns of suicidal behaviour on railway tracks in Germany between two observation periods (1995-1998 and 2005-2008) in order to investigate their stability and value in railway suicide prevention. Cases were derived from the National Central Registry of person accidents on the German railway network (STABAG). The association of daytime, weekday and month with the mean number of suicides was analysed applying linear regression. Potential differences by observation period were assessed by adding observation period and the respective interaction terms into the linear regression. A 95% confidence interval for the mean number of suicides was computed using the t distribution. A total of 7,187 railway suicides were recorded within both periods: 4,102 (57%) in the first period (1995-1998) and 3,085 (43%) in the second (2005-2008). The number of railway suicides was highest on Mondays and Tuesdays in the first period with an average of 3.2 and 3.5 events and of 2.6 events on both days in the second period. In both periods, railway suicides were more common between 6:00 am and noon, and between 6:00 pm and midnight. Seasonality was only prominent in the period 1995-1998. Over the course of two observation periods, the weekday and circadian patterns of railway suicides remained stable. Therefore, these patterns should be an integral part of railway suicide preventive measures, e.g. gatekeeper training courses.

  12. Randomized phase II/III trial of post-operative chemoradiotherapy comparing 3-weekly cisplatin with weekly cisplatin in high-risk patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1008).

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Futoshi; Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Fujii, Masato

    2014-08-01

    A randomized Phase II/III study was launched in Japan to evaluate the non-inferiority of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) compared with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) for post-operative high-risk patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. This study began in October 2012, and a total of 260 patients will be accrued from 18 institutions within 5 years. The primary endpoint of the Phase II part is proportion of treatment completion and that of the Phase III part is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, nutrition-support-free survival, non-hospitalized treatment period during permissible treatment period and adverse events. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000009125 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/].

  13. Superorbital Periodic Modulation in Wind-Accretion High-Mass X-Ray Binaries from Swift Burst Alert Telescope Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbet, Robin H. D.; Krimm, Hans A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery using data from the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital periodicities in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital periods. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This suggests an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital period. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital periods, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array, and International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries.

  14. Superorbital periodic modulation in wind-accretion high-mass X-ray binaries from swift burst alert telescope observations

    SciTech Connect

    Corbet, Robin H. D.; Krimm, Hans A.

    2013-11-20

    We report the discovery using data from the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418–4532, and IGR J16479–4514. Together with already known superorbital periodicities in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493–4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital periods. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This suggests an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital period. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital periods, IGR J16393–4643 (= AX J16390.4–4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array, and International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory light curves. 1E 1145.1–6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries.

  15. Observations of Periodic Comet 2P/Encke: Physical Properties of the Nucleus and First Visual-Wavelength Detection of Its Dust Trail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Stephen C.; Weissman, Paul R.; Sykes, Mark V.; Reach, William T.

    2003-01-01

    We are conducting an observational program designed to determine the overall distributions of size, shape, rotation period, and surface characteristics of cometary nuclei. Here, we present results from a study of the Jupiter- family comet 2P/Encke based on observations from Steward Observatory's 2.3m Bok Telescope at Kitt Peak. This comet has been observed extensively in the past and was one of the primary flyby targets of the recently failed CONTOUR mission.

  16. Observations of Periodic Comet 2P/Encke: Physical Properties of the Nucleus and First Visual-Wavelength Detection of Its Dust Trail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Stephen C.; Weissman, Paul R.; Sykes, Mark V.; Reach, William T.

    2003-01-01

    We are conducting an observational program designed to determine the overall distributions of size, shape, rotation period, and surface characteristics of cometary nuclei. Here, we present results from a study of the Jupiter- family comet 2P/Encke based on observations from Steward Observatory's 2.3m Bok Telescope at Kitt Peak. This comet has been observed extensively in the past and was one of the primary flyby targets of the recently failed CONTOUR mission.

  17. DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neutrophils of dairy cows during the transition period.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, M; Endoh, D; Oikawa, S

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the apoptotic process in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) in dairy cattle during the transition period. Blood samples were collected from 4 dairy cattle at 3 weeks before the expected parturition (wk -3), parturition (wk 0) and 3 weeks after parturition (wk +3). The DNA damage of PBMC and PMN was evaluated based on the comet assay using visual scoring (arbitrary units). Undamaged DNA remained within the core (score 0) and the broken DNA migrated from the core towards the anode forming the tail of a comet (scores 1-4). Significantly higher scores in PBMC at wk 0 and wk +3 were observed compared with those in PMN although there were no significant changes of scores in either cell type during the experimental period. It is suggested that the apoptotic rate of PBMC is accelerated compared with that of PMC during the transition period.

  18. Ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in transgenic mice over-expressing erythropoietin: effect of acclimation to 3-week hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Cárdenas-Alayza, Rosa; Macarlupú, José Luis; Monge-C, Carlos; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2007-09-30

    We used transgenic mice constitutively over-expressing erythropoietin ("tg6" mice) and wild-type (wt) mice to investigate whether the high hematocrit (hct), consequence of Epo over-expression affected: (1) the normoxic ventilation (V (E)) and the acute hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and decline (HVD), (2) the increase in ventilation observed after chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (430mmHg for 21 days), (3) the respiratory "blunting", and (4) the erythrocythemic response induced by chronic hypoxia exposure. V (E) was found to be similar in tg6 and wt mice in normoxia (FIO2=0.21). Post-acclimation V (E) was significantly elevated in every time point in wt mice at FIO2=0.10 when compared to pre-acclimation values. In contrast, tg6 mice exhibited a non-significant increase in V (E) throughout acute hypoxia exposure. Changes in V (E) are associated with adjustments in tidal volume (V(T)). HVR and HVD were independent of EE in tg6 and wt mice before chornic hypoxia exposure. HVR was significantly greater in wt than in tg6 mice after chronic hypoxia. After acclimation, HVD decreased in tg6 mice. Chronic hypoxia exposure caused hct to increase significantly in wt mice, while only a marginal increase occurred in the tg6 group. Although pre-existent EE does not appear to have an effect on HVR, the observation of alterations on V(T) suggests that it may contribute to time-dependent changes in ventilation and in the acute HVR during exposure to chronic hypoxia. In addition, our results suggest that EE may lead to an early "blunting" of the ventilatory response.

  19. The histological observations on the large intestine of the goose (Anser anser) during the pre- and post-hatching periods.

    PubMed

    Líman, Narin; Aslan, Sahin; Gülmez, Nurhayat

    2002-08-01

    The development of the cecum and colon in the goose was investigated during the period from the 15th to 28th day of the incubation and from 1 to 30 days of age after hatching by light microscopy. By day 15 of the incubation, in the cecum and colon, the lumen was surrounded by pseudostratified epithelium. The previllous ridges appeared at 15th and 17th days of the incubation in the colon and ceca, respectively. At the base of previllous ridges, the epithelium changed into a simple prismathic epithelium at 15th and 17th days of the incubation in the colon and cecum, respectively. The villi appeared at the 21st days of the incubation. The crypts and goblet cells appeared on the first day after hatching. In the pre-hatching period, the lamina muscularis mucosa was present only in the colon. The submucosa consisted of loosely aggregated connective tissue in the pre-hatching period. In the post-hatching period, it consisted of a very thin layer of connective tissue. Its presence was only obvious where the cells of the submucosal nerve plexus or occasional large blood vessels considerably increased its thickness. The nerve plexus corresponding to the Auerbach's plexus of the mammalian intestine and submucosal nerve plexus appeared by 15th days of the incubation. From the 15th to 28th day of incubation, the tunica muscularis consisted of circular smooth muscle cells in the ceca. On the 28th day of the incubation a thinner longitudinal muscle layer added to the circular muscle layer. In the colon there was an outer longitudinal and a thicker circular muscle layer.

  20. Anomalous domain periodicity observed in ferroelectric PbTiO3 nanodots having 180° stripe domains

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jong Yeog; Song, Seungwoo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2016-01-01

    Nanometer-scale ferroelectric dots and tubes have received a great deal of attention owing to their potential applications to nonvolatile memories and multi-functional devices. As for the size effect of 180° stripe domains in ferroelectric thin films, there have been numerous reports on the thickness-dependent domain periodicity. All these studies have revealed that the domain periodicity (w) of 180° stripe domains scales with the film thickness (d) according to the classical Landau-Lifshitz-Kittel (LLK) scaling law (w ∝ d1/2) down to the thickness of ~2 nm. In the case of PbTiO3 nanodots, however, we obtained a striking correlation that for the thickness less than a certain critical value, dc (~35 nm), the domain width even increases with decreasing thickness of the nanodot, which surprisingly indicates a negative value in the LLK scaling-law exponent. On the basis of theoretical considerations of dc, we attributed this anomalous domain periodicity to the finite lateral-size effect of a ferroelectric nanodot with an additional effect possibly coming from the existence of a thin non-ferroelectric surface layer. PMID:27226162

  1. Anomalous domain periodicity observed in ferroelectric PbTiO3 nanodots having 180° stripe domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jong Yeog; Song, Seungwoo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Jang, Hyun Myung

    2016-05-01

    Nanometer-scale ferroelectric dots and tubes have received a great deal of attention owing to their potential applications to nonvolatile memories and multi-functional devices. As for the size effect of 180° stripe domains in ferroelectric thin films, there have been numerous reports on the thickness-dependent domain periodicity. All these studies have revealed that the domain periodicity (w) of 180° stripe domains scales with the film thickness (d) according to the classical Landau-Lifshitz-Kittel (LLK) scaling law (w ∝ d1/2) down to the thickness of ~2 nm. In the case of PbTiO3 nanodots, however, we obtained a striking correlation that for the thickness less than a certain critical value, dc (~35 nm), the domain width even increases with decreasing thickness of the nanodot, which surprisingly indicates a negative value in the LLK scaling-law exponent. On the basis of theoretical considerations of dc, we attributed this anomalous domain periodicity to the finite lateral-size effect of a ferroelectric nanodot with an additional effect possibly coming from the existence of a thin non-ferroelectric surface layer.

  2. (abstract) Role of Long Equatorial Wave Reflection in the Low-Frequency Variability Observed During the TOPEX/POSEIDON Period: Data Analysis and Coupled Model Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, J. P.; Perigaud, C.; Fu, L. L.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level and ERS-1 zonal wind stress data gives evidence that first mode meridonal long Rossby waves fully reflected into Kelvin waves at the equatorial western Pacific boundary at different periods including the January-June 1994 period. The evolution of the conditions (zonal wind stress, sea surface temperature and sea level anomalies) in the central Pacific suggests that this reflection may have played a role in the reversal of cold to warm anomalies observed in the central Pacific in June-July 1994. To investigate the actual role of reflected Kelvin waves observed by TOPEX/POSEIDON, a simple ocean-atmosphere coupled model is designed. Starting from these initial conditions, several simulations are run for testing the role western bundary reflection evidenced in TOPEX/POSEIDON data. Coupled mechanisms are suggested to explain the low-frequency variability observed during this period.

  3. (abstract) Role of Long Equatorial Wave Reflection in the Low-Frequency Variability Observed During the TOPEX/POSEIDON Period: Data Analysis and Coupled Model Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, J. P.; Perigaud, C.; Fu, L. L.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level and ERS-1 zonal wind stress data gives evidence that first mode meridonal long Rossby waves fully reflected into Kelvin waves at the equatorial western Pacific boundary at different periods including the January-June 1994 period. The evolution of the conditions (zonal wind stress, sea surface temperature and sea level anomalies) in the central Pacific suggests that this reflection may have played a role in the reversal of cold to warm anomalies observed in the central Pacific in June-July 1994. To investigate the actual role of reflected Kelvin waves observed by TOPEX/POSEIDON, a simple ocean-atmosphere coupled model is designed. Starting from these initial conditions, several simulations are run for testing the role western bundary reflection evidenced in TOPEX/POSEIDON data. Coupled mechanisms are suggested to explain the low-frequency variability observed during this period.

  4. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With 3-Week Accelerated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, Manjeet; Woode, Rudolph; Sillanpaa, Jussi; Lucido, David; Boolbol, Susan K.; Kirstein, Laurie; Osborne, Michael P.; Feldman, Sheldon; Harrison, Louis B.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes of accelerated whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost. Methods and Materials: This is a prospective, institutional review board-approved study. Eligibility included stage TisN0, T1N0, and T2N0 breast cancer. Patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were ineligible. The whole breast received 40.5 Gy in 2.7-Gy fractions with a concomitant lumpectomy boost of 4.5 Gy in 0.3-Gy fractions. Total dose to the lumpectomy site was 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 19 days. Results: Between October 2004 and December 2010, 160 patients were treated; stage distribution was as follows: TisN0, n=63; T1N0, n=88; and T2N0, n=9. With a median follow-up of 3.5 years (range, 1.5-7.8 years) the 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.94) and 97% (95% CI 0.93-0.99), respectively. Five-year local relapse-free survival was 99% (95% CI 0.96-0.99). Acute National Cancer Institute/Common Toxicity Criteria grade 1 and 2 skin toxicity was observed in 70% and 5%, respectively. Among the patients with ≥2-year follow-up no toxicity higher than grade 2 on the Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic scale was observed. Review of the radiation therapy dose–volume histogram noted that ≥95% of the prescribed dose encompassed the lumpectomy target volume in >95% of plans. The median dose received by the heart D{sub 05} was 215 cGy, and median lung V{sub 20} was 7.6%. Conclusions: The prescribed accelerated schedule of whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost can be administered, achieving acceptable dose distribution. With follow-up to date, the results are encouraging and suggest minimal side effects and excellent local control.

  5. A 3-week dietary safety study of octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starch in neonatal farm piglets.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Brinda; Thorsrud, Bjorn A; Brorby, Gregory P; Ferguson, Heather E

    2014-10-01

    Octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starch functions as both an emulsifier and emulsion stabilizer in foods, and is intended for use in infant formula, follow-on formula, and formulae for special medical purposes. These formulae predominantly include extensively hydrolyzed protein or free amino acids, rather than intact protein, which otherwise would provide emulsifying functionality. The study objectives were to evaluate (1) the safety of OSA-modified starch after three weeks of administration to neonatal farm piglets, beginning 2 days after birth and (2) the impact of OSA-modified starch on piglet growth. OSA-modified starch was added to formula at concentrations of 2, 4, and 20 g/L. The vehicle control, low-dose, and mid-dose diets were supplemented with Amioca™ Powder to balance the nutritional profiles of all formulations. There were no test article-related effects of any diet containing OSA-modified starch on piglet growth and development (clinical observations, body weight, feed consumption), or clinical pathology parameters (hematology, clinical chemistry, coagulation, urinalysis). In addition, there were no adverse effects at terminal necropsy (macro- and microscopic pathology evaluations). Therefore, dietary exposure to OSA-modified starch at concentrations up to 20 g/L was well tolerated by neonatal farm piglets and did not result in adverse health effects or impact piglet growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Observations of the surge-type Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska, during a quiescent period, 1970-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinrichs, Thomas A.; Mayo, L.R.; Trabant, D.C.; March, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents 23 years (1970 to 1992) of observations of Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. Black Rapids Glacier is a surge-type glacier which most recently surged in 1936-37, and is currently in its quiescent phase. This glacier is of special interest because it is a potential hazard to the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. Ten sites on the glacier were monitored from 1972 to 1987, and three sites were monitored from 1988 to 1992. The measurement program presented here includes observations of surface mass balance, ice velocity, and surface altitude made twice each year. Additional one-time data include observations of ice thickness, previously unreported observations of the 1936-37 surge, establishment of the geodetic control monuments, and a new map of Black Rapids Glacier.

  7. Observations and Modeling of Low Level Moisture Convergence Patterns in the Southern Appalachians during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx) Extended Observing Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Anna M.; Barros, Ana P.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate fields of precipitation accumulations and intensity at high spatial resolution in regions of complex terrain are largely unavailable. This is due to first, a lack of existing in situ observations, both because of the challenge in having high enough density in the instrument placement to represent the large spatial heterogeneity in rainfall patterns in these regions and because of the remote, harsh nature of the terrain that makes it difficult to install and maintain instrumentation and second, obstacles to remote sensing such as beam blockage and ground clutter that are caused by the complex orography. In this study we leverage observations from two sources: 1) a high-elevation, high-density tipping bucket rain gauge network that has been recording precipitation observations for over six years along ridgelines in the Pigeon River Basin, a small watershed in the Southern Appalachians, and 2) the 4-D database of observations collected in 2014 in support of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) during the first field campaign after the launch of the GPM satellite, the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), to learn about formation and maintenance mechanisms for fog and low cloud in this region and the resulting impact on the precipitation regime. The observations focused on here are those at the near surface, within 2 kilometers of the ground level. This presentation will focus on process-based modeling studies using the Advanced Research Weather and Forecasting Model conducted based upon observations made during this campaign. Case studies will be presented for real events simulated during the IPHEx campaign. These case studies occurred with different synoptic conditions, but include observational evidence of orographic enhancement. The case studies are simulated and analyzed in order to investigate how the topography modulates the regional, diurnal patterns of moisture convergence and fog and low cloud formation, as well as the mid

  8. A Comparative Experimental Study of an Extreme Rainstorm Caused by the Southwest China Vortex during the Intensive Observation Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.

    2016-12-01

    Abstract A rainstorm caused by the Southwest China vortex (SWCV) in Sichuan during 7 July-10 July 2012 is analyzed by using the NCEP data of 1ºx1º with 6-hour interval, the conventional observed data and the intensive observed data of SWCV experiment during flood season. The results show that using the Southwest Center - WRF ADAS Real-time Modeling System (SWCWARMS), compared with the control experiment, the distribution of rainfall in assimilation experiment (only assimilating intensive observed data) is more similar to the actual precipitation. By assimilating intensive observed data, the southerly flow exists in northern Sichuan in initial time, which benefits for the newborn of SWCV. Contrast research shows the strength and the range of SWCV are much larger than them in control experiment. In addition, there is a phenomenon that airflow heaps up at the south side of Daba Mountain due to the blocking function of terrain, which causes rainstorm at the border of Sichuan and Shanxi. So, assimilating the intensive observed data in regional modeling system can improve the weather forecast of heavy rainfall and promote the predict ability of SWCV. Key words: Intensive observation, Southwest China vortex, Rainstorm

  9. Phase I study of Aplidine in a dailyx5 one-hour infusion every 3 weeks in patients with solid tumors refractory to standard therapy. A National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group study: NCIC CTG IND 115.

    PubMed

    Maroun, J A; Belanger, K; Seymour, L; Matthews, S; Roach, J; Dionne, J; Soulieres, D; Stewart, D; Goel, R; Charpentier, D; Goss, G; Tomiak, E; Yau, J; Jimeno, J; Chiritescu, G

    2006-09-01

    Aplidine is a cyclic depsipeptide isolated from the marine tunicate Aplidium albicans. This phase I study of Aplidine given as a 1-hour i.v. infusion daily for 5 days every 3 weeks was conducted in patients with refractory solid tumors. Objectives were to define the dose limiting toxicities, the maximal tolerated dose, and the recommended phase II dose. Thirty-seven patients were accrued on study. Doses ranged from 80 microg/m(2) to 1500 microg/m(2)/day. Eleven patients received more than three cycles of Aplidine. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred at 1500 microg/m(2) and 1350 microg/m(2)/day and consisted of nausea, vomiting, myalgia, fatigue, skin rash and diarrhea. Mild to moderate muscular pain and weakness was noted in patients treated with multiple cycles with no significant drug related neurotoxicity. Bone marrow toxicity was not observed. The recommended dose for phase II studies was 1200 microg/m(2) daily for 5 days, every 3 weeks. Pharmacokinetic studies performed during the first cycle demonstrated that therapeutic plasma levels of Aplidine are reachable well below the recommended dose. Nine patients with progressive disease at study entry had stable disease and two had minor responses, one in non-small cell lung cancer and one in colorectal cancer. Aplidine given at a dose of 1200 microg/m(2) daily for 5 days, every 3 weeks is well tolerated with few severe adverse events. This schedule of Aplidine is under evaluation in phase II studies in hematological malignancies and solid tumors.

  10. Using dissolved gases to observe the evolution of groundwater age in a mountain watershed over a period of thirteen years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    Baseflows in snowmelt-dominated mountain streams are critical for sustaining ecosystems and water resources during periods of greatest demand. Future climate predictions for mountainous areas throughout much of the western U.S. include increasing temperatures, declining snowpacks, and earlier snowmelt periods. The degree to and rate at which these changes will affect baseflows in mountain streams remains unknown, largely because baseflows are groundwater-fed and the relationship between climate and groundwater recharge/discharge rates in mountain watersheds is uncertain. We use groundwater age determinations from multiple dissolved gas tracers (CFCs, SF6, and 3H/3He) to track changes in groundwater age over a period of thirteen years in the Sagehen Creek watershed, Sierra Nevada Mountains, CA. Data were collected from springs and wells in 2009 and 2010 and combined with those obtained in prior studies from 1997 to 2003. Apparent ages range from 0 to >60 years. Comparison between variations in age and variations in snow water equivalent (SWE) and mean annual air temperature reveals the degree of correlation between these climate variables and recharge rate. Further, comparison of apparent ages from individual springs obtained at different times and using different tracers helps constrain the age distribution in the sampled waters. The age data are generally more consistent with an exponential age distribution than with piston-flow. However, many samples, even those with relatively old mean ages, must have a disproportionately large very young fraction that responds directly to annual SWE variations. These findings have important implications for how future baseflows may respond to decreasing SWE.

  11. Photometric observations and Numerical modeling of SDSS J162520.29+120308.7, an SU UMa in the CV period gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. M.; Voloshina, I.; Olenick, Richard; Meziere, Kyle; Metlov, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    We present R-band photometric observations of Cataclysmic Variable dwarf nova SU UMa SDSS J162520.29+120308.7 during the July 2010 superoutburst, from near maximum through decline and into a single rebrightening. We find a maximum superoutburst amplitude of ∼ 6.1 magnitudes and a maximum rebrightening amplitude of ∼4 magnitudes. Near superoutburst maximum, we find 0.09604(3) days for the mean Stage B positive superhump period and a much longer period for the hump shaped modulation during the rebrightening. For the orbital period, we find Porb = 0.09113(30) days. As all periods both agree and disagree with values reported by others, additional observations are needed. Our 2015 observations of this system in quiescence reveal a 0.09080(20) day orbital period. As our 2010 value is within the error bars of a spectroscopically determined value and our 2015 photometrically determined value, we suggest 0.09113(30) days as the orbital period for this system. As for the secondary-to-primary mass ratio, analytical models using observed orbital and Stage B positive superhump periods as input suggest q = 0.221. As a check, we present a 3D SPH simulation of the rise to, and during the plateau stage of, the SU UMa in superoutburst, assuming Porb=0.09113 days. For Stages A and B, we find 0.09717 days and 0.09702 days, respectively, for the average simulated positive superhump periods. Analytical models using these simulated Stages A and B and the simulated orbital period suggest q = 0.1920(4) and q = 0.221, respectively, for this system. Due to the poorly constrained observational data and the similar mass ratio estimates regardless of stage, we can neither confirm nor deny that Stage A is better than Stage B for determining mass ratio in CV dwarf novae SU UMa systems. Additional observations and simulations are needed to further test this recently proposed hypothesis. For now, we suggest an average q = 0.21(1) for this system.

  12. Kinematical parameters of the meteors from the results of the basic television observations during the period of the autumn solstice 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, P.; Rozhilo, O.; Taranukha, Ju.

    2012-12-01

    Results of kinematical processing of double-station TV meteor observations during a period of Autumn Equinox of 2001 are presented. "Introskop" TV systems equipped by high sensitive transmitting TV tubes of super-isocon type (Li-804), and photographic lenses Jupiter-3 had been used for the observations. The observations were carried out on September 21-22, 2001 simultaneously from two points placed at the distance of 54 km. We have registered 18 double-station meteors for the observational period. Kinematical parameters of meteors are presented, and the problem of precision of the observational data is discussed. The observational results are compared with the working list of meteor shower radiants of Meteor Data Center of International Astronomical Union. Established meteor showers from the list: Dayt. Kappa Leonids and October Capricornids, which had to be active during observational periods were confirmed by no one of 18 meteors. Another established shower named September epsilon Perseids could be confirmed by four meteors, but not surely because of significant deviations of control parameters. Also we have confirmed a few mini-showers, including one: sigma Orionids with possible enhancement of its activity time for three days.

  13. Comparative 3-week clinical tooth-shade evaluation of a novel liquid whitening gel containing 18% carbamide peroxide and a commercially available whitening dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Salim; Giniger, Martin; Proskin, Howard M; Stewart, Bernal; Robinson, Richard; Collins, Michael; DeVizio, William; Petrone, Margaret; Volpe, Anthony R

    2002-11-01

    A randomized, controlled, examiner-blind, parallel-group clinical trial was performed to compare the tooth-whitening benefits of a novel, nontray, "paint-on" liquid gel containing 18% carbamide peroxide (Colgate Simply White Clear Whitening Gel) to those of a commercially available whitening dentifrice. Efficacy was measured by using Vita shade scores obtained at baseline and after 2 and 3 weeks of product use. Eighty subjects were first balanced according to gender, age, and shade scores into two groups. Half were then randomly assigned to either alpha 3-week routine of tooth-brushing (using a nonwhitening dentifrice) and twice-daily 18% carbamide peroxide gel application or a 3-week routine of twice-daily brushing with the commercially available whitening dentifrice. At the completion of the study, the results showed that subjects' teeth in the liquid whitening gel-treated group exhibited a statistically significant (P < .05) 4.12 mean tooth-shade improvement compared to baseline and exhibited a mean score that was 3.7 units higher than the corresponding mean score of the group assigned to use the whitening dentifrice (statistically significant, P < .05). It can therefore be concluded that the combined use of Colgate Simply White Clear Whitening Gel immediately after brushing with a regular toothpaste is clinically superior at whitening teeth than solely using a clinically proven, commercially available whitening dentifrice.

  14. Lanreotide autogel every 6 weeks compared with Lanreotide microparticles every 3 weeks in patients with well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: a Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Bajetta, Emilio; Procopio, Giuseppe; Catena, Laura; Martinetti, Antonia; De Dosso, Sara; Ricci, Sergio; Lecchi, Alberto S; Boscani, Paolo F; Iacobelli, Stefano; Carteni, Giacomo; De Braud, Filippo; Loli, Paola; Tartaglia, Andreas; Bajetta, Roberto; Ferrari, Leonardo

    2006-11-15

    The noninferiority of a 6-week dosing schedule of lanreotide Autogel (Lan ATG) at a dose of 120 mg compared with a 3-week dosing schedule of lanreotide microparticles (Lan MP) at a dose of 60 mg was investigated in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Patients who had sporadic, well differentiated NET with a low grade of malignancy were recruited for this open-label, Phase III, multicenter trial. Patients were randomized to receive either 3 deep subcutaneous injections of Lan ATG (120 mg, every 6 weeks) or 6 intramuscular injections of Lan MP (60 mg, every 3 weeks). Tumor markers, tumor size, and symptoms were assessed between baseline and Week 18. Success was classified as a response that ranged from disappearance to an increase <25% in tumor marker, tumor size, or symptom frequency. Sixty patients were randomized, and 46 patients completed the study. Both for tumor markers and for tumor size, Lan ATG was not inferior to Lan MP (55% and 59% of patients responded on tumor markers, respectively; 68% and 66% of patients responded on tumor size, respectively). There were too few symptomatic patients to compare carcinoid symptoms. Both treatments were tolerated well, and no safety concerns were identified. Lan ATG at a dose of 120 mg every 6 weeks was as effective for controlling NET as Lan MP at a dose of 60 mg every 3 weeks.

  15. Excretion of Zinc and Copper Increases in Men during 3 Weeks of Bed Rest, with or without Artificial Gravity.

    PubMed

    Heacox, Hayley N; Gillman, Patricia L; Zwart, Sara R; Smith, Scott M

    2017-06-01

    Background: Zinc and copper have many physiologic functions and little or no functional storage capability, so persistent losses of either element present health concerns, especially during extended-duration space missions.Objectives: We evaluated the effects of short-term bed rest (BR), a spaceflight analog, on copper and zinc metabolism to better understand the role of these nutrients in human adaptation to (simulated) spaceflight. We also investigated the effect of artificial gravity on copper and zinc homeostasis.Methods: Zinc and copper balances were studied in 15 men [mean ± SD age: 29 ± 3 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 26.4 ± 2.2] before, during, and after 21 d of head-down tilt BR, during which 8 of the participants were subjected to artificial gravity (AG) by centrifugation for 1 h/d. Control subjects were transferred onto the centrifuge but were not exposed to centrifugation. The study was conducted in a metabolic ward; all urine and feces were collected. Data were analyzed by 2-factor repeated-measures ANOVA.Results: Urinary zinc excretion values for control and AG groups were 33% and 14%, respectively, higher during BR than before BR, and fecal zinc excretion values for control and AG groups were 36% and 19%, respectively, higher during BR, resulting in 67% and 82% lower net zinc balances for controls and AG, respectively (both P < 0.01), despite lower nutrient intake during BR. Fecal copper values for control and AG groups were 40% and 33%, respectively, higher during BR than before BR (P < 0.01 for both). Urinary copper did not change during BR, but a 19% increase was observed after BR compared with before BR in the AG group (P < 0.05).Conclusions: The increased fecal excretion of copper and zinc by men during BR suggests that their absorption of these minerals from the diet was reduced, secondary to the release of minerals from bone and muscle. These findings highlight the importance of determining dietary requirements for astronauts on space

  16. Factors Affecting Health Insurance Enrollment Through the State Marketplaces: Observations on the ACA's Third Open Enrollment Period.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Justin; Curran, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Issue: Nearly 12.7 million individuals signed up for coverage in the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) health insurance marketplaces during the third open enrollment period, and by the end of March there were 11.1 million consumers with active coverage. States that operate their own marketplaces posted a year-to-year enrollment gain of 8.8 percent. To maintain membership and attract new consumers, the state-based marketplaces must sponsor enrollment assistance programs and conduct consumer outreach. These marketplaces relied heavily on such efforts during the third enrollment period, despite declining funding. Goal: To learn which outreach strategies, assistance programs, and other factors marketplace officials viewed as having exerted the greatest influence on enrollment. Methods: Survey of officials representing each of the 17 state-based marketplaces (15 responses). Key findings and conclusions: The cost of coverage and low health insurance literacy pose significant barriers to enrollment for many consumers. Marketplaces sought to overcome them by encouraging consumers to obtain in-person enrollment assistance from ACA-created assistance programs and from insurance brokers, and by partnering with community organizations for outreach activities. Many marketplaces also enhanced their web portals to make them easier to navigate and to give consumers better tools with which to evaluate their coverage options.

  17. Inner magnetosphere variations after solar proton events. Observations on Mir space station in 1989-1994 time period.

    PubMed

    Dachev TsP; Semkova, J V; Matviichuk YuN; Tomov, B T; Koleva, R T; Baynov, P T; Petrov, V M; Shurshakov, V V; Ivanov, Y u

    1998-01-01

    Measurements on board the Mir space station have been used to study the dose rate and the particle flux distribution in the inner magnetosphere. The measurements have been performed with the Bulgarian-Russian dosimeter-radiometer Liulin. The paper concentrates on the dynamics of the observed "new" and "second" maxima which were created after Solar Proton Events (SPE) in the 1989-1994 time. The "second" belt was first observed after the SPE on October 20, 1989, and the last observation was after the SPE on February 20, 1994. The creation of the "new" belt is a unique phenomena seen in the Liulin data set after the SPE on March 23, 1991 and relates to the magnetic storm on March 24. The new belt fully disappears in the middle of 1993.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Observations On The Gamma-Ray Blazar PG1553+113 As A Probe For Geometrical Periodical Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamerra, Antonio; Prandini, E.; Paiano, S.; Da Vela, P.; Gareth, H.; Covino, S.; Cutini, S.; Sandrinelli, A.; Sobacchi, E.; Sormani, M. C.

    2016-10-01

    New claims of periodic variability from gamma-ray blazars have been reported, possibly pointing at milli-pc SMBH binary systems. A modulation of 2 year on 3.5 cycles was recently discovered with Fermi/LAT on the blazar PG1553+113 - for the first time in gamma-rays with high significance - and confirmed by optical lightcurves. Other possible gamma-ray periodic variations have been claimed on PKS 2155-304 and PKS 0537 by Sandrinelli et al. (2015, 2016). The interpretation of such periodicity, when confirmed with continuous observations in following years, is not straightforward. Emission from blazars is dominated by non-thermal emission from the jet; different processes in the jet or at its base, may lead to quasi-periodic emission. We used multi-wavelength (MWL) observations on PG1553+113 to investigate if the observed modulation can be explained with geometrical variations in the jet, possibly pointing to jet precession or to an helical pattern. The ongoing MWL monitoring campaign from radio to very-high energy gamma-ray bands, led by the MAGIC collaboration, will follow the maximum expected at the beginning of 2017, and will allow to set tighter constrains on underlying periodic processes.

  19. Optical extinction by upper tropospheric/stratospheric aerosols and clouds: GOMOS observations for the period 2002-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhellemont, F.; Fussen, D.; Mateshvili, N.; Tétard, C.; Bingen, C.; Dekemper, E.; Loodts, N.; Kyrölä, E.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Dalaudier, F.; Blanot, L.; Fanton D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Guirlet, M.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra, L.

    2010-04-01

    Although the retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficients from satellite remote measurements is notoriously difficult (in comparison with gaseous species) due to the lack of typical spectral signatures, important information can be obtained. In this paper we present an overview of the current operational nighttime UV/Vis aerosol extinction profile results for the GOMOS star occultation instrument, spanning the period from August 2002 to May 2008. Some problems still remain, such as the ones associated with incomplete scintillation correction and the aerosol spectral law implementation, but good quality extinction values can be expected at a wavelength of 500 nm. Typical phenomena associated with atmospheric particulate matter in the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) are easily identified: Polar Stratospheric Clouds, tropical subvisual cirrus clouds, background stratospheric aerosols, and post-eruption volcanic aerosols (with their subsequent dispersion around the globe). In this overview paper we will give a summary of the current results.

  20. Observation of electron states of small period artificial graphene in nano-patterned GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Scarabelli, Diego; Kuznetsova, Yuliya Y.; Wind, Shalom J.; Pinczuk, Aron; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Manfra, Michael J.; Gardner, Geoff C.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.

    2016-09-01

    Engineered honeycomb lattices, called artificial graphene (AG), are tunable platforms for the study of novel electronic states related to Dirac physics. In this work, we report the achievement of electronic bands of the honeycomb topology with the period as low as 40 nm on the nano-patterned modulation-doped AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. Resonant inelastic light scattering spectra reveal peaks which are interpreted as combined electronic transitions between subbands of the quantum well confinement with a change in the AG band index. Spectra lineshapes are explained by joint density of states obtained from the calculated AG electron band structures. These results provide a basis for further advancements in AG physics.

  1. Periodic psychological examination of train drivers' fitness in Belgium: deficits observed and efficacy of the screening procedure.

    PubMed

    De Valck, Elke; Smeekens, Ludo; Vantrappen, Luc

    2015-04-01

    We report on a procedure for early detection of individual psychological deficits that adversely influence cognitive driving abilities in train drivers. Records of 1266 train drivers sent for recertification examination in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed. Performance on attention and memory tests in the first step of the procedure, and results of extended psychological examination for those not succeeded, are described. Nine percent of train drivers were referred for extended psychological examination; 1.5% was considered unfit for driving. Most frequently, the background was a sleep disorder, intolerance for irregular working hours, psychosocial stress, and depression. Periodic psychological examinations allow the detection of relevant deficits in functioning in a substantial portion of train drivers. The stepwise procedure adds to the feasibility of such examinations in large groups of professional drivers.

  2. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  3. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  4. Testing the Disk Regulation Paradigm with Spitzer Observations. I. Rotation Periods of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars in the IC 348 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, Lucas; Baliber, Nairn

    2006-10-01

    We present 105 stellar rotation periods in the young cluster IC 348, 75 of which are new detections, increasing the total number of known periods in this cluster to 143. The period distribution resembles that seen in the heart of the Orion Nebula cluster by Herbst and colleagues. Stars estimated to be less massive than 0.25 Msolar show a unimodal distribution of fast rotators (P~1-2 days) and a tail of slower rotators, while stars estimated to be more massive than 0.25 Msolar show a bimodal distribution with peaks at ~2 and ~8 days. We combine all published rotation periods in IC 348 with Spitzer mid-IR (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm) photometry, an unprecedentedly efficient and reliable disk indicator, in order to test the disk-braking paradigm. We find no evidence that the tail of slow rotators in low-mass stars or the long-period peak in high-mass stars are preferentially populated by objects with disks as might be expected based on the current disk-braking model. We find some indication that the disk fraction decreases significantly for stars with very short periods (P<~1.5 days), which is the only feature of our sample that could potentially be interpreted as evidence for disk braking. It has been proposed that the observational signatures of disk braking might be significantly masked by the intrinsic breadth of the initial period distribution. We argue that more rigorous modeling of angular momentum evolution and a quantitative analysis of the observational data are required before the disk-braking model can be regarded as inconsistent with observations.

  5. Experimental observations on the response of 1(st) and 2(nd) order fibre optic long period grating coupling bands to the deposition of nanostructured coatings.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen W; Cheung, C S; Tatam, Ralph P

    2007-10-01

    The sensitivity of attenuation bands corresponding to the 2(nd) order coupling to cladding modes by a fibre optic long period grating (LPG) to the deposition of nanostructured coatings is investigated and compared with that of the 1(st) order coupling. The experimental observations support previously reported theoretical descriptions of LPGs with nanoscale coatings.

  6. Structure of the polar oval from simultaneous observations of the optical emissions and particle precipitations during the period of high solar activity 1981-1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoshev, M. M.; Maglova, P. V.; Guineva, V. Kh.; Dachev, Ts. P.; Shepherd, G. G.

    The observations on board the IC-Bulgaria-1300 satellite, obtained during the period 1981 - 1982, have been analysed. The optical emissions have been measured by the optical photometer EMO-5. The simultaneous precipitating electron and proton fluxes have been measured by the ANEPE spectrometer. The structure of the oval is studied as a function of the magnetic local time and the geomagnetic activity.

  7. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, M. E.; Shalashov, A. G.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase-space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the “holes and clumps” mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for the acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  8. Some observational results of the ionosonde at Wuchang during the coordinated campaign in the period of the maximum solar activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shun-Rong; Chen, Jing-Wu

    1989-10-01

    Up to March 1989, the coordinated observations during the maximum solar activity of the 22nd 11-year-cycle have been carried out for 6 times respectively in March, April, June (to July) and December 1988, and also in January and March 1989. The obvious and different effects on the ionosphere due to the violent solar variations, such as solar flare, could been found.

  9. Satellite observations of atmospheric SO 2 from volcanic eruptions during the time-period of 1996-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Frankenberg, C.; Van Roozendael, M.; Beirle, S.; Kühl, S.; Richter, A.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    In this article, we present satellite observations of atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO 2) from volcanic eruptions. Global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) data for the years 1996-2002 is analyzed using a DOAS based algorithm with the aim of retrieving SO 2 slant column densities (SCD). The retrieval of SO 2 SCD in the UV spectral region is difficult due to strong and interfering ozone absorptions. It is also likely affected by instrumental effects. We investigated these effects in detail to obviate systematic biases in the SO 2 retrieval. A quantitative study of about 20 volcanoes from Italy, Iceland, Congo/Zaire, Ecuador, Japan, Vanuatu Island and Mexico is presented. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios. We prepared a 7-year mean map (1996-2002) of SO 2 SCD observed by GOME and tabulated the ratios of the maximum SO 2 SCD observed to the average SO 2 SCD as seen in the 7-year mean map. The further aim of this study is to provide information about unknown volcanic eruptions, e.g., Bandai Honshu Japan, Central Islands Vanuatu, Piton de la Fournaise Réunion Island France, Kamchatka region of Russia and from Indonesia especially. The results demonstrate a high sensitivity of the GOME instrument towards SO 2 emissions during both eruption and degassing episodes.

  10. Ground-based Solar Observations and Plasma Bubbles in Brazilian Sector During a Period of Extreme Low Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardelli-Coelho, F.; Abalde, J. R.; Tardelli, A.; de Abreu, A. J.

    2016-04-01

    Studies presented on the relation of the Sun-Earth system are currently of great importance. Ionospheric irregularities in the F-region, caused by geomagnetic storms have significant and adverse effects on the Earth. The recent advancement in technological techniques for monitoring space weather has facilitated these studies. The focus of this study was to determine whether a geomagnetic storm interfered with the generation, propagation, and durability of plasma bubbles that occurred over a period of solar minimum in two cities in the Brazilian sector, São José dos Campos - SP, designated SJC, (23.21°S, 45.86°W; dip latitude 17.6°S), low-latitude region and near the south crest of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly; and Palmas - TO, called PAL (10.28°S, 48.33°W; dip latitude 6.7°S), near the magnetic equator, located in the geographical South, tropical region and the hemisphere opposite the magnetic equator. This study was conducted with data analysis of five years (2006-2010) for SJC and four years (2007-2010) for PAL, considering the 24th solar cycle, using an all-sky imaging photometer operating with interference filters in OI 630.0 nm emission resulting from dissociative recombination process that occurs at an altitude of 250-300 km (F-region).

  11. Wave structures observed in the equatorial F-region plasma density and temperature during the sunset period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savio, S.; Muralikrishna, P.; Batista, I. S.; de Meneses, F. C.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density and temperature measurements were carried out with Langmuir probes (LP) on board Brazilian sounding rockets launched soon after the local sunset from Natal (5.8°S, 35.2°W, dip 23.7°S) and Alcântara (2.3°S, 44.4°W, dip 7°S), Brazil, on December 02, 2011, and December 08, 2012, respectively. Digisondes operating near the launching sites revealed a rapid rise in the F-region base indicating a probable pre-reversal enhancement of the vertical plasma drift. Strong spread-F traces are also visible on the ionograms simultaneously recorded, suggesting the occurrence of ionospheric bubbles during these campaigns. Electron density and temperature vertical profiles estimated from the LP data exhibit in the E-F region valley (120-300 km) the presence of large-amplitude wave activity, and electron temperature values higher than 1600 K, respectively, phenomena probably related to the electrodynamic processes that occur during the sunset period.

  12. An observational study of atmospheric ice nuclei number concentration during three fog-haze weather periods in Shenyang, northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liguang; Zhou, Deping; Wang, Yangfeng; Hong, Ye; Cui, Jin; Jiang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    Characteristics of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations during three fog-haze weather periods from November 2010 to January 2012 in Shenyang were presented in this paper. A static diffusion chamber was used and sampling of IN aerosols was conducted using a membrane filter method. Sampling membrane filter processing conditions were unified in the activation temperature at - 15 °C under conditions of 20% ice supersaturation and 3% water supersaturation. The variations of natural IN number concentrations in different weather conditions were investigated. The relations between the meteorological factors and the IN number concentrations were analyzed, and relationships between pollutants and IN number concentrations were also studied. The results showed that mean IN number concentration were 38.68 L- 1 at - 20 °C in Shenyang, for all measurements. Mean IN number concentrations are higher during haze days (55.92 L- 1 at - 20 °C) and lower after rain. Of all meteorological factors, wind speed, boundary stability, and airflow direction appeared to influence IN number concentrations. IN number concentrations were positively correlated with particulate matters PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 during haze weather.

  13. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  14. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  15. Observations and Modeling of the Companions of Short Period Binary Millisecond Pulsars: Evidence for High-mass Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules

    2014-10-01

    We present observations of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz & Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio observations to be M NS > 1.75 M ⊙ at the 3σ level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M c > 0.1 M ⊙), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245-2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.

  16. Observations and modeling of the companions of short period binary millisecond pulsars: evidence for high-mass neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Joshua; Halpern, Jules

    2014-10-01

    We present observations of fields containing eight recently discovered binary millisecond pulsars using the telescopes at MDM Observatory. Optical counterparts to four of these systems are detected, one of which, PSR J2214+3000, is a novel detection. Additionally, we present the fully phase-resolved B, V, and R light curves of the optical counterparts to two objects, PSR J1810+1744 and PSR J2215+5135 for which we employ model fitting using the eclipsing light curve (ELC) model of Orosz and Hauschildt to measure the unknown system parameters. For PSR J1810+1744, we find that the system parameters cannot be fit even assuming that 100% of the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar is irradiating the secondary, and so radial velocity measurements of this object will be required for the complete solution. However, PSR J2215+5135 exhibits light curves that are extremely well constrained using the ELC model and we find that the mass of the neutron star is constrained by these and the radio observations to be M {sub NS} > 1.75 M {sub ☉} at the 3σ level. We also find a discrepancy between the model temperature and the measured colors of this object, which we interpret as possible evidence for an additional high-temperature source such as a quiescent disk. Given this and the fact that PSR J2215+5135 contains a relatively high mass companion (M {sub c} > 0.1 M {sub ☉}), we propose that similar to the binary pulsar systems PSR J1023+0038 and IGR J18245–2452, the pulsar may transition between accretion- and rotation-powered modes.

  17. Modeling long period swell in Southern California: Practical boundary conditions from buoy observations and global wave model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate, unbiased, high-resolution (in space and time) nearshore wave predictions are needed to drive models of beach erosion, coastal flooding, and alongshore transport of sediment, biota and pollutants. On highly sheltered shorelines, wave predictions are sensitive to the directions of onshore propagating waves, and nearshore model prediction error is often dominated by uncertainty in offshore boundary conditions. Offshore islands and shoals, and coastline curvature, create complex sheltering patterns over the 250km span of southern California (SC) shoreline. Here, regional wave model skill in SC was compared for different offshore boundary conditions created using offshore buoy observations and global wave model hindcasts (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Wave Watch 3, WW3). Spectral ray-tracing methods were used to transform incident offshore swell (0.04-0.09Hz) energy at high directional resolution (1-deg). Model skill is assessed for predictions (wave height, direction, and alongshore radiation stress) at 16 nearshore buoy sites between 2000 and 2009. Model skill using buoy-derived boundary conditions is higher than with WW3-derived boundary conditions. Buoy-driven nearshore model results are similar with various assumptions about the true offshore directional distribution (maximum entropy, Bayesian direct, and 2nd derivative smoothness). Two methods combining offshore buoy observations with WW3 predictions in the offshore boundary condition did not improve nearshore skill above buoy-only methods. A case example at Oceanside harbor shows strong sensitivity of alongshore sediment transport predictions to different offshore boundary conditions. Despite this uncertainty in alongshore transport magnitude, alongshore gradients in transport (e.g. the location of model accretion and erosion zones) are determined by the local bathymetry, and are similar for all predictions.

  18. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Imager Flight Performance Assessment: Investigating Dark Current Stability Over One-Half Orbit Period during the First 60 Days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The stability of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager dark current levels over the period of one-half orbit is investigated. A series of two-second dark current collections, over the course of 40 minutes, was performed during the first sixty days the instrument was in orbit. Analysis of this data indicates only two dark current reference periods, obtained entering and exiting eclipse, are required to remove ALI dark current offsets for 99.9% of the focal plane to within 1.5 digital numbers for any observation on the solar illuminated portion of the orbit.

  19. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Imager Flight Performance Assessment: Investigating Dark Current Stability Over One-Half Orbit Period during the First 60 Days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The stability of the EO-1 Advanced Land Imager dark current levels over the period of one-half orbit is investigated. A series of two-second dark current collections, over the course of 40 minutes, was performed during the first sixty days the instrument was in orbit. Analysis of this data indicates only two dark current reference periods, obtained entering and exiting eclipse, are required to remove ALI dark current offsets for 99.9% of the focal plane to within 1.5 digital numbers for any observation on the solar illuminated portion of the orbit.

  20. Observation of Periodic and Transient Cosmic Ray Flux Variations by the Daejeon Neutron Monitor and the Seoul muon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon; Kang, Jeongsoo

    2013-09-01

    Recently, two instruments of cosmic ray are operating in South Korea. One is Seoul muon detector after October 1999 and the other is Daejeon neutron monitor (Kang et al. 2012) after October 2011. The former consists of four small plastic scintillators and the latter is the standard 18 NM 64 type. In this report, we introduce the characteristics of both instruments. We also analyze the flux variations of cosmic ray such as diurnal variation and Forbush decrease. As the result, the muon flux shows the typical seasonal and diurnal variations. The neutron flux also shows the diurnal variation. The phase which shows the maximum flux in the diurnal variation is around 13-14 local time. We found a Forbush decrease on 7 March 2012 by both instruments. It is also identified by Nagoya multi-direction muon telescope and Oulu neutron monitor. The observation of cosmic ray at Jangbogo station as well as in Korean peninsula can support the important information on space weather in local area. It can also enhance the status of Korea in the international community of cosmic ray experiments.

  1. COSMIC observations of ionospheric density profiles over Indian region: Ionospheric conditions during extremely low solar activity period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samireddipalle, Sripathi

    2012-07-01

    In the present paper, for the first time, an attempt has been made to study the seasonal, altitudinal, diurnal and latitudinal variation of low latitude electron density obtained using COSMIC Radio Occultation (RO) measurements over Indian longitudes during the deep solar minimum year 2008. The seasonal variation shows enhanced electron densities at vernal and autumn equinoxes compared to winter and summer seasons. The observations also suggest a shift in the time and altitude at which the peak of the electron density occurs in different seasons. An important finding is that there exists an equinoctial asymmetry in the electron density with respect to altitude and latitude, where the electron density is higher at vernal equinox compared to autumn equinox. The latitudinal and seasonal variation of peak electron density (NmF2) during 10:00-14:00 LT indicate enhanced Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) on either-side of the magnetic equator at both vernal and autumn equinoxes compared to the other seasons. Seasonal variation of Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ) strength obtained from geomagnetic H-field variations also shows strong EEJ at vernal and autumn equinoxes indicating that EEJ strength indeed partly controls the EIA development. Further, our results indicate that NmF2 over the northern EIA crest region is correlated well with solar flux.

  2. Long-period effects of the Denali earthquake on water bodies in the Puget Lowland: Observations and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barberopoulou, A.; Qamar, A.; Pratt, T.L.; Steele, W.P.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of strong-motion instrument recordings in Seattle, Washington, resulting from the 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake reveals that amplification in the 0.2-to 1.0-Hz frequency band is largely governed by the shallow sediments both inside and outside the sedimentary basins beneath the Puget Lowland. Sites above the deep sedimentary strata show additional seismic-wave amplification in the 0.04- to 0.2-Hz frequency range. Surface waves generated by the Mw 7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002 produced pronounced water waves across Washington state. The largest water waves coincided with the area of largest seismic-wave amplification underlain by the Seattle basin. In the current work, we present reports that show Lakes Union and Washington, both located on the Seattle basin, are susceptible to large water waves generated by large local earthquakes and teleseisms. A simple model of a water body is adopted to explain the generation of waves in water basins. This model provides reasonable estimates for the water-wave amplitudes in swimming pools during the Denali earthquake but appears to underestimate the waves observed in Lake Union.

  3. A statistical analysis of energy and power demand for the tractive purposes of an electric vehicle in urban traffic - an analysis of a short and long observation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaski, G.; Ohde, B.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of a statistical dispersion analysis of an energy and power demand for tractive purposes of a battery electric vehicle. The authors compare data distribution for different values of an average speed in two approaches, namely a short and long period of observation. The short period of observation (generally around several hundred meters) results from a previously proposed macroscopic energy consumption model based on an average speed per road section. This approach yielded high values of standard deviation and coefficient of variation (the ratio between standard deviation and the mean) around 0.7-1.2. The long period of observation (about several kilometers long) is similar in length to standardized speed cycles used in testing a vehicle energy consumption and available range. The data were analysed to determine the impact of observation length on the energy and power demand variation. The analysis was based on a simulation of electric power and energy consumption performed with speed profiles data recorded in Poznan agglomeration.

  4. Factors influencing the progress of mobilization in hip fracture patients during the early postsurgical period?-A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Buecking, Benjamin; Bohl, Katharina; Eschbach, Daphne; Bliemel, Christopher; Aigner, Rene; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Dodel, Richard; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Debus, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the independent factors influencing mobilization progress after geriatric hip fractures. 392 Hip fracture patients older than 60 years were included in this prospective, observational, cohort study. The progress of mobilization was measured with walking ability 4 days post-surgery, ability to climb stairs until discharge and the Tinetti test at discharge. Factors correlated with the progress of mobilization were determined using multivariate analyses. The independent factors influencing walking ability 4 days post-surgery were the pre-fracture Charlson Comorbidity Index (OR=0.834, p=0.005), the American Society of Anesthesiologists Score (OR=0.550, p=0.013), pre-fracture Barthel Index ([BI], OR=1.019, p=0.012) and risk for depression, as measured by the Geriatric Depression Scale, (OR=0.896, p=0.013). The probability of climbing stairs until discharge was influenced by the patient's age (OR=0.840, p<0.001), pre-fracture BI (OR=1.047, p=0.042), cognitive impairment, as measured by the mini mental state examination (OR=1.182 p=0.008), pre surgical hemoglobin (OR=1.026, p=0.044), time until surgery (OR=0.961, p=0.023), duration of surgery (OR=0.982, p=0.014), and surgery type (prosthesis, OR=4.545, p=0.001). Similar variables influenced the Tinetti test ad discharge. While pre-fracture co-morbidities and function cannot be changed, the treatment of patients with cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms should be optimized. Efforts should be undertaken to ensure early surgery for all hip fractures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-period oscillations of sunspot magnetic fields by simultaneous observations of the Global Oscillation Network Group and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, V. I.; Parfinenko, L. D.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Riehokainen, A.

    2016-12-01

    For the first time, the ultra-low oscillation mode of the sunspot magnetic field strength has been detected with a high degree of confidence by ground-based observations of sunspots with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) network of telescopes. Synchronous series of magnetograms derived from the GONG and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOHO/MDI) have been processed. They were obtained on September 27-30, 2010, for the active region NOAA 11109 with a total duration of 80 h. The periods of magnetic field oscillations found by space data coincide with the periods defined with GONG. This confirms the physical reality of the oscillatory process. The power spectrum contains harmonics with periods of 26 h, 8-10 h, and 3-4 h.

  6. Influence of regional biomass burning on the highly elevated organic carbon concentrations observed at Gosan, South Korea during a strong Asian dust period.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Luong; Kim, Jin Young; Ghim, Young Sung; Shim, Shang-Gyoo

    2015-03-01

    PM2.5 carbonaceous particles were measured at Gosan, South Korea during 29 March-11 April 2002 which includes a pollution period (30 March-01 April) when the highest concentrations of major anthropogenic species (nss-SO4 (2-), NO3 (-), and NH4 (+)) were observed and a strong Asian dust (AD) period (08-10 April) when the highest concentrations of mainly dust-originated trace elements (Al, Ca, Mg, and Fe) were seen. The concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) measured in the pollution period were higher than those measured in the strong AD period, whereas an inverse variation in the concentrations of organic carbon (OC) was observed. Based on the OC/EC ratios, the possible source that mainly contributed to the highly elevated OC concentrations measured in the strong AD period was biomass burning. The influence of the long-range transport of smoke plumes emitted from regional biomass burning sources was evaluated by using MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data for fire locations and the potential source contribution function analysis. The most potential source regions of biomass burning were the Primorsky and Amur regions in Far Eastern Russia and southeastern and southwestern Siberia, Russia. Further discussion on the source characteristics suggested that the high OC concentrations measured in the strong AD period were significantly affected by the smoldering phase of biomass burning. In addition to biomass burning, secondary OC (SOC) formed during atmospheric long-range transport should be also considered as an important source of OC concentration measured at Gosan. Although this study dealt with the episodic case of the concurrent increase of dust and biomass burning particles, understanding the characteristics of heterogeneous mixing aerosol is essential in assessing the radiative forcing of aerosol.

  7. Rainfall yield characteristics of electrical storm observed in the Spanish Basque Country area during the period 1992 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezcurra, A.; Saenz, J.; Ibarra-Berastegi, G.; Areitio, J.

    2008-08-01

    This paper is focused on the study of rainfall yield characteristics of electrical storms observed over the Northern Iberian Peninsula during 1992-1996. To this aim Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) method have been used. The SOM method is a group of artificial neural networks based on the topological properties of the human brain. Results clearly suggest that there exist three different meteorological patterns that are linked to the characteristics of electrical events found in the study area. In winter, most of the electrical events are formed under oceanic advection (NW air fluxes). On these cases, mean rainfall yield estimates reach values of 700 10 4 m 3 per cloud to ground lightning flash (CG flash). During summer most frequent electrical storms are associated to local instability shooting by surface heating with advection of humidity coming from the Iberian Peninsula. Under these meteorological situations, rain is scarcer if compared with oceanic events but lightning CG counts reach the maximum values found in the area (about 10 CG counts per 20 × 20 km 2 and day) giving this way the smallest rainfall yield with a mean value of 15 10 4 m 3 per CG flash. Iberian air fluxes associated with cold air in upper parts of the atmosphere represent the third meteorological pattern found. This pattern is most common in spring and autumn but is not unusual in the rest of the seasons. In those cases mean rainfall yield in the area is about 150 10 4 m 3 per CG flash. In all electrical episodes K instability index is greater than 15 °C but in the most lightning producing events, this index reaches in the area values greater than 24 °C. PCA results pointed out that there exists a relationship between rain and CG counts expressed by the first principal component computed from standardized data. However, we must notice that no event is solely linked to this axis, since a seasonal influence which decreases lightning production when rain

  8. Spatial analysis of annual mean stable isotopes in precipitation across Japan based on an intensive observation period throughout 2013.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Kimpei; Tanoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Spatial distribution of annual mean stable isotopes in precipitation (δ(18)O, δ(2)H) was observed at 56 sites across Japan throughout 2013. Annual mean δ(18)O values showed a strong latitude effect, from -12.4 ‰ in the north to -5.1 ‰ in the south. Annual mean d-excess values ranged from 8 to 21 ‰, and values on the Sea of Japan side in Northern and Eastern Japan were relatively higher than those on the Pacific Ocean side. The local meteoric water line (LMWL) and isotope effects were based on the annual mean values from all sites across Japan as divided into distinct regions: the Sea of Japan side to the Pacific Ocean side and Northeastern to Southwestern Japan. Slopes and intercepts of LMWL ranged from 7.4 to 7.8 and 9.8 to 13.0, respectively. Slopes for latitude, altitude, and temperature effects ranged from -0.27 to -0.48 ‰/°N, -0.0034 to -0.0053 ‰/m, and 0.36 to 0.46 ‰/°C, respectively, with statistically significance at the 99 % level. However, there was no precipitation amount effect. From the result of a multiple regression analysis, the empirical formula of annual mean δ(18)O in precipitation from latitude and altitude for all sites across Japan was determined to be δ(18) O = -0.348 (LAT) - 0.00307 (ALT) + 4.29 (R(2) = 0.59). Slopes for latitude and altitude ranged from - 0.28 to - 0.51, and - 0.0019 to - 0.0045, respectively. Even though site distribution was uneven, these equations are the first trial estimation for annual mean stable isotopes in precipitation across Japan. Further research performed on the monthly basis is required to elucidate factors controlling the spatiotemporal variability of stable isotopes in precipitation across Japan.

  9. Optimal CD4 count for initiating HIV treatment: impact of CD4 observation frequency and grace periods, and performance of dynamic marginal structural models.

    PubMed

    Ewings, Fiona M; Ford, Deborah; Walker, A Sarah; Carpenter, James; Copas, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    In HIV infection, dynamic marginal structural models have estimated the optimal CD4 for treatment initiation to minimize AIDS/death. The impact of CD4 observation frequency and grace periods (permitted delay to initiation) on the optimal regimen has not been investigated nor has the performance of dynamic marginal structural models in moderately sized data sets-two issues that are relevant to many applications. To determine optimal regimens, we simulated 31,000,000 HIV-infected persons randomized at CD4 500-550 cells/mm to regimens "initiate treatment within a grace period following observed CD4 first observation frequencies and grace periods were defined by highest 10-year AIDS-free survival. To evaluate the performance of dynamic marginal structural models, we simulated 1000 observational studies (n = 3,000) with CD4-dependent treatment initiation. Decreasing the frequency of CD4 measurements from monthly to every 3, 6, and 12 months increased the optimal regimen from a CD4 level of 350 (10-year AIDS-free survival, 0.8657) to 410 (0.8650), 460 (0.8634), and 490 (0.8564), respectively. Under a regimen defined by x = 350 with annual CD4s, 10-year AIDS-free survival dropped to 0.8304. Extending the grace period from 1 to 3 or 6 months, with 3-monthly CD4s, maintained the optimal regimen at 410 for 3 months and increased it to 460 for 6 months. In observational studies with 3-monthly CD4s, the mean (SE) estimated optimal regimen was 402 (76), 424 (66), and 430 (63) with 1-, 3-, and 6-month grace periods; 24%, 15%, and 14% of estimated optimal regimens resulted in >0.5% lower AIDS-free survival compared with the true optimal regimen. The optimal regimen is strongly influenced by CD4 frequency and less by grace period length. Dynamic marginal structural models lack precision at moderate sample

  10. Quasi-periodic variations in x-ray emission and long-term radio observations: Evidence for a two-component jet in Sw J1644+57

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiu-Zhou; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wang, Ding-Xiong; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Yin; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He E-mail: dxwang@hust.edu.cn E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-06-10

    The continued observations of Sw J1644+57 in X-ray and radio bands accumulated a rich data set to study the relativistic jet launched in this tidal disruption event. The X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 from 5-30 days presents two kinds of quasi-periodic variations: a 200 s quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and a 2.7 day quasi-periodic variation. The latter has been interpreted by a precessing jet launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius of a warped disk. Here we suggest that the ∼200 s QPO could be associated with a second, narrower jet sweeping the observer line-of-sight periodically, which is launched from a spinning black hole in the misaligned direction with respect to the black hole's angular momentum. In addition, we show that this two-component jet model can interpret the radio light curve of the event, especially the re-brightening feature starting ∼100 days after the trigger. From the data we infer that inner jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γ{sub j} ∼ 5.5 and a kinetic energy of E {sub k,} {sub iso} ∼ 3.0 × 10{sup 52} erg, while the outer jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γ{sub j} ∼ 2.5 and a kinetic energy of E{sub k,} {sub iso} ∼ 3.0 × 10{sup 53} erg.

  11. First continuous ground-based observations of long period oscillations in the vertically resolved wind field of the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüfenacht, Rolf; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2016-04-01

    Direct measurements of middle-atmospheric wind oscillations with periods between 5 and 50 days in the altitude range between mid-stratosphere (5 hPa) and upper mesosphere (0.02 hPa) have been made using a novel ground-based Doppler wind radiometer. The oscillations were not inferred from tracer measurements, as the radiometer offers the unique capability of near-continuous horizontal wind profile measurements. Observations from four campaigns at high, middle and low latitudes with an average duration of 10 months have been analyzed. The dominant oscillation has mostly been found to lie in the extra-long period range (20-50 days), while the well-known atmospheric normal modes around 5, 10 and 16 days have also been observed. Comparisons of our results with ECMWF operational analysis data revealed remarkably good agreement below 0.3 hPa but discrepancies above.

  12. The study of baseline shift error in strong-motion and ground tilting during co-seismic period with collocated GPS and strong-motion observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Rui; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Jinhai; Lu, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Strong-motion's baseline shift error is very difficult to process precisely; it is mainly caused by the tilting, rotation of the ground and environment noises during the co-seismic period. In the study, we first studied how to effectively extract the strong-motion's baseline shift error with GPS observation; this also provides a new way of correcting the baseline shift errors. Then we studied how to retrieve the ground tilting information of the station point with the collocated GPS and strong-motion observations, the information is an important input parameter of rotational seismology. In addition, both experimental result and seismic data show that the baseline shift error is mainly caused by the ground tiling and rotation during the co-seismic period. Also, there is a strong directly proportional relationship between the baseline shift error and ground tilting, of which the proportionality constant is approximately equal to the value of gravitational acceleration of the station.

  13. X-ray and optical observations of the ultrashort period dwarf nova SW Ursae Majoris - A likely new DQ Herculis star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Szkody, P.; Thorstensen, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray and optical photometric and optical spectroscopic observations of the ultrashort period cataclysmic variable SW UMa are reported. The spectroscopic observations reveal the presence of an s-wave component which is almost in phase with the extreme line wings and presumably the white dwarf. This very unusual phasing in conjunction with the available optical and X-ray data seems to indicate that a region of enhanced emission exists on the opposite side of the disk from the expected location of the hot spot. The photometric observations reveal the presence of a hump in the light curve occurring at an orbital phase which is consistent with the phase at which the region of enhanced line emission is most favorably seen. Changes in the hump amplitude are seen from night to night, and a 15.9 min periodicity is evident in the light curve. The optical and X-ray periodicities suggest that SW UMa is a member of the DQ Her class of cataclysmic variables.

  14. Two-day period fluctuation of PMC occurrence over Syowa Station, Antarctica observed by a ground-based lidar and AIM satellite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Suzuki, H.; Tsutsumi, M.; Ejiri, M. K.; Tomikawa, Y.; Abo, M.; Kawahara, T.; Tsuda, T. T.; Nishiyama, T.

    2014-12-01

    A Rayleigh/Raman lidar system has been operated by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) since February, 2011 (JARE 52nd) in Syowa Station Antarctica (69.0S, 39.5E). The lidar system consists of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (355nm) as a transmitter and two telescopes with four photo multiplier tubes which are to detect Rayleigh scattered light from low and high atmosphere at 355 nm and N2 Raman emission at 387nm. Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) was detected by the lidar at 22:30UT (+3hr for LT) on Feb 4th, 2011, the first day of a routine operation. This event was the first time to detect PMC over Syowa Station by a lidar [Suzuki et al., Ann. Geophys., 2013]. However, signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the PMC event was not so good due to large shot noises from daytime background signals. Moreover, a receiver system was designed mainly for nighttime observations. In this way, observation of PMC during the midnight sun, which also corresponds to most frequent PMC season, was difficult. Thus, to improve SNR of the PMC observation with the lidar during daytime, a narrow band-pass Fabry-Perot etalon unit has been developed and installed in the receiver system on Dec 2013 by JARE 55th. By using this new system, clear PMC signals were successfully detected under daylight condition during the period of summer operation of JARE55th. During this period of 53 days (from 17 Dec. 2013 to 7 Feb. 2014), only 11 days were with a clear sky and suitable for PMC observation. Thus, it was difficult to study temporal variations on a PMC activity only by using the lidar data. Fortunately, NASA's AIM satellite had passed near Syowa Station and provided with complimentary PMC data during observation gap of the lidar. By combining our lidar data with the AIM/CIPS data, nearly continuous monitoring of PMC variability over Syowa Station was achieved for period between 13th and 18th in January 2014. PMC occurrence with an interval of two days over Syowa Station during the period was clearly

  15. QUASI-PERIODIC SLIPPING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION DURING AN X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AND INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2015-05-01

    We first report the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flare loops during an eruptive X-class flare on 2014 September 10. The slipping motion was investigated at a specific location along one of the two ribbons and can be observed throughout the impulsive phase of the flare. The apparent slipping velocity was 20–110 km s{sup −1}, and the associated period was 3–6 minutes. The footpoints of flare loops appeared as small-scale bright knots observed in 1400 Å, corresponding to fine structures of the flare ribbon. These bright knots were observed to move along the southern part of the longer ribbon and also exhibited a quasi-periodic pattern. The Si iv 1402.77 Å line was redshifted by 30–50 km s{sup −1} at the locations of moving knots with a ∼40–60 km s{sup −1} line width, larger than other sites of the flare ribbon. We suggest that the quasi-periodic slipping reconnection is involved in this process and the redshift at the bright knots is probably indicative of reconnection downflow. The emission line of Si iv at the northern part of the longer ribbon also exhibited obvious redshifts of about 10–70 km s{sup −1} in the impulsive phase of the flare, with the redshifts at the outer edges of the ribbon larger than those in the middle. The redshift velocities at post-flare loops reached about 80–100 km s{sup −1} in the transition region.

  16. A collection of sub-daily pressure and temperature observations for the early instrumental period with a focus on the "year without a summer" 1816

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnara, Y.; Auchmann, R.; Brönnimann, S.; Allan, R. J.; Auer, I.; Barriendos, M.; Bergström, H.; Bhend, J.; Brázdil, R.; Compo, G. P.; Cornes, R. C.; Dominguez-Castro, F.; van Engelen, A. F. V.; Filipiak, J.; Holopainen, J.; Jourdain, S.; Kunz, M.; Luterbacher, J.; Maugeri, M.; Mercalli, L.; Moberg, A.; Mock, C. J.; Pichard, G.; Řezníčková, L.; van der Schrier, G.; Slonosky, V.; Ustrnul, Z.; Valente, M. A.; Wypych, A.; Yin, X.

    2015-08-01

    The eruption of Mount Tambora (Indonesia) in April 1815 is the largest documented volcanic eruption in history. It is associated with a large global cooling during the following year, felt particularly in parts of Europe and North America, where the year 1816 became known as the "year without a summer". This paper describes an effort made to collect surface meteorological observations from the early instrumental period, with a focus on the years of and immediately following the eruption (1815-1817). Although the collection aimed in particular at pressure observations, correspondent temperature observations were also recovered. Some of the series had already been described in the literature, but a large part of the data, recently digitised from original weather diaries and contemporary magazines and newspapers, is presented here for the first time. The collection puts together more than 50 sub-daily series from land observatories in Europe and North America and from ships in the tropics. The pressure observations have been corrected for temperature and gravity and reduced to mean sea level. Moreover, an additional statistical correction was applied to take into account common error sources in mercury barometers. To assess the reliability of the corrected data set, the variance in the pressure observations is compared with modern climatologies, and single observations are used for synoptic analyses of three case studies in Europe. All raw observations will be made available to the scientific community in the International Surface Pressure Databank.

  17. Periodicities of the RV Tauri-type pulsating star DF Cygni: A combination of Kepler data with ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bódi, A.; Szatmáry, K.; Kiss, L. L.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The RV Tauri stars constitute a small group of classical pulsating stars with some dozen known members in the Milky Way. The light variation is caused predominantly by pulsations, but these alone do not explain the full complexity of light curves. High-quality photometry of RV Tau-type stars is very rare. DF Cygni is the only member of this class of stars in the original Kepler field, hence allowing the most accurate photometric investigation of any RV Tauri star to date. Aims: The main goal is to analyse the periodicities of the RV Tauri-type star DF Cygni by combining four years of high-quality Kepler photometry with almost half a century of visual data collected by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO). Methods: Kepler quarters of data were stitched together to minimize the systematic effects of space data. The mean levels have been matched with AAVSO visual data. Both datasets were submitted to Fourier and wavelet analyses, while the stability of the main pulsations was studied with the O-C method and analysis of time-dependent amplitudes. Results: DF Cygni shows very rich behaviour on all timescales. The slow variation has a period of 779.606 d and it has been remarkably coherent during the whole time span of the combined data. On top of the long-term cycles, the pulsations appear with a period of 24.925 d, or the double period of 49.85 d if we take the RV Tau-type alternation of the cycles into account. Both types of light variation significantly fluctuate in time, with a constantly changing interplay of amplitude and phase modulations. Long-period change (i.e. the RVb signature) somewhat resembles the long secondary period (LSP) phenomenon of pulsating red giants, whereas short-period pulsations are very similar to those of the Cepheid variables. Comparing the pulsation patterns with the latest models of Type-II Cepheids, we found evidence of strong non-linear effects that are directly observable in the Kepler light curve.

  18. Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second-order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Gruess, M.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the origin of the architectures of low-mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range (1-4) M⊕. These evolve for up to 2 × 107 yr under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow circularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few per cent terminating in second-order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small <0.1 and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced only a limited range of period ratios and cannot reproduce Kepler observations. When circularization alone operates in the final stages, divergent migration occurs causing period ratios to increase. Depending on its strength the whole period ratio range between 1 and 2 can be obtained. A few systems close to second-order commensurabilities also occur. In contrast to when arising through convergent migration, resonant trapping does not occur and resonant angles circulate. Thus, the behaviour of the resonant angles may indicate the form of migration that led to near resonance.

  19. Swift Observations of the High-mass X-Ray Binary IGR J16283-4838 Unveil a 288 Day Orbital Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Masetti, N.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term periodic modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed observations. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a periodic modulation at Po = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at Po shows a sharp peak lasting ~12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ~300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The observed phenomenology suggests that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow periodic peaks and the ~300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.

  20. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY IGR J16283-4838 UNVEIL A 288 DAY ORBITAL PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Masetti, N.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2013-09-20

    We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term periodic modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed observations. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a periodic modulation at P{sub o} = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at P{sub o} shows a sharp peak lasting ∼12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ∼300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The observed phenomenology suggests that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow periodic peaks and the ∼300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.

  1. High energy X-ray observations of CYG X-3 from from OSO-8: Further evidence of a 34.1 day period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The X-ray source Cyg X-3 (=4U2030+40) was observed with the high energy X-ray spectrometer on OSO-8 for two weeks in 1975 and in 1976 and for one week in 1977. No change in spectral shape and intensity above 23 keV was observed from year to year. No correlation is observed between the source's intensity and the phase of the 34.1 day period discovered by Molteni, et al. (1980). The pulsed fraction of the 4.8 hour light curve between 23 and 73 keV varies from week to week, however, and the magnitude of the pulsed fraction appears to be correlated with the 34.1 day phase. No immediate explanation of this behavior is apparent in terms of previously proposed models of the source.

  2. From "Periodical Observations" to "Anthochronology" and "Phenology" - the scientific debate between Adolphe Quetelet and Charles Morren on the origin of the word "Phenology".

    PubMed

    Demarée, Gaston R; Rutishauser, This

    2011-11-01

    Mankind has observed and documented life cycle stages of plants and animals for a long time. However, it was comparatively recently that the newly emerging science was given its name. The name of Charles Morren and the year 1853 are being cited, although not frequently. Exact information is hardly known among present-day phenologists, yet new evidence shows that the term "phenology" was already in use in 1849. In the early 1840s, physicist and astronomer Adolphe Quetelet set up an observational network named "Observations of periodical Phenomena of the Animal and Vegetable Kingdom" and issued instructions for it. Even though biologist Charles Morren welcomed Quetelet's initiative, differences between Morren and Quentlet regarding the instructions for the observations and the potential results soon arose and a debate started, which lasted for nearly 10 years. In the wake of these disagreements, Morren was compelled to create a new term to denote his ideas on "periodical phenomena". At first, he temporally used the word anthochronology, but in the end he coined the word phenology. The term was first used in a public lecture at the Académie royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique' in Brussels on 16 December 1849, and simultaneously in the December 1849 issue of volume V of the Annales de la Société royale d'Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand. One had to wait until 1853 before the new name appeared in the title of one of Morren's publications. Based on evidence from archives and original publications, we trace the 10-year-long scientific debate between Morren and Quetelet. Morren states his biologist's view on the subject and extends the more climate-related definition of Quetelet of "periodical phenomena".

  3. Observation of a periodic array of flux-closure quadrants in strained ferroelectric PbTiO3 films

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y. L.; Zhu, Y. L; Ma, Xiuliang; Borisevich, Albina Y; Morozovska, A. N.; Eliseev, Eugene; Wang, W. Y; Wang, Yujia; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, Z. D.; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    Nanoscale ferroelectrics are expected to exhibit various exotic domain configurations, such as the full flux-closure pattern that is well known in ferromagnetic materials. Here we observe not only the atomic morphology of the flux-closure quadrant but also a periodic array of flux closures in ferroelectric PbTiO3 films, mediated by tensile strain on a GdScO3 substrate. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we directly visualize an alternating array of clockwise and counterclockwise flux closures, whose periodicity depends on the PbTiO3 film thickness. In the vicinity of the core, the strain is sufficient to rupture the lattice, with strain gradients up to 109 per meter. We found engineering strain at the nanoscale may facilitate the development of nanoscale ferroelectric devices.

  4. Repeated administration of a mild acute toxic dose of di-n-butyltin dichloride at intervals of 3 weeks induces severe lesions in pancreas and liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Merkord, J; Weber, H; Kröning, G; Hennighausen, G

    2001-08-01

    Di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) induced thymus atrophy, bile duct lesions, pancreatitis, and liver lesions in rats. Depending on dose [6 and 8 mg/kg intravenous (i.v.) DBTC] and time (1-24 weeks), the lesions in pancreas developed to a pancreatic fibrosis and the lesions in liver to liver cirrhosis. A single i.v. administration of 4 mg/kg DBTC induces a mild interstitial pancreatitis after 2-4 days followed by a restitutio ad integrum after 21-28 days. In the present study, the lesions of biliopancreatic duct, pancreas, and liver of rats after repeated administration of 4 mg/kg DBTC i.v. at intervals of 3 weeks have been investigated. The histopathological changes of pancreas and liver were examined by light microscopy 1,4, and 7 days and 2,3,4,6,9, and 12 weeks after administration of DBTC. Furthermore, pathobiochemical parameters of pancreatitis (amylase and lipase activity in serum), liver lesions (alkaline phosphatase activity and bilirubin in serum), and of fibrosis (hyaluronic acid in serum) were studied. Repeated administration of rats with DBTC (4 mg/kg i.v.) at intervals of 3 weeks induced an acute interstitial pancreatitis and after 9-12 weeks, a pancreatic fibrosis and liver lesions (intrahepatic bile duct hyperplasia, inflammation in periportal tract, and necrosis). In serum, elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, and hyaluronic acid were found. This study demonstrates that the organotin compound induces toxic effects on pancreas and liver of rats by repeated administration of lower doses at long intervals. The risk of exposure to organotin at long intervals should be considered.

  5. Comparing the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Steven L; Kim, Eonho; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men. Twenty-one men were randomly assigned to vibration-stretching (VS; n = 8), vibration only (VO; n = 6), or stretching only (SO; n = 7) groups that trained 3 times per week for 3 weeks. All 3 groups performed 9 total sets of 30-second stretches. The VS group performed four 30-second upper-body vibration exercises and five 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. The VO group performed nine 30-second upper-body vibration exercises. The SO group performed nine 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. Shoulder flexion (SF), shoulder extension (SE), and shoulder transverse extension (STE) were assessed by a Leighton Flexometer and back scratch tests bilaterally (BSR, BSL) were measured via tape measure. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated groups at baseline and a 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA evaluated the interventions over time. At baseline, there were no group differences in age, height, or weight. There was a significant (p < 0.01) time main effect for each flexibility outcome variable (SF: +6.1%, +3.9%, +3.4%; SE: +8.9%, +13.5%, +26.9%; STE: +12.8%, +8.7%, +24.3%; BSR: +4.4 cm, +3.4 cm, +3.1 cm; BSL: +3.6 cm, +2.3 cm, +6.1 cm) for SO, VO, and VS, respectively. Shoulder extension was the only variable that showed a significant (p < 0.05) interaction effect for group by time. In conclusion, vibration training, alone or combined with stretching, is a viable alternative to a standard stretching routine when attempting to increase shoulder flexibility. Adding vibration training to a flexibility regimen may improve the likelihood of regularly performing flexibility sessions because of increased variety.

  6. Climate and polar motion during the GRACE observing period: 2002-2015: Implications for decadal scale oscillations during the 20th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivins, Erik; Adhikari, Surendra; Larour, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The motion of the Earth's pole in space has been observed with great accuracy for the last 115 years. The angular variations of the pole position away from its mean are a well explained at annual and 434-day periods. Variations at annual periods are caused by changes in the mass and angular momentum forced by all Earth surface changes that have near seasonality. The 434-day period is explained as a resonance between the cumulative driving forces having periods near the Chandler wobble free eigenmode of the Earth and is well understood theoretically. The Earth also has a longer-term drift that is explained primarily as a response to the ice age changes in the moments of inertial of the Earth. However, there has been a long-standing search for the origins of pole variations that have a period near 10 years. Using GRACE space gravimetry we show that ice mass losses from Greenland and Antarctica, and when combined with changes in continental hydrology, explain almost all the main features of interannual time scale polar wander. The discovery has broad interdisciplinary implications, as we show that decadal scale pole variations are directly linked to global changes continental water. The energy sources for these pole position changes are, therefore, likely to be associated with decadal scale ocean and atmospheric oscillations that also drive 20th Century on-land wet-dry oscillations at decadal-scale across the globe. Variability in pole position, therefore, offers a tool for assessing past stability of our climate, and for the future, now faced with an increased intensity in the water cycle and more vulnerable to ice sheet instability.

  7. Water quality observations of ice-covered, stagnant, eutrophic water bodies and analysis of influence of ice-covered period on water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    sugihara, K.; Nakatsugawa, M.

    2013-12-01

    The water quality characteristics of ice-covered, stagnant, eutrophic water bodies have not been clarified because of insufficient observations. It has been pointed out that climate change has been shortening the duration of ice-cover; however, the influence of climate change on water quality has not been clarified. This study clarifies the water quality characteristics of stagnant, eutrophic water bodies that freeze in winter, based on our surveys and simulations, and examines how climate change may influence those characteristics. We made fixed-point observation using self-registering equipment and vertical water sampling. Self-registering equipment measured water temperature and dissolved oxygen(DO).vertical water sampling analyzed biological oxygen demand(BOD), total nitrogen(T-N), nitrate nitrogen(NO3-N), nitrite nitrogen(NO2-N), ammonium nitrogen(NH4-N), total phosphorus(TP), orthophosphoric phosphorus(PO4-P) and chlorophyll-a(Chl-a). The survey found that climate-change-related increases in water temperature were suppressed by ice covering the water area, which also blocked oxygen supply. It was also clarified that the bottom sediment consumed oxygen and turned the water layers anaerobic beginning from the bottom layer, and that nutrient salts eluted from the bottom sediment. The eluted nutrient salts were stored in the water body until the ice melted. The ice-covered period of water bodies has been shortening, a finding based on the analysis of weather and water quality data from 1998 to 2008. Climate change was surveyed as having caused decreases in nutrient salts concentration because of the shortened ice-covered period. However, BOD in spring showed a tendency to increase because of the proliferation of phytoplankton that was promoted by the climate-change-related increase in water temperature. To forecast the water quality by using these findings, particularly the influence of climate change, we constructed a water quality simulation model that

  8. Regional modeling of tropospheric NO2 vertical column density over East Asia during the period 2000-2010: comparison with multisatellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; Irie, H.; Kurokawa, J.-I.; Ohara, T.

    2014-04-01

    Satellite observations of the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) are closely correlated to, and thus can be used to estimate, surface NOx emissions. In this study, the NO2 VCD simulated by a regional chemical transport model with emissions data from the updated Regional Emission inventory in ASia (REAS) version 2.1 were validated through comparison with multisatellite observations during the period 2000-2010. Rapid growth in NO2 VCD (~11% year-1) driven by the expansion of anthropogenic NOx emissions was identified above the central eastern China (CEC) region, except for the period during the economic downturn. In contrast, slightly decreasing trends (~2% year-1) were identified above Japan accompanied by a decline in anthropogenic emissions. To systematically compare the modeled NO2 VCD, we estimated sampling bias and the effect of applying the averaging kernel information, with particular focus on the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) data. Using the updated REAS, the modeled NO2 VCD reasonably reproduced annual trends observed by multisatellites, suggesting that the rate of increase of NOx emissions estimated by the updated REAS inventory would be robust. Province-scale revision of emissions above CEC is needed to further refine emission inventories. Based on the close linear relationship between modeled and observed NO2 VCD and anthropogenic NOx emissions, NOx emissions in 2009 and 2010, which were not covered by the updated REAS inventory, were estimated. NOx emissions from anthropogenic sources in China in 2009 and 2010 were determined to be 26.4 and 28.5 Tg year-1, respectively, indicating that NOx emissions increased more than twofold between 2000 and 2010. This increase reflected the strong growth of anthropogenic emissions in China following the rapid recovery from the economic downturn from late 2008 until mid-2009. Our method consists of simple estimations from satellite observations and

  9. Mortality coefficients among personnel of radiochemical plants of {open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes}-Combine for 40-year period of observation

    SciTech Connect

    Koshurnikova, N.A.; Komleva, N.S.; Baisogolov, G.D.

    1993-12-31

    The results of the epidemiological research, conducted among the personnel of the radiochemical plants of {open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes}. Combine are as follows: during the 40-year-period of observation the mortality rate from all and separate causes, except age, is lower, than the expected one, which is calculated on the basis of the National Statistics. Oncological mortality rate is reliably higher, than the expected one, which is conditioned by the high frequency of lung cancer and leucaemia. Internal {alpha}-irradiation plays the leading role in the induction of lung cancer, and the increase of mortality rate from leukemia is closely connected with external {gamma}-irradiation.

  10. Observation of three-dimensional structures of quasi-periodic echoes associated with mid-latitude sporadic-E layers by MU radar ultra-multi-channel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hashiguchi, H.; Maegawa, A.

    2006-07-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) backscatter observed by VHF radars associated with the mid-latitude Sporadic-E (Es) layers is characterized by distinct striations on range-time-intensity (RTI) plots. Two competing models claim to explain the structure of unstable regions that scatter the radar waves: horizontally drifting patches at an almost constant altitude and unstable regions elongated in altitude along the geomagnetic field line. We have conducted interferometric imaging observations of QP radar echoes to investigate spatial structures of QP echoes, precisely. Kyoto University's newly developed ultra-multi-channel receiving system of middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar was used. We used 19 independent channels for the radar imaging, and determined the three-dimensional structure and the motion of the QP echoes. During the observation from 30 May to 02 June 2005, well-defined QP echoes were observed on the nights of 31 May, 01 June, and 02 June 2005. Some of QP echoes were found at altitudes higher than 120 km and appeared to descend in altitude as they approached the radar. This result suggests that backscatter regions are developed along the geomagnetic field line from Es layer altitudes to as high as 130 km and that the fluctuations in plasma density and electric field observed by Pfaff et al. (2005) using in-situ measurements form a part of QP echoes.

  11. Long-term monitoring of long-period seismicity and space-based SO2 observations at African lava lake volcanoes Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira (DR Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrière, Julien; Oth, Adrien; Theys, Nicolas; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Kervyn, François

    2017-06-01

    Magma ascent that may lead to an eruption is commonly accompanied by variations of long-period seismic activity and SO2 degassing. Space-based measurements of SO2 emission rates represent a rapidly emerging and highly convenient approach for volcano monitoring; however, combining these long-term remote sensing observations with seismic data is still rare and, in particular, the potential of such a multidisciplinary approach as volcano monitoring tool remains largely unexplored. Here shallow magmatic activity and magma migration patterns at the two closely located African volcanoes Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira are inferred from a nearly 3 years long SO2 emissions record and seismic observations between April 2014 and February 2017. The discrimination of magma movements into shallow plumbing systems allows for signs of volcanic unrest to be deciphered on a daily time scale, even with limited instrumentation on site.

  12. Explorer 45 (S 3-A) observations of the magnetosphere and magnetopause during the 4-5 August 1972, magnetic storm period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Anderson, R. R.; Maynard, N. C.; Smith, P. H.; Fritz, T. A.; Williams, D. J.; Konradi, A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Explorer 45 satellite performed extensive field and particle measurements in the heart of the magnetosphere during the double magnetic storm period of August 4-5, 1972. Both ground level magnetic records and the magnetic field deformations measured along the orbit by the satellite indicated the existence of only a moderate ring current. This was confirmed by the measurements of the total proton energy density less than those observed during the December 1971 and June 1972 magnetic storms. The plasmapause in the noon quadrant was eroded continuously from the onset of the first storm at the beginning of August 4 to an altitude below L = 2.07 at about 18 hours on August 5. During the orbit containing the second sudden commencement a large amount of low frequency electric and magnetic field noise was encountered throughout the entire orbit. A noteworthy observation during this orbit was the contraction of the magnetopause to distances inside the satellite at L = 5.2.

  13. Periodicity in host availability does not account for evolutionary branching as observed in many plant pathogens: an application to Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, F; Gilligan, C A; Bailey, D J; van den Bosch, F

    2010-11-01

    Periodicity in host availability is common in agricultural systems. Although it is known to have profound effects on plant pathogen abundance, the evolutionary consequences of periodicity for the pathogen population have not previously been analyzed. An epidemiological model incorporating periodic absence of the host crop is combined with the theory of adaptive dynamics to determine whether or not seasonality in host presence plays a role in the occurrence of evolutionary branching, leading to coexisting yet genetically distinct pathogen phenotypes. The study is motivated and illustrated by the specific example of take-all disease of wheat, caused by the pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, for which two coexisting but genetically distinct types and a trade-off related to seasonality in host presence have been identified. Numerical simulations are used to show that a trade-off between the pathogen transmission rate and the survival of the pathogen between cropping seasons cannot account for the evolutionary branching observed in many pathogens. Model elaborations show that this conclusion holds for a broad range of putative mechanisms. Although the analysis is motivated and illustrated by the specific example of take-all of wheat, the results apply to a broad range of pathogens.

  14. A two-level perturbation method for connecting unstable periodic orbits with low fuel cost and short time of flight: application to a lunar observation mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirogiannis, George A.; Davis, Kathryn E.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed method connects two unstable periodic orbits by employing trajectories of their associated invariant manifolds that are perturbed in two levels. A first level of velocity perturbations is applied on the trajectories of the discretized manifolds at the points where they approach the nominal unstable periodic orbit in order to accelerate them. A second level of structured velocity perturbations is applied to trajectories that have already been subjected to first level perturbations in order to approximately meet the necessary conditions for a low Δ {V} transfer. Due to this two-level perturbation approach, the number of the trajectories obtained is significantly larger compared with approaches that employ traditional invariant manifolds. For this reason, the problem of connecting two unstable periodic orbits through perturbed trajectories of their manifolds is transformed into an equivalent discrete optimization problem that is solved with a very low computational complexity algorithm that is proposed in this paper. Finally, the method is applied to a lunar observation mission of practical interest and is found to perform considerably better in terms of Δ {V} cost and time of flight when compared with previous techniques applied to the same project.

  15. Comparison of IRI-2012 with JASON-1 TEC and incoherent scatter radar observations during the 2008-2009 solar minimum period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Eun-Young; Jee, Geonhwa; Lee, Changsup

    2016-08-01

    The 2008-2009 solar minimum period was unprecedentedly deep and extended. We compare the IRI-2012 with global TEC data from JASON-1 satellite and with electron density profiles observed from incoherent scatter radars (ISRs) at middle and high latitudes for this solar minimum period. Global daily mean TECs are calculated from JASON-1 TECs to compare with the corresponding IRI TECs during the 2008-2009 period. It is found that IRI underestimates the global daily mean TEC by about 20-50%. The comparison of global TEC maps further reveals that IRI overall underestimates TEC for the whole globe except for the low-latitude region around the equatorial anomaly, regardless of season. The underestimation is particularly strong in the nighttime winter hemisphere where the ionosphere seems to almost disappear in IRI. In the daytime equatorial region, however, the overestimation of IRI is mainly due to the misrepresentation of the equatorial anomaly in IRI. Further comparison with ISR electron density profiles confirms the significant underestimation of IRI at night in the winter hemisphere.

  16. Operation of a digital seismic network on Mount St. Helens volcano and observations of long period seismic events that originate under the volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Chouet, B.

    1982-09-01

    A 9 station digital seismic array was operated on Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington State during 1981. One of the stations was placed inside the crater of the volcano, six were located on the flanks of the volcano within two km of the crater and two were approximately ten km from the crater. Four of the instruments recorded three components of motion and the remaining five recorded only the vertical component. A one day experiment was carried out during which the crater monitoring seismometer was complimented by the addition of two ink recording instruments. During the one day experiment six observers recorded times of rockfall, felt-earthquake occurrences, and changes in steam emissions from the dome in the crater. Using information obtained during the one day experiment seismic events recorded by the digital instruments were classified as earthquakes, rockfalls, helicopter noise and a type of event that is unique to volcanoes which is called long period. Waveforms of these long period events have a duration of up to 30 seconds and a spectrum that is peaked at approximately 2 Hz. The frequency at which the peak in the spectrum occurs is nearly the same at all stations which means that the unique waveform of long period events is due to a source effect, not a path effect. The peak frequency is fairly insensitive to the amplitude of the signal which means that the size of the source region is constant, independent of the signal amplitude. Long period events were not felt and were accompanied by no visible changes inside the crater which lead to the conclusion that they are some sort of seismic disturbance generated inside the Volcano.

  17. Comparison between IRI-2001 predictions and observed measurements of hmF2 over three high latitude stations during different solar activity periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyeyemi, E. O.; Adewale, A. O.; Adeloye, A. B.; Akala, A. O.

    2010-06-01

    The monthly median values of the height of peak electron density of the F2-layer (hmF2) derived from ionosonde measurements at three high latitude stations, namely Narssarssuaq (NAR) (61.2 °N, 314.6 °E), Sondrestrom (SON) (67°N, 309.1°E) and College (COL) (69.9°N, 212.2°E) were analyzed and compared with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2001) model, using Comité Consultatif International des Radio communications) (CCIR and Union Radio-Scientifique Internationale (URSI) options. The analysis covers hmF2 values for March Equinox (February, March, April), June Solstice (May, June, July), September Equinox (August, September, October), and December Solstice (November, December, January), during periods of high (2000-2001), medium (2004-2005) and low (2007-2008) solar activity. Generally, the IRI-2001 prediction follow fairly well the diurnal and seasonal variation patterns of the observed values of hmF2 at all the stations. However, IRI-2001 overestimates and underestimates hmF2 at different times of the day for all solar activity periods and in all the seasons considered. The percentage deviation never exceeded 20%, except during DEC SOLS at COL and SON and during MARCH EQUI at SON during low solar activity period. For all solar activity periods considered, both the URSI and CCIR options of the IRI-2001 model give hmF2 values close to the ones measured, but the URSI option performed better than the CCIR option.

  18. Water Production Activity of Nine Long-Period Comets from SOHO/SWAN Observations of Hydrogen Lyman-alpha: 2013-2016.

    PubMed

    Combi, M R; Mäkinen, T T; Bertaux, J-L; Quémerais, E; Ferron, S; Avery, M; Wright, C

    2018-01-15

    Nine recently discovered long-period comets were observed by the Solar Wind Anisotropies (SWAN) Lyman-alpha all-sky camera on board the Solar and Heliosphere Observatory (SOHO) satellite during the period of 2013 to 2016. These were C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS), C/2013 US10 (Catalina), C/2013 V5 (Oukaimeden), C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), C/2014 E2 (Jacques), C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), C/2015 G2 (MASTER), C/2014 Q1 (PanSTARRS) and C/2013 X1 (PanSTARRS). Of these 9 comets 6 were long-period comets and 3 were possibly dynamically new. Water production rates were calculated from each of the 885 images using our standard time-resolved model that accounts for the whole water photodissociation chain, exothermic velocities and collisional escape of H atoms. For most of these comets there were enough observations over a broad enough range of heliocentric distances to calculate power-law fits to the variation of production rate with heliocentric distances for pre- and post-perihelion portions of the orbits. Comet C/2014 Q1 (PanSTARRS), with a perihelion distance of only ~0.3 AU, showed the most unusual variation of water production rate with heliocentric distance and the resulting active area variation, indicating that when the comet was within 0.7 AU its activity was dominated by the continuous release of icy grains and chunks, greatly increasing the active sublimation area by more than a factor of 10 beyond what it had at larger heliocentric distances. A possible interpretation suggests that a large fraction of the comet's mass was lost during the apparition.

  19. Quasi-periodic oscillations in short recurring bursts of magnetars SGR 1806–20 and SGR 1900+14 observed with RXTE

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, D.; Heil, L. M.; Watts, A. L.; Göğüş, E.

    2014-11-10

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the giant flares of magnetars are of particular interest due to their potential to open up a window into the neutron star interior via neutron star asteroseismology. However, only three giant flares have been observed. We therefore make use of the much larger data set of shorter, less energetic recurrent bursts. Here, we report on a search for QPOs in a large data set of bursts from the two most burst-active magnetars, SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14, observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find a single detection in an averaged periodogram comprising 30 bursts from SGR 1806–20, with a frequency of 57 Hz and a width of 5 Hz, remarkably similar to a giant flare QPO observed from SGR 1900+14. This QPO fits naturally within the framework of global magneto-elastic torsional oscillations employed to explain giant flare QPOs. Additionally, we uncover a limit on the applicability of Fourier analysis for light curves with low background count rates and strong variability on short timescales. In this regime, standard Fourier methodology and more sophisticated Fourier analyses fail in equal parts by yielding an unacceptably large number of false-positive detections. This problem is not straightforward to solve in the Fourier domain. Instead, we show how simulations of light curves can offer a viable solution for QPO searches in these light curves.

  20. Comparisons of observed and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement period of the HOxComp field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Fuchs, H.; Holland, F.; Rohrer, F.; Bohn, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.; Kajii, Y.; Miyamoto, K.; Nishida, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshino, A.; Kubistin, D.; Martinez, M.; Rudolf, M.; Harder, H.; Berresheim, H.; Elste, T.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Stange, G.; Kleffmann, J.; Elshorbany, Y.; Schurath, U.

    2012-03-01

    was characterized by low isoprene concentrations (∼0.5 ppb) and OH reactivity that was well explained by the observed species, especially before noon. For this selected period, as opposed to the general behavior, the model tended to underestimate HO2(*). We found that this tendency is associated with high NOx concentrations, suggesting that some HO2 production or regeneration processes under high NOx conditions were being overlooked; this might require revision of ozone production regimes.

  1. Auroral activities observed by SNPP VIIRS day/night band during a long period geomagnetic storm event on April 29-30, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xi; Cao, Changyong; Liu, Tung-chang; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Wenhui; Fung, Shing F.

    2015-10-01

    The Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPP represents a major advancement in night time imaging capabilities. The DNB senses radiance that can span 7 orders of magnitude in one panchromatic (0.5-0.9 μm) reflective solar band and provides imagery of clouds and other Earth features over illumination levels ranging from full sunlight to quarter moon. When the satellite passes through the day-night terminator, the DNB sensor is affected by stray light due to solar illumination on the instrument. With the implementation of stray light correction, stray light-corrected DNB images enable the observation of aurora occurred in the high latitude regions during geomagnetic storms. In this paper, DNB observations of auroral activities are analyzed during a long period (> 20 hours) of geomagnetic storm event occurred on Apr. 29-30, 2014. The storm event has the Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) pointing southward for more than 20 hours. During this event, the geomagnetic storm index Dst reached -67 nT and the geomagnetic auroral electrojet (AE) index increased and reached as high as 1200 nT with large amplitude fluctuations. The event occurred during new moon period and DNB observation has minimum moon light contamination. During this event, auroras are observed by DNB for each orbital pass on the night side (~local time 1:30am) in the southern hemisphere. DNB radiance data are processed to identify regions of aurora during each orbital pass. The evolution of aurora is characterized with time series of the poleward and equatorward boundary of aurora, area, peak radiance and total light emission of the aurora in DNB observation. These characteristic parameters are correlated with solar wind and geomagnetic index parameters. It is found that the evolution of total area-integrated radiance of auroral region over the southern hemisphere correlated well with the ground geomagnetic AE index with correlation

  2. Field Observation of Heterogeneous Formation of Dicarboxylic acids, Keto-carboxylic acids, α-Dicarbonyls and Nitrate in Xi'an, China during Asian dust storm periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wang, J.; Ren, Y.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on dust surfaces, this study investigated the concentrations and compositions of dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), keto-carboxylic acids (C3-C7), α-dicarbonyls and inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols (9-stages) collected in Xi'an, China during the nondust storm and dust storm periods of 2009 and 2011. During the events the ambient particulate dicarboxylic acids were 932-2240 ng m-3, which are comparable and even higher than those in nondust periods. Molecular compositions of the above SOA are similar to those in nondust periods with oxalic acid being the leading species. In the presence of the dust storms, all the above mentioned SOA species in Xi'an were predominantly enriched on the coarse particles (>2.1μm), and oxalic acid well correlated with NO3- (R2=0.72, p<0.001) rather than SO42-.This phenomenon differs greatly from the SOA in any other nondust period that is characterized by an enrichment of oxalic acid in fine particles and a strong correlation of oxalic acid with SO42-. Our results further demonstrate that NO3- in the dust periods in Xi'an was mostly derived from secondary oxidation, whereas SO42- during the events was largely derived from surface soil of Gobi deserts. We propose a formation pathway to explain these observations, in which nitric acid and/or nitrogen oxides react with dust to produce Ca(NO3)2 and form a liquid phase on the surface of dust aerosols via water vapor-absorption of Ca(NO3)2, followed by a partitioning of the gas-phase water-soluble organic precursors (e.g.,glyoxal and methylglyoxal) into the aqueous-phase and a subsequent oxidation into oxalic acid. To the best of our knowledge, we found for the first time the enrichment of glyoxal and methylglyoxal on dust surface. Our data suggest an important role of nitrate in the heterogeneous formation process of SOA on the surface of Asian dust.

  3. Evidence of low-latitude daytime large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances observed by high-frequency multistatic backscatter sounding system during a geomagnetically quiet period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Gang; Hu, Yaogai; Zhang, Yuannong

    2012-06-01

    Observations from the high-frequency multistatic backscatter sounding radars on a geomagnetically quiet day (minimum Dst = -14 nT) captured the anti-equatorward propagation of daytime large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (LSTID) at the low-latitude regions. The observed LSTID was characterized approximately by a meridional propagation speed of 347 ± 78 m/s and azimuthal angle of -4.7 ± 27.6° (counterclockwise from north), with a period of 76 min and a wavelength of 1583 ± 354 km by means of maximum entropy cross-spectral analysis. Vertical phase velocity was also evaluated to be <˜42 m/s through the Doppler measurements. These results provide evidence that the low-latitude ionosphere can undergo large-scale perturbations even under geomagnetically quiet conditions. We suggest that this observed LSTID could be due to the secondary gravity waves from thermospheric body forces created from the dissipation of primary gravity waves from deep tropospheric convection.

  4. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Piqueras, D. Álvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arduini, G.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Navarro, L. Barranco; Barreiro, F.; Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães da; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Benitez, J.; Garcia, J. A. 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A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Sola, J. D. Bossio; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Madden, W. D. Breaden; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruce, R.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Urbán, S. Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Toro, R. Camacho; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Armadans, R. Caminal; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Bret, M. Cano; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Garrido, M. D. M. Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Gimenez, V. Castillo; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Alberich, L. Cerda; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Barajas, C. A. Chavez; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Moursli, R. Cherkaoui El; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Muiño, P. Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Ortuzar, M. Crispin; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Donszelmann, T. Cuhadar; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Sousa, M. J. Da Cunha Sargedas De; Via, C. Da; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Hoffmann, M. Dano; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; Benedetti, A. De; Castro, S. De; Cecco, S. De; Groot, N. De; de Jong, P.; Torre, H. De la; Lorenzi, F. De; Pedis, D. De; Salvo, A. De; Sanctis, U. De; Santo, A. De; Regie, J. B. De Vivie De; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Peso, J. Del; Prete, T. Del; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Pietra, M. Della; Volpe, D. della; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Ciaccio, A. Di; Ciaccio, L. Di; Clemente, W. K. Di; Donato, C. Di; Girolamo, A. Di; Girolamo, B. Di; Micco, B. Di; Nardo, R. Di; Simone, A. Di; Sipio, R. Di; Valentino, D. Di; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Vale, M. A. B. do; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; Kacimi, M. El; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Giannelli, M. Faucci; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Martinez, P. Fernandez; Perez, S. Fernandez; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; de Lima, D. E. Ferreira; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Parodi, A. Ferretto; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Castillo, L. R. Flores; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Torregrosa, E. Fullana; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Walls, F. M. Garay; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Bravo, A. Gascon; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. 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D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Hernandez, D. Paredes; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Lopez, S. Pedraza; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Codina, E. Perez; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Astigarraga, M. E. Pozo; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.

    2016-05-20

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was observed, is presented. Correlations between backgrounds and beam intensity losses in special fills with very high β* are studied.

  5. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-05-20

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency bucketsmore » of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was observed, is presented. Correlations between backgrounds and beam intensity losses in special fills with very high β* are studied.« less

  6. Beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton running period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arduini, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. 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H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; RØhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses various observations on beam-induced and cosmic-ray backgrounds in the ATLAS detector during the LHC 2012 proton-proton run. Building on published results based on 2011 data, the correlations between background and residual pressure of the beam vacuum are revisited. Ghost charge evolution over 2012 and its role for backgrounds are evaluated. New methods to monitor ghost charge with beam-gas rates are presented and observations of LHC abort gap population by ghost charge are discussed in detail. Fake jets from colliding bunches and from ghost charge are analysed with improved methods, showing that ghost charge in individual radio-frequency buckets of the LHC can be resolved. Some results of two short periods of dedicated cosmic-ray background data-taking are shown; in particular cosmic-ray muon induced fake jet rates are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and to the fake jet rates from beam background. A thorough analysis of a particular LHC fill, where abnormally high background was observed, is presented. Correlations between backgrounds and beam intensity losses in special fills with very high β* are studied.

  7. Impact of infection control activities on the rate of needle stick injuries at a tertiary care hospital of Pakistan over a period of six years: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Accidental exposure to blood and body fluids is frequent among health care workers. They are at high risk of nosocomial transmission of blood borne pathogens due to injuries caused by used sharps. We are reporting impact of surveillance and educational program on the rate of needle stick injuries among health care workers at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan. Methods At Aga Khan University Hospital sharp injuries are reported to infection control office. To reduce these incidents a quality improvement project was inducted in the year 2005. Health care workers were educated; surveillance data from 2002 to 2007 was analyzed and compared with various risk factors. Results During study period 1382 incidents were reported. Junior doctors sustained highest number of injuries (n = 394; 28.5%) followed by registered nurses (n = 283; 20.4%). Highest number of incidents was reported during blood collection (19%). An increasing trend was observed in the pre intervention years (2002–04). However noticeable fall was noted in the post intervention period that is in year 2006 and 2007. Major decline was noted among nurses (from 13 to 5 NSI/100 FTE/year). By relating and comparing the rates with various activities directly linked with the use of syringes a significant reduction in incidents were found including; hospital admissions (p-value 0.01), surgeries and procedures performed (p = 0.01), specimens collected in the laboratory (p = 0.001) and patients visits in clinics (p = 0.01). Conclusion We report significant reduction in needle stick injuries especially during post intervention study period. This is being achieved by constant emphasis on improving awareness by regular educational sessions, implemented as a quality improvement project. PMID:19480683

  8. Effect of two new chlorhexidine mouthrinses on the development of dental plaque, gingivitis, and discolouration. A randomized, investigator-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-week experimental gingivitis study.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K; Bruhn, G; Heumann, C; Netuschil, L; Brecx, M; Hoffmann, T

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this experimental gingivitis study was to assess the efficacy and safety of two new chlorhexidine (CHX) mouthrinses. Ninety volunteers participated in this investigator-blind, randomized, clinical-controlled trial in parallel groups. During the treatment period, no oral hygiene measures except rinsing with non-alcoholic 0.2% CHX or 0.2% CHX/0.055% sodium fluoride mouthrinses, a positive control, or a negative control were permitted. The primary parameter was the gingival index; the secondary parameters were plaque index, discolouration index, and bleeding on probing. Clinical examinations were conducted 14 days before the start of the study, at baseline, and after 7, 14, and 21 days. The two sample t-test, anova, and ancova were used for the statistical analysis. No difference in efficacy was found between the two new CHX formulations and the positive control. On day 21, statistically significantly less gingival inflammation and plaque accumulation compared with placebo were observed. Besides discolouration and taste irritations, no adverse events were recorded. The two new CHX mouthrinses were able to inhibit plaque re-growth and gingivitis. Neither the omission of alcohol nor the supplementation with sodium fluoride had weakened the clinical efficacy of CHX with respect to the analysed clinical parameters.

  9. F3 layer development during quiet and disturbed periods as observed at conjugate locations in Brazil: The role of the meridional wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Candido, C. M. N.; Souza, J. R.; Abdu, M. A.; Araujo, R. C.; Resende, L. C. A.; Santos, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we use ionospheric data from two low-latitude stations located north and south of the geomagnetic equator, at approximately the same magnetic longitude, in order to study the occurrence of the F3 layer. The location of the stations being at almost geomagnetically conjugate points is such that the effects of the electric field/vertical plasma drift and diffusion will be almost symmetric around the magnetic equator. Under this configuration it is possible to deduce the effect of meridional wind in the F3 layer occurrence. Our results show that during the December solstice the layer will be present at the Southern Hemisphere (SH) location in 97% of the days and in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) location in only 4% of the days. In the June solstice the situation is reversed with the occurrence in the NH being 82% and 16% in the SH. For the March equinox the occurrence is low at both locations (4% in NH and 7% in SH), being mainly present during magnetically disturbed periods. The analysis of the effective meridional wind based on the Horizontal Wind Model and on the asymmetry of the F layer peak height observed at the two locations confirms the ubiquitous role of the wind in the F3 layer formation and/or persistence during both quiet and disturbed periods. The B0 parameter, that is a measure of the thickness of the bottomside F region profile, revealed to be a good proxy for the F3 layer occurrence.

  10. Oscillations in a solar filament: first observation of long periods in the HeI 584.33 Å line, modelling and diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouget, G.; Bocchialini, K.; Solomon, J.

    2006-05-01

    Three long observations of filaments were carried out in the 584.33 HeI line during MEDOC campaigns in November 2003 and November 2004, by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer onboard SOHO. Their duration was 15-16 h and the temporal resolution was 20 s, allowing measurements of the entire range of periodicities theoretically expected in a filament (particularly both the short periods, less than 10 min, and the long ones, more than 40 min). Fourier analysis of the Doppler velocities in the filament allows us to detect oscillations over a wide range, and particularly very slow velocity oscillations (5-6 h) that were not detected previously. We test an earlier interpretation of these velocity oscillations in the prominence model of Joarder & Roberts (1993, A&A, 277, 225), who treat the prominence as a slab. We used a systematic method to identify the six fundamental modes predicted by the model among the numerous frequencies detected. Identification of these modes - and especially the slowest one, the slow kink mode - provides a complete diagnostic of the filament in terms of the Alfvén speed, temperature, and angle between the magnetic field and the main axis of the filament.

  11. Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.; Goldsmith, JE M.

    1999-08-01

    Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's first water vapor intensive observation period (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This instrument, which makes high-resolution measurements of water vapor both spatially and temporally, is capable of making these measurements with no operator interaction (other than initial startup) for days at a time. Water vapor measurements collected during the 1996 and 1997 WVIOPs are discussed here, illustrating both the nighttime and daytime capabilities of this system. System characteristics, calibration issues, and techniques are presented. Finally, detailed intercomparisons of the lidar's data with those from a microwave radiometer, radiosondes, an instrumented tower, a chilled mirror flown on both a tethersonde and a kite, and measurements from aircraft are shown and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and stability of this system for both nighttime and daytime measurements.

  12. A synoptic-scale overview of the TOGA COARE intensive observing period November 1992 to February 1993 based on analyses from US operational global data assimilation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorino, M.; Lord, S. J.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Phoebus, P. A.; Strey, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The operational global analyses from the two major U.S. numerical weather prediction centers, the Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center and the National Meteorological Center, are used to describe the synoptic-scale features of the 1 Nov. 1992 to 28 Feb. 1993 TOGA COARE intensive observing period (IOP). TOGA COARE is an international field experiment in which a large number of research scientists from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910) and the Laboratory for Hydrospheres (Code 970) participated. Two high-amplitude intraseasonal (30-60 day) oscillations passed through the TOGA COARE observational network located in the equatorial western Pacific. Associated with the oscillations were two 6-10 day periods of persistent westerly surface winds at the equator or 'westerly wind bursts.' These events are depicted through time series and time-longitude cross sections of divergence/velocity potential, surface winds, precipitation, ocean mixed-layer depth, and sea surface temperature. The high and low frequency components of the flow in which the intraseasonal oscillations were embedded are shown using seasonal, monthly, and 5-day averages of the surface, 850 and 200 mb winds, precipitation, and sea-level pressure, and a time-longitude cross section of tropical cyclone activity. Independent verification of precipitation comes from near real-time satellite estimates, and a reference climatology is given based on 9 years of ECMWF analyses. Daily 00 UTC analyses of surface winds and sea-level pressure for the entire western Pacific and Indian Ocean are provided to trace the evolution of individual synoptic events.

  13. Improvement of the Management of Infants, Children and Adults with a Molecular Diagnosis of Enterovirus Meningitis during Two Observational Study Periods

    PubMed Central

    Archimbaud, Christine; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Mirand, Audrey; Chambon, Martine; Demeocq, François; Labbé, André; Laurichesse, Henri; Schmidt, Jeannot; Clavelou, Pierre; Aumaître, Olivier; Regagnon, Christel; Bailly, Jean-Luc; Henquell, Cécile; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are a major cause of aseptic meningitis, and RNA detection using molecular assay is the gold standard diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an EV positive diagnosis on the clinical management of patients admitted for meningitis over the course of two observational study periods (2005 and 2008–09) in the same clinical departments. We further investigated in multivariate analysis various factors possibly associated with hospital length of stay (LOS) in all age groups (infants, children, and adults). The results showed an overall improvement in the management of patients (n = 142) between the study periods, resulting in a significantly shorter hospital LOS for adults and children, and a shorter duration of antibiotic use for adults and infants. In multivariate analysis, we observed that the time from molecular test results to discharge of patients and the median duration of antibiotic treatment were associated with an increase in LOS in all age groups. In addition, among adults, the turnaround time of the molecular assay was significantly correlated with LOS. The use of CT scan in children and hospital admission outside the peak of EV prevalence in infants tended to increase LOS. In conclusion, the shorter length of stay of patients with meningitis in this study was due to various factors including the rapidity of the EV molecular test (particularly in adults), greater physician responsiveness after a positive result (in adults and children), and greater experience on the part of physicians in handling EV meningitis, as evidenced by the shorter duration of antibiotic use in adults and infants. PMID:23874676

  14. Multi-point and multi-instrument observations analyzed for the study of ionospheric electron density perturbations during periods of intense geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belehaki, Anna; Kutiev, Ivan; Marinov, Pencho; Tsagouri, Ioanna; Koutroumbas, Konstantinos; Elias, Panagiotis; Themelis, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    Ionospheric electron density perturbations occurred during 7 to 10 March 2012, as a result of a series of magnetospheric disturbances, have been studied using data from geomagnetic observatories, ground based ionosondes and GNSS receivers and spacecraft observations from ACE and, DMSP missions. Analyzing the interplanetary causes in each phase of this disturbed period, in comparison with the total electron content (TEC) disturbances, we have concluded that the interplanetary solar wind controls largely the ionospheric response. An interplanetary shock detected at 0328 UT on 7 March caused the formation of prompt penetrating electric fields in the dayside that transported plasma from the near-equatorial region to higher in attitudes and latitudes forming a giant plasma fountain which is part of the so-called dayside ionospheric super-fountain. The super-fountain produces an increase in TEC which is the dominant effect at middle latitude, masking the effect of the negative storm. Simultaneously, inspecting the TEC maps, we found evidence for a turbulence in TEC propagating southward probably caused by large scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) linked to auroral electrojet intensification. On 8 March, a magnetospheric sudden impulse at 1130 UT accompanied with strong pulsations in all interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components and with northward Bz component during the growth phase of the storm. These conditions triggered a pronounced directly driven substorm phase during which we observe LSTID. However, the analysis of DMSP satellite observations, provided with strong evidence for Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) formation that erode travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID) signatures. The overall result of these mechanisms can be detected in maps of de-trended TEC, but it is difficult to identify separately each of the sources of the observed perturbations, i.e. auroral electrojet activity and LSTIDs, super-fountain and SAPS.

  15. Effects of asenapine on depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar I disorder experiencing acute manic or mixed episodes: a post hoc analysis of two 3-week clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Asenapine demonstrated superiority over placebo for mania in bipolar I disorder patients experiencing acute current manic or mixed episodes in 2 randomized, placebo-and olanzapine-controlled trials. We report the results of exploratory pooled post hoc analyses from these trials evaluating asenapine's effects on depressive symptoms in patients from these trials with significant baseline depressive symptoms. Methods In the original trials (A7501004 [NCT00159744], A7501005 [NCT00159796]), 977 patients were randomized to flexible-dose sublingual asenapine (10 mg twice daily on day 1; 5 or 10 mg twice daily thereafter), placebo, or oral olanzapine 5-20 mg once daily for 3 weeks. Three populations were defined using baseline depressive symptoms: (1) Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score ≥20 (n = 132); (2) Clinical Global Impression for Bipolar Disorder-Depression (CGI-BP-D) scale severity score ≥4 (n = 170); (3) diagnosis of mixed episodes (n = 302) by investigative site screening. For each population, asenapine and olanzapine were independently compared with placebo using least squares mean change from baseline on depressive symptom measures. Results Decreases in MADRS total score were statistically greater with asenapine versus placebo at days 7 and 21 in all populations; differences between olanzapine and placebo were not significant. Decreases in CGI-BP-D score were significantly greater with asenapine versus placebo at day 7 in all categories and day 21 in population 1; CGI-BP-D score reductions were significantly greater with olanzapine versus placebo at day 21 in population 1 and day 7 in populations 2 and 3. Conclusions These post hoc analyses show that asenapine reduced depressive symptoms in bipolar I disorder patients experiencing acute manic or mixed episodes with clinically relevant depressive symptoms at baseline; olanzapine results appeared to be less consistent. Controlled studies of asenapine in patients with acute

  16. Effects of asenapine on depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar I disorder experiencing acute manic or mixed episodes: a post hoc analysis of two 3-week clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Armin; Zhao, Jun; van Willigenburg, Arjen; Nations, Kari R; Mackle, Mary; Panagides, John

    2011-06-20

    Asenapine demonstrated superiority over placebo for mania in bipolar I disorder patients experiencing acute current manic or mixed episodes in 2 randomized, placebo-and olanzapine-controlled trials. We report the results of exploratory pooled post hoc analyses from these trials evaluating asenapine's effects on depressive symptoms in patients from these trials with significant baseline depressive symptoms. In the original trials (A7501004 [NCT00159744], A7501005 [NCT00159796]), 977 patients were randomized to flexible-dose sublingual asenapine (10 mg twice daily on day 1; 5 or 10 mg twice daily thereafter), placebo, or oral olanzapine 5-20 mg once daily for 3 weeks. Three populations were defined using baseline depressive symptoms: (1) Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score ≥20 (n = 132); (2) Clinical Global Impression for Bipolar Disorder-Depression (CGI-BP-D) scale severity score ≥4 (n = 170); (3) diagnosis of mixed episodes (n = 302) by investigative site screening. For each population, asenapine and olanzapine were independently compared with placebo using least squares mean change from baseline on depressive symptom measures. Decreases in MADRS total score were statistically greater with asenapine versus placebo at days 7 and 21 in all populations; differences between olanzapine and placebo were not significant. Decreases in CGI-BP-D score were significantly greater with asenapine versus placebo at day 7 in all categories and day 21 in population 1; CGI-BP-D score reductions were significantly greater with olanzapine versus placebo at day 21 in population 1 and day 7 in populations 2 and 3. These post hoc analyses show that asenapine reduced depressive symptoms in bipolar I disorder patients experiencing acute manic or mixed episodes with clinically relevant depressive symptoms at baseline; olanzapine results appeared to be less consistent. Controlled studies of asenapine in patients with acute bipolar depression are necessary to

  17. A phase I study with MAG-camptothecin intravenously administered weekly for 3 weeks in a 4-week cycle in adult patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Wachters, F M; Groen, H J M; Maring, J G; Gietema, J A; Porro, M; Dumez, H; de Vries, E G E; van Oosterom, A T

    2004-06-14

    In MAG-camptothecin (MAG-CPT), the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin is linked to a water-soluble polymer. Preclinical experiments showed enhanced antitumour efficacy and limited toxicity compared to camptothecin alone. Prior phase I trials guided the regimen used in this study. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, safety profile, and pharmacokinetics of weekly MAG-CPT. Patients with solid tumours received MAG-CPT intravenously administered weekly for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles. At the starting dose level (80 mg x m(-2) week(-1)), no dose-limiting toxicities occurred during the first cycle (n=3). Subsequently, three patients were enrolled at the second dose level (120 mg x m(-2) week(-1)). Two of three patients at the 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1) cohort developed haemorrhagic cystitis (grade 1/3 dysuria and grade 2/3 haematuria) during the second and third cycles. Next, the 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1) cohort was enlarged to a total of six patients. One other patient at this dose level experienced grade 1 haematuria. At 120 mg x m(-2) week(-1), grade 1 bladder toxicity occurred in two of three patients. Dose escalation was stopped at 120 mg x m(-2) week(-1). Cumulative bladder toxicity was dose-limiting toxicity at 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1). Pharmacokinetics revealed highly variable urinary camptothecin excretion, associated with bladder toxicity. Due to cumulative bladder toxicity, weekly MAG-CPT is not a suitable regimen for treatment of patients with solid tumours.

  18. Austrian Moderate Altitude Study (AMAS 2000): erythropoietic activity and Hb-O(2) affinity during a 3-week hiking holiday at moderate altitude in persons with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Greie, Sven; Humpeler, Egon; Mittermayr, Markus; Fries, Dietmar; Schobersberger, Beatrix; Artner-Dworzak, Erika; Hasibeder, Walter; Klingler, Anton; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2005-01-01

    Moderate altitude hypoxia (1500 to 2500 m) is known to stimulate erythropoiesis and to improve oxygen transport to tissue by a reduction of Hb-O(2) affinity. Whether this adaptation also occurs in tourists with metabolic syndrome has not yet been investigated sufficiently. Thus, we performed a prospective field study to measure erythropoietic parameters and oxygen transport properties in 24 male volunteers with metabolic syndrome during a 3- week holiday program at 1700 m consisting of four guided, individually adapted hiking tours per week. The following examinations were performed: baseline investigations at 500 m (T1); examinations at moderate altitude on day 1 (T2), day 4 (T3), day 9 (T4), and day 19 (T5); and postaltitude tests (T6) 7 to 10 days after return. On day 1 and day 19, a walk on a standardized hiking test route with oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) measure points was performed. Hemoglobin, packed cell volume, and red cell count showed changes over time, with higher values at T5 as compared to baseline. Reticulocyte count and erythropoietin (EPO) were increased at T2 and increased further until T5. EPO declined toward prealtitude values. P50-value (blood PO(2) at 50% hemoglobin oxygen saturation at actual pH) increased during the altitude sojourn (maximum increase at T5 by +0.40 kPa). At T5 all volunteers had a higher SpO(2) before, during, and at the end of the test route compared to T1. During adaptation to moderate altitude, persons with metabolic syndrome exhibit an increase in EPO and a rightward shift of the oxygen dissociation curve that is similar to healthy subjects.

  19. What Are the Trends in Tonsillectomy Techniques in Wales? A Prospective Observational Study of 19,195 Tonsillectomies over a 10-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Walijee, Hussein; Al-Hussaini, Ali; Harris, Andrew; Owens, David

    2015-01-01

    There are a multitude of techniques to undertake tonsillectomy, with hot techniques such as diathermy and coblation being associated with a higher risk of secondary haemorrhage. The UK National Prospective Tonsillectomy Audit (2004) advocated cold steel dissection and ties to be the gold standard. This prospective observational study investigates the trends in tonsillectomy techniques across Wales in the last decade to establish if surgeons have adhered to this national guidance. Data relating to tonsillectomy were extracted over a 10-year period from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2012 from the Wales Surgical Instrument Surveillance Programme database. A total of 19,195 patients were included. Time-series analysis using linear regression showed there was an increase in the number of bipolar diathermy tonsillectomies by 84% (Pearson's r = 0.762, p = 0.010) and coblation tonsillectomies by 120% (r = 0.825, p = 0.003). In contrast, there was a fall in the number of cold steel dissection tonsillectomies with ties by 60% (r = −0.939, p < 0.001). This observational study suggests that the use of bipolar and coblation techniques for tonsillectomy has increased. This deviation from national guidance may be due to these techniques being faster with less intraoperative bleeding. Further study for the underlying reasons for the increase in these techniques is warranted. PMID:26693228

  20. Explorer 45 /S3-A/ observations of the magnetosphere and magnetopause during the August 4-6, 1972, magnetic storm period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Smith, P. H.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Fritz, T. A.; Williams, D. J.; Konradi, A.

    1975-01-01

    The Explorer 45 (S3-A) satellite performed extensive field and particle measurements in the heart of the magnetosphere during the double magnetic storm period of August 4-6, 1972. Both the ground level magnetic records and the magnetic field deformations measured along the orbit by the satellite indicated the existence of only a moderate ring current. This was confirmed by the measurements of the total proton energy density by the on-board particle detectors, which showed a maximum energy density less than the densities observed during the December 1971 and June 1972 magnetic storms. The plasmapause in the noon quadrant was eroded continuously from the onset of the first storm at the beginning of August 4 to an altitude below L = 2.07 at about 1800 hours on August 5. Throughout the entire orbit during which the second sudden commencement occurred, a large amount of low-frequency electric and magnetic field noise was encountered. The most remarkable observation during this orbit was the contraction of the magnetopause to distances inside the satellite location at L = 5.2.

  1. Cloud Properties Derived From GOES-7 for Spring 1994 ARM Intensive Observing Period Using Version 1.0.0 of ARM Satellite Data Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.; Ayers, J. Kirk; Doelling, David R.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the initial formulation (Version 1.0.0) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program satellite data analysis procedures. Techniques are presented for calibrating geostationary satellite data with Sun synchronous satellite radiances and for converting narrowband radiances to top-of-the-atmosphere fluxes and albedos. A methodology is documented for co