Science.gov

Sample records for 3-yr field study

  1. Soccer increases bone mass in prepubescent boys during growth: a 3-yr longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zouch, Mohamed; Zribi, Anis; Alexandre, Christian; Chaari, Hamada; Frere, Delphine; Tabka, Zouhair; Vico, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 3-yr soccer practice on bone acquisition in prepubescent boys. We investigated 65 boys (aged 10-13 yr, Tanner stage I) at baseline, among which only 40 boys (Tanner stages II and III) have continued the 3-yr follow-up: 23 soccer players (F) completed 2-5 h of training plus 1 competition game per week and 17 controls (C). Bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and bone mineral content (BMC, g) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at different sites. At baseline, BMD was higher in soccer players than in controls in the whole body and legs. In contrast, there was nonsignificant difference BMD in head, femoral neck, arms, and BMC in all measured sites between groups. At 3-yr follow-up, soccer players were found to have higher BMD and BMC at all sites than controls, except for head BMD and BMC and arms BMC in which the difference was nonsignificant between groups. During the 3-yr follow-up, the soccer players were found to gain significantly more in lumbar spine (31.2% ± 2.9% vs 23.9% ± 2.1%; p < 0.05), femoral neck (24.1% ± 1.8% vs 11.4% ± 1.9%; p < 0.001), whole body (16.5% ± 1.4% vs 11.8% ± 1.5%; p < 0.05), and nondominant arm BMD (18.2% ± 1.4% vs 13.6% ± 1.7%; p < 0.05) as well as lumbar spine (62.5% ± 20.1% vs 39.5% ± 20.1%; p < 0.001), femoral neck, (37.7% ± 14.2% vs 28.9% ± 12.8%; p < 0.05) and nondominant arm BMC (68.6% ± 22.9% vs 50.1% ± 22.4%; p < 0.05) than controls. In contrast, soccer players have less %BMD and %BMC changes in the head than controls. A nonsignificant difference was found in legs, dominant arm, head %BMD and %BMC changes, and whole-body %BMC changes between groups. In summary, we suggest that soccer has an osteogenic effect BMD and BMC in loaded sites in pubertal soccer players. The increased bone mass induced by soccer training in the stressed sites was associated to a decreased skull bone mass after 3 yr of follow-up.

  2. The soy isoflavones for reducing bone loss study: 3-yr effects on pQCT bone mineral density and strength measures in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Shedd-Wise, Kristine M; Alekel, D Lee; Hofmann, Heike; Hanson, Kathy B; Schiferl, Dan J; Hanson, Laura N; Van Loan, Marta D

    2011-01-01

    Soy isoflavones exert inconsistent bone density-preserving effects, but the bone strength-preserving effects in humans are unknown. Our double-blind randomized controlled trial examined 2 soy isoflavone doses (80 or 120mg/d) vs placebo tablets on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and strength (by means of peripheral quantitative computed tomography) in healthy postmenopausal women (46-63yr). We measured 3-yr changes in cortical BMD (CtBMD), cortical thickness (CtThk), periosteal circumference (PC), endosteal circumference (EC), and strength-strain index (SSI) at 1/3 midshaft femur (N=171), and trabecular BMD (TbBMD), PC, and SSI at 4% distal tibia (N=162). We found no treatment effect on femur CtThk, PC, or EC, or tibia TbBMD or PC. The strongest predictors (negative) of tibia TbBMD and SSI and femur CtBMD were timepoint and bone resorption; whole-body fat mass was protective of SSI. As time since last menstrual period (TLMP) increased (p=0.012), 120-mg/d dose was protective of CtBMD. The strongest predictors of femur SSI were timepoint, bone resorption, and TLMP (protective). Isoflavone tablets were negative predictors of SSI, but 80-mg/d dose became protective as bone turnover increased (p=0.011). Soy isoflavone treatment for 3yr was modestly beneficial for midshaft femur vBMD as TLMP increased and for midshaft femur SSI as bone turnover increased.

  3. AmeriFlux US-SP2 Slashpine-Mize-clearcut-3yr,regen

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SP2 Slashpine-Mize-clearcut-3yr,regen. Site Description - Even aged slash pine (Pinus elliottii) plantation. Planted in Jan. 1999.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XO-4b 3yr observations with DEMONEX (Villanueva+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, S. Jr; Eastman, J. D.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    New observations of XO-4b were made using DEdicated MONitor of EXotransits (DEMONEX). DEMONEX monitored bright stars hosting known transiting planets over a 3yr period from 2008 to 2011 in order to provide a homogeneous data set of precise relative photometry for over 40 transiting systems. There are 20 nights of data from 2008 November to 2010 May taken during primary transits of XO-4b. All observations were made in the Sloan z band. (1 data file).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler planetary candidates. V. 3yr Q1-Q12 (Rowe+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, J. F.; Coughlin, J. L.; Antoci, V.; Barclay, T.; Batalha, N. M.; Borucki, W. J.; Burke, C. J.; Bryson, S. T.; Caldwell, D. A.; Campbell, J. R.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Christiansen, J. L.; Cochran, W.; Gilliland, R. L.; Girouard, F. R.; Haas, M. R.; Helminiak, K. G.; Henze, C. E.; Hoffman, K. L.; Howell, S. B.; Huber, D.; Hunter, R. C.; Jang-Condell, H.; Jenkins, J. M.; Klaus, T. C.; Latham, D. W.; Li, J.; Lissauer, J. J.; McCauliff, S. D.; Morris, R. L.; Mullally, F.; Ofir, A.; Quarles, B.; Quintana, E.; Sabale, A.; Seader, S.; Shporer, A.; Smith, J. C.; Steffen, J. H.; Still, M.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thompson, S. E.; Twicken, J. D.; van Laerhoven, C.; Wolfgang, A.; Zamudio, K. A.

    2015-04-01

    We began with the transit-event candidate list from Tenenbaum et al. (2013ApJS..206....5T) based on a wavelet, adaptive matched filter to search 192313 Kepler targets for periodic drops in flux indicative of a transiting planet. Detections are known as Threshold Crossing Events (TCEs). Tenenbaum et al. utilized three years of Kepler photometric observations (Q1-Q12) -the same data span employed by this study based on SOC 8.3 as part of Data Release 21 (Thompson S. E., Christiansen J. L., Jenkins J. M. et al. Kepler (KSCI-19061-001)). (3 data files).

  6. Pilot Field Test Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherriff, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The Field Test study is currently in full swing, preceded by the successful completion of the Pilot Field Test study that paved the way for collecting data on the astronauts in the medical tent in Kazakhstan. Abigail Sherriff worked alongside Logan Dobbe on one Field Test aspect to determine foot clearance over obstacles (5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) using APDM Inc. Internal Measurement Units (IMU) worn by the astronauts. They created a program to accurately calculate foot clearance using the accelerometer, magnetometer, and gyroscope data with the IMUs attached to the top of the shoes. To validate the functionality of their program, they completed a successful study on test subjects performing various tasks in an optical motion studio, considered a gold standard in biomechanics research. Future work will include further validation and expanding the program to include other analyses.

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  8. Field studies courses open

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourteen month-long courses combining applied academics with training in field research methodology are being offered this summer by the School for Field Studies. The courses, held in eight countries during May, June, July, and August, provide unique opportunities for participants to work as a team under primitive conditions.‘Our courses bind together the academic challenge of the research problem, the physical challenge of the site itself, and the interpersonal challenge of the expedition team in a dynamic way so that both cognitive and affective learning are accelerated,’ according to Jim Elder, the school's director.

  9. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  10. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  11. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  12. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  13. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  14. Baja California: Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, John; Stewart, Jack

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to plan and execute an extended field trip which provides first hand observation of biological and cultural systems. Socialization of the participants was achieved through common planning and goal achievement. (BR)

  15. The University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Community OutReach Development Summer Science Institute Program: A 3-Yr Laboratory Research Experience for Inner-City Secondary-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemann, Marilyn A.; Miller, Michael L.; Davis, Thelma

    2004-01-01

    This article describes and assesses the effectiveness of a 3-yr, laboratory-based summer science program to improve the academic performance of inner-city high school students. The program was designed to gradually introduce such students to increasingly more rigorous laboratory experiences in an attempt to interest them in and model what…

  16. The study of TeV variability and the duty cycle of Mrk 421 from 3 Yr of observations with the milagro observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Barber, A. S.; Allen, B. T.; Chen, C.; Delay, R. S.; Aune, T.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Goodman, J. A.; Christopher, G. E.; DeYoung, T.; Dingus, B. L.; Hoffman, C. M.; Imran, A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fraija, N.; González, M. M.; Hays, E.; Hüntemeyer, P. H.; and others

    2014-02-20

    TeV-flaring activity with timescales as short as tens of minutes and an orphan TeV flare have been observed from the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421). The TeV emission from Mrk 421 is believed to be produced by leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. In this scenario, correlations between the X-ray and the TeV fluxes are expected, TeV orphan flares are hardly explained, and the activity (measured as duty cycle) of the source at TeV energies is expected to be equal to or less than that observed in X-rays if only SSC is considered. To estimate the TeV duty cycle of Mrk 421 and to establish limits on its variability at different timescales, we continuously observed Mrk 421 with the Milagro observatory. Mrk 421 was detected by Milagro with a statistical significance of 7.1 standard deviations between 2005 September 21 and 2008 March 15. The observed spectrum is consistent with previous observations by VERITAS. We estimate the duty cycle of Mrk 421 for energies above 1 TeV for different hypotheses of the baseline flux and for different flare selections and we compared our results with the X-ray duty cycle estimated by Resconi et al. The robustness of the results is discussed.

  17. The Study of TeV Variability and the Duty Cycle of Mrk 421 from 3 Yr of Observations with the Milagro Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Allen, B. T.; Aune, T.; Barber, A. S.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Chen, C.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    TeV-flaring activity with timescales as short as tens of minutes and an orphan TeV flare have been observed from the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421). The TeV emission from Mrk 421 is believed to be produced by leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. In this scenario, correlations between the X-ray and the TeV fluxes are expected, TeV orphan flares are hardly explained, and the activity (measured as duty cycle) of the source at TeV energies is expected to be equal to or less than that observed in X-rays if only SSC is considered. To estimate the TeV duty cycle of Mrk 421 and to establish limits on its variability at different timescales, we continuously observed Mrk 421 with the Milagro observatory. Mrk 421 was detected by Milagro with a statistical significance of 7.1 standard deviations between 2005 September 21 and 2008 March 15. The observed spectrum is consistent with previous observations by VERITAS. We estimate the duty cycle of Mrk 421 for energies above 1 TeV for different hypotheses of the baseline flux and for different flare selections and we compared our results with the X-ray duty cycle estimated by Resconi et al. The robustness of the results is discussed.

  18. The Study of TeV Variability and the Duty Cycle of Mrk 421 from 3 yr of Observations with the Milagro Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Allen, B. T.; Aune, T.; Barber, A. S.; Berley, D.; Braun, J.; Chen, C.; Christopher, G. E.; Delay, R. S.; DeYoung, T.; Dingus, B. L.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fraija, N.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P. H.; Imran, A.; Kolterman, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; Marinelli, A.; McEnery, J. E.; Morgan, T.; Mincer, A. I.; Nemethy, P.; Patricelli, B.; Pretz, J.; Ryan, J. M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Shoup, A.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Walker, G. P.; Williams, D. A.; Yodh, G. B.

    2014-02-01

    TeV-flaring activity with timescales as short as tens of minutes and an orphan TeV flare have been observed from the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421). The TeV emission from Mrk 421 is believed to be produced by leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. In this scenario, correlations between the X-ray and the TeV fluxes are expected, TeV orphan flares are hardly explained, and the activity (measured as duty cycle) of the source at TeV energies is expected to be equal to or less than that observed in X-rays if only SSC is considered. To estimate the TeV duty cycle of Mrk 421 and to establish limits on its variability at different timescales, we continuously observed Mrk 421 with the Milagro observatory. Mrk 421 was detected by Milagro with a statistical significance of 7.1 standard deviations between 2005 September 21 and 2008 March 15. The observed spectrum is consistent with previous observations by VERITAS. We estimate the duty cycle of Mrk 421 for energies above 1 TeV for different hypotheses of the baseline flux and for different flare selections and we compared our results with the X-ray duty cycle estimated by Resconi et al. The robustness of the results is discussed.

  19. Coding Major Fields of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, L. G.; Carroll, C. D.

    The National Center for Education Statistics conducts surveys which require the coding of the respondent's major field of study. This paper presents a new system for the coding of major field of study. It operates on-line i a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) environment and allows conversational checks to verify coding directly from…

  20. Stink bugs (Hemitera: Pentatomidae) in pheromone-baited traps near crop field edges in Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) are economic pests of cotton. Our specific objective for this 3-yr study was to use traps baited with Euschistus spp. pheromone to monitor stink bugs in habitats near cotton and peanut field edges before, during, and after crop growth and development. Plant-feedi...

  1. Static magnetic fields: animal studies.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Various experimental studies carried out over the last 30-40 years have examined the effects of the chronic or acute exposure of laboratory animals to static magnetic fields. Many of the earlier studies have been adequately reviewed elsewhere; few adverse effects were identified. This review focuses on studies carried out more recently, mostly those using vertebrates, particularly mammals. Four main areas of investigation have been covered, viz., nervous system and behavioural studies, cardiovascular system responses, reproduction and development, and genotoxicity and cancer. Work on the role of the natural geomagnetic field in animal orientation and migration has been omitted. Generally, the acute responses found during exposure to static fields above about 4 T are consistent with those found in volunteer studies, namely the induction of flow potentials around the heart and the development of aversive/avoidance behaviour resulting from body movement in such fields. No consistently demonstrable effects of exposure to fields of approximately 1T and above have been seen on other behavioural or cardiovascular endpoints. In addition, no adverse effects of such fields on reproduction and development or on the growth and development of tumours have been firmly established. Overall, however, far too few animal studies have been carried out to reach any firm conclusions.

  2. The University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Community OutReach Development Summer Science Institute Program: A 3-Yr Laboratory Research Experience for Inner-City Secondary-Level Students

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    This article describes and assesses the effectiveness of a 3-yr, laboratory-based summer science program to improve the academic performance of inner-city high school students. The program was designed to gradually introduce such students to increasingly more rigorous laboratory experiences in an attempt to interest them in and model what “real” science is like. The students are also exposed to scientific seminars and university tours as well as English and mathematics workshops designed to help them analyze their laboratory data and prepare for their closing ceremony presentations. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of student performance in these programs indicates that participants not only learn the vocabulary, facts, and concepts of science, but also develop a better appreciation of what it is like to be a “real” scientist. In addition, the college-bound 3-yr graduates of this program appear to be better prepared to successfully academically compete with graduates of other high schools; they also report learning useful job-related life skills. Finally, the critical conceptual components of this program are discussed so that science educators interested in using this model can modify it to fit the individual resources and strengths of their particular setting. PMID:15526064

  3. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  4. Mentoring Field Directors: A National Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Martha L.; Raskin, Miriam S.

    2014-01-01

    In social work field education, mentoring is underused and lacks research data. There is a paucity of research that examines the effect mentoring has on social work field directors who administer field programs at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. This exploratory study fills this void by examining the mentoring opportunities and…

  5. Field Guides in Academe: A Citation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Dianne

    2006-01-01

    Field guides are common in libraries but are generally not considered scholarly. This study examines citations to fifty field guides to determine how they were used in scholarly publications, finding that field guides are frequently cited as a source of data on the ranges, habits, and descriptions of plants and animals.

  6. Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0099 TITLE: Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Naturalistic Field Studies of Sleep and Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0099 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Center (SPRC) conducts human and animal  studies  in laboratory and field settings in support of basic and applied sleep  research at Washington State

  7. Indigenous Studies as an International Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Robles, Rodolfo

    This paper proposes the development of Indigenous Studies as an international field, both in the sense of advancing the discipline internationally, wherever there are Indigenous peoples, and in the sense of incorporating international perspectives into curricula. In Canada, Indigenous Studies has been and is still treated as something to be done…

  8. Studying electric fields in dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-11-01

    In Earth's magnetotail, sharp increases in the magnetic field known as dipolarization fronts are associated with high-speed plasma flows that connect Earth's ionosphere via electric currents. Some aspects of these dipolarization fronts have puzzled scientists; in particular, the dip in magnetic field that occurs just ahead of the dipolarization front layer is not well understood. Sun et al. analyze observations made using the Cluster satellites to elucidate the details of electric fields associated with dipolarization fronts. The study shows that a type of electric current known as a Hall current dominates in the dipolarization front region and in the region where the magnetic field dips, but this current flows in opposite directions in these two regions.

  9. Common Group Problems: A Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Sanford B.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A field study of a naturally functioning group (N=125) was conducted to identify common group problems. Trained observers attended group meetings and described the problems encountered. Difficulties of cohesion, leadership, sub-group formation, and personality conflict were identified. (RC)

  10. Outdoor Education, Junior Biology Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, John H.; And Others

    Field studies for grade nine and ten biology students are developed in this teacher and student guide for outdoor education. A small section is devoted to teacher pre-planning and final sections are concerned with equipment, audio-visual resources, and a large booklist. Twenty-three investigations related to earth science and biology topics are…

  11. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  12. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  13. Field Studies of Exercise and Food Deprivation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    limit to fat reserves in physically active underfed young adult men, and in response to exercise and underfeeding, women used more fat mass and less fat...a shift to increased fat utilization, appear to be enhanced by concurrent physical activity . Exercise , diet and reproductive function Controlled... physically active and undernourished humans should help guide strategies to manage obesity safely and effectively. This review focuses on field studies

  14. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  15. Field study plan for alternate barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.; Relyea, J.F.

    1989-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is providing technical assistance in selecting, designing, evaluating, and demonstrating protective barriers. As part of this technical assistance effort, asphalt, clay, and chemical grout will be evaluated for use as alternate barriers. The purpose of the subsurface layer is to reduce the likelihood that extreme events (i.e., 100-year maximum storms, etc.) will cause significant drainage through the barrier. The tests on alternate barriers will include laboratory and field analysis of the subsurface layer performance. This field test plan outlines the activities required to test and design subsurface moisture barriers. The test plan covers activities completed in FY 1988 and planned through FY 1992 and includes a field-scale test of one or more of the alternate barriers to demonstrate full-scale application techniques and to provide performance data on a larger scale. Tests on asphalt, clay, and chemical grout were initiated in FY 1988 in small (30.5 cm diameter) tube-layer lysimeters. The parameters used for testing the materials were different for each one. The tests had to take into account the differences in material characteristics and response to change in conditions, as well as information provided by previous studies. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste

  17. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering); Ursic, J.R. . Region V)

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  18. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.; King, W.C.; Ursic, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  19. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  20. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Washington and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. Investigations discussed address principally mudflow phenomena and drainage development. At the Valley of 10,000 Smokes (Katmai, AK) and Mount St. Helens, WA, studies of the development of erosional landforms (in particular, drainage) on fresh, new surfaces permitted analysis of the result of competition between geomorphic processes. Of specific interest is the development of stream pattern as a function of the competition between perennial seepage overland flow (from glacial or groundwater sources), ephemeral overland flow (from pluvial or seasonal melt sources), and ephemeral/perennial groundwater sapping, as a function of time since initial resurfacing, material properties, and seasonal/annual environmental conditions.

  1. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Iceland and Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. These studies, conducted in Iceland and in Antarctica, investigated physical and chemical weathering mechanisms and rates, eolitan processes, mudflow phenomena, drainage development, and catastrophic fluvial and volcanic phenomena. Continuing investigations in Iceland fall in three main catagories: (1) catastrophic floods of the Jokulsa a Fjollum, (2) lahars associated with explosive volcanic eruptions of Askja caldera, and (3) rates of eolian abrasion in cold, volcanic deserts. The ice-free valleys of Antarctica, in particular those in South Victoria Land, have much is common with the surface of Mars. In addition to providing independent support for the application of the Iceland findings to consideration of the martian erosional system, the Antarctic observations also provide analogies to other martian phenomena. For example, a family of sand dunes in Victoria Valley are stabilized by the incorporation of snow as beds.

  2. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  3. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  4. Studies of the Martian Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    This report covers two awards: the first NAGW-2573 was awarded to enable participation in the Mars 94 mission that slipped to become the Mars 96 mission. Upon the unfortunate failure of Mars 96 to achieve its intended trajectory, the second grant was awarded to closeout the Mars 96 activities. Our initial efforts concentrated on assisting our colleagues: W. Riedler, K. Schwingenschuh, K. Gringanz, M. Verigin and Ye. Yeroshenko with advice on the development of the magnetic field portion of the investigation and to help them with test activities. We also worked with them to properly analyze the Phobos magnetic field and plasma data in order to optimize the return from the Mars 94/96 mission. This activity resulted in 18 papers on Mars scientific topics, and two on the instrumentation. One of these latter two papers was the last of the papers written, and speaks to the value of the closeout award. These 20 papers are listed in the attached bibliography. Because we had previously studied Venus and Titan and since it was becoming evident that the magnetic field was very weak, we compared the various properties of the Martian interaction with those of the analogous interactions at Venus and Titan while other papers simply analyzed the properties of the interaction as Phobos 2 observed them. One very interesting observation was the identification of ions picked up in the solar wind, originating in Mars neutral atmosphere. These had been predicted by our earlier observation of cyclotron waves at the proton gyrofrequency in the region upstream from Mars in the solar wind. Of course, the key question we addressed was that of the intrinsic or induced nature of the Martian magnetic field. We found little evidence for the former and much for the latter point of view. We also discussed the instrumentation planned for the Mars balloon and the instrumentation on the orbiter. In all these studies were very rewarding despite the short span of the Phobos data. Although they did not

  5. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  6. Leishmaniasis entomological field studies: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando; Canto-Lara, Silvia B; Del Rosario Garcia-Miss, Maria

    2009-12-01

    Occupational health remains neglected in developing countries because of competing social, economic and political challenges. Ethical issues in the workplace related to the hazards and risks of becoming infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana, through the bite of naturally infected sand flies, is another area of concern that has been neglected as well. We report here the results of reviewing two entomological field studies carried out in our research center from 2003 to 2006. Eight students from our School of Biology were invited to catch sand flies. A total of six of the eight (75%) developed a typical clinical picture of Localized Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (LCL) caused by L. (L.) mexicana. In this article we identify the ethical issues related to these kinds of studies and propose some guidelines for conducting them.

  7. Summary of modeling studies of the Krafla geothermal field, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Stefansson, V.; Eliasson, E.T.

    1983-08-01

    A comprehensive modeling study of the Krafla geothermal field in Iceland has been carried out. The study consists of four tasks: the analysis of well test data, modeling of the natural state of the field, the determination of the generating capability of the field, and modeling of well performance. The results of all four tasks are consistent with field observations.

  8. Field studies of the electrification of thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H.; Holmes, C. R.; Moore, C. B.; Gaskell, W.; Illingworth, A. J.; Latham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Many theories have been advanced to explain the development of electric fields in thunderstorms, culminating in lightning, but thorough appraisal of these has been hampered by the lack of reliable and comprehensive observational data on the electrical characteristics, microphysical properties and dynamical behavior of the storms. A major field experiment (the Thunderstorm Research International Project) has been in progress for three years, in an effort to remedy this deficiency, and this paper describes some of this work and the results emanating from it. Major tools in this investigation are: an instrumented aircraft capable of penetrating the clouds; dual-Doppler and fast scanning radars; field-change and precipitation-recording networks; and an acoustic system for reconstructing the location of points on the lightning channels. The early results indicate a strong correlation between updraughts, precipitation and high fields. Circumstantial evidence points towards the presence of ice as being crucial to rapid field growth.

  9. Nonperturbative studies in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of three different research topics. The first part deals with the Study of the so-called local lattice Yukawa theory. The motivation for this study is to investigate the interior of the phase diagram of this theory. A strong y expansion (y being the bare Yukawa coupling) is performed of the partition function and show that within the (finite) range of convergence of the series expansion, the lattice Yukawa theory is equivalent to a purely bosonic theory, with a shifted action. The author explicitly calculated the shifted action to the fourth order in 1/y and find that it is composed of competing interactions. This suggests that away from y = [infinity] towards the interior of the phase diagram, there is a more complicated ordering than simple ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic. In the second part, the question is addressed of formation of bound states out of constituent fields in an exactly soluble theory, i.e. multifermion electro-dynamics in two space-time dimensions. The author exactly calculates the correlation function corresponding to a neutral composite fermion operator and discuss the pole structure of its Fourier transform. It does not exhibit a simple pole in p[sup 2], hence the corresponding neutral composite operator does not create an asymptotic state in the spectrum of the theory. In part three, the author puts multifermion QED[sub 2] in a heat bath and address the same question as in part two. The author first exactly calculates a bosonic correlation function at finite temperature and density, and discuss its behavior. The author then exactly calculates the correlation function corresponding to the neutral composite fermion operator at finite temperature and density and discusses its behavior. It is concluded that the temperature does not help the composite fermion operator create a particle in the spectrum of the theory.

  10. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  11. Field Ecology Studies in the Rocky Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Philip A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a six-week field plant ecology course in Montana which is offered by the Botany Department at Southern Illinois University. The goals of the course, how it is taught, and student evaluation are also presented. (HM)

  12. Plant Taxonomy as a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    Suggests methods of teaching plant identification and taxonomic theory using keys, statistical analyses, and biometrics. Population variation, genotype- environment interaction and experimental taxonomy are used in laboratory and field. (AL)

  13. Millimeter wave near-field study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, Neill

    1990-01-01

    The possibility is evaluated of current technology measuring large aperture millimeter wave antennas. Included are a mathematical modeling of system errors, experimental data supporting error model, predictions of system accuracy at millimeter wavelengths, advantage of near-field measurements, and a cost estimate for a facility upgrade. The use is emphasized of software compensation and other inexpensive alternatives to develop a near optimum solution to near-field measurement problems at millimeter wavelengths.

  14. Duck nesting in fields of undisturbed grass-legume cover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duebbert, H.F.; Lokemoen, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    A study of dabbling duck (Anatinae) nesting was conducted during 1971-73 on nine 12- to 54-ha Cropland Adjustment Program fields in the prairie pothole region of north-central South Dakota. The tall, dense vegetation was comprised of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes, primarily smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis), intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium), and alfalfa. Complexes of temporary, seasonal, and semipermanent wetlands surrounded the fields at densities of 1.5-8.1 basins/km2 and areas of 9.4-17.2 ha/km2. Of the 620 nests studied, 38 percent were of blue-winged teal (Anas discors), 24 percent were of mallards (A. platyrhynchos), and 24 percent were of gadwalls (A. strepera). Densities of nests of all species averaged 67, 114, and 47 nests/km2 (3-yr av 77/km2). Calculated hatching rates were 69, 58, and 32 percent (av 56) for the 3 years. Hatchability of eggs in successful nests averaged 97.1 percent. Averages of 4.0, 6.2, and 1.2 ducklings were hatched per hectare in 1971, 1972, and 1973, respectively (3-yr av 3.7/ha).

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of a Field and Non-Field Based Social Studies Preservice Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.; Vansickle, Ronald L.

    1978-01-01

    Comparison of pre-service social studies teachers in field and non-field based methods courses indicated no significant differences with regard to teaching skills, attitudes, or behaviors teachers should exhibit in the classroom. (Author/DB)

  16. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  17. Toward a Field of Interfaith Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Eboo

    2013-01-01

    Scholars from a range of fields have long taken an interest in how people who orient around religion differently interact with one another. Indeed, this phenomenon has been the subject of important works in political science ("The Clash of Civilizations" by Samuel Huntington), sociology ("American Grace" by Robert Putnam and…

  18. Distributions of Personalities Within Occupations and Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, John L.; Holland, Joan E.

    1977-01-01

    Self Directed Search (SDS) and Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) results occupations and fields of study were organized to show the distributions of personalities within an occupation or field of study. The results show that single fields tolerate several types, but some types occur only infrequently. (Author)

  19. Field study on moving force identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Hung-tin Tommy; Yung, Tak H.; Law, S. S.

    2001-08-01

    A field measurement to validate a moving force identification method was carried out on an existing prestressed concrete highway bridge with a span length of 28 m. The test bridge is located at Ma Tau Wai, Kowloon, Hong Kong. A heavy 2-axle truck with known axle loads was used as a control vehicle. Besides the control vehicle, axle load data of in-service vehicles were also collected. The bridge responses acquired for the identification were indirectly measured using strain gauges. Results show that dynamic axle loads induced from both control and in-service vehicles can be identified indicating the method is valid for identification of moving forces.

  20. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, D.A.; Daniel, D.E.; Koerner, R.M.; Bonaparte, R.

    1997-12-31

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project.

  1. NASA Computational Case Study: Modeling Planetary Magnetic and Gravitational Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, David G.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2014-01-01

    In this case study, we model a planet's magnetic and gravitational fields using spherical harmonic functions. As an exercise, we analyze data on the Earth's magnetic field collected by NASA's MAGSAT spacecraft, and use it to derive a simple magnetic field model based on these spherical harmonic functions.

  2. Comparative Study of Bacterial Growth in Magnet Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Derek; Masood, Samina

    It has been shown that magnetic fields affect bacterial growth. A comparative study of growth rates for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria with different types of magnetic fields is done. Special focus is placed upon growth within liquid media, and the effect of magnetic fields relative to the chosen growth medium is considered.

  3. THE FIELD STUDY NOTEBOOK FOR THE OUTDOOR SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BURGESS, ROBERT A.; GILFILLAN, WARREN C.

    THE "FIELD STUDY NOTEBOOK" HAS BEEN PREPARED FOR USE BY PAROCHIAL AND PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR STUDYING ECOLOGY AT AN OUTDOOR SCHOOL. THE NOTEBOOK EMPHASIZES COMMUNITY DYNAMICS THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES THAT ILLUSTRATE ECOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS. INFORMATION IS PROVIDED ON THE ORGANIZATION OF A FIELD STUDY AND ON PERFORMING…

  4. NAFTA Guidance Document for Conducting Terrestrial Field Dissipation Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Harmonized guidance for TFD studies that demonstrate transformation, transport and fate of pesticides under representative actual use conditions. Field studies substantiate physicochemical, mobility and biotransformation data from laboratory studies.

  5. Social Studies: A Field of Dreams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larrabee, Larry J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the development of social studies from the social upheaval of the industrial revolution to the present. Defines social studies as an integrated, interdisciplinary curriculum for instruction in citizenship education. Lists objectives as gaining necessary knowledge, developing skill in processing information, examining one's own beliefs,…

  6. Simulated Laboratory/Field Study of Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubowsky, Nathan; Hartman, Elliott M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Immediately following a lecture discussion on early hominid characteristics and behavior, students participate in a laboratory study of bipedal locomotion based on an analysis of footprints. The development and use of this simulation are described. (JN)

  7. Framing in the Field: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Strategic Frame Analysis can inform the daily practice of policy advocates by bringing an evidence-based communications approach to their work. This case study of FrameWorks' decade-long association with the national Kids Count Network shares stories from advocates who are transforming their communications strategies, resulting in more effective…

  8. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-30

    Studies were initiated at the Hanford Site to evaluate the process controlling the transport of fluids in the vadose zone and to develop a reliable database upon which vadose-zone transport models can be calibrated. These models are needed to evaluate contaminant migration through the vadose zone to underlying groundwaters at Hanford. A study site that had previously been extensively characterized using geophysical monitoring techniques was selected in the 200 E Area. Techniques used previously included neutron probe for water content, spectral gamma logging for radionuclide tracers, and gamma scattering for wet bulk density. Building on the characterization efforts of the past 20 years, the site was instrumented to facilitate the comparison of nine vadose-zone characterization methods: advanced tensiometers, neutron probe, electrical resistance tomography (ERT), high-resolution resistivity (HRR), electromagnetic induction imaging (EMI), cross-borehole radar (XBR), and cross-borehole seismic (XBS). Soil coring was used to obtain soil samples for analyzing ionic and isotopic tracers.

  9. Adaptive radiations: From field to genomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Scott A.; Derieg, Nathan J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive radiations were central to Darwin's formation of his theory of natural selection, and today they are still the centerpiece for many studies of adaptation and speciation. Here, we review the advantages of adaptive radiations, especially recent ones, for detecting evolutionary trends and the genetic dissection of adaptive traits. We focus on Aquilegia as a primary example of these advantages and highlight progress in understanding the genetic basis of flower color. Phylogenetic analysis of Aquilegia indicates that flower color transitions proceed by changes in the types of anthocyanin pigments produced or their complete loss. Biochemical, crossing, and gene expression studies have provided a wealth of information about the genetic basis of these transitions in Aquilegia. To obtain both enzymatic and regulatory candidate genes for the entire flavonoid pathway, which produces anthocyanins, we used a combination of sequence searches of the Aquilegia Gene Index, phylogenetic analyses, and the isolation of novel sequences by using degenerate PCR and RACE. In total we identified 34 genes that are likely involved in the flavonoid pathway. A number of these genes appear to be single copy in Aquilegia and thus variation in their expression may have been key for floral color evolution. Future studies will be able to use these sequences along with next-generation sequencing technologies to follow expression and sequence variation at the population level. The genetic dissection of other adaptive traits in Aquilegia should also be possible soon as genomic resources such as whole-genome sequencing become available. PMID:19528644

  10. Coastal Studies in a Comprehensive Summer Field Geology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Barry; Jones, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a college geology course that incorporates a coastal segment. Field studies are done on Plum Island and include examining beaches, dune fields, and an adjacent marsh and spit. Topics include sedimentation, coastal geomorphology, botanical effects, and coastal studies methodology. (MA)

  11. Field Study Manual to Freshwater and Estuarine Habitats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This field studies manual, developed by biology students in the 1971 Georgia Governor's Honors Program, was designed for collection of data pertinent to freshwater and estuarine habitats. In addition to the various methods of sampling the ecosystem and for quantification of the data, instructions for dividing the field study into three logical…

  12. Study of Several Potentials as Scalar Field Dark Matter Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Vazquez-Gonzalez, Alberto; Magan a, Juan

    2008-12-04

    In this work we study several scalar field potentials as a plausible candidate to be the dark matter in the universe. The main idea is the following; if the scalar field is an ultralight boson particle, it condensates like a Bose-Einstein system at very early times and forms the basic structure of the Universe. Real scalar fields collapse in equilibrium configurations which oscillate in space-time (oscillatons). The cosmological behavior of the field equations are solved using the dynamical system formalism. We use the current cosmological parameters as constraints for the free parameters of the scalar field potentials. We are able to reproduce very well the cosmological predictions of the standard {lambda}CDM model with some scalar field potentials. Therefore, scalar field dark matter seems to be a good alternative to be the nature of the dark matter of the universe.

  13. Lattice Study of Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterowd, Christopher; Detar, Carleton; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of graphene ranks as one of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years. As a strongly interacting system whose low-energy excitations are described by the Dirac equation, graphene has many similarities with other strongly interacting field theories, particularly quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Graphene, along with other relativistic field theories, have been predicted to exhibit spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) when an external magnetic field is present. Using nonperturbative methods developed to study QCD, we study the low-energy effective field theory (EFT) of graphene subject to an external magnetic field. We find strong evidence supporting the existence of SSB at zero-temperature and characterize the dependence of the chiral condensate on the external magnetic field. We also present results for the mass of the Nambu-Goldstone boson and the dynamically generated quasiparticle mass that result from the SSB.

  14. Magnetic field effect on indole exciplexes: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tamal; Basu, Samita

    2004-04-01

    A comparative magnetic field effect (MFE) study was done on indole exciplexes with various acceptors, anthracene, pyrene, all-s- trans-1,4-diphenylbuta-1,3-diene and 9-cyanophenanthrene. A surprisingly low magnetic field effect was detected for the 9-cyanophenanthrene exciplexes and was correlated with exciplex geometry. The wavelength dependence of magnetic field effect confirms the presence of single charge-transfer complex for all the exciplexes with 1,2-dimethylindole.

  15. Policy Forum: Studying Eyewitness Investigations in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Robyn; Jacoby, Larry L.; Kahneman, Daniel; Lempert, Richard; Roediger, Henry L.; Rosenthal, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This article considers methodological issues arising from recent efforts to provide field tests of eyewitness identification procedures. We focus in particular on a field study (Mecklenburg 2006) that examined the “double blind, sequential” technique, and consider the implications of an acknowledged methodological confound in the study. We explain why the confound has severe consequences for assessing the real-world implications of this study. PMID:17610149

  16. Toward a Virtual Field Trip Model for the Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    In the current state of social studies education, field trips are being cut from many schools' curriculum. While not a true substitution, today's technologies provide some opportunities through virtual field trips (VFTs) to simulate these experiences, engage students in knowledge production and disciplined inquiry, and have interactions with the…

  17. A Guide to the Baja California Field Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercade, Jose A.

    Since 1974, Glendale Community College (GCC) has offered a variety of biology, social science, and language classes at a field station located on the Baja California peninsula, Republic of Mexico. This guide to GCC's Baja California Field Studies Program (BCFSP) provides manuals, forms, job descriptions, contracts with participating organizations,…

  18. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the…

  19. Hooking the Geographer in Children with Field-Based Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krall, Florence; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Suggests projects to help elementary students learn about man-land relationships through field experience, inquiry techniques, and a thematic, interdisciplinary approach. Children study a natural community, a human community, solid wastes, and energy conservation. (Author/AV)

  20. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  1. Aristoteles - An ESA mission to study the earth's gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambeck, K.

    In preparing for its first Solid-Earth Program, ESA has studied a satellite concept for a mission dedicated to the precise determination of the earth's geopotential (gravitational and magnetic) fields. Data from such a mission are expected to make substantial contributions to a number of research and applications fields in solid-earth geophysics, oceanography and global-change monitoring. The impact of a high-resolution gravity-field mission on studies of the various earth-science problems is assessed. The current state of our knowledge in this area is discussed and the ability of low-orbit satellite gradiometry to contribute to their solution is demonstrated.

  2. Case studies of EUV cyclones and their associated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shu-Hong

    2015-09-01

    EUV cyclones are rotating structures in the solar corona, and they are usually rooted in the underlying rotating network magnetic fields in the photosphere. However, their connection with the surrounding magnetic fields remains unknown. Here we report an observational study of four typical cyclones which are rooted in different kinds of magnetic fields. We use Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data to investigate the rotation of EUV features in cyclones and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager data to study the associated magnetic fields. The results show that, (1) an EUV cyclone rooted in a sunspot rotates with the photospheric magnetic field; (2) two EUV cyclones in two faculae of an active region are connected to the same sunspot of the active region but rotate oppositely; (3) an EUV cyclone is rooted in a coronal hole with weak open magnetic fields; (4) a pair of conjugated cyclones is rooted in magnetic fields that have opposite polarity with opposite directions of rotation. The differences in the spatial extent of a cyclone, characteristics of its rotation and underlying fields indicate that cyclones are ubiquitous over the solar atmosphere and that the magnetic structures relevant to the cyclones are more complicated than expected.

  3. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies were conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function; (2) experiments on cancer development in animals; and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats were shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies were conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels were shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements were performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  4. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  5. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  6. STUDYING THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM ANISOTROPIES IN VELOCITY CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D. E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu

    2015-11-20

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position–position–velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  7. Field studies on pesticides and birds: Unexpected and unique relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, Charles J.

    1997-01-01

    We review the advantages and disadvantages of experimental and field studies for determining effects of pesticides on birds. Important problems or principles initially discovered in the field include effects of DDT (through its metabolite DDE) on eggshell thickness, reproductive success, and population stability; trophic-level bioaccumulation of the lipid-soluble organochlorine pesticides; indirect effects on productivity and survival through reductions in the food supply and cover by herbicides and insecticides; unexpected toxic effects and routes of exposure of organophosphorus compounds such as famphur and dimethoate; effects related to simultaneous application at full strength of several pesticides of different classes; and others. Also, potentially serious bird problems with dicofol, based on laboratory studies, later proved negligible in the field. In refining field tests of pesticides, the selection of a species or group of species to study is important, because exposure routes may vary greatly, and 10-fold interspecific differences in sensitivity to pesticides are relatively common. Although there are limitations with field investigations, particularly uncontrollable variables that must be addressed, the value of a well-designed field study far outweighs its shortcomings.

  8. Field studies on pesticides and birds: unexpected and unique relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    We review the advantages and disadvantages of experimental and field studies for determining effects of pesticides on birds. Important problems or principles initially discovered in the field include effects of DDT (through its metabolite DDE) on eggshell thickness, reproductive success, and population stability; trophic-level bioaccumulation of the lipid-soluble organochlorine pesticides; indirect effects on productivity and survival through reductions in the food supply and cover by herbicides and insecticides; unexpected toxic effects and routes of exposure of organophosphorus compounds such as famphur and dimethoate; effects related to simultaneous application at full strength of several pesticides of different classes; and others. Also, potentially serious bird problems with dicofol, based on laboratory studies, later proved negligible in the field. In refining field tests of pesticides, the selection of a species or group of species to study is important, because exposure routes may vary greatly, and 10-fold interspecific differences in sensitivity to pesticides are relatively common. Although there are limitations with field investigations, particularly uncontrollable variables that must be addressed, the value of a well-designed field study far outweighs its shortcomings

  9. Cellular studies and interaction mechanisms of extremely low frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liburdy, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide interest in the biological effects of ELF (extremely low frequency, <1 kHz) electromagnetic fields has grown significantly. Health professionals and government administrators and regulators, scientists and engineers, and, importantly, an increasing number of individuals in the general public are interested in this health issue. The goal of research at the cellular level is to identify cellular responses to ELF fields, to develop a dose threshold for such interactions, and with such information to formulate and test appropriate interaction mechanisms. This review is selective and will discuss the most recent cellular studies directed at these goals which relate to power line, sinusoidal ELF fields. In these studies an interaction site at the cell membrane is by consensus a likely candidate, since changes in ion transport, ligand-receptor events such as antibody binding, and G protein activation have been reported. These changes strongly indicate that signal transduction (ST) can be influenced. Also, ELF fields are reported to influence enzyme activation, gene expression, protein synthesis, and cell proliferation, which are triggered by earlier ST events at the cell membrane. The concept of ELF fields altering early cell membrane events and thereby influencing intracellular cell function via the ST cascade is perhaps the most plausible biological framework currently being investigated for understanding ELF effects on cells. For example, the consequence of an increase due to ELF fields in mitogenesis, the final endpoint of the ST cascade, is an overall increase in the probability of mutagenesis and consequently cancer, according to the Ames epigenetic model of carcinogenesis. Consistent with this epigenetic mechanism and the ST pathway to carcinogenesis is recent evidence that ELF fields can alter breast cancer cell proliferation and can act as a copromoter in vitro. The most important dosimetric question being addressed currently is whether the electric (E

  10. Electroresistance and field effect studies on manganite based heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, P. S.; Khachar, Uma; Vagadia, Megha; Ravalia, Ashish; Katba, Savan; Kuberkar, D. G.

    2015-04-14

    Electronic properties of manganites are significantly important for various spintronic applications such as microelectronics, magnetic data storage, communication technologies, and memory devices. Influence of applied electric field on the room temperature charge transport in ZnO/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrNb{sub 0.002}Ti{sub 0.998}O{sub 3} (SNTO) heterostructure has been investigated using field effect studies. Large negative and positive electroresistance has been observed in heterostructure under various possible circuit geometries. Field effect studies have been carried out using three different circuit geometries, namely: (i) ZnO as a control electrode (E{sub LZ}), (ii) SNTO as a control electrode (E{sub LS}), and (iii) shorted ZnO and SNTO as control electrodes (E{sub LZS}). For this, channel electric field (E{sub CH}) dependent variation in channel resistance (R{sub C}) (of manganite channel) and I-V (across manganite channel) under various control fields (E{sub C}) have been studied. Variation in barrier height (Φ{sub B}) with control field (E{sub C}) for different geometries has been discussed.

  11. Spectral studies of the sources of ionospheric electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, G.D.; Kelley, M.C. )

    1987-01-01

    Spectral analyses have been performed upon a number of incoherent scatter radar data sets obtained at Jicamarca, Peru; Chatanika, Alaska; and Arecibo, Puerto Rico, with the goal of understanding the sources of electric fields with periods in the range of 1-10 hours. Two distinct sources are identified and studied in some detail. In quiet times, atmospheric gravity waves seem the most likely source of the ionospheric electric field. In fact, both in an average sense and in the single case study available the mesospheric winds measured at Poker Flat, Alaska, in this frequency range are remarkably similar in magnitude to the quiet time thermospheric plasma drifts measured overhead by the nearby Chatanika radar. Such drifts are driven by electric fields which, the authors argue, could easily be generated by the observed wind fields. Comparison with the spectra of electric field measurements at other latitudes suggests that such a source is worldwide and determines the geophysical noise level of low- and mid-latitude electric field measurements. Turning to active times, the authors present a measure of the transfer function for electric field measurements. Turning to active times, they present a measure of the transfer function for electric field penetration between high- and low-altitude L shells. At the very lowest frequencies (periods of {ge} 10 hours) the low-altitude sites are well shielded, presumably by an Alfven layer at the inner edge of the ring current. Higher frequency fluctuations penetrate very easily to low latitudes. A response peak seems to occur in the 3- to 5-hour range of periods, with a lower response occurring at 1 cycle/hour, although this result must be viewed as preliminary for now. Between L = 5.5 and L = 1.4 the zonal electric field component as projected to the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere penetrates with little or no attenuation.

  12. International Field Studies 1973 Report to the Bahamian Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Field Studies, Inc., Columbus, OH.

    This document describes the International Field Studies program on Andros Island, Bahamas. Several sections detail the facilities and financing of the projects. Other sections discuss the general characteristics of Andros concerning the local culture and government. An outline of the environmental studies course used in this program is presented…

  13. The Work of the Secondary Vice Principalship: A Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Donald B.

    A formally conducted field study was used to investigate the work of vice-principals of eight large Southern California high schools and the relationship of their work to the school as an organization. Most of the vice-principals studied deal with student discipline, but four have important discipline responsibilities, which they exercise by…

  14. Field quality study in Nb(3)Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; DiMarco, J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Schlabach, P.; Velev, G.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Four nearly identical Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole models of the same design were built and tested at Fermilab. It provided a unique opportunity of systematic study the field quality effects in Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets. The results of these studies are reported in the paper.

  15. Mid Infrared Near Field Study of Monolayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Z.; Andreev, G. O.; Bao, W.; Zhang, L. M.; Zhao, Z.; Dominguez, G.; Thiemens, M.; Fogler, M. M.; Lau, C. N.; Keilmann, F.; Basov, D. N.

    2011-03-01

    We have performed near-field spectroscopic studies of both monolayer suspended graphene (SG) and graphene on Si O2 /Si substrate (GOS) using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM). Our data show that SG produces reliable near-field signal in mid-infrared frequencies. Images taken with high spatial resolution (~ 20 nm) show nanoscopic features such as ripples and electronic inhomogeneities. The Si O2 /Si substrate contributes a phonon resonance in the near-field signal around 1130 cm-1 . This resonance is remarkably strengthened and broadened by just a single layer of graphene in the case of GOS. By probing the resonance spectrum we find over 400% contrast in near field signal between GOS and the bare substrate. The detailed analysis of the contrast suggests that GOS is slightly doped. This study therefore provides much needed insight into the thickness resolution of the s-SNOM technique, proving it can be sensitive to just a single layer of atoms, and advances the fundamental understanding of graphene-light interactions by probing in the near-field regime.

  16. Reservoir simulation studies on the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, M.; Abril, A.; Arellano, V.; Marquez, R.

    1982-01-01

    A reservoir engineering and simulation study is being carried out on the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. A preliminary material balance has been applied to the old part of this field. A single block with constant properties in the horizontal direction was used for this preliminary material balance. The vertical block column was subdivided in several levels in order to take into account the known lithologic column. From existing pressure and enthalpy field histories, a single phase (liquid) reservoir assumption was selected. Under this assumption, a lateral radial recharge was considered in obtaining the pressure and enthalpy history match. These preliminary results indicate that another type of recharge is probably taking place in this part of the field, rather than lateral radial.

  17. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the 2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  18. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2010-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions . The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  19. Whole-Home Dehumidifiers: Field-Monitoring Study

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Tom; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Johnson, Russell

    2014-09-23

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) initiated a WHD field-metering study to expand current knowledge of and obtain data on WHD operation and energy consumption in real-world applications. The field study collected real-time data on WHD energy consumption, along with information regarding housing characteristics, consumer behavior, and various outdoor conditions expected to affect WHD performance and efficiency. Although the metering study collected similar data regarding air conditioner operation, this report discusses only WHDs. The primary objectives of the LBNL field-metering study are to (1) expand knowledge of the configurations, energy consumption profiles, consumer patterns of use (e.g., relative humidity [RH] settings), and environmental parameters of whole-home dehumidification systems; and (2) develop distributions of hours of dehumidifier operation in four operating modes: off, standby, fan-only, and compressor (also called dehumidification mode). Profiling energy consumption entails documenting the power consumption, duration of power consumption in different modes, condensate generation, and properties of output air of an installed system under field conditions of varying inlet air temperature and RH, as well as system configuration. This profiling provides a more detailed and deeper understanding of WHD operation and its complexities. This report describes LBNL’s whole-home dehumidification field-metering study conducted at four homes in Wisconsin and Florida. The initial phase of the WHD field-metering study was conducted on one home in Madison, Wisconsin, from June to December of 2013. During a second phase, three Florida homes were metered from June to October of 2014. This report presents and examines data from the Wisconsin site and from the three Florida sites.

  20. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-11-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the Smithsonian Institute, School for Field Studies and Earthwatch. Control student teams worked from single research goals and sets of methods, while experimental teams varied goals, methods, and collaborative activities in Kenya, Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador. Results from studies indicate that students who conducted local pilot studies, collaborative symposia, and ongoing, long-term fieldwork generated significantly more data than did control groups. Research reports of the experimental groups were ranked highest by experts, and contributed the most data to international science journals. Data and anecdotal information in this report indicate that structured collaboration in local long-term studies using apprenticeships may increase the potential for students' academic field studies contribution of new information to science.

  1. A program to study the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GP President-Elect Ron Merrill has appointed a steering committee to develop a new initiative for a program to study the earth's magnetic field. In addition to Merrill, who will serve as chair, and Kenneth Verosub (University of California, Davis) who will be vice-chair, the committee includes George Backus (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.), Ned Benton (University of Colorado, Boulder), Rob Coe (University of California, Santa Cruz), and Dennis Kent (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, N.Y.). The objective of the new program would be to develop a better description of the behavior of the geomagnetic field on all time scales and to use this description to increase our understanding of the physical processes that govern the generation of the geomagnetic field. The program would have three areas of emphasis: the present and recent field and its secular variation, the paleo-field and its variation on various time scales, and the core processes that produce the field.

  2. Program Plan: field radionuclide migration studies in Climax granite

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Coles, D.; Stone, R.

    1980-11-01

    This Program Plan describes the field radionuclide migration studies we plan to conduct in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. Laboratory support studies are included to help us understand the geochemical and hydrologic processes involved in the field. The Program Plan begins with background information (Section 1) on how this program fits into the National Waste Terminal Storage Program Plan and discusses the needs for field studies of this type. The objectives stated in Section 2 are in direct response to these needs, particularly the need to determine whether laboratory studies accurately reflect actual field conditions and the need for field testing to provide a data base for verification of hydrologic and mass transport models. The technical scope (Section 3) provides a work breakdown structure that integrates the various activities and establishes a base for the technical approach described in Section 4. Our approach combines an interactive system of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of hydrologic models for pre-test predictions and data interpretation. Section 5 on program interfaces identifies how information will be transferred to other related DOE projects. A schedule of activities and major milestones (Section 6) and the budget necessary to meet the project objectives (Section 7) are included in the Program Plan. Sections 8 and 9 contain brief descriptions of how the technical and program controls will be established and maintained and an outline of our quality assurance program. This program plan is an initial planning document and provides a general description of activities. An Engineering Test Plan containing detailed experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan and equipment design drawings will be published as a separate document.

  3. Studies on Partially Coherent Fields and Coherence Measurement Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seongkeun

    The concept of coherence in optics means how closely an optical field oscillates in unison at the same position in different time (temporal coherence) or at different positions at the same time (spatial coherence). Since all optical fields oscillate very rapidly with random fluctuations, coherence theory has been developed to describe the state of coherence of those optical fields through the usage of time-averaged correlation functions. This thesis reviews and applies coherence theory for an accurate and improved modeling in field-propagation and coherence measurement for partially coherent fields. The first half of this thesis discusses the study of phase-space distributions and phase-space tomography. Phase-space distributions such as the Wigner and the ambiguity functions can be used as simple mathematical tools for describing the propagation of an optical field for any state of coherence as those functions incorporate wave effects with the simplicity of ray optics. However, the Wigner and the ambiguity functions require a paraxial condition for the field description. To overcome this limitation, the nonparaxial extensions of the Wigner function have been studied and applied for nonparaxial fields. In this thesis, a simple series expression for calculating a nonparaxial generalization of theWigner function from the standard Wigner function is developed in both two- and three-dimensional free space. A nonparaxial generalization of the ambiguity function that retains properties analogous to the standard ambiguity function is also proposed in both two and three dimensions. This generalization extends phase-space tomography to the nonparaxial regime. The second half of this thesis proposes a new method of coherence measurement based on diffraction. By measuring the radiant intensity of a field with and without a binary transparent phase mask, one can estimate the coherence of a field at all pairs of the points centered at the mask's edge. This method is proposed in

  4. Simulation studies and the need for field reflectance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggin, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    There is a need to calibrate satellite data obtained at large polar (i.e., off-nadir) view angles for effects caused by scanner geometry and by the atmosphere. If such effects are not corrected for, then recorded radiance data will contain systematic and random errors which will make accurate target identification and quantification difficult. Adequate calibration of digital radiance data requires both an inductive analysis of digital satellite images and a deductive analysis based upon a priori simulation studies. The inputs to a simulation model (ground reflectance, atmospheric transmission and bandscatter) and their variability are dependent upon (for example) sun-target-sensor geometry. There is a major need to make accurate ground reflectance measurements to provide calibration information on the anisotropy of ground reflectance. There is also a need to assess atmospheric transmission and backscatter from the image itself. A potential simple, inexpensive method for making ground reflectance measurements in the above context is discussed.

  5. Simulation Studies And The Need For Field Reflectance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, M. J.

    1983-06-01

    There is a need to calibrate satellite data obtained at large polar (i.e. off-nadir) view angles for effects caused by scanner geometry and by the atmosphere. If such effects are not corrected for, then recorded radiance data will contain systematic and random errors which will make accurate target identification and quantification difficult. Adequate calibration of digital radiance data requires both an inductive analysis of digital satellite images and a deductive analysis based upon a priori simulation studies. The inputs to a simulation model (ground reflectance, atmospheric transmission and bandscatter) and their variability are dependent upon (for example) sun-target-sensor geometry. There is a major need to make accurate ground reflectance measurements to provide calibration information on the anisotropy of ground reflectance. There is also a need to assess atmospheric transmission and backscatter from the image itself. A potential simple, inexpensive method for making ground reflectance measurements in the above context is discussed.

  6. Effectively Integrating an International Field Study into the EMBA Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotner, John; Jones, Raymond; Kashlak, Roger

    2003-01-01

    An international field study (IFS) is an integral part of the EMBA program because of the various critical roles it plays. This international travel experience is a value-added activity not only as "stand alone" vehicle for understanding macro-level environments and firm-level strategic initiatives, but also as a tool that integrates other pieces…

  7. PACKAGE PLANTS FOR SMALL SYSTEMS: A FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A joint field study was conducted by AWWA and the Drinking Water Research Division of USEPA to evaluate existing small community systems that use package plant technology. Forty-eight package plant systems representing a geographic and technological cross section were evaluated t...

  8. Seating Position and Interaction in Triads: A Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, C. Harris; Stang, David J.

    1976-01-01

    Relationships between seating position, length of acquaintance between subjects, observer bias toward the experimental outcome, and interaction rates are examined in a field study. Subjects with greatest visual centrality spoke most often. Length of acquaintance between subjects was unrelated to interaction rates. (Author/DEP)

  9. Longitudinal Field Research Methods for Studying Processes of Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Ven, Andrew H.; Huber, George P.

    1990-01-01

    This and the next issue of "Organization Science" contain eight papers that deal with the process of organizational change. The five papers in this issue feature the theory of method and practice of researchers engaged in longitudinal field studies aimed at understanding processes of organizational change. (MLF)

  10. Are Facilitated Mentoring Programs Beneficial? A Randomized Experimental Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Toby Marshall; Song, Zhaoli

    2008-01-01

    Results from a pretest-posttest randomized field experiment study with a control group comparing the impact of high- and low-level-facilitated mentoring programs on new employees' performance and perceptions about their jobs and organization were reported in this paper. Results indicated increases in job satisfaction, organizational commitment,…

  11. Emotional Reactions of Students in Field Education: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvack, Andrea; Mishna, Faye; Bogo, Marion

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study using qualitative methodology was undertaken with recent MSW graduates (N=12) from 2 graduate social work programs to identify and describe the students' emotional reactions to experiences in field education. Significant and interrelated themes emerged including the subjective and unique definitions of emotionally charged…

  12. Assessing Student Learning in the Major Field of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessing student attainment in the major field of study is increasingly important to employers and accrediting bodies alike. Construction and manufacturing firms do not like engineers who design faulty bridges and airplanes. Marketing firms want to hire students who understand the difference between a niche market and a global market. School…

  13. Preliminary simulation studies related to the Cerro Prieto Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Rivera, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results of preliminary numerical simulations of the behavior of the Cerro Prieto field are discussed. The purpose of these studies is to examine: (1) the effect of using conventional isothermal methods of well test data analysis for geothermal systems, and (2) the influence of recharge from over under underlying aquifers on the temperature of a producing geothermal reservoir. 8 refs.

  14. A Field Study Program in Analytical Chemistry for College Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhus, D. L.; Flinchbaugh, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an elective field study program at Moravian College (Pennsylvania) in which seniors in analytical chemistry obtain first-hand experience at Bethlehem Steel Corporation. Discusses the program's planning phase, some method development projects done by students, experiences received in laboratory operations, and the evaluation of student…

  15. On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G.

    2012-12-21

    We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

  16. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  17. Field Initiated Studies Program. Abstracts of Funded Projects 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Office of Research.

    The Field-Initiated Studies program is open to institutions of higher education, public and private organizations, institutions, and agencies, as well as individuals. Applicants may propose projects that last up to 18 months, and proposals are reviewed and evaluated based on their technical quality and national importance judged by scholars and…

  18. Comparison of different force fields for the study of disaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen empirical force fields and the semi-empirical quantum method PM3CARB-1 were compared for studying ß-cellobiose, a-maltose, and a-galabiose [a-D-Galp-(1'4)-a-D-Galp]. For each disaccharide, the energies of 54 conformers with differing hydroxymethyl, hydroxyl and glycosidic linkage orientatio...

  19. Affirmative Action in Nine Large Companies: A Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon-Gerstenfeld, Susan; Burke, Edmund

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe the findings of a field study of affirmative action programs in companies in a variety of industries. The distinction between equal employment opportunity and affirmative action is addressed. Methods used to train managers in implementing affirmative action are examined. Also explores employee development, community…

  20. Which Is More Consequential: Fields of Study or Institutional Selectivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yingyi; Savas, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    The persisting gender pay gap favoring men among college graduates is a puzzle given women's remarkable success in postsecondary education. This article examines income disparities among recent college graduates by intersecting gender and social class and evaluating the relative importance of fields of study and institutional selectivity.…

  1. The significance of field work in monographic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this paper is to document the clear and obvious advantages of field work for monographic studies. These advantages include: 1) ability to understand published distributions better and greatly expand these data, 2) access to taxonomic data obscured on herbarium sheets (as colors, odors, ...

  2. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ANALYSIS: FIELD STUDIES, MODELING AND MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The user‘s guide entitled “Water Distribution System Analysis: Field Studies, Modeling and Management” is a reference guide for water utilities and an extensive summarization of information designed to provide drinking water utility personnel (and related consultants and research...

  3. Alternatives to Pyrotechnic Distress Signals; Laboratory and Field Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    London, CT 06320 Alternatives to Pyrotechnic Distress Signals; Laboratory and Field Studies iii UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 RDC | M. J. Lewandowski...1 Chelsea Street New London, CT 06320 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS) 11. Contract or Grant No. 12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address...various wind speeds (WS). ...................................... 22  Figure 15. Signal generator signal head

  4. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  5. CFD SIMULATIONS OF JOINT URBAN ATMOSPHERE DISPERSION FIELD STUDY 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R L; Humphreys, T D; Chan, S T

    2004-03-31

    In the Spring of 2003, a series of dispersion field experiments (Joint Urban 2003) were conducted at Oklahoma City. These experiments were complimentary to the URBAN 2000 field studies at Salt Lake City (Allwine, et. al, 2002) in that they will provide a second set of comprehensive field data for evaluation of CFD as well as for other dispersion models. In contrast to the URBAN 2000 experiments that were conducted entirely at night, these new field studies took place during both daytime and nighttime thus including the possibility of convective as well as stable atmospheric conditions. Initially several CFD modeling studies were performed to provide guidance for the experimental team in the selection of release sites and in the deployment of wind and concentration sensors. Also, while meteorological and concentration measurements were taken over the greater Oklahoma City urban area, our CFD calculations were focused on the near field of the release point. The proximity of the source to a large commercial building and to the neighboring buildings several of which have multi-stories, present a significant challenge even for CFD calculations involving grid resolutions as fine as 1 meter. A total of 10 Intensive Observations Periods (IOP's) were conducted within the 2003 field experiments. SF{sub 6} releases in the form of puffs or continuous sources were disseminated over 6 daytime and 4 nighttime episodes. Many wind and concentration sensors were used to provide wind and SF{sub 6} data over both long and short time-averaging periods. In addition to the usual near surface measurements, data depicting vertical profiles of wind and concentrations adjacent to the outside walls several building were also taken. Also of interest were observations of the trajectory of balloons that were released closed to the tracer release area. Many of the balloons released exhibit extremely quick ascents up from ground level to the top of buildings, thus implying highly convective

  6. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  7. Examining graphene field effect sensors for ferroelectric thin film studies.

    PubMed

    Rajapitamahuni, A; Hoffman, J; Ahn, C H; Hong, X

    2013-09-11

    We examine a prototype graphene field effect sensor for the study of the dielectric constant, pyroelectric coefficient, and ferroelectric polarization of 100-300 nm epitaxial (Ba,Sr)TiO3 thin films. Ferroelectric switching induces hysteresis in the resistivity and carrier density of n-layer graphene (n = 1-5) below 100 K, which competes with an antihysteresis behavior activated by the combined effects of electric field and temperature. We also discuss how the polarization asymmetry and interface charge dynamics affect the electronic properties of graphene.

  8. Lattice field theory studies of magnetic catalysis in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterowd, Christopher R.

    Consisting of a single two-dimensional layer of Carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, graphene represents one of the most exciting recent developments in condensed matter physics. With novel electronic and mechancial properties, graphene not only has great potential with respect to technological applications, but also displays phenomena that typically appear in relativistic quantum field theory. The low-energy electronic excitations of graphene consist of two identical species of massless Dirac particles. Due to the small Fermi velocity, these particles are strongly coupled through the Coulomb interaction. Although various perturbative approaches have succeeded in elucidating many of the electronic properties of graphene, one would still like a nonperturbative study to address various questions. In particular, the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in the presence of an external magnetic field, commonly known as magnetic catalysis, is one of these questions. Early studies of this phenomenon in model relativistic field theories have posited the mechanism to be universal. More recently, this mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking has been studied in low-dimensional condensed matter systems. Due to the strongly-coupled nature of the low-energy effective field theory of graphene, nonperturbative methods of lattice gauge theory can be used which are well suited to studying chiral symmetry breaking. Most notably used to study the theory of the strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics, these methods have proven successful in elucidating nonperturbative phenomena in cases where perturbative methods fail. In this thesis, using these methods, evidence in favor of magnetic catalysis in the graphene effective field theory will be presented.

  9. Effects of organic fertilizer on net global warming potential under an intensively managed vegetable field in southeastern China: A three-year field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Li, B.; Xiong, Z. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Organic fertilizer may not only improve soil quality but may also contribute to climate protection by increasing carbon sequestration in agricultural ecosystems. A 3-yr study was conducted with ten consecutive vegetable crops in intensively managed vegetable cropping systems in southeastern China to examine the effects of organic fertilizer application (ORGA) on net global warming potential (net GWP) after accounting for carbon dioxide equivalent emissions from all sources including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, agrochemical inputs and farm operations and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration derived from the net ecosystem carbon budget). Results indicated that ORGA significantly increased ecosystem respiration by 13.9% without obvious effects on CH4 and N2O emissions as compared to local conventional chemical fertilization (CHEM). The SOC sequestration rates during the 3-year observation period were estimated at -0.52 t C ha-1 for the control, -0.42 t C ha-1 for the CHEM plot and 0.27 t C ha-1 for the ORGA plot, respectively, and thus contributed significantly to the net GWP. Overall, compared with CHEM, the ORGA significantly decreased net GWP and greenhouse gas intensity by 15.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Our findings suggest that higher yields and lower greenhouse gas intensities and carbon costs can be achieved by substituting chemical nitrogen fertilizers with organic fertilization strategies.

  10. Extremely low frequency fields and cancer: laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E. )

    1998-10-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. However, no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, although several are suggestive of potential health impacts. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Several approaches are outlined in the experimental approach to this question. With specific reference to the radiofrequencies (RF) associated with wireless technology, even less research has been carried out than with ELF. Particularly, in regard to research on carcinogenesis and RF exposure in animals, little is known This section addresses laboratory studies in animals exposed to extremely low-power-frequency EMF, the relevance of which, to RF, is unknown. However, the approaches used with ELF may be useful in guiding laboratory research on the issue of RF exposure and cancer. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss studies investigating the potential relationship between ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposure and the risk of cancer.

  11. Zero-field-cooled/field-cooled magnetization study of Dendrimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arejdal, M.; Bahmad, L.; Benyoussef, A.

    2017-01-01

    Being motivated by Dendrimer model with mixed spins σ=3 and S=7/2, we investigated the magnetic nanoparticle system in this study. We analyzed and discussed the ground-state phase diagrams and the stable phases. Then, we elaborated and explained the magnetic properties of the system by using Monte Carlo Simulations (MCS) in the framework of the Ising model. In this way, we determined the blocking temperature, which is deduced through studying the partial-total magnetization and susceptibility as a function of the temperature, and we established the effects of both the exchange coupling interaction and the crystal field on the hysteresis loop.

  12. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (2004–2007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  13. Planning and setting objectives in field studies: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Robert N.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter enumerates the steps required in designing and planning field studies on the ecology and conservation of reptiles, as these involve a high level of uncertainty and risk. To this end, the chapter differentiates between goals (descriptions of what one intends to accomplish) and objectives (the measurable steps required to achieve the established goals). Thus, meeting a specific goal may require many objectives. It may not be possible to define some of them until certain experiments have been conducted; often evaluations of sampling protocols are needed to increase certainty in the biological results. And if sampling locations are fixed and sampling events are repeated over time, then both study-specific covariates and sampling-specific covariates should exist. Additionally, other critical design considerations for field study include obtaining permits, as well as researching ethics and biosecurity issues.

  14. Satellite Studies of Ionospheric Electric Fields and Neutral Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, Bela G.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied mid- and low-latitude electrodynamic and neutral thermospheric dynamic processes using measurements on board the AE-E, DE-2, and UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) satellites, and global convection and general circulation models. These studies have determined the morphology of the equatorial zonal electric fields, the response of equatorial plasma irregularities to magnetospheric disturbances, and the time dependent response of the mid- and low latitude electric fields to magnetospheric disturbances. We have also used extensive F region zonal and meridional wind data obtained by Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) instrument on board the UARS to study the latitudinal dependence of daytime disturbance winds during magnetically disturbed periods and the general characteristics of the global thermospheric disturbance wind system during geomagnetically active periods. This project has supported the PhD thesis research of John Emmert.

  15. Geography Teacher Candidates' Experiences of Field Study in Western Anatolia: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balci, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish expectations of 5th grade students from Marmara University's Department of Geography Teaching on geographical field study in Western Anatolia. For this reason, a field study trip was organized to Western Anatolia. A survey, which was consisted of open-ended questions, was prepared by experts and it was…

  16. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tong

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  17. Integrated modeling and field study of potential mechanisms forinduced seismicity at The Geysers Goethermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Majer, Ernie; Oldenburg, Curt; Peterson, John; Vasco, Don

    2006-06-07

    In this paper, we present progress made in a study aimed atincreasing the understanding of the relative contributions of differentmechanisms that may be causing the seismicity occurring at The Geysersgeothermal field, California. The approach we take is to integrate: (1)coupled reservoir geomechanical numerical modeling, (2) data fromrecently upgraded and expanded NCPA/Calpine/LBNL seismic arrays, and (3)tens of years of archival InSAR data from monthly satellite passes. Wehave conducted a coupled reservoir geomechanical analysis to studypotential mechanisms induced by steam production. Our simulation resultscorroborate co-locations of hypocenter field observations of inducedseismicity and their correlation with steam production as reported in theliterature. Seismic and InSAR data are being collected and processed foruse in constraining the coupled reservoir geomechanicalmodel.

  18. Monte Carlo study of MLC fields for cobalt therapy machine

    PubMed Central

    Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Rani, Roopa A.; Kumar, Anil; Reddy, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    An automated Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) system has been developed as add-on for the cobalt-60 teletherapy machines available in India. The goal of the present computational study is to validate the MLC design using Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. The study was based on the Kirloskar-supplied Phoenix model machines that closely match the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) theratron-80 machine. The MLC is a retrofit attachment to the collimator assembly, with 14 non-divergent leaf pairs of 40 mm thick, 7 mm wide, and 150 mm long tungsten alloy plates with rounded edges and 20 mm tongue and 2 mm groove in each leaf. In the present work, the source and collimator geometry has been investigated in detail to arrive at a model that best represents the measured dosimetric data. The authors have studied in detail the proto-I MLC built for cobalt-60. The MLC field sizes were MC simulated for 2 × 2 cm2 to 14 × 14 cm2 square fields as well as irregular fields, and the percent depth dose (PDD) and profile data were compared with ROPS† treatment planning system (TPS). In addition, measured profiles using the IMATRIXX system‡ were also compared with the MC simulations. The proto-I MLC can define radiation fields up to 14 × 14 cm2 within 3 mm accuracy. The maximum measured leakage through the leaf ends in closed condition was 3.4% and interleaf leakage observed was 7.3%. Good agreement between MC results, ROPS and IMATRIXX results has been observed. The investigation also supports the hypothesis that optical and radiation field coincidence exists for the square fields studied with the MLC. Plots of the percent depth dose (PDD) data and profile data for clinically significant irregular fields have also been presented. The MC model was also investigated to speed up the calculations to allow calculations of clinically relevant conformal beams. †Radiation Oncology Planning System (ROPS) is supplied by Tirumala Jyothi Computer Systems described at https

  19. A field study of microbiological growth and reservoir souring

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.D.; Surinach, P.

    1997-08-01

    The souring of normally sweet production systems is a significant problem which can have implications to continued oilfield operations. Such problems are commonly approached by gathering of field sample and laboratory analysis or by simple test kits. This paper describes an alternative approach which includes the use of specialized field sampling and analysis procedures and portable equipment that can be moved from site to site. A case study is presented that illustrates the use of these procedures and equipment. In the present case, it was learned that whereas souring was occurring in oil producing wells, no major infection of SRB was found. Evaluation of the injection wells indicated only limited inflection. Based on field studies it was found that the problem was likely due to maintenance of a sessile SRB population in the injection system due to a combination of general heterotrophic bacteria and accumulation of solids followed by growth of mesophilic SRB in the formation after injection. Remedial actions were developed based on field data and this mechanism of reservoir souring.

  20. Electron field emission in nanostructures: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Joseph Andrew

    The objective of this work was to study electron field emission from several nanostructures using a first-principles framework. The systems studied were carbon nanowires, graphene nanoribbons, and nanotubes of varying composition. These particular structures were chosen because they have recently been identified as showing novel physical phenomena, as well as having tremendous industrial applications. We examined the field emission under a variety of conditions, including laser illumination and the presence of adsorbates. The goal was to explore how these conditions affect the field emission performance. In addition to the calculations, this dissertation has presented computational developments by the author that allowed these demanding calculations to be performed. There are many possible choices for basis when performing an electronic structure calculation. Examples are plane waves, atomic orbitals, and real-space grids. The best choice of basis depends on the structure of the system being analyzed and the physical processes involved (e.g., laser illumination). For this reason, it was important to conduct rigorous tests of basis set performance, in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. There are no existing benchmark calculations for field emission, but transport calculations for nanostructures are similar, and so provide a useful reference for evaluating the performance of various basis sets. Based on the results, for the purposes of studying a non-periodic nanostructure under field emission conditions, we decided to use a real-space grid basis which incorporates the Lagrange function approach. Once a basis was chosen, in this case a real-space grid, the issue of boundary conditions arose. The problem is that with a non-periodic system, field emitted electron density can experience non-physical reflections from the boundaries of the calculation volume, leading to inaccuracies. To prevent this issue, we used complex absorbing potentials (CAPs) to absorb

  1. Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) concept evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Babcock, S.M.; Watkin, D.C.; Oliver, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    The Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) is an initiative to introduce a palletized load system (PLS) that is transportable with an automated ammunition processing and storage system for use on the battlefield. System proponents have targeted a 20% increase in the ammunition processing rate over the current operation while simultaneously reducing the total number of assigned field artillery battalion personnel by 30. The overall objective of the FAAPS Project is the development and demonstration of an improved process to accomplish these goals. The initial phase of the FAAPS Project and the subject of this study is the FAAPS concept evaluation. The concept evaluation consists of (1) identifying assumptions and requirements, (2) documenting the process flow, (3) identifying and evaluating technologies available to accomplish the necessary ammunition processing and storage operations, and (4) presenting alternative concepts with associated costs, processing rates, and manpower requirements for accomplishing the operation. This study provides insight into the achievability of the desired objectives.

  2. Human melatonin in magnetic fields: Second study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Cohen, H.D.

    1995-11-01

    Melatonin (MLT) is a hormone secreted primarily at night by the pineal gland in the brain. A number of studies suggest it is part of the body`s natural defenses against cancer. This hormone is reported to stimulate immune function and has been implicated in the control of cell proliferation, the growth of transplanted tumors, and the promotion and/or co-promotion of mammary tumors. MLT also plays a key role in the regulation of reproductive hormones implicated in a number of carcinogenic processes. Studies with rodents, although not always consistent, suggest that nocturnal MLT levels may be suppressed by electric or magnetic field (EMF) exposure. This relationship has been proposed as a possible biological mechanism to account for epidemiological reports linking chronic EMF exposure and increased cancer risk. Research was needed to determine if a similar suppression of MLT occurs when humans are exposed to magnetic fields at night.

  3. Studies on Weak Electromagnetic Fields Effects in Chick Embryos.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-31

    of them for the field exposed eggs , the other for the controls. In the first one called "Experimental incubator", are located cylindric coils or...of fertilized chicken eggs in these experimental conditions. In our previous and present studies of EMFs effects on chick embryos development, the...of 34C for eggs in- F30. DISTISUTIONIAVAILAPUTY 00 "ITRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION UCkSSPION~oumITED 03 SAMES As apt. DOI USERS(U

  4. Providing Field Support for the Behavior Response Study (BRS-08)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    pp. Evans, D.I. and G.R. England. (2001) Joint interim report Bahamas marine mammal stranding event of 15 – 16 March 2000. National Oceanographic...Providing Field Support for the Behavior Response Study (BRS-08) Diane Elaine Claridge Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation P.O. Box AB...took place in 2008, known as BRS-08. Specific objectives were: 1) To work with the Marine Mammal Monitoring (M3R) program at the Atlantic Undersea

  5. Study of the electric field inside microchannel plate multipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, E.; Oba, K.; Rehak, P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric field inside high gain microchannel plate multipliers was studied. The calculations were based directly on the solution of the Maxwell equations applied to the microchannel plate (MCP) rather than on the conventional lumped RC model. The results are important to explain the performance of MCP's, (1) under a pulsed bias tension and, (2) at high rate conditions. The results were tested experimentally and a new method of MCP operation free from the positive ion feedback was demonstrated.

  6. The hamster cheek pouch model for field cancerization studies.

    PubMed

    Monti-Hughes, Andrea; Aromando, Romina F; Pérez, Miguel A; Schwint, Amanda E; Itoiz, Maria E

    2015-02-01

    External carcinogens, such as tobacco and alcohol, induce molecular changes in large areas of oral mucosa, which increase the risk of malignant transformation. This condition, known as 'field cancerization', can be detected in biopsy specimens using histochemical techniques, even before histological alterations are identified. The efficacy of these histochemical techniques as biomarkers of early cancerization must be demonstrated in appropriate models. The hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model, universally employed in biological studies and in studies for the prevention and treatment of oral cancer, is also an excellent model of field cancerization. The carcinogen is applied in solution to the surface of the mucosa and induces alterations that recapitulate the stages of cancerization in human oral mucosa. We have demonstrated that the following can be used for the early detection of cancerized tissue: silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions; the Feulgen reaction to stain DNA followed by ploidy analysis; immunohistochemical analysis of fibroblast growth factor-2, immunohistochemical labeling of proliferating cells to demonstrate an increase of epithelial cell proliferation in the absence of inflammation; and changes in markers of angiogenesis (i.e. those indicating vascular endothelial growth factor activity, endothelial cell proliferation and vascular density). The hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer was also proposed and validated by our group for boron neutron capture therapy studies for the treatment of oral cancer. Clinical trials of this novel treatment modality have been performed and are underway for certain tumor types and localizations. Having demonstrated the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy to control tumors in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model, we adapted the model for the long-term study of field cancerized tissue. We demonstrated the inhibitory effect of boron neutron capture therapy on tumor development in field

  7. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  8. CFD Simulations of Joint Urban Atmospheric Dispersion Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R; Humphreys III, T; Chan, S

    2004-06-17

    The application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the understanding of urban wind flow and dispersion processes has gained increasing attention over recent years. While many of the simpler dispersion models are based on a set of prescribed meteorology to calculate dispersion, the CFD approach has the ability of coupling the wind field to dispersion processes. This has distinct advantages when very detailed results are required, such as for the case where the releases occur around buildings and within urban areas. CFD also has great flexibility as a testbed for turbulence models, which has important implications for atmospheric dispersion problems. In the spring of 2003, a series of dispersion field experiments (Joint Urban 2003) were conducted at Oklahoma City (Allwine, et. al, 2004). These experiments were complimentary to the URBAN 2000 field studies at Salt Lake City (Shinn, et. al, 2000) in that they will provide a second set of comprehensive field data for evaluation of CFD as well as for other dispersion models. In contrast to the URBAN 2000 experiments that were conducted entirely at night, these new field studies took place during both daytime and nighttime thus including the possibility of convective as well as stable atmospheric conditions. Initially several CFD modeling studies were performed to provide guidance for the experimental team in the selection of release sites and in the deployment of wind and concentration sensors. Also, while meteorological and concentration measurements were taken over the greater Oklahoma City urban area, our CFD calculations were focused on the near field of the release point. The proximity of the source to a large commercial building and to the neighboring buildings several of which have multistories, present a significant challenge even for CFD calculations involving grid resolutions as fine as 1 meter. A total of 10 Intensive Observations Periods (IOP's) were conducted within the 2003 field experiments. SF6

  9. High-Resolution Studies of the Solar Polar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsik, J. R.; Wilson, P. R.; Li, Y.

    1999-02-01

    We present high-resolution studies of the solar polar magnetic fields near sunspot maximum in 1989 and towards sunspot minimum in 1995. We show that, in 1989, the polar latitudes were covered by several unipolar regions of both polarities. In 1995, however, after the polar field reversal was complete, each pole exhibited only one dominant polarity region. Each unipolar region contains magnetic knots of both polarities but the number count of the knots of the dominant polarity exceeds that of the opposite polarity by a ratio of order 4:1, and it is rare to find opposite polarity pairs, i.e., magnetic bipoles. These knots have lifetimes greater than 7hours but less than 24hours. We interpret the longitudinal displacement of the knots over a 7-hour period as a measure of the local rotation rate. This rotation rate is found to be generally consistent with Snodgrass' (1983) magnetic rotation law. In an attempt to obtain some insight into the operation of the solar dynamo, sketches of postulated subsurface field configurations corresponding to the observed surface fields at these two epochs of the solar cycle are presented.

  10. Comparative study of supertips for electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Hans W. P.; Weber, Mark A.; Urban, J.; Schoessler, C.

    1995-09-01

    A numerical study of tips and supertips prone for fieldemission sources is performed using a 3D numerical electron optics package. Special supertips are fabricated with additive lithography under computer control. Different materials are used to generate amorphous or nanocrystalline tips. Its performance is simulated. Additive lithography using electron beam induced deposition allows to design base radii from 50 to 1000 nm. Tip radii and tip length of similar dimensions can be generated. Supertips on top of a deposited tip can have a radius as small as 5 nm. This is achieved using a high resolution scanning electron microscope with a cold field emission source. Gold-tips are constructed on top of Pt/Ir-wire tips. The positioning accuracy is 20 nm. Tips are routinely produced with aspect ratios of 5 to 10 and give an additional field enhancement factor. The influence of the nanocrystallinity of the deposited material to the field enhancement is investigated. Nanocrystals at the tip enhance the field up to a factor of 4. This effect explains the high emission current obtained in experiments from nanocrystalline tips.

  11. Science and ecological literacy in undergraduate field studies education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapp, Kim J.

    There is an ever-increasing number of issues that face our world today; from climate change, water and food scarcity, to pollution and resource extraction. Science and ecology play fundamental roles in these problems, and yet the understanding of these fields is limited in our society (Miller, 2002; McBride, Brewer, Berkowitz, and Borrie, 2013). Across the nation students are finishing their undergraduate degrees and are expected to enter the workforce and society with the skills needed to succeed. The deficit of science and ecological literacy in these students has been recognized and a call for reform begun (D'Avanzo, 2003 and NRC, 2009). This mixed-methods study looked at how a field studies course could fill the gap of science and ecological literacy in undergraduates. Using grounded theory, five key themes were data-derived; definitions, systems thinking, human's role in the environment, impetus for change and transference. These themes where then triangulated for validity and reliability through qualitative and quantitative assessments. A sixth theme was also identified, the learning environment. Due to limited data to support this themes' development and reliability it is discussed in Chapter 5 to provide recommendations for further research. Key findings show that this field studies program influenced students' science and ecological literacy through educational theory and practice.

  12. Rotating field collector subsystem phase 1 study and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Eibling, J. A.

    1982-10-01

    The rotating field collector system is an alternative concept in which all heliostats are mounted on a single large platform which rotates around a tower to track the azumuthal angle of the Sun. Each heliostat is mounted to the platform with appropriate pivots, linkage, and controls to provide the additional positioning required to properly direct the solar radiation onto the receiver. The results are presented of the first phase of a study to investigate the technical and economic merits of a particular type of rotating field collector subsystem. The large pie-shaped platform would revolve over an array of support pedestals by means of a roller at the top of each pedestal. Several heliostats were built to demonstrate their construction features, and the operation of both flat and amphitheater rotating fields was studied. Work included an analysis of the concepts, development of modifications and additions to make the system comply with design criteria, and cost estimates to be used for comparison with other heliostat subsystems. Because of considerably high cost estimates, the focus of a large part of the study was directed toward developing lower cost designs of major components.

  13. Reversed-field pinch studies in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Henry, J.; Ji, H.; Prager, S.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1993-04-03

    Studies of large-size (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.5 m), moderate current (I < 750 kA) reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas are carried out in the Madison Symmetric Torus in order to evaluate and improve RFP confinement, study general toroidal plasma MHD issues, determine the mechanism of the RFP dynamo, and measure fluctuation-induced transport and anomalous ion heating. MST confinement has been improved by reduction of magnetic field errors with correction coils in the primary circuit and reduction of impurities using boronization; high densities have been achieved with hydrogen pellet injection. MHD tearing modes with poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode numbers n = 5--7 are prevalent and nonlinearly couple to produce sudden relaxations akin to tokamak sawteeth. Edge fluctuation-induced transport has been measured with a variety of insertable probes. Ions exhibit anomalous heating, with increases of ion temperature occuring during strong MHD relaxation. The RFP dynamo has been studied with attention to various possible mechanisms, including motion-EMF drive, the Hall effect, and superthermal electrons. Initial profile control experiments have begun using insertable biased probes and plasma guns. The toroidal field capacity of MST will be upgraded during Summer, 1993 to allow low-current tokamak operation as well as improved RFP operation.

  14. A novel field emission microscopy method to study field emission characteristics of freestanding carbon nanotube array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhan; Sun, Yonghai; Jaffray, David; Yeow, John T W

    2017-02-17

    Field emission (FE) uniformity and mechanism of emitter failure of freestanding carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have not been well studied due to the difficulty of observing and quantifying FE performance of each emitter in CNT arrays. Herein a field emission microscopy (FEM) method based on Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin film is proposed to study the FE uniformity and CNT emitter failure of freestanding CNT arrays. FE uniformity of freestanding CNT arrays and different levels of FE current contributions from each emitter in the arrays are recorded and visualized. FEM patterns on the PMMA thin film contain the details of the CNT emitter tip shape and whether multiple CNT emitters occurring at an emission site. Observation of real-time FE performance and CNT emitter failure process in freestanding CNT arrays are successfully achieved using a microscopic camera. High emission currents through CNT emitters causes joule heating and light emission followed by an explosion of the CNTs. The proposed approach is capable of resolving the major challenge of building the relationship between FE performances and CNT morphologies, which can significantly facilitate the study of FE non-uniformity and emitter failure mechanism and the development of stable and reliable FE devices in practical applications.

  15. A novel field emission microscopy method to study field emission characteristics of freestanding carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunhan; Sun, Yonghai; Jaffray, David A.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2017-04-01

    Field emission (FE) uniformity and the mechanism of emitter failure of freestanding carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have not been well studied due to the difficulty of observing and quantifying FE performance of each emitter in CNT arrays. Herein a field emission microscopy (FEM) method based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin film is proposed to study the FE uniformity and CNT emitter failure of freestanding CNT arrays. FE uniformity of freestanding CNT arrays and different levels of FE current contributions from each emitter in the arrays are recorded and visualized. FEM patterns on the PMMA thin film contain the details of the CNT emitter tip shape and whether multiple CNT emitters occur at an emission site. Observation of real-time FE performance and the CNT emitter failure process in freestanding CNT arrays are successfully achieved using a microscopic camera. High emission currents through CNT emitters causes Joule heating and light emission followed by an explosion of the CNTs. The proposed approach is capable of resolving the major challenge of building the relationship between FE performance and CNT morphologies, which can significantly facilitate the study of FE non-uniformity, the emitter failure mechanism and the development of stable and reliable FE devices in practical applications.

  16. A field scale study of nZVI Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Kocur, C. M.; Chowdhury, A.; Weber, K.; Boparai, H. K.; Krol, M. M.; Sakulchaicharoen, N.; Sleep, B. E.; Austrins, L.; Peace, C.

    2011-12-01

    Nanometals have received significant attention in recent years due to their ability to rapidly destroy numerous priority source zone contaminants in controlled laboratory studies. This has led to great optimism about the potential of nanometal injection for insitu remediation. However, rapid nanometal settling, reportedly due to the ferromagnetic attractive forces between particles causing agglomeration, and poor mobility have limited widespread application of this technology. In literature studies different methods have been proposed to counteract attractive forces between nanometal particles (e.g., polymers providing steric and electrostatic repulsive forces), thus limiting agglomeration and preventing rapid settling. Although laboratory characterization of these particles confirm that these methods yield nanoscale particles that are stable and readily reactive for extended periods of time under laboratory conditions, several important uncertainties remain. The laboratory procedures for synthesizing stabilized nZVI are quite involved and labour intensive, with limited scale-up of the synthesis procedure to the field described in the literature. Furthermore, it is unclear if these nanometal particles would be of high quality and mobile in the field. In this study, these questions were addressed by scaling up laboratory synthesis techniques to produce 1000 litres of nanometal suspension at 1 g/L on site. The suspension was injected into a contaminated zone containing various chlorinated solvents. Detailed characterization of the field site before, during and after the field trial suggested that the injected nanoparticles travelled in excess of 1 m at normalized concentrations in excess of 50% and would therefore be available for contaminant destruction in the target source zone. This presentation will also discuss detailed characterization (e.g., TEM, zero valent iron content) of injected nanometals and those captured at the monitoring wells.

  17. Study of the Cygnus Star-Forming Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Christopher; Kaltcheva, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The star-forming complexes in Cygnus extend nearly 30 deg in Galactic longitude and 20 deg in latitude, and most probably include star-formation sites located between 600 and 4000 pc. We combine the catalog by Heiles (2000) with uvbyβ photometric data from the catalog of Paunzen (2015) to collate a sample of O and B-type stars with precise homogeneous distances, color excess and available polarimetry. This allows us to identify star-forming sites at different distances along the line of sight and to investigate their spatial correlation to the interstellar matter. Further, we use this sample to study the orientation of the polarization as revealed by the polarized light of the bright early-type stars and analyze the polarization-extinction correlation for this field. Since dust grains align in the presence of a magnetic field cause the observed polarization at optical wavelengths, the data contain information about the large-scale component of the Galactic magnetic field. In addition, wide-field astrophotography equipment was used to image the Cygnus field in Hydrogen-alpha, Hydrogen-beta and the [OIII] line at 500.7 nm. This allows us to map the overall distribution of ionized material and the interstellar dust and trace large-scale regions where the physical conditions change rapidly due to supernova shock fronts and strong stellar winds. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by NSF grant AST- 1516932 and the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium, NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship Program, NASA Training Grant #NNX14AP22H.

  18. Study of intermittent field hardware failure data in digital electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, E. J.; Halverson, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The collection and analysis of data concerning intermittent dailures in digital devices was performed using data from a computer design for shipboard usage. The failure data consisted of actual field failures classified by failure mechanisms and their likelihood of having been intermittent, potentially intermittent, or hard. Each class was studies with respect to computer operation in the ranges of 0 to 2,000 hours, 0 to 5, hours, and 0 to 10,000 hours. The study was done at the computer level as well as the microcircuit level. Results indicate that as age increases, the quasi-intermittent failure rate increases and the mean time to failure descreases.

  19. Teaching and Learning in the Tropics: An Epistemic Exploration of "the Field" in a Development Studies Field Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Kamna

    2015-01-01

    Development studies employs theories, tools and methods often found in geography, including the international field trip to a "developing" country. In 2013 and 2014, I led a two-week trip to Ethiopia. To better comprehend the effects of "the field" on students' learning, I introduced an assessed reflexive field diary to…

  20. Temperature field study of hot water circulation pump shaft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Y.; Kong, F. Y.; Daun, X. H.; Zhao, R. J.; Hu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    In the process of engineering application under the condition of hot water circulation pump, problems of stress concentration caused by the temperature rise may happen. In order to study the temperature field in bearing and electric motor chamber of the hot water circulation pump and optimize the structure, in present paper, the model of the shaft system is created through CREO. The model is analyzed by ANSYS workbench, in which the thermal boundary conditions are applied to calculate, which include the calorific values from the bearings, the thermal loss from electric motor and the temperature from the transporting medium. From the result, the finite element model can reflect the distribution of thermal field in hot water circulation pump. Further, the results show that the maximum temperature locates in the bearing chamber.The theoretical guidance for the electric motor heat dissipation design of the hot water circulation pump can be achieved.

  1. Reservoir engineering studies of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, K. P.; Lippmann, M. J.; Tsang, C. F.

    1982-09-01

    Reservoir engineering studies of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field began in 1978 under a five-year cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and the Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico, with the ultimate objective of simulating the reservoir to forecast its production capacity, energy longevity, and recharge capability under various production and injection scenarios. During the fiscal year 1981, attempts were made to collect information on the evolution history of the field since exploitation began; the information is to be used later to validate the reservoir model. To this end, wellhead production data were analyzed for heat and mass flow and also for changes in reservoir pressures, temperatures, and saturations for the period from March 1973 to November 1980.

  2. Swarm Observations of Field-Aligned Currents: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Stolle, C.; Luhr, H.; Park, J.; Rauberg, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a few case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal and spatial characteristics. During the commissioning phase, the three Swarm spacecraft were in an identical polar orbit with a string-of-pearl configuration with small separations. During the science operational phase (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: one spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and two side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). We analyze a few FAC events in both orbital phases and during periods of active geomagnetic conditions. The multi-point observations enable us to examine the FACs' temporal evolution and separate their temporal and spatial variations.

  3. Long-term field studies: positive impacts and unintended consequences.

    PubMed

    Strier, Karen B

    2010-09-01

    Long-term field studies of wild primates can have far-reaching impacts that transcend their contributions to science. These impacts can benefit not only the study animals, study areas, and local human communities, but they can also have unintended, potentially negative consequences. Examples of some of the positive impacts from the Northern Muriqui Project of Caratinga, in Minas Gerais, Brazil, include contributions to conservation efforts on behalf of this critically endangered species, capacity building through the training of Brazilian students, and employment opportunities for local people through our collaboration with a locally administered NGO that is facilitating ecotourism, education, and reforestation programs. Some concerns about unintended consequences of the research include the effects of our trails and trail traffic on surrounding vegetation and other aspects of the environmental "footprints" that both long-term researchers and short-term visitors may leave. In addition, although precautions against potential health risks from routine exposure to human observers are now standard protocol, little is known about the other ways in which our long-term research presence can affect the primates' experiences or alter their perceptions of their social and ecological environments. Risk analysis, which weighs both the positive and negative impacts can provide useful perspectives for addressing the ethical considerations that can arise during long-term field studies.

  4. Puerto Rico - 2002 : field studies to resolve aerosol processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Ravelo, R.

    1999-10-05

    A number of questions remain concerning homogeneous aerosol formation by natural organics interacting with anthropogenic pollutants. For example, chlorine has been proposed as a potential oxidant in the troposphere because of its very high reactivity with a wide range of organics (Finlayson-Pitts, 1993). Indeed, sea salt aerosol in the presence of ozone has been shown to produce chlorine atoms in heterogeneous photochemical reactions under laboratory conditions. Whether chlorine can initiate oxidation of natural organics such as monoterpene hydrocarbons and can generate homogeneous nucleation or condensable material that contributes to aerosol loadings needs to be assessed. The nighttime reactions of ozone and nitrate radical can also result in monoterpene reactions that contribute to aerosol mass. We are currently planning field studies in Puerto Rico to assess these aerosol issues and other atmospheric chemistry questions. Puerto Rico has a number of key features that make it very attractive for a field study of this sort. The principal feature is the island's very regular meteorology and its position in the Caribbean Sea relative to the easterly trade winds. This meteorology and the island's rectangular shape (100 x 35 miles) make it highly suitable for simplification of boundary layer conditions. In addition, the long stretch between Puerto Rico and the nearest pollution sources in Africa and southern Europe make the incoming background air relatively clean and constant. Furthermore, Puerto Rico has approximately 3.5 million people with a very well defined source region and a central area of rain forest vegetation. These features make Puerto Rico an ideal locale for assessing aerosol processes. The following sections describe specific areas of atmospheric chemistry that can be explored during the proposed field study.

  5. [Clinical studies with cefmenoxime in the field of pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Takimoto, M; Yoshioka, H; Maruyama, S; Sanae, N; Nagamatsu, I

    1982-10-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of cefmenoxime (CMX), a new cephalosporin antibiotic for injection in the field of pediatrics. Thirty-one cases, including 2 cases with sepsis, 18 cases with respiratory tract infections and 7 cases with urinary tract infections, were given CMX at daily doses of 30 mg/kg to 125 mg/kg divided into 3 or 4 for 3 days to 13 days. Clinical responses were excellent in 16 cases, good in 9 cases and poor in 6 cases, the satisfactory response being 80.6%. No side effects and no abnormal laboratory findings relating to the drug were observed.

  6. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-10-14

    The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms (CRs) with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many CRs are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in CRs. This document provides a summary of the detailed plans developed for the field study that will take place in 2005 to evaluate the energy and IAQ performance of a new classroom HVAC technology. The field study will include measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions in 10 classrooms with the new HVAC technology and in six control classrooms with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters will be monitored continuously, while other IEQ measurements will be will be performed seasonally. Continuously monitored data will be remotely accessed via a LonWorks network. Instrument calibration plans that vary with the type of instrumentation used are established. Statistical tests will be employed to compare energy use and IEQ conditions with the new and standard HVAC systems. Strengths of this study plan include the collection of real time data for a full school year, the use of high quality instrumentation, the incorporation of many quality control measures, and the extensive collaborations with industry that limit costs to the sponsors.

  7. Numerical study of the magnetic field diffusion in the toroidal field coils of the TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Preis, H.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion of the vertical magnetic field through the toroidal field coils is numerically analyzed in TFTR. Two different excitations of the vertical field are assumed whose behavior can be described by either a step function or a ramp function. Using the computer code FEDIFF, the distribution of the eddy currents in the windings and casing of the toroidal field coils, as well as their time behavior, is calculated for these functions. From integration of the eddy current functions over their pulse length, the energy dissipated by them is obtained. Finally, the magnetic field of the eddy currents within the torous is calculated. Based upon this field, which is represented as a function of time and space coordinates, the influence of this diffusion upon the field curvature index is described.

  8. An Optimization of Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    To date, in our research we have focused on the use of normal human neuronal progenitor (NHNP) cells because of their importance in human nervous system regeneration, development and maintenance, but we have developed 2-D and 3-D bioreactors that can accommodate any cell line. In this Project, we will include the use of tissues important for physiological regeneration: Human osteoblasts or chondrocytes, and vascular cells. Our initial results with the NHNP cells were quite startling using extremely low-level electromagnetic fields (5 microtesla at 10Hz; 6mA). The low-amplitude, rapidly time-varying electromagnetic fields exert a very potent effect on the proliferation, morphology, and gene expression of the cells in culture, both in standard 2-dimensional culture plates as well as cells organized into 3-dimensional tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) in a 3D bioreactor. We have replicated our preliminary results many, many times, have analyzed the gene expression using gene arrays (followed by Luminex analysis for protein production), and have monitored cell proliferation, orientation, morphology, and glucose metabolism, and we are confident that we have a stable and reliable model to study the control of high-level cellular processes by application of low-amplitude, time varying electromagnetic fields (TVEMF) (1, 2). In additional studies at the University of Michigan, we have been able to generate functional in vitro engineered mammalian skeletal muscle, and have employed nerve-muscle co-culture techniques to promote axonal sprouting. We believe that nearly all tissues, in particular, neural, are susceptible to the influences of low-level TVEMF.

  9. Practical use of video imagery in nearshore oceanographic field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, K.T.; Holman, R.A.; Lippmann, T.C.; Stanley, J.; Plant, N.

    1997-01-01

    An approach was developed for using video imagery to quantify, in terms of both spatial and temporal dimensions, a number of naturally occurring (nearshore) physical processes. The complete method is presented, including the derivation of the geometrical relationships relating image and ground coordinates, principles to be considered when working with video imagery and the two-step strategy for calibration of the camera model. The techniques are founded on the principles of photogrammetry, account for difficulties inherent in the use of video signals, and have been adapted to allow for flexibility of use in field studies. Examples from field experiments indicate that this approach is both accurate and applicable under the conditions typically experienced when sampling in coastal regions. Several applications of the camera model are discussed, including the measurement of nearshore fluid processes, sand bar length scales, foreshore topography, and drifter motions. Although we have applied this method to the measurement of nearshore processes and morphologic features, these same techniques are transferable to studies in other geophysical settings.

  10. Bioaerosol sampling: sampling mechanisms, bioefficiency and field studies.

    PubMed

    Haig, C W; Mackay, W G; Walker, J T; Williams, C

    2016-07-01

    Investigations into the suspected airborne transmission of pathogens in healthcare environments have posed a challenge to researchers for more than a century. With each pathogen demonstrating a unique response to environmental conditions and the mechanical stresses it experiences, the choice of sampling device is not obvious. Our aim was to review bioaerosol sampling, sampling equipment, and methodology. A comprehensive literature search was performed, using electronic databases to retrieve English language papers on bioaerosol sampling. The review describes the mechanisms of popular bioaerosol sampling devices such as impingers, cyclones, impactors, and filters, explaining both their strengths and weaknesses, and the consequences for microbial bioefficiency. Numerous successful studies are described that point to best practice in bioaerosol sampling, from the use of small personal samplers to monitor workers' pathogen exposure through to large static samplers collecting airborne microbes in various healthcare settings. Of primary importance is the requirement that studies should commence by determining the bioefficiency of the chosen sampler and the pathogen under investigation within laboratory conditions. From such foundations, sampling for bioaerosol material in the complexity of the field holds greater certainty of successful capture of low-concentration airborne pathogens. From the laboratory to use in the field, this review enables the investigator to make informed decisions about the choice of bioaerosol sampler and its application.

  11. Hydraulic aspects of riverbank filtration—field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Jürgen

    2002-09-01

    The Düsseldorf waterworks have been using riverbank filtration since 1870 with bank filtration as the most important source for public water supply in this densely populated and industrialised region. There have been many threats to this supply in the last few decades—e.g. poor river water quality, heavy clogging of the riverbed, accidental pollution—which had to be overcome. First field studies in the river Rhine were carried out with a diving cabin in 1953 and 1954 to investigate riverbed clogging during high loads of organic contaminants in the river water. In 1987 a second investigation of the riverbed followed in the same area during which time the water quality of the river had improved. After the Sandoz accident in 1986 a joint research project was carried out in the Lower Rhine region to improve knowledge of flow and transport phenomena of riverbank filtration and to develop numerical models for the dynamic simulation of flow and transport. The main objective of the field studies was to gain more insight into the dynamic river-aquifer interactions and the effects of fluctuating river levels. These fluctuations are not only relevant for clogging processes and the velocities and residence times in the subsoil, but can also affect the quality of the well water. Depth-orientated sampling in the adjacent aquifer was employed. One important finding was a marked age-stratification of the bank-filtered water which balances out fluctuating concentrations of dissolved compounds in the river water.

  12. Wide Field X-Ray Telescope Mission Concept Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Thomas, H. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Baysinger, M.; Hornsby, L. S.; Maples, C. D.; Purlee, T. E.; Capizzo, P. D.; Percy, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field X-Ray Telescope (WFXT) is an astrophysics mission concept for detecting and studying extra-galactic x-ray sources, including active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, in an effort to further understand cosmic evolution and structure. This Technical Memorandum details the results of a mission concept study completed by the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in 2012. The design team analyzed the mission and instrument requirements, and designed a spacecraft that enables the WFXT mission while using high heritage components. Design work included selecting components and sizing subsystems for power, avionics, guidance, navigation and control, propulsion, structures, command and data handling, communications, and thermal control.

  13. Cathodoluminescence studies of nanocrystalline silicon films for field emission displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biaggi Labiosa, Azlin M.

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) emission from p-type porous silicon (PSi) films excited with low energy electron beams compatible with field emission display (FED) technologies was investigated. First, a study was carried out to find the optimal PSi configuration that would yield the strongest CL emission. It was found that the highest, stable CL intensities were obtained from samples prepared from p-type wafers with resistivity between 1-2 Ocm. Afterwards, the effects on the morphological details and the chemical composition due to the electron irradiation of the PSi films were studied. During a continuous irradiation of 10 hours the CL intensity of the films reduced in less than 10%. In situ SIMS analyses before and after prolonged e-beam excitation showed minor compositional changes of the film and reduced sputtering of the silicon nanoparticles due to the electron irradiation. It was also found that the electron bombardment causes microscale morphological modifications of the films, but the nanoscale features appear to be unchanged. The structural changes are manifested by the increase in the density of the nanoparticles which explains the significant enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) that follows the electron irradiation. Second, after a thorough characterization of the PSi films under electron irradiation, tuning of the CL emission of PSi films was investigated. The PSi films used for this experiment were non-oxidized films unlike the ones used for the CL characterization that were oxidized films. The tuning was achieved by controlling the average size of the nanostructure thus showing that the origin of this CL emission is associated with the quantum confinement and the surface chemistry effects that are known to exist in the porous silicon system. However, the CL emission obtained from these samples was unstable which is attributed to the breaking of Si--H bonds due to the electron irradiation. Dangling bonds are then formed on the surface and this in

  14. ELF magnetic fields: animal studies, mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lagroye, Isabelle; Percherancier, Yann; Juutilainen, Jukka; De Gannes, Florence Poulletier; Veyret, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    Animal studies can contribute to addressing the issue of possible greater health risk for children exposed to 50-60 Hz extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs), mostly in terms of teratological effects and cancer. Teratology has been extensively studied in animals exposed to ELF MFs but experiments have not established adverse developmental effects. Childhood leukaemia has been the only cancer consistently reported in epidemiological studies as associated with exposure to ELF MFs. This association has been the basis for the classification as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in 2002. Animal experiments have provided only limited support for these epidemiological findings. However, none but one study used an animal model for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the main form of childhood leukaemia, and exposures to ELF MFs were not carried out over the whole pregnancy period, when the first hit of ALL is assumed to occur. Moreover, there are no generally accepted biophysical mechanisms that could explain carcinogenic effects of low-level MFs. The radical pair mechanism and related cryptochromes (CRY) molecules have recently been identified in birds and other non-mammalian species, as a sensor of the geomagnetic field, involved in navigation. The hypothesis has to be tested in mammalian models. CRY, which is part of the molecular circadian clock machinery, is a ubiquitous protein likely to be involved in cancer cell growth and DNA repair. In summary, we now have some clues to test for a better characterization of the interaction between ALL and ELF MFs exposure.

  15. Comparison study of toroidal-field divertors for a compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two divertor configurations for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) based on diverting the minority (toroidal) field have been reported. A critical factor in evaluating the performance of both poloidally symmetric and bundle divertor configurations is the accurate determination of the divertor connection length and the monitoring of magnetic islands introduced by the divertors, the latter being a three-dimensional effect. To this end the poloidal-field, toroidal-field, and divertor coils and the plasma currents are simulated in three dimensions for field-line tracings in both the divertor channel and the plasma-edge regions. The results of this analysis indicate a clear preference for the poloidally symmetric toroidal-field divertor. Design modifications to the limiter-based CRFPR design that accommodate this divertor are presented.

  16. Study on the near-field recording spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xiandeng; Xia, You-xin; Huang, Hao; Xie, Changsheng; Wang, Haiwei

    2003-04-01

    Evanescent energy can be used to get extremely small optical spots. For the data storage applications, optical near field is defined in terms of Evanescent coupling between the system used to read or write data and recording layer. Near-field techniques can be applied to optical data storage systems to greatly increase recording density. So near-field recording technique has great potential in optical disc recording system and hybrid recording system. The characteristic of near-field recording spot is of vital importance in the data storage system basing the near-field theory, so it is absolutely necessary to be analyzed and measured. This paper analyses characteristic of near-field spots. The heat response time of the near field to overcome super paramagnetic effect is calculated basing the heat transfer theory. A novel measuring method for the diameter of near-field recording spot is also presented. Since the grain of the recording media is tiny enough, with the aid of atomic force microscope (AFM), near-field optical lithography can be accomplished. The diameter of near-field recording spot can be obtained by specifically designed computer either. So the relationship between the near-field recording spot diameter and the probe size of near-field recording system, the near field recording distance coupling between head and disc can be got.

  17. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  18. Experimental and field studies with thiophanate in pigs.

    PubMed

    Baines, D M; Dalton, S E; Eichler, D A

    1976-08-14

    Thiophanate, administered at a dosage of 50 mg per kg to artifically infected pigs, removed 96 to 99 per cent of adult Oesophagostomum spp, Hyostrongylus rubidus and Trichuris suis. Activity was also high against larval stages of these nematodes, except for 26-day-old T suis. Thiophanate also showed ovicidal and larvicidal activity against H rubidus and Oesophagostomum spp. At 50 mg per kg thiophanate administered alone was inactive against Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus apri, the former species also being refractory at 200 mg per kg. Field trials confirmed these efficacy results in naturally infected animals. Pellet formulations providing mean dosages of 63 mg thiophanate per kg for adult pigs and 75 mg thiophanate per kg with 83 mg piperazine base per kg for growing pigs were highly effective in reducing the faecal output of Oesophagostomum spp, H rubidus and T suis eggs. In growing pigs, A suum was controlled by the thiophanate/piperazine product. No palatability or tolerance problems were observed when thiophanate or thiophanate/piperazine mixtures were administered at recommended dosage or multiples thereof in experimental or field studies.

  19. Near-Field Microscopy Studies of Lung Surfactant Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aga, Rachel; Dunn, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), the fourth leading cause of infant mortality in the United States, arises from an insufficiently developed lung surfactant (LS). Healthy LS, a mixture of lipids and proteins that coats the inner surface of the lungs, reduces the alveolar surface tension to a few millinewtons per meter and, thus, facilitates breathing by stabilizing the large surface area changes associated with respiration. In the absence of an effective LS, surfactant collapse pressure (i.e., monolayer compressibility) and the ability of the monolayer to re-spread during the breathing cycle are reduced, resulting in labored breathing, reduced oxygen transport, and often death in those afflicted. In this study, we investigate the mechanism of collapse and re-spreading of a monolayer formed by a replacement surfactant commonly used in treatment of RDS. Through confocal microscopy fluorescence images obtained at a series of pressures near collapse, we find evidence for multilayer formation in the films. A further understanding of the collapse mechanism is obtained by comparing high resolution fluorescence and topography information measured with near-field scanning optical microscopy. The combined data from both confocal and near-field measurements are used to develop a model of lung surfactant collapse and re-spreading.

  20. Field and data analysis studies related to the atmospheric environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, Stanley; Mach, Douglas; Bailey, Jeff; Stewart, Michael; Slaton, Dave; Buechler, Dennis; Botts, Michael; Collins, Laurie

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work on a broad array of projects including: (1) applications of meteorological and/or oceanographic satellites; (2) improvement of the current set of NASA/USAF lightning related launch commit criteria rules; (3) the design, building, testing and deployment of a set of cylindrical field mills for aircraft use; (4) the study of marginal electrification storm conditions in relationship to the current launch commit rules for the space shuttle and various other launch vehicles using an instrumented aircraft; (5) support of the DC-8 and ER-2 lightning instrument package as part of both the Tropical Ocean - Global Atmospheric/Coupled Ocean-Atmospheric Response Experiment and the Convection and Moisture Experiment; (6) design of electronic circuitry and microprocessor firmware for the NASA Advanced Ground Based Field Mill; (7) design and testing of electronic and computer instrumentation for atmospheric electricity measurements; (8) simulating observations from a lightning imaging sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring satellite; and (9) supporting scientific visualization and the development of computer software tools.

  1. Biological and Agricultural Studies on Application of Discharge Plasma and Electromagnetic Fields 5. Effects of High Electric Fields on Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaka, Katsuo

    The biological effects of extremely low frequency electric fields on animals are reviewed with emphasis on studies of the nervous system, behavior, endocrinology, and blood chemistry. First, this paper provides a histrical overview of studies on the electric field effects initiated in Russia and the United States mainly regarding electric utility workers in high voltage substations and transmission lines. Then, the possible mechanisms of electric field effects are explained using the functions of surface electric fields and induced currents in biological objects. The real mechanisms have not yet been identified. The thresholds of electric field perception levels for rats, baboons, and humans are introduced and compared. The experimental results concerning the depression of melatonin secretion in rats exposed to electric fields are described.

  2. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study FY 2003 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2003-04-15

    and suction lysimeters. The tension infiltrometer will be used to measure mobile-immobile parameters. The resulting data will used characterize fine-scale heterogeneity as well as correlation lengths of hydraulic and transport parameters. Tracer breakthrough data will be used to determine longitudinal and transverse dispersivities and their scale dependence. Parameters will be analyzed to identify a suitable averaging (upscaling) procedure for field-scale infiltration predictions. A combination of in situ permeability, water content and resistivity measurements will be combined with the granulometry and core analysis to quantify hydraulic geochemical properties in the laboratory. These data will be coupled with the field-measured hydraulic and transport parameters and the 3-D lithofacies map to generate a 3-D hydrofacies map of the site that includes the distribution geochemical properties controlling sorption. This map, along with measured distributions of water and solute, will be used to validate a numerical model for forward predictions and the applicability of upscaled parameters to reactive transport processes that typically occur under transient flow and at large spatial and temporal scales. The results of this study will help to bridge the gap between local-scale transport observations and field-scale transport behavior. It will allow validation of recently developed inverse procedures for predicting field-scale parameters and will improve our prediction capability fort reactive transport in heterogeneous sediments at Hanford. The improved conceptualizations will permit the DOE to make defensible corrective and remedial action decisions at Hanford and other waste sites.

  3. Cybertrips in Social Studies. Online Field Trips for All Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Scott

    The Internet can take students on virtual field trips to anywhere earth, under the seas, out in space, or back in time. This book demonstrates how teachers can use the Internet to take students on field trips. Composed of two parts, part 1, "Preparing for the Trip," discusses the background of virtual field trips what they are, and why…

  4. Studying electric field enhancement factor of the nanostructured emission surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zartdinov, A. N.; Nikiforov, K. A.

    2016-08-01

    Mathematical model of nanostructured field emission surface is proposed. In order to determine geometrical parameters of the surface structure digital processing of scanning electron microscopy images was used. Effective value of local electrical field enhancement factor is defined and calculated within the Fowler-Nordheim theory. It was found effective enhancement factor decreases as the applied electrical field increases for a fixed geometry.

  5. A Scoping-Level Field Monitoring Study of Synthetic Turf Fields and Playgrounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recycled tire material, or "tire crumb," is used as a component in many recreational fields, including synthetic turf fields and playgrounds. The use of tire crumbs in these applications provides several benefits, including reduced sports injury. The public recently has raised co...

  6. Results from an energy-efficient showerhead field study

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, W.M.; Bailey, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    In 1991 the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) initiated research to determine the energy savings potential of energy-efficient showerheads, including a two-phase study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The PNL study focused on 154 homes monitored with end-use metering equipment. In the first phase of the study, PNL recruited participants from the homes, installed energy efficient showerheads, and collected occupant and site characteristics data. The second phase of the study is an analysis of the end-use load data to estimate energy use and savings from showerheads over a two-year period. This report presents the results from the first phase field study. Program results are based on the number of homes that participated in various aspects of the study. Among the 154 of homes selected for the study, 65% agreed to participate. Eighty-eight percent of these homes actually had their showerheads replaced. After 15 months, 94% of the homes where showerheads were installed still had at least one in place. Measure results are based on the number of showerheads that were installed. The 154 homes contained an estimated 240 showerheads that could have been replaced. Sixty-six percent of these showerheads were actually replaced. If only showers in participant homes are considered, 83% of the showerheads were replaced. Measure persistence at the end of 15 months was 94%. The water flow rate from existing showerheads averaged 3.2 gallons per minute (gpm) at participating sites. Average water pressure for city-supplied water was 66 pounds per square inch (psi). Water pressure at homes on wells was over 40% lower, which reduced savings potential. The energy-efficient showerheads had an average flow rate of 1.8 gpm. Observed water flow reductions of 1.4 gpm were obtained from retrofit of energy-efficient showerheads. In about 20% of the showers, water flows remained constant or actually increased after retrofit of energy-efficient showerheads.

  7. Communication Problems in Requirements Engineering: A Field Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Rawas, Amer; Easterbrook, Steve

    1996-01-01

    The requirements engineering phase of software development projects is characterized by the intensity and importance of communication activities. During this phase, the various stakeholders must be able to communicate their requirements to the analysts, and the analysts need to be able to communicate the specifications they generate back to the stakeholders for validation. This paper describes a field investigation into the problems of communication between disparate communities involved in the requirements specification activities. The results of this study are discussed in terms of their relation to three major communication barriers: (1) ineffectiveness of the current communication channels; (2) restrictions on expressiveness imposed by notations; and (3) social and organizational barriers. The results confirm that organizational and social issues have great influence on the effectiveness of communication. They also show that in general, end-users find the notations used by software practitioners to model their requirements difficult to understand and validate.

  8. Gyrokinetic studies of microinstabilities in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, D.; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.

    2013-05-15

    An analytic equilibrium, the Toroidal Bessel Function Model, is used in conjunction with the gyrokinetic code GYRO to investigate the nature of microinstabilities in a reversed field pinch plasma. The effect of the normalized electron plasma pressure β on the characteristics of the microinstabilities is studied. At a β of 4.5%, a transition between an ion temperature gradient (ITG) and a microtearing mode is observed. Suppression of the ITG mode occurs as in the tokamak, through coupling to shear Alfvén waves, with a critical β for stability higher than its tokamak equivalent due to a shorter parallel connection length. A steep dependence of the microtearing growth rate on the temperature gradient suggests high profile stiffness. There is evidence for a collisionless microtearing mode. The properties of this mode are investigated, and it is found that electron curvature drift plays an important role in the instability.

  9. Multidisciplinary study of Hewett Field, Zechstein Kalk Formation

    SciTech Connect

    West, K.L. )

    1994-04-01

    New technology and a multidisciplinary team approach were effectively used by Phillips Petroleum for optimum reservoir development in the Hewett field, North Sea. Near-horizontal drilling technology and depositional environment and fracture studies were used by engineering and geology. Geophysics contributed structure and porosity trend maps and used new technology developed by Phillips called Incremental Pay Thickness modeling. IPT modeling enhances the integration of well-log data and seismic wiggle traces so porosity and pay thickness can be estimated directly from seismic data. Seismic amplitude values were mapped and processed into estimated porosity thickness using the IPT mathematical relationship. This interpretation aided in locating three successful development wells in areas of predicted high porosity, which increased production by 67 MMCF/D and optimized recovery.

  10. CSEM-Steel hybrid wiggler/undulator magnetic field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Plate, D.; Shuman, D.

    1985-06-01

    Current design of permanent magnet wiggler/undulators use either pure charge sheet equivalent material (CSEM) or the CSEM-Steel hybrid configuration. Hybrid configurations offer higher field strength at small gaps, field distributions dominated by the pole surfaces and pole tuning. Nominal performance of the hybrid is generally predicted using a 2-D magnetic design code neglecting transverse geometry. Magnetic measurements are presented showing transverse configuration influence on performance, from a combination of models using CSEMs, REC (H/sub c/ = 9.2 KOe) and NdFe (H/sub c/ = 10.7 kOe), different pole widths and end configurations. Results show peak field improvement using NdFe in place of REC in identical models, gap peak field decrease with pole width decrease (all results less than computed 2-D fields), transverse gap field distributions, and importance of CSEM material overhanging the poles in the transverse direction for highest gap fields. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  11. CSEM-steel hybrid wiggler/undulator magnetic field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Plate, D.; Shuman, D.

    1985-05-01

    Current design of permanent magnet wiggler/undulators use either pure charge sheet equivalent material (CSEM) or the CSEM-Steel hybrid configuration. Hybrid configurations offer higher field strength at small gaps, field distributions dominated by the pole surfaces and pole tuning. Nominal performance of the hybrid is generally predicted using a 2-D magnetic design code neglecting transverse geometry. Magnetic measurements are presented showing transverse configuration influence on performance, from a combination of models using CSEMs, REC (H/sub c/ = 9.2 kOe) and NdFe (H/sub c/ = 10.7 kOe), different pole widths and end configurations. Results show peak field improvement using NdFe in place of REC in identical models, gap peak field decrease with pole width decrease (all results less than computed 2-D fields), transverse gap field distributions, and importance of CSEM material overhanging the poles in the transverse direction for highest gap fields.

  12. Laboratory studies of oil spill bioremediation; toward understanding field behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.C.; Hinton, S.M.; Elmendorf, D.L.; Lute, J.R.; Grossman, M.J.; Robbins, W.K.; Hsu, Chang S.; Richard, B.E.; Haith, C.E.; Senius, J.D.; Minak-Bernero, V.; Chianelli, R.R.; Bragg, J.R.; Douglas, G.S.

    1993-12-31

    Oil spill remediation aims to enhance the natural process of microbial hydrocarbon biodegradation. The microbial foundations have been studied throughout this century, but the focus of most of this work has been on the degradation of well defined compounds by well defined microbial species. This paper addresses laboratory studies on crude oil biodegradation by microbial consortia obtained from oiled beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska following the spill from the Exxon Valdez. It demonstrates that oil degradation is indeed likely to be nitrogen-limited in Prince William Sound, the different molecular classes in crude oil that are subjected to biodegradation, the identification of conserved species in the oil that can be used for assessing biodegradation and bioremediation in the field, the effectiveness of fertilizers in stimulating sub-surface biodegradation, the role of the olephilic fertilizer Inipol EAP22, and the identification of the oil-degrading microorganisms in Prince William Sound. Together, these laboratory studies provided guidance and important insights into the microbial phenomena underlying the successful bioremediation of the oiled shorelines.

  13. A field study of virus removal in septic tank drainfields.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, L A; Rose, J B; Stark, L; Stewart, M T

    2001-01-01

    Two field studies were conducted at a research station in Tampa, Florida to assess the removal of bacteriophage PRD1 from wastewater in septic tank drainfields. Infiltration cells were seeded with PRD1 and bromide and the effects of effluent hydraulic loading rate and rainfall on virus removal were monitored. Septic tank effluent samples were collected after passage through 0.6 m of unsaturated fine sand and PRD1 was detected over an average of 67 d. Bacteriophage PRD1 breakthrough was detected at approximately the same time as bromide in all three cells except for the low-load cell (Study 1), where bromide was never detected. Log10 removals of PRD1 were 1.43 and 1.91 for the high-load cells (hydraulic loading rate = 0.063 m/d) and 2.21 for the low-load cell (hydraulic loading rate = 0.032 m/d). Virus attenuation is attributed to dispersion, dilution, and inactivation. Significant increases in PRD1 elution with rainfall were observed in the first 10 d of the study. Approximately 125 mm of rainfall caused a 1.2 log10 increase of PRD1 detected at the 0.6-m depth. Current Florida onsite wastewater disposal standards, which specify a 0.6-m distance from the drainfield to the water table, may not provide sufficient removal of viruses, particularly during the wet season.

  14. A systematic study of finite field-dependent BRST-BV transformations in Sp(2) extended field-antifield formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Bering, Klaus; Lavrov, Peter M.; Tyutin, Igor V.

    2014-11-01

    In the framework of Sp(2) extended Lagrangian field-antifield BV formalism, we study systematically the role of finite field-dependent BRST-BV transformations. We have proved that the Jacobian of a finite BRST-BV transformation is capable of generating arbitrary finite change of the gauge-fixing function in the path integral.

  15. Extending field life in offshore Gulf of Mexico using 3-D seismic survey

    SciTech Connect

    Bulling, T.P.; Olsen, R.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Discovered by ARCO in 1967, the High Island 24L field (lower Miocene) is located in the Texas state waters of the Gulf of Mexico. By 1986, the field had produced 320 billion ft{sup 3} of gas and 3.0 million bbl of oil. An engineering field study completed in 1986 showed the field was declining and would be unprofitable within 3 yr. Study of reservoir maps revealed three basin problems: volumetric reserve calculations were less than reserves produced, hydrocarbon-water contacts were inconsistent between wells thought to be in communication, and ultimate recoveries could not be accurately calculated. Attempts to remap the field with the existing two-dimensional seismic data base and well data proved unsuccessful. In 1986, a three-dimensional seismic survey was acquired in an effort to evaluate the true present worth and potential of the field. Remapping of 30 reservoir horizons began in 1987. The integration of detailed well log correlations tied to the dense grid of quality three dimensional seismic data improved the reservoir maps. These maps helped resolve engineering problems by defining the configuration of the reservoirs more accurately. Reservoir maps now closely match volumetrics, fluid contacts within reservoir units are consistent, and a better definition of extension well opportunities exists. The authors study resulted in six additional wells. These wells along with engineering modifications and operations cost containment resulted in the extension of the economic life of the High Island 24-L field by at least 8 yr.

  16. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Nearshore Hydrodynamics Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.; Voulgaris, G.; Demir, H.; Work, P. A.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) a nearshore field experiment was carried out for five days in December 2003 just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, providing measurements of the waves, currents and morphological evolution. This experiment occurred concurrently with an extensive field campaign several kilometers offshore which included measurements of the waves and currents on and near a significant sand shoal. The purpose of the nearshore experiment was to aid in the identification of the effect of the offshore shoal on the nearshore processes. The resulting dataset will be used for verification of numerical models being used to investigate the hydrodynamics of the region. The experiment was carried out from December 10 to December 15 and consisted of measurements of the waves and currents, extensive surveys of the bathymetry every day, grab samples of the sediments, and video imagery. The hydrodynamics were measured using two Sontek Triton downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters and two Nortek AquaDopp profilers arranged in a cross-shore line from inside the swash to several surf zone widths past the breakers. The bathymetric surveying was accomplished using both a differential GPS system and a total station. Surveying was performed each day in order to capture the morphological changes. On the last day, seven sediment samples were taken along a single cross-section to determine the sediment characteristics across the beach. Additionally, a video camera was located on a balcony of the top floor of a nearby hotel providing an excellent field of view of the entire experimental area. Digital video was captured directly onto a computer during all daylight hours and many control points were surveyed in each day to facilitate rectification of the imagery. A variety of conditions were encountered during the experiment, including two storm fronts which passed through, generating wind speeds up to 15 m/s. The first storm generated

  17. Magnetic field gradients and their uses in the study of the earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Southam, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients are discussed from the standpoint of their usefulness in modeling crustal magnetizations. The fact that gradients enhance shorter wavelength features helps reduce both the core signal and the signal from external fields in comparison with the crustal signal. If the gradient device can be oriented, then directions of lineation can be determined from single profiles, and anomalies caused by unlineated sources can be identified.

  18. A Study of the Mean Field Approach to Knapsack Problems.

    PubMed

    Pi, Hong; Ohlsson, Mattias

    1997-03-01

    The mean field theory approach to knapsack problems is extended to multiple knapsacks and generalized assignment problems with Potts mean field equations governing the dynamics. Numerical tests against "state of the art" conventional algorithms shows good performance for the mean field approach. The inherently parallelism of the mean field equations makes them suitable for direct implementations in microchips. It is demonstrated numerically that the performance is essentially not affected when only a limited number of bits is used in the mean field equations. Also, a hybrid algorithm with linear programming and mean field components is showed to further improve the performance for the difficult homogeneous N x M knapsack problem. Copyright 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Field studies of the leachability of aged brown coal ash.

    PubMed

    Mudd, G M; Kodikara, J

    2000-09-15

    The environmental management of ash produced from the brown coal power stations of the Latrobe Valley region of Australia has been studied. Current practice consists of slurrying fly and bottom ash, a short distance to an ash disposal pond. However, storage facilities are approaching capacity and alternative ash management strategies are required in the near future. Initially, the ash produced within the power stations is known to possess a large soluble mass, which can leach rapidly to generate a saline leachate with minor trace metal content. After slurrying and deposition within the ash pond, it has been demonstrated that the soluble mass is significantly lower and the ash can be considered as aged or "leached" ash - a more benign waste that meets the criteria for fill material. In order to assess the long-term behaviour of the leached ash and its suitability for co-disposal in engineered sites within overburden dumps, two field cells were constructed and monitored over a period of 1 year. Each cell was 5 x 5 m in area, 3-m deep and HDPE lined with a coarse drainage layer and leachate collection pipe. The first cell only collected natural rainfall and was known as the Dry Cell. The second cell had an external tank of 5000 l installed (200-mm rainfall equivalent) and water was spray-irrigated regularly to simulate higher rainfall and accelerate the leaching process. The cumulative inflow and outflow for each cell has been calculated using a linear relationship and the leachate quality was monitored over time. The results demonstrate that the ash behaves as an unsaturated porous material, with the effect of evaporation through the profile being dominant and controlling the production of leachate. The leachate quality was initially moderately saline in both cells, with the concentration dropping by nearly 95% in the Wet Cell by the end of the field study. The leachate chemistry has been analysed using the PHREEQC geochemical model. The log activity plots of various

  20. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony C.; Cooley, Victoria

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC-type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first-order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  1. A field study on downwind odor transport from swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents field data to illustrate the characteristics of downwind odor dispersion. A total of eight swine facilities were studied in this project and power functions were found to be an appropriate description of the pattern of downwind odor transport for both swine buildings and manure storage lagoons and tanks. The coefficients of correlation for the power regressions ranged from 0.75-0.87. It was found that swine buildings have the potential of generating more odor than manure storage facilities such as lagoons and tanks and thus could be the major odor sources causing downwind odor nuisance. Therefore, to maintain the building clean should be highly recommended as swine producers' best management practice. For earthen basins, the odor strength was reduced by 80% at about 250-meter distance from the source. While for the swine building, a 50% of reduction in odor strength was observed at the same distance. The study did not show any advantages of using lagoons over concrete (or steel) manure tanks in terms of reducing downwind odor concentrations. Land application of manure did not cause persistent downwind odor problems.

  2. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  3. Spectral studies of the sources of ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earle, G. D.; Kelley, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral analyses (applying the Fourier analysis methods) were performed on three incoherent scatter radar data sets (obtained at Jicamarca, Peru; Chatanika, Alaska; and Arecibo, Puerto Rico) with the aim of investigating the origin of ionospheric electric fields in the frequency range of 0.01-2 cycles/h. In quiet times, atmospheric gravity waves appeared to be the most likely source of the ionospheric electric field. This hypothesis was tested by a direct simultaneous comparison of measurements of gravity waves in the mesosphere and of electric fields in the thermosphere during very quiet conditions. The results indicated that a gravity wave source is a plausible candidate for the electric field fluctuations.

  4. Magnetic field study of the ``hidden transition'' in UCd11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundu, C. R.; Andraka, B.; Stewart, G. R.; Takano, Y.; Fisk, Z.

    2005-05-01

    The specific heat of UCd11 was measured in magnetic fields to 27T. Besides the antiferromagnetic transition, there is a second transition that can be clearly resolved in fields between 14 and 20T. This second transition (at Tm) extrapolates to a broad shoulder in C /T in zero field. The two lines of transitions cross somewhere between 20 and 23T. Tm displays unusually weak dependence on the strength of the magnetic field. Our results argue for the intrinsic origin of this "hidden" transition.

  5. Skills Utilisation at Work, the Quality of the Study Programme and Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Støren, Liv Anne; Arnesen, Clara Åse

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that may have impact on the extent to which the knowledge and skills of master's degree graduates in Norway are utilised at work, three years after graduation. The focus is on the impact of the quality of the study programme as well as the graduates' fields of study, when also taking into account other factors…

  6. Field Methods for the Study of Slope and Fluvial Processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1967-01-01

    In Belgium during the summer of 1966 the Commission on Slopes and the Commission on Applied Geomorphology of the International Geographical Union sponsored a joint symposium, with field excursions, and meetings of the two commissions. As a result of the conference and associated discussions, the participants expressed the view that it would be a contribution to scientific work relating to the subject area if the Commission on Applied Geomorphology could prepare a small manual describling the methods of field investigation being used by research scientists throughout the world in the study of various aspects of &lope development and fluvial processes. The Commission then assumed this responsibility and asked as many persons as were known to be. working on this subject to contribute whatever they wished in the way of descriptions of methods being employed.The purpose of the present manual is to show the variety of study methods now in use, to describe from the experience gained the limitations and advantages of different techniques, and to give pertinent detail which might be useful to other investigators. Some details that would be useful to know are not included in scientific publications, but in a manual on methods the details of how best t6 use a method has a place. Various persons have learned certain things which cannot be done, as well as some methods that are successful. It is our hope that comparison of methods tried will give the reader suggestions as to how a particular method might best be applied to his own circumstance.The manual does not purport to include methods used by all workers. In particular, it does not interfere with a more systematic treatment of the subject (1) or with various papers already published in the present journal. In fact we are sure that there are pertinent research methods that we do not know of and the Commission would be glad to receive additions and other ideas from those who find they have something to contribute. Also, the

  7. Light Scattering Studies of Organic Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil, Danish

    Organic semiconductors hold a great promise of enabling new technology based on low cost and flexible electronic devices. While much work has been done in the field of organic semiconductors, the field is still quite immature when compared to that of traditional inorganic based devices. More work is required before the full potential of organic field effect transistors (OFETs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is realized. Among such work, a further development of diagnostic tools that characterize charge transport and device robustness more efficiently is required. Charge transport in organic semiconductors is limited by the nature of the metal-semiconductor interfaces where charge is injected into the semiconductor film and the semiconductor-dielectric interface where the charge is accumulated and transported. This, combined with that fact that organic semiconductors are especially susceptible to having structural defects induced via oxidation, charge transport induced damage, and metallization results in a situation where a semiconductor film's ability to conduct charge can degrade over time. This degradation manifests itself in the electrical device characteristics of organic based electronic devices. OFETs, for example, may display changes in threshold voltage, lowering of charge carrier mobilities, or a decrease in the On/Off ratio. All these effects sum together to result in degradation in device performance. The work begins with a study where matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition (MAPLE), an alternative organic semiconductor thin film deposition method, is used to fabricate OFETs with improved semiconductor-dielectric interfaces. MAPLE allows for the controlled layer-by-layer growth of the semiconductor film. Devices fabricated using this technique are shown to exhibit desirable characteristics that are otherwise only achievable with additional surface treatments. MAPLE is shown to be viable alternative to other

  8. Study of the electric field formation in a multi-cusped magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui Yu, Daren; Wu, Huan; Zhao, Yinjian; Ma, Chengyu; Wang, Di; Wei, Haoyu

    2014-09-15

    The multi-cusped field thruster is a kind of electric thruster adopting a cusped magnetic field to achieve a potentially longer lifetime. It is observed in some experiments that the main electric potential drop forms near the exhaust plane, but the formation mechanism of the electric field in this kind of thrusters is not fully clear yet. Based on the analysis of the electron movement, a 2D Particle-in-Cell plus Monte Carlo model is built to reveal the difference of the constraint to electrons between the central leak path and the lateral region of the thruster. Electron trajectories from cathode are analyzed furthermore. It is found that the central leak path inside the discharge channel may play a significant role in the formation of the main electric potential drop near the exhaust plane.

  9. Field Studies of Geothermal Reservoirs Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    James C Witcher

    2002-07-30

    The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent field laboratory to study the nature of geothermal systems in an extensional environment. Much of the geologic complexity that is found in the Basin and Range is absent because the rift is located on cratonic crust with a thin and well-characterized Phanerozoic stratigraphy and tectonic history. On the other hand, the Neogene thermo-tectonic history of the rift has many parallels with the Basin and Range to the west. The geology of the southern Rio Grande rift is among the best characterized of any rift system in the world. Also, most geologic maps for the region are rather unique in that detailed analyses of Quaternary stratigraphic and surficial unit are added in concert with the details of bedrock geology. Pleistocene to Holocene entrenchment of the Rio Grande and tributaries unroofs the alteration signatures and permeability attributes of paleo outflow plumes and upflow zones, associated with present-day, but hidden or ''blind,'' hydrothermal systems at Rincon and San Diego Mountain.

  10. Plasma-induced field emission study of carbon nanotube cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang; Liu, Xingguang; Yang, Anmin; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Liao, Qingliang; Zhang, Yue

    2011-10-01

    An investigation on the plasma-induced field emission (PFE) properties of a large area carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode on a 2 MeV linear induction accelerator injector is presented. Experimental results show that the cathode is able to emit intense electron beams. Intense electron beams of 14.9-127.8A/cm2 are obtained from the cathode. The CNT cathode desorbs gases from the CNTs during the PFE process. The fast cathode plasma expansion affects the diode perveance. The amount of outgassing is estimated to be 0.06-0.49Pa·L, and the ratio of outgassing and electron are roughly calculated to be within the range of 170-350 atoms per electron. The effect of the outgassing is analyzed, and the outgassing mass spectrum of the CNT cathode has been studied during the PFE. There is a significant desorption of CO2, N2(CO), and H2 gases, which plays an important role during the PFE process. All the experiments demonstrate that the outgassing plays an important role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Moreover, the characteristic turn-on time of the CNT cathode was measured to be 39 ns.

  11. An experimental field study of weight salience and food choice.

    PubMed

    Incollingo Rodriguez, Angela C; Finch, Laura E; Buss, Julia; Guardino, Christine M; Tomiyama, A Janet

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory research has found that individuals will consume more calories and make unhealthy food choices when in the presence of an overweight individual, sometimes even regardless of what that individual is eating. This study expanded these laboratory paradigms to the field to examine how weight salience influences eating in the real world. More specifically, we tested the threshold of the effect of weight salience of food choice to see if a more subtle weight cue (e.g., images) would be sufficient to affect food choice. Attendees (N = 262) at Obesity Week 2013, a weight-salient environment, viewed slideshows containing an image of an overweight individual, an image of a thin individual, or no image (text only), and then selected from complimentary snacks. Results of ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that participants who viewed the image of the overweight individual had higher odds of selecting the higher calorie snack compared to those who viewed the image of the thin individual (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = [1.04, 3.04]), or no image (OR = 2.42, 95% CI = [1.29, 4.54]). Perceiver BMI category did not moderate the influence of image on food choice, as these results occurred regardless of participant BMI. These findings suggest that in the context of societal weight salience, weight-related cues alone may promote unhealthy eating in the general public.

  12. Magnetic field studies at jupiter by voyager 2: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuna, M H; Lepping, R P; Burlaga, L F; Behannon, K W; Neubauer, F M

    1979-11-23

    Data from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometers on Voyager 2 have yielded on inbound trajectory observations of multiple crossings of the bow shock and magnetosphere near the Jupiter-sun line at radial distances of 99 to 66 Jupiter radii (RJ) and 72 to 62 RJ, respectively. While outbound at a local hour angle of 0300, these distances increase appreciably so that at the time of writing only the magnetopause has been observed between 160 and 185 RJ. These results and the magnetic field geometry confirm the earlier conclusion from Voyager I studies that Jupiter has an enormous magnetic tail, approximately 300 to 400 RJ in diameter, trailing behind the planet with respect to the supersonic flow of the solar wind. Addi- tional observations of the distortion of the inner magnetosphere by a concentrated plasma show a spatial merging of the equatorial magnetodisk current with the cur- rent sheet in the magnetic tail. The spacecraft passed within 62,000 kilometers of Ganymede (radius = 2,635 kilometers) and observed characteristic fluctuations in- terpreted tentatively as being due to disturbances arising from the interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with Ganymede.

  13. Transport studies in high-performance field reversed configuration plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Barnes, D. C.; Dettrick, S. A.; Trask, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Hubbard, K.; Korepanov, S.; Thompson, M. C.; Zhai, K.; Tajima, T.

    2016-05-01

    A significant improvement of field reversed configuration (FRC) lifetime and plasma confinement times in the C-2 plasma, called High Performance FRC regime, has been observed with neutral beam injection (NBI), improved edge stability, and better wall conditioning [Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)]. A Quasi-1D (Q1D) fluid transport code has been developed and employed to carry out transport analysis of such C-2 plasma conditions. The Q1D code is coupled to a Monte-Carlo code to incorporate the effect of fast ions, due to NBI, on the background FRC plasma. Numerically, the Q1D transport behavior with enhanced transport coefficients (but with otherwise classical parametric dependencies) such as 5 times classical resistive diffusion, classical thermal ion conductivity, 20 times classical electron thermal conductivity, and classical fast ion behavior fit with the experimentally measured time evolution of the excluded flux radius, line-integrated density, and electron/ion temperature. The numerical study shows near sustainment of poloidal flux for nearly 1 ms in the presence of NBI.

  14. A study of solidification with a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roplekar, Jayant K.

    Due to the drive for weight reduction in the automobile industry, near net shape parts produced by semi-solid processing of aluminum alloys are increasingly replacing traditional steel parts. Magnetohydrodynamic direct chill casting (MHD-DC) process, developed in the mid-eighties, is the method of choice to produce rheocast metal alloys for semi-solid applications. In spite of commercial applicability of the MHD-DC process there is no integrated process model available for this process. In the present work we use an experimental setup that combines directional solidification with magnetic stirring to develop a numerical model for the MHD-DC process. We use the finite element method to solve the coupled equations of turbulent fluid flow, species transport and heat transfer with solidification on a fixed grid. Effects of the rotating magnetic field are incorporated through a body-force term which is determined a priori based on a detailed analytical study and experimental data. Due to the nature of temperature-solute coupling and the advection dominated evolution of the liquid fraction, special numerical procedures had to be implemented in the present work. The numerical procedure used in the present work is validated against two validation problems. In the first validation problem, we apply the two-phase methodology to solve the classical problem of diffusion-dominated solidification. The good agreement between the finite element solution and the analytical solution establishes soundness of the two-phase formulation developed in this work. In the second validation problem, a finite element prediction of the flow induced in a cylindrical cavity due to a rotating magnetic field is compared with an independent spectral solution. The close agreement between two radically different solution procedures establishes the accuracy in the formulation and implementation of the both procedures. We then simulate the experiments using the numerical model. The numerical model

  15. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Assisted in vitro Electroporation: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Pamedytytė, Dovilė; Kalėdienė, Lilija; Novickij, Jurij; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-09-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon occurring due to exposure of cells to Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) which leads to increase of membrane permeability. Electroporation is used in medicine, biotechnology, and food processing. Recently, as an alternative to electroporation by PEF, Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF) application causing similar biological effects was suggested. Since induced electric field in PEMF however is 2–3 magnitudes lower than in PEF electroporation, the membrane permeabilization mechanism remains hypothetical. We have designed pilot experiments where Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida lusitaniae cells were subjected to single 100–250 μs electrical pulse of 800 V with and without concomitant delivery of magnetic pulse (3, 6 and 9 T). As expected, after the PEF pulses only the number of Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent cells has increased, indicative of membrane permeabilization. We further show that single sub-millisecond magnetic field pulse did not cause detectable poration of yeast. Concomitant exposure of cells to pulsed electric (PEF) and magnetic field (PMF) however resulted in the increased number PI fluorescent cells and reduced viability. Our results show increased membrane permeability by PEF when combined with magnetic field pulse, which can explain electroporation at considerably lower electric field strengths induced by PEMF compared to classical electroporation.

  16. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Assisted in vitro Electroporation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Novickij, Vitalij; Grainys, Audrius; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Pamedytytė, Dovilė; Kalėdienė, Lilija; Novickij, Jurij; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon occurring due to exposure of cells to Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) which leads to increase of membrane permeability. Electroporation is used in medicine, biotechnology, and food processing. Recently, as an alternative to electroporation by PEF, Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF) application causing similar biological effects was suggested. Since induced electric field in PEMF however is 2–3 magnitudes lower than in PEF electroporation, the membrane permeabilization mechanism remains hypothetical. We have designed pilot experiments where Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida lusitaniae cells were subjected to single 100–250 μs electrical pulse of 800 V with and without concomitant delivery of magnetic pulse (3, 6 and 9 T). As expected, after the PEF pulses only the number of Propidium Iodide (PI) fluorescent cells has increased, indicative of membrane permeabilization. We further show that single sub-millisecond magnetic field pulse did not cause detectable poration of yeast. Concomitant exposure of cells to pulsed electric (PEF) and magnetic field (PMF) however resulted in the increased number PI fluorescent cells and reduced viability. Our results show increased membrane permeability by PEF when combined with magnetic field pulse, which can explain electroporation at considerably lower electric field strengths induced by PEMF compared to classical electroporation. PMID:27634482

  17. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

  18. Studies on Quantum Field Theory and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shoucheng

    This dissertation is a summary of research in various areas of theoretical physics and is divided into three parts. In the first part, quantum fluctuations of the recently proposed superconducting cosmic strings are studied. It is found that vortices on the string world sheet represent an important class of fluctuation modes which tend to disorder the system. Both heuristic arguments and detailed renormalization group analysis reveal that these vortices do not appear in bound pairs but rather form a gas of free vortices. Based on this observation we argue that this fluctuation mode violates the topological conservation law on which superconductivity is based. Anomalies and topological aspects of supersymmetric quantum field theories are studied in the second part of this dissertation. Using the superspace formulation of the N = 1 spinning string, we obtain a path integral measure which is free from the world-sheet general coordinate as well as the supersymmetry anomalies and therefore determine the conformal anomaly and critical dimension of the spinning string. We also apply Fujikawa's formalism to computer the chiral anomaly in conformal as well as ordinary supergravity. Finally, we given a Noether-method construction of the supersymmetrized Chern-Simons term in five dimensional supergravity. In the last part of this dissertation, the soliton excitations in the quarter-filled Peierls-Hubbard model are investigated in both the large and the small U limit. For a strictly one dimensional system at zero temperature, we find that solitons in both limits are in one-to-one correspondence, while in the presence of weak three dimensional couplings or at finite temperature, the large U systems differ qualitatively from the small U systems in that the spin associated with the solitons ceases to be a sharp quantum observable.

  19. Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Geraint

    2016-05-01

    The last field campaign held at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea (PNG), was conducted in February 2014 as part of the Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) campaign. This campaign was a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and the United Kingdom’s (UK) Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) to study the composition of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) and the impact of deep convection on this composition. There are three main areas of interest: i) transport of trace gases in the tropical atmosphere (especially short-lived halogenated compounds that can be lifted rapidly into the TTL, where they augment the stratospheric loading of these species); ii) formation of cirrus and its impact on the TTL; and iii) the upper-atmosphere water vapor budget. Overall, the aim was to improve understanding of the dynamical, radiative, and chemical role of the TTL. The Manus operation was a joint experiment between the Universities of Manchester and Cambridge and the UK National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS). It consisted of two elements: an ozonesonde campaign to measure ozone vertical profiles through the TTL, and ground-based monitoring of ozone, halogenated hydrocarbons, and greenhouse gases to determine the composition of lower-boundary-layer air in the Warm Pool region. Thanks to the support from the ARM Climate Research Facility and the exemplary collaboration of ARM staff in the region, the campaign was very successful.

  20. Stimulated oxidation of metals (laser, electric field, etc.): Comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánai, László; Füle, Miklós

    2014-11-01

    In this report we demonstrate the importance of metal oxides, e.g. thin films and nanostructures, in modern science and technology. The basic laws of oxide thickness on base of diffusion of specimens versus time in different circumstances (Cabrera-Mott and Wagner laws) under the influence of external fields, e.g. electromagnetic field, static electric and magnetic field, are demonstrated. We give experimental results for various metal oxide layers over a wide range of different metals. Theoretical explanations are provided as well for the most reliable circumstances.

  1. Study of Nonclassical Fields in Phase-Sensitive Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung Shik; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    1996-01-01

    We show that the reservoir influence can be modeled by an infinite array of beam splitters. The superposition of the input fields in the beam splitter is discussed with the convolution laws for their quasiprobabilities. We derive the Fokker-Planck equation for the cavity field coupled with a phase-sensitive reservoir using the convolution law. We also analyze the amplification in the phase-sensitive reservoir with use of the modified beam splitter model. We show the similarities and differences between the dissipation and amplification models. We show that a super-Poissonian input field cannot become sub-Poissonian by the phase-sensitive amplification.

  2. Preliminary Studies on Pulsed Electric Field Breakdown of Lead Azide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    subjected to combinations of 400.0 nm irradiation (strongly absorbed by Pb(N_)-) and strong field, for both polarities, again with no effect . It has...II n»Kt*tmy mad I4mtlty by MeeM mmt»mr) .± Lead Azide Electric Field Initiation Contact Effects Surface Effects Radiation Effect ! A9STMACT...reported. Specifically, ws-d4*eu«s the effects of contacts on the initiation of explosives by electric fields, and present preliminary weaouresents

  3. 3-D seismic data for field development: Landslide field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Raeuchle, S.K.; Carr, T.R.; Tucker, R.D. )

    1990-05-01

    The Landslide field is located on the extreme southern flank of the San Joaquin basin, approximately 25 mi south of Bakersfield, California. The field, discovered in 1985, has produced in excess 9 million bbl of oil with an estimated ultimate recovery of more than 13 MMBO. The Miocene Stevens sands, which form the reservoir units at Landslide field, are interpreted as a series of constructional submarine fan deposits. Deposition of the fans was controlled by paleotopography with an abrupt updip pinch-out of the sands to the southwest. The three-dimensional seismic data over the field was used to locate the bottom hole of the landslide 22X-30 development well as close to this abrupt updip pinchout as possible in order to maximize oil recovery. A location was selected two traces (330 ft) from the updip pinch-out as mapped on the seismic data. The well was successfully drilled during 1989, encountering 150 ft of net sand with initial production in excess of 1,500 bbl of oil/day. A pressure buildup test indicates the presence of a boundary approximately 200 ft from the well bore. This boundary is interpreted as the updip pinchout of the Stevens sands against the paleohigh. Based on examination of changes in amplitude, the absence or presence of reservoir-quality sand can be mapped across the paleohighs. Application of three-dimensional seismic data, integration with well data, and in particular reconstruction cuts tied closely to existing wells can be used to map the ultimate extent of the field and contribute to efficient development.

  4. Fundamental Studies of Electric-Field-Induced Coherent Raman Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-07

    mechanisms of nanosecond- pulsed dielectric barrier discharges generated in open air. Our experimental observations have revealed that, in the pre...dynamics in nanosecond- pulsed discharges . a) Electric-field-induced coherent Raman scattering (E-CRS) In this section, I describe the...the electric field in hydrogen. With E-CRS method, our group has revealed very fast discharge dynamics in repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges [4

  5. A Study of Magnetic Fields on Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji

    2015-08-01

    Bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs), which are located at periphery of HII regions, are considered to be potential sites for induced star formation by UV radiation from nearby massive stars. Many theorists have developed 2D/3D hydrodynamical models to understand dynamical evolution of such molecular clouds. Most simulations, however, did not always include the magnetic field effect, which is of importance in the astrophysics. This is because that there are few observation results examining the magnetic field configuration of BRCs in detail. In order to obtain information on magnetic field in and around BRCs, we have made near-infrared (JHKs) imaging polarimetry toward 24 BRCs showing strong interaction with HII region (Urquhart et al. 2009). We used the imaging polarimeter SIRPOL/SIRIUS (FOV ~7.7’ x 7.7’) mounted on IRSF 1.4 m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory.We found that polarization vectors, i.e., magnetic fields inside the clouds, follow the curved bright rim just behind the bright rim for almost all of the observed BRCs. Our investigation into the relation between the ambient magnetic field direction and the UV radiation direction suggests a following tendency. In the case that the ambient magnetic field is perpendicular to the direction of incident UV radiation, the clouds are likely to have bright rims with small curvatures. On the other hand, in the case that the ambient field is parallel to the UV radiation, they would have those with larger curvatures. In this presentation, we will present the physical quantities for these BRCs (i.e., magnetic field strength, the post shock pressure by the ionization front, etc.) as well as these morphological results.

  6. A field study of littoral processes in Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, J.R.; Anima, R.J.; Molzan, D.E.; Luepke, Gretchen; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Estero Bay, which lies on the central California coast, has rocky headlands at both ends and sandy beaches within it. The shoreline of the bay has adjusted to be in equilibrium with the predominant wave climate, which is from the northwest. Because of its present shoreline configuration, the net southward littoral transport found along much of the California coast does not occur within Estero Bay. Instead, the sand primarily moves on- and offshore with a reversing longshore component. This sand transport pattern produces a littoral cell within Estero Bay even though there is no submarine canyon in the area. The primary sand sinks for this cell appear to be the sand spit south of Morro Rock and the entrance to Morro Bay itself, although this opinion was not experimentally verified. Field work during one summer (1978) and the following winter (1979) produced baseline data on the profile of and grain-size distribution across the littoral zone. In the offshore part of the littoral zone we also studied ripple size and type, internal structure, depth of erosion, and mineralogy. Although these data, which were collected along nine transects spaced 2 km apart, are inadequate to yield transport and energy rates, they indicate a northward decrease in wave energy within Estero Bay and a mixing of the sediments in the offshore. Box core and rod height data from grid points in seven meters of water showed that on the order of a meter of erosion occurred in the central part of the bay between the two sampling periods. Offshore, the data were incomplete, but at one station, in 17 m of water, at least 20 cm of erosion occurred.

  7. Human habitation field study of the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Archer, Ronald D.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    Landing and supporting a permanent outpost on a planetary surface represents humankind's capability to expand its own horizons and challenge current technology. With this in mind, habitability of these structures becomes more essential given the longer durations of the missions. The purpose of this evaluation was to obtain preliminary human-in-the-loop performance data on the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) configuration during a 14-day simulated lunar exploration field trial and to apply this knowledge to further enhance the habitat's capabilities for forward designs. Human factors engineers at the NASA/Johnson Space Center's Habitability and Human Factors Branch recorded approximately 96 h of crew task performance with four work stations. Human factors measures used during this study included the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) and customized post questionnaires. Overall the volume for the PEM was considered acceptable by the crew; however; the habitat's individual work station volume was constrained when setting up the vehicle for operation, medical operations, and suit maintenance while general maintenance, logistical resupply, and geo science was considered acceptable. Crew workload for each station indicated resupply as being the lowest rated, with medical operations, general maintenance, and geo science tasks as being light, while suit maintenance was considered moderate and general vehicle setup being rated the highest. Stowage was an issue around the habitat with the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV) resupply stowage located in the center of the habitat as interfering with some work station volumes and activities. Ergonomics of the geo science station was considered a major issue, especially with the overhead touch screens.

  8. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Craig R; Santanello, Joseph A; Gentine, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    This document presents initial analyses of the enhanced radiosonde observations obtained during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign (ESLCS), which took place at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) from June 15 to August 31, 2015. During ESLCS, routine 4-times-daily radiosonde measurements at the ARM-SGP CF were augmented on 12 days (June 18 and 29; July 11, 14, 19, and 26; August 15, 16, 21, 25, 26, and 27) with daytime 1-hourly radiosondes and 10-minute ‘trailer’ radiosondes every 3 hours. These 12 intensive operational period (IOP) days were selected on the basis of prior-day qualitative forecasts of potential land-atmosphere coupling strength. The campaign captured 2 dry soil convection advantage days (June 29 and July 14) and 10 atmospherically controlled days. Other noteworthy IOP events include: 2 soil dry-down sequences (July 11-14-19 and August 21-25-26), a 2-day clear-sky case (August 15-16), and the passing of Tropical Storm Bill (June 18). To date, the ESLCS data set constitutes the highest-temporal-resolution sampling of the evolution of the daytime planetary boundary layer (PBL) using radiosondes at the ARM-SGP. The data set is expected to contribute to: 1) improved understanding and modeling of the diurnal evolution of the PBL, particularly with regard to the role of local soil wetness, and (2) new insights into the appropriateness of current ARM-SGP CF thermodynamic sampling strategies.

  9. Fundamental study of flow field generated by rotorcraft blades using wide-field shadowgraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors are visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen makes it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale rotors. Tip vortex trajectories are visible in shadowgraphs for a range of tip Mach number of 0.38 to 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack is substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core is significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the sensitivity is carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius and increases with increasing tip Mach number. The threshold value of the sensitivity is found to be 0.0015, below which the vortex core is not visible and above which it is visible. The effect of the optical path length is also discussed. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the application of this wide-field shadowgraph technique to a large wind tunnel test should be feasible. In addition, two simultaneous shadowgraph views would allow three-dimensional reconstruction of vortex trajectories.

  10. Field study - Steinle Ranch, an intermediate depth oil field, shows significant benefit from bauxite proppants

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlhaas, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Steinle Ranch field initially was developed in the mid-1970s. Wells were drilled, cased, perforated, and treated by chemical injection with lease-crude or condensate carriers to restore oil saturation to the formation, which is suspected to be hydrophobic. Stimulation by hydraulic fracturing of 4 wells was attempted from 1975 through 1977 with mixed results and no particular success. These treatments used sand and glass beads for proppant. A fifth hydraulic fracture treatment, in which sintered bauxite was used as the proppant was very successful. As a result, all wells in the field have been fractured. This program, in a mature field in late stages of depletion, at intermediate depth (10,600 ft), has been very successful; ca 940,000 bbl of additional reserves have resulted for a total cost of ca $2,000,000, a return on investment of 9.4:1. Comparing these reserves to estimated reserves if the wells had been propped with sand shows a 23:1 return by the incremental reserves on the incremental cost of the bauxite.

  11. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail during Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Our studies elucidated the relationship between the auroral arcs and magnetotail phenomena. One paper examined particle energization in the source region of the field-aligned currents that intensify at substorm onset when the arc brightens to form the westward electrojet. A second paper examined the relationship between the precipitating particles in the arcs, the location of the westward electrojet, and magnetospheric source regions. Two earlier papers also investigated the roles that field aligned currents and particle acceleration have during substorms.

  12. Field and laboratory procedures used in a soil chronosequence study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Michael J.; Janitzky, Peter

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the late Denis Marchand initiated a research project entitled "Soil Correlation and Dating at the U.S. Geological Survey" to determine the usefulness of soils in solving geologic problems. Marchand proposed to establish soil chronosequences that could be dated independently of soil development by using radiometric and other numeric dating methods. In addition, by comparing dated chronosequences in different environments, rates of soil development could be studied and compared among varying climates and mineralogical conditions. The project was fundamental in documenting the value of soils in studies of mapping, correlating, and dating late Cenozoic deposits and in studying soil genesis. All published reports by members of the project are included in the bibliography.The project demanded that methods be adapted or developed to ensure comparability over a wide variation in soil types. Emphasis was placed on obtaining professional expertise and on establishing consistent techniques, especially for the field, laboratory, and data-compilation methods. Since 1978, twelve chronosequences have been sampled and analyzed by members of this project, and methods have been established and used consistently for analysis of the samples.The goals of this report are to:Document the methods used for the study on soil chronosequences,Present the results of tests that were run for precision, accuracy, and effectiveness, andDiscuss our modifications to standard procedures.Many of the methods presented herein are standard and have been reported elsewhere. However, we assume less prior analytical knowledge in our descriptions; thus, the manual should be easy to follow for the inexperienced analyst. Each chapter presents one or more references of the basic principle, an equipment and reagents list, and the detailed procedure. In some chapters this is followed by additional remarks or example calculations.The flow diagram in figure 1 outlines the step-by-step procedures used to

  13. Extending membrane pore lifetime with AC fields: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Allen L.; Bogdan Neculaes, V.

    2012-07-01

    AC (sinusoidal) fields with frequencies from kilohertz to gigahertz have been used for gene delivery. To understand the impact of AC fields on electroporation dynamics, we couple a nondimensionalized Smoluchowski equation to an exact representation of the cell membrane voltage obtained solving the Laplace equation. The slope of the pore energy function, dφ/dr, with respect to pore radius is critical in predicting pore dynamics in AC fields because it can vary from positive, inducing pore shrinkage, to negative, driving pore growth. Specifically, the net sign of the integral of dφ/dr over time determines whether the average pore size grows (negative), shrinks (positive), or oscillates (zero) indefinitely about a steady-state radius, rss. A simple analytic relationship predicting the amplitude of the membrane voltage necessary for this behavior agrees well with simulation for frequencies from 500 kHz to 5 MHz for rss < 10 nm. For larger pore size (rss > 10 nm), dφ/dr oscillates about a negative value, suggesting that a net creation of pores may be necessary to maintain a constant pore size. In both scenarios, the magnitude of rss depends only upon the amplitude of the membrane voltage and not directly upon the applied field frequency other than the relationship between the amplitudes of the applied field and membrane voltage.

  14. Field Studies for Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Transboundary Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irei, S.; Takami, A.; Sadanaga, Y.; Nozoe, S.; Hayashi, M.; Hara, K.; Arakaki, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Miyoshi, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Bandow, H.

    2014-12-01

    To study formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the air outflowed from the Chinese continent and its fraction in an urban city located in downwind, we have conducted field studies at two background sites and one urban site in the western Japan: the Cape Hedo Aerosol and Atmospheric Monitoring Station (26.9˚N, 128.3˚E), the Fukue Atmospheric Monitoring Station (32.8˚N, 128.7˚E), and Fukuoka University (33.6˚N, 130.4˚E), respectively. During the studies, stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of low-volatile water-soluble organic carbon (LV-WSOC) was measured in 24 h collected filter samples of total suspended particulate matter. Concentration of fine organic aerosol and the proportion of the signal at m/z 44 (ions from the carboxyl group) in the organic mass spectra (f44) were also measured by Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers. Limited to the Fukue site only, mixing ratios of trace gas species, such as aromatic hydrocarbons, NOx, and NOy, were also measured using GC-FID and NOx and NOyanalyzers for estimation of photochemical age (t[OH]). A case study in December 2010 showed that plots of δ13C versus f44 showed systematic variations at Hedo and Fukue. However, their trends were opposite. At Fukue the trend was consistent in the plot of δ13C of LV-WSOC versus t[OH] estimated by the NOx/NOy or the hydrocarbon ratios, indicating influence of SOA. The systematic trends aforementioned qualitatively agreed with a binary mixture model of SOA with background LV-WSOC having the f44 of ~0.06 and the δ13C of -17‰ or higher, implication of some influence of primary emission associated with C4plants. Given that the LV-WSOC at the urban Fukuoka site was a binary mixture, a mass balance for δ13C was constructed below. In the equation, δ13CMix, δ13CLocal, δ13CTrans, and FLocal are δ13C of binary LV-WSOC mixture, δ13C of LV-WSOC from local emission origin, δ13C of LV-WSOC from transboundary pollution origin, and a fraction of LV-WSOC from local emission

  15. Reservoir Studies of the Seltjarnarnes Geothermal Field, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Tulinius, H.; Spencer, A.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kristmannsdottir, H.; Thorsteinsson, T.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A.E.

    1987-01-20

    The Seltjarnarnes geothermal field in Iceland has been exploited for space heating for the last 16 years. A model of the field has been developed that integrates all available data. The model has been calibrated against the flow rate and pressure decline histories of the wells and the temperature and chemical changes of the produced fluids. This has allowed for the estimation of the permeability and porosity distribution of the system, and the volume of the hot reservoir. Predictions of future reservoir behavior using the model suggest small pressure and temperature changes, but a continuous increase in the salinity of the fluids produced. 10 figs., 23 refs.

  16. Drift studies--comparison of field and wind tunnel experiments.

    PubMed

    Stadler, R; Regenauer, W

    2005-01-01

    Drift at pesticide application leads to a pollution of non-target crops, non-target species and surface water. Spray drift is influenced by many factors like environmental conditions, vegetation, technical conditions, and physical properties of the tank mixes and influenced by Chemicals. Field experiments to characterise spray drift effects with the risk of permanent changing weather conditions can be supported by wind tunnel experiments. Wind tunnel experiments do not lead to the same soil deposition curves like field experiments, but the ratio of drift reduction potential is comparable.

  17. Gravitational field models for study of Earth mantle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The tectonic forces or stresses due to the small scale mantle flow under the South American plate are detected and determined by utilizing the harmonics of the geopotential field model. The high degree harmonics are assumed to describe the small scale mantle convection patterns. The input data used in the derivation of this model is made up of 840,000 optical, electronic, and laser observations and 1,656 5 deg x 5 deg mean free air anomalies. Although there remain some statistically questionable aspects of the high degree harmonics, it seems appropriate now to explore their implications for the tectonic forces or stress field under the crust.

  18. Controlled field study for validation of vadose zone transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.; Yeh, T.C.; Hills, R.G.

    1994-08-01

    Prediction of radionuclide migration through soil and groundwater requires models which have been tested under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, many of the existing models have not been tested in the field, partly because such testing requires accurate and representative data. This report provides the design of a large scale field experiment representative, in terms of,surface area and depth of vadose zone, of an actual disposal area. Experiments are proposed which will yield documented data, of sufficient scale, to allow testing of a variety of models including effective media stochastic models and deterministic models. Details of the methodology and procedures to be used in the experiment are presented.

  19. In Situ Detection of Subsurface Biofilm Using Low-Field NMR: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Catherine M; Herrling, Maria P; Hiebert, Randy; Bender, Andrew T; Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David O; Codd, Sarah L

    2015-09-15

    Subsurface biofilms are central to bioremediation of chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater whereby micro-organisms degrade or sequester environmental pollutants like nitrate, hydrocarbons, chlorinated solvents and heavy metals. Current methods to monitor subsurface biofilm growth in situ are indirect. Previous laboratory research conducted at MSU has indicated that low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is sensitive to biofilm growth in porous media, where biofilm contributes a polymer gel-like phase and enhances T2 relaxation. Here we show that a small diameter NMR well logging tool can detect biofilm accumulation in the subsurface using the change in T2 relaxation behavior over time. T2 relaxation distributions were measured over an 18 day experimental period by two NMR probes, operating at approximately 275 kHz and 400 kHz, installed in 10.2 cm wells in an engineered field testing site. The mean log T2 relaxation times were reduced by 62% and 43%, respectively, while biofilm was cultivated in the soil surrounding each well. Biofilm growth was confirmed by bleaching and flushing the wells and observing the NMR signal's return to baseline. This result provides a direct and noninvasive method to spatiotemporally monitor biofilm accumulation in the subsurface.

  20. Field Studies of Raindrop Oscillations with Applications to Radar Meteorology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokay, Ali

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics and causes of raindrop oscillations were studied from two field experiments in Hawaiian and Illinois showers. The former experiment (HaRP) focused on the onset of raindrop oscillations as well as oscillations frequencies of small raindrops, whereas the latter experiment (ISWS) had a broader purpose to investigate the oscillation characteristics of moderate-to-large size raindrops including amplitudes as well as frequencies, and oscillation causes. Raindrop oscillations were found to start at a diameter of d = 1.0 to 1.1 mm in both HaRP and ISWS experiments, consistent with 1991 laboratory observations of Beard, Kubesh and Ochs and with the expected onset of eddy shedding. Most of the oscillation frequencies (>95%) were near the fundamental harmonic (f_2) with only a few observed near the first harmonic (f _3) in both experiments. The oscillation frequencies around the fundamental harmonic showed a size dependency that crossed the theoretical value for f _2 at about d = 1.5 to 1.6 mm. The oscillation amplitude measurements determined from the vertical extent of the dash streaks showed good agreement with the 1988 data of Sterlyadkin, whereas the oscillation amplitudes estimated from the distortion indicated somewhat larger values for d > 2mm. Eddy shedding was found to be the most likely cause of small raindrop oscillations because of the onset oscillations near 1.0 mm and weak forcing by drop collisions, turbulence, and wind shear. The influence of raindrop oscillations on dual -polarization radar parameters was investigated for the observed and theoretical size distributions using axis ratios based on four different sets of calculations and measurements. Differential reflectivity (Z_ {rm DR}) decreased by as much as 0.74 dB from its value for non-oscillating raindrops. Similar change caused by raindrop oscillations were also found for the other dual-polarization parameters, such as the circular and linear depolarization ratios (CDR, LDR

  1. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  2. Flow field studies using holographic interferometry at Langley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.; Helms, V. T.; Gooderum, P. B.

    1982-09-01

    Some of the uses of holographic interferometry at Langley Research Center both for flow visualization and for density field determinations are described and tests in cryogenic flows at the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel are discussed. Experimental and theoretical fringe shift data are compared.

  3. Field study of variable rate irrigation management in humid climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil physical properties in the Mississippi Delta can vary considerably within a single field resulting in differing water storage capabilities, amounts of water available to the crop, and crop yield potential. Variable rate irrigation (VRI) technologies are able to site-specifically apply irrigatio...

  4. The American Legal System: A Field Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milwaukee Public Schools, WI. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The document presents an outline for a high school legal education program which emphasizes field experiences. The program is called the American Legal System Satellite Center, and is designed to provide students with experiential knowledge of the functions, procedures, and facets of law; to expose them to a wide range of law-related career…

  5. Disentangling dust emission mechanisms – a field study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The dust emission mechanism (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) as well as the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary un...

  6. Laboratory and field studies of guayule modified to overexpress HMGR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the genetic modification of guayule to overexpress the isoprenoid pathway enzyme HMGR. The rubber content of two-month old in vitro transformed plantlets showed a 65% increase in rubber over the control for one line (HMGR6), and lower resin for another (HMGR2). In field evaluations HMGR6...

  7. Anomalous cosmic ray studies using the geomagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Cummings, J. R.; Leske, R. A.; Selesnick, R. S.; Stone, E. C.; Rosenvinge, T. T. von

    1996-07-20

    We use instrumentation on SAMPEX and the Earth's field as a magnetic filter, to obtain a 'pure' sample of anomalous cosmic rays. The energy spectrum of anomalous oxygen is found to extend to {approx}100 MeV/nuc, which has implications for models of the acceleration of these nuclei.

  8. Field Studies: Hands-on, Real-Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunniff, Patricia A.; McMillen, Janet L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an intensive three-week experience for 10th and 11th graders in a National Science Foundation Young Scholars Program. Two weeks of biology instruction precede one week of field research. The curriculum includes life histories of birds in the Chesapeake Bay area, reproductive ecology, aquatic ecology, entomology, and statistics. (DDR)

  9. Field Study for Remote Sensing: An instructor's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H. (Editor); Hull, G. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The need for and value of field work (surface truthing) in the verification of image identification from high atitude infrared and multispectral space sensor images are discussed in this handbook which presents guidelines for developing instructional and research procedures in remote sensing of the environment.

  10. Scatter dose summation for irregular fields: speed and accuracy study.

    PubMed

    DeWyngaert, J K; Siddon, R L; Bjarngard, B E

    1986-05-01

    Using program IRREG as a standard, we have compared speed and accuracy of several algorithms that calculate the scatter dose in an irregular field. All the algorithms, in some manner, decompose the irregular field into component triangles and obtain the scatter dose as the sum of the contributions from those triangles. Two of the algorithms replace each such component triangle with a sector of a certain "effective radius": in one case the average radius of the triangle, in the other the radius of the sector having the same area as the component triangle. A third algorithm decomposes each triangle further into two right triangles and utilizes the precalculated "equivalent radius" of each, to find the scatter contribution. For points near the center of a square field, all the methods compare favorably in accuracy to program IRREG, with less than a 1% error in total dose and with approximately a factor of 3-5 savings in computation time. Even for extreme rectangular fields (2 cm X 30 cm), the methods using the average radius and the equivalent right triangles agree to within 2% in total dose and approximately a factor of 3-4 savings in computation time.

  11. Star field attitude sensor study for the Pioneer Venus spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolf, W. P.; Reed, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of a star field attitude sensor for use with the Pioneer Venus spacecraft are presented. The aspects of technical feasibility, system interface considerations, and cost of flight hardware development are discussed. The tradeoffs which relate to performance, design, cost, and reliability are analyzed. The configuration of the system for installation in the spacecraft is described.

  12. 34 CFR 650.36 - May fellows make changes in institution or field of study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May fellows make changes in institution or field of... What Conditions Must be Met By Fellows? § 650.36 May fellows make changes in institution or field of study? After an award is made, a fellow may not make any change in the field of study or...

  13. 34 CFR 650.36 - May fellows make changes in institution or field of study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May fellows make changes in institution or field of... What Conditions Must be Met By Fellows? § 650.36 May fellows make changes in institution or field of study? After an award is made, a fellow may not make any change in the field of study or...

  14. The Relationship between Life Goals and Fields of Study among Young European Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Aracil, Adela; Gabaldon, Daniel; Mora, Jose-Gines; Vila, Luis E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationships among life goals, job prospects and fields of study for a sample of young European higher education graduates. The results show that there is a characteristic pattern for each field of study with regard to the variables used. Graduates in a given field have similar life goals and job prospects, as well as a…

  15. Insolation Weathering: An Instrumentation and Field Based Study (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, M. C.; Warren, K.; Swami, S.; Folz-Donahue, K.; Evans, S.; Cavendar, J.; Smith, I.; Layzell, A.

    2010-12-01

    Processes of mechanical weathering related to diurnal insolation are largely unexplored. Recent studies (McFadden et al., 2005, Eppes et al., 2010) demonstrated that rocks in a range of environments exhibit preferentially orientated (~N-S) cracks that are hypothesized to form as rocks are heated and cooled during the sun’s daily transit across the sky. In this study, we attempt to better understand the association between rock fracture and directional insolation. In Charlotte, NC we instrumented a ~30 cm diameter granite boulder sitting in full sun exposure with 8 thermocouples, 8 strain rosettes, 6 acoustic emission sensors and a moisture sensor, in order to spatially and temporally correlate rock cracking with rock surface conditions. Temperature and strain are recorded every minute along with a suite of meteorological data, and acoustic emissions are continuously monitored. As part of an NSF REU, in the Providence Mountains of the Mojave Desert of Southern California, we examined every crack greater than 2 cm in length on 1027 desert pavement rocks of varying types and on surfaces of varying age (~1 ka to ~150 ka) in order to examine crack characteristics as a function of rock shape, rock type and rock exposure age. Analysis of preliminary instrumentation data indicates that rock cracking as monitored by AE devices occurs in discrete intervals of events that initially appear to be related to rapid changes in temperature and/or temperature gradients on the rock surface. Using 3-D location software, we are also able to locate the foci of events within the rock to a reasonable degree of certainty. Our data will allow us to begin to quantify the stress and temperature conditions under which cracking occurs. Preliminary analysis of our field data indicates that cracks exhibit preferred strike orientations (~NE) and dip directions (~ESE). These data support the idea that cracking occurs in association with the extreme temperature gradients that arise as rocks are

  16. A field study of solid rocket exhaust impacts on the near-field environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Keller, Vernon W.

    1990-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors release large quantities of hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide exhaust during launch and testing. Measurements and analysis of the interaction of this material with the deluge water spray and other environmental factors in the near field (within 1 km of the launch or test site) are summarized. Measurements of mixed solid and liquid deposition (typically 2 normal HCl) following space shuttle launches and 6.4 percent scale model tests are described. Hydrogen chloride gas concentrations measured in the hours after the launch of STS 41D and STS 51A are reported. Concentrations of 9 ppm, which are above the 5 ppm exposure limits for workers, were detected an hour after STS 51A. A simplified model which explains the primary features of the gas concentration profiles is included.

  17. Monte Carlo study of the influence of magnetic field on energy measurements in calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. V.

    1996-02-01

    The influence of magnetic field on energy measurements in calorimeters is studied by Monte Carlo methods. It is shown that magnetic field influence depends on type of incident particles and on material and thickness of absorber plates.

  18. ENHANCED BIOREMEDIATION UTILIZING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AS A SUPPLEMENTAL SOURCE OF OXYGEN: A LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field scale studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using hydrogen peroxide as a supplemental source of oxygen for bioremediation of an aviation gasoline fuel spill. Field samples of aviation gasoline contaminated aquifer material were artificially...

  19. Comparison Study of SEASAT Scatterometer and Conventional Wind Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    Support was provided by the United States Navy through the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I Reproduction in whole or in part is permitted for any...remotely sensing surface wind information, developed in response to this requirement for a surface wind field with global coverage and improved spatial...winds provide a unique set of scatterometer wind information for a global comparison with winds from conventional sources. A one-month (12 August to 9

  20. Thin Ising films with both competing surface fields and a magnetic field gradient: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Lijun; Landau, D. P.; Binder, K.

    2006-03-01

    Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the interesting effects resulting from a linearly varying magnetic field on a thin Ising film (equivalent to applying gravity to the corresponding lattice-gas model). Besides competing surface fields acting on two LxL free surfaces a distance D apart from each other, we also apply a magnetic field g that varies linearly between the surfaces and which competes with the surface fields. To determine the phase diagram, we look for bulk two-phase conexistence at different values of g and temperature T. In situations with only competing surface fields applied, the interface unbinding transition happens at temperature Tc(D). The addition of the g field produces a phase diagram in which, as g increases, the temperature bounding bulk two-phase coexistence first goes up from Tc(D), and then decreases. For small g, we find a second order transition, whereas for large g, the transition appears to be first order. We will compare our simulation results with theoretical predictions. K.Binder, D.P.Landau, A.M.Ferrenberg, Phys.Rev.E 51, 2824(1995) J.Rogiers, J.O.Indekeu, Europhys.Lett. 24, 21(1993). Research supported by NSF

  1. A telluric method for natural field induced polarization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorin, Nikita; Epishkin, Dmitrii; Yakovlev, Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Natural field induced polarization (NFIP) is a branch of low-frequency electromagnetics designed for detection of buried polarizable objects from magnetotelluric (MT) data. The conventional approach to the method deals with normalized MT apparent resistivity. We show that it is more favorable to extract the IP effect from solely electric (telluric) transfer functions instead. For lateral localization of polarizable bodies it is convenient to work with the telluric tensor determinant, which does not depend on the rotation of the receiving electric dipoles. Applicability of the new method was verified in the course of a large-scale field research. The field work was conducted in a well-explored area in East Kazakhstan known for the presence of various IP sources such as graphite, magnetite, and sulfide mineralization. A new multichannel processing approach allowed the determination of the telluric tensor components with very good accuracy. This holds out a hope that in some cases NFIP data may be used not only for detection of polarizable objects, but also for a rough estimation of their spectral IP characteristics.

  2. Paleomagnetic Study of a Reversal of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J R; Fuller, M; Ito, H; Schmidt, V A

    1971-05-21

    A detailed record of a field reversal has been obtained from the natural remanent magnetization of the Tatoosh intrusion in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. The reversal took place at 14.7 +/- 1 million years and is interpreted to be from reverse to normal. A decrease in the intensity of the field of about an order of magnitude occurs immediately before the reversal, while its orientation remains substantially unchanged. The onset of the reversal is marked by abrupt swinging of the virtual geomagnetic pole along an arc of a great circle. During the reversal the pole traces a path across the Pacific. In the last stage of the process recorded in the sections, the succession of virtual geomagnetic poles is very similar to those generated by secular variation in the recent past. Although the cooling rate of the intrusion is not sufficiently well known to permit a useful calculation of the duration of the reversal process, an estimate based on the length of the supposed secular variation cycles gives 1 to 4 x 103 years for the reversal of field direction and approximately 1 x 104 years for the time scale of the intensity changes.

  3. Thermodynamic Study on Plasma Expansion along a Divergent Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-01-15

    Thermodynamic properties are revisited for electrons that are governed by nonlocal electron energy probability functions in a plasma of low collisionality. Measurements in a laboratory helicon double layer experiment have shown that the effective electron temperature and density show a polytropic correlation with an index of γ_{e}=1.17±0.02 along the divergent magnetic field, implying a nearly isothermal plasma (γ_{e}=1) with heat being brought into the system. However, the evolution of electrons along the divergent magnetic field is essentially an adiabatic process, which should have a γ_{e}=5/3. The reason for this apparent contradiction is that the nearly collisionless plasma is very far from local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electrons behave nonlocally. The corresponding effective electron enthalpy has a conservation relation with the potential energy, which verifies that there is no heat transferred into the system during the electron evolution. The electrons are shown in nonlocal momentum equilibrium under the electric field and the gradient of the effective electron pressure. The convective momentum of ions, which can be assumed as a cold species, is determined by the effective electron pressure and the effective electron enthalpy is shown to be the source for ion acceleration. For these nearly collisionless plasmas, the use of traditional thermodynamic concepts can lead to very erroneous conclusions regarding the thermal conductivity.

  4. Leaching of microelement contaminants: a long-term field study.

    PubMed

    Németh, Tamás; Kádár, Imre

    2005-01-01

    A field experiment with microelement loads was set up on loamy textured, calcareous chernozem soil formed on loess. The ploughed layer contained ca. 5% CaCO3 and 3% humus. The soil was well supplied with Ca, Mg, Mn and Cu, moderately supplied with N and K, and weakly supplied with P and Zn. The water table is at the depth of 15 m, the water balance of the area is negative, and the site is drought sensitive. Salts of the 13 examined microelements were applied at 4 doses in the spring of 1991. Treatments were arranged in a split-plot design, in a total of 104 plots with two replications. Loading rates were 0, 90, 270 and 810 kg/ha per element in the form of AlCl3, NaAsO2, BaCl2, CdSO4, K2CrO4, CuSO4, HgCl2, (NH4)6Mo7O24, NiSO4, Pb(NO3)2, Na2SeO3, SrSO4, ZnSO4. Soil profiles of the control and the 810 kg/ha treated plots were sampled in the 3rd, 6th and 10th year of the trial. The mixed samples, consisting of 5 cores/plot were taken in 30 cm steps to 60 cm (year 1993), 90 cm (year 1996), and 290 cm (year 2000). Ammonium acetate + EDTA-soluble element content was determined. The main conclusions of the study are: (1) In soils contaminated with 810 kg/ha load rates As, Hg, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ba and Sr displayed no significant vertical movement. There is little uptake and translocation in plants of these elements: their concentration in the above-ground plant parts usually remains below 5-10 mg/kg dry mass with the exception of Ba and Sr showing a somewhat higher accumulation. Under our conditions the above elements did not behave as dangerous contaminants to the soil, groundwater, or plants. (2) Moderate leaching of Zn and Cd was detected when applied at higher doses. Their accumulation was also moderate in the above-ground plants parts. Zn is not a dangerous pollutant for soil, plants or groundwater at our site. Cd, however, is a very dangerous element because of its high toxicity to mammals, soil life and crops. (3) Cr, Se, and Mo (in the form of chromate, selenate and

  5. Evaluation of bioaccumulation using in vivo laboratory and field studies.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Annie V; Woodburn, Kent B; Koelmans, Albert A; Parkerton, Thomas F; McElroy, Anne E; Borgå, Katrine

    2009-10-01

    A primary consideration in the evaluation of chemicals is the potential for substances to be absorbed and retained in an organism's tissues (i.e., bioaccumulated) at concentrations sufficient to pose health concerns. Substances that exhibit properties that enable biomagnification in the food chain (i.e., amplification of tissue concentrations at successive trophic levels) are of particular concern due to the elevated long-term exposures these substances pose to higher trophic organisms, including humans. Historically, biomarkers of in vivo chemical exposure (e.g., eggshell thinning, bill deformities) retrospectively led to the identification of such compounds, which were later categorized as persistent organic pollutants. Today, multiple bioaccumulation metrics are available to quantitatively assess the bioaccumulation potential of new and existing chemicals and identify substances that, upon or before environmental release, may be characterized as persistent organic pollutants. This paper reviews the various in vivo measurement approaches that can be used to assess the bioaccumulation of chemicals in aquatic or terrestrial species using laboratory-exposed, field-deployed, or collected organisms. Important issues associated with laboratory measurements of bioaccumulation include appropriate test species selection, test chemical dosing methods, exposure duration, and chemical and statistical analyses. Measuring bioaccumulation at a particular field site requires consideration of which test species to use and whether to examine natural populations or to use field-deployed populations. Both laboratory and field methods also require reliable determination of chemical concentrations in exposure media of interest (i.e., water, sediment, food or prey, etc.), accumulated body residues, or both. The advantages and disadvantages of various laboratory and field bioaccumulation metrics for assessing biomagnification potential in aquatic or terrestrial food chains are discussed

  6. From Field to Laboratory: A New Database Approach for Linking Microbial Field Ecology with Laboratory Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Leslie; Keller, R.; Miller, S.; Jahnke, L.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Ames Exobiology Culture Collection Database (AECC-DB) has been developed as a collaboration between microbial ecologists and information technology specialists. It allows for extensive web-based archiving of information regarding field samples to document microbial co-habitation of specific ecosystem micro-environments. Documentation and archiving continues as pure cultures are isolated, metabolic properties determined, and DNA extracted and sequenced. In this way metabolic properties and molecular sequences are clearly linked back to specific isolates and the location of those microbes in the ecosystem of origin. Use of this database system presents a significant advancement over traditional bookkeeping wherein there is generally little or no information regarding the environments from which microorganisms were isolated. Generally there is only a general ecosystem designation (i.e., hot-spring). However within each of these there are a myriad of microenvironments with very different properties and determining exactly where (which microenvironment) a given microbe comes from is critical in designing appropriate isolation media and interpreting physiological properties. We are currently using the database to aid in the isolation of a large number of cyanobacterial species and will present results by PI's and students demonstrating the utility of this new approach.

  7. Optical design study of the Wide Field Survey Telescope (WFST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Zheng; Liang, Ming; Yao, Dazhi; Zheng, Xianzhong; Cheng, Jingquan; Wang, Hairen; Liu, Wei; Qian, Yuan; Zhao, Haibin; Yang, Ji

    2016-10-01

    WFST is a proposed 2.5m wide field survey telescope intended for dedicated wide field sciences. The telescope is to operate at six wavelength bands (u, g, r, i, z, and w), spanning from 320 to 1028 nm. Designed with a field of view diameter of 3 degree and an effective aperture diameter of 2.29 m, the WFST acquires a total optical throughput over 29.3 m2deg2. With such a large throughput, WFST will survey up to 6000deg2 of the northern sky in multiple colors each night, reaching 23th magnitude for high-precision photometry and astrometry. The optical design is based on an advanced primary-focus system made up of a 2.5 m f/2.48 concave primary mirror and a primary-focus assembly (PFA) consisting of five corrector lenses, atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC), filters, and the focal-plane instrument. For zenith angles from 0 to 60 degrees, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy falls within a 0.35 arcsec diameter. The optical design also highlights an enhanced transmission in the UV bands. The total optical transmission reaches 23.5% at 320 nm, allowing unique science goals in the U band. Other features include low distortion and ease of baffling against stray lights, etc. The focal-plane instrument is a 0.9 gigapixel mosaic CCD camera comprising 9 pieces of 10K×10K CCD chips. An active optics system (AOS) is used to maintain runtime image quality. Various design aspects of the WFST including the optical design, active optics, mirror supports, and the focal-plane instrument are discussed in detail.

  8. Field Line Resonance at Mercury's Magnetosphere: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Hwa Kim, Jay R. Johnson, and Dong-Hun Lee

    2008-05-22

    Ultra low frequency (ULF) waves, which are assumed to be standing waves on the field, are observed by the Mariner 10 spacecraft at Mercury. These waves are oscillating at 38% of the proton gyrofrequency. It is well known that the heavy ions, such as Na+, are abundant in Mercury's magnetosphere. Because the presence of different ion species has an influence on the plasma dispersion characteristics near the ion gyro-frequencies, such relatively high frequencies of magnetospheric eigenoscillations at Mercury require a multi-fluid treatment for the plasma. Thus ULF waves at Mercury may have a distinct difference from typical ULF oscillations at Earth, which are often described in terms of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). By adopting a multi-fluid numerical wave model, we examine how magnetic eigenoscillations occur in Mercury's magnetosphere. Because protons and sodium ions are the main constituents at Mercury, we assume an electron-proton- sodium plasma in our model. The frequency spectra and time histories of the electromagnetic fields at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) and cavity resonances are presented. Our results show: (1) The observed ULF waves are likely compressional waves rather than FLR. (2) Resonant absorption occurs at the IIH resonance, thus incoming compressional waves are converted into the IIH resonance. (3) The IIH resonance is strongly guided by the background magnetic field and shows linear polarization in the east-west meridian. (4) Both the Alfvén and the IIH are suggested as a mechanism for FLR at Mercury. (5) The resonance frequency enables us to estimate the local heavy ion concentration ratio.

  9. An integral field spectrograph for SNAP supernova studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ealet, Anne; Prieto, E.; Bonissent, A.; Malina, R.; Basa, S.; LeFevre, O.; Mazure, A.; Tarle, G.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amidei, D.E.; Astier, P.; Baden, A.R.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.M.; Bower, C.R.; Campbell, M.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Curtis, D.W.; Deustua, S.E.; Edwards, W.R.; Ellis, R.S.; Fruchter, A.; Frye, B.L.; Genat, J.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Graham, J.R.; Hardin, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Honeycutt, R.; Holland, S.E.; Hook, I.; Huterer, D.; Kasen, D.N.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Lafever, R.; Lampton, M.L.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Levy, J.M.; Lidman, C.; Lin, R.P.; Linder, E.V.; Loken, S.C.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Metzger, M.R.; Miquel, R.; Mourao, A.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.A.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Pankow, D.H.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Perlmutter, S.; Refregier, A.; Rich, J.; Robinson, K.E.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schubnell, M.S.; Spadafora, A.; Smoot, G.F.; Sullivan, G.W.; Tomasch, A.D.; SNAP Collaboration

    2002-07-29

    A well-adapted spectrograph concept has been developed for the SNAP (SuperNova/Acceleration Probe) experiment. The goal is to ensure proper identification of Type Ia supernovae and to standardize the magnitude of each candidate by determining explosion parameters. An instrument based on an integral field method with the powerful concept of imager slicing has been designed and is presented in this paper. The spectrograph concept is optimized to have very high efficiency and low spectral resolution (R {approx} 100), constant through the wavelength range (0.35-1.7{micro}m), adapted to the scientific goals of the mission.

  10. Study of Elastin Sequences with Solvent Induced Force Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkin, Handan

    Conformational structures of two common repeat motifs Val1-Pro2-Gly3-Val4-Gly5 and Gly1-Leu2-Gly3-Gly4 of tropoelastin are investigated by using the multicanonical simulation procedure with solvation effects included energy force field. The effects of solvation energy term on the conformations are determined by analyzing Ramachandran plots. By minimizing the energy structures along the trajectory, the thermodynamically most stable low-energy microstates of the molecule in aqueous solution are determined and the root mean square deviations of these structures with respect to the global minimum are calculated.

  11. Mean field theory studies of surface reactions on disordered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, Joaquín.; Narváez, Ana; Puschmann, Heinrich; Valencia, Eliana

    2003-03-01

    A mean field theory (MFT) in the site and pair approximations of a surface reaction system on a disordered substrate showing geometric heterogeneity is proposed, characterizing the substrate completely through the set { qi} of probabilities that a surface site has i neighbours that belong to the substrate in the model. The MFT results allow the interpretation of the Monte Carlo (MC) simulations carried out for the ZGB algorithm at instantaneous and finite rates over a series heterogeneous substrates corresponding to percolation clusters. The change in the character of the irreversible phase transitions (IPT) with the degree of disorder or branching of the substrate and its theoretical interpretation are analyzed.

  12. Noise Studies on Injected-Beam Crossed-Field Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    In the gyrotron, where l magnetron injection guns are used, noise under crossed-field conditions is a limiting factor in the performance of the gun...charge I affected the behavior of the beam. Two factors which seemed to give rise to these effects appeared to be in the noise generated near the cathode...circuit I bars, or 0.270". The essential electrical properties of the meander circuit, the delay ratio (C/ vph ) and coupling impedance at the level of the

  13. Analytical Studies of Wave Modes with Transverse Static Electric Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    In order to evaluate the time integral in (8) we need the wher ’~~) I V ~~’)fl.ThequanityparmetzeS orbits. The x component of (1) gives the net force ...different con- First consider the case where the eletric field is not strong stant value in region II for the "top hat" profile. Geometry enough to...and the rhs we find that =- ( ’)X + corrections, (A!9) B= - V (t)A’/12rl( )l 2 . (AI0) whereX=( _-x)= Ivy- V,( )]/. Therefore the re- Thus storing force

  14. A field study of the Chelyabinsk airburst impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P. M.; Popova, O. P.; Emel'yanenko, V. V.; Kartashova, A.; Biryukov, E.; Khaibrakhmanov, S.; Shuvalov, V.

    2013-12-01

    On February 15 2013 UT, a ~600 kT asteroid impact generated an airburst strong enough to cause widespread glass damage in the district of Chelyabinsk, Russia. 1,613 people requested medical assistance, while 112 people were hospitalized, two in serious condition. Starting three weeks after the event, the Russian Academy of Sciences organized a two-week field campaign, led by the Institute for Dynamics of Geospheres and the Institute of Astronomy, to investigate the extent of the damage and calibrate the entry conditions of the meteoroid by following up on the many fireball videos posted on the internet. Aim was to better understand how the airburst was generated and what damage it caused. In addition, recovered meteorites shortly after the impact were made available by Chelyabinsk State University and South Ural State University researchers to an international Chelyabinsk Airburst Consortium, to investigate their material properties. We will describe the field campaign and discuss results from the consortium research, including the meteoroid trajectory, maps of damage and injuries, and models of meteoroid fragmentation and the generation of the shock wave, and discuss the origin and dynamical history of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid.

  15. Use of field experimental studies to evaluate emergency response models

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Lange, R.; Rodriguez, D.J.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1985-07-16

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell atmospheric transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to estimate the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. These models have undergone extensive evaluations against field experiments conducted in a variety of environmental settings ranging from relatively flat to very complex terrain areas. Simulations of tracer experiments conducted in a complex mountain valley setting revealed that 35 to 50% of the comparisons between calculated and measured tracer concentrations were within a factor of 5. This may be compared with a factor of 2 for 50% of the comparisons for relatively flat terrain. This degradation of results in complex terrain is due to a variety of factors such as the limited representativeness of measurements in complex terrain, the limited spatial resolution afforded by the models, and the turbulence parameterization based on sigma/sub theta/ measurements to evaluate the eddy diffusivities. Measurements of sigma/sub theta/ in complex terrain exceed those measured over flat terrain by a factor of 2 to 3 leading to eddy diffusivities that are unrealistically high. The results of model evaluations are very sensitive to the quality and the representativeness of the meteorological data. This is particularly true for measurements near the source. The capability of the models to simulate the dispersion of an instantaneously produced cloud of particulates was illustrated to be generally within a factor of 2 over flat terrain. 19 refs., 16 figs.

  16. Study of the luminosity function for field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Nine determinations of the luminosity function (LF) for field galaxies are adjusted, analyzed, and compared. Adjustments are made for differences in definitions as well as in assumptions regarding magnitude systems, the Hubble constant, and galactic absorption. Eight of the nine adjusted determinations are found to be in fairly good agreement, and the discrepancy in the ninth is attributed to incompleteness effects. A large-scale normalization of the LF is performed using the method and some integral counts of Gott and Turner (1976); the large-scale mean LF of (mostly field) galaxies is found to be about 2.3 times less than a previously derived 'local' LF. The large-scale luminosity density in space arising from sources within the B(0) isophotes of galaxies is evaluated, and a value of 86 million (H/50) suns per cu Mpc is obtained for a galactic absorption coefficient of 0.25 magnitude. It is noted that the true large-scale luminosity density is probably within a factor of 1.6 of the reported value.

  17. Pressure field study of the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Klebaner, A.L.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2003-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations [1]. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/sec of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/sec. Operating speeds are between 40 and 95 krpm, with a speed of 80 krpm at the design point. Different heat loads and magnet quench performance of each of the twenty-four satellite refrigerators dictates different process pressure and flow rates of the cold compressors. Reducing the process flow rate can cause the centrifugal cold compressor to stop pumping and subsequently surge. Tests have been conducted at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab to map the pressure field and appropriate efficiency of the IHI hydrodynamic cold compressor. The information allows tuning of each of the twenty-four Tevatron satellite refrigerators to avoid cold compressor operation near the surge and choke lines. A new impeller has also been tested. The Tevatron cold compressor pressure field and efficiency data with the new impeller are presented in this paper.

  18. Minimising exposure of amphibians to pathogens during field studies.

    PubMed

    Phillott, A D; Speare, R; Hines, H B; Skerratt, L F; Meyer, E; McDonald, K R; Cashins, S D; Mendez, D; Berger, L

    2010-11-01

    Many of the recent global amphibian mass mortalities, declines and extinctions have been attributed to the emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis. There have been mass mortalities due to ranaviral disease but no major declines or extinctions. Controlling the transmission and spread of disease is of utmost importance, especially where there is the potential for human involvement. We have reviewed current hygiene guidelines for working with wild frogs, identified potential flaws and recommended those most suitable and effective for the field environment. Our within-site hygiene measures aim to reduce the risk of transmission among individuals. These measures encompass the capture, handling and holding of amphibians, skin disinfection before and after invasive procedures, marking frogs, sealing open wounds and treatment of accessory equipment. Our between-site hygiene measures aim to mitigate the risk of pathogen spread among populations. We have designed a risk calculator to help simplify and standardise the decision-making process for determining the level of risk and appropriate risk mitigation strategies to reduce the risk of increasing pathogen spread above background levels. Calculation of an overall risk score for pathogen spread takes into account the prior activity of field workers, the proposed activity, remoteness of the site, presence of known pathogens and the consequences of increased pathogen spread for amphibians in a given area.

  19. Gender Differences in the Field of Information Security Technology Management: A Qualitative, Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marcia L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored why there are so few senior women in the information security technology management field and whether gender played a part in the achievement of women in the field. Extensive interviews were performed to capture the lived experiences of successful women in the field regarding the obstacles and common denominators of…

  20. The history of polarisation measurements: their role in studies of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, R.

    2015-03-01

    Radio astronomy gave us new methods to study magnetic fields. Synchrotron radiation, the main cause of comic radio waves, is highly linearly polarised with the `E' vector normal to the magnetic field. The Faraday Effect rotates the `E' vector in thermal regions by the magnetic field in the line of sight. Also the radio Zeeman Effect has been observed.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation penetrating vehicle glass: a field based comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimlin, M. G.; Parisi, A. V.

    1999-04-01

    The solar UV transmitted through automobile glass was measured in the field in two cars using a spectroradiometer. The two cars were identical except that one of the cars had all of the windows (except the windshield) tinted. The measured spectral erythemal UV on a horizontal plane with the windows fully closed was reduced in the tinted car by a factor of 42 when compared with the erythemal UV measured in the untinted car. The ambient UVA irradiances at various locations within four different makes of car and a tractor were also measured with a broad band UVA hand-held meter. The average normalized daily UVA exposure (measured with a broad band UVA meter) was 1.3 times higher in a large family sedan when compared with that in a small hatchback and the UVA exposure in a car with tinted windows was 3.8 times less than in a similar untinted car.

  2. Study of Near Field Communication Technology in University Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Irene Luque; Miraz, Guillermo Matas; Gómez-Nieto, Miguel Ángel

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we present an introduction to the possibilities of NFC (Near Field Communication) technology in the University environment. NFC is the key for the development of interactive systems where "intelligent" objects interact with the user just only by touching the objects with a NFC device. We support that a University environment with active objects dispatching information and services to the users (students and teachers) can introduce an appropriate environment for the fulfillment of the new Educational European directives. Here, we briefly describe some of the possibilities of the NFC technology and we include an example of the use of NFC through a Smart Poster for a scenario where a Department directory is considered.

  3. Microearthquake Studies at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    DOE Data Explorer

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate microearthquakes to aid in the characterization of reservoir fracture networks. Accurate identification and mapping of the large numbers of microearthquakes induced in EGS is one technique that provides diagnostic information when determining the location, orientation and length of underground crack systems for use in reservoir development and management applications. Conventional earthquake location techniques often are employed to locate microearthquakes. However, these techniques require labor-intensive picking of individual seismic phase onsets across a network of sensors. For this project we adapt the Matched Field Processing (MFP) technique to the elastic propagation problem in geothermal reservoirs to identify more and smaller events than traditional methods alone.

  4. Field Tested Service Oriented Robotic Architecture: Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Utz, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software methods and technologies applied to the robotic world. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA extends its reach beyond the on-board robot controller and supports the full suite of software tools used during mission scenarios from ground control to remote robotic sites. SORA has been field tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The results of these high fidelity experiments are illustrated through concrete examples that have shown the benefits of using SORA as well as its limitations.

  5. Review of Experimental Concepts for Studying the Quantum Vacuum Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. W.; Teofilo, V. L.; Haisch, B.; Puthoff, H. E.; Nickisch, L. J.; Rueda, A.; Cole, D. C.

    2006-01-01

    We review concepts that provide an experimental framework for exploring the possibility and limitations of accessing energy from the space vacuum environment. Quantum electrodynamics (QED) and stochastic electrodynamics (SED) are the theoretical approaches guiding this experimental investigation. This investigation explores the question of whether the quantum vacuum field contains useful energy that can be exploited for applications under the action of a catalyst, or cavity structure, so that energy conservation is not violated. This is similar to the same technical problem at about the same level of technology as that faced by early nuclear energy pioneers who searched for, and successfully discovered, the unique material structure that caused the release of nuclear energy via the neutron chain reaction.

  6. Detailed study of a transverse field Zeeman slower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ali, D.; Badr, T.; Brézillon, T.; Dubessy, R.; Perrin, H.; Perrin, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a thorough analysis of a Zeeman slower for sodium atoms made of permanent magnets in a Halbach configuration. Due to the orientation of the magnetic field, the polarization of the slowing laser beam cannot be purely circular, leading to optical leakages into dark states. To circumvent this effect, we propose an atomic state preparation stage that is able to significantly increase the performance of the Zeeman slower. After a careful theoretical analysis of the problem, we experimentally implement an optical pumping stage leading to an increase in the magneto-optical trap loading rate by 3.5. Such a method is easy to set up and could be extended to other Zeeman slower architectures.

  7. Review of Experimental Concepts for Studying the Quantum Vacuum Field

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E. W.; Puthoff, H. E.; Teofilo, V. L.; Nickisch, L. J.; Rueda, A.; Cole, D. C.

    2006-01-20

    We review concepts that provide an experimental framework for exploring the possibility and limitations of accessing energy from the space vacuum environment. Quantum electrodynamics (QED) and stochastic electrodynamics (SED) are the theoretical approaches guiding this experimental investigation. This investigation explores the question of whether the quantum vacuum field contains useful energy that can be exploited for applications under the action of a catalyst, or cavity structure, so that energy conservation is not violated. This is similar to the same technical problem at about the same level of technology as that faced by early nuclear energy pioneers who searched for, and successfully discovered, the unique material structure that caused the release of nuclear energy via the neutron chain reaction.

  8. Experimental studies on near-field holographic antenna measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yingxi; Xu, Linfen; An, Hongye; Sun, Jixian; Lou, Zheng; Yang, Ji; Zhang, Xuguo; Li, Zhenqiang; Lu, Dengrong; Pang, Xinghai; Li, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A near-field millimeter-wave holography system operating in the 3-mm waveband have been developed as a prototype for DATE5, a 5-m terahertz telescope proposed to be deployed at Dome A, Antarctica. Experimental measurements at 92 GHz have been made on a 1.45-m test antenna. During the night time at which the ambient temperature doesn't vary rapidly, a 75-minute repeatability (repeating measurement 3 times) of 2.3 μm rms has been achieved with an aperture resolution of 46 mm. A local surface change of known value is correctly detected. After long-time repeating measurements, thermal-induced feed displacement is also detected with an accuracy of approximately 20 μm. Random error factors of the experiment system are evaluated and their contributions to the derived surface error are also simulated, showing that relative poor pointing of the test antenna is the major factor limiting the measurement repeatability.

  9. Study on field weed recognition in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong; Pan, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yun

    2006-02-01

    This research aimed to identify weeds from crops in early stage in the field by using image-processing technology. As 3CCD images offer greater binary value difference between weed and crop section than ordinary digital images taken by common cameras. It has 3 channels (green, red, ir red), which takes a snap-photo of the same area, and the three images can be composed into one image, which facilitates the segmentation of different areas. In this research, MS3100 3CCD camera is used to get images of 6 kinds of weeds and crops. Part of these images contained more than 2 kinds of plants. The leaves' shapes, sizes and colors may be very similar or differs from each other greatly. Some are sword-shaped and some (are) round. Some are large as palm and some small as peanut. Some are little brown while other is blue or green. Different combinations are taken into consideration. By the application of image-processing toolkit in MATLAB, the different areas in the image can be segmented clearly. The texture of the images was also analyzed. The processing methods include operations, such as edge detection, erosion, dilation and other algorithms to process the edge vectors and textures. It is of great importance to segment, in real time, the different areas in digital images in field. When the technique is applied in precision farming, many energies and herbicides and many other materials can be saved. At present time large scale softwares as MATLAB on PC are also used, but the computation can be reduced and integrated into a small embedded system. The research results have shown that the application of this technique in agricultural engineering is feasible and of great economical value.

  10. Whole-Field Measurements of Turbulent Flow for the Study of Aero-optical Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Aerooptical phenomena associated with the propagation of optical beams and imaging through turbulent index-of-refraction fields have been investigated...Using simultaneous imaging of optical -beam distortion and the turbulent index-or-refraction field, we have documented near-field behavior, following...of TECHNOLOGY Pasadena, California 91125 Whole-field measurements of turbulent flow for the study of aero- optical effects Paul E. Dimotakis Air

  11. Why surface-truth field study is needed in remote-sensing instruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Especially designed field studies are needed in remote sensing technology transfer courses regardless of the field work provided by the students'/trainees' major disciplines because the remote sensing discipline has unique emphases and needs. Modification of existng schedules to include field work provides the equivalent of extending the duration of the program with the added benefit of enhancing learning achievements per actual program day. The process of surface truth field instruction, levels of student capabilities and stages in the development of surface truth field studies are discussed.

  12. Construction of an interim storage field using recovered municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Field performance study.

    PubMed

    Sormunen, Laura Annika; Kolisoja, Pauli

    2017-03-18

    The leaching of hazardous substances from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash (BA) has been studied in many different scales for several years. Less attention has been given to the mechanical performance of MSWI BA in actual civil engineering structures. The durability of structures built with this waste derived material can have major influence on the functional properties of such structures and also the potential leaching of hazardous substances in the long term. Hence, it is necessary to properly evaluate in which type of structures MSWI BA can be safely used in a similar way as natural and crushed rock aggregates. In the current study, MSWI BA treated with ADR (Advance Dry Recovery) technology was used in the structural layers of an interim storage field built within a waste treatment centre. During and half a year after the construction, the development of technical and mechanical properties of BA materials and the built structures were investigated. The aim was to compare these results with the findings of laboratory studies in which the same material was previously investigated. The field results showed that the mechanical performance of recovered BA corresponds to the performance of natural aggregates in the lower structural layers of field structures. Conversely, the recovered MSWI BA cannot be recommended to be used in the base layers as such, even though its stiffness properties increased over time due to material aging and changes in moisture content. The main reason for this is that BA particles are prone for crushing and therefore inadequate to resist the higher stresses occurring in the upper parts of road and field structures. These results were in accordance with the previous laboratory findings. It can thus be concluded that the recovered MSWI BA is durable to be used as a replacement of natural aggregates especially in the lower structural layers of road and field structures, whereas if used in the base layers, an additional base

  13. Field epidemiologic studies of populations exposed to waste dumps.

    PubMed

    Heath, C W

    1983-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies are required for assessing health risks related to toxic waste exposure. Since the settings in which such studies must be performed are extremely diverse, epidemiologic approaches must be versatile. For any particular study, three fundamental requirements are to assess what toxic materials are present, understand how human exposure may occur, and objectively measure possible biologic effects. In assessing links between exposure and disease, epidemiologists must be particularly aware of: expected disease frequencies in relation to the size of populations studied, implications of long or varied disease latencies for study design and competing causes of disease and associated confounding variables. These concepts are illustrated by discussion of epidemiologic studies related to the Love Canal toxic waste dump site in Niagara Falls, NY.

  14. Toward a Model for Field-Testing Patient Decision-Support Technologies: A Qualitative Field-Testing Study

    PubMed Central

    Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian; Watson, Eila; Austoker, Joan; Grol, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Field-testing is a quality assurance criterion in the development of patient decision-support technologies (PDSTs), as identified in the consensus statement of the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration. We incorporated field-testing into the development of a Web-based, prostate-specific antigen PDST called Prosdex, which was commissioned as part of the UK Prostate Cancer Risk Management Programme. Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a model for the future field-testing of PDSTs, based on the field-testing of Prosdex. Our objectives were (1) to explore the reactions of men to evolving prototypes of Prosdex, (2) to assess the effect of these responses on the development process, and (3) to develop a model for field-testing PDSTs based on the responses and their effect on the development process. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with the men after they had viewed evolving prototypes of Prosdex in their homes. The men were grouped according to the prototype viewed. Men between 40 and 75 years of age were recruited from two family practices in different parts of Wales, United Kingdom. In the interviews, the men were asked for their views on Prosdex, both as a whole and in relation to specific sections such as the introduction and video clips. Comments and technical issues that arose during the viewings were noted and fed back to the developers in order to produce subsequent prototypes. Results A total of 27 men were interviewed, in five groups, according to the five prototypes of Prosdex that were developed. The two main themes from the interviews were the responses to the information provided in Prosdex and the responses to specific features of Prosdex. Within these themes, two of the most frequently encountered categories were detail of the information provided and balance between contrasting viewpoints. Criticisms were encountered, particularly with respect to navigation of the site. In addition, we found

  15. Where in the world are my field plots? Using GPS effectively in environmental field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Chris E.; Barton, Christopher C.

    2004-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology is rapidly replacing tape, compass, and traditional surveying instruments as the preferred tool for estimating the positions of environmental research sites. One important problem, however, is that it can be difficult to estimate the uncertainty of GPS-derived positions. Sources of error include various satellite- and site-related factors, such as forest canopy and topographic obstructions. In a case study from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, hand-held, mapping-grade GPS receivers generally estimated positions with 1–5 m precision in open, unobstructed settings, and 20–30 m precision under forest canopy. Surveying-grade receivers achieved precisions of 10 cm or less, even in challenging terrain. Users can maximize the quality of their GPS measurements by “mission planning” to take advantage of high-quality satellite conditions. Repeated measurements and simultaneous data collection at multiple points can be used to assess accuracy and precision.

  16. A Field-Study/Data-Collection Model for Developing an Education-Business Liaison Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Olive D.

    Thirteen Wyoming teachers and counselors interviewed managers in 215 businesses covering 9,515 jobs. This field study served as a basis for developing a field study-data collection model to be used in establishing an education-business liaison network. Each interviewer participating in the study was instructed to contact from 10 to 20 local…

  17. Women's Selection of Quantitative Undergraduate Fields of Study: Direct and Indirect Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethington, Corinna A.; Wolfle, Lee M.

    1988-01-01

    Factors influencing women's decisions to pursue undergraduate degrees in quantitative fields were studied, using a structural equation model. Significant factors in High School and Beyond study data included courses taken in high school, student socioeconomic status, parental attitudes, and choice of study field as a high school sophomore. (TJH)

  18. Field of Study Choice: Using Conjoint Analysis and Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shtudiner, Ze'ev; Zwilling, Moti; Kantor, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to measure student's preferences regarding various attributes that affect their decision process while choosing a higher education area of study. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper exhibits two different models which shed light on the perceived value of each examined area of study: conjoint analysis and…

  19. A field based study of ferrous metal corrosion in groundwater.

    PubMed

    McLaughlan, R G; Stuetz, R M

    2004-01-01

    There is an increased emphasis on adopting explicit management strategies to ensure the effective use of water wells. This can be achieved through identifying the operational and maintenance needs of water wells and associated infrastructure. The types of material used for this infrastructure will impact upon the life of these assets and their maintenance needs. In groundwater environments there is often little available corrosion rate data from historical records of operating wells upon which to make choices about material selection. Under these conditions it is necessary to rely on corrosion test data to inform design choices. A long term field based immersion test using corrosion coupons was undertaken at 24 sites across Australia. The general corrosion rates of mild steel after 9 months were found to range from 0.018 to 0.624 mm per year while stainless steel was found to have minimal corrosion under the same conditions. Galvanised steel was found to offer minimal protection compared with mild steel when the pH was below 7.

  20. Field studies of microbiological corrosion in water injection plant

    SciTech Connect

    Elboujdaini, M.; Sastri, V.S.

    1995-12-01

    Electrochemical impedance, weight loss and potentiodyne techniques were used to determine the corrosion rates of carbon steel along with the determination of activities of both sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and acid-producing bacteria (APB) in a water injection field test facility. Corrosion rates determined by the potentiodyne technique did not correlate with the bacterial activity. Corrosion rates obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were comparable to the rates obtained by weight loss measurements. The average corrosion rates obtained by EIS paralleled the cumulative SRB activity over 84 days, and the addition of biocide resulted in reduced bacterial activity and corrosion rate. The depression angles in Nyquist plots were high (30{degree}, 29{degree}) for control and biocide lines respectively indicating a fair degree of pitting corrosion. After 42 days, the values were lower, 11{degree} for biocide line compared to 22{degree} for control he showing the decrease in pitting tendency in line to which biocide was added at the end of 28 days.

  1. Colloid Mobilization in Two Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifers: Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1990-02-01

    The geochemical mechanisms leading to the mobilization of colloids in groundwater were investigated in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and in rural central Delaware by sampling pairs of wells screened in oxic and anoxic groundwaters in the same geologic formations. Samples were carefully taken at very low flow rates (˜100 mL min-1) to avoid suspending immobilized particles. The colloidal matter was characterized by light-scattering photometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X ray analysis, microelectrophoresis, and Fe, Al, Si, and organic carbon analyses. The colloids, composed primarily of clays, were observed at high concentrations (up to 60 mg colloids/L) in the anoxic groundwaters, while the oxic groundwaters exhibited ≤1 mg colloids/L. Colloidal organic carbon was present in all groundwaters; but under anoxic conditions, one-third to one-half of the total organic carbon was associated with the inorganic colloids. The field evidence indicates that anoxic conditions cause the mobilization of soil colloids by dissolving the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings cementing the clay particles to the aquifer solids. The depletion of oxidized iron on the surfaces of immobile particles and the addition of organic carbon coatings on the soil particles and colloids apparently stabilizes the colloidal suspension in the anoxic groundwaters.

  2. Study of fusion product effects in field-reversed mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Driemeyer, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of fusion products (fps) on Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) reactor concepts has been evaluated through the development of two new computer models. The first code (MCFRM) treats fps as test particles in a fixed background plasma, which is represented as a fluid. MCFRM includes a Monte Carlo treatment of Coulomb scattering and thus provides an accurate treatment of fp behavior even at lower energies where pitch-angle scattering becomes important. The second code (FRMOD) is a steady-state, globally averaged, two-fluid (ion and electron), point model of the FRM plasma that incorporates fp heating and ash buildup values which are consistent with the MCFRM calculations. These codes have been used extensively in the development of an advanced-fuel FRM reactor design (SAFFIRE). A Catalyzed-D version of the plant is also discussed along with an investigation of the steady-state energy distribution of fps in the FRM. User guides for the two computer codes are also included.

  3. Reasons related to adherence in community-based field studies.

    PubMed

    Atwood, J R; Haase, J; Rees-McGee, S; Blackwell, G; Giordano, L; Earnest, D; Alberts, D; Sheehan, E; Benedict, J; Aickin, M

    1992-06-01

    This study identified participants' reasons for good, marginal or poor adherence, or withdrawing from community-based clinical studies using a dietary and/or drug intervention. Adults aged 48-75 years participated in one of three studies related to decreasing colon polyp recurrence. Qualitative data from progress notes (N = 675) and end-of-study evaluations (N = 87) were coded using constant comparative analysis with 100% content validity panel agreement. Most common reasons for non-adherence were barriers such as side-effects, interference with vacation plans, unrelated illness, forgetting and competing outside stressors. Participation motivators were benefits such as altruism, medical benefits, free service and staff rapport. Findings supported the Health Behavior in Cancer Prevention model-based approach to adherence interventions and provided directions for adherence promotion in future community-based clinical studies.

  4. PRIORITIZATION OF NTP REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANTS FOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population studies evaluate human reproductive impairment are time consuming,
    expensive, logistically difficult and with limited resources must be prioritized to
    effectivelyprevent the adverse health effects in humans. Interactions among
    health scientists, unions,a...

  5. Forest health monitoring: 1991 Georgia indicator evaluation and field study

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, S.A.; Baldwin, M.; Bechtold, W.A.; Cassell, D.L.; Cline, S.

    1994-03-01

    The pilot study was designed to test methods for quantifying vegetation structure, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), dendrochronology, and selected root fungi. Testing the methods included comparing different data collection procedures for individual indicators, estimating sampling efficiency (both of the sampling design and the sampling unit design), and evaluating spatial variability. In addition, the accuracy and precision of tree height instruments were determined as part of the pilot study.

  6. Large field-induced irreversibility in Ni-Mn based Heusler shape-memory alloys: A pulsed magnetic field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. K.; Mejia, C. Salazar; D'Souza, S. W.; Chadov, S.; Skourski, Y.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a pulsed magnetic field study on the magnetic and magnetostriction properties of Ni-Mn-Z (Z =In , Sn, and Sb) based Heusler shape-memory alloys. These materials generally display a field-induced magnetostructural transition that could lead to an irreversible phase transition, when measured near the martensitic transition temperature. Here, we show that independently of the transition temperature, the critical field for the phase transition sensitively depends on the main-group element in the sample. Irrespective of their compositions, all samples display a magnetization of around 2 μB/f .u . in the martensite phase and about 6 μB/f .u . in the cubic austenite phase. Our magnetic and magnetostriction measurements at low temperatures exhibit a partial or complete arrest of the high-field austenite phase below the reverse martensitic transition. This results in a large irreversibility with a hysteresis width as high as 24 T. We introduce a theoretical model to discuss the experimental results.

  7. Numerical study of primordial magnetic field amplification by inflation-produced gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-01-15

    We numerically study the interaction of inflation-produced magnetic fields with gravitational waves, both of which originate from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The resonance between the magnetic field perturbations and the gravitational waves has been suggested as a possible mechanism for magnetic field amplification. However, some analytical studies suggest that the effect of the inflationary gravitational waves is too small to provide significant amplification. Our numerical study shows more clearly how the interaction affects the magnetic fields and confirms the weakness of the influence of the gravitational waves. We present an investigation based on the magnetohydrodynamic approximation and take into account the differences of the Alfven speed.

  8. Isentropic Compression Studies at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast...Isentropic Compression Studies At The Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT ...Laboratory (NHMFL) at Los Alamos was originally designed to study actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple

  9. Theoretical Studies of High Field Transport in III-V Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    AD-A123 947 THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HIGH FIELD TRANSPORT IN Ill-V- 1/2 SENXCONDUCTORS(U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA COORDINATED SCIENCE LAB H SHICHIJO...CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitleo S. TYPE Of REPORT & PERIOD COVERED THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HIGH FIELD TRANSPORT Technical Report IN IllI-V...Continue on reverse aide It necessary and identitfy by block number) High field transport , 3-5 semicopductors, Monte Carlo simulation 20. ABSTRACT

  10. Flipped Classroom Research and Trends from Different Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuddin, Zamzami; Halili, Siti Hajar

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to analyse the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 20 articles that report on flipped learning classroom initiatives from 2013-2015. The content analysis was used as a methodology to investigate methodologies, area of studies, technology tools or online platforms, the most frequently used keywords and works…

  11. A Field Study Training Program on Wastewater Lagoon Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Wastewater Technical School, Neosho, MO.

    This publication is a text and reference manual for operating personnel of both large and small wastewater lagoon systems with support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As a text, this inservice training manual is intended to be used in a correspondence course wherein the trainee or operator would read and study each chapter before…

  12. Industrial Waste Treatment. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This operations manual represents a continuation of operator training manuals developed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in response to the technological advancements of wastewater treatment and the changing needs of the operations profession. It is intended to be used as a home-study course manual (using the concepts…

  13. Advanced Waste Treatment. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This operations manual represents a continuation of operator training manuals developed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in response to the technological advancements of wastewater treatment and the changing needs of the operations profession. It is intended to be used as a home-study course manual (using the concepts…

  14. DECREASING LEAD BIOAVAILABILITY OF MINE WASTES: TWO PHOSPHATE FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Findings from two evaluation studies of phosphate-based in situ treatment of soils for reducing lead (Pb) bioavailability at two lead mining and lead refining Superfund sites will be presented and discussed. These assessments correlated physicochemical data with results obtained...

  15. Progress on field study with precision mobile drip irrigation technologly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision mobile drip irrigation (PMDI) is a technology that was developed in the 1970s that converts drop hoses on moving irrigation systems to dripline. Although this technology was developed more than 40 years ago, it was not widely implemented and few studies reported on its performance. Recentl...

  16. Procedures Used in Adjusting the Field Studies Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Charles L.; And Others

    This paper describes procedures used to stratify and refine an original sample of 951 families with preschool children living in the Appalachia area, for a study to provide information on the target audience for Appalachia Educational Laboratory's Home-Oriented Preschool Education Program (HOPE). The procedure was to force-match the sample…

  17. The Development of the Field of HRD: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, David; Cseh, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The study explored the views of leading human resource development (HRD) academics regarding five main issues: the disciplinary bases of HRD, the historical milestones in HRD, the constituent components of HRD, the leading contributions in terms of journal articles and books to the development of HRD and the future of HRD.…

  18. Target Practice: A Batesonian "Field" Guide for Communication Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Horace

    1993-01-01

    Uses three quotations from Gregory Bateson to inform the author's comments on the discipline of communication. Argues that communication teachers and scholars must aim for a curriculum and a mode of study, research, and teaching that leads to means of recognizing, addressing, and responding to truly significant questions, rather than disciplinary,…

  19. Field and Numerical Study on Natural River Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    AND NUMERICAL STUDY ON NATURAL RIVER MIXING by William A. Swick June 2011 Dissertation Supervisor: James MacMahan THIS PAGE......ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Mixing in several natural rivers is investigated using comprehensive point-source dye experiments, Lagrangian GPS-equipped

  20. Teaching Business Shops and Stores' Locations through Field Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Wu, Xianliang; Fu, Wenru

    2014-01-01

    Location, where geographic elements interwork spatially and dynamically, has been one of the enduring themes in geographic studies. There are a number of location theories to explain why things are located where they are. Alfred Weber's location theory stresses that the least cost of delivering products is a key factor in location selection, and…

  1. Electrostatic-field-enhanced photoexfoliation of bilayer benzene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Kazuki; Silaeva, Elena P.; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Photoexfoliation of bilayer benzene in an external electrostatic (dc) field is studied using time-dependent density functional theory combined with molecular dynamics. We find that the dc-field-induced force on the upper benzene in addition to the repulsive interaction between the positively charged benzene molecules induced by the laser field leads to fast athermal exfoliation. Thus, we conclude that the dc field enhances the photoexfoliation due to dc-field emission in addition to laser-assisted photoemission. The athermal exfoliation process is shown to depend crucially on the charge state of benzene molecules rather than on the excitation energy supplied by the laser.

  2. A field study to evaluate runoff quality from green roofs.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, U M; Balasubramanian, R

    2012-03-15

    Green (vegetated) roofs are emerging as practical strategies to improve the environmental quality of cities. However, the impact of green roofs on the storm water quality remains a topic of concern to city planners and environmental policy makers. This study investigated whether green roofs act as a source or a sink of various metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni, Li and Co), inorganic anions (NO3-, NO2-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), Cl-, F- and Br-) and cation (NH4+). A series of green roof assemblies were constructed. Four different real rain events and several artificial rain events were considered for the study. Results showed that concentrations of most of the chemical components in runoff were highest during the beginning of rain events and subsided in the subsequent rain events. Some of the important components present in the runoff include Na, K, Ca, Mg, Li, Fe, Al, Cu, NO3-, PO4(3-) and SO4(2-). However, the concentration of these chemical components in the roof runoff strongly depends on the nature of substrates used in the green roof and the volume of rain. Based on the USEPA standards for freshwater quality, we conclude that the green roof used in this study is reasonably effective except that the runoff contains significant amounts of NO3- and PO4(3-).

  3. International Relations as a Field of Study in the Canadian System of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Istomina, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    The research presents an attempt to investigate the current state of international relations as a field of study in the context of higher education system in Canada. It contains a general overview of the field of study, focusing predominantly on the role and function of the given academic discipline. The scientific investigation covers the issue…

  4. Study Choice and Career Development in STEM Fields: An Overview and Integration of the Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tuijl, Cathy; van der Molen, Juliette H.

    2016-01-01

    Although science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) study paths and STEM work fields may be relatively difficult and therefore not appropriate for everyone, too many children prematurely exclude STEM-related study and work options, based on negative images of the field or negative ability beliefs. In the present article, we provide an…

  5. Adult Education: Evolution and Achievements in a Developing Field of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, John M.; And Others

    This volume is a companion to "Adult Education: Outlines of an Emerging Field of University Study" (more commonly known as "the black book"), a classic work published in 1964. It explores the developments, accomplishments, and changes in the field since 1964 and charts new directions for research, theory, and practice in the study of adult…

  6. Field of Study, Learning Styles, and Language Learning Strategies of University Students: Are There Any Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahragard, Rahman; Khajavi, Yaser; Abbasian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the possible relationships between field of study, learning style preferences, and language learning strategies among university students majoring in the fields of arts and humanities, science, engineering, social sciences, and English as a foreign language. To this end, 376 university students completed the…

  7. Experimental Study of Magnetic Field Effect on dc Corona Discharge in Low Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabbas, K.

    2014-09-01

    In the present paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effect of applying a transverse magnetic field on the dc corona discharge behavior in low vacuum. In general, two experiments were carried out in this work: the first is the ionization-region magnetic field experiment, and the second was the drift region magnetic field experiment. In these experiments, permanent magnets were used to produce magnetic field. The degree of vacuum used in this test was 0.4×105 Pa. It is found that the effect of the magnetic field increases as the degree of vacuum increases. It is also seen from this study that the corona current values are higher with magnetic fields than without magnetic fields. The experimental results indicate that the enhancement of the magnetic field near the wire discharge electrode has a significant influence on the increment of the discharge current. The effect of the magnetic field on the discharge current is the most significant with the negative corona discharges rather than with positive corona discharge. In contrast to, the curves were demonstrated that the application of magnetic fields in drift region magnetic field does not significantly change the corona discharge current. Discharge characteristics of magnetically enhanced corona discharges, extracted from this study, can be applied to various industrial applications, such as, in an electrostatic enhancement filter for the purpose of capturing fine particles, and as effective method for production of high ozone concentrations in a generator as compared to the ultraviolet (UV) radiation method.

  8. Magnetic fields from steel-belted radial tires: implications for epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Milham, S; Hatfield, J B; Tell, R

    1999-10-01

    Magnetic fields emanate from radial tires due to the presence of reinforcing belts which are made of magnetized steel wire. When these tires spin, they generate alternating magnetic fields of extremely low frequency (ELF), usually below 20 Hz. The fundamental frequency of these fields is determined by tire rotation rate and has a sinusoidal waveform with a high harmonic content. The static field of radial tires can exceed 500 microT at the tread, and the tire-generated alternating fields can exceed 2.0 microT at seat level in the passenger compartment of vehicles. Degaussing the tires reduces both the static and alternating fields to low levels, but the fields increase gradually over time after degaussing. The tire-generated fields are below the frequencies detected by most of the magnetic field meters used in previous studies of power frequency magnetic field health effects. If these fields are biologically active, failure to detect them could compromise exposure assessments associated with epidemiologic studies.

  9. Performance of underfloor air distribution: Results of a field study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas

    2004-09-02

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a new method of supplying heated or cooled air throughout a building. Reported advantages of UFAD include easy relocation of air supply diffusers, energy savings, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). We measured several aspects of the performance of an UFAD system installed in a medium-size office building. The measured air change effectiveness was very close to unity, which is comparable to that measured in buildings with typical overhead air distribution. The pollutant removal efficiency for carbon dioxide was 13 percent higher than expected in a space with well-mixed air, suggesting a 13 percent reduction in exposures to occupant generated pollutants. The increase in indoor air temperatures with height above the floor was only 1 to 2 C (2-4 F). This amount of thermal stratification could reduce the sensible energy requirements for cooling of outdoor air by approximately 10 percent. The occupants level of satisfaction with thermal conditions w as well above average and this high satisfaction rating could possibly be due, in all or part, to the use of a UFAD system. The results of this study provide some evidence of moderate energy and IAQ-related benefits of UFAD. Before general conclusions are drawn, the benefits need to be confirmed in other studies.

  10. Subjective field study of response to impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects, located outdoors and indoors, judged the noisiness and other subjective noise characteristics of flyovers of two helicopters and a propeller driven airplane as part of a study of the effects of impulsiveness on the subjective response to helicopter noise. In the first experiment, the impulsive characteristics of one helicopter was controlled by varying the main rotor speed while maintaining a constant airspeed in level flight. The second experiment which utilized only the helicopters, included descent and level flight operations. The more impulsive helicopter was consistently judged less noisy than the less impulsive helicopter at equal effective perceived noise levels (EPNL). The ability of EPNL to predict noisiness was not improved by the addition of either of two proposed impulse corrections. A subjective measure of impulsiveness, however, which was not significantly related to the proposed impulse corrections, was found to improve the predictive ability of EPNL.

  11. High sulfur related thiamine deficiency in cattle: A field study

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, S. Ravi; Olkowski, Andrzej A.; Klemmer, Robert G.; Kessler, Gerald A.; Christensen, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Following development of polioencephalomalacia in one of 105 cattle in a farm in southeastern Saskatchewan, a study was initiated to monitor thiamine (B1) and copper (Cu) status, and to evaluate interactive nutritional factors which may have been responsible for this occurrence. It was evident that a combination of high sulfur (S) and low Cu intake was responsible for the depletion of blood B1 and plasma Cu. Supplementation with trace minerals alone resulted in a significant (p<0.05) improvement in both B1 and Cu status of the herd. We recommend that herds exposed to high intakes of S be supplemented with Cu up to 50 mg/kg feed dry matter to alleviate potential deficiencies of B1 and Cu. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17423233

  12. Studies of HED Plasmas with Self-Generated Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Mikhail

    2016-02-08

    High-amplitude sub-Larmor-scale electromagnetic turbulence is ubiquitous in high-energy density environments, such as laboratory plasmas produced by high-intensity lasers, e.g., NIF, Omega-EP, Trident, and others, and in astrophysical and space plasmas, e.g., at high-Mach-number collisionless shocks in weakly magnetized plasmas upstream regions of quasi-parallel shocks, sites of magnetic reconnection and others. Studies of plasmas and turbulence in these environments are important for fusion energy sciences and the inertial confinement concept, in particular, as well as to numerous astrophysical systems such as gamma-ray bursts, supernovae blast waves, jets of quasars and active galactic nuclei, shocks in the interplanetary medium, solar flares and many more. Such turbulence can be of various origin and thus have rather different properties, from being purely magnetic (Weibel) turbulence to various types of electromagnetic turbulence (for example, whistler wave turbulence or turbulence produced by filamentation or Weibel-type streaming instability), to purely electrostatic Langmuir turbulence. In this project we use analytical and numerical tools to study the transport, radiative, and magneto-optical properties of plasmas with sub-Larmor-scale turbulence. We discovered the connection of transport/diffusion properties to certain spectral benchmark features of (jitter) radiation produced by the plasma and radiation propagation through it. All regimes, from the relativistic to non-relativistic, were thoroughly investigated and predictions were made for laboratory plasmas and astrophysical plasmas. Thus, all the tasks outlined in the proposal were fully and successfully accomplished.

  13. Experimental studies on ion acceleration and stream line detachment in a diverging magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Ogiwara, K.; Aramaki, M.; Tanaka, M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The flow structure of ions in a diverging magnetic field has been experimentally studied in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The flow velocity field of ions has been measured with directional Langmuir probes calibrated with the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. For low ion-temperature plasmas, it is concluded that the ion acceleration due to the axial electric field is important compared with that of gas dynamic effect. It has also been found that the detachment of ion stream line from the magnetic field line takes place when the parameter |fciLB∕Vi| becomes order unity, where fci, LB, and Vi are the ion cyclotron frequency, the characteristic scale length of magnetic field inhomogeneity, and the ion flow velocity, respectively. In the detachment region, a radial electric field is generated in the plasma and the ions move straight with the E×B rotation driven by the radial electric field. PMID:20838424

  14. A novel methodology to study shape and surface tension of drops in Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, A.; Susnar, S. S.; Amirfazli, A.; Neumann, A. W.

    2005-03-01

    A novel methodology is introduced that can be used to study the behavior of conducting drops in electrostatic fields, when gravity effects are negligible. This methodology, called Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis — Electric Field (ADSA-EF), generates numerical drop profiles in the electrostatic field, for a given surface tension. Then, it calculates the true value of the surface tension by matching the theoretical profiles with the shape of the experimental drops, with the surface tension as an adjustable parameter. ADSA-EF can be employed for simulating drop shapes in the electric field, detecting the effect of an electric field on liquid surface tensions, and measuring surface tensions in microgravity, where current drop-shape techniques are not applicable. The predicted drop shapes in the electric field were compared with experimental images, indicating good agreement. Preliminary experiments according to ADSA-EF methodology suggested that the surface tension of water increases by about one percent in the electric field.

  15. Study of Spray Disintegration in Accelerating Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurick, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was conducted to perform "proof of principlem experiments to establish the effects of propellant combustion gas velocity on propella'nt atomization characteristics. The propellants were gaseous oxygen (GOX) and Shell Wax 270. The fuel was thus the same fluid used in earlier primary cold-flow atomization studies using the frozen wax method. Experiments were conducted over a range in L* (30 to 160 inches) at two contraction ratios (2 and 6). Characteristic exhaust velocity (c*) efficiencies varied from SO to 90 percent. The hot fire experimental performance characteristics at a contraction ratio of 6.0 in conjunction with analytical predictions from the drovlet heat-up version of the Distributed Energy Release (DER) combustion computer proDam showed that the apparent initial dropsize compared well with cold-flow predictions (if adjusted for the gas velocity effects). The results also compared very well with the trend in perfomnce as predicted with the model. significant propellant wall impingement at the contraction ratio of 2.0 precluded complete evaluation of the effect of gross changes in combustion gas velocity on spray dropsize.

  16. Meteoric water - basalt interactions: a field and laboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of this study is to define and interpret the composition of the meteoric waters in N.E. Iceland in their cycle through the hydrosphere and the upper part of the crust, and to calibrate the natural process by dissolution experiments done in the laboratory. The composition of rain, snow, spring and geothermal waters from the rift zone of N.E. Iceland can be explained by sea-spray addition (1/10000), dissolution of basalts and buffering by alteration minerals. Rates, stoichiometry and activation energy of dissolution, pH vs. time and activity-activity paths were determined by dissolving basaltic rocks under simulated natural conditions at 25 to 60/sup 0/C. Dissolution follows a linear rate law, with basaltic glass dissolving 10 times faster than the crystalline basalt. Rates are independent of pH from 7 to 10. The average activation energy for dissolution of basaltic glass is 31.8 kJ/mol (+/-3). For individual elements leached from crystalline basalt it ranges from 35 to 15 kJ/mol. This indicates that under the experimental conditions reactions on the surfaces of the solids are the rate determining step in the dissolution mechanism. Considerable differences (2 to 4 log units) exist in the calculated oxygen fugacities obtained from different redox species in the geothermal fluids. This is primarily caused by the nonequilibrium state of the sulfur redox pair.

  17. Methanogenic Hydrocarbon Degradation: Evidence from Field and Laboratory Studies.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Núria; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten; Treude, Tina; Krüger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Microbial transformation of hydrocarbons to methane is an environmentally relevant process taking place in a wide variety of electron acceptor-depleted habitats, from oil reservoirs and coal deposits to contaminated groundwater and deep sediments. Methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is considered to be a major process in reservoir degradation and one of the main processes responsible for the formation of heavy oil deposits and oil sands. In the absence of external electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate, sulfate or Fe(III), fermentation and methanogenesis become the dominant microbial metabolisms. The major end product under these conditions is methane, and the only electron acceptor necessary to sustain the intermediate steps in this process is CO2, which is itself a net product of the overall reaction. We are summarizing the state of the art and recent advances in methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation research. Both the key microbial groups involved as well as metabolic pathways are described, and we discuss the novel insights into methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading populations studied in laboratory as well as environmental systems enabled by novel cultivation-based and molecular approaches. Their possible implications on energy resources, bioremediation of contaminated sites, deep-biosphere research, and consequences for atmospheric composition and ultimately climate change are also addressed.

  18. Entangled Polymer Melt Dynamics Studied By Low-Field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca Chavez, Fabian; Huebsch, Patrick; Zirbs, Ronald; Binder, Wolfgang; Saalwaechter, Kay

    2009-03-01

    Proton Multiple-Quantum (MQ) NMR is a powerful technique to investigate polymer dynamics due to its sensitivity to molecular motions on very different timescales. Entangled melts exhibit dynamic processes that cover a wide range of timescales, starting from fast ps-scale segmental reorientation up to diffusive and cooperative motions on the ms-s-scale. In this work, we apply MQ NMR to linear poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) and poly(isobutylene) of different molecular weight above the glass transition over suitable ranges of temperature, in order to establish the dynamic regimes predicted by the tube model, and, for the first time, to extract actual time scale information. This directly complements many neutron scattering studies, which are restricted to the sub-μs-timescale. Measurements on PIB-grafted silica particles with different molecular weights and different chain densities on the surface of the particle are also shown. The data is analyzed by establishing scaling laws which can be directly associated with different dynamic regimes predicted by the tube/reptation model. Full analytical analyses based on a correlation function which explicitly includes segmental, Rouse, and reptation dynamics are discussed.

  19. Microearthquake source mechanism studies at the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Romero, A. Jr.; Peterson, J. Jr.; Johnson, L.; Majer, E.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss moment tensors obtained from inversion of MEQ waveform data recorded at the Southeast (SE) and Northwest (NW) Geysers geothermal areas by the high-resolution seismic networks operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Coldwater Creek Geothermal Company (now CCPA). The network in the SE Geysers consists of 13 high-frequency (4.5 Hz), digital (480 samples), three-component, telemetered stations deployed on the surface in portions of the Calpine, Unocal-NEC-Thermal (U-N-T), and Northern California Power Agency (NCPA) leases. The network in the NW Geysers is a 16-station borehole array of three-component geophones (4.5 Hz), digital at 400 samples/sec, and telemetered to a central site. One of the main objectives of Berkeley Lab`s program at the Geysers is to assess the utility of MEQ monitoring as a reservoir management tool. Discrimination of the mechanisms of these events may aid in the interpretation of MEQ occurrence patterns and their significance to reservoir processes and conditions of interest to reservoir managers. Better understanding of the types of failure deduced from source mechanism studies, and their relations to production parameters, should also lead to a better understanding of the effects of injection and withdrawal.

  20. Numerical self-consistent field theory study of the response of strong polyelectrolyte brushes to external electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Chaohui

    2015-08-07

    The response of strong polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes grafted on an electrode to electric fields generated by opposite surface charges on the PE-grafted electrode and a second parallel electrode has been numerically investigated by self-consistent field theory. The influences of grafting density, average charge fraction, salt concentration, and mobile ion size on the variation of the brush height against an applied voltage bias were investigated. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulation results, a higher grafting density requires a larger magnitude of voltage bias to achieve the same amount of relative change in the brush height. In the experimentally relevant parameter regime of the applied voltage, the brush height becomes insensitive to the voltage bias when the grafting density is high. Including the contribution of surface charges on the grafting electrode, overall charge neutrality inside the PE brushes is generally maintained, especially for PE brushes with high grafting density and high average charge fraction. Our numerical study further reveals that the electric field across the two electrodes is highly non-uniform because of the complex interplay between the surface charges on the electrodes, the charges on the grafted PE chains, and counterions.

  1. The Effects of Dosed versus Gravity-Fed Loading Methods on the Performance and Reliability of Contour Trench Disposal Fields Used for Onsite Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bridson-Pateman, Evan; Hayward, Jennifer; Jamieson, Rob; Boutilier, Leah; Lake, Craig

    2013-01-01

    In Nova Scotia, Canada, contour trench disposal fields are the most common type of onsite wastewater system. In this study, two identical contour trench disposal fields were monitored for 3 yr to compare performance under gravity-fed versus periodically dosed loading conditions. Influent and effluent from both systems were analyzed for a suite of water quality parameters, and the hydraulics of the systems were assessed using tracer studies and measurements of ponded water depth in the distribution trenches. Ponded water depths in the distribution trench of the gravity-fed disposal field were observed to increase steadily during the monitoring period, indicating progressive clogging. This was not observed in the periodically dosed field. Regarding treatment, both systems performed well, consistently producing effluent with 5-d biochemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations <10 mg L and achieving >5 log reductions in . However, the gravity-fed system produced statistically lower average effluent concentrations for total P and TSS. It is speculated that the slightly better treatment performance achieved by the gravity-fed system is due to enhanced biomat formation. This study demonstrated adequate treatment of residential wastewater by contour trench disposal fields regardless of loading method. However, because the hydraulic performance of these systems is heavily dependent on pretreatment and loading methods, it is recommended that a dosing system be used to distribute wastewater to contour trench disposal fields to help prevent hydraulic failure.

  2. Review of Studies Concerning Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposure Assessment in Europe: Low Frequency Fields (50 Hz-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to review the findings of exposure assessment studies done in European countries on the exposure of the general public to low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of various frequencies. The study shows that outdoor average extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) in public areas in urban environments range between 0.05 and 0.2 µT in terms of flux densities, but stronger values (of the order of a few µT) may occur directly beneath high-voltage power lines, at the walls of transformer buildings, and at the boundary fences of substations. In the indoor environment, high values have been measured close to several domestic appliances (up to the mT range), some of which are held close to the body, e.g., hair dryers, electric shavers. Common sources of exposure to intermediate frequencies (IF) include induction cookers, compact fluorescent lamps, inductive charging systems for electric cars and security or anti-theft devices. No systematic measurement surveys or personal exposimetry data for the IF range have been carried out and only a few reports on measurements of EMFs around such devices are mentioned. According to the available European exposure assessment studies, three population exposure categories were classified by the authors regarding the possible future risk analysis. This classification should be considered a crucial advancement for exposure assessment, which is a mandatory step in any future health risk assessment of EMFs exposure.

  3. Review of Studies Concerning Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposure Assessment in Europe: Low Frequency Fields (50 Hz–100 kHz)

    PubMed Central

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to review the findings of exposure assessment studies done in European countries on the exposure of the general public to low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of various frequencies. The study shows that outdoor average extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) in public areas in urban environments range between 0.05 and 0.2 µT in terms of flux densities, but stronger values (of the order of a few µT) may occur directly beneath high-voltage power lines, at the walls of transformer buildings, and at the boundary fences of substations. In the indoor environment, high values have been measured close to several domestic appliances (up to the mT range), some of which are held close to the body, e.g., hair dryers, electric shavers. Common sources of exposure to intermediate frequencies (IF) include induction cookers, compact fluorescent lamps, inductive charging systems for electric cars and security or anti-theft devices. No systematic measurement surveys or personal exposimetry data for the IF range have been carried out and only a few reports on measurements of EMFs around such devices are mentioned. According to the available European exposure assessment studies, three population exposure categories were classified by the authors regarding the possible future risk analysis. This classification should be considered a crucial advancement for exposure assessment, which is a mandatory step in any future health risk assessment of EMFs exposure. PMID:27598182

  4. Morphology, orthography, and the two hemispheres: A divided visual field study with Hindi/Urdu biliterates.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chaitra; Vaid, Jyotsna

    2016-07-25

    Although identical on the spoken level, Hindi and Urdu differ markedly on the written level in terms of reading/writing direction and orthographic depth, with discernible processing consequences. The present study used a divided field paradigm to study the impact of writing system characteristics of Hindi and Urdu on word naming latencies in skilled biliterate users of these languages. Hindi (read/written from left to right) was hypothesized to show a larger right field advantage than Urdu (read/written from right to left); Hindi words sharing form overlap with primes were expected to show a significant priming effect in the left visual field, but a significant right field effect for morphologically-primed naming. Both these expectations were confirmed. An overall right field advantage was obtained for one syllable Hindi and Urdu words; two syllable Urdu words showed either no visual field differences or a left field advantage, and the right field advantage for Hindi was significantly greater for two syllable than one syllable words. Further, Hindi words showed significant form priming (relative to control stimuli) in the left visual field and significant morphological priming (relative to form priming) in the right visual field. By contrast, Urdu words showed no significant form priming in either visual field, and significantly greater morphological than form priming in the left visual field. These results are taken to suggest that visual field asymmetries in word naming are sensitive to differences in reading habit-related scanning biases and to orthographic depth-related differences in word recognition processes.

  5. History of aquatic toxicology and the evolution of field studies in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    Aquatic toxicology has developed as a multidisciplinary science in scope. Early studies first concentrated on single-species acute laboratory tests with effluents to assess stress to fish and invertebrates. Later studies progressed to full chronic and partial chronic tests with various xenobiotics including pesticides. In response to a growing need to evaluate the risk of xenobiotics to a myriad of aquatic organisms various types of natural and simulated model field studies have evolved in parallel with multi-species and sediment-water laboratory toxicity tests. Each test has advantages and limitations and field studies have very unique problems. Laboratory tests along with fate models continue to be the foundation for decisions in risk assessment. The role of aquatic field studies in risk assessment is still not clearly understood. The presentation will emphasize aquatic field studies with special consideration to background, and the advantages and limitations of the different types.

  6. Field of Study in College and Lifetime Earnings in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kim, ChangHwan; Tamborini, Christopher R.; Sakamoto, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding about the relationship between education and lifetime earnings often neglects differences by field of study. Utilizing data that matches respondents in the Survey of Income and Program Participation to their longitudinal earnings records based on administrative tax information, we investigate the trajectories of annual earnings following the same individuals over 20 years and then estimate the long-term effects of field of study on earnings for U.S. men and women. Our results provide new evidence revealing large lifetime earnings gaps across field of study. We show important differences in individuals’ earnings trajectories across the different stages of the work-life by field of study. In addition, the gaps in 40-year (i.e., ages 20 to 59) median lifetime earnings among college graduates by field of study are larger, in many instances, than the median gap between high school graduates and college graduates overall. Significant variation is also found among graduate degree holders. Our results uncover important similarities and differences between men and women with regard to the long-term earnings differentials associated with field of study. In general, these findings underscore field of study as a critical dimension of horizontal stratification in educational attainment. Other implications of the empirical findings are also discussed. PMID:28042177

  7. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  8. Wage Differentials by Field of Study--The Case of German University Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grave, Barbara S.; Goerlitz, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Using data on German university graduates, this paper analyzes wage differentials by field of study at labor market entry and five to six years later. At both points of time, graduates from arts/humanities have lower average monthly wages compared to other fields. Blinder-Oaxaca decompositions show that these wage differentials can be explained…

  9. Resource Guide for Field Study: St. Augustine to Flagler Beach. Resource Monograph No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Felicia E.

    This resource monograph is one of a series designed as a teaching guide for field studies. Each guide centers around the exploration, observation, and interpretation of a field site in one of the four geological areas of Florida. Incorporated into the guides are many of the subject-matter schemes of the Earth Science Curriculum Program (ESCP) and…

  10. A systematic study of finite BRST-BV transformations in field-antifield formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.; Tyutin, Igor V.

    2014-11-01

    We study systematically finite BRST-BV transformations in the field-antifield formalism. We present explicitly their Jacobians and the form of a solution to the compensation equation determining the functional field dependence of finite Fermionic parameters, necessary to generate arbitrary finite change of gauge-fixing functions in the path integral.

  11. Higher Education as a Field of Study and Research in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the emergence of higher education as a field of research, scholarship and study. In the first part, the meaning of higher education as a field of research is defined contrasting Europe and the US. Then, the institutional basis of higher education research in Europe is analysed (learned societies, institutes and centres,…

  12. The Role of Field Study in Humanistic and Interdisciplinary Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alagona, Peter S.; Simon, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that field courses can improve college students' interest and engagement not only in the environmental sciences, but also in the environmental humanities--including environmental history, philosophy, and literature. We base this argument on five years of experience teaching an environmental studies field course through the…

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING METHANOGENESIS IN A SHALLOW ANOXIC AQUIFER: A FIELD AND LABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental factors influencing methanogenesis in a shallow anoxic aquifer were probed in a combined field and laboratory study. Field data collected over a year revealed that in situ rates of methane production were depressed in winter and elevated in summer. Over the same...

  14. Engaging the Borders: Empathy, Religious Studies, and Pre-Professional Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trothen, Tracy J.

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes that religious studies instructors can gain pedagogical insights regarding the value and teaching of empathy from pre-professional health care and counseling fields. I present research findings from these fields to support claims that empathic skills are teachable. I then show that empathy has been established within the…

  15. Judicious Use of Journal Impact Factors and the Preservation of Our Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    This article comments on the judicious use of journal impact factors. It aims to preserve our fields of study within the context of increased scholarly scrutiny and the hierarchical structures inherent in academia. It concludes by recommending actions for "JOPERD," other journals in the field, and the producers and evaluators of…

  16. Supporting Medical Students to Do International Field Research: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Stephen; Parr, Jennifer; Ullah, Zafar; Omar, Maye

    2014-01-01

    Field research can benefit medical students' learning through experiential engagement with research and personal exposure to foreign health systems. However, the off-campus nature of the activity raises challenges for teachers. This article presents a case study that illustrates the benefits and challenges of organising a field research project…

  17. The Distribution of Job Satisfaction among Young European Graduates: Does the Choice of Study Field Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vila, Luis E.; Garcia-Aracil, Adela; Mora, Jose-Gines

    2007-01-01

    A student's choice of a field of study is a personal decision that combines individual tastes, inclinations, preferences, and prospects related to the working life with a number of financial and academic constraints. Therefore, the analysis of the effects of degree field on job satisfaction should also address the unobserved heterogeneity among…

  18. Laser-assisted field evaporation of metal oxides: A time-dependent density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Li, Zhibing

    2016-11-01

    To understand laser-assisted field evaporation of semiconductors and insulators at the microscopic level, we study the time evolution of the electronic and atomic structure of a MgO cluster in high electrostatic fields subjected to strong laser pulses. We find that the critical laser intensity for evaporation decreases linearly as the electrostatic field strength increases. The optical absorption enhancement in high electrostatic field is confirmed by the redshift of the optical absorption spectra, the reduction of the energy gap, and the increase of the absorption cross section.

  19. Numerical study of chiral plasma instability within the classical statistical field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buividovich, P. V.; Ulybyshev, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a numerical study of real-time dynamics of electromagnetically interacting chirally imbalanced lattice Dirac fermions within the classical statistical field theory approach. Namely, we perform exact simulations of the real-time quantum evolution of fermionic fields coupled to classical electromagnetic fields, which are in turn coupled to the vacuum expectation value of the fermionic electric current. We use Wilson-Dirac Hamiltonian for fermions, and noncompact action for the gauge field. In general, we observe that the backreaction of fermions on the electromagnetic field prevents the system from acquiring chirality imbalance. In the case of chirality pumping in parallel electric and magnetic fields, the electric field is screened by the produced on-shell fermions and the accumulation of chirality is hence stopped. In the case of evolution with initially present chirality imbalance, axial charge tends to transform to helicity of the electromagnetic field. By performing simulations on large lattices we show that in most cases this decay process is accompanied by the inverse cascade phenomenon, which transfers energy from short-wavelength to long-wavelength electromagnetic fields. In some simulations, however, we observe a very clear signature of inverse cascade for the helical magnetic fields that is not accompanied by the axial charge decay. This suggests that the relation between the inverse cascade and axial charge decay is not as straightforward as predicted by the simplest form of anomalous Maxwell equations.

  20. Electric field controlled reversible magnetic anisotropy switching studied by spin rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2014-03-10

    In this letter, spin rectification was used to study the electric field controlled dynamic magnetic properties of the multiferroic composite which is a Co stripe with induced in-plane anisotropy deposited onto a Pb(Mg{sub 1∕3}Nb{sub 2∕3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} substrate. Due to the coupling between piezoelectric and magnetoelastic effects, a reversible in-plane anisotropy switching has been realized by varying the history of the applied electric field. This merit results from the electric hysteresis of the polarization in the nonlinear piezoelectric regime, which has been proved by a butterfly type electric field dependence of the in-plane anisotropy field. Moreover, the electric field dependent effective demagnetization field and linewidth have been observed at the same time.

  1. (Studies in quantum field theory: Progress report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992)

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C M

    1992-01-01

    Professors Bender, Bernard, and Shrauner, Assistant Professors Ogilvie and Goltermann, Research Assistant Professors Visser and Petcher, and Research Associate Rivas are currently conducting research in many areas of high energy theoretical and mathematical physics. These areas include: lattice gauge calculations of masses and weak matrix elements; strong-coupling approximation; low-energy effective field theories; classical solutions of non-Abelian gauge theories; mean-field approximation in quantum field theory; path integral and coherent state representations in quantum field theory; the nature of perturbation theory in large order; quark condensation in QCD; chiral fermion theories on the lattice; the 1/N expansion in quantum field theory; effective potential and action in quantum field theories, including QCD; studies of the early universe and inflation; quantum gravity. This work is described in detail in the body of this proposal.

  2. A study: Effect of Students Peer Assisted Learning on Magnetic Field Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueanploy, Wannapa

    2016-04-01

    This study is the case study of Physic II Course for students of Pathumwan Institute of Technology. The purpose of this study is: 1) to develop cooperative learning method of peer assisted learning (PAL), 2) to compare the learning achievement before and after studied magnetic field lesson by cooperative learning method of peer assisted learning. The population was engineering students of Pathumwan Institute of Technology (PIT’s students) who registered Physic II Course during year 2014. The sample used in this study was selected from the 72 students who passed in Physic I Course. The control groups learning magnetic fields by Traditional Method (TM) and experimental groups learning magnetic field by method of peers assisted learning. The students do pretest before the lesson and do post-test after the lesson by 20 items achievement tests of magnetic field. The post-test higher than pretest achievement significantly at 0.01 level.

  3. A qualitative and quantitative study of mites in similar alfalfa fields in Greece.

    PubMed

    Badieritakis, Evangelos G; Fantinou, Argyro A; Emmanouel, Nikolaos G

    2014-02-01

    The present study investigated the mite fauna and the relative abundance of mites present in foliage and litter of two adjacent and similar alfalfa fields, differing only in the number of cuttings, in Kopais Valley (Central Greece) through 2008-2010. We also examined the relationship between assemblage patterns of Mesostigmata, Oribatida and Prostigmata by comparing their population fluctuation, population density, species richness and diversity. Spatial distribution of common dominant and influent mite species was also estimated. Our results showed that both fields supported a very rich and similar mite fauna with eight new species records for alfalfa of Greece, although these species have been previously reported from other habitats in Greece. The pattern of population fluctuation in foliage was similar in both fields, unlike the fluctuation in litter. Population density significantly differed between fields, being higher in the less harvested field, except Prostigmata. Species richness in litter was higher in the less harvested field, whereas it was higher in the foliage of the more harvested field, apart from that of prostigmatic mites in litter, which was higher in the more harvested field, and that of oribatid mites in foliage, which was higher in the less harvested field. The diversity of mites was higher in the more harvested field, with the exception of prostigmatic mites. The spatial distribution of mites in foliage and litter was aggregated in both fields. Our results indicate that despite the considerable similarity of the study fields, the different harvesting frequency might have disturbed differently the mite communities hosted in foliage and litter.

  4. Monitoring of landscape change in paddy fields: Case study of Karawang District - West Java Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franjaya, E. E.; Syartinilia; Setiawan, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Paddy field is an important agricultural land in Indonesia, as one of the largest rice producing-country in the world. At least 26 from 33 provinces in Indonesia are characterized by the existence of paddy field landscape. However, due to the increasing of population and development of infrastructure building, a conversion of paddy field rapidly occurs in many sites. This study aimed to examine the dynamics change in paddy field in Karawang District-West Java during the period of 1994-2015. The method used in this study mainly by the remote sensing technique using satellite images data. The result indicated that conversion of paddy fields to built area/infrastructure in Karawang is approximately 10.326,6 ha. It took up 56% from the paddy that were changed. Based on the result, the changes are likely to occur in the middle of karawang district, near the central city. This result showed the change of paddy field in 1994 converted into some built-up areas such as settlement or roads in 2015. However, about 85.597,56 ha paddy field is not changed during these period. The study showed that paddy fields landscape is facing a changes over the last two decades.

  5. Experimental studies of collective excitations of a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Niffenegger, Robert; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of collective modes including spin dipole mode and scissors mode of a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields and synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). By Raman dressing the mf spin states within the F =1 manifold, we engineer atoms' energy-momentum dispersion to create synthetic SOC, and spin dependent synthetic electric and magnetic fields. We have used spin dependent synthetic electric fields to make two BECs with different spins oscillate and collide in the optical trap. We have studied the effects of SOC on both the momentum damping and thermalization behaviors of the BECs when undergoing such spin dipole oscillations. We have also used spatially dependent synthetic electric fields to excite the scissors mode, which has been used as a probe for superfluidity. We have investigated the effects of the synthetic gauge fields and SOC on the measured scissors mode.

  6. Argand-plane vorticity singularities in complex scalar optical fields: an experimental study using optical speckle.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Freda; Bishop, Alexis I; Kitchen, Marcus J; Paganin, David M

    2014-03-24

    The Cornu spiral is, in essence, the image resulting from an Argand-plane map associated with monochromatic complex scalar plane waves diffracting from an infinite edge. Argand-plane maps can be useful in the analysis of more general optical fields. We experimentally study particular features of Argand-plane mappings known as "vorticity singularities" that are associated with mapping continuous single-valued complex scalar speckle fields to the Argand plane. Vorticity singularities possess a hierarchy of Argand-plane catastrophes including the fold, cusp and elliptic umbilic. We also confirm their connection to vortices in two-dimensional complex scalar waves. The study of vorticity singularities may also have implications for higher-dimensional fields such as coherence functions and multi-component fields such as vector and spinor fields.

  7. A case study of urban student and teacher experiences surrounding an outdoor environmental science field trip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusch, Peggy L.

    2009-12-01

    Field trips provide opportunities for students to experience many different contexts beyond the classroom, and are a popular choice of K-12 teachers in the US. Recent interest in learning that occurs at informal science education centers such as museums, zoos and aquariums has stimulated studies of the relationship between learning in and outside of schools. Although many studies focus on the teachers, the contexts, and/or the students during the field trip, only a few look at the entire process of learning by including the classroom setting before and after the field trip. This study was designed to develop understandings of the student process of learning during and surrounding an environmental science field trip to an outdoor setting. John Dewey's extensive writings on the relationship between experience and learning informed the analysis, creating a focus on active and passive elements of the experience, continuity within and across contexts, the interactive nature of the experience and the importance of subject matter. An exploration of environmental education (EE), environmental science (ES), and nature study as content revealed the complexities of the subject matter of the field trip that make its presentation problematic. An urban school was chosen to contribute to the research literature about urban student learning in outdoor environments. During the field trip, the students' active engagement with each other and the environment supported meaningful remembrances of the field trip experiences during interviews after the field trip. The students accurately described plants and animals they had observed in different habitats during the field trip. They also made connections with their home life and prior experiences in the outdoors as they discussed the field trip and drew pictures that represented their experiences. One student integrated his outdoor experience with a language arts assignment as he reflected deeply on the field trip. One implication of this

  8. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    General guidance for designing field studies to measure bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) is not available. To develop such guidance, a series of modeling simulations were performed to evaluate the underlying factors and principles th...

  9. Cyanobacteria, Toxins and Indicators: Field Monitoring,Treatment Facility Monitoring and Treatment Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a compilation of harmful algal bloom (HAB) related field monitoring data from the 2015 bloom season, treatment plant monitoring data from the 2013 and 2014 bloom seasons, and bench-scale treatment study data from 2015.

  10. Pilot Study of Extraneous Paperwork in a Parole/Probation Field Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Herbert R.; Libonate, DeAnna

    1990-01-01

    Discusses history of parole and probation and the special problems surrounding its paperwork. Presents results of a pilot study that measured extraneous paperwork of a parole/probation field office with preliminary recommendations. (Author/ABL)

  11. University of Washington Airborne Studies in Support of the CLAMS-2001 Field Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2003-01-01

    The main activity under this grant was participation in the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field study from 10 July through 2 August 2001. The Cloud and Aerosol Research Group (CARG) from the University of Washington (UW) flew its Convair-580 research aircraft on thirteen occasions, for a total of 45 research flight hours, in support of CLAMS. Some of the main accomplishments of these flights were: 1) Aerosol and trace gas measurements and sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical depth and column water vapor and ozone from close to Ocean surface to approx. 10,000 ft off Delmarva Peninsula on various occasions; 2) Measurements of aerosol properties on seven occasions beneath the Terra satellite, once beneath AVHRR, and five times beneath the ER-2 aircraft; 3) Measurements of aerosol properties in the vicinity of the (CERES instrumented) Chesapeake Bay lighthouse (COVE) on nine occasions; 4) Use of the NASA Goddard Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) to obtain measurements of BRDF of the ocean surface on fifteen occasions and over Great Dismal Swamp on two occasions; 5) Measurements of aerosol properties over instrumented buoys 44014, 44004, and 41001. 6) On July 17 (a CLAMS 'Golden Day') six aircraft, including the Convair-580 and ER-2, were stacked above the Chesapeake Bay lighthouse under clear skies at the time of the Terra overpass.

  12. Use of terrestrial field studies in the derivation of bioaccumulation potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Nico W; Arblaster, Jennifer A; Bowman, Sarah R; Conder, Jason M; Elliott, John E; Johnson, Mark S; Muir, Derek C G; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Rattner, Barnett A; Sample, Bradley E; Shore, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Field-based studies are an essential component of research addressing the behavior of organic chemicals, and a unique line of evidence that can be used to assess bioaccumulation potential in chemical registration programs and aid in development of associated laboratory and modeling efforts. To aid scientific and regulatory discourse on the application of terrestrial field data in this manner, this article provides practical recommendations regarding the generation and interpretation of terrestrial field data. Currently, biota-to-soil-accumulation factors (BSAFs), biomagnification factors (BMFs), and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) are the most suitable bioaccumulation metrics that are applicable to bioaccumulation assessment evaluations and able to be generated from terrestrial field studies with relatively low uncertainty. Biomagnification factors calculated from field-collected samples of terrestrial carnivores and their prey appear to be particularly robust indicators of bioaccumulation potential. The use of stable isotope ratios for quantification of trophic relationships in terrestrial ecosystems needs to be further developed to resolve uncertainties associated with the calculation of terrestrial trophic magnification factors (TMFs). Sampling efforts for terrestrial field studies should strive for efficiency, and advice on optimization of study sample sizes, practical considerations for obtaining samples, selection of tissues for analysis, and data interpretation is provided. Although there is still much to be learned regarding terrestrial bioaccumulation, these recommendations provide some initial guidance to the present application of terrestrial field data as a line of evidence in the assessment of chemical bioaccumulation potential and a resource to inform laboratory and modeling efforts.

  13. Use of terrestrial field studies in the derivation of bioaccumulation potential of chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Arblaster, Jennifer A.; Bowman, Sarah R.; Conder, Jason M.; Elliott, John E.; Johnson, Mark S.; Muir, Derek C.G.; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Rattner, Barnett A.; Sample, Bradley E.; Shore, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Field-based studies are an essential component of research addressing the behavior of organic chemicals, and a unique line of evidence that can be used to assess bioaccumulation potential in chemical registration programs and aid in development of associated laboratory and modeling efforts. To aid scientific and regulatory discourse on the application of terrestrial field data in this manner, this article provides practical recommendations regarding the generation and interpretation of terrestrial field data. Currently, biota-to-soil-accumulation factors (BSAFs), biomagnification factors (BMFs), and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) are the most suitable bioaccumulation metrics that are applicable to bioaccumulation assessment evaluations and able to be generated from terrestrial field studies with relatively low uncertainty. Biomagnification factors calculated from field-collected samples of terrestrial carnivores and their prey appear to be particularly robust indicators of bioaccumulation potential. The use of stable isotope ratios for quantification of trophic relationships in terrestrial ecosystems needs to be further developed to resolve uncertainties associated with the calculation of terrestrial trophic magnification factors (TMFs). Sampling efforts for terrestrial field studies should strive for efficiency, and advice on optimization of study sample sizes, practical considerations for obtaining samples, selection of tissues for analysis, and data interpretation is provided. Although there is still much to be learned regarding terrestrial bioaccumulation, these recommendations provide some initial guidance to the present application of terrestrial field data as a line of evidence in the assessment of chemical bioaccumulation potential and a resource to inform laboratory and modeling efforts.

  14. 3XMM J185246.6+003317: Another Low Magnetic Field Magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, N.; Viganò, D.; Israel, G. L.; Pons, J. A.; Torres, D. F.

    2014-01-01

    We study the outburst of the newly discovered X-ray transient 3XMM J185246.6+003317, re-analyzing all available XMM-Newton observations of the source to perform a phase-coherent timing analysis, and derive updated values of the period and period derivative. We find the source rotating at P = 11.55871346(6) s (90% confidence level; at epoch MJD 54728.7) but no evidence for a period derivative in the seven months of outburst decay spanned by the observations. This translates to a 3σ upper limit for the period derivative of \\dot{P}< 1.4\\times 10^{-13} s s-1, which, assuming the classical magneto-dipolar braking model, gives a limit on the dipolar magnetic field of B dip < 4.1 × 1013 G. The X-ray outburst and spectral characteristics of 3XMM J185246.6+003317 confirm its identification as a magnetar, but the magnetic field upper limit we derive defines it as the third "low-B" magnetar discovered in the past 3 yr, after SGR 0418+5729 and Swift J1822.3-1606. We have also obtained an upper limit to the quiescent luminosity (<4 × 1033 erg s-1), in line with the expectations for an old magnetar. The discovery of this new low field magnetar reaffirms the prediction of about one outburst per year from the hidden population of aged magnetars.

  15. Field evaporation of ZnO: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yu Karahka, Markus; Kreuzer, H. J.

    2015-07-14

    With recent advances in atom probe tomography of insulators and semiconductors, there is a need to understand high electrostatic field effects in these materials as well as the details of field evaporation. We use density functional theory to study field effects in ZnO clusters calculating the potential energy curves, the local field distribution, the polarizability, and the dielectric constant as a function of field strength. We confirm that, as in MgO, the HOMO-LUMO gap of a ZnO cluster closes at the evaporation field strength signaling field-induced metallization of the insulator. Following the structural changes in the cluster at the evaporation field strength, we can identify the field evaporated species, in particular, we show that the most abundant ion, Zn{sup 2+}, is NOT post-ionized but leaves the surface as 2+ largely confirming the experimental observations. Our results also help to explain problems related to stoichiometry in the mass spectra measured in atom probe tomography.

  16. Ionization Study of Isomeric Molecules in Strong-field Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigo, Stefan; Le, Anh-Thu; Timilsina, Pratap; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.

    2017-02-01

    Through the use of the technique of time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, we obtain strong-field ionization yields for randomly oriented 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2-DCE) (C2H2Cl2) and 2-butene (C4H8). We are interested in studying the effect of conformal structure in strong-field ionization and, in particular, the role of molecular polarity. That is, we can perform strong-field ionization studies in polar vs non-polar molecules that have the same chemical composition. We report our findings through the ionization yields and the ratio (trans/cis) of each stereoisomer pair as a function of intensity.

  17. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  18. Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy: Input to epidemiological studies and dose-risk models.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Roger

    2017-04-06

    Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy have been increasingly studied in recent years because of the generally improved survival of patients who have received radiotherapy as part of their treatment for cancer and their subsequent risk of a second malignancy. This short article attempts to identify some current problems, challenges and opportunities for dosimetry developments in this field. Out-of-field doses and derived risk estimates contribute to general knowledge about radiation effects on humans as well as contributing to risk-benefit considerations for the individual patient. It is suggested that for input into epidemiological studies, the complete dose description (i.e. the synthesis of therapy and imaging doses from all the treatment and imaging modalities) is ideally required, although there is currently no common dosimetry framework which easily covers all modalities. A general strategy for out-of-field dose estimation requires development and improvement in several areas including (i) dosimetry in regions of steep dose gradient close to the field edge (ii) experimentally verified analytical and Monte Carlo models for out-of-field doses (iii) the validity of treatment planning system algorithms outside the field edge (iv) dosimetry of critical sub-structures in organs at risk (v) mixed field (including neutron) dosimetry in proton and ion radiotherapy and photoneutron production in high energy photon beams (vi) the most appropriate quantities to use in neutron dosimetry in a radiotherapy context and (vii) simplification of measurement methods in regions distant from the target volume.

  19. Simulation and experimental study of DC electric field distribution characteristics of rat hippocampal slices in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Qiu, Qian; Li, Ze-yan; Zhao, Zhe; Chen, Rui-juan; Wang, Hui-quan

    2016-06-01

    Direct current (DC) electric field is a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons. Despite its efficacy, the dielectric constant of artificial cerebrospinal fluid and the position and direction of brain slices and other factors can affect the field intensity and distribution acting on the surface of rat hippocampus slices, thus causing errors. In this study, we describe a new analytical method optimized for DC electric fields acting on brain slices, and the design of an external DC electric field stimulator to allow scientific evaluation of brain slices. We investigated parameters regarding the uniformity of electric field distribution and identified the maximal parameters using the finite element method. Then, we selected and simplified slice images using magnetic resonance imaging data and calculated the electric field intensity of the original and simplified models. The electric field simulator induced action potential and excitatory postsynaptic current with intensities of 1, 5, and 10 V/m. This study describes the development of a new electric field stimulator and successfully demonstrates its practicability for scientific evaluation of tissue slices.

  20. SU-E-T-596: Axillary Nodes Radiotherapy Boost Field Dosimetric Impact Study: Oblique Field and Field Optimization in 3D Conventional Breast Cancer Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Su, M; Sura, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric impact of two axillary nodes (AX) boost techniques: (1) posterior-oblique optimized field boost (POB), (2) traditional posterior-anterior boost (PAB) with field optimization (O-PAB), for a postmastectomy breast patient with positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods: Five patients, 3 left and 2 right chest walls, were included in this study. All patients were simulated in 5mm CT slice thickness. Supraclavicular (SC) and level I/II/III AX were contoured based on the RTOG atlas guideline. Five treatment plans, (1) tangential chest wall, (2) oblique SC including AX, (3) PAB, O-PAB and POB, were created for each patient. Three plan sums (PS) were generated by sum one of (3) plan with plan (1) and (2). The field optimization was done through PS dose distribution, which included a field adjustment, a fractional dose, a calculation location and a gantry angle selection for POB. A dosimetric impact was evaluated by comparing a SC and AX coverage, a PS maximum dose, an irradiated area percentage volume received dose over 105% prescription dose (V105), an ipsi-laterial mean lung dose (MLD), an ipsi-laterial mean humeral head dose (MHHD), a mean heart dose (MHD) (for left case only) and their DVH amount these three technique. Results: O-PAB, POB and PAB dosimetric results showed that there was no significant different on SC and AX coverage (p>0.43) and MHD (p>0.16). The benefit of sparing lung irradiation from PAB to O-PAB to POB was significant (p<0.004). PAB showed a highest PS maximum dose (p<0.005), V105 (p<0.023) and MLD (compared with OPAB, p=0.055). MHHD showed very sensitive to the patient arm positioning and anatomy. O-PAB convinced a lower MHHD than PAB (p=0.03). Conclusion: 3D CT contouring plays main role in accuracy radiotherapy. Dosimetric advantage of POB and O-PAB was observed for a better normal tissue irradiation sparing.

  1. Solar magnetic field studies using the 12 micron emission lines. II - Stokes profiles and vector field samples in sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewagama, Tilak; Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Osherovich, Vladimir; Wiedemann, Gunter; Zipoy, David; Mickey, Donald L.; Garcia, Howard

    1993-01-01

    Polarimetric observations at 12 microns of two sunpots are reported. The horizontal distribution of parameters such as magnetic field strength, inclination, azimuth, and magnetic field filling factors are presented along with information about the height dependence of the magnetic field strength. Comparisons with contemporary magnetostatic sunspot models are made. The magnetic data are used to estimate the height of 12 micron line formation. From the data, it is concluded that within a stable sunspot there are no regions that are magnetically filamentary, in the sense of containing both strong-field and field-free regions.

  2. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies. [Extremely Low Frequency (ELF)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  3. Studies on weak electromagnetic fields effects in chick embryos. Annual report, June 1985-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-31

    This research was directed to test some experimental conditions of the Henhouse project and to enforce a previous study on VLF electromagnetic fields effects on chick embryos. Henhouse Project: the response of White Leghorn Hisex embryos to field exposures effective on the Shaver breed, was studied. 1) A 48-hour exposure, in vivo, to a pulsed horizontal field of 100-Hz frequency, 1.0 micro T intensity, 500-microsecond pulse duration and 2-microsecond rise time induced a significant increase of developmental abnormalities in Hisex embryos. 2) A five-hour exposure of stage 7 Hisex embryos changed the Mitotic Index of their neural tissue. So, the early development of Hisex embryos, like Shaver embryos, can be modified by VLF pulsed electromagnetic fields. In the protocol of the Henhouse project, it was suggested a temperature of 38 C for eggs incubation. Studying the development of chick embryos in relation to the temperature, in the range of 37.4-40 C, it was confirmed that a 48-hour incubation at 38 C (with 55% humidity) does not induce abnormalities and allows a convenient developmental growth rate of the chick embryos. Electromagnetic fields effects in relation to the embryos orientation: preliminary results on the induction of abnormalities in field exposed embryos in relation to their orientation were confirmed. In a East-West oriented horizontal pulsed field, the organisms oriented to Southwest and Southeast showed a significant increase of developmental abnormalities. No effect was appreciable among the embryos Southward oriented.

  4. Epidemiological appraisal of studies of residential exposure to power frequency magnetic fields and adult cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C Y; Thériault, G; Lin, R S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To appraise epidemiological evidence of the purported association between residential exposure to power frequency magnetic fields and adult cancers. METHODS: Literature review and epidemiological evaluation. RESULTS: Seven epidemiological studies have been conducted on the risk of cancer among adults in relation to residential exposure to power frequency magnetic fields. Leukaemia was positively associated with magnetic fields in three case-control studies. The other two case-control studies and two cohort studies did not show such a link. Brain tumours and breast cancer have rarely been examined by these studies. Based on the epidemiological results, the analysis of the role of chance and bias, and the criteria for causal inferences, it seems that the evidence is not strong enough to support the putative causal relation between residential exposure to magnetic fields and adult leukaemia, brain tumours, or breast cancer. Inadequate statistical power is far more a concern than selection bias, information bias, and confounding in interpreting the results from these studies, and in explaining inconsistencies between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our reviews suggested that the only way to answer whether residential exposure to magnetic fields is capable of increasing the risks of adult cancers is to conduct more studies carefully avoiding methodological flaws, in particular small sample size. We also suggested that the risk of female breast cancer should be the object of additional investigations, and that future studies should attempt to include information on exposure to magnetic fields from workplaces as well as residential exposure to estimate the effects of overall exposure to magnetic fields. PMID:8983460

  5. Study of the reduced magnetic field required for thermally assisted magnetization reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdausi, H. F. Y.; Utari; Purnama, B.

    2016-11-01

    The reduced magnetic field required for thermally magnetization reversal discussed in this paper. Study of thermally assisted magnetization reversal conduct by using micromagnetic simulation. The magnetic dot size of the simulation was 50 nm × 50 nm × 20 nm. The perpendicularly anisotropy constant was 2 × 106 erg/cm3. Initial condition was set single domain configuration. Then a sufficiently thermal pulse was used to get stochastic effect so that the magnetization along to the induce field direction for pico second duration. The results show that the reduced magnetic field mechanism seem to be temporary antiferromagnetic configuration before single domain configuration in alinging along to field direction. The same mechanims observed for modify of thickness dot particles. The require magnetic field of 145 Oe in thermally assisted magnetization reversal open a posibility for MRAM application.

  6. Comparative Study of Electric Field Measurement in Glow Discharges using Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2008-10-22

    The net electric field inside low-pressure glow discharges has been measured using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of 1s2s {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}np{sup 1}P{sub 1} Rydberg series of atomic helium. Three different types of discharges, an inductively coupled RF discharge cell operating at 4 MHz, a homemade DC discharge cell and a commercial see-through hollow cathode lamp have been used for these studies. The Rydberg series terminates earlier in the high electric field discharge as compared to that in the low electric field discharge. The net electric field also produces shift and broadens the observed spectral lines especially in the high lying Rydberg transitions. The electric field has been determined from the series termination and also from the energy shift of the observed transitions.

  7. Thermo acoustic study of carbon nanotubes in near and far field: Theory, simulation, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, S. S.; Moosavi, A.; Huynh, C.; Saleki, O.

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotube webs exhibit interesting properties when used as thermo-acoustic projectors. This work studies thermo-acoustic effect of these sound sources both in near and far field regions. Based on two alternative forms of the energy equation, we have developed a straightforward formula for calculation of pressure field, which is consistent with experimental data in far field. Also we have solved full 3-D governing equations using numerical methods. Our three-dimensional simulation and experimental data show pressure waves are highly affected by dimensions of sound sources in near field due to interference effects. However, generation of sound waves in far field is independent of projectors area surface. Energy analysis for free standing Thermo-Acoustic (TA) sound sources show that aerogel TA sound sources like CNT based projectors could act more efficiently compared to the other sources in delivering more than 75% of alternative input energy to the medium gas up to a frequency of 1 MHz.

  8. Photoluminescence studies of modulation doped coupled double quantum wells in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Perry, C.H. |; Simmons, J.A.; Klem, J.F.; Jones, E.D.; Rickel, D.G.

    1996-09-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence spectra of a series of mudulation doped couple double quantum well structures in parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields to 62 tesla at 4K and 77K, for B{parallel}a, the spectra display distinct Landau level transitions which show anti-crossing with the e1-hh1 exciton. At high fields, the lowest conduction band-valence exciton approaches the extrapolated 0- 0 Landau level. About 25 Tesla, there is valence band mixing of the e1-lh1, e1-hh2, e1-hh1 transitions. The spectral peaks display a diamagnetic shift in low in-plane magnetic fields which become linear in high fields. At magnetic fields beyond 40T, spin splitting is observed for both B{parallel}z and B{perpendicular} geometries. The partial energy gap discovered in conductance measurements in in-plane fields was not conclusively observed using photoluminescence spectroscopy, although anomalies in the energy dependence of the lowest level with magnetic field were evident at similar field values.

  9. Factors motivating Cambodian American students to go to college and to study STEM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sann, Visna

    Cambodian Americans graduate from college at a lower rate than most Asian American groups. This qualitative study involved interviewing five current Cambodian American college students. This study examined how participants' high school experiences contributed to their decisions to go to college and to study STEM fields, how parental influences guided participants to college, and how college experiences influenced their decisions to stay and succeed in STEM fields. Findings from this study suggest: having supportive teachers in high school may have been important in motivating participants to go to college and to study STEM Fields, Cambodian parents tell stories of their lives in Cambodia to motivate their children to go to college, and Cambodian club on campus was a socially and academically supportive place.

  10. Laboratory study of magnetic reconnection with a guide field and density asymmetry across the current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongxuan; Yoo, J.; Ji, H.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.; Yamada, M.

    2016-10-01

    It has been known that the diamagnetic drift can stabilize the tearing mode, which is used to explain incomplete reconnection during sawtooth oscillations in Tokamaks. Swisdak et al. propose that reconnection with a strong guide field and pressure asymmetry is suppressed when the relative drift speed between ions and electrons along the outflow direction exceeds the upstream Alfvén speed. Swisdak's argument has been supported by space observations, but the exact mechanism of suppression has not been conclusively verified. We will conduct experiments in MRX to study suppression of reconnection with a strong guide field and density asymmetry. We will apply a guide field strength of about 2-3 times of the reconnecting field and achieve a density ratio up to 10. By systematically changing the guide field strength, we will investigate how the electron diamagnetic drift can affect profiles of the magnetic/electric field and patterns of the ion/electron flow. Finally, we will study how these modified field profiles and flow patterns contribute to reduction of the reconnection rate. This work is supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC0209CH11466.

  11. Reservoir Simulation on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field: A Continuing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, M.; Marquez, R.; Arellano, V.; Esquer, C.A.

    1983-12-15

    The Cerro Prieto geothermal field is a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir of complex geological and hydrological structure. It is located at the southern end of the Salton-Mexicali trough which includes other geothermal anomalies as Heber and East Mesa. Although in 1973, the initial power plant installed capacity was 75 MW of electrical power, this amount increased to 180 MW in 1981 as field development continued. It is expected to have a generating capacity of 620 MW by the end of 1985, when two new plants will be completely in operation. Questions about field deliverability, reservoir life and ultimate recovery related to planned installations are being presently asked. Numerical modeling studies can give very valuable answers to these questions, even at the early stages in the development of a field. An effort to simulate the Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoir has been undergoing for almost two years. A joint project among Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) and Intercomp of Houstin, Texas, was created to perform reservoir engineering and simulation studies on this field. The final project objective is tosimulate the behavior of the old field region when production from additional wells located in the undeveloped field zones will be used for feeding the new power plants.

  12. Review of in vivo static and ELF electric fields studies performed at Gazi Biophysics Department.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Nesrin; Güler, Göknur

    2006-01-01

    In vivo effects of Static Electric and ELF Magnetic and Electric fields have been carried out for more than 20 years in the Bioelectromagnetic Laboratory at the Biophysics Department of the Medical Faculty of Gazi University. In this article, the results of in vivo ELF Electric field studies are presented as a review. Static and 50 Hz ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) Electric (E) fields effects on free radical synthesis, antioxidant enzyme level, and collagen synthesis were analyzed on tissues of guinea pigs, such as brain, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, testis, and plasma. Animals were exposed to static and ELF electric fields with intensities ranging from 0.3 kV/m to 1.9 kV/m in vertical and horizontal directions. Exposure periods were 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days. Electric fields were generated from a specially designed parallel plate capacitor system. The results indicate that the effects of electric fields on the tissues studied depend significantly on the type and magnitude of electric field and exposure period.

  13. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute leukaemia: analysis of a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Willett, E; McKinney, P; Fear, N; Cartwright, R; Roman, E

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether the risk of acute leukaemia among adults is associated with occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. Methods: Probable occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields at higher than typical residential levels was investigated among 764 patients diagnosed with acute leukaemia during 1991–96 and 1510 sex and age matched controls. A job exposure matrix was applied to the self reported employment histories to determine whether or not a subject was exposed to electromagnetic fields. Risks were assessed using conditional logistic regression for a matched analysis. Results: Study subjects considered probably ever exposed to electromagnetic fields at work were not at increased risk of acute leukaemia compared to those considered never exposed. Generally, no associations were observed on stratification by sex, leukaemia subtype, number of years since exposure stopped, or occupation; there was no evidence of a dose-response effect using increasing number of years exposed. However, relative to women considered never exposed, a significant excess of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was observed among women probably exposed to electromagnetic fields at work that remained increased irrespective of time prior to diagnosis or job ever held. Conclusion: This large population based case-control study found little evidence to support an association between occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute leukaemia. While an excess of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia among women was observed, it is unlikely that occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields was responsible, given that increased risks remained during periods when exposure above background levels was improbable. PMID:12883018

  14. Site Study Plan for Acoustics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The Acoustics site study plan describes a field program which characterizes existing sound levels, determines the area's sound propagation characteristics, and monitors the project-related sound emissions. The plan describes for each study: the need for the study, study design, data management and use, schedule, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Requirements Document. 37 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Numerical study of soap-film flow by nonuniform alternating electric fields.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, M; Shirsavar, R; Mollaei, S; Ramos, A

    2017-02-01

    Fluid flow of suspended liquid films induced by non-uniform alternating electric fields has been reported. The electric fields were generated by two rod-like electrodes perpendicular to the fluid surface. The observed fluid flow was explained qualitatively by considering a charge induction mechanism, where the electric field actuates on the charge induced on the film surface. In this paper we perform a numerical study of this fluid flow taking into account the charge induction mechanism. The numerical results are compared with experiments and good agreement is found. Finally, we propose the application of the device as a new kind of two dimensional fluid pump.

  16. Analytical studies of advanced high-field designs: 20-tesla large-bore superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, R.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hickman, R.B.; Lee, J.D.

    1983-09-30

    Several emerging technologies have been combined in a conceptual design study demonstrating the feasibility of producing ultrahigh magnetic fields from large-bore superconducting solenoid magnets. Several designs have been produced that approach peak fields of 20-T in 2.0-m diameter inner bores. The analytical expressions comprising the main features of CONDUCTOR and ADVMAGNET, the two computer programs used in the design of these advanced magnets, are also discussed. These magnets and design techniques will make a paramount contribution to the national mirror-fusion endeavor and to the newly emerging field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) whole-body scanners.

  17. MODEL STUDY OF THE SIGN PROBLEM IN A MEAN-FIELD APPROXIMATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HIDAKA,Y.

    2007-07-30

    We study the sign problem of the fermion determinant at nonzero baryon chemical potential. For this purpose we apply a simple model derived from Quantum Chromodynamics, in the limit of large chemical potential and mass. For SU(2) color, there is no sign problem and the mean-field approximation is similar to data from the lattice. For SU(3) color the sign problem is unavoidable, even in a mean-field approximation. We apply a phase-reweighting method, combined with the mean-field approximation, to estimate thermodynamic quantities. We also investigate the meanfield free energy using a saddle-point approximation [1].

  18. Numerical study of soap-film flow by nonuniform alternating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, M.; Shirsavar, R.; Mollaei, S.; Ramos, A.

    2017-02-01

    Fluid flow of suspended liquid films induced by non-uniform alternating electric fields has been reported. The electric fields were generated by two rod-like electrodes perpendicular to the fluid surface. The observed fluid flow was explained qualitatively by considering a charge induction mechanism, where the electric field actuates on the charge induced on the film surface. In this paper we perform a numerical study of this fluid flow taking into account the charge induction mechanism. The numerical results are compared with experiments and good agreement is found. Finally, we propose the application of the device as a new kind of two dimensional fluid pump.

  19. Objectives and strategies for a cooperative EPA/API field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, John S.; Zwicker, Judith O.; Feldman, Howard

    1995-05-01

    A description is provided of design considerations for a forthcoming cooperative field measurement study to evaluate optical remote sensing technology for potential use in directly measuring and/or inferring industrial air toxics emissions. The general layout of these experiements (tracer releases from simulated volume sources) also lends itself to development of dispersion data that can be used to test and improve upon existing volume source models. Accordingly, point sampling arrays will be deployed downwind of the tracer sources in addition to the remote sensing instruments. Sponsors of the cooperative field study include the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Emissions Measurement Branch, and the Office of Research and Development, Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory of the US EPA, and the American Petroleum Institute. The field measurements are scheduled to take place between December 5 and December 23, 1994 at an open field site near Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

  20. A study on some optical illusions based upon the theory of inducing field.

    PubMed

    Ge, Sheng; Saito, Takashi; Wu, Jing-Long; Iramina, K

    2006-01-01

    The study of optical illusion is an important method to elucidate the mechanism of visual perception. However, many details about the cause of optical illusions are still unclear. In this research, based on the characteristic of the physiological structure of the retina, we proposed an on-center receptive field model of the retina. Using this model, we simulated the distributions of the inducing field of some visual stimulus. Comparing to the past studies' results, the validity of the proposed model was proofed. Furthermore, we simulated the distributions of the inducing field of some typical illusions. The simulation results can explain these illusion phenomenon rationally. Therefore, it suggested that some of illusions are probably engendered by the distributions of the inducing field in the retina which generated by the illusions stimuli. The practicality of the proposed model was also verified.

  1. Effective field study of ising model on a double perovskite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngantso, G. Dimitri; El Amraoui, Y.; Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.

    2017-02-01

    By using the effective field theory (EFT), the mixed spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 Ising ferrimagnetic model adapted to a double perovskite structure has been studied. The EFT calculations have been carried out from Ising Hamiltonian by taking into account first and second nearest-neighbors interactions and the crystal and external magnetic fields. Both first- and second-order phase transitions have been found in phase diagrams of interest. Depending on crystal-field values, the thermodynamic behavior of total magnetization indicated the compensation phenomenon existence. The hysteresis behaviors are studied by investigating the reduced magnetic field dependence of total magnetization and a series of hysteresis loops are shown for different reduced temperatures around the critical one.

  2. Educational Expansion and Field of Study: Trends in the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Inequality in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraaykamp, Gerbert; Tolsma, Jochem; Wolbers, Maarten H. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study to what extent parental field of study affects a person's educational level and field of study. We employ information on 8800 respondents from the Family Survey Dutch Population (1992-2009). Our results first of all show that, over the last five decades, economic fields of study have become more fashionable among men. In…

  3. Estimating magnetic fields of homes near transmission lines in the California Power Line Study.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Ximena P; Kavet, Robert; Crespi, Catherine M; Hooper, Chris; Silva, J Michael; Kheifets, Leeka

    2015-07-01

    The California Power Line Study is a case-control study investigating the relation between residences near transmission lines and risk of childhood leukemia. It includes 5788 childhood leukemia cases and 5788 matched primary controls born between 1986 and 2007. We describe the methodology for estimating magnetic fields at study residences as well as for characterizing sources of uncertainty in these estimates. Birth residences of study subjects were geocoded and their distances to transmission lines were ascertained. 302 residences were deemed sufficiently close to transmission lines to have non-zero magnetic fields attributable to the lines. These residences were visited and detailed data, describing the physical configuration and dimensions of the lines contributing to the magnetic field at the residence, were collected. Phasing, loading, and directional load flow data for years of birth and diagnosis for each subject as well as for the day of site visit were obtained from utilities when available; when yearly average load for a particular year was not available, extrapolated values based on expert knowledge and prediction models were obtained. These data were used to estimate the magnetic fields at the center, closest and farthest point of each residence. We found good correlation between calculated fields and spot measurements of fields taken on site during visits. Our modeling strategies yielded similar calculated field estimates, and they were in high agreement with utility extrapolations. Phasing was known for over 90% of the lines. Important sources of uncertainty included a lack of information on the precise location of residences located within apartment buildings or other complexes. Our findings suggest that we were able to achieve high specificity in exposure assessment, which is essential for examining the association between distance to or magnetic fields from power lines and childhood leukemia risk.

  4. Wide-field monitoring strategy for the study of fast optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Greco, Giuseppe; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  5. Scaling and applied field studies of MPD thrusters with laser diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: self-field magnetoplasmadynamics; 1/4-scale applied-field MPD; scaling of arcs and MPD-arcs; magnetic nozzle studies; advanced diagnostic techniques needed for obtaining particle velocity, temperature, and current distributions in plasma thrusters; nonintrusive laser diagnostics for arcs and MPD-arcs; and schematic of multi-beam interferometer for electron density profile determination.

  6. Pooled analysis of recent studies on magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kheifets, L; Ahlbom, A; Crespi, C M; Draper, G; Hagihara, J; Lowenthal, R M; Mezei, G; Oksuzyan, S; Schüz, J; Swanson, J; Tittarelli, A; Vinceti, M; Wunsch Filho, V

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous pooled analyses have reported an association between magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia. We present a pooled analysis based on primary data from studies on residential magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia published after 2000. Methods: Seven studies with a total of 10 865 cases and 12 853 controls were included. The main analysis focused on 24-h magnetic field measurements or calculated fields in residences. Results: In the combined results, risk increased with increase in exposure, but the estimates were imprecise. The odds ratios for exposure categories of 0.1–0.2 μT, 0.2–0.3 μT and ⩾0.3 μT, compared with <0.1 μT, were 1.07 (95% CI 0.81–1.41), 1.16 (0.69–1.93) and 1.44 (0.88–2.36), respectively. Without the most influential study from Brazil, the odds ratios increased somewhat. An increasing trend was also suggested by a nonparametric analysis conducted using a generalised additive model. Conclusions: Our results are in line with previous pooled analyses showing an association between magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia. Overall, the association is weaker in the most recently conducted studies, but these studies are small and lack methodological improvements needed to resolve the apparent association. We conclude that recent studies on magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia do not alter the previous assessment that magnetic fields are possibly carcinogenic. PMID:20877339

  7. The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study

    SciTech Connect

    1982-07-01

    This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of

  8. Field experience in science for fifth grade students---a mixed methods study of learning environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Barbara E.

    The purpose of this research is to compare students' perceptions of the learning environment in a traditional science classroom and a field study classroom. This mixed methods study used a sequential explanatory design. Phase one was the quantitative phase using two survey tools. A modified version of the "What is happening in this Classroom Survey" (WIHIC) (Fraser et al., 1996) and the "Test of Science Related Attitudes" (TOSRA) (Fraser, 1982) was administered to 60 fifth grade students from one school. Data was then disaggregated by socioeconomic class and ethnicity. Results from Phase one showed that students prefer the classroom for investigation and prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Differences in ethnicity and class were small but Hispanic students prefer the field for investigation and equity. Students that are low socio-economic class rank cooperation in the field higher than the classroom and students that do not qualify for free or reduced lunch prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Finally, there are strong correlations for the variables of cooperation, investigation, equity and enjoyment of science in both the classroom and the field environment. Questions raised from the analysis of the survey data were further explored through qualitative data collection methods in phase two. Student responses to three questions were coded using template analysis to provide answers to the "how and why" field experience effects students' attitudes toward science. Three themes emerged from the coding of the results. These results showed that students are physically engaged, develop a sense of place and learn skills in the field that reinforce concepts learned in the classroom. This information will help teachers in developing quality and meaningful experiences for all students. "Closing the gaps among minority groups while improving achievement of all students constitutes the dual goals of education in the nation" (Lee et al., 2004

  9. Stability of vaccinia-vectored recombinant oral rabies vaccine under field conditions: a 3-year study.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Joseph R; Fry, Alethea M; Siev, David; Slate, Dennis; Lewis, Charles; Gatewood, Donna M

    2011-10-01

    Rabies is an incurable zoonotic disease caused by rabies virus, a member of the rhabdovirus family. It is transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Control methods, including oral rabies vaccination (ORV) programs, have led to a reduction in the spread and prevalence of the disease in wildlife. This study evaluated the stability of RABORAL, a recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine that is used in oral rabies vaccination programs. The vaccine was studied in various field microenvironments in order to describe its viability and facilitate effective baiting strategies. Field microenvironments influenced the stability of this vaccine in this study. This study emphasizes the importance of understanding how vaccines perform under varying field conditions in order to plan effective baiting strategies.

  10. FAST/Polar Conjunction Study of Field-Aligned Auroral Acceleration and Corresponding Magnetotail Drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Richard, R. L.; Klezting, C.; Dotan, Y.; Wygant, J.

    2003-01-01

    The discrete aurora results when energized electrons bombard the Earth's atmosphere at high latitudes. This paper examines the physical processes that can cause field-aligned acceleration of plasma particles in the auroral region. A data and theoretical study has been carried out to examine the acceleration mechanisms that operate in the auroral zone and to identi@ the magnetospheric drivers of these acceleration mechanisms. The observations used in the study were collected by the Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) and Polar satellites when the two satellites were in approximate magnetic conjunction in the auroral region. During these events FAST was in the middle of the auroral zone and Polar was above the auroral zone in the near-Earth plasma sheet. Polar data were used to determine the conditions in the magnetotail at the time field-aligned acceleration was measured by FAST in the auroral zone. For each of the magnetotail drivers identified in the data study, the physics of field-aligned acceleration in the auroral region was examined using existing theoretical efforts and/or a long-system particle in cell simulation to model the magnetically connected region between the two satellites. Results from the study indicate that there are three main drivers of auroral acceleration: (1) field-aligned currents that lead to quasistatic parallel potential drops (parallel electric fields), (2) earthward flow of high-energy plasma beams from the magnetotail into the auroral zone that lead to quasistatic parallel potential drops, and (3) large-amplitude Alfven waves that propagate into the auroral region from the magnetotail. The events examined thus far confm the previously established invariant latitudinal dependence of the drivers and show a strong dependence on magnetic activity. Alfven waves tend to occur primarily at the poleward edge of the auroral region during more magnetically active times and are correlated with intense electron precipitation. At lower latitudes away

  11. Spin polarization transfer mechanisms of SABRE: A magnetic field dependent study.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Petrov, Pavel A; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field dependence of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) arising from binding of para-hydrogen (p-H2) and a substrate to a suitable transition metal complex. The magnetic field dependence of the amplification of the (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals of the released substrates and dihydrogen, and the transient transition metal dihydride species shows characteristic patterns, which is explained using the theory presented here. The generation of SABRE is most efficient at low magnetic fields due to coherent spin mixing at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in the SABRE complexes. We studied two Ir-complexes and have shown that the presence of a (31)P atom in the SABRE complex doubles the number of LACs and, consequently, the number of peaks in the SABRE field dependence. Interestingly, the polarization of SABRE substrates is always accompanied by the para-to-ortho conversion in dihydride species that results in enhancement of the NMR signal of free (H2) and catalyst-bound H2 (Ir-HH). The field dependences of hyperpolarized H2 and Ir-HH by means of SABRE are studied here, for the first time, in detail. The field dependences depend on the chemical shifts and coupling constants of Ir-HH, in which the polarization transfer takes place. A negative coupling constant of -7Hz between the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent hydride nuclei is determined, which indicates that Ir-HH is a dihydride with an HH distance larger than 2Å. Finally, the field dependence of SABRE at high fields as found earlier has been investigated and attributed to polarization transfer to the substrate by cross-relaxation. The present study provides further evidence for the key role of LACs in the formation of SABRE-derived polarization. Understanding the spin dynamics behind the SABRE method opens the way to optimizing its performance and overcoming the main limitation of NMR, its notoriously low sensitivity.

  12. The University of California Institute of Environmental Stress Marathon Field Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    In 1973, the Institute of Environmental Stress of the University of California-Santa Barbara, under the direction of Steven M. Horvath, began a series of field and laboratory studies of marathon runners during competition. As one of Horvath's graduate students, many of these studies became part of my doctoral dissertation. The rationale for…

  13. Understanding the Impact of Affirmative Action Bans in Different Graduate Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garces, Liliana M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of affirmative action bans in four states (California, Florida, Texas, and Washington) on the enrollment of underrepresented students of color within six different graduate fields of study: the natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, business, education, and humanities. Findings show that affirmative action…

  14. Higher Order Cumulant Studies of Ocean Surface Random Fields from Satellite Altimeter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, B.

    1996-01-01

    Higher order statistics, especially 2nd order statistics, have been used to study ocean processes for many years in the past, and occupy an appreciable part of the research literature on physical oceanography. They in turn form part of a much larger field of study in statistical fluid mechanics.

  15. 2012 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2012 represented the third sequential year of research regarding the limited irrigation 12-200 corn production assessment study at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) with the yield results being improved from that of the 2011 season but less than of the 2010 season. The study's purpose was to ev...

  16. Factors Influencing Singapore Students' Choice of Physics as a Tertiary Field of Study: A Rasch Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oon, Pey-Tee; Subramaniam, R.

    2013-01-01

    Asian students often perform well in international science and mathematics assessments. Their attitude toward technical subjects, such as physics, remains curious for many. The present study examines Singapore school students' views on various aspects of physics according to whether they intend to choose physics as an advanced field of study. A…

  17. Religious Studies: The Shaping of a Field and a Guide to Reference Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippy, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the development of religious studies as an academic discipline. Examines the work of leading thinkers in the field, including anthropologists Sir James Fraser and Edward Burnett Taylor, sociologist Max Weber, and psychologist Erik Erikson. Identifies some of the many reference works that deal with religious studies. (SG)

  18. Walking the Talk: Towards a More Inclusive Field of Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opini, Bathseba

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a conversation about growing an inclusive field of disability studies. The paper draws on data collected through an analysis of existing disability studies programmes in selected Canadian universities. The paper makes a case for including diverse perspectives, experiences, viewpoints, and voices in these programmes. In this work, I…

  19. This Isn't Business, It's Personal: Personal Narratives in the Field of Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golar, Norman

    2010-01-01

    I focus on three critical autobiographies in the field of composition studies: Mike Rose's "Lives on the Boundary: A Moving Account of the Struggles and Achievements of America's Educationally Underprepared," Keith Gilyard's "Voices of the Self: A Study of Language Competence," and Victor Villanueva, Jr.'s "Bootstraps: From an American Academic of…

  20. Participation without Parity in U.S. Higher Education: Gender, Fields of Study, and Institutional Selectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Ann L.; Baker, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    While women now earn more bachelor's degrees than men in many parts of the world, large gender gaps persist in fields of study, and women remain underrepresented in the most prestigious institutions. This study updates and extends the literature on gender disparities in higher education by comparing the selectivity of the institutions where men…

  1. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  2. Information-Seeking and Sharing Behaviors among Fire Service Field Staff Instructors: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruan, Lian J.

    2011-01-01

    Fire service field staff instructors seek and share information and use information sources during their instructional work of teaching, training and curriculum development. This study is the first attempt to study their information-seeking and sharing behaviors, which have not previously been investigated empirically. Twenty-five fire service…

  3. A test on reactive force fields for the study of silica dimerization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moqadam, Mahmoud; Riccardi, Enrico; Trinh, Thuat T.; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Erp, Titus S. van

    2015-11-14

    We studied silica dimerization reactions in the gas and aqueous phase by density functional theory (DFT) and reactive force fields based on two parameterizations of ReaxFF. For each method (both ReaxFF force fields and DFT), we performed constrained geometry optimizations, which were subsequently evaluated in single point energy calculations using the other two methods. Standard fitting procedures typically compare the force field energies and geometries with those from quantum mechanical data after a geometry optimization. The initial configurations for the force field optimization are usually the minimum energy structures of the ab initio database. Hence, the ab initio method dictates which structures are being examined and force field parameters are being adjusted in order to minimize the differences with the ab initio data. As a result, this approach will not exclude the possibility that the force field predicts stable geometries or low transition states which are realistically very high in energy and, therefore, never considered by the ab initio method. Our analysis reveals the existence of such unphysical geometries even at unreactive conditions where the distance between the reactants is large. To test the effect of these discrepancies, we launched molecular dynamics simulations using DFT and ReaxFF and observed spurious reactions for both ReaxFF force fields. Our results suggest that the standard procedures for parameter fitting need to be improved by a mutual comparative method.

  4. Bioremediation of weathered petroleum hydrocarbon soil contamination in the Canadian High Arctic: laboratory and field studies.

    PubMed

    Sanscartier, David; Laing, Tamsin; Reimer, Ken; Zeeb, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    The bioremediation of weathered medium- to high-molecular weight petroleum hydrocarbons (HCs) in the High Arctic was investigated. The polar desert climate, contaminant characteristics, and logistical constraints can make bioremediation of persistent HCs in the High Arctic challenging. Landfarming (0.3 m(3) plots) was tested in the field for three consecutive years with plots receiving very little maintenance. Application of surfactant and fertilizers, and passive warming using a greenhouse were investigated. The field study was complemented by a laboratory experiment to better understand HC removal mechanisms and limiting factors affecting bioremediation on site. Significant reduction of total petroleum HCs (TPH) was observed in both experiments. Preferential removal of compounds field and the laboratory. In the laboratory, significant removal of compounds >nC16 occurred, whereas in the field, TPH reduction was mainly limited to removal of compounds nC16 was observed in the fertilized field plots only. The greenhouse increased average soil temperatures and extended the treatment season but did not enhance bioremediation. Findings suggest that temperature and low moisture content affected biodegradation of HCs in the field. Little volatilization was measured in the laboratory, but this process may have been predominant in the field. Low-maintenance landfarming may be best suited for remediation of HCs compounds

  5. Simulational studies of epitaxial semiconductor superlattices: Quantum dynamical phenomena in ac and dc electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Joseph

    1997-10-08

    Using high-accuracy numerical methods the author investigates the dynamics of independent electrons in both ideal and realistic superlattices subject to arbitrary ac and/or dc electric fields. For a variety of superlattice potentials, optically excited initial wave packets, and combinations of ac and dc electric fields, he numerically solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the case of ideal periodic superlattice potentials, he investigates a long list of dynamical phenomena involving multiple miniband transitions and time-dependent electric fields. These include acceleration effects associated with interminiband transitions in strong fields, Zener resonances between minibands, dynamic localization with ac fields, increased single-miniband transport with an auxiliary resonant ac field, and enhanced or suppressed interminiband probability exchange using an auxiliary ac field. For all of the cases studied, the resulting time-dependent wave function is analyzed by projecting the data onto convenient orthonormal bases. This allows a detailed comparison with approximately analytic treatments. In an effort to explain the rapid decay of experimentally measured Bloch oscillation (BO) signals the author incorporates a one-dimensional representation of interface roughness (IR) into their superlattice potential. He shows that as a result of IR, the electron dynamics can be characterized in terms of many discrete, incommensurate frequencies near the Block frequency. Chapters 2, 3, 4 and 5 have been removed from this report and will be processed separately.

  6. A quantitative study relating observed shear in photospheric magnetic fields to repeated flaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the shear in the magnetic field along the neutral line in an active region during an epoch of flare activity is presented. Shear is defined as the angular difference in the photosphere between the potential magnetic field, which fits the boundary conditions imposed by the observed line-of-sight field, and the observed magnetic field. For the active region studied, this angular difference (shear) is non-uniform along the neutral line with maxima occurring at the locations of repeated flare onsets. It is suggested that continued magnetic evolution causes the field's maximum shear to exceed a critical value of shear, resulting in a flare around the site of maximum shear. Evidently, the field at the site of the flare must relax to a state of shear somewhat below the critical value (but still far from potential), with subsequent evolution returning the field to the critical threshold. This inference is drawn because several flares occured at sites of maximum photospheric shear which were persistent in location.

  7. [Comparative study of the electrocorticogram of several brain fields of dozing cats in a chronic experiment].

    PubMed

    Konik, O E

    1976-01-01

    Peculatities of background electrical activity of some projection regions, the I somatosensory (field 53), and I and II auditory (fields 22 and 52, respectively), visual (field 17) and associative cortex (field 5), were studied in chronic experiments, performed on unanesthetized dozy cats. In transient periods, from vigil to sleep and vice versa, the maximal distinctions in slow-wave activity were detected between the regions under recording. They consisted in dissimilarities of spindle activity and low crosscorrelation coefficients (0.21 +/- 0.04). The synchrony of the potentials of different cortical regions increased and the crosscorrelation coefficients grew from 0.4 +/- 18 as sleep deepened. The functional reorganization of thalamic pacemaker mechanisms is supposed to take place with changes in the sleep depth. No distinctions in desynchronization were observed in different projective cortical fields because of the expressive orientation reflex. Only after the orientation reaction was suppressed and after application of the stimuli of adequate strength it was possible to reveal specific peculiarities of the projective field electrical reaction. Availability of definite conditions is emphasized for developing specific signs of the projective field electrical reaction.

  8. Development toxicology study in rats exposed to 60-Hz horizontal magnetic fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1997-09-01

    A replicate study using large numbers of animals was conducted to determine if 60 Hz magnetic fields would produce developmental toxicity in rats. Systems used previously for electric field exposures were retrofitted to provide magnetic field exposures to small laboratory animals. Large coils, separated from the rat cages, were energized by computer-controlled function generators providing a relatively pure, 1,000--{micro}T (10 G), 60-Hz, horizontal magnetic field for the high exposure group. Leakage fields to a second system provided a second exposure group with average exposures of 0.61 {micro}T (6.1 mG). Ambient fields within a third (control) system were 0.09 {micro}T (0.9 mG). Replicate experiments were conducted in which female rats were mated, and sperm-positive females were randomly distributed among the three exposure groups: (0.09, 0.61, and 1,000 {micro}T). Pregnant animals were exposed to 60 Hz horizontal magnetic fields for 20 hr/day from mating until very near term, 20 days later.

  9. Study on the time difference of solar polar field reversal between the north and south hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukuya, D.; Kusano, K.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamo is a mechanism whereby the kinetic energy of plasma is converted to the magnetic energy. This mechanism works to generate and maintain the solar and stellar magnetic field. Since the sun is only a star whose magnetic field can be directly observed, the understanding of solar dynamo can provide clues to clarify dynamo mechanisms. On the other hand, because solar activities, which are caused by solar dynamo, can influence the Earth's climate, solar variability is an important issue also to understand long-term evolution of the Earth's climate. It is widely known that the polarity of the solar magnetic fields on the north and south poles periodically reverses at every sunspot maxima. It is also known that the reversal at one pole is followed by that on the other pole. The time difference of magnetic field reversal between the poles was first noted by Babcock (1959) from the very first observation of polar field. Recently, it was confirmed by detailed observations with the HINODE satellite (Shiota et al. 2012). Svalgaard and Kamide (2013) indicated that there is a relationship between the time difference of the polarity reversal and the hemispheric asymmetry of the sunspot activity. However, the mechanisms for the hemispheric asymmetry are still open to be revealed. In this paper, we study the asymmetric feature of the solar dynamo based on the flux transport dynamo model (Chatterjee et al. 2004) to explain the time difference of magnetic polarity reversal between the north and south poles. In order to calculate long-term variations of solar activities, we use the mean field kinematic dynamo model, which is derived from magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equation through the mean field and other approximations. We carried out the mean field dynamo simulations using the updated SURYA code which was developed originally by Choudhuri and his collaborators (2004). We decomposed the symmetric and asymmetric components of magnetic field, which correspond respectively to the

  10. In situ visualization study of CO 2 gas bubble behavior in DMFC anode flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Zhao, T. S.; Ye, Q.

    This paper reports on a visual study of the CO 2 bubble behavior in the anode flow field of an in-house fabricated transparent Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC), which consisted of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an active area of 4.0 × 4.0 cm 2, two bipolar plates with a single serpentine channel, and a transparent enclosure. The study reveals that at low current densities, small discrete bubbles appeared in the anode flow field. At moderate current densities, a number of gas slugs formed, in addition to small discrete bubbles. And at high current densities, the flow field was predominated by rather long gas slugs. The experiments also indicate that the cell orientation had a significant effect on the cell performance, especially at low methanol flow rates; for the present flow field design the best cell performance could be achieved when the cell was orientated vertically. It has been shown that higher methanol solution flow rates reduced the average length and the number of gas slugs in the flow field, but led to an increased methanol crossover. In particular, the effect of methanol solution flow rates on the cell performance became more pronounced at low temperatures. The effect of temperature on the bubble behavior and the cell performance was also examined. Furthermore, for the present flow field consisting of a single serpentine channel, the channel-blocking phenomenon caused by CO 2 gas slugs was never encountered under all the test conditions in this work.

  11. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study of Dissociation of Water under an Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitta, A. Marco; Saija, Franz; Giaquinta, Paolo V.

    2012-05-01

    The behavior of liquid water under an electric field is a crucial phenomenon in science and engineering. However, its detailed description at a microscopic level is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here we report on the first ab initio molecular-dynamics study on water under an electric field. We observe that the hydrogen-bond length and the molecular orientation are significantly modified at low-to-moderate field intensities. Fields beyond a threshold of about 0.35V/Å are able to dissociate molecules and sustain an ionic current via a series of correlated proton jumps. Upon applying even more intense fields (˜1.0V/Å), a 15%-20% fraction of molecules are instantaneously dissociated and the resulting ionic flow yields a conductance of about 7.8Ω-1cm-1, in good agreement with experimental values. This result paves the way to quantum-accurate microscopic studies of the effect of electric fields on aqueous solutions and, thus, to massive applications of ab initio molecular dynamics in neurobiology, electrochemistry, and hydrogen economy.

  12. Proteomic analysis of field cancerization in pharynx and oesophagus: a prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Leipold, Alexandra; Nees, Matthias; Holzinger, Dana; Dietz, Andreas; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Wolf, Thomas; Zapatka, Marc; Bosch, Franz X

    2010-08-01

    'Field cancerization' in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is poorly understood and it may extend from the pharynx into the oesophagus. Both local recurrences and second primary carcinomas/second field tumours may originate from field cancerization. Our prospective pilot study aimed at the identification of patients suffering from field cancerization on the basis of mucosal protein profiles. Five mucosal biopsies from the oropharynx, hypopharynx and from three regions of the oesophagus were taken from 24 patients. Protein profiles were generated from the mucosal biopsies. After classifier learning, using the profiles of the patients without tumour diagnosis (n = 9), we were able to discriminate between the different mucosal sites and between healthy mucosa and HNSCC using tumour and healthy tissue samples. Mucosal biopsies of tumour patients (n = 15) revealed changes in the protein profiles similar to those in the tumours. During 42 months median follow-up, six tumour patients experienced local recurrences and second field tumours, of which three occurred in the oesophagus. In all six cases, tumour relapse was correctly predicted by altered mucosal protein profiles (p = 0.007, Fisher's exact test, two-tailed). Consequently, molecular field cancerization had a strong impact on progression-free survival (p = 0.007, log-rank test). Protein profiles of small diagnostic biopsies hold great promise to improve personalized risk assessment in HNSCC. Larger studies are needed to further substantiate these findings.

  13. Coherence of heart rate variability and local physical fields in monitoring studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzhilkin, D. A.; Borodin, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Technological advances have led to a substantial modification of the physical fields of the environment, which could affect the status of living organisms under their constant exposure. In this study, the activity of human cardiovascular system under the influence of a complex natural physical environmental factors investigated. The study was conducted on a representative homogeneous sample (44 persons aged 19 to 22 years) by simultaneous monitoring of electrocardiograms and natural physical fields in Tomsk (geomagnetic field, meteorological parameters - temperature, pressure and humidity, surface wind speed, the parameters of the Schumann resonance - amplitude, frequency and quality factor of the first four modes in the range of 6 to 32 Hz, the power spectral density infrasonic background in the range of from 0,5 to 32 Hz). It was shown that among the set of parameters of physical fields present field that can resonate in the functioning of the human organism. The greatest coherence with heart rate variability detect variations eastern component of the geomagnetic field.

  14. An exposure chamber for studies on human perception of DC electric fields and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.H.; Maruvada, P.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Direct current (DC) transmission lines are often used, for technical and economic reasons, as interconnections in modern high voltage power systems, which are essentially of the alternating current (AC) type. Significant differences exist, however, between the field effects produced in the vicinity of AC and DC transmission lines. DC electric fields induce charges, on the surface of a conducting body such as a human being and may therefore be ''perceived'' by humans due to hair stimulation and other sensations experienced by the skin. A human being exposed to the ionized field of a DC transmission line experiences not only surface charges but also the conducted ion currents. A systematic laboratory study has been undertaken by Hydro Quebec to investigate human perception, using well established psycho physical techniques, of DC electric fields and ions. The design, construction and operation of an exposure chamber for this purpose, in the high voltage laboratory of IREQ, are described in this paper.

  15. Fully differential study on dissociative ionization dynamics of deuteron molecules in strong elliptical laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yun; He, Peilun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Sun, Xufei; Li, Min; Deng, Yongkai; Wu, Chengyin; He, Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2017-03-01

    Deuteron momentum distributions from the dissociative ionization of D2 in intense elliptically polarized laser fields have been explored in a joint experimental and numerical study. The asymmetrical charge localization in the dissociative D2 + offers a large torque, and thus an elliptically polarized laser field efficiently rotates the molecular ion during its dissociation, resulting in the emission of deuterons finally deviating from the bond direction at the instant of tunneling ionization of D2. The rotating torque of the molecular ions increases with the field ellipticity, leading to an ellipticity-dependent tilt angle for the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the notable rotation of D2 + during its dissociation, the photoelectron angular distributions in the laboratory frame and the molecular frame are distinct, which illustrates that the axial recoil approximation is broken for discussing the photoelectron angular distributions of molecules in elliptically polarized laser fields.

  16. Experimental study of directionally solidified ferromagnetic shape memory alloy under multi-field coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuping; Chen, Tao; Teng, Yao; Liu, Bingfei; Xue, Lijun

    2016-11-01

    Directionally solidified, polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga is studied in this paper. The polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga samples were cut at different angles to solidification direction. The magnetic field induced strain under constant stress and the temperature-induced strain under constant magnetic field during the loading-unloading cycle were measured. The experimental results show that the mechanical behavior during the loading-unloading cycle of the material is nonlinear and anisotropic. Based on the experimental results, the effects of multi-field coupling factors, such as stress, magnetic field, temperature and cutting angle on the mechanical behaviors were analyzed. Some useful conclusions were obtained, which will provide guidance for practical applications.

  17. A portable high-field pulsed magnet system for x-ray scattering studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Z.; Ruff, J.P.C.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Ross, K. A.; Gaulin, B. D.; Qu, Z.; Lang, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a portable pulsed-magnet system for x-ray studies of materials in high magnetic fields (up to 30 T). The apparatus consists of a split-pair of minicoils cooled on a closed-cycle cryostat, which is used for x-ray diffraction studies with applied field normal to the scattering plane. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling the sample to near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields (- 1 ms in total duration) are generated by discharging a configurable capacitor bank into the magnet coils. Time-resolved scattering data are collected using a combination of a fast single-photon counting detector, a multichannel scaler, and a high-resolution digital storage oscilloscope. The capabilities of this instrument are used to study a geometrically frustrated system revealing strong magnetostrictive effects in the spin-liquid state.

  18. Near-Sun and 1 AU magnetic field of coronal mass ejections: a parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Georgoulis, M. K.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: The magnetic field of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) determines their structure, evolution, and energetics, as well as their geoeffectiveness. However, we currently lack routine diagnostics of the near-Sun CME magnetic field, which is crucial for determining the subsequent evolution of CMEs. Methods: We recently presented a method to infer the near-Sun magnetic field magnitude of CMEs and then extrapolate it to 1 AU. This method uses relatively easy to deduce observational estimates of the magnetic helicity in CME-source regions along with geometrical CME fits enabled by coronagraph observations. We hereby perform a parametric study of this method aiming to assess its robustness. We use statistics of active region (AR) helicities and CME geometrical parameters to determine a matrix of plausible near-Sun CME magnetic field magnitudes. In addition, we extrapolate this matrix to 1 AU and determine the anticipated range of CME magnetic fields at 1 AU representing the radial falloff of the magnetic field in the CME out to interplanetary (IP) space by a power law with index αB. Results: The resulting distribution of the near-Sun (at 10 R⊙) CME magnetic fields varies in the range [0.004, 0.02] G, comparable to, or higher than, a few existing observational inferences of the magnetic field in the quiescent corona at the same distance. We also find that a theoretically and observationally motivated range exists around αB = -1.6 ± 0.2, thereby leading to a ballpark agreement between our estimates and observationally inferred field magnitudes of magnetic clouds (MCs) at L1. Conclusions: In a statistical sense, our method provides results that are consistent with observations.

  19. Numerical and exact density functional studies of light atoms in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wuming

    2005-11-01

    Although current density functional theory (CDFT) was proposed almost two decades ago, rather little progress has been made in development and application of this theory, in contrast to many successful applications that ordinary density functional theory (DFT) has enjoyed. In parallel with early DFT exploration, we have made extensive studies on atom-like systems in an external magnetic field. The objectives are to advance our comparative understanding of the DFT and CDFT descriptions of such systems. A subsidiary objective is to provide extensive data on light atoms in high fields, notably those of astrophysical interest. To address the cylindrical symmetry induced by the external field, an efficient, systematic way to construct high quality basis sets within anisotropic Gaussians is provided. Using such basis sets, we did extensive Hartree-Fock and DFT calculations on helium through carbon atoms in a wide range of B fields. The applicability and limitations of modern DFT and CDFT functionals for atomic systems in such fields is analyzed. An exact soluble two-electron model system, Hooke's atom (HA), is studied in detail. Analogously with known results for zero field, we developed exact analytical solutions for some specific confinement and field strengths. Exact DFT and CDFT quantities for the HA in B fields, specifically exchange and correlation functionals were obtained and compared with results from approximate functionals. Major qualitative differences were identified. A major overall conclusion of the work is that the vorticity variable, introduced in CDFT to ensure gauge invariance, is rather difficult to handle computationally. The difficulty is severe enough to suggest that it might be profitable to seek an alternative gauge-invariance formulation of the current-dependence in DFT.

  20. Case-control study of childhood cancer and exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; Wachtel, H.; Barnes, F.A.; John, E.M.; Tvrdik, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    Concern with health effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields has been raised by epidemiologic studies of childhood cancer in relation to proximity to electric power distribution lines. This case-control study was designed to assess the relation between residential exposure to magnetic fields and the development of childhood cancer. Eligible cases consisted of all 356 residents of the five-county 1970 Denver, Colorado Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area aged 0-14 years who were diagnosed with any form of cancer between 1976 and 1983. Controls were selected by random digit dialing to approximate the case distribution by age, sex, and telephone exchange area. Exposure was characterized through in-home electric and magnetic field measurements under low and high power use conditions and wire configuration codes, a surrogate measure of long-term magnetic field levels. Measured magnetic fields under low power use conditions had a modest association with cancer incidence; a cutoff score of 2.0 milligauss resulted in an odds ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-2.9) for total cancers and somewhat larger odds ratios (ORs) for leukemias (OR = 1.9), lymphomas (OR = 2.2), and soft tissue sarcomas (OR = 3.3). Neither magnetic fields (OR = 1.0) nor electric fields (OR = 0.9) under high power use conditions were related to total cancers. Wire codes associated with higher magnetic fields were more common among case than control homes. The odds ratio to contrast very high and high to very low, low, and buried wire codes was 1.5 (95% CI = 1.0-2.3) for total cases, with consistency across cancer subgroups except for brain cancer (OR = 2.0) and lymphomas (OR = 0.8). Contrasts of very high to buried wire code homes produced larger, less precise odds ratios of 2.3 for total cases, 2.9 for leukemias, and 3.3 for lymphomas.

  1. Results of a multisite study of U.S. residential magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Richard F; Bracken, T Dan; Senior, Russell S; Kavet, Robert; Montgomery, Judith H

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the study design, measurement protocols, and results of a project examining residential magnetic-field exposures at eight sites across the contiguous United States. The goal of the project was to investigate surrogates that have been used in epidemiologic studies to characterize residential magnetic-field exposure. These surrogates include: personal-exposure (PE), fixed-location long-term (LT), and outside and inside point-in-time (PIT) magnetic-field measurements; net-service (or ground current) measurements; and the "wire-code category" of the residence. (The latter is a surrogate for magnetic-field exposure based on the nature and proximity of electric power lines outside the house.) Measurements were conducted on four visits to each of eight sites between January 1994 and June 1997 for a study population of 218 single-unit detached dwellings. Information on the residence, residents, and neighborhood was collected. A simple random sample of 392 single-unit detached dwellings at the sites was used to create a weighted sample of houses representative of the population of single-unit residences. The correlations among the various types of 60-Hz magnetic-field measures were relatively strong (Pearson r>0.74, Spearman rho>0.78). Variability of PE and LT measurements, as measured by the standard deviations during a visit, was independent of wire-code category. Visit means for PE, LT, and outside and inside PIT were well correlated over periods between visits of from 1.5 to 20 months (r>0.62, rho>0.76). These results support the use of survey measurements (less demanding than personal monitoring) to represent exposure that occurred up to 20 months in the past. The principal component of the total variance in PE measurements was the between-house variance; between-visit and between-site variances were generally less important. This supports the sampling of many houses with relatively few visits in residential exposure characterization studies. There

  2. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail During Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    1996-01-01

    This section outlines those tasks undertaken in the final year that contribute integrally to the overarching project goals. Fast, during the final year, it is important to note that the project benefited greatly with the addition of a Boston University graduate student, Ms. Karen Hirsch. Jointly, we made substantial progress on the development of and improvements to magnetotail magnetic field and plasma models. The ultimate aim of this specific task was to assess critically the utility of such models for mapping low-altitude phenomena into the magnetotail (and vice-versa). The bulk of this effort centered around the finite-width- magnetotail convection model developed by and described by Spence and Kivelson (J. Geophys. Res., 98, 15,487, 1993). This analytic, theoretical model specifies the bulk plasma characteristics of the magnetotail plasma sheet (number density, temperature, pressure) across the full width of the tail from the inner edge of the plasma sheet to lunar distances. Model outputs are specified by boundary conditions of the source particle populations as well as the magnetic and electric field configuration. During the reporting period, we modified this code such that it can be interfaced with the auroral particle precipitation model developed by Dr. Terry Onsager. Together, our models provide a simple analytic specification of the equatorial distribution of fields and plasma along with their low-altitude consequences. Specifically, we have built a simple, yet powerful tool which allows us to indirectly 'map' auroral precipitation signatures (VDIS, inverted-V's, etc.) measured by polar orbiting spacecraft in the ionosphere, to the magnetospheric equatorial plane. The combined models allow us to associate latitudinal gradients measured in the ion energy fluxes at low-altitudes with the large-scale pressure gradients in the equatorial plane. Given this global, quasi-static association, we can then make fairly strong statements regarding the location of

  3. Sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence study of cavitation field in a 1.2MHz focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hui; Qiao, Yangzi; Cao, Hua; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    An intensified CCD (ICCD) and an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) were employed to observe the spatial distribution of sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation bubbles in a 1.2MHz HIFU field. Various sonication conditions, which are free field and focal region near a water-parenchyma interface, were studied. In addition, the differences of two shells coated UCAs were also investigated. In this study, an acoustic radiation force (ARF) counterbalance appliance was added to reduce bubble displacement. Cavitation mapping in this situation was also operated through SCL recording. SCL was also employed to measure cavitation does and map the spatial distribution of cavitation near a boundary of parenchyma.

  4. Experimental studies of excitations in a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Niffenegger, Robert; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of various excitation processes in a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields. We have systematically studied controllable inter-band excitations by modulating the strength of the Raman coupling, and probed the resultant decay from the upper dressed bands and heating of the BEC. We also present preliminary results probing the effects of synthetic spin-orbit coupling and gauge fields on collective excitations as well as photoassociation processes in the BEC.

  5. Phase field crystal study of deformation and plasticity in nanocrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Peter; Haataja, Mikko; Provatas, Nikolas

    2009-10-01

    We introduce a modified phase field crystal (MPFC) technique that self-consistently incorporates rapid strain relaxation alongside the usual plastic deformation and multiple crystal orientations featured by the traditional phase field crystal (PFC) technique. Our MPFC formalism can be used to study a host of important phase transformation phenomena in material processing that require rapid strain relaxation. We apply the MPFC model to study elastic and plastic deformations in nanocrystalline materials, focusing on the "reverse" Hall-Petch effect. Finally, we introduce a multigrid algorithm for efficient numerical simulations of the MPFC model.

  6. Planetary magnetic fields in the solar system: A numerical study of dynamo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Perez, Natalia

    In this dissertation numerical models of self-sustained convective dynamos are studied and developed, with application to solar system planetary dynamos. The three main works are: Chapter 2, model of different stages of terrestrial planet core growth; Chapter 3, model of magnetic fields of the ice giants; Chapters 4 and 5, development of the legacy dynamo code to include radially variable conductivity, and application of resulting models to the gas giants. Aging terrestrial planets have growing inner cores. We show that core size can determine the character of dynamo generated magnetic fields. Even though they depend on initial conditions and scaling parameters, it is possible to use field geometries and magnitudes as diagnostic of internal planetary structure. The ratio between inner and outer core radii, h, yields strong magnetic fields for intermediate values (0.25 < h < 0.45), and weaker fields otherwise. High magnetic field intensity patches are found near latitudes arccos(h) where the inner core tangent cylinder intersects the outer boundary. Boundary conditions and internal force balances are responsible for dominant harmonic components of external magnetic fields. The peculiar characteristics of ice giants' magnetic fields can be explained by internal force balances. Uranus and Neptune have deep electrolytic liquid interiors of ice-like composition, with electrical conductivity about two orders of magnitude lower than molten iron. Low electrical conductivity models yield numerical dynamos dominated by kinetic energies. We show the simulated flows are quasi-geostrophic and result in non- dipolar, highly transient, and non-axisymmetric magnetic fields, comparable to magnetic fields of the ice giants. Modifications of the numerical code, better representing the gas giants' interiors, are introduced and tested. Radially variable electrical conductivity (expected for the gas giants) is implemented into numerical algorithms to solve the magnetohydrodynamic

  7. Studying Geology of Central Texas through Web-Based Virtual Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C.; Khan, S. D.; Wellner, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    website is relevant to my class." These virtual field trips provide an alternative for students who cannot attend the actual field trips. They also allow transfer students to experience these sites before attending upper level field trips, which often return to study these sites in more detail. These modules provide a valuable supplementary experience for all students, as they emphasize skills for which we are presently unable to provide sufficient practice in lecture, fieldtrips, or laboratory. Public access to the field trips is available at: http://geoinfo.geosc.uh.edu/VR/

  8. Sealing rice field boundaries in Bangladesh: a pilot study demonstrating reductions in water use, arsenic loading to field soils, and methane emissions from irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Pracht, Lara E; Polizzotto, Matthew L; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf

    2014-08-19

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated and methane-rich groundwater loads arsenic into field soils and releases methane into the atmosphere. We tested the water-savings potential of sealing field bunds (raised boundaries around field edges) as a way to mitigate these negative outcomes. We found that, on average, bund sealing reduced seasonal water use by 52 ± 17% and decreased arsenic loading to field soils by 15 ± 4%; greater savings in both water use and arsenic loading were achieved in fields with larger perimeter-to-area ratios (i.e., smaller fields). Our study is the first to quantify emission of methane from irrigation water in Bangladesh, a currently unaccounted-for methane source. Irrigation water applied to unsealed fields at our site emits 18 to 31 g of methane per square-meter of field area per season, potentially doubling the atmospheric input of methane from rice cultivation. Bund sealing reduced the emission of methane from irrigation water by 4 to 19 g/m(2). While the studied outcomes of bund sealing are positive and compelling, widespread implementation of the technique should consider other factors, such as effect on yields, financial costs, and impact on the hydrologic system. We provide an initial and preliminary assessment of these implementation factors.

  9. Accuracy and repeatability of an inertial measurement unit system for field-based occupational studies.

    PubMed

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard; Oyama, Sakiko; Douphrate, David I

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy and repeatability of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) system for directly measuring trunk angular displacement and upper arm elevation were evaluated over eight hours (i) in comparison to a gold standard, optical motion capture (OMC) system in a laboratory setting, and (ii) during a field-based assessment of dairy parlour work. Sample-to-sample root mean square differences between the IMU and OMC system ranged from 4.1° to 6.6° for the trunk and 7.2°-12.1° for the upper arm depending on the processing method. Estimates of mean angular displacement and angular displacement variation (difference between the 90th and 10th percentiles of angular displacement) were observed to change <4.5° on average in the laboratory and <1.5° on average in the field per eight hours of data collection. Results suggest the IMU system may serve as an acceptable instrument for directly measuring trunk and upper arm postures in field-based occupational exposure assessment studies with long sampling durations. Practitioner Summary: Few studies have evaluated inertial measurement unit (IMU) systems in the field or over long sampling durations. Results of this study indicate that the IMU system evaluated has reasonably good accuracy and repeatability for use in a field setting over a long sampling duration.

  10. Site study plan for ecology, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The Ecology Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of studies which include surveys for endangered, threatened, and candidate species; vegetation characterization, including mapping and cover typing, plant succession, wetlands description, and preexisting stresses; and wildlife community characterization, including availability and quality of habitats and descriptions of mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, and invertebrate populations. The plan for each study describes the need for the study, study design, data management and use, schedule and personnel requirements, and quality assurance. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document (SRP-RD). 83 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Study of magnetic fields and current in the Z pinch at stagnation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V.; Anderson, A. A.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Dmitriev, O.; Papp, D.

    2015-09-15

    The structure of magnetic fields in wire-array Z pinches at stagnation was studied using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The electron plasma density and the Faraday rotation angle in plasma were calculated from images of the three-channel polarimeter. The magnetic field was reconstructed with Abel transform, and the current was estimated using a simple model. Several shots with wire-array Z pinches at 0.5–1.5 MA were analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field measured in plasma of the stagnated pinch was in the range of 1–2 MG. The magnetic field and current profile in plasma near the neck on the pinch were reconstructed, and the size of the current-carrying plasma was estimated. It was found that current flowed in the large-size trailing plasma near the dense neck. Measurements of the magnetic field near the bulge on the pinch also showed current in trailing plasma. A distribution of current in the large-size trailing plasma can prevent the formation of multi-MG fields in the Z pinch.

  12. Origins of electromagnetic hypersensitivity to 60 Hz magnetic fields: A provocation study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Jae Lim; Nam, Ki Chang; Yang, Dong In; Kwon, Min Kyung

    2012-05-01

    With increasing electrical device usage, social concerns about the possible effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on human health have increased. The number of people with self-attributed electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) who complain of various subjective symptoms such as headache and insomnia has also increased. However, it is unclear whether EHS results from physiological or other origins. In this double-blinded study, we simultaneously investigated physiological changes (heart rate, respiration rate, and heart rate variability), subjective symptoms, and perception of the magnetic field to assess origins of the subjective symptoms. Two volunteer groups of 15 self-reported EHS and 16 non-EHS individuals were tested with exposure to sham and real (60 Hz, 12.5 µT) magnetic fields for 30 min. Magnetic field exposure did not have any effects on physiological parameters or eight subjective symptoms in either group. There was also no evidence that the EHS group perceived the magnetic field better than the non-EHS group. In conclusion, the subjective symptoms did not result from the 60 Hz, 12.5 µT magnetic field exposures but from other non-physiological factors.

  13. A preliminary study of extended magnetic field structures in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, James D.; Lane, Barton G.; Post, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    Several plasma phenomena which are to be expected around a magnet in LEO were identified and analyzed qualitatively. The ASTROMAG cusp magnet will create an extended field whose strength drops to the ambient level over a scale length of approx. 15 m; the combined field has a complex topology with ring nulls and open and closed field lines. The entire configuration is moving through the partially ionized F-layer of the ionosphere at a speed slow compared to the local Alfven speed but fast compared to the ion sound speed. The ambient plasma crosses the extended field structure in a time short compared to the ion Larmor period yet long relative to the electron Larmor period. Thus, electrons behave as a magnetized fluid while ions move ballistically until reflected from higher fields near the cusp. Since the Debye length is short compared to the field scale length, an electrostatic shock-like structure forms to equilibrate the flows and achieve quasi-neutrality. The ambient plasma will be excluded from a cavity near the magnet. The size and nature of the strong interaction region in which the magnet significantly perturbs the ambient flow were determined by studying ion orbits numerically. Lecture viewgraphs summarizing these results are presented.

  14. Human aquaporin 4 gating dynamics in dc and ac electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garate, J.-A.; English, Niall J.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2011-02-01

    Water self-diffusion within human aquaporin 4 has been studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the absence and presence of external ac and dc electric fields. The computed diffusive (pd) and osmotic (pf) permeabilities under zero-field conditions are (0.718 ± 0.24) × 10-14 cm3 s-1 and (2.94 ± 0.47) × 10-14 cm3 s-1, respectively; our pf agrees with the experimental value of (1.50 ± 0.6) × 10-14 cm3 s-1. A gating mechanism has been proposed in which side-chain dynamics of residue H201, located in the selectivity filter, play an essential role. In addition, for nonequilibrium MD in external fields, it was found that water dipole orientation within the constriction region of the channel is affected by electric fields (e-fields) and that this governs the permeability. It was also found that the rate of side-chain flipping motion of residue H201 is increased in the presence of e-fields, which influences water conductivity further.

  15. First Principle DFT Study of Electric Field Effects on the Characteristics of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzyan, Hassan; Sadeghpour, Narges

    2017-01-01

    First principle density functional theory methods, local density and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximations with Goedecker pseudopotential (LDA-G & PBE-G), are used to study the electric field effects on the binding energy and atomic charges of bilayer graphene (BLG) at the Γ point of the Brillouin zone based on two types of unit cells (α and β) containing nC=8-32 carbon atoms. Results show that application of electric fields of 4-24 V/nm strengths reduces the binding energies and induces charge transfer between the two layers. The transferred charge increases almost linearly with the strength of the electric field for all sizes of the two types of unit cells. Furthermore, the charge transfer calculated with the α-type unit cells is more sensitive to the electric field strength. The calculated field-dependent contour plots of the differential charge densities of the two layers show details of charge density redistribution under the influence of the electric field.

  16. XPCS study of dynamic correlation in polyurethane gel-carbonyl iron composite under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriew, Helena; Wiegart, Lutz; Boczkowska, Anna; Mirkowska, Monika

    2010-10-01

    An X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) study of composite-type material consisting of polyurethane gel and carbonyl iron micrometric spheres was performed under magnetic fields of 0, 300 and 600 mT. The onion-like spheres structure was destroyed during the composite processing. The following conclusions were obtained from the study: -The polyurethane matrix is preferred as a source for the observed dynamic effects. -Below 300mT the material dynamics in direction of the outer magnetic field are very clear. -For 600 mT the dependence of the dynamics on magnetic field direction disappears, but the correlation rate is much higher. These findings may be caused by a disturbance of the polymer mesostructure by larger strain leading to its cross-linking.

  17. A Validation Study of the General Amber Force Field Applied to Energetic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Magnus; Caleman, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Molecula dynamics is a well-established tool to computationally study molecules. However, to reach predictive capability at the level required for applied research and design, extensive validation of the available force fields is pertinent. Here we present a study of density, isothermal compressibility and coefficients of thermal expansion of four energetic materials (FOX-7, RDX, CL-20 and HMX) based on molecular dynamics simulations with the General Amber Force Field (GAFF), and compare the results to experimental measurements from the literature. Furthermore, we quantify the accuracy of the calculated properties through hydrocode simulation of a typical impact scenario. We find that molecular dynamics simulations with generic and computationally efficient force fields may be used to understand and estimate important physical properties of nitramine-like energetic materials.

  18. A study of the effects of thunderstorm distance and topography on the atmospheric electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelis, Nikolaos; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Kotroni, Vasiliki; Lagouvardos, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric electric field, though not measured as routinely as other meteorological variables, can be utilized in a variety of applications, including that of approaching or developing thunderstorms recognition. In the current work, the operational active radius of an electric field mill located at the boundary between a valley and a mountain range is evaluated for such use, using also lightning location data from the ZEUS network. The active radius of the electric field mill was around 15 km for the mountain range, while for the valley region it increased to about 30 km. The potential gradient (PG) declined exponentially as distance to thunderclouds increased. The PG response to approaching charged clouds was also studied using the most severe thunderstorm of the study period as a test case.

  19. Ionization Study of Isomeric Molecules in Strong-field Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Zigo, Stefan; Le, Anh-Thu; Timilsina, Pratap; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Through the use of the technique of time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, we obtain strong-field ionization yields for randomly oriented 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2-DCE) (C2H2Cl2) and 2-butene (C4H8). We are interested in studying the effect of conformal structure in strong-field ionization and, in particular, the role of molecular polarity. That is, we can perform strong-field ionization studies in polar vs non-polar molecules that have the same chemical composition. We report our findings through the ionization yields and the ratio (trans/cis) of each stereoisomer pair as a function of intensity. PMID:28186110

  20. Computer study of convection of weakly ionized plasma in a nonuniform magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiau, J. N.

    1972-01-01

    A weakly ionized plasma in a strong and nonuniform magnetic field exhibits an instability analogous to the flute instability in a fully ionized plasma. The instability sets in at a critical magnetic field. To study the final state of the plasma after the onset of the instability, the plasma equations are integrated numerically assuming a certain initial spectrum of small disturbances. In the regime studied, numerical results indicate a final steadily oscillating state consisting of a single finite amplitude mode together with a time-independent modification of the original equilibrium. These results agree with the analytic results obtained by Simon in the slightly supercritical regime. As the magnetic field is increased further, the wavelength of the final oscillation becomes nonunique. There exists a subinterval in the unstable wave band. Final stable oscillation with a wavelength in this subinterval can be established if the initial disturbance has a sufficiently strong component at the particular wavelength.

  1. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  2. Improvement in day zero recoveries in field soil dissipation studies using larger diameter soil samples.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok K; Strek, Harry J; Barefoot, Aldos C

    2014-05-07

    Obtaining acceptable recovery of the applied test substance at zero time in field soil dissipation studies has been a subject of considerable interest among scientists conducting regulatory field studies. In particular, achieving recoveries of ≥90% in soil samples collected immediately after applications in most studies has been elusive. This study investigated a modified soil sampling method, which could be used not only on day zero but for the entire study duration, to see if the recoveries in soil samples, especially in the early stages, can be improved. The modified sampling system has demonstrated that recoveries averaging 90% are possible and can be routinely obtained on day zero. Description of this modified sampling procedure and statistical analysis of the data collected for day zero samples are discussed.

  3. Relaxation behavior study of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles at ultralow and ultrahigh magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Pacheco, Victor; Willbold, Dieter; Zhang, Yi; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Hartmann, Rudolf; Weirich, Thomas E; Ma, Peixiang; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Gu, Zhongwei

    2011-12-15

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) have attracted attention because of their current and potential usefulness as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). USPIOs are usually used for their significant capacity to produce predominant proton relaxation effects, which result in signal reduction. However, most previous studies that utilized USPIOs have been focused on the relaxation behavior at commonly used magnetic fields of clinical MRI systems (typically 1-3 T). In this paper, magnetic relaxation processes of protons in water surrounding the USPIOs are studied at ultralow (≤10 mT) and ultrahigh magnetic fields (14.1 T). USPIOs used in our experiments were synthesized with a core size of 6 nm, and transferred from organic to water by ligand exchange. The proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) and spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)) were investigated at ultralow (212 μT for T(2) and 10 mT for T(1)) and at 14.1 T with different iron concentrations. At all of the fields, there is a linear relationship between the inverse of relaxation times and the iron concentration. The spin-spin relaxivity (r(2)) at 14.1 T is much larger than that value of the ultralow field. At ultralow field, however, the spin-lattice relaxivity (r(1)) is larger than the r(1) at ultrahigh field. The results provide a perspective on potential in vivo and in vitro applications of USPIOs in ultralow and ultrahigh field NMR and MRI.

  4. Taiwan: a perfect field trip to study active tectonics and erosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Cormier, Florence; Beauval, Véronique; Martinez, Claire-Marie; Seyeux, Jana

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan is located at the boundary between the Philippine Sea Plate to the East and the Eurasian Plate to the West. This plate boundary is rather complex since it comprises two subduction zones of reverse polarities. Due to this specific geodynamic context, this field is a perfect area to answer the French program in 5th grade (erosion processes) and 4th grade (active tectonics) in Earth Science class. That's why for the second year, students from the Lycée Français de Shanghai (LFS) in 4th grade will go for a 4-day field trip to discover volcanoes (in the Yangminshan National Park) and para-seismic constructions in the 101 Tower at Taipei. It will remind them the program of their previous class (5ème) through the visit of Yehliu Geographic Park and some other areas in the North of the Island where they will be able to observe different erosion processes (wind or water) carving the landscape. The aim of this field trip is first to show them that Earth Sciences cannot be studied only in class but also on the field to get a better understanding of the processes. In this manner, after having understood the internal thermal system of our Earth in class, they will see its manifestations on the surface of the Earth, by seeing an active explosive volcano with gas ejection, specific mineralization, and hot springs. Furthermore on the field, they will be able to do a link between the external and internal geodynamics processes usually studied separately in middle school. The poster presented will detail the first field trip in Taiwan realized in May 2013 by the LFS 4th grade students and will be made by the students going in June 2014. Thus, this activity will allow them to get a perspective of the topic that they will discover on the field trip.

  5. Risk-Based, Hypothesis-Driven Framework for Hydrological Field Campaigns with Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harken, B.; Rubin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    There are several stages in any hydrological modeling campaign, including: formulation and analysis of a priori information, data acquisition through field campaigns, inverse modeling, and prediction of some environmental performance metric (EPM). The EPM being predicted could be, for example, contaminant concentration or plume travel time. These predictions often have significant bearing on a decision that must be made. Examples include: how to allocate limited remediation resources between contaminated groundwater sites or where to place a waste repository site. Answering such questions depends on predictions of EPMs using forward models as well as levels of uncertainty related to these predictions. Uncertainty in EPM predictions stems from uncertainty in model parameters, which can be reduced by measurements taken in field campaigns. The costly nature of field measurements motivates a rational basis for determining a measurement strategy that is optimal with respect to the uncertainty in the EPM prediction. The tool of hypothesis testing allows this uncertainty to be quantified by computing the significance of the test resulting from a proposed field campaign. The significance of the test gives a rational basis for determining the optimality of a proposed field campaign. This hypothesis testing framework is demonstrated and discussed using various synthetic case studies. This study involves contaminated aquifers where a decision must be made based on prediction of when a contaminant will arrive at a specified location. The EPM, in this case contaminant travel time, is cast into the hypothesis testing framework. The null hypothesis states that the contaminant plume will arrive at the specified location before a critical amount of time passes, and the alternative hypothesis states that the plume will arrive after the critical time passes. The optimality of different field campaigns is assessed by computing the significance of the test resulting from each one

  6. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  7. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson's r, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson's r increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  8. Radiofrequency field exposure and cancer: what do the laboratory studies suggest?

    PubMed Central

    Repacholi, M H

    1997-01-01

    Significant concern has been raised about possible health effects from exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields, especially after the rapid introduction of mobile telecommunications systems. Parents are especially concerned with the possibility that children might develop cancer after exposure to the RF emissions from mobile telephone base stations erected in or near schools. These questions have followed scientific reports suggesting that residence near high voltage power lines may to be associated with an increased childhood leukemia risk. Epidemiologic studies have been plagued by poor RF exposure assessment and differences in methodology. There are no high-quality epidemiologic studies that can be used to evaluate health risks from RF exposure. Laboratory studies in this area have been somewhat confusing. Some animal studies suggest that RF fields accelerate the development of sarcoma colonies in the lung, mammary tumors, skin tumors, hepatomas, and sarcomas. A substantial RF-induced increase in lymphoma incidence in transgenic mice exposed for up to 18 months has also been reported. In contrast, other studies have not found carcinogenic effects. These conflicting results indicate the need for more well-conducted studies on laboratory animals, supplemented with high-quality in vitro studies to identify effects that need further research in vivo, and to characterize any acting mechanisms, especially at low RF field levels. This paper provides a review of the laboratory studies and indicates what conclusions about RF-induced cancer can be drawn. PMID:9467083

  9. Treatment planning for SBRT using automated field delivery: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Owen, Dawn; Brooks, Cassandra M.; Stenmark, Matthew H.

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning and delivery can be accomplished using a variety of techniques that achieve highly conformal dose distributions. Herein, we describe a template-based automated treatment field approach that enables rapid delivery of more than 20 coplanar fields. A case study is presented to demonstrate how modest adaptations to traditional SBRT planning can be implemented to take clinical advantage of this technology. Treatment was planned for a left-sided lung lesion adjacent to the chest wall using 25 coplanar treatment fields spaced at 11° intervals. The plan spares the contralateral lung and is in compliance with the conformality standards set forth in Radiation Therapy and Oncology Group protocol 0915, and the dose tolerances found in the report of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 101. Using a standard template, treatment planning was accomplished in less than 20 minutes, and each 10 Gy fraction was delivered in approximately 5.4 minutes. For those centers equipped with linear accelerators capable of automated treatment field delivery, the use of more than 20 coplanar fields is a viable SBRT planning approach and yields excellent conformality and quality combined with rapid planning and treatment delivery. Although the case study discusses a laterally located lung lesion, this technique can be applied to centrally located tumors with similar results.

  10. Magnetic field measurements for study of fast electron transport in magnetized HED plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Griffin, Brandon; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Interaction of megagauss magnetic fields with high energy density (HED) plasma is of great interest in the field of magnetized plasma. The field changes fundamental properties of the HED plasma such as thermal and magnetic diffusion. A coupled capability utilizing the 1.0 MA Zebra pulsed power generator and the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility enables to create such a condition for studies of magnetized plasma properties. We have conducted an experiment to measure magnetic fields generated by a 1.0 MA, 100 ns Zebra pulsed current in stainless steel coils. Using a 532 nm continuous laser from a single longitudinal mode laser system, the temporal change in the magnetic field was measured with the Faraday rotation in F2 glass. The probe laser passing through the 1.5 mm in radius and 1.75 mm thick glass placed in the vicinity of the inductive coils was split with a Glan-Taylor prism to measure vertical and horizontal polarization components with photodiodes. We will present the analysis of the experimental result and a design of a coupled experiment for study of fast electron transport in the magnetized plasma.

  11. Development of a new methodology to study drop shape and surface tension in electric fields.

    PubMed

    Bateni, A; Susnar, S S; Amirfazli, A; Neumann, A W

    2004-08-31

    Development of a new methodology for the study of both shape and surface tension of conducting drops in an electric field is presented. This methodology, called axisymmetric drop shape analysis-electric fields (ADSA-EF), generates numerical drop profiles in an electrostatic field, for a given surface tension. Then, it calculates the true value of the surface tension by matching theoretical profiles to the shape of experimental drops, using the surface tension as an adjustable parameter. ADSA-EF can be employed to simulate and study drop shapes in the electric field and to determine its effect on liquid surface tension. The method can also be used to measure surface tension in microgravity, where current drop-shape techniques are not applicable. The axisymmetric shape of the drop is the only assumption made in the development of ADSA-EF. The new scheme is applicable when both gravity and electrostatic forces are present. Preliminary measurements using ADSA-EF suggest that the surface tension of water increases by about 2% when an electric field with the magnitude of 10(6) V/m is applied.

  12. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume II. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  13. Water Treatment Plant Operation Volume 2. A Field Study Training Program. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  14. The Economic Returns to Field of Study and Competencies among Higher Education Graduates in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Elish; O'Connell, Philip J.; Smyth, Emer

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at the economic returns to different fields of study in Ireland in 2004 and also the value placed on various job-related competencies, accumulated on completion of higher education, in the Irish labour market. In examining these issues, the paper also analyses, through quantile regression, how the returns vary across the earnings…

  15. A hyperboloidal study of tail decay rates for scalar and Yang Mills fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenginoğlu, Anıl

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the asymptotic behavior of spherically symmetric solutions to scalar wave and Yang Mills equations on a Schwarzschild background. The studies demonstrate the astrophysical relevance of null infinity in predicting radiation signals for gravitational wave detectors and show how test fields on unbounded domains in black hole spacetimes can be simulated conveniently by numerically solving hyperboloidal initial value problems.

  16. FIELD-SCALE STUDIES: HOW DOES SOIL SAMPLE PRETREATMENT AFFECT REPRESENTATIVENESS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from field-scale studies are very heterogeneous and can contain large soil and rock particles. Oversize materials are often removed before chemical analysis of the soil samples because it is not practical to include these materials. Is the extracted sample representativ...

  17. FIELD-SCALE STUDIES: HOW DOES SOIL SAMPLE PRETREATMENT AFFECT REPRESENTATIVENESS ? (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from field-scale studies are very heterogeneous and can contain large soil and rock particles. Oversize materials are often removed before chemical analysis of the soil samples because it is not practical to include these materials. Is the extracted sample representativ...

  18. A Guide to Field Studies for the Coastal Environment. Project CAPE Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Wells J.

    Twenty-five coastal field study investigations, comprising this supplement to a junior high school earth science curriculum, are designed to help students obtain a fuller understanding of: (1) their coastal environment, (2) some of the problems which confront it, (3) the interrelationships between the land and the surrounding bodies of water, and…

  19. Simple, Low-Cost Data Collection Methods for Agricultural Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Richard T.; Winger, Marlon; Kitchen, Boyd

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes relatively simple and inexpensive methods for collecting data from agricultural field studies. Describes methods involving on-farm testing, crop yield measurement, quality evaluations, weed control effectiveness, plant nutrient status, and other measures. Contains 29 references illustrating how these methods were used to conduct…

  20. 2011 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North Plains Water Conservation District started a water conservation project in 2010 on corn irrigation aimed at using just 12 inches of irrigation and producing 200 bu/ac of corn. This report is for 2011, the second year of the study, conducted at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) in Ett...

  1. The Impact of Farmer Field Schools on Human and Social Capital: A Case Study from Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Soniia; Asamoah, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Based on a case study of Ghanaian cocoa farmers who attended farmer field schools (FFS), this paper explores the impact of the FFS methodology on farmers' technical knowledge, experimentation, knowledge diffusion, group formation and social skills as a way of assessing whether the relatively high costs associated with the method is justified. We…

  2. Applying Threshold Concepts Theory to an Unsettled Field: An Exploratory Study in Criminal Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimshurst, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    Criminal justice education is a relatively new program in higher education in many countries, and its curriculum and parameters remain unsettled. An exploratory study investigated whether threshold concepts theory provided a useful lens by which to explore student understandings of this multidisciplinary field. Eight high-performing final-year…

  3. Coproducing European Integration Studies: Infrastructures and Epistemic Movements in an Interdisciplinary Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper is interested in the interdisciplinary characteristics of European integration studies. It explores how the institutional and intellectual, internal and external boundaries of this interdisciplinary field are shaped. For this purpose, it discusses two interlocking dynamics that are most important: on the one hand, the European Union…

  4. Motion of Electrons in Electric and Magnetic Fields: Introductory Laboratory and Computer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha R.; Lelek, Jeffrey J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a series of laboratory experiments and computer simulations of the motion of electrons in electric and magnetic fields. These experiments, which involve an inexpensive student-built electron gun, study the electron mean free path, magnetic focusing, and other aspects. (Author/HM)

  5. Career-Focused Field Trips as Experienced by At-Risk Rural Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutson, Tommye L.

    2010-01-01

    A lack of recent research focused on field trips as pedagogy in K-12 settings established the foundation for this work. The research design followed multiple-case case study model. The participants were four male students from a small rural high school in central Texas. Each participant, previously labeled as academically "at-risk", had…

  6. A field wind tunnel study of fine dust emissions in sandy soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A portable field wind tunnel has been developed to allow measurements of dust emissions from soil surfaces to test the premise that dust concentration and properties are highly correlated with surface soil properties, as modified by crop management system. In this study, we report on the effect of ...

  7. Understanding Intent to Leave the Field: A Study of Student Affairs Master's Students' Career Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Blake R.; Jakeman, Rick C.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study of 20 student affairs master's students explored their career plans and perceptions of the field. Five themes emerged from interviews with participants who considered leaving student affairs to pursue other careers: (a) distance from the institutional mission, (b) student affairs as devalued work, (c) lack of fulfillment,…

  8. Mentoring Support and Power: A Three Year Predictive Field Study on Protege Networking and Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blickle, Gerhard; Witzki, Alexander H.; Schneider, Paula B.

    2009-01-01

    Career success of early employees was analyzed from a power perspective and a developmental network perspective. In a predictive field study with 112 employees mentoring support and mentors' power were assessed in the first wave, employees' networking was assessed after two years, and career success (i.e. income and hierarchical position) and…

  9. On- and Off-Field Antisocial and Prosocial Behavior in Adolescent Soccer Players: A Multilevel Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Esther A.; Dekovic, Maja; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; Schuengel, Carlo; Hoeksma, Jan B.; Biesta, Gert J. J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated to what extent team membership predicts on- and off-field antisocial and prosocial behavior in (pre)adolescent athletes. Effects of team-membership were related to characteristics of the team environment, such as relational support from the coach towards team members, fair play attitude and sociomoral reasoning within the…

  10. Grades of Evidence: Variability in Quality of Findings in Effectiveness Studies of Complex Field Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterji, Madhabi

    2007-01-01

    This article argues with a literature review that a simplistic distinction between strong and weak evidence hinged on the use of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), the federal "gold standard" for generating rigorous evidence on social programs and policies, is not tenable with evaluative studies of complex, field interventions such as…

  11. Higher Education Fields of Study and Professional Employment: Trends in Sex Segregation during the 1970s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beller, Andrea H.; Han, Kee-ok Kim

    Changes in women's attainment of higher education during the 1970s have been dramatic. This paper documents trends toward women acquiring a higher proportion of degrees at all levels and moving into traditionally male fields of study. In 1980, females were awarded nearly half of all baccalaureate and master's degrees, slightly less than one-third…

  12. Against-the-Grain Teacher Education: A Study of Coursework, Field Experience, and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jesse; Fish, Dale R.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored how preservice elementary teachers experienced coursework and field experiences that fostered commitment to socially and pedagogically progressive teaching, especially development of against-the-grain perspectives. Interviews and observations indicated that against-the-grain perspectives evolved from complex interactions of…

  13. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume I. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  14. The Efficacy of Drama in Field Experience: A Qualitative Study Using MAXQDA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elaldi, Senel; Yerliyurt, Nazli Sila

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the views of senior preservice preschool teachers on the efficacy of drama activities in their field experience in terms of the effect of students' learning, socialization, individual or group work skills and school connectedness and also disclosed the suggestions of senior preservice preschool teachers for faculty…

  15. PM 2.5 CHEMICAL SPECIATION SAMPLER EVALUATION FIELD PROGRAM: RESULTS FROM THE FOUR CITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this sampler intercomparison field study is to determine the performance characteristics for the collection of the chemical components of PM2.5 by the chemical speciation monitors developed for the national network relative to each other, to the Federal Referen...

  16. Analysis of field data from the Duke Forest and Project OPTEX studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Frances; Paine, Robert J.; Zwicker, Judith O.; Feldman, Howard

    1999-02-01

    The American Petroleum Institute (API) has developed data sets for the evaluation of dispersion modeling and optical remote sensing techniques. An initial field study (in Duke Forest, North Carolina) conducted in early 1995 at an open field site featured several tracer gas releases from simulated point, area, and volume sources with release heights up to 7 meters. A second study took place at an operational petrochemical facility in Texas and featured tracer releases at heights up to 41 meters from points located in an active process unit. Both field studies featured measurements of tracer gas concentrations using bag samplers and Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) instrumentation. One of the issues of interest to API that are currently being investigated from these field studies is the ability for OP- FTIR technology to be used to determine emission rates from point, area, and volume sources for known source locations. The ISCST3 and AERMOD air quality dispersion models have been employed to estimate the emission rate of a tracer gas by computing a ratio of the measured to the modeled path-averaged concentration. The results of tests using point, volume, and area source depictions of the emissions configurations are reported.

  17. DESIGN OF FIELD STUDIES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF BAFS AND BSAFS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for aquatic organisms are necessary parameters for assessing the ecological risks of nonpolar organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems. In designing a field study to measure BAFs and/or BSAFs, one of th...

  18. DESIGN OF A SURFACTANT REMEDIATION FIELD DEMONSTRATION BASED ON LABORATORY AND MODELINE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced subsurface remediation is being evaluated as an innovative technology for expediting ground-water remediation. This paper reports on laboratory and modeling studies conducted in preparation for a pilot-scale field test of surfactant-enhanced subsurface remedia...

  19. A Study of Full-Time Student Equivalents for University of Missouri Field Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, William Ed

    The major objective of this study was to determine if an index to indicate the work load of field staff personnel could be developed. The data were collected by the county directors on the basis of information included in the state and federal reports covering the period July 1, 1966 to December 31, 1966. A factor of 450 was used to convert total…

  20. Parental Qualifications as Determinants of University Entrance and Choice of a Field of Study in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georg, Werner; Bargel, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Against the background of Bourdieu's reproduction theory, the choice of field of study was addressed above all as topic of social inequality in tertiary education. It was supposed that "title inflation" led to a relocation of the distinctive advantage of the upper classes from the vertical to the horizontal dimension of inequality in the…