Science.gov

Sample records for 30-100 kev polarization

  1. The determination of interplanetary magnetic field polarities around sector boundaries using E greater than 2 keV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S.; Lin, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    The determination of the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields (whether the field direction is outward from or inward toward the sun) has been based on a comparison of observed field directions with the nominal Parker spiral angle. These polarities can be mapped back to the solar source field polarities. This technique fails when field directions deviate substantially from the Parker angle or when fields are substantially kinked. We introduce a simple new technique to determine the polarities of interplanetary fields using E greater than 2 keV interplanetary electrons which stream along field lines away from the sun. Those electrons usually show distinct unidirectional pitch-angle anisotropies either parallel or anti-parallel to the field. Since the electron flow direction is known to be outward from the sun, the anisotropies parallel to the field indicate outward-pointing, positive-polarity fields, and those anti-parallel indicate inward-pointing, negative-polarity fields. We use data from the UC Berkeley electron experiment on the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISSE-3) spacecraft to compare the field polarities deduced from the electron data, Pe (outward or inward), with the polarities inferred from field directions, Pd, around two sector boundaries in 1979. We show examples of large (greater than 100 deg) changes in azimuthal field direction Phi over short (less than 1 hr) time scales, some with and some without reversals in Pe. The latter cases indicate that such large directional changes can occur in unipolar structures. On the other hand, we found an example of a change in Pe during which the rotation in Phi was less than 30 deg, indicating polarity changes in nearly unidirectional structures. The field directions are poor guides to the polarities in these cases.

  2. Effect of initial-state target polarization on the single ionization of helium by 1-keV electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Yan; Li, Xia; Miao, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Xiang-Fu

    2012-07-01

    We report new results of triple differential cross sections for the single ionization of helium by 1-KeV electron impact at the ejection energy of 10 eV. Investigations have been made for both the perpendicular plane and the plane perpendicular to the momentum transfer geometries. The present calculation is based on the three-Coulomb wave function. Here we have also incorporated the effect of target polarization in the initial state. A comparison is made between the present calculation with the results of other theoretical methods and a recent experiment [Dürr M, Dimopoulou C, Najjari B, Dorn A, Bartschat K, Bray I, Fursa D V, Chen Z, Madison D H and Ullrich J 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 032717]. At an impact energy of 1 KeV, the target polarization is found to induce a substantial change of the cross section for the ionization process. We observe that the effect of target polarization plays a dominant role in deciding the shape of triple differential cross sections.

  3. Performance of a reflection-type polarizer by use of muscovite mica crystal in the soft x-ray region of 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Imazono, Takashi; Ishino, Masahiko; Koike, Masato; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hirono, Toko; Sano, Kazuo

    2005-02-01

    To develop the polarizer functioning in the soft x-ray region of 1 keV, the polarization performance of muscovite mica has been investigated theoretically with a simulation code based on dynamical theory. As the result of calculation, muscovite mica is found to be a promising candidate as a reflection-type polarizer with the reflectivity for s polarization of 0.03 at approximately 0.9 keV at the angle of incidence of 45 deg. In order to verify the polarization performance of muscovite mica experimentally, a symmetric Bragg reflection measurement of muscovite mica(002) was carried out using a linearly polarized undulator radiation. As a result, the maximum reflectivity for s polarization and the extinction ratio of muscovite mica were approximately 0.018 and 200 at 878 eV, respectively. This result indicates that muscovite mica works as a practical polarizer in the soft x-ray region.

  4. Studies of polarization bremsstrahlung and ordinary bremsstrahlung from 89Sr beta particles in metallic targets in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    Studies of polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) and ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) produced by the 89Sr beta emitter in Al, Ti, Sn and Pb targets were undertaken at photon energies of 1-100 keV. The experimental results are compared with the Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (EBH) theory and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (Fmod BH) theory for OB and with the Avdonina and Pratt (Fmod BH + PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS). These results are in agreement with the Fmod BH + PB theory up to 13 keV, 16 keV, 22 keV and 28 keV energies for Al, Ti, Sn and Pb targets, respectively; Fmod BH theory is more accurate at higher energies.

  5. 30. 100 foot through truss detail of an upper, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. 100 foot through truss - detail of an upper, inside, corner of a through truss. Shows the upper chord pin connection, end post, lateral lace strut and sway bracing. There are four of these per through truss, for a total of eight. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  6. 41 CFR 101-30.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.100 Scope of subpart. This subpart defines the objectives of the Federal Catalog... Federal Catalog System are contained in published cataloging handbooks and manuals described in...

  7. 41 CFR 101-30.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.100 Scope of subpart. This subpart defines the objectives of the Federal Catalog... Federal Catalog System are contained in published cataloging handbooks and manuals described in...

  8. 41 CFR 101-30.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.100 Scope of subpart. This subpart defines the objectives of the Federal Catalog... Federal Catalog System are contained in published cataloging handbooks and manuals described in...

  9. 41 CFR 101-30.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.100 Scope of subpart. This subpart defines the objectives of the Federal Catalog... Federal Catalog System are contained in published cataloging handbooks and manuals described in...

  10. 41 CFR 101-30.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.1-General § 101-30.100 Scope of subpart. This subpart defines the objectives of the Federal Catalog... Federal Catalog System are contained in published cataloging handbooks and manuals described in...

  11. 24 CFR 30.100 - Settlement of a civil money penalty action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Settlement of a civil money penalty... Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Procedures § 30.100 Settlement of a civil money penalty action. The officials listed at subpart B of this part, or...

  12. 24 CFR 30.100 - Settlement of a civil money penalty action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Settlement of a civil money penalty... Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Procedures § 30.100 Settlement of a civil money penalty action. The officials listed at subpart B of this part, or...

  13. 24 CFR 30.100 - Settlement of a civil money penalty action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Settlement of a civil money penalty... Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Procedures § 30.100 Settlement of a civil money penalty action. The officials listed at subpart B of this part, or...

  14. 24 CFR 30.100 - Settlement of a civil money penalty action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Settlement of a civil money penalty... Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Procedures § 30.100 Settlement of a civil money penalty action. The officials listed at subpart B of this part, or...

  15. 24 CFR 30.100 - Settlement of a civil money penalty action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Settlement of a civil money penalty... Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Procedures § 30.100 Settlement of a civil money penalty action. The officials listed at subpart B of this part, or...

  16. Dynamic magnetic properties of Fe70Co30(100) single-crystal thin films deposited at various substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, T.; Asai, Y.; Ohtake, M.; Takeda, S.; Futamoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Crystallographic orientation dependence of Gilbert damping constant, α, has been measured under different static magnetic fields for Fe70Co30(100) single-crystal thin film samples prepared at various substrate temperatures. Lorentz type resonance peaks are observed for the samples prepared below 200 ºC. For a sample deposited at 400 ºC, broadening of the resonance peak is observed, which is related with an increased surface roughness. α value decreases monotonically with increasing the static field when the field is applied parallel to the easy magnetization axis, whereas it increases when the field is applied along the hard magnetization axis up to around the anisotropy field and then decreases. The minimum value of α is determined to be 0.012 for the hard axis under static fields greater than 650 Oe. The value is twice larger compared with that of Fe(100) single-crystal film. The static magnetization curves measured for Fe70Co30 films show large deviations from the curves expected by coherent rotation mode. Such deviation seems to be a possible reason for a larger α value of Fe70Co30 thin film.

  17. Polarized electrons in ELSA (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.; von Drachenfels, W.; Durek, D.; Frommberger, F.; Hoffmann, M.; Husmann, D.; Kiel, B.; Klein, F. J.; Menze, D.; Michel, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Naumann, J.; Reichelt, T.; Steier, C.; Toyama, T.; Voigt, S.; Westermann, M.

    1998-01-01

    Polarized electrons have been accelerated in the electron stretcher accelerator ELSA for the first time. Up to 2.1 GeV the polarization of the electron beam supplied by the 120 keV polarized electron source has been measured with a Mo/ller polarimeter. Preliminary results of polarization measurements at high energies and the performance of the source are presented.

  18. On the Polarization Properties of Magnetar Giant Flare Pulsating Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Three giant flares have been detected so far from soft gamma-ray repeaters, each characterized by an initial short hard spike and a pulsating tail. The observed pulsating tails are characterized by a duration of ˜100 s, an isotropic energy of ˜1044 erg, and a pulse period of a few seconds. The pulsating tail emission likely originates from the residual energy after the intense energy release during the initial spike, which forms a trapped fireball composed of a photon-pair plasma in a closed-field-line region of the magnetars. Observationally the spectra of pulsating tails can be fitted by the superposition of a thermal component and a power-law component, with the thermal component dominating the emission in the early and late stages of the pulsating-tail observations. In this paper, assuming that the trapped fireball is from a closed-field-line region in the magnetosphere, we calculate the atmospheric structure of the optically thick trapped fireball and the polarization properties of the trapped fireball. By properly treating the photon propagation in a hot, highly magnetized, electron-positron pair plasma, we tally photons in two modes (O mode and E mode) at a certain observational angle through Monte Carlo simulations. Our results suggest that the polarization degree depends on the viewing angle with respect to the magnetic axis of the magnetar, and can be as high as Π ≃ 30% in the 1-30 keV band, and Π ≃ 10% in the 30-100 keV band, if the line of sight is perpendicular to the magnetic axis.

  19. Quasidiatomic Approach to the Collisions of Low KEV Molecular Ions with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenen, Orhan

    The polarization of L(,(alpha)) radiation is measured in coincidence with a charged particle scattered at specific laboratory angles, resulting from the collision induced dissociation of low keV H(,2)('+) and H(,3)('+) incident on target gases. Coincidence measurements of the polarization pattern are made for a variety of scattering angles for 3.22 keV H(,2)('+) incident on He and Ne, and for 4.83 keV H(,3)('+) incident on He. The molecular states excited during the collision are determined from the alignment of the observed polarization patterns. A quasidiatomic collision model, which is an extension of the electron promotion model of ion-atom collisions at low keV energies to molecule-atom collisional systems, is developed to interpret the experimental results. The rules of building simple quasidiatomic correlation diagrams, to qualitatively estimate the dynamical behavior of molecular collisions, are presented. The general idea of treating the molecule as an atom under certain circumstances, is applied to a molecular two-state calculation of the differential charge-transfer probabilities in H('+)-H(,2) collisions. This calculation reproduces the essential features of previous experiments.

  20. Compton Polarization with Nustar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta

    In this study we assess the NuSTAR capabilities to detect polarized signals in the Compton regime, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observational data. Both NuSTAR focal plane detectors are equipped with high resolution pixilated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range 2.5-80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities due to their high quality factor, very low background and scattering angles of ~90°, which is ideal for incident photon energies below 100 keV. However the sensitivity is limited by the very low efficiency of the CZT for Compton interactions and by intrinsic readout systematics, such as charge sharing between pixels. An additional source of degradation is the incompleteness of double events information in the science telemetry. We estimated the Minimum Detectable Polarization of cosmic sources as a function of intensity, and the results obtained were validated through the comparison with the first actual data from the Crab Nebula and Cygnus X-1. We also evaluated the count rate and the background expected for polarization measurements, comparing our estimates with the data measured in flight. Our simulations reproduce well the actual NuSTAR data, showing that the focal plane detectors should be able to detect polarization from highly polarized sources like the Crab and other potential bright sources, dominated by synchrotron and/or SSC emission. The background for polarization measurements was found to be negligible.

  1. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  2. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  3. Electron Flux Models at GEO: 30 keV - 600 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, R.; Balikhin, M. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walker, S. N.; Ganushkina, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Forecast models are developed for the electron fluxes measured by the Magnetospheric Electron Detector (MagED) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13. The models employ solar wind and geomagnetic indices as inputs to produce a forecast of the electron flux at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) for five energy ranges from 30 keV - 600 keV. All of these models will be implemented in real time to forecast the electron fluxes on the PROGRESS project website (https://ssg.group.shef.ac.uk/progress2/html/index.phtml).

  4. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keY from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  5. Fine pitch CdTe-based hard-X-ray polarimeter performance for space science in the 70-300 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, S.; Limousin, O.; Ferrando, P.

    2015-07-01

    X-rays astrophysical sources have been almost characterized through imaging, spectroscopy and timing analysis. Nevertheless, more observational parameters such as polarization are needed because some radiation mechanisms present in gamma-ray sources are still unclear. We have developed a CdTe based fine-pitch imaging spectrometer, Caliste to study polarization. With a 58-micron pitch and 1 keV energy resolution at 60 keV, we are able to accurately reconstruct the polarization angle and fraction of an impinging flux of photons which are scattered by 90° after Compton diffusion within the crystal. In this paper, we present the principles and the results obtained for this kind of measurements: on one hand, we compare simulations results with experimental data taken at ESRF ID15A (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) using a 35-300 keV mono-energetic polarized beam. Applying a judicious energy selection to our data set, we reach a remarkable sensitivity level characterized by a measured Quality factor of 0.78±0.02 in the 200-300 keV range; and a measured Q factor of 0.64±0.0 at 70 keV where hard X-rays mirrors are already available.

  6. Single ionization of helium by 40-3000-keV antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.; Morenzoni, E.

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of single-ionization cross sections for antiproton impact on helium atoms are reported for impact energies ranging from 40 keV to 3 MeV. It is found that the measured cross sections are in good agreement with recent theoretical estimates based on the continuum-distorted-wave approximation. From a comparison with similar proton data, the ratio between antiproton and proton results is obtained. The energy dependence of this ratio is compared with various theoretical estimates and explained as a result of polarization and binding effects.

  7. Physics of a 17 keV neutrino.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayser, B.

    The possible 17 keV neutrino, if real, cannot be νμ but could be essentially ντ. Relic 17 keV neutrinos from the big bang must have disappeared, through a non-Standard-Model decay or annihilation process, before the present epoch. If one assumes that the 17 keV neutrino is not a Dirac neutrino of the conventional kind, then one is led to picture it as a Dirac neutrino of the unconventional Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud kind. It is then an amalgam of ντ and ν¯μ.

  8. Beta decay anomalies and the 17-keV conundrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.

    1993-03-01

    Recent developments in pursuance of the 17-keV neutrino are reviewed. Several different experiments found anomalies in {beta} decay spectra which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino. On the other hand, recent null results definitively rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino, as well as escaping criticisms applicable to earlier experiments. While missing links remain, it seems that any strong evidence for a 17-keV neutrino has vanished. Specifically, the anomalies observed in {sup 35}S and {sup 63}Ni spectra at Oxford can be reinterpreted in terms of electron scattering effects. In addition, the discrepancy amongst internal bremsstrahlung measurements has an instrumental origin, and recent results disfavour a 17-keV neutrino. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  9. Beta decay anomalies and the 17-keV conundrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in pursuance of the 17-keV neutrino are reviewed. Several different experiments found anomalies in [beta] decay spectra which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino. On the other hand, recent null results definitively rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino, as well as escaping criticisms applicable to earlier experiments. While missing links remain, it seems that any strong evidence for a 17-keV neutrino has vanished. Specifically, the anomalies observed in [sup 35]S and [sup 63]Ni spectra at Oxford can be reinterpreted in terms of electron scattering effects. In addition, the discrepancy amongst internal bremsstrahlung measurements has an instrumental origin, and recent results disfavour a 17-keV neutrino. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy investigation of various plasma-deposited polymer films irradiated with 170 keV He + ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelamo, R. V.; Trasferetti, B. C.; Durrant, S. F.; Davanzo, C. U.; Rouxinol, F. P.; Gadioli, G. Z.; Bica de Moraes, M. A.

    2006-08-01

    This work illustrates the advantages of using p-polarized radiation at an incidence angle of 70° in contrast to the conventional unpolarized beam at normal (or near-normal) incidence for the infrared spectroscopic study of polycarbosilane, polysilazane and polysiloxane thin films synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and subsequently irradiated with 170 keV He+ ions at fluences from 1 × 1014 to 1 × 1016 cm-2. Several bands not seen using the conventional mode could be observed in the polarized mode.

  11. Polarization studies with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, B.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta; Zoglauer, A.

    2012-09-01

    The capability of NuSTAR to detect polarization in the Compton scattering regime (>50 keV) has been investigated. The NuSTAR mission, flown on June 2012 a Low Earth Orbit (LEO), provides a unique possibility to confirm the findings of INTEGRAL on the polarization of cosmic sources in the hard X-rays. Each of the two focal plane detectors are high resolution pixellated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range ~ 3 - 80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities when the proper information on the double events is transmitted on ground. In this case it will be possible to detect polarization from bright sources on timescales of the order of 105 s

  12. Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.; Seggebrock, T.; Habs, D.

    2012-07-09

    We present for the first time the concept of a seeded {gamma} quantum Free-Electron-Laser (QFEL) at 478 keV, which has very different properties compared to a classical. The basic concept is to produce a highly brilliant {gamma} beam via SASE. To produce highly intense and coherent {gamma} beam, we intend to use a seeded FEL scheme. Important for the production of such a {gamma} beam are novel refractive {gamma}-lenses for focusing and an efficient monochromator, allowing to generate a very intense and coherent seed beam. The energy of the {gamma} beam is 478 keV, corresponding to a wavelength in the sub-Angstrom regime (1/38 A). To realize a coherent {gamma} beam at 478 keV, it is necessary to use a quantum FEL design. At such high radiation energies a classical description of the {gamma}-FEL becomes wrong.

  13. Compact, maintainable 80-KeV neutral beam module

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Molvik, Arthur W.

    1980-01-01

    A compact, maintainable 80-keV arc chamber, extractor module for a neutral beam system immersed in a vacuum of <10.sup.-2 Torr, incorporating a nested 60-keV gradient shield located midway between the high voltage ion source and surrounding grounded frame. The shield reduces breakdown or arcing path length without increasing the voltage gradient, tends to keep electric fields normal to conducting surfaces rather than skewed and reduces the peak electric field around irregularities on the 80-keV electrodes. The arc chamber or ion source is mounted separately from the extractor or ion accelerator to reduce misalignment of the accelerator and to permit separate maintenance to be performed on these systems. The separate mounting of the ion source provides for maintaining same without removing the ion accelerator.

  14. Neutron suppression in polarized dd fusion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.S.; Liu, K.F.; Shuy, G.W.

    1999-11-01

    We report a model-independent partial-wave analysis of polarized dd fusion reactions at low energies. The radial transition amplitudes, designated by the central, spin-orbit, and tensor forces, are determined by fitting angular distributions of the tensor and vector analyzing powers A{sub XZ}({theta}), A{sub ZZ}({theta}), A{sub XX-YY}({theta}), and A{sub Y}({theta}), and the unpolarized cross section {sigma}{sub 0}({theta}). The polarized fusion cross section {sigma}{sub 1,1}({theta}) is then predicted from these radial transition amplitudes. We stress that this is feasible only when these amplitudes are separated according to the tensor rank of the interaction. This study includes the {ital D}-state components of the deuteron, triton, and {sup 3}He, and the partial-wave expansion is done up to the {ital d} wave for both the entrance and exit channels. Experimental data at E{sub lab}=30, 50, 70, and 90 keV for the d(d,p)t reaction are very well fitted with this method. It is found that the ratio of polarized to unpolarized cross sections is about 86{percent} at 30 keV and goes down to 22{percent} at 90 keV. The implication of the suppression of a polarized dd fusion reaction is discussed in the context of the neutron-lean fusion reactor with polarized {ital D}-{sup 3}He fuel. It turns out that the important range of energy for suppressing the d(d,p)t and d(d,n){sup 3}He reactions at the plasma temperature T=60 keV is E{sub d}=80{endash}600 keV. More experimental data are needed in this range to make a detailed study of the neutron suppression. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. KevJumba and the Adolescence of YouTube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the significance of YouTube as a pedagogical space from which young people can play participatory roles as theorists in their own constructions as popular cultural subjects. Drawing upon the public profile of "KevJumba," a teenager who makes videos of himself on YouTube, the article suggests that representational practices…

  16. Scientific capabilities of POLAR and its coordinated observation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    POLAR is a compact polarimeter dedicated to measuring the polarization of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other bright hard X-ray and low energy gamma-ray sources between 50-350 keV wth a very large field of view, to be launched in September 2016 onboard China's Tianggong-2 spacelab. On behalf of the international POLAR collaboration team between China, Switzerland and Poland, I will summarize the scientific capabilities of POLAR and its coordinated observation program, including releasing promptly the estimated sensitivity to each GRB triggered by other instruments and in the field of view of POLAR.

  17. A Catalog of Soft X-Ray Shadows, and More Contemplation of the 1/4 KeV Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Freyberg, M. J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Sanders, W. T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a catalog of shadows in the 1/4 keV soft X-ray diffuse background 4 (SXRB) that were identified by a comparison between ROSAT All-Sky Survey maps and DIRB&corrected IRAS 100 micron maps. These "shadows" are the negative correlations between the surface brightness of the SXRB and the column density of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISIM) over limited angular regions (a few degrees in extent). We have compiled an extensive but not exhaustive set of 378 shadows in the polar regions of the Galaxy (Absolute value (beta) > and approximately equal 20 deg.), and determined their foreground and background X-ray intensities (relative to the absorbing features), and the respective hardness ratios of that emission. The portion of the sky that was examined to find these shadows was restricted in general to regions where the minimum column density is less than and approximately equal to 4 x 10(exp 20) H/square cm, i.e., relatively high Galactic latitudes, and to regions away from distinct extended features in the SXRB such as supernova remnants and superbubbles. The results for the foreground intensities agree well with the recent results of a general analysis of the local 1/4 KeV emission while the background intensities show additional. but not unexpected scatter. The results also confirm the existence of a gradient in the hardness of the local 1/4 keV emission along a Galactic center/ anticenter axis with a temperature that varies from 10(exp 6.13) K to 10(exp 6.02) K, respectively. The average temperature of the foreground component from this analysis is 10(exp 6.08) K, compared to 10(exp 6.06) K in the previous analysis. Likewise, the average temperature for the distant component for the current and previous analyses are 10(exp 6.06) K and 10(exp 6.02) K, respectively. Finally, the results for the 1/4 keV halo emission are compared to the observed fluxes at 3/4 keV, where the lack of correlation suggests that the Galactic halo's 1/4 keV and 3/4 keV

  18. Extreme energetic electron fluxes in low Earth orbit: Analysis of POES E > 30, E > 100, and E > 300 keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Isles, John D.; Green, Janet C.

    2016-02-01

    Energetic electrons are an important space weather hazard. Electrons with energies less than about 100 keV cause surface charging, while higher-energy electrons can penetrate materials and cause internal charging. In this study we conduct an extreme value analysis of the maximum 3-hourly flux of E > 30 keV, E > 100 keV, and E > 300 keV electrons in low Earth orbit as a function of L∗, for geomagnetic field lines that map to the outer radiation belt, using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) from July 1998 to June 2014. The 1 in 10 year flux of E > 30 keV electrons shows a general increasing trend with distance ranging from 1.8 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 to 6.6 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=8.0. The 1 in 10 year flux of E > 100 keV electrons peaks at L∗=4.5-5.0 at 1.9 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 decreasing to minima of 7.1 × 106 and 8.7 × 106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 and 8.0, respectively. In contrast to the E > 30 keV electrons, the 1 in 10 year flux of E > 300 keV electrons shows a general decreasing trend with distance, ranging from 2.4 × 106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 to 1.2 × 105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=8.0. Our analysis suggests that there is a limit to the E > 30 keV electrons with an upper bound in the range 5.1 × 107 to 8.8 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. However, the results suggest that there is no upper bound for the E > 100 keV and E > 300 keV electrons.

  19. Observations of solar X-ray bursts in the energy range 5-15 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D. W.; Hudson, H. S.; Peterson, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Bursts of solar X-rays in the energy range 5-15 keV are associated with flares and are due to thermal emission from a hot coronal plasma. The results of the first study of a large sample of separate bursts, 197 events associated with subflares, and of a few events of importance 1 are presented. The observations were made by a proportional counter on the satellite OSO-7 from October, 1971 to June, 1972. In most cases, the temperature characterizing the X-ray spectrum rises impulsively at the onset of the burst and then declines slowly throughout the remainder of the burst. The emission measure rises exponentially with a time scale of 30-100 sec and then declines slowly on a time scale of the order of 1,000 sec. It is shown that the growth of the thermal energy in the flare plasma throughout the burst can be due to the heating of new cool material.

  20. Spectroscopy from 2 to 200 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Chanan, G. A.; Novick, R.; Maccallum, C. J.; Leventhal, M.

    1981-01-01

    The astrophysical processes responsible for line and continuum emission in the spectra range 2 keV to 200 keV are examined from the viewpoint of designing a spectrometer which would operate in this regime. Phenomena considered include fluorescent line radiation in X-ray binaries, magnetically shifted iron lines and cyclotron emission from neutron star surfaces, line emission from cosmically abundant elements in thermal plasmas, and nuclear deexcitation lines in fresh nucleosynthetically produced matter. An instrument consisting of a approximately 10 sq cm array of planar germanium detectors surrounded by a large sodium-iodide anticoincidence shield is described and projected background rates and sensitivities are considered. A sample observing program for a two-day shuttle-based mission is included as an example of the wide range of scientific questions which could be addressed by such an instrument.

  1. Polarization developments

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist.

  2. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  4. THE EMISSION OF CYGNUS X-1: OBSERVATIONS WITH INTEGRAL SPI FROM 20 keV TO 2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.; Malzac, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on Cyg X-1 observations performed by the SPI telescope on board the INTEGRAL mission and distributed over more than 6 years. We investigate the variability of the intensity and spectral shape of this peculiar source in the hard X-ray domain, and more particularly up to the MeV region. We first study the total averaged spectrum which presents the best signal-to-noise ratio (4 Ms of data). Then, we refine our results by building mean spectra by periods and gathering those of similar hardness. Several spectral shapes are observed with important changes in the curvature between 20 and 200 keV, even at the same luminosity level. In all cases, the emission decreases sharply above 700 keV, with flux values above 1 MeV (or upper limits) well below the recently reported polarized flux, while compatible with the MeV emission detected some years ago by the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/COMPTEL. Finally, we take advantage of the spectroscopic capability of the instrument to seek for spectral features in the 500 keV region with negative results for any significant annihilation emission on 2 ks and day timescales, as well as in the total data set.

  5. Polarized rainbow.

    PubMed

    Können, G P; de Boer, J H

    1979-06-15

    The Airy theory of the rainbow is extended to polarized light. For both polarization directions a simple analytic expression is obtained for the intensity distribution as a function of the scattering angle in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. This approach is valid at least down to droplet diameters of 0.3 mm in visible light. The degree of polarization of the rainbow is less than expected from geometrical optics; it increases with droplet size. For a droplet diameter >1 mm the locations of the supernumerary rainbows are equal for both polarization directions, but for a diameter <1 mm the supernumerary rainbows of the weaker polarization component are located between those in the strong component. PMID:20212586

  6. Microdosimetry of a 25 keV electron microbeam.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W E; Lynch, D J; Wei, K; Braby, L A

    2001-01-01

    Electron microbeam experiments are planned or under way to explore in part the question regarding whether the bystander effect is a general phenomenon or is restricted to high-LET radiation. Since low-LET radiations scatter more readily compared to high-LET radiations, identifying bystander cells and assessing the potential dose that they may receive will be crucial to the interpretation of radiobiological results. This paper reports on initial calculations of the basic information needed for a stochastic model of the penetration of energetic electrons in tissue-like matter; the model will be used to predict doses delivered to adjacent regions in which bystander cells may reside. Results are presented of calculations of the stochastics of energy deposition by 25 keV electrons slowing down in a homogeneous water medium. Energy deposition distributions were scored for 1-micrometer spheres located at various penetration and radial distances up to 10 micrometer from the point of origin. The energy of 25 keV was selected because experiments are planned for that energy. At 25 keV there is a high probability that the entire electron track will be contained within a typical mammalian cell. Individual tracks are scored because of their primacy; data for higher doses can be obtained by convoluting single-track distributions. The event frequency decreases approximately exponentially after the first micrometer to 1% at about 8 micrometer of penetration. Radially, the 1% contour extends to 3.5 micrometer at a penetration of 5.5 micrometer. The frequency-mean energy deposited decreases from 1.5 to 1 keV/micrometer at a penetration of 3.5 micrometer, then increases back to about 1.5 at a penetration of 6.5 micrometer. The mean energy increases to about 3 keV/micrometer at a radial distance of 8.5 micrometer.

  7. PALOMA: A Magnetic CV between Polars and Intermediate Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Arti; Pandey, J. C.; Singh, K. P.; Agrawal, P. C.

    2016-10-01

    We present analyses of archival X-ray data obtained from the XMM-Newton satellite and optical photometric data obtained from 1 m class telescopes of ARIES, Nainital of a magnetic cataclysmic variable (MCV) Paloma. Two persistent periods at 156 ± 1 minutes and 130 ± 1 minutes are present in the X-ray data, which we interpret as the orbital and spin periods, respectively. These periods are similar to those obtained from the previous as well as new optical photometric observations. The soft-X-ray excess seen in the X-ray spectrum of Paloma and the averaged X-ray spectra are well fitted by two-temperature plasma models with temperatures of {0.10}-0.01+0.02 and {13.0}-0.5+0.5 keV with an Fe Kα line and an absorbing column density of 4.6 × 1022 cm‑2. This material partially covers 60 ± 2% of the X-ray source. We also present the orbital and spin-phase-resolved spectroscopy of Paloma in the 0.3{--}10.0 {keV} energy band and find that the X-ray spectral parameters show orbital and spin-phase dependencies. New results obtained from optical and X-ray studies of Paloma indicate that it belongs to a class of a few magnetic CVs that seem to have the characteristics of both the polars and the intermediate polars.

  8. Astrophysics and cosmology confront the 17-keV neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    A host of astrophysical and cosmological arguments severely constrain the properties of a 17 keV Dirac neutrino. Such a neutrino must have interactions beyond those of the standard electroweak theory to reduce its cosmic abundance (through decay or annihilation) by a factor of two hundred. A predicament arises because the additional helicity states of the neutrino necessary to construct a Dirac mass must have interactions strong enough to evade the astrophysical bound from SN 1987A, but weak enough to avoid violating the bound from primordial nucleosynthesis.

  9. Astrophysics and cosmology confront the 17 keV neutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    A host of astrophysical and cosmological arguments severely constrain the properties of a 17 keV Dirac neutrino. Such a neutrino must have interactions beyond those of the standard electroweak theory to reduce its cosmic abundance (through decay or annihilation) by a factor of two hundred. A predicament arises because the additional helicity states of the neutrino necessary to construct a Dirac mass must have interactions strong enough to evade the astrophysical bound from SN 1987A, but weak enough to avoid violating the bound from primordial nucleosynthesis.

  10. 511 keV photons from superconducting cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2005-12-31

    We show that a tangle of light superconducting strings in the Milky Way could be the source of the observed 511 keV emission from electron-positron annihilation in the Galactic bulge. The scenario predicts a flux that is in agreement with observations if the strings are at the approximately 1 TeV scale, making the particle physics within reach of planned accelerator experiments. The emission is directly proportional to the galactic magnetic field, and future observations should be able to differentiate the superconducting string scenario from other proposals. PMID:16486335

  11. Realistic simulation of the Space-borne Compton Polarimeter POLAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hualin

    2016-07-01

    POLAR is a compact wide field space-borne detector dedicated for precise measurements of the linear polarization of hard x-rays emitted by transient sources. Its energy range sensitivity is optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). POLAR is developed by an international collaboration of China, Switzerland and Poland. It is planned to be launched into space in 2016 onboard the Chinese space laboratory TG2. The energy range of POLAR spans between 50 keV and 500 keV. POLAR detects gamma rays with an array of 1600 plastic scintillator bars read out by 25 muti-anode PMTs (MAPMTs). Polarization measurements use Compton scattering process and are based on detection of energy depositions in the scintillator bars. Reconstruction of the polarization degree and polarization angle of GRBs requires comparison of experimental modulation curves with realistic simulations of the full instrument response. In this paper we present a method to model and parameterize the detector response including efficiency of the light collection, contributions from crosstalk and non-uniformity of MAPMTs as well as dependency on low energy detection thresholds and noise from readout electronics. The performance of POLAR for determination of polarization is predicted with such realistic simulations and carefully cross-checked with dedicated laboratory tests.

  12. Width of the 3841-keV level in 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Beck, O.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pitz, H. H.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pietralla, N.; Zilges, A.

    1994-10-01

    The width of 3841-keV level in 17O was precisely measured in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments performed at the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility. The result of Γ(3841 keV)=(92+/-6) meV is compared with upper limits quoted in the literature. Possible particle-hole configurations of the 3841-keV level are discussed.

  13. Polarizing cues.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues. PMID:22400143

  14. High resolution 17 keV to 75 keV backlighters for High Energy Density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Maddox, B R; Giraldez, E; Hatchett, S P; Hudson, L; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Pape, S L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Remington, B A; Seely, J F; Tommasini, R; Town, R; Workman, J

    2008-02-25

    We have developed 17 keV to 75 keV 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional high-resolution (< 10 {micro}m) radiography using high-intensity short pulse lasers. High energy K-{alpha} sources are created by fluorescence from hot electrons interacting in the target material after irradiation by lasers with intensity I{sub L} > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have achieved high resolution point projection 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional radiography using micro-foil and micro-wire targets attached to low-Z substrate materials. The micro-wire size was 10 {micro}m x 10 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m on a 300 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m x 5 {micro}m CH substrate. The radiography performance was demonstrated using the Titan laser at LLNL. We observed that the resolution is dominated by the micro-wire target size and there is very little degradation from the plasma plume, implying that the high energy x-ray photons are generated mostly within the micro-wire volume. We also observe that there are enough K{alpha} photons created with a 300 J, 1-{omega}, 40 ps pulse laser from these small volume targets, and that the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high, for single shot radiography experiments. This unique technique will be used on future high energy density (HED) experiments at the new Omega-EP, ZR and NIF facilities.

  15. Polarization Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    1998-01-01

    As light passes through a optical system the reflections and refractions will in general change the polarization state of the light. If we assume that all of the materials in the thin film coatings and substrate are isotropic and homogeneous then calculating the amount of "instrumental" polarization is a relatively straight forward task. In the following sections we will present a of the steps required to perform a 'polarization ray trace' calculation for a single ray and monochromatic and hence polarized light. The thin film portion of the calculation is also shown. The reason for explicitly showing the thin film equations is that there are sign conventions imposed on the boundary value equations by the orientation and handedness of the various coordinate frames which are attached to the geometric rays. The attenuation of light through a optical system, is relatively simple, and requires at the very least a lens (average) reflectivity or transmissivity. Determining the polarization sensitivity of a optical system is still relatively straight forward requiring at least a knowledge of the behavior of the "s" and "p" components at each interface for the chief ray. Determining the thin film induced aberrations of a optical system are somewhat more demanding. Questions about the arithmetic sign of the phase factors and how this relates to the overall "OPD" of a ray are ubiquitous. Many rays are required to construct a wavefront. Thin film codes which modify the OPD's of rays are a requirement for this last mentioned computation. This requires a consistent scheme of coordinate frames and sign conventions and is probably the most demanding task of a polarization ray trace. Only the electric field will used in the discussion. This is not a restriction as the Stokes parameters are functions of the electric field. The following does not attempt to explain, but only to present all of the required concepts and formulas.

  16. Measurement of the linear polarization of channeling radiation in silicon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepka, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Diedrich, E.; Kotthaus, R.; Kufner, W.; Roessl, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hoffmann-Stascheck, P.; Genz, H.; Nething, U.; Richter, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1995-07-01

    Utilizing 90{degree} Compton scattering the linear polarization of channeling radiation produced at the superconducting accelerator S-DALINAC with 62 MeV electrons in silicon and diamond has been measured in the energy range between 50 and 400 keV. Planar channeling radiation due to transitions involving transversal bound as well as unbound states is completely linearly polarized perpendicular to the channeling plane. Axial channeling radiation does not show linear polarization.

  17. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  18. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  19. Polar Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    30 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroding mesas of frozen carbon dioxide in the martian south polar residual cap. During the summer season, the scarps that bound each pit and mesa in the south polar region become dark as carbon dioxide sublimes away. The darkening might result from the roughening of the surfaces from which ice is subliming, or from the concentration of trace amounts of dust on these slopes, or both.

    Location near: 84.7oS, 48.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  20. Evidence for a Target-Material Dependence of the Neutron-Proton Branching Ratio in d + d Reactions for Deuteron Energies Below 20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huke, A.; Czerski, K.; Dorsch, T.; Heide, P.

    2006-02-01

    Angular distributions and the neutron-proton branching ratio of the mirror reactions 2H(d,p)3H and 2H(d,n)3He have been investigated using different deuterized metallic targets at projectile energies ranging from 5 to 60 keV. Whereas the experimental results obtained for Al, Zr, Pd, and Ta targets do not differ from those known from gas-target experiments, an enhancement of the angular anisotropy in the neutron channel and a quenching of the neutron-proton branching ratio have been observed for Li and Sr targets at deuteron energies below 20 keV. Both effects can be explained assuming an induced adiabatic polarization of the reacting deuterons in the crystal lattice.

  1. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  2. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics: Optical Excitation Function of H(1s-2p) Produced by electron Impact from Threshold to 1.8 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Slevin, J. A.; Shemansky, D. E.; McConkey, J. W.; Bray, I.; Dziczek, D.; Kanik, I.; Ajello, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The optical excitation function of prompt Lyman-Alpha radiation, produced by electron impact on atomic hydrogen, has been measured over the extended energy range from threshold to 1.8 keV. Measurements were obtained in a crossed-beams experiment using both magnetically confined and electrostatically focused electrons in collision with atomic hydrogen produced by an intense discharge source. A vacuum-ultraviolet mono- chromator system was used to measure the emitted Lyman-Alpha radiation. The absolute H(1s-2p) electron impact excitation cross section was obtained from the experimental optical excitation function by normalizing to the accepted optical oscillator strength, with corrections for polarization and cascade. Statistical and known systematic uncertainties in our data range from +/- 4% near threshold to +/- 2% at 1.8 keV. Multistate coupling affecting the shape of the excitation function up to 1 keV impact energy is apparent in both the present experimental data and present theoretical results obtained with convergent close- coupling (CCC) theory. This shape function effect leads to an uncertainty in absolute cross sections at the 10% level in the analysis of the experimental data. The derived optimized absolute cross sections are within 7% of the CCC calculations over the 14 eV-1.8 keV range. The present CCC calculations converge on the Bethe- Fano profile for H(1s-2p) excitation at high energy. For this reason agreement with the CCC values to within 3% is achieved in a nonoptimal normalization of the experimental data to the Bethe-Fano profile. The fundamental H(1s-2p) electron impact cross section is thereby determined to an unprecedented accuracy over the 14 eV - 1.8 keV energy range.

  3. Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    10 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded remnants of carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The scarps that outline each small mesa have retreated about 3 meters (10 feet) per Mars year since MGS began orbiting the red planet in 1997.

    Location near: 87.0oS, 31.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  4. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope upon which are exposed some of the layered materials that underlie the south polar cap of Mars. The layers are generally considered to be sediments--perhaps dust--that may have been cemented by water ice.

    Location near: 84.1oS, 343.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  5. Polar Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02155 Polar Markings

    These bright and dark markings occurred near the end of summer in the south polar region. The dark material is likely dust that has been freed of frost cover.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -76.3N, Longitude 84.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02153 Polar Layers

    This image of the south polar region shows layered material. It is not known if the layers are formed yearly or if they form over the period of 10s to 100s of years or more.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.3N, Longitude 296.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  10. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Polarized gamma-ray emission from the galactic black hole Cygnus X-1.

    PubMed

    Laurent, P; Rodriguez, J; Wilms, J; Cadolle Bel, M; Pottschmidt, K; Grinberg, V

    2011-04-22

    Because of their inherently high flux allowing the detection of clear signals, black hole x-ray binaries are interesting candidates for polarization studies, even if no polarization signals have been observed from them before. Such measurements would provide further detailed insight into these sources' emission mechanisms. We measured the polarization of the gamma-ray emission from the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1 with the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory Imager on Board the Integral Satellite (INTEGRAL/IBIS) telescope. Spectral modeling of the data reveals two emission mechanisms: The 250- to 400-keV (kilo-electron volt) data are consistent with emission dominated by Compton scattering on thermal electrons and are weakly polarized. The second spectral component seen in the 400-keV to 2-MeV band is by contrast strongly polarized, revealing that the MeV emission is probably related to the jet first detected in the radio band. PMID:21436402

  12. In-vacuum figure-8 undulator for hard X-rays with both horizontal and vertical polarization.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Maréchal, X M; Hara, T; Tanabe, T; Kitamura, H

    1998-05-01

    A figure-8 undulator of the in-vacuum type has been adopted as an insertion device for BL24XU, the Hyogo Beamline at SPring-8, to provide hard X-rays with both horizontal and vertical polarization instead of a tandem undulator consisting of horizontal and vertical undulators. The undulator will be operated with the gap almost fixed at 11.6 mm to provide the fundamental radiation with horizontal polarization at 9.5 keV and the 1.5th harmonic with vertical polarization at 14 keV.

  13. Polarized wiggler for NSLS x-ray ring design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Krinsky, S.; Blum, E.

    1992-03-01

    We examine the properties of an elliptically polarized wiggler that will generate circularly polarized photons with energy spectrum of 3--12 KeV. The vertical wiggler magnetic field is produced by permanent magnets while the horizontal wiggler field is generated by electric coils capable of AC excitation. The radiation parameters of the wiggler are presented, including photon flux, circular and linear polarization and spectrum. These parameters are compared to the synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet. Numerical values are calculated for radiation from the wiggler and bending magnet for the NSLS X-ray ring parameters. A conceptual design for such a wiggler is discussed and several different alternatives are analyzed. We consider AC excitation of the wiggler to produce the time modulation of the elliptic polarization, and also to produce time modulated linearly polarized radiation.

  14. Polar cap auroral electron fluxes observed with Isis 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winningham, J. D.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Three types of auroral particle precipitation have been observed over the polar caps, well inside the auroral oval, by means of the soft particle spectrometer on the Isis 1 satellite. The first type is a uniform, very soft (about 100 eV) electron 'polar rain' over the entire polar cap; this may well be present with very weak intensity at all times, but it is markedly enhanced during worldwide geomagnetic storms. A second type of precipitation is a structured flux of electrons with energies near 1 keV, suggestive of localized 'polar showers'; it seems likely that these are the cause of the sun-aligned auroral arcs that have been observed during moderately quiet conditions. During periods of intense magnetic disturbance this precipitation can become very intense and exhibit a characteristic pattern that we have come to call a 'polar squall'.

  15. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  16. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03581 Polar Layers

    This image shows just one example of the bright and dark markings that appear during summer time. The marks are related to the polar layers. If you happen to see a wild-eyed guy sticking his tongue out at you, you'll know why this image qualifies for the old 'art' category of THEMIS releases.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6S, Longitude 34.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. An electromagnetic helical undulator for polarized x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Gluskin, E.; Vinokurov, N.; Tcheskidov, V.; Medvedko, A.; Evtushenko, Y. Kolomogorov, V.; Vobly, P.; Antokhin, E.; Ivanov, P.; Vasserman, I. B.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Deriy, B.; Erdmann, M.; Makarov, O.; Moog, E. R.

    1999-10-28

    Linearly and circularly polarized x-rays have been very successfully applied to the study of the properties of materials. Many applications can benefit from the availability of energy-turnable, high-brilliance x-ray beams with adjustable polarization properties. A helical undulator that can generate beams of variable (linear to circular) polarization has been designed and built by the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and the Advanced Photon Source. The first harmonic of this 12.8-cm-period device will cover the energy range from 0.4 keV to 3.5 keV. An important feature of this fully electromagnetic device is that it will allow one to generate 100% horizontally (K{sub x}=O)or vertically (K{sub y}=O) plane-polarized radiation, which will enable many experiments otherwise not technically feasible. With symmetric deflection parameters (K{sub x}=K{sub y}), the on-axis radiation will be circularly polarized, with a user-selectable handedness. The polarization can be changed at rates up to 10 Hz.

  18. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  19. Stacked depth graded multilayer for hard X-rays measured up to 130 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. P.; Christensen, F. E.; Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Zhong, Z.

    2007-09-01

    Depth graded multilayer designs for hard x-ray telescopes in the 10 keV to 70-80 keV energy range have had either W or Pt as the heavy element. These materials have been chosen because of reasonable optical constants, the possibility to grow smooth interfaces with the spacer material, and the stability over time. On the flip side both W and Pt have an absorption edge -- 69.5 keV (W) and 78.4 keV (Pt) -- which is very close to the two 44Ti lines at 67.9 keV and 78.4 keV that are produced in the envelope of a super nova explosion. Other materials have better optical constants and no absorption edges in this energy range, for example Ni 0.93V 0.07, but are not used because of high interface roughness. By using a WC/SiC multilayer for the bottom and a Ni 0.93V 0.07/SiC multilayer for the thicker top layers of a depth graded multilayer we have made a reflector that doesn't have a clear absorption edge. This reflector has been measured at energies between 8 keV and 130 keV. At a graze angle of 0.11 degree there is still nearly the same reflectivity below the W absorption edge as for a traditional W based coating, and above the W absorption edge there is still 48% reflection at 80 keV.

  20. Characterizing the Integral Intermediate Polar Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Andrew

    A major surprise of the INTEGRAL mission is that, although Intermediate Polars are <10% of the population of Cataclysmic Variables, they make up >90% of the CVs detected by the IBIS survey. We propose to observe 8 probable IPs detected by INTEGRAL, plus 4 more recently identified likely IPs, for which no pointed X-ray observations exist in order to (i) search for and characterize their pulsed X-ray emission and (ii) measure their 2-20 keV spectrum. This will confirm their classification and address how/why this hard X-ray selected sample differ from the known IPs. They may have different magnetic field strengths, accretion rates or accretion flow structures, and so follow a different evolutionary path. It's even possible they represent the long sought after IPs that evolve into polars.

  1. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  2. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  3. Measurement of the nuclear polarization of hydrogen and deuterium molecules using a Lamb-shift polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Ralf Gorski, Robert; Grigoryev, Kiril; Mikirtychyants, Maxim; Rathmann, Frank; Seyfarth, Hellmut; Ströher, Hans; Weiss, Philipp; Kochenda, Leonid; Kravtsov, Peter; Trofimov, Viktor; Tschernov, Nikolay; Vasilyev, Alexander; Vznuzdaev, Marat; Schieck, Hans Paetz gen.

    2014-10-15

    Lamb-shift polarimeters are used to measure the nuclear polarization of protons and deuterons at energies of a few keV. In combination with an ionizer, the polarization of hydrogen and deuterium atoms was determined after taking into account the loss of polarization during the ionization process. The present work shows that the nuclear polarization of hydrogen or deuterium molecules can be measured as well, by ionizing the molecules and injecting the H{sub 2}{sup +} (or D{sub 2}{sup +}) ions into the Lamb-shift polarimeter.

  4. Characteristic 8 keV X rays possess radiobiological properties of higher-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, Ravi; Estabrook, William; Yudelev, Mark; Rakowski, Joseph; Burmeister, Jay; Wilson, George D; Joiner, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Electronic brachytherapy systems are being developed that can deliver X rays of varying energy depending on the material of a secondary target. A copper target produces characteristic 8 keV X rays. Our aim was to determine whether 8 keV X rays might deliver greater biological effectiveness than megavoltage photons. Cells of the U251 human glioma cell line were used to compare the biological effects of 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays in terms of relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and DNA damage. The RBE at 50% and 10% survival was 2.6 and 1.9, respectively. At 50% survival, the OER for cells treated with 8 keV X rays was 1.6 compared with 3.0 for (60)Co gamma rays. The numbers of H2AX foci per Gy after treatment with 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays were similar; however, the size of the foci generated at 8 keV was significantly larger, possibly indicating more complex DNA damage. The mean area of H2AX foci generated by 8 keV X rays was 0.785 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.756-0.814) compared with 0.491 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.462-0.520) for (60)Co gamma rays (P < 0.0001). Characteristic 8 keV X rays produce two to three times the biological effectiveness of megavoltage photons, with a radiobiological profile similar to higher-LET radiations.

  5. OPPIS UPGRADE FOR 2003 POLARIZED RUN IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ZELENSKI,A.ALESSI,J.BRISCOE,B.KPONOU,A.KOKHANOVSKI,S.KLENOV,V.LODESTRO,V.RITTER,J.ZUBETS,V.

    2002-11-06

    The polarization dilution by molecular ions which are produced in the ECR primary proton source is discussed. The molecular component can be reduced to about 5% by ECR source-operation optimization. It is further suppressed by optimization of the extraction electrode optics and by the decelerating einzel lens in the 35 keV LEBT line. As a result, the proton polarization of the accelerated beam was increased to over 80%. as measured in the 200 MeV proton-deuterium polarimeter. The OPPIS upgrade for 6 2/3 Hz repetition rate operation is also discussed.

  6. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  7. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  8. Data Analysis And Polarization Measurements With GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohmayer, Tod

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission was selected by NASA for flight in 2014. GEMS will make the first sensitive survey of X-ray polarization across a wide range of source classes including black hole and neutron star binaries, AGN of different types, rotation and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. GEMS employs grazing-incidence foil mirrors and novel time-projection chamber (TPC) polarimeters leveraging the photoelectric effect. The GEMS detectors image the charge tracks of photoelectrons produced by 2 - 10 keV X-rays. The initial direction of the photoelectron is determined by the linear polarization of the photon. We present an overview of the data analysis challenges and methods for GEMS, including procedures for producing optimally filtered images of the charge tracks and estimating their initial directions. We illustrate our methods using laboratory measurements of polarized and unpolarized X-rays with flight-like detectors as well as from simulated tracks. We also present detailed simulations exploring the statistics of polarization measurements appropriate for GEMS, and make comparisons with previous work.

  9. Nondiffracting transversally polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G H; Wei, S B; Yuan, X-C

    2011-09-01

    Generation of a nondiffracting transversally polarized beam by means of transmitting an azimuthally polarized beam through a multibelt spiral phase hologram and then highly focusing by a high-NA lens is presented. A relatively long depth of focus (∼4.84λ) of the electric field with only radial and azimuthal components is achieved. The polarization of the wavefront near the focal plane is analyzed in detail by calculating the Stokes polarization parameters. It is found that the polarization is spatially varying and entirely transversally polarized, and the polarization singularity disappears at the beam center, which makes the central bright channel possible. PMID:21886250

  10. Crossed elliptical polarization undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1997-05-01

    The first switching of polarization direction is possible by installing two identical helical undulators in series in a same straight section in a storage ring. By setting each undulator in a circular polarization mode in opposite handedness, one can obtain linearly polarized radiation with any required polarization direction depending on the modulator setting between two undulators. This scheme can be used without any major degradation of polarization degree in any low energy low emittance storage ring.

  11. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, D.E.

    1998-02-17

    A beamsplitter assembly is disclosed that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting. 10 figs.

  12. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    1998-01-01

    A beamsplitter assembly that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting.

  13. Steady State Sputtering Yields and Surface Compositions of Depleted Uranium and Uranium Carbide bombarded by 30 keV Gallium or 16 keV Cesium Ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-10-23

    Depleted uranium that included carbide inclusions was sputtered with 30-keV gallium ions or 16-kev cesium ions to depths much greater than the ions’ range, i.e. using steady-state sputtering. The recession of both the uranium’s and uranium carbide’s surfaces and the ion corresponding fluences were used to determine the steady-state target sputtering yields of both uranium and uranium carbide, i.e. 6.3 atoms of uranium and 2.4 units of uranium carbide eroded per gallium ion, and 9.9 uranium atoms and 3.65 units of uranium carbide eroded by cesium ions. The steady state surface composition resulting from the simultaneous gallium or cesium implantation and sputter-erosion of uranium and uranium carbide were calculated to be U₈₆Ga₁₄, (UC)₇₀Ga₃₀ and U₈₁Cs₉, (UC)₇₉Cs₂₁, respectively.

  14. HEAO 3 upper limits to the expected 1634 KeV line from SS 483

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    A model based on 24 Mg(1369) was developed as the source of the lines in which refractory grains in the jets, containing Mg and 0, are bombarded, by ambient protons in the local ISM. The narrowness of the features results because the recoil Mg nucleus is stopped in the grain before the 1369 keV excited state decays. A consequence of the 24 Mg interpretation is the expected appearance of other emission lines, due to 20 Ne and 20 Na, which are produced by proton bombardment of 24 Mg at the 33 MeV/nucleon energy corresponding to the velocity of the jets. These lines appear at rest energies of 1634 keV and 1636 keV, respectively, and should have essentially the same total flux as that emited at 1369 keV. The HEAO 3 data are examined to search for the 1634 keV (rest) emission. The observation and analysis, the results, and the implications for the understanding of SS 433 are discussed.

  15. Influence of ~7 keV sterile neutrino dark matter on the process of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakovskyi, Anton; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports of a weak unidentified emission line at ~3.5 keV found in spectra of several matter-dominated objects may give a clue to resolve the long-standing problem of dark matter. One of the best physically motivated particle candidate able to produce such an extra line is sterile neutrino with the mass of ~7 keV . Previous works show that sterile neutrino dark matter with parameters consistent with the new line measurement modestly affects structure formation compared to conventional cold dark matter scenario. In this work, we concentrate for the first time on contribution of the sterile neutrino dark matter able to produce the observed line at ~3.5 keV, to the process of reionization. By incorporating dark matter power spectra for ~7 keV sterile neutrinos into extended semi-analytical `bubble' model of reionization we obtain that such sterile neutrino dark matter would produce significantly sharper reionization compared to widely used cold dark matter models, impossible to `imitate' within the cold dark matter scenario under any reasonable choice of our model parameters, and would have a clear tendency of lowering both the redshift of reionization and the electron scattering optical depth (although the difference is still below the existing model uncertainties). Further dedicated studies of reionization (such as 21 cm measurements or studies of kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) will thus be essential for reconstruction of particle candidate responsible the ~3.5 keV line.

  16. CdZnTe x-ray detector for 30 {endash} 100 keV energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.-S.; Rodricks, B.; Shastri, S.D.; Montano, P.A.

    1996-07-01

    High-pressure-Bridgman (HPB) grown CdZnTe x-ray detectors 1.25-1.7 mm thick were tested using monochromatic x-rays of 30 to 100 keV generated by a high energy x-ray generator. The results were compared with a commercially available 5 cm thick NaI detector. A linear dependence of the counting rate versus the x-ray generator tube current was observed at 58.9 keV. The measured pulse height of the photopeaks shows a linear dependence on energy. Electron and hole mobility-lifetime products ({mu}{tau}) were deduced by fitting bias dependent photopeak channel numbers at 30 keV x-ray energy. Values of 2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V and 2 x 10{sup -4}cm{sup 2}/V were obtained for {mu}{tau}{sub e} and {mu}{tau}{sub p}, respectively. The detector efficiency of CdZnTe at a 100 V bias was as high as, or higher than 90 % compared to a NaI detector. At x-ray energies higher than 70 keV, the detection efficiency becomes a dominant factor and decreases to 75 % at 100 keV.

  17. Spatial distribution of upstream magnetospheric geq50 keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Argyropoulos, G.; Kaliabetsos, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present for the first time a statistical study of geq50 keV ion events of a magnetospheric origin upstream from Earth's bow shock. The statistical analysis of the 50-220 keV ion events observed by the IMP-8 spacecraft shows: (1) a dawn-dusk asymmetry in ion distributions, with most events and lower intensities upstream from the quasi-parallel pre-dawn side (4 LT-6 LT) of the bow shock, (2) highest ion fluxes upstream from the nose/dusk side of the bow shock under an almost radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) configuration, and (3) a positive correlation of the ion intensities with the solar wind speed and the index of geomagnetic index Kp, with an average solar wind speed as high as 620 km s-1 and values of the index Kp > 2. The statistical results are consistent with (1) preferential leakage of sim50 keV magnetospheric ions from the dusk magnetopause, (2) nearly scatter free motion of sim50 keV ions within the magnetosheath, and (3) final escape of magnetospheric ions from the quasi-parallel dawn side of the bow shock. An additional statistical analysis of higher energy (290-500 keV) upstream ion events also shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the occurrence frequency of these events, with the occurrence frequency ranging between sim16%-sim34% in the upstream region.

  18. Investigation of Coulombic bremsstrahlung spectra of metallic targets for the photon energy region of 1-100keV.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A S

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the formation of bremsstrahlung spectra by ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) in metallic targets by (35)S beta particles has been investigated in the photon energy region of 1-100keV. From the experimental measurements and the theoretical results obtained from Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe Heitler (EBH) theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) (FmodBH) theories for OB and Avdonina and Pratt (FmodBH+PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS) having the contribution of PB into OB, it has been found that the contribution of PB into BS in a target is limited to a low energy region only and also varies with the atomic number of target material. The FmodBH+PB theory is in agreement with the experimental results in low energy regions of the target, whereas at high energy region FmodBH is found to give better agreement. Further, the present experimental results indicate that the screening effects in the Coulombic bremsstrahlung process cannot be neglected in the high energy region, and the multiple scattering and secondary electron emissions effects in thick target are required to be taken into account in describing the bremsstrahlung process. PMID:27400163

  19. Investigation of Coulombic bremsstrahlung spectra of metallic targets for the photon energy region of 1-100keV.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A S

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the formation of bremsstrahlung spectra by ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) in metallic targets by (35)S beta particles has been investigated in the photon energy region of 1-100keV. From the experimental measurements and the theoretical results obtained from Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe Heitler (EBH) theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) (FmodBH) theories for OB and Avdonina and Pratt (FmodBH+PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS) having the contribution of PB into OB, it has been found that the contribution of PB into BS in a target is limited to a low energy region only and also varies with the atomic number of target material. The FmodBH+PB theory is in agreement with the experimental results in low energy regions of the target, whereas at high energy region FmodBH is found to give better agreement. Further, the present experimental results indicate that the screening effects in the Coulombic bremsstrahlung process cannot be neglected in the high energy region, and the multiple scattering and secondary electron emissions effects in thick target are required to be taken into account in describing the bremsstrahlung process.

  20. Degeneracy at 1871 keV in Cd112 and implications for neutrinoless double electron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, K. L.; Garrett, P. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D. S.; Colosimo, S.; Cross, D.; Demand, G. A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Kulp, W. D.; Leach, K. G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Wood, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2009-09-01

    High-statistics β-decay measurements of Ag112 and In112 were performed to study the structure of the Cd112 nucleus. The precise energies of the doublet of levels at 1871 keV, for which the 0+ member has been suggested as a possible daughter state following neutrinoless double electron capture of Sn112, were determined to be 1871.137(72) keV (04+ level) and 1870.743(54) keV (42+ level). The nature of the 04+ level, required for the calculation of the nuclear matrix element that would be needed to extract a neutrino mass from neutrinoless double electron capture to this state, is suggested to be of intruder origin.

  1. Evaluation of the 1077 keV γ-ray emission probability from 68Ga decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Li-Yang; Chen, Xiong-Jun; Chen, Guo-Chang

    2014-04-01

    68Ga decays to the excited states of 68Zn through the electron capture decay mode. New recommended values for the emission probability of 1077 keV γ-ray given by the ENSDF and DDEP databases all use data from absolute measurements. In 2011, JIANG Li-Yang deduced a new value for 1077 keV γ-ray emission probability by measuring the 69Ga(n,2n) 68Ga reaction cross section. The new value is about 20% lower than values obtained from previous absolute measurements and evaluations. In this paper, the discrepancies among the measurements and evaluations are analyzed carefully and the new values are re-recommended. Our recommended value for the emission probability of 1077 keV γ-ray is (2.72±0.16)%.

  2. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  3. Polarized Electron Source Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Charles K. Sinclair

    1990-02-23

    Presently, only two methods of producing beams of polarized electrons for injection into linear accelerators are in use. Each of these methods uses optical pumping by circularly polarized light to produce electron polarization. In one case, electron polarization is established in metastable helium atoms, while in the other case, the polarized electrons are produced in the conduction band of appropriate semiconductors. The polarized electrons are liberated from the helium metastable by chemi-ionization, and from the semiconductors by lowering the work function at the surface of the material. Developments with each of these sources since the 1988 Spin Physics Conference are reviewed, and the prospects for further improvements discussed.

  4. Relative biological effectiveness of 280 keV neutrons for apoptosis in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L A; Wilkins, R C; McFarlane, N M; Sung, M M; McNamee, J P; Boreham, D R

    2006-07-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons varies from unity to greater than ten depending upon neutron energy and the biological endpoint measured. In our study, we examined apoptosis in human lymphocytes to assess the RBE of low energy 280 keV neutrons compared to Cs gamma radiation and found the RBE to be approximately one. Similar results have been observed for high energy neutrons using the same endpoint. As apoptosis is a major process that influences the consequences of radiation exposure, our results indicate that biological effect and the corresponding weighting factors for 280 keV neutrons may be lower in some cell types and tissues.

  5. 3.55 keV line in minimal decaying dark matter scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Covi, Laura; Dradi, Federico

    2015-07-20

    We investigate the possibility of reproducing the recently reported 3.55 keV line in some simple decaying dark matter scenarios. In all cases a keV scale decaying DM is coupled with a scalar field charged under SM gauge interactions and thus capable of pair production at the LHC. We will investigate how the demand of a DM lifetime compatible with the observed signal, combined with the requirement of the correct DM relic density through the freeze-in mechanism, impacts the prospects of observation at the LHC of the decays of the scalar field.

  6. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghai-Khozani, H.; Barna, D.; Corradini, M.; De Salvador, D.; Hayano, R.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Prest, M.; Seiler, D.; Soter, A.; Todoroki, K.; Vallazza, E.; Venturelli, L.

    2015-08-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ˜130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at ˜125 keV.

  7. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  8. Polarization at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-01-01

    A highly polarized electron beam is a key feature. for the Current physics program at SLAC. An electron beam polarization of 80% can now be routinely achieved for typically 5000 hours of machine operation per year. Two main Physics programs utilize the polarized beam. Fixed target experiments in End Station A study the collision of polarized electrons with polarized nuclear targets to elucidate the spin structure of the nucleon and to provide an important test of QCD. Using the SLAC Linear Collider, collisions of polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons allow precise measurements of parity violation in the Z-fermion couplings and provide a very precise measurement of tile weak mixing angle. This paper discusses polarized beam operation at SLAC, and gives an overview of the polarized physics program.

  9. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  10. First μ+SR studies on thin films with a new beam of low energy positive muons at energies below 20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokscha, T.; Birke, M.; Forgan, E.; Glückler, H.; Hofer, A.; Jackson, T.; Küpfer, K.; Litterst, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Pleines, M.; Riseman, T.; Schatz, A.; Schatz, G.; Weber, H. P.; Binns, C.

    1999-09-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute slow positive muons (μ+) with nearly 100% polarization and an energy of about 10 eV are generated by moderation of an intense secondary beam of surface muons in an appropriate condensed gas layer. These epithermal muons are used as a source of a tertiary beam of tunable energy between 10 eV and 20 keV. The range of these muons in solids is up to 100 nm which allows the extension of the μ+SR techniques (muon spin rotation, relaxation, resonance) to the study of thin films. A basic requirement for the proper interpretation of μ+SR results on thin films and multi-layers is the knowledge of the depth distribution of muons in matter. To date, no data are available concerning this topic. Therefore, we investigated the penetration depth of μ+ with energies between 8 keV and 16 keV in Cu/SiO2 samples. The experimental data are in agreement with simulated predictions. Additionally, we present two examples of first applications of low energy μ+ in μ+SR investigations. We measured the magnetic field distribution inside a 500-nm thin High-TC superconductor (YBa2Cu3O7-δ), as well as the depth dependence of the field distribution near the surface. In another experiment a 500-nm thin sample of Fe-nanoclusters (diameter 2.4(4) nm), embedded in an Ag matrix with a volume concentration of 0.1%, was investigated with transverse field μ+SR.

  11. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  12. Polarity at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  13. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  14. Bumblebees Learn Polarization Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Foster, James J.; Sharkey, Camilla R.; Gaworska, Alicia V.A.; Roberts, Nicholas W.; Whitney, Heather M.; Partridge, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Foraging insect pollinators such as bees must find and identify flowers in a complex visual environment. Bees use skylight polarization patterns for navigation [1–3], a capacity mediated by the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area (DRA) of their eye [4, 5]. While other insects use polarization sensitivity to identify appropriate habitats [6], oviposition sites, and food sources [7], to date no nonnavigational functions of polarization vision have been identified in bees. Here we investigated the ability of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) to learn polarization patterns on artificial “flowers” in order to obtain a food reward. We show that foraging bumblebees can learn to discriminate between two differently polarized targets, but only when the target artificial “flower” is viewed from below. A context for these results is provided by polarization imaging of bee-pollinated flowers, revealing the potential for polarization patterns in real flowers. Bees may therefore have the ability to use polarization vision, possibly mediated by their polarization-sensitive DRA, both for navigation and to learn polarization patterns on flowers, the latter being the first nonnavigational function for bee polarization vision to be identified. PMID:24909321

  15. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  16. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  17. Field aligned currents and the auroral spectrum below 1 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements during auroral events were conducted with the aid of detectors flown aboard three Nike-Tomahawk rocket flights. The detectors used to measure the auroral spectrum below 1 keV consisted of electrostatic analyzers positioned in the rocket to measure particles moving up and down the magnetic field lines. The analyzers measured electrons and protons simultaneously during a given sweep.

  18. The Solar Flare 4: 10 keV X-ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The 4-10 keV solar flare spectrum includes highly excited lines of stripped Ca, Fe, and Ni ions as well as a continuum steeply falling with energy. Groups of lines at approximately 7 keV and approximately 8 keV, observed during flares by the broad-band RHESSI spectrometer and called here the Fe-line and Fe/Ni-line features, are formed mostly of Fe lines but with Ni lines contributing to the approximately 8 keV feature. Possible temperature indicators of these line features are discussed - the peak or centroid energies of the Fe-line feature, the line ratio of the Fe-line to the Fe/Ni-line features, and the equivalent width of the Fe-line feature. The equivalent width is by far the most sensitive to temperature. However, results will be confused if, as is commonly believed, the abundance of Fe varies from flare to flare, even during the course of a single flare. With temperature determined from the thermal continuum, the Fe-line feature becomes a diagnostic of the Fe abundance in flare plasmas. These results are of interest for other hot plasmas in coronal ionization equilibrium such as stellar flare plasmas, hot gas in galaxies, and older supernova remnants.

  19. Gamma-ray burst spectra and time histories from 2 to 400keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenimore, E. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray burst detector on Ginga consisted of a proportional counter to observe the x-rays and a scintillation counter to observe the gamma-rays. It was ideally suited to study the x-rays associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Ginga detected ~120 GRBs and 22 of them had sufficient statistics to determine spectra from 2 to 400keV. Although the Ginga and BATSE trigger criteria were very similar, the distribution of spectral parameters was different. Ginga observed bend energies in the spectra down to 2keV and had a larger fraction of bursts with low energy power law indexes greater than zero. The average ratio of energy in the x-ray band (2 to 10keV) compared to the gamma-ray band (50 to 300keV) was 24%. Some events had more energy in the x-ray band than in the gamma-ray band. One Ginga event had a period of time preceding the gamma rays that was effectively pure x-ray emission. This x-ray ``preactivity'' might be due to the penchant for the GRB time structure to be broader at lower energy rather than a different physical process. The x-rays tend to rise and fall slower than the gamma rays but they both tend to peak at about the same time. This argues against models involving the injection of relativistic electrons that cool by synchrotron radiation.

  20. Heliospheric Neutral Atom Spectra Between 0.01 and 6 keV fom IBEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Gloeckler, G.; Heirtzler, D.; Janzen, P.; Kubiak, M.; Kucharek, H.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Moore, T. E.; Petrinec, S. M.; Quinn, M.; Reisenfeld, D.; Saul, L. A.; Scheer, J. A.; Schwardron, N.; Trattner, K. J.; Vanderspek, R.; Wurz, P.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2008 December, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has been making detailed observations of neutrals from the boundaries of the heliosphere using two neutral atom cameras with overlapping energy ranges. The unexpected, yet defining feature discovered by IBEX is a Ribbon that extends over the energy range from about 0.2 to 6 keV. This Ribbon is superposed on a more uniform, globally distributed heliospheric neutral population. With some important exceptions, the focus of early IBEX studies has been on neutral atoms with energies greater than approx. 0.5 keV. With nearly three years of science observations, enough low-energy neutral atom measurements have been accumulated to extend IBEX observations to energies less than approx. 0.5 keV. Using the energy overlap of the sensors to identify and remove backgrounds, energy spectra over the entire IBEX energy range are produced. However, contributions by interstellar neutrals to the energy spectrum below 0.2 keV may not be completely removed. Compared with spectra at higher energies, neutral atom spectra at lower energies do not vary much from location to location in the sky, including in the direction of the IBEX Ribbon. Neutral fluxes are used to show that low energy ions contribute approximately the same thermal pressure as higher energy ions in the heliosheath. However, contributions to the dynamic pressure are very high unless there is, for example, turbulence in the heliosheath with fluctuations of the order of 50-100 km/s.

  1. A study on the microstructural parameters of 550 keV electron irradiated Lexan polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Hareesh, K.; Pramod, R.; Petwal, V. C.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Sangappa; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2012-06-05

    Lexan polymer films irradiated with 550 keV Electron Beam (EB) were characterized using Wide Angle Xray Scattering (WAXS) data to study the microstructural parameters. The crystal imperfection parameters like crystal size , lattice strain (g in %) and enthalpy ({alpha}) have been determined by Line Profile Analysis (LPA) using Fourier method of Warren.

  2. Ionization of atomic hydrogen by 30 1000 keV antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, H.; Mikkelsen, U.; Paludan, K.; Kirsebom, K.; Moller, S.P.; Uggerhoj, E.; Slevin, J.; Charlton, M.; Morenzoni, E.

    1995-06-05

    Ionization in collisions between antiprotons and atomic hydrogen is perhaps the least complicated and most fundamental process that can be treated by atomic-collision theory. We present measurements of the ionization cross section for 30--1000 keV antiprotons colliding with atomic hydrogen.

  3. A STRONG EXCESS IN THE 20-100 keV EMISSION OF NGC 1365

    SciTech Connect

    Risaliti, G.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Wang, J.; Braito, V.; Laparola, V.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Maiolino, R.; Reeves, J.; Salvati, M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a new Suzaku observation of the obscured active galactic nucleus in NGC 1365, revealing an unexpected excess of X-rays above 20 keV of at least a factor approx2 with respect to the extrapolation of the best-fitting 3-10 keV model. Additional Swift-BAT and Integral-IBIS observations show that the 20-100 keV is concentrated within approx1.5 arcmin from the center of the galaxy, and is not significantly variable on timescales from days to years. A comparison of this component with the 3-10 keV emission, which is characterized by a rapidly variable absorption, suggests a complex structure of the circumnuclear medium, consisting of at least two distinct components with rather different physical properties, one of which covers >80% of the source with a column density N {sub H} approx 3-4x10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. An alternative explanation is the presence of a double active nucleus in the center of NGC 1365.

  4. Bremsstrahlung in Mo and Pt targets produced by {sup 90}Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2015-08-28

    Bremsstrahlung spectra in thick targets of Mo and Pt, produced by beta emitter {sup 90}Sr (end point energy = 546 keV) have been studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured bremsstrahlung spectra measured with Si(Li) detector were compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH) theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler (F{sub mod}BH+PB) theory, which includes the polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into total bremsstrahlung (BS). The present results indicate the correctness of F{sub mod}BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where the contributions of PB into BS are dominant, which is described in terms of stripped atom (SA) approximation. But at the middle and higher energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, where the contribution of PB is negligible, the F{sub mod}BH theory is more close to the experimental results. Hence, it is clear that the production of PB in the low energy region, due to the dynamic response of the target atom suppresses the production of bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends.

  5. Neutron Total Cross Sections of {sup 235}U From Transmission Measurements in the Energy Range 2 keV to 300 keV and Statistical Model Analysis of the Data

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    2000-05-01

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample.1 The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al.4 in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code 2 was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained 3 from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  6. NEUTRON TOTAL CROSS SECTIONS OF 235U FROM TRANSMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN THE ENERGY RANGE 2 keV to 300 keV AND STATISTICAL MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2000-05-22

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample. The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al. in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and {alpha} data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  7. Elasticity, internal excitation, and charge transfer during grazing scattering of keV fullerenes from a LiF(1 0 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wethekam, S.; Winter, H.

    2011-06-01

    C60+ molecular ions with energies of 5-45 keV are scattered under grazing angles of incidence of 1-3° from a LiF(1 0 0) surface. From the analysis of polar angular distributions, fragment size distributions, and ion fractions for scattered projectiles, information on elastic, internal excitation, and charge transfer processes are derived. The results are compared to classical molecular dynamics simulations, which reproduce the angular distributions on a quantitative level, but the internal excitation only in part. In addition to the transfer of the normal energy loss to internal degrees of freedom of the molecule, an excitation is identified and interpreted as resonant coherent excitation in the oscillating electric field in front of the surface experienced by the moving projectile. The ion fractions are in accord with a complete suppression of charge transfer between fullerene ion and surface.

  8. Spectral Analysis on Solar Flares with an Emission > 300 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, R.; Connaughton, V.

    2013-12-01

    The continuum gamma-ray emission from solar flares is caused when a population of electrons is accelerated to relativistic speeds and interacts with the solar plasma. However, it has been theorized that the gamma-ray emission from some brighter flares comes from two populations of electrons. Using the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), we studied the gamma-ray emission spectra of solar flares and paid special attention to the solar flares that showed emission above 300 keV. We found that the emission above 300 keV was better fit with a broken power-law than a single power-law, evidence that the gamma-ray emission from certain solar flares involved two populations of electrons. Specifically, our best model involved a broken power law that had a steeper slope before the break in energy than after. We studied the spectral parameters as a function of time during the period of the high-energy emission. We also found that solar flares with emission above 300 keV form a small subset (~4%) of flares that trigger GBM above 20 keV. One of the flares with an emission greater than 300 keV was fitted with a Broken Power Law model. Only data from the BGO detector was used in making the plots. Various parameters of the fit have been plotted vs. time with the top two graphs representing the light curves of the flare from different detectors (BGO-0 and NaI-4). A spectral fit for bn100612038 for the time interval of [45s-50s] using only the BGO (0) detector file. Data from this fit was used in creating the other plots.

  9. Hybrid polarity SAR architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, R. Keith

    2009-05-01

    A space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) designed to provide quantitative information on a global scale implies severe requirements to maximize coverage and to sustain reliable operational calibration. These requirements are best served by the hybrid-polarity architecture, in which the radar transmits in circular polarization, and receives on two orthogonal linear polarizations, coherently, retaining their relative phase. This paper summarizes key attributes of hybrid-polarity dual- and quadrature-polarized SARs, reviews the associated advantages, formalizes conditions under which the signal-to-noise ratio is conserved, and describes the evolution of this architecture from first principles.

  10. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  11. ULF turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1993-03-01

    Results of a spectral analysis of the ULF wave turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp are presented. The activity is characterized as broadbanded, extending up to a maximum frequency of about 0.5 Hz, and having maximum wave amplitudes as large as 6 percent of the dc magnetic field. Activity in the cusp region was particularly intense at its frontside and backside, associated with the magnetopause and cusp/magnetosphere boundaries, respectively. The turbulence, particularly that above f(ci), is tentatively identified as whistler mode. It is argued that such whistler mode turbulence should resonate with electrons having energies in the tens of kiloelectron volts. Observations indicate a very strong correlation of the ULF turbulence with the energetic electrons between 22 and 35 keV measured by Voyager's low-energy charged particle experiment. A vigorous interaction between the two is inferred. ULF wave turbulence in the cusp may represent a significant but not complete power source for the magnetosphere.

  12. Polarization in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Walter G.

    1992-12-01

    A review of the experimental and theoretical aspects of optical polarization is presented with definitions of the observed polarization characteristics and relationship to the Stokes parameters. A typical terrestrial soil polarization curve is characterized and related to the current theoretical knowledge. This polarization relationship is extended to cover planetary surfaces, such as the Moon, and Mars and terrestrial surfaces composed of farm areas and water surfaces. Instrumentation for imaging and non-imaging polarimetry are described including the use of focal plane arrays. Recent Space Shuttle polarimetric observations of the region around the Island of Hawaii and New Madrid, Missouri are described, as well as concurrent cloud and haze observations. Polarization is a sensitive indicator of cloud particle size distributions, soil texture, farm crops, sea state and atmospheric aerosols and haze. Cloud particle size distributions are uniquely characterized by polarization, and this cannot be achieved with photometry. An extensive bibliography of polarization in remote sensing is appended.

  13. Polarity inversion in polar-nonpolar-polar heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Cho, S; Youn, S J; Kim, Y; DiVenere, A; Wong, G K; Freeman, A J; Ketterson, J B

    2001-09-17

    We have observed an epilayer-thickness-dependent polarity inversion for the growth of CdTe on Sb(Bi)/CdTe(111)B. For films with Sb(Bi) thicknesses of less than 40 A (15 A), the CdTe layer shows a B (Te-terminated) face, but it switches to an A (Cd-terminated) face for thicker layers. On the other hand, a CdTe layer grown on Bi(Sb)/CdTe(111)A always shows the A face regardless of Sb or Bi layer thicknesses. In order to address the observations we have performed ab initio calculations, which suggest that the polarity of a polar material on a nonpolar one results from the binding energy difference between the two possible surface configurations.

  14. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED

  15. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  16. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray energies up to 22 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T; Neumayer, P; Girard, F; Kugland, N L; Landen, O L; Niemann, C; Glenzer, S H

    2008-04-30

    We used Kr K{alpha} (12.6 keV) and Ag K{alpha} (22.1 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt class laser pulses interacting with a Kr gas jet and a silver foil, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity of flat Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) up to fifth order. The reflectivity in fourth order is lower by a factor of 50 when compared to first order diffraction. In second order the integrated reflectivity decreases from 1.3 mrad at 12.6 keV to 0.5 mrad at 22.1 keV. The current study indicates that HOPG crystals are suitable for measuring scattering signals from high energy x ray sources (E {ge} 20 keV). These energies are required to penetrate through the high density plasma conditions encountered in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  17. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  18. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanisms, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  19. Energetic (greater than 100 keV) O(+) ions in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.

    1984-01-01

    The first measurements of very energetic (112 - 157 keV) O(+) ions in the earth's magnetosphere are presented. The observations were made with the UMd/MPE ULECA sensor on ISEE-1 on 5 March 1981 at geocentric distances approximately 20 R(E) in the earth's magnetotail. During this time period an Energetic Storm Particle event was observed by the nearly identical sensor on the ISEE-3 spacecraft, located approximately 250 R(E) upstream of the earth's magnetosphere. The ISEE-1 sensor observed a similar temporal profile except for several sharp intensity enhancements, corresponding to substorm recoveries during which the plasma sheet engulfed the spacecraft. During these plasma sheet encounters we observe O(+)/H(+) abundance ratios, at approximately 130 kev, as large as 0.35. In between plasma sheet encounters the O(+)/H(+) ratio at this energy is consistent with zero.

  20. Experimental results of a dual-beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. H. Cui, B. Q.; Ma, R. G.; Ma, Y. J.; Tang, B.; Huang, Q. H.; Jiang, W. S.; Zheng, Y. N.

    2014-02-15

    A dual beam ion source for 200 keV ion implanter aimed to produce 200 keV H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} beams simultaneously has been developed. Not suitable to use the analyzing magnet, the purity of beam extracted from the source becomes important to the performance of implanter. The performance of ion source was measured. The results of experiments show that the materials of inlet tube of ion source, the time of arc ionization in ion source, and the amount of gas flow have significant influence on the purity of beam. The measures by using copper as inlet tube material, long time of arc ionization, and increasing the inlet of gas flow could effectively reduce the impurity of beam. And the method using the gas mass flow controller to adjust the proportion of H{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} is feasible.

  1. 0. 073% (95% C. L. ) upper limit on 17keV neutrino admixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, T. )

    1992-02-01

    A direct search was made for a threshold kink in [sup 63]Ni [beta]-ray spectrum due possibly to a sizeable admixture of 17keV neutrino. A fine energy scan was performed using a magnetic spectrometer over the specific energy region with very high statistics and a very high signal-to-background ratio. The resultant mixing strength is [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2]=([minus]0.011[plus minus]0.033(stat.)[plus minus]0.030(sys.) )% and its upper limit [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][le]0.073% (95% C.L.). The result clearly excludes neutrinos with [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][ge]0.1% for the mass range from 11 to 24keV.

  2. Tuning of wettability of PANI-GNP composites using keV energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2016-07-01

    Polyaniline nanofiber composites with various nanomaterials have several applications in electrochemical biosensors. The surface properties of these composites coated electrodes play crucial role in enzyme absorption and analyte detection process. In the present study, Polyaniline-Graphene nanopowder (PANI-GNP) composites were prepared by rapid-mixing polymerization method. The films were prepared on ITO coated glass substrates and irradiated with 42 keV He+ ions produced by indigenously fabricated accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi. The films were characterized before and after irradiation by SEM, Raman spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The as-prepared films show superhydrophilic nature and after irradiation the films show highly hydrophobic nature with water contact angle (135°). The surface morphology was studied by SEM and structural changes were studied by Raman spectra. The surface morphological modifications induced by keV energy ions helps in tuning the wettability at different ion fluences.

  3. Secondary ion emission from V and Al surfaces under keV light ion on bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blauner, Patricia G.; Weller, Martha R.; Kaurin, Michael G.; Weller, Robert A.

    1986-03-01

    Positive secondary ion mass spectra have been measured for oxidized polycrystalline V and Al targets bombarded by H +, H 2+, He + and Ar + ions with beam energies ranging from 25 keV to 275 keV. An enhancement in the relative yield of positive ions of electronegative surface constituents, in particular O + is observed under light ion bombardment. Metallic ion intensities were found to decrease with increasing primary beam energy in proportion to the estimated total sputtering yields for these targets and beams. In contrast, the O + secondary ion intensities were independent of primary beam energy. This behavior is similar to that observed previously with heavy ions of comparable velocities. In addition, for the projectiles and targets used in these measurements, no energy thresholds or collective effects were observed in the emission of any positive ion. Published data on secondary ion emission resulting from electron, photon, and heavy ion bombardment are compared with these results.

  4. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  5. Limits on a variable source of 511 keV annihilation radiation near the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, Gerald H.; Leising, Mark D.; Messina, Daniel C.; Purcell, William R.

    1990-08-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) has observed a strong Galactic source of 511 keV annihilation radiation from its launch in 1980 to its reentry in 1989. These observations are consistent with an extended source having an intensity of about 0.002 gamma/sq cm/s averaged over the central radian of Galactic longitude. These data are searched for evidence of the variable Galactic center source of 511 keV line radiation which was reported to have reappeared in 1988 by Leventhal et al. The SMM data are consistent with, but do not require, a compact source emitting a time-averaged flux of about 0.0004 gamma/sq cm/s during about 3 month transits in 1987 and 1988; they are inconsistent with a compact source flux in excess of 0.0008 gamma/sq cm/s for each year.

  6. The 871 keV gamma ray from 17O and the identification of plutonium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peurrung, Anthony; Arthur, Richard; Elovich, Robert; Geelhood, Bruce; Kouzes, Richard; Pratt, Sharon; Scheele, Randy; Sell, Richard

    2001-12-01

    Disarmament agreements and discussions between the United States and the Russian Federation for reducing the number of stockpiled nuclear weapons require verification of the origin of materials as having come from disassembled weapons. This has resulted in the identification of measurable "attributes" that characterize such materials. It has been proposed that the 871 keV gamma ray of 17O can be observed as an indicator of the unexpected presence of plutonium oxide, as opposed to plutonium metal, in such materials. We have shown that the observation of the 871 keV gamma ray is not a specific indicator of the presence of the oxide, but rather indicates the presence of nitrogen.

  7. Dynamical simulations of radiation damage induced by 10 keV energetic recoils in UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X. F.; Gao, T.; Long, Chongsheng; Li, JiuKai; Jiang, Gang; Xiao, Hongxing

    2011-08-01

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations to simulate the primary damage state induced by 10 keV energetic recoils in UO 2. The numbers versus time and the distance distributions for the displaced uranium and oxygen atoms were investigated with the energetic recoils accelerated along four different directions. The simulations suggest that the direction of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) has no effect on the final primary damage state. In addition, it was found that atomic displacement events consisted of replacement collision sequences in addition to the production of Frenkel pairs. The spatial distribution of defects introduced by 10 keV collision cascades was also presented and the results were similar to that of energetic recoils with lower energy.

  8. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  9. The 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Prantzos, N.; Boehm, C.; Bykov, A. M.; Diehl, R.; Ferriere, K.; Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Marcowith, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Strong, A.; Weidenspointner, G.

    2011-07-01

    The first {gamma}-ray line originating from outside the Solar System that was ever detected is the 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Despite 30 years of intense theoretical and observational investigation, the main sources of positrons have not been identified up to now. Observations in the 1990s with OSSE/CGRO (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on GRO satellite/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) showed that the emission is strongly concentrated toward the Galactic bulge. In the 2000s, the spectrometer SPI aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) allowed scientists to measure that emission across the entire Galaxy, revealing that the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio is larger than observed at any other wavelength. This mapping prompted a number of novel explanations, including rather ''exotic'' ones (e.g., dark matter annihilation). However, conventional astrophysical sources, such as type Ia supernovae, microquasars, or x-ray binaries, are still plausible candidates for a large fraction of the observed total 511 keV emission of the bulge. A closer study of the subject reveals new layers of complexity, since positrons may propagate far away from their production sites, making it difficult to infer the underlying source distribution from the observed map of 511 keV emission. However, in contrast to the rather well-understood propagation of high-energy (>GeV) particles of Galactic cosmic rays, understanding the propagation of low-energy ({approx}MeV) positrons in the turbulent, magnetized interstellar medium still remains a formidable challenge. The spectral and imaging properties of the observed 511 keV emission are reviewed and candidate positron sources and models of positron propagation in the Galaxy are critically discussed.

  10. Solar Wind ~0.1-1.5 keV Electrons at Quiet Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Wang, L.; Zong, Q. G.; Li, G.; He, J.; Tu, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Salem, C. S.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind halo/strahl electrons carry important information on the formation of suprathermal electrons in the solar wind. Here we present a statistical survey on the energy spectrum of 0.1-1.5 keV electrons observed by WIND/3DP in the solar wind during quiet times at solar minimum and maximum of solar cycle 23 and 24. First, we separate strahl electrons from halo electrons according to their different behaviors in the angular distribution. Secondly, we fit the observed energy spectrum of halo/strahl electrons at 0.1-1.5 keV to a kappa distribution function with an index κ and effective temperature Teff. We also integrate the electron measurements to obtain the number density n of halo/strahl electrons at 0.1-1.5 keV. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both halo and strahl electrons. For strahl electrons, the index κ (number density n) appears to decrease (increase) with increasing solar activity. For halo electrons, the index κ also decreases with increasing solar activity, while the number density n shows no clear solar-cycle variation. Based on a simple model, we find that the escape of thermal electrons from the coronal region with a higher temperature T could lead to a larger κ for the 0.1-1.5 keV electrons measured in the solar wind, if T > ~0.73×106 K. These results suggest that strahl electrons are likely related to the escaping thermal electrons from different regions in the hot corona, while halo electrons are probably formed due to the scatter/acceleration of strahl electrons in the interplanetary medium.

  11. Compton polarimeter for 10–30 keV x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.; Beilmann, C.; Shah, C.; Tashenov, S.

    2015-09-15

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10–30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  12. Compton polarimeter for 10-30 keV x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S.; Beilmann, C.; Shah, C.; Tashenov, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10-30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  13. Compton polarimeter for 10-30 keV x rays.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Beilmann, C; Shah, C; Tashenov, S

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10-30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  14. Compton polarimeter for 10-30 keV x rays.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Beilmann, C; Shah, C; Tashenov, S

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10-30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results. PMID:26429432

  15. Picosecond x-ray measurements from 100 eV to 30 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.; Kauffman, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.

    1980-10-15

    Picosecond x-ray measurements relevant to the Livermore Laser Fusion Program are reviewed. Resolved to 15 picoseconds, streak camera detection capabilities extend from 100 eV to higher than 30 keV, with synchronous capabilities in the visible, near infrared, and ultraviolet. Capabilities include automated data retrieval using charge coupled devices (CCD's), absolute x-ray intensity levels, novel cathodes, x-ray mirror/reflector combinations, and a variety of x-ray imaging devices.

  16. Proton collisions with the water dimer at keV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, O.; Deumens, E.; Öhrn, Y.

    Proton collisions with the water dimer are studied using a nonadiabatic, direct, time-dependent approach called electron nuclear dynamics (END). Fragmentation of the water dimer in collisions with protons at energies of 5.0, 1.0 keV and 200 eV is the primary aim of this initial study of water clusters using END. We report on the initial fragmentation dynamic, that is, for times less than 200 fs.

  17. Origin of the Galactic Disk 6.7 kev Line Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchwell, Ed

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine if the extended FeXXV 6.7 kev line emission might possibly be produced and confined by the hot wind-shocked bubbles to accompany UC HII regions. The main result of this study are: (1) FeXXV is detected in the W3 complex, but at a level that could only explain a small fraction of the galactic disk emission if all UC HII regions emit at about the same intensity as the W3 complex; (2) Two X-ray sources are detected in W3. W3-X 1 coincides with the radio image of this region, but W3-X2 has no radio, optical, or infrared counterpart; (3) There is no evidence for variability of W3-X1 during the period of observations (approx, 40,000 sec); (4) The X-ray spectrum of W3-X1 has no emission shortward of 1 kev, it peaks at approx. 2 kev and show significant emission out to approx. 6 kev. No individual lines are resolved. There is currently no generally accepted theory for extended hard X-ray emission in HII regions. Perhaps the most significant discovery of this program has been the detection of extended hard X-rays and the realization that some entirely new processes must be invoked to understand this; and (5)A minimum (chi)(sup 2) fit of the spectrum implies a H absorbing column of N(sub H) approx, equals to 2.1 x 10(exp 22)/ cm, a temperature of the emitting plasma of 7 x 10(exp 7) K, and a luminosity of approx. equal to 10(33)erg/s.

  18. Probing the Accretion Geometry of Black Holes with X-Ray Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnitman, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    In the coming years, new space missions will be able to measure X-ray polarization at levels of 1% or better in the approx.1-10 keV energy band. In particular, X-ray polarization is an ideal tool for determining the nature of black hole (BH) accretion disks surrounded by hot coronae. Using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code in full general relativity, we calculate the spectra and polarization features of these BH systems. At low energies, the signal is dominated by the thermal flux coming directly from the optically thick disk. At higher energies, the thermal seed photons have been inverse-Compton scattered by the corona, often reflecting back off the disk before reaching the observer, giving a distinctive polarization signature. By measuring the degree and angle of this X-ray polarization, we can infer the BH inclination, the emission geometry of the accretion flow, and also determine the spin of the black hole.

  19. Polarized Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Black Hole Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurent, P.; Rodriquez, J.; Wilms, J.; Bel, M. Cadolle; Pottschmidt, K.; Grinberg, V.

    2011-01-01

    Because of their inherently high flux allowing the detection of clear signals, black hole X-ray binaries are interesting candidates for polarization studies, even if no polarization signals have been observed from them before. Such measurements would provide further detailed insight into these sources' emission mechanisms. We measured the polarization of the gamma-ray emission from the black hole binary system Cygnus X-I with the INTEGRAL/IBIS telescope. Spectral modeling ofthe data reveals two emission mechanisms: The 250-400 keY data are consistent with emission dominated by Compton scattering on thermal electrons and are weakly polarized. The second spectral component seen in the 400keV-2MeV band is by contrast strongly polarized, revealing that the MeV emission is probably related to the jet first detected in the radio band.

  20. Polarization at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  1. A large scale height galactic component of the diffuse 2-60 keV background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwan, D.; Marshall, F. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Mushotzky, R.; Shafer, R. A.; Stottlemyer, A.

    1982-01-01

    The diffuse 2-60 keV X-ray background has a galactic component clearly detectable by its strong variation with both galactic latitude and longitude. This galactic component is typically 10 percent of the extragalactic background toward the galactic center, half that strong toward the anticenter, and extrapolated to a few percent of the extragalactic background toward the galactic poles. It is acceptably modeled by a finite radius emission disk with a scale height of several kiloparsecs. The averaged galactic spectrum is best fitted by a thermal spectrum of kT about 9 keV, a spectrum much softer than the about 40 keV spectrum of the extragalactic component. The most likely source of this emission is low luminosity stars with large scale heights such as subdwarfs. Inverse Compton emission from GeV electrons on the microwave background contributes only a fraction of the galactic component unless the local cosmic ray electron spectrum and intensity are atypical.

  2. No 17 keV neutrino: Admixture [lt]0. 073% (95% C. L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, T.; Shirai, J.; Tsukamoto, T. ); Sugaya, Y.; Takahashi, K. ); Suzuki, T. ); Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, S. ); Ueno, K. ); Yonezawa, Y. ); Kawakami, H.; Kato, S.; Shibata, S.; Ukai, K. )

    1993-06-01

    To solve the controversial issue concerning the possible existence of a 17 keV neutrino with a 1% admixture in nuclear [beta] decay, we searched directly for any evidence of a production-threshold effect. The [sup 63]Ni [beta] spectrum was measured with a magnetic spectrometer, with very high statistics along with a fine energy scan over a narrow energy region around the expected threshold. The obtained mixing strength was [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2]=[[minus]0.011[plus minus]0.033(stat)[plus minus]0.030(syst)]%, very consistent with zero, and decisively excluding the existence of a 17 keV neutrino admixing at the 1% level with the electron neutrino. The corresponding upper limit was set at [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][lt]0.073% (95% C.L.). A new limit was also obtained for a wider mass range: [vert bar][ital U][vert bar][sup 2][lt]0.15% (95% C.L.) for 10.5 to 25.0 keV neutrinos.

  3. Solar wind ˜0.1-1.5 keV electrons at quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiawei; Wang, Linghua; Zong, Qiugang; Li, Gang; Salem, Chadi S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a statistical survey of the energy spectrum of solar wind suprathermal (˜0.1-1.5 keV) electrons measured by the WIND 3-D Plasma & Energetic Particle (3DP) instrument at 1 AU during quiet times at the minimum and maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. Firstly, we separate strahl (beaming) electrons and halo (isotropic) electrons based on their features in pitch angle distributions. Secondly, we fit the observed energy spectrum of both the strahl and halo electrons at ˜0.1-1.5 keV to a Kappa distribution function with an index κ, effective temperature Teff and density n0. We also integrate the the measurements over ˜0.1-1.5 keV to obtain the average electron energy Eavg of the strahl and halo. We find a strong positive correlation between κ and Teff for both the strahl and halo, possibly reflecting the nature of the generation of these suprathermal electrons. Among the 245 selected samples, ˜68% have the halo κ smaller than the strahl κ, while ˜50% have the halo Eh larger than the strahl Es.

  4. Searching for keV Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter with X-Ray Microcalorimeter Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Anderson, A. J.; Castro, D.; Goldfinger, D. C.; Rutherford, J.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; XQC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectrometers onboard suborbital sounding rockets can search for dark matter candidates that produce X-ray lines, such as decaying keV-scale sterile neutrinos. Even with exposure times and effective areas far smaller than XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, high-resolution, wide field of view observations with sounding rockets have competitive sensitivity to decaying sterile neutrinos. We analyze a subset of the 2011 observation by the X-ray Quantum Calorimeter instrument centered on Galactic coordinates l=165°,b=-5° with an effective exposure of 106 s, obtaining a limit on the sterile neutrino mixing angle of {{sin}}22θ < 7.2× {10}-10 at 95% CL for a 7 keV neutrino. Better sensitivity at the level of {{sin}}22θ ∼ 2.1× {10}-11 at 95% CL for a 7 keV neutrino is achievable with future 300-s observations of the galactic center by the Micro-X instrument, providing a definitive test of the sterile neutrino interpretation of the reported 3.56 keV excess from galaxy clusters.

  5. Effective field theory and keV lines from dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Krall, Rebecca; Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas E-mail: mreece@physics.harvard.edu

    2014-09-01

    We survey operators that can lead to a keV photon line from dark matter decay or annihilation. We are motivated in part by recent claims of an unexplained 3.5 keV line in galaxy clusters and in Andromeda, but our results could apply to any hypothetical line observed in this energy range. We find that given the amount of flux that is observable, explanations in terms of decay are more plausible than annihilation, at least if the annihilation is directly to Standard Model states rather than intermediate particles. The decay case can be explained by a scalar or pseudoscalar field coupling to photons suppressed by a scale not far below the reduced Planck mass, which can be taken as a tantalizing hint of high-scale physics. The scalar case is particularly interesting from the effective field theory viewpoint, and we discuss it at some length. Because of a quartically divergent mass correction, naturalness strongly suggests the theory should be cut off at or below the 1000 TeV scale. The most plausible such natural UV completion would involve supersymmetry. These bottom-up arguments reproduce expectations from top-down considerations of the physics of moduli. A keV line could also arise from the decay of a sterile neutrino, in which case a renormalizable UV completion exists and no direct inference about high-scale physics is possible.

  6. A study of 2-20 KeV X-rays from the Cygnus region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Two rocket-borne proportional counters, each with 650 sq c, met area and 1.8 x 7.1 deg FWHM rectangular mechanical collimation, surveyed the Cygnus region in the 2 to 20 keV energy range on two occasions. X-ray spectral data gathered on 21 September 1970 from discrete sources in Cygnus are presented. The data from Cyg X-1, Cyg X-2, and Cyg X-3 have sufficient statistical significance to indicate mutually exclusive spectral forms for the three. Upper limits are presented for X-ray intensities above 2 keV for Cyg X-4 and Cyg X-5 (Cygnus loop). A search was made on 9 August 1971 for a diffuse component of X-rays 1.5 keV associated with an interarm region of the galaxy at galactic longitudes in the vicinity of 60 degrees. A statistically significant excess associated with a narrow disk component was detected. Several possible emission models are discussed, with the most likely candidate being a population of unresolvable low luminosity discrete sources.

  7. Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Comley, A.; Back, C. A.; Szabo, C.; Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Hudson, L. T.; Seltzer, S.; Haugh, M. J.; Ali, Z.

    2011-05-15

    Line emission and broadband x-ray sources with x-ray energies above 10 keV have been investigated using a range of calibrated x-ray detectors for use as x-ray backlighters in high energy density (HED) experiments. The conversion efficiency of short- and long-pulse driven Mo and Ag line-emission backlighters at 17 and 22 keV was measured to investigate the crossover region between short- and long-pulse conversion efficiency. It was found that significant 17 and 22 keV line emissions were observed using a 3 {omega}, 1 ns long-pulse drive for Mo and Ag targets and a comparison between the measured Mo x-ray spectrum and calculations using an atomic physics code suggests that the line emission is due to thermal emission from N-like Mo atoms. Electron temperatures derived from fits to the continuum region of the x-ray spectra agree well with the T{sub hot} scaling as 100x(I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}. The continuum emissions from empty and 1 atm Kr-filled imploded CH shell targets were also measured for the use as broadband backlighters.

  8. Energy loss of tens keV charged particles traveling in the hot dense carbon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, ZhenGuo; Wang, ZhiGang; He, Bin; Li, DaFang; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The energy loss of charged particles, including electrons, protons, and α-particles with tens keV initial energy E 0, traveling in the hot dense carbon (C) plasma for densities from 2.281 to 22.81 g/cm3 and temperatures from 400 to 1500 eV is systematically and quantitatively studied by using the dimensional continuation method. The behaviors of different charged particles are readily distinguishable from each other. Firstly, because an ion is thousands times heavier than an electron, the penetration distance of the electron is much longer than that of proton and α-particle traveling in the plasma. Secondly, most energy of electron projectile with E 0 < 100 keV deposits into the electron species of C plasma, while for the cases of proton and α-particle with E 0 < 100 keV, about more than half energy transfers into the ion species of C plasma. A simple decreasing law of the penetration distance as a function of the plasma density is fitted, and different behaviors of each projectile particle can be clearly found from the fitted data. We believe that with the advanced progress of the present experimental technology, the findings shown here could be confirmed in ion-stopping experiments in the near future.

  9. Relative dissociation fractions of SF6 under impact of 15-keV to 30-keV H- and C- negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zilong; Li, Junqin; Zhang, Xuemei

    2013-10-01

    The relative dissociation fractions for the production of fragment ions and ion pairs of SF6 are studied for H- and C- impact in the energy range from 15 to 30 keV. Recoil ions (SF4+, SF3+, SF2+, SF+, S+, F+, SF42+, SF22+) and ion pairs (SF3++F+,SF2++F+,SF++F+,S++F+, F++F+) are detected and identified in coincidence with scattered projectiles in two charge states (q=0 and q=+1) by using a time-of-flight spectrometer. The relative dissociation fractions are energy dependent for both single-electron-loss (SL) channel and double-electron-loss (DL) channel processes for certain negative ions. It is also found that the relative dissociation fractions for DL are larger than those for SL. In addition, the degree of fragmentation will become greater with a larger mass number of the projectiles at the same impact energy for the same electron-loss channel. A comparison of the time-of-flight spectra is made between that under negative-ion impact and that under electron impact, and it is found that the probability of production of SFn+ ions with n odd is higher than that of similar ions with n even, and the probability of production of SFn2+ ions with n even is higher than that of similar ions withn odd under H-, C-, positive-ion, and electron impact. We analyze this interesting phenomenon from the bond-dissociation energies of SFn+ and SFn2+. We also analyze the coincident time-of-flight spectra of two fragment ions resulting from double ionization of SF6 by H- and C- impact and describe the major dissociation pathways of SF62+ for H- and C- impact in the energy range from 15 to 30 keV.

  10. Mutagenic effect of a keV range N + beam on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huiyun; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Lixiang; Han, Wei; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-07-01

    The radiobiological effects of a keV (5-20 keV) range nitrogen ion (N +) beam on mammalian cells were studied, particularly with regard to the induction of mutation in the cell genome. The experiment demonstrated that the 20 keV N + beam, which resulted in cell death to a certain extent, induced a 2-3 fold increase in the mutation rates at the CD59 gene locus of the mammalian A L cells as compared to the control. Within certain fluence ranges (0-6 × 10 14 N +/cm 2), the cell survival displayed a down-up-down pattern which is similar to the phenomenon known as 'hyper-radiosensitivity' manifested under low-dose irradiation; the CD59 mutation rate firstly showed a gradual rise up to a 3-fold increment above the background level as the ion fluence went up to 4 × 10 14 N +/cm 2, after this peak point however, a downtrend appeared though the ion fluence increased further. It was also observed that the fraction of CD59 mutation bears no proportional relation to ion energy in further experiments of mutation induction by N + beams with the incident energies of 5, 10, 15 and 20 keV at the same fluence of 3 × 10 14 N +/cm 2. Analyses of the deletion patterns of chromosome 11 in CD59- mutants induced by 5-20 keV N + beams showed that these ions did not result in large-size chromosome deletions in this mammalian cell system. A preliminary discussion, suggesting that the mutagenic effect of such low-energy ion influx on mammalian cells could result from multiple processes involving direct collision of particles with cellular DNA, and cascade atomic and molecular reactions due to plentiful primary and secondary particles, was also presented. The study provided the first glimpse into the roles low-energy ions may play in inducing mutagenesis in mammalian cells, and results will be of much value in helping people to understand the contribution of low-energy ions to radiological effects of various ionising radiations.

  11. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  12. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  13. Our Polar Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  14. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  15. Polar Science Is Cool!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  16. Nomenclature of polarized light - Elliptical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D.

    1974-01-01

    Alternative handedness and sign conventions for relating the orientation of elliptical polarization are discussed. The discussion proceeds under two headings: (1) snapshot picture, where the emphasis for the convention is contained in the concept of handedness; and (2) angular momentum consideration, where the emphasis for the convention is strongly associated with mathematical convention and the sign of the fourth Stokes parameter.

  17. Polarization and polarization fatigue in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaofeng

    This thesis addresses some fundamental issues in ferroelectricity and its applications through a computational and experimental effort. It focuses on a variety of perovskite-type ferroelectric oxides and investigates the physical basis for spontaneous polarization, domain wall dynamics, and texture development in thin film applications. The dipole-dipole interactions between ionic species in perovskite-type materials have been calculated to determine the local field and the lattice instability. Different ferroelectric and anti-ferroelectric polarization transitions can be realized by taking into account the structure distortion of the parent perovskites. We find the local field is enhanced by short range disorder and its nature varies from disorder to disorder, causing polarization transitions in non-(100) directions. The molecular field theory has also been extended to layered perovskites, which favors in-plane polarization over c-polarization. These theoretical predictions are in agreement with the experimental observations of various perovskites and layered perovskites in both single crystal and thin film forms. Domain switching in PZT has been studied by probing the frequency dependency of polarization hysteresis. A picture of thermally activated domain wall movement is established from the frequency spectra of coercive field. The field dependence of domain wall bulging and the nature of the binding between pinning obstacles and the walls are inferred from such a study. Consistent with this picture, polarization fatigue can be defined as a process of increasing the resistance from pinning defects to domain wall motion. The chemical species that act as pinning defects have been identified through model experiments that control carrier injection, electrode interfaces, and film compositions. Based on these observations, a methodology is proposed to evaluate and predict the fatigue damage of both PZT and layered perovskite thin films. Processing of layered

  18. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    PubMed Central

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security. PMID:27184813

  19. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  20. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  1. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  2. Neutron Polarizers Based on Polarized 3He

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Snow

    2005-05-01

    The goal of this work, which is a collaborative effort between Indiana University, NIST, and Hamilton College, is to extend the technique of polarized neutron scattering into new domains by the development and application of polarized 3He-based neutron spin filters. After the IPNS experiment which measured Zeeman sp[litting in surface scattered neutrons using a polarized 3He cell as a polarization analyzer transporterd by car from Bloomington to Chicago, the Indiana work focused on technical developments to improve the 3He polarization of the Indiana compression system. The compression system was rebuilt with a new valve system which allows gas trapped in the dead volume of the compressors at the end of the piston stroke to be exhausted and conducted back to the optical pumping cell where it can be repolarized. We also incorporated a new intermediate storage volume made at NIST from 1720 glass which will reduce polarization losses between the compressors. Furthermore, we improved the stability of the 1083 nm laser by cooling the LMA rod. We achieved 60% 3he polarization in the optical pumping cell and 87% preservation of the polarization during compression. In parallel we built a magnetically-shielded transport solenoid for use on neutron scattering instruments such as POSY which achieves a fractional field uniformity of better than 10-3 per cm. The field was mapped using an automated 3D field mapping system for in-situ measurement of magnetic field gradients Diluted magnetic semiconductors offer many exciting opportunities for investigation of spintronic effects in solids and are certain to be one of the most active areas of condensed matter physics over then next several years. These materials can act as efficient spin injectors for devices that make use of spin-dependent transport phenomena. We just (late July 2002) finished a neutron reflectivity experiment at NIST on a GaMnAs trilayer film. This material is a ferromagnetic semiconductor which is of interest

  3. Polarization at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Stanford Linear collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z/sup 0/ mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Polarization Control of VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, Johannes Michael; Michalzik, Rainer

    In most types of VCSELs, the light output polarization is inherently unstable. While, in case of single-mode oscillation, the emitted light is mainly linearly polarized, its orientation is not well defined. This is because both the resonator and the gain medium are quasi isotropic in the plane of the active layers. Since a stable polarization is required for almost all sensing and some datacom applications, extensive and in-depth investigations have been undertaken during the last twenty years in order to stabilize the polarization of VCSELs without affecting their favorable operation parameters. Polarization control of VCSELs can be achieved by introducing a polarization-dependent gain, an asymmetric resonator, or mirrors with a polarization-dependent reflectivity. It has turned out that the last approach is most promising. It can be realized by incorporating a shallow surface grating in the upper mirror of a top-emitting VCSEL. Several million grating VCSELs are in reliable operation meanwhile, mainly in optical computer mice.

  5. Polarization at the SLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffeit, Kenneth C.

    1989-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. Longitudinally polarized electrons colliding with unpolarized positrons at a center of mass energy near the Z0 mass can be used as novel and sensitive probes of the electroweak process. A gallium arsenide based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 45 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positrons. A system to monitor the polarization based on Mo/ller and Compton scattering will be used. Nearly all major components have been fabricated and tested. Subsystems of the source and polarimeters have been installed, and studies are in progress. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses.

  6. NEW OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR 0.5–5 KEV SOFT X-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry P.

    2015-03-20

    The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ∼0.2 and ∼4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially integrated solar spectral irradiance from ∼0.5 to ∼5 keV, with ∼0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5–10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ∼6, close to the predictions of nanoflare models of coronal heating. Observations during the more active 2013 flight indicate an enrichment of low first-ionization potential elements of only ∼1.6, below the usually observed value of ∼4, suggesting that abundance variations may be related to coronal heating processes. The XUV Photometer System Level 4 data product, a spectral irradiance model derived from integrated broadband measurements, significantly overestimates the spectra from both flights, suggesting a need for revision of its non-flare reference spectra, with important implications for studies of Earth ionospheric dynamics driven by solar SXRs.

  7. Decline of the 2-10 keV Emission from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liburd, Jamar; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using processed data from the X-ray Telescope on Swift reveals a peak flux on July 16, 2014 of 0.046 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (3.37+/-0.15×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2). This flux is similar to the previous maximum flux seen by the XRT, 3.53+/-0.13×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (0.049 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2), ATEL #6298). Since this peak on July 16, the most recent Swift XRT quicklook data show a drop in flux. On July 20, 2014 the XRT flux as seen in the quicklook data was 0.011 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (8.3+/-0.5×10(exp -11) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2)). This most likely indicates that the 2-10 keV flux is in its declining phase as Eta Car approaches its deep X-ray minimum stage (Hamaguchi et al., 2014, ApJ, 784, 125) associated with periastron passage of the 2024-day binary orbit. The column density derived from analysis of the July 20 XRT quicklook data is 7.2×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2). This is consistent with the column density seen near the same orbital phase in 2003 (7.7×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2), Hamaguchi et al., 2007, ApJ, 663, 522). Eta Car's deep X-ray minimum phase is expected to begin on July 30, 2014. Weekly Swift/XRT observations of Eta Car in the 2-10 keV band are planned throughout the X-ray minimum.

  8. Direct Measurements of an increased threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering with polarization smoothing in ignition hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D; Divol, L; Berger, R L; London, R; Meezan, N; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Stagnito, S; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H; Strozzi, D

    2007-11-08

    We demonstrate a significant reduction of stimulated Brillouin scattering by polarization smoothing. The intensity threshold is measured to increase by a factor of 1.7 {+-} 0.2 when polarization smoothing is applied. The results were obtained in a high-temperature (T{sub 3} {approx_equal} 3 keV) hohlraum plasma where filamentation is negligible in determining the backscatter threshold. These results are explained by an analytical model relevant to ICF plasma conditions that modifies the linear gain exponent to account for polarization smoothing.

  9. XMM-Newton Observation of the Intermediate Polar XY Ari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin Camurdan, Dicle; Balman, Solen; Burwitz, Vadim

    2016-07-01

    XY Ari is a rare Intermediate Polar which shows deep X-ray eclipses and has no optical counterpart due to the high visual extinction. We present results from a detailed analysis of an unpublished archival observation using XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and MOS data covering to more than five orbital periods in a quiescent state of XY Ari. The X-ray orbital modulation and spin pulse variations were investigated in 0.2-10 keV energy band and also in different energy bands (i.e. 0.3-1.5, 1.6-3.0, 3.1-10 keV). The EPIC light curves folded at the spin phases show a double peak profile as expected from double pole accretion. However, a detailed analysis showed that the relative peak heights of the spin profiles, corresponding to different time intervals, vary during the entire observation which may be a result of small accretion rate differences or variable scattering from the weaker pole. We modeled the time-averaged spectrum with single- and multi-temperature optically thin thermal plasma emission (e.g. MEKAL APEC/VAPEC, CEVMKL, MKCFLOW/VMKCFLOW) in XSPEC to derive spectral parameters. The simultaneously fitted EPIC spectra with a double MEKALs model yield plasma temperatures of kT_{MEKAL}=39-44 keV and kT_{MEKAL}=0.3-2.21 keV with a solar metal abundance of 0.52-71 (for higher MEKAL temperature). We find an intrinsic, partial covering absorption about N _{H}=2.9-5.5x10 ^{22} cm ^{-2}. In addition, Gaussian lines at the Fe line energies 6.4 and 6.7 keV, were also included in the fit. We will discuss different model fits and the accretion geometry of the system. The X-ray luminosity of the source is ˜2x10 ^{32} erg/sec in the 0.2-10.0 keV range assuming a 270 pc distance.

  10. GUIDE FOR POLARIZED NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Sailor, V.L.; Aichroth, R.W.

    1962-12-01

    The plane of polarization of a beam of polarized neutrons is changed by this invention, and the plane can be flipped back and forth quicitly in two directions in a trouble-free manner. The invention comprises a guide having a plurality of oppositely directed magnets forming a gap for the neutron beam and the gaps are spaced longitudinally in a spiral along the beam at small stepped angles. When it is desired to flip the plane of polarization the magnets are suitably rotated to change the direction of the spiral of the gaps. (AEC)

  11. Polarized noble gas MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P. III; Lange, Eduard E. de; Knight-Scott, Jack; Maier, Therese; Bogorad, Paul; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Cates, Gordon; Happer, William; Daniel, Thomas M.; Truwit, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-20

    The development of convenient methods to polarize liter quantities of the noble gases helium-3 and xenon-129 has provided the opportunity for a new MRI method to visualize the internal air spaces of the human lung. These spaces are usually poorly seen with hydrogen-based MRI, because of the limited water content of the lung and the low thermal polarization of the water protons achieved in conventional magnets. In addition, xenon, which has a relatively high solubility and a sufficiently persistent polarization level in blood and biological tissue, offers the prospect of providing perfusion images of the lung, brain and other organs.

  12. North Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. Surrounding much of the north polar ice cap are fields of sand dunes. In this case, the strongest winds responsible for the dunes blew off the polar cap (not seen here), from the north-northwest (upper left).

    Location near: 76.5oN, 63.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  13. Rise time in 20-32 keV impulsive X-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.; Takakura, T.

    1974-01-01

    A new property of the X-ray impulsive component observed in solar flares is discussed, giving attention to the relation between the slope of the electron power spectrum and the rise time in the 20-32 keV X-ray spike. This particular energy range was chosen because it offered the greatest number of impulsive events while being sufficiently high to avoid contamination by soft X radiation. It is found for the thin-target model that the electron spectrum tends to be softer when the acceleration rate is smaller.

  14. Asymmetric 511 keV Positron Annihilation Line Emission from the Inner Galactic Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerry; Weidenspointner, Georg; Jean, Pierre; Knodlseder, Jurgen; Ballmoos, Perer von; Bignami, Giovanni; Diehl, Roland; Strong, Andrew; Cordier, Bertrand; Schanne, Stephane; Winkler, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    A recently reported asymmetry in the 511 keV gamma-ray line emission from the inner galactic disk is unexpected and mimics an equally unexpected one in the distribution of LMXBs seen at hard X-ray energies. A possible conclusion is that LMXBs are an important source of the positrons whose annihilation gives rise to the line. We will discuss these results, their statistical significance and that of any link between the two. The implication of any association between LMXBs and positrons for the strong annihilation radiation from the galactic bulge will be reviewed.

  15. Extension to Low Energies (<7keV) of High Pressure X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Itie, J.-P.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Idir, M.; Polian, A.; Couzinet, B.

    2007-01-19

    High pressure x-ray absorption has been performed down to 3.6 keV, thanks to the new LUCIA beamline (SLS, PSI) and to the use of perforated diamonds or Be gasket. Various experimental geometries are proposed, depending on the energy of the edge and on the concentration of the studied element. A few examples will be presented: BaTiO3 at the titanium K edge, Zn0.95 Mn0.05O at the manganese K edge, KCl at the potassium K edge.

  16. On the vectorial photoelectric effect at 2.69 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, P. S.; Hanany, S.; Liu, Y.; Church, E. D.; Fleischman, J.; Kaaret, P.; Novick, R.; Santangelo, A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted to study the vectorial photoelectric effect with CsI, Al2O3 and Si photocathodes at 2.69 keV indicate null results. Detailed analysis shows that previously measured modulation can be well explained by geometrical misalignment and a combination of the asymmetric shape of the incident X-ray beam and a small detection area of the photoelectron detector. After the elimination of the sources of spurious modulation, we observed a modulation factor of less than 3 percent for a grazing incidence angle as small as 5 deg. There is no observable difference in the pulse height distribution between s and p states.

  17. A 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Senjanovic, G.; Tao, Zhijian; Berezhiani, Z. G.

    1992-08-01

    Zee-type models with Majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, a particularly simple solution is found to the solar neutrino problem, which besides nu(sub 17) predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino nu(sub light) = nu(sub e) + nu(sub mu)(sup c) with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10(exp -11)(mu)(sub B) through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  18. 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Eugeni Kh.; Berezhiani, Zurab G.; Senjanović, Goran; Tao, Zhijian

    1993-01-01

    Zee-type models with majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, we find a particularly simple solution to the solar neutrino problem, which besides ν17 predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino νlight = νe + νcμ with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10 -11μB through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  19. Microchannel plate pinhole camera for 20 to 100 keV x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.L.; Leipelt, G.R.; Nilson, D.G.

    1984-10-03

    We present the design and construction of a sensitive pinhole camera for imaging suprathermal x-rays. Our device is a pinhole camera consisting of four filtered pinholes and microchannel plate electron multiplier for x-ray detection and signal amplification. We report successful imaging of 20, 45, 70, and 100 keV x-ray emissions from the fusion targets at our Novette laser facility. Such imaging reveals features of the transport of hot electrons and provides views deep inside the target.

  20. The effect of 1 to 5 keV electrons on the reproductive integrity of microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, J. B.; Brady, J.

    1977-01-01

    Microorganisms were exposed to simulated space environment in order to assess the effect of electrons in the energy range 1 to 5 keV on their colony-forming ability. The test system consisted of an electron gun and power supply, a dosimetry subsystem, and a vacuum subsystem. The system was capable of current densities ranging from 0.1 nA/sq cm to 5 micro A/sq cm on a 25 sq on target and an ultimate vacuum of 0.0006 N/sq m (0.000004 torr). The results of the experimental program show a significant reduction in microbial reproductive integrity.

  1. Ionization and Fragmentation of 5-Chlorouracil induced by 100 keV protons collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cafarelli, Pierre; Champeaux, Jean-Philippe; Le Padellec, Arnaud; Moretto-Capelle, Patrick; Rabier, Julien; Sence, Martine; Carcabal, Pierre

    2008-12-08

    We present preliminary experimental results on the dissociation of singly and doubly ionized 5-Chlorouracil induced by collisions with proton of 100 keV energy. Multiple coincidence techniques are used to detect the ionic fragments from single dissociation events. This enables a thorough analysis of kinetic momentums of the charged and neutral species involved in the dissociation. In many cases, this leads to the establishment of the scenario the molecule undergoes after ionization as well as the determination of the nature of intermediate (undetected) species. In other cases, the dissociation scenario cannot be unambiguously identified and further analysis as well as theoretical support is needed.

  2. Dynamic dependence of interaction potentials for keV atoms at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, A.; Adamov, G.; Wethekam, S.; Maass, K.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.

    2004-05-01

    He and N atoms are scattered with keV energies under a grazing angle of incidence from clean and flat Ag(111) and Al(111) surfaces. For incidence along low index crystallographic directions in the surface plane, atomic projectiles are steered by rows of atoms (''axial surface channeling'') giving rise to characteristic rainbows in their angular distribution. From the analysis of this effect we derive effective scattering potentials which reveal pronounced dynamical effects. We attribute our observation to the embedding energy for penetration of atoms in the electron gas of a metal.

  3. Evidence for electron acceleration up to approximately 300 keV in the magnetic reconnection diffusion region of earth's magnetotail.

    PubMed

    ØIeroset, M; Lin, R P; Phan, T D; Larson, D E; Bale, S D

    2002-11-01

    We report direct measurements of high-energy particles in a rare crossing of the diffusion region in Earth's magnetotail by the Wind spacecraft. The fluxes of energetic electrons up to approximately 300 keV peak near the center of the diffusion region and decrease monotonically away from this region. The diffusion region electron flux spectrum obeys a power law with an index of -3.8 above approximately 2 keV, and the electron angular distribution displays strong field-aligned bidirectional anisotropy at energies below approximately 2 keV, becoming isotropic above approximately 6 keV. These observations indicate significant electron acceleration inside the diffusion region. Ions show no such energization.

  4. Characteristics of upstream energetic (E>=50keV) ion events during intense geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Rigas, A. G.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1998-05-01

    In this work we examine the statistical presence of some important features of upstream energetic (>=50 keV) ion events under some special conditions in the upstream region and the magnetosphere. The 125 ion events considered in the statistic were observed by the IMP 7 and IMP 8 spacecraft, at ~35RE from the Earth, during nine long time intervals of a total of 153 hours. The time intervals analyzed were selected under the following restrictions: existence of high proton flux (i.e., >=900 pcm-2s-1sr-1) and of a great number of events (an occurrence frequency of ~10 events per 12 hours in the whole statistics) in the energy range 50-220 keV. The most striking findings are the following: (1) The upstream events were observed during times with high values of the geomagnetic activity index Kp(>=3-) (2) all of the upstream events (100%) have energy spectra extending up to energies E>=290keV (3) 86% of these events are accompanied by relativistic (E>=220keV) electrons; and (4) the majority of the upstream ion events (82%) showed noninverse velocity dispersion during their onset phase (22% of the events showed forward velocity dispersion, and 60% showed no velocity dispersion at all when 5.5-min averaged observations were analyzed). Further statistical analysis of this sample of upstream particle events shows that the 50- to 220-keV proton flux shows a positive correlation with the following parameters: the Kp index of geomagnetic activity and the flux of the high-energy (290-500 keV) protons and (>=220 keV) electrons. More specific findings are the following: (1) The spectral index γ for a power law distribution of ions detected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Energetic Particle Experiment (EPE) instrument (50<=E<=220keV) and The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) instrument (290<=E<=500keV) ranges between 2 and 6, with maximum probability between 4 and 5 and (2) the peak

  5. Precise Determination of the Intensity of 226Ra Alpha Decay to the 186 keV Excited State

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. LaMont; R.J. Gehrke; S.E. Glover; R.H. Filby

    2001-04-01

    There is a significant discrepancy in the reported values for the emission probability of the 186 keV gamma-ray resulting from the alpha decay of 226 Ra to 186 keV excited state of 222 Rn. Published values fall in the range of 3.28 to 3.59 gamma-rays per 100 alpha-decays. An interesting observation is that the lower value, 3.28, is based on measuring the 186 keV gamma-ray intensity relative to the 226 Ra alpha-branch to the 186 keV level. The higher values, which are close to 3.59, are based on measuring the gamma-ray intensity from mass standards of 226 Ra that are traceable to the mass standards prepared by HÓNIGSCHMID in the early 1930''s. This discrepancy was resolved in this work by carefully measuring the 226 Ra alpha-branch intensities, then applying the theoretical E2 multipolarity internal conversion coefficient of 0.692±0.007 to calculate the 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability. The measured value for the alpha branch to the 186 keV excited state was (6.16±0.03)%, which gives a 186 keV gamma-ray emission probability of (3.64±0.04)%. This value is in excellent agreement with the most recently reported 186 keV gamma-ray emission probabilities determined using 226 Ra mass standards.

  6. 2-20 ns interframe time 2-frame 6.151 keV x-ray imaging on the recently upgraded Z Accelerator: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G. R.; Smith, I. C.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Robertson, G.; Atherton, B. W.; Jones, M. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2008-10-15

    When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' recently upgraded 26 MA Z Accelerator, the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57 nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151 keV (1s{sup 2}-1s2p triplet line of He-like Mn) curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004); G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), complex hydrodynamics, and other high-energy-density physics experiments. For example, this diagnostic has recently afforded microgram-scale mass perturbation measurements on an imploding ignition-scale 1 mg ICF capsule [G. R. Bennett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 205003 (2007)], where the perturbation was initiated by a surrogate deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel fill tube. Using an angle-time multiplexing technique, ZBL now has the capability to provide two spatially and temporally separated foci in the Z chamber, allowing 'two-frame' imaging to be performed, with an interframe time range of 2-20 ns. This multiplexing technique allows the full area of the four-pass amplifiers to be used for the two pulses, rather than split the amplifiers effectively into two rectangular sections, with one leg delayed with respect to the other, which would otherwise double the power imposed onto the various optics thereby halving the damage threshold, for the same irradiance on target. The 6.151 keV two frame technique has recently been used to image imploding wire arrays, using a 7.3 ns interframe time. The diagnostic will soon be converted to operate with p-rather than s-polarized laser light for enhanced laser absorption in the Mn foil, plus other changes (e.g., operation at the possibly brighter 6.181 keV Mn 1s{sup 2}-1s2p singlet line), to increase x-ray yields. Also, a highly sensitive inline multiframe ultrafast

  7. 2-20 ns interframe time 2-frame 6.151 keV x-ray imaging on the recently upgraded Z Accelerator: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. R.; Smith, I. C.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Robertson, G.; Atherton, B. W.; Jones, M. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' recently upgraded 26MA Z Accelerator, the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151keV (1s2-1s2p triplet line of He-like Mn) curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004); G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), complex hydrodynamics, and other high-energy-density physics experiments. For example, this diagnostic has recently afforded microgram-scale mass perturbation measurements on an imploding ignition-scale 1mg ICF capsule [G. R. Bennett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 205003 (2007)], where the perturbation was initiated by a surrogate deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel fill tube. Using an angle-time multiplexing technique, ZBL now has the capability to provide two spatially and temporally separated foci in the Z chamber, allowing "two-frame" imaging to be performed, with an interframe time range of 2-20ns. This multiplexing technique allows the full area of the four-pass amplifiers to be used for the two pulses, rather than split the amplifiers effectively into two rectangular sections, with one leg delayed with respect to the other, which would otherwise double the power imposed onto the various optics thereby halving the damage threshold, for the same irradiance on target. The 6.151keV two frame technique has recently been used to image imploding wire arrays, using a 7.3ns interframe time. The diagnostic will soon be converted to operate with p-rather than s-polarized laser light for enhanced laser absorption in the Mn foil, plus other changes (e.g., operation at the possibly brighter 6.181keV Mn 1s2-1s2p singlet line), to increase x-ray yields. Also, a highly sensitive inline multiframe ultrafast (1ns gate time

  8. SENSITIVITY OF STACKED IMAGING DETECTORS TO HARD X-RAY POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Muleri, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Emission of polarized light by slow ions after excitation near a magnetic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närmann, A.; Schleberger, M.; Heiland, W.; Huber, C.; Kirschner, J.

    1991-07-01

    We investigation the emission of polarized light from slow (3-12 KeV) particles scattered off a magnetized Fe(110) surface for different transitions, energies and incident angles. Recently, a similar experiment has been performed for the grazing incident case at much higher energies [H. Winter, H. Hagedorn, R. Zimny, H. Nienhaus and J. Kirschner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 (1989) 296]. By changing the incident angle we can separate effects due to anisotropically distributed angular momenta from effects due to the polarization of surface electrons.

  10. Polar Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, R. G.; Schulteis, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    The present and projected benefits of the polar regions were reviewed and then translated into information needs in order to support the array of polar activities anticipated. These needs included measurement sensitivities for polar environmental data (ice/snow, atmosphere, and ocean data for integrated support) and the processing and delivery requirements which determine the effectiveness of environmental services. An assessment was made of how well electromagnetic signals can be converted into polar environmental information. The array of sensor developments in process or proposed were also evaluated as to the spectral diversity, aperture sizes, and swathing capabilities available to provide these measurements from spacecraft, aircraft, or in situ platforms. Global coverage and local coverage densification options were studied in terms of alternative spacecraft trajectories and aircraft flight paths.

  11. Mercury's South Polar Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows 89 wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury’s south polar region acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) over one complete Mercury solar day (176 Earth days). Thi...

  12. Influence of a keV sterile neutrino on neutrinoless double beta decay: How things changed in recent years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Alexander; Niro, Viviana

    2013-12-01

    Earlier studies of the influence of dark matter keV sterile neutrinos on neutrinoless double beta decay concluded that there is no significant modification of the decay rate. These studies have focused only on a mass of the keV sterile neutrino above 2 and 4 keV, respectively, as motivated by certain production mechanisms. On the other hand, alternative production mechanisms have been proposed, which relax the lower limit for the mass, and new experimental data are available, too. For this reason, an updated study is timely and worthwhile. We focus on the most recent data, i.e., the newest Chandra and XMM-Newton observational bounds on the x-ray line originating from radiative keV sterile neutrino decay, as well as the new measurement of the previously unknown leptonic mixing angle θ13. While the previous works might have been a little short-sighted, the new observational bounds do indeed render any influences of keV sterile neutrinos on neutrinoless double beta decay small. This conclusion even holds in case not all the dark matter is made up of keV sterile neutrinos.

  13. High order reflectivity of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals for x-ray energies up to 22 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Neumayer, P.; Landen, O. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Girard, F.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.

    2008-10-15

    We used Kr K{alpha} (12.6 keV), Zr K{alpha} (15.7 keV), and Ag K{alpha} (22.2 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt-class laser pulses, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity R{sub int} of flat highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) up to the fifth order. The maximum R{sub int} was observed in first order (3.7 mrad at 12.6 keV), decreasing by a factor of 3-5 for every successive order, and dropping by a factor of 2-2.5 at 22.2 keV. The current study indicates that HOPG crystals are suitable for measuring scattering signals from high energy x-ray sources (E{>=}20 keV). These energies are required to penetrate through the high density plasma conditions encountered in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  14. Resolution of the 1,238-keV gamma-ray line from supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of supernova 1987A from the maiden flight of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) are reported. SN1987A was observed for a period of 11.1 hours on May 1, 1988. Line emission at 1238 keV and continuum emission from 60-800 keV were detected. A gaussian line profile gives an acceptable fit to the 1238 keV line. The best-fit parameters are: flux = 8.5(+ 2.3, - 2.2) x 10 to the -4th photons/sq cm/s; peak energy = 1235.4 (+ 2.2, - 2.4) keV; FWHM = 16.3 (+ 6.1, - 5.7) keV. No evidence is found for a supernova-produced red- or blueshift in the 1238 keV line. The measured linewidth is a factor of about two greater than model predictions, although the discrepancy represents only two standard deviations. The line profiles are characteristic of optically thin regions, whereas the intensity implies a mean optical depth of about two. Fragmentation or nonspherical geometry of the supernova shell are possible explanations of the data.

  15. EDITORIAL: Polarization Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Jari; Friesem, Asher A.; Friberg, Ari T.

    2004-03-01

    This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which are based on presentations at the International Commission for Optics Topical Meeting on Polarization Optics, held in Polvijärvi, Finland, between 30 June and 3 July 2003. While this issue should not in any sense be considered as a `proceedings' of this meeting, the possibility of submitting papers to it was widely advertised during the meeting, which was attended by a large fraction of prominent scientists in the field of polarization optics. Thus the quality of papers in this special issue is high. In announcing both the meeting and this special issue, we emphasized that the concept of `polarization optics' should be understood in a wide sense. In fact, all contributions dealing with the vectorial nature of light were welcome. As a result, the papers included here cover a wide range of different aspects of linear and nonlinear polarization optics. Both theoretical and experimental features are discussed. We are pleased to see that the conference and this special issue both reflect the wide diversity of important and novel polarization phenomena in optics. The papers in this special issue, and other recently published works, demonstrate that even though polarization is a fundamental property of electromagnetic fields, interest in it is rapidly increasing. The fundamental relations between partial coherence and partial polarization are currently under vigorous research in electromagnetic coherence theory. In diffractive optics it has been found that the exploitation of the vectorial nature of light can be of great benefit. Fabrication of sophisticated, spatially variable polarization-control elements is becoming possible with the aid of nanolithography. Polarization singularities and the interplay of bulk properties and topology in nanoscale systems have created much enthusiasm. In nonlinear optics, the second harmonic waves generated on reflection and

  16. Polar Warming Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDunn, T. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Polar warming is a dynamically induced temperature enhancement over mid-to-high latitudes that results in a reversed (poleward) meridional temperature gradient. This phenomenon was recently characterized over the 40-90 km altitude region [1] based on nearly three martian years of Mars Climate Sounder observations [2, 3]. Here we investigate which forcing mechanisms affect the magnitude and distribution of the observed polar warming by conducting simulations with the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting General Circulation Model [4, 5]. We present simulations confirming the influence topography [6] and dust loading [e.g., 7] have upon polar warming. We then present simulations illustrating the modulating influence gravity wave momentum deposition exerts upon polar warming, consistent with previous modeling studies [e.g., 8]. The results of this investigation suggest the magnitude and distribution of polar warming in the martian middle atmosphere is modified by gravity wave activity and that the characteristics of the gravity waves that most significantly affect polar warming vary with season. References: [1] McDunn, et al., 2012 (JGR), [2]Kleinböhl, et al., 2009 (JGR), [3] Kleinböhl, et al., 2011 (JQSRT), [4] Richardson, et al., 2007 (JGR), [5] Mischna, et al., 2011 (Planet. Space Sci.), [6] Richardson and Wilson, 2002 (Nature), [7] Haberle, et al., 1982 (Icarus), [8] Barnes, 1990 (JGR).

  17. Polarization Imaging Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin K.; Chen, Qiushui

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus has shown promise as a prototype of instruments for medical imaging with contrast greater than that achievable by use of non-polarized light. The underlying principles of design and operation are derived from observations that light interacts with tissue ultrastructures that affect reflectance, scattering, absorption, and polarization of light. The apparatus utilizes high-speed electro-optical components for generating light properties and acquiring polarization images through aligned polarizers. These components include phase retarders made of OptoCeramic (registered TradeMark) material - a ceramic that has a high electro-optical coefficient. The apparatus includes a computer running a program that implements a novel algorithm for controlling the phase retarders, capturing image data, and computing the Stokes polarization images. Potential applications include imaging of superficial cancers and other skin lesions, early detection of diseased cells, and microscopic analysis of tissues. The high imaging speed of this apparatus could be beneficial for observing live cells or tissues, and could enable rapid identification of moving targets in astronomy and national defense. The apparatus could also be used as an analysis tool in material research and industrial processing.

  18. Attenuation of photons at 3 to 14 keV energies in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; Berry, H.G.; Gemmell, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Using X-ray photons at the X24A, X23B and X23A2 beam lines at NSLS, we measured the total photo-attenuation cross section of helium for photons in the energy range of 3 to 14 keV. In this range the photoionization cross section decreases rapidly with energy, so that Compton scattering is significant at 4 keV and dominates at the highest energies. The apparatus consisted of a 1.4-m long helium-absorption tube, 5 cm in diameter, with 75-{mu} thick, 7-mm diameter, kapton end windows. The tube could be filled with helium up to a pressure of 10{sup 6} Pa. We attained a precision of 1-2% in the attenuation cross section. The measurements verify the dominance of Compton scattering in this energy range and its importance in recent measurements of the ratio of double-to-single photoionization of helium. The measured cross sections are close to the combined calculated cross sections for Compton scattering and photoionization, and we are able to distinguish the contributions of the two effects.

  19. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  20. Hydroxyapatite-titanium interface reaction induced by keV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Foti, G.

    1992-03-01

    Thin films of hydroxyapatite bioceramic, 5-50 Å in thickness, have been deposited on ion cleaned titanium surfaces to study the chemical-physical adhesion of metal-ceramic interfaces of biomedical devices (orthopaedic and dentistry prosthesis). Film deposition was performed in ultrahigh vacuum condition (10 -10 mbar) using 5 keV argon sputtering of hydroxyapatite matrix; the film thickness was measured in situ with Auger electron spectroscopy. The hydroxyapatite-titanium interface was irradiated with an electron beam of 0.5-5 keV energy and 0.2-2 A/cm 2 current density. During electron irradiation, Auger spectra show chemical shifts of phosphorus, titanium and oxygen peaks. The released electron energy induces modifications in the tetraedric phosphorus-oxygen groups with production of new chemical bonds between phosphorus, oxygen and titanium. Oxygen, for example, diffuses into the titanium interface forming titanium oxide. Chemical reactions induced by electron irradiation are driven by the metal-ceramic interface. Near the interface a strong and fast effect is observed while far from the interface a weak and slow effect occurs. Chemical reactions depend on the electron irradiation dose showing an inhibition threshold at about 10 19 e/cm 2 and, near the interface, a saturation condition at about 5 × 10 20 e/cm 2. Titanium-ceramic chemical reactions are inhibited if the substrate titanium surface is rich in oxide.

  1. Lifetime measurement of the 167.1 keV state in {sup 41}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    White, E. R.; Mach, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Koester, U.; Arndt, O.; Blazhev, A.; Braun, N.; Fransen, C.; Jolie, J.; Boelaert, N.; Borge, M. J. G.; Boutami, R.; Reillo, E.-M.; Tengblad, O.; Bradley, H.; Dlouhy, Z.; Ugryumov, V.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hinke, Ch.; Kroell, T.

    2007-11-15

    The Advanced-Time-Delayed method was used to measure lifetimes of the states in {sup 41}Ar populated in the {beta} decay of {sup 41}Cl. The nuclei {sup 41}Cl were produced at ISOLDE by 1.4-GeV proton bombardment of a thick UC{sub x} target and mass-separated as molecular ions, XeCl{sup +}. Our measured half-life of the 167.1-keV state, T{sub 1/2}=315(15) ps, is significantly lower than the previously measured value of 410(30) ps. We have also determined T{sub 1/2}=260(80) ps and T{sub 1/2}{<=}46 ps for the 515.9- and 1867.7-keV states, respectively. These are the shortest lifetimes measured so far with the ultrafast timing method using the new LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) crystals for {gamma}-ray detection.

  2. EMISSION LINES BETWEEN 1 AND 2 keV IN COMETARY X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Ian; Christian, Damian J.; Bodewits, Dennis; Dennerl, Konrad; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J. E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu

    2013-01-20

    We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0-2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected five comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model. Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV which we identify as being created by SWCX lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700-2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution that these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.

  3. Stimulated Raman scattering in hydrogen by ultrashort laser pulse in the keV regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachau, H.; Dondera, M.

    2016-04-01

    This letter addresses the problem of stimulated Raman excitation of a hydrogen atom submitted to an ultrashort and intense laser pulse in the keV regime. The pulse central frequency ω of 55 a.u. (about 1.5 keV) is in the weakly relativistic regime, ω ≤ c/a0 (c is the speed of light in vacuum and a 0 the Bohr radius) and the pulse duration is τ ≈ 18.85 a.u. (about 456 attoseconds). We solve the corresponding time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) using a spectral approach, retardation (or nondipole) effects are included up to O(1/c) , breaking the conservation of the magnetic quantum number m and forcing the resolution of the TDSE in a three-dimensional space. Due to the laser bandwidth, which is of the order of the ionization potential of hydrogen, stimulated Raman scattering populates nlm excited states (n and l are the principal and azimuthal quantum numbers, respectively). The populations of these excited states are calculated and analyzed in terms of l and m quantum numbers, this showing the contributions of the retardation effects and their relative importance.

  4. Improving accuracy and reliability of 186-keV measurements for unattended enrichment monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Boyer, Brian D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Moss, Calvin E; Goda, Joetta M; Favalli, Andrea; Lombardi, Marcie; Paffett, Mark T; Hill, Thomas R; MacArthur, Duncan W; Smith, Morag K

    2010-04-13

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants (GCEPs), whilst reducing the inspection effort, is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One aspect of this measurement is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from {sup 235}U. (The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe. This can be obtained by transmission measurements or pressure measurements). In this paper we describe our research efforts towards such a passive measurement system. The system includes redundant measurements of the 186-keV line from the gas and separately from the wall deposits. The design also includes measures to reduce the effect of the potentially important background. Such an approach would practically eliminate false alarms and can maintain the operation of the system even with a hardware malfunction in one of the channels. The work involves Monte Carlo modeling and the construction of a proof-of-principle prototype. We will carry out experimental tests with UF{sub 6} gas in pipes with and without deposits in order to demonstrate the deposit correction.

  5. The 16 August 1997 Novaya Zemlya seismic event as viewed from GSN stations KEV and KBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartse, H.E.

    1997-11-01

    Using current and historic seismic records from Global Seismic Network stations KEV and KBS, the authors find that S minus P arrival time comparisons between nuclear explosions and the 16 August 1997 seismic event (m{sub b} {approx} 3.6) from near Novaya Zemlya clearly indicate that (relative to KEV) the 16 August event occurred at least 80 km east of the Russian test site. Including S minus P arrival times from KBS constrains the location to beneath the Kara Sea and in good agreement with previously reported locations, over 100 km southeast of the test site. From an analysis of P{sub n}/S{sub n} waveform ratios at frequencies above 4 Hz, they find that the 16 August event falls within the population of regional earthquakes and is distinctly separated from Novaya Zemlya and other northern Eurasian nuclear explosion populations. Thus, given its location and waveform characteristics, they conclude the 16 August event was an earthquake. The 16 August event was not detected at teleseismic distances, and thus, this event provides a good example of the regional detection, location, and identification efforts that will be required to monitor the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty below m{sub b} {approx} 4.

  6. Neutron activation of natural zinc samples at kT=25 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, R.; Dababneh, S.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Sonnabend, K.; Uberseder, E.

    2012-03-01

    The neutron-capture cross sections of 64Zn, 68Zn, and 70Zn have been measured with the activation technique in a quasistellar neutron spectrum corresponding to a thermal energy of kT=25 keV. By a series of repeated irradiations with different experimental conditions, an uncertainty of 3% could be achieved for the 64Zn(n,γ)65Zn cross section and for the partial cross section 68Zn(n,γ)69Znm feeding the isomeric state in 69Zn. For the partial cross sections 70Zn(n,γ)71Znm and 70Zn(n,γ)71Zng, which had not been measured so far, uncertainties of only 16% and 6% could be reached because of limited counting statistics and decay intensities. Compared to previous measurements on 64,68Zn, the uncertainties could be significantly improved, while the 70Zn cross section was found to be two times smaller than existing model calculations. From these results Maxwellian average cross sections were determined between 5 and 100 keV. Additionally, the β-decay half-life of 71Znm could be determined with significantly improved accuracy. The consequences of these data have been studied by network calculations for convective core He burning and convective shell C burning in massive stars.

  7. Operation of the optically pumped polarized H sup minus source at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    York, R.L.; Tupa, D.; Swenson, D.R.; van Dyck, O.B.

    1991-01-01

    We report on the first five months of operation of the Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source (OPPIS) for the nuclear physics research program at LAMPF. The LAMPF OPPIS is unique in using Ti: Sapphire lasers to polarize the potassium charge-exchange medium, and until recently was unique in using a superconducting magnet in the ECR source and polarizer regions. The ECR extraction electrode biasing arrangement is also unique. Typical performance was 25 microamps of peak current (measured at 750 keV) with 55% beam polarization or 15 microamps at 62%. Ion source availability was greater than 90%. We also report our planned improvements in preparation for research operation in May of 1991. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Polarization properties of linearly polarized parabolic scaling Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mengwen; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-10-01

    The intensity profiles for the dominant polarization, cross polarization, and longitudinal components of modified parabolic scaling Bessel beams with linear polarization are investigated theoretically. The transverse intensity distributions of the three electric components are intimately connected to the topological charge. In particular, the intensity patterns of the cross polarization and longitudinal components near the apodization plane reflect the sign of the topological charge.

  9. Rectilinear lattices of polarization vortices with various spatial polarization distributions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shiyao; Zhang, Shikun; Wang, Tonglu; Gao, Chunqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a type of rectilinear lattices of polarization vortices, each spot in which has mutually independent, and controllable spatial polarization distributions. The lattices are generated by two holograms under special design. In the experiment, the holograms are encoded on two spatial light modulators, and the results fit very well with theory. Our scheme makes it possible to generate multiple polarization vortices with various polarization distributions simultaneously, for instance, radially and azimuthally polarized beams, and can be used in the domains as polarization-based data transmission system, optical manufacture, polarization detection and so on. PMID:27505812

  10. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, D.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Appelt, S.; Bouchard, L. S.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast (˜100 Hz) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  11. Polarized nuclear target based on parahydrogen induced polarization

    SciTech Connect

    D. Budker, M.P. Ledbetter, S. Appelt, L.S. Bouchard, B. Wojtsekhowski

    2012-12-01

    We discuss a novel concept of a polarized nuclear target for accelerator fixed-target scattering experiments, which is based on parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP). One may be able to reach a 33% free-proton polarization in the ethane molecule. The potential advantages of such a target include operation at zero magnetic field, fast ({approx}100 HZ) polarization oscillation (akin to polarization reversal), and operation with large intensity of an electron beam.

  12. Polar low dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1992-12-15

    Polar lows are intense subsynoptic-scale cyclones that form over high-latitude oceans in association with deep cumulus convection and strong ambient baroclinicity. Recent observations indicate that polar lows are generally initiated by a nonaxisymmetric interaction between a surface disturbance and an upper-level mobile trough. Extant theories of polar low formation preclude study of such a process since they either constrain their models to be axisymmetric, or do not explicitly account for his transient interaction. In this work the physics of interacting upper- and lower-level potential vorticity structures is studied as an initial-value problem using a three-dimensional nonlinear geostrophic momentum model that incorporates moist processes and includes strong baroclinic dynamics. Model results illustrate the rapid formation of an intense small-scale cyclone whose structure is consistent with observations of mature polar lows. A conceptual model of polar low development is proposed. In the first stage of development, called induced self-development, a mobile upper trough initiates a rapid low-level spinup due to the enhanced omega response in a conditionally neutral baroclinic atmosphere. A secondary development follows, called diabatic destabilization, that is associated with the production of low-level potential vorticity by diabatic processes. Diabatic destabilization represents a simple mechanism for maintaining the intensity of polar lows until they reach land. In exceptional instances of negligible upper-level forcing, the latter may also describe the gradual intensification of small-scale cyclones in regions of sustained neutrality and surface baroclinicity. Ideas regarding polar low equilibration and prospects for a unified theory of arctic and midlatitude cyclones are discussed. 75 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  14. Polar low monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, Leonid; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta; Mitnik, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Polar lows are intense mesoscale atmospheric low pressure weather systems, developing poleward of the main baroclinic zone and associated with high surface wind speeds. Small size and short lifetime, sparse in-situ observations in the regions of their development complicate polar low study. Our knowledge of polar lows and mesocyclones has come almost entirely during the period of satellite remote sensing since, by virtue of their small horizontal scale, it was rarely possible to analyse these lows on conventional weather charts using only the data from the synoptic observing network. However, the effects of intense polar lows have been felt by coastal communities and seafarers since the earliest times. These weather systems are thought to be responsible for the loss of many small vessels over the centuries, although the nature of the storms was not understood and their arrival could not be predicted. The actuality of the polar low research is stipulated by their high destructive power: they are a threat to such businesses as oil and gas exploration, fisheries and shipping. They could worsen because of global warming: a shrinking of sea ice around the North Pole, which thawed to its record minimum in the summer of 2007, is likely to give rise to more powerful storms that form only over open water and can cause hurricane-strength winds. Therefore, study of polar lows, their timely detection, tracking and forecasting represents a challenge for today meteorology. Satellite passive microwave data, starting from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) onboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite, remain invaluable source of regularly available remotely sensed data to study polar lows. The sounding in this spectral range has several advantages in comparison with observations in visible and infrared ranges and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data: independence on day time and clouds, regularity and high temporal resolution in Polar Regions. Satellite

  15. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of ‘polarization twist’, which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  16. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-02

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms.

  17. Polarization twist in perovskite ferrielectrics.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Hirano, Kiyotaka; Ogino, Motohiro; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Because the functions of polar materials are governed primarily by their polarization response to external stimuli, the majority of studies have focused on controlling polar lattice distortions. In some perovskite oxides, polar distortions coexist with nonpolar tilts and rotations of oxygen octahedra. The interplay between nonpolar and polar instabilities appears to play a crucial role, raising the question of how to design materials by exploiting their coupling. Here, we introduce the concept of 'polarization twist', which offers enhanced control over piezoelectric responses in polar materials. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide direct evidence that a ferrielectric perovskite exhibits a large piezoelectric response because of extended polar distortion, accompanied by nonpolar octahedral rotations, as if twisted polarization relaxes under electric fields. The concept underlying the polarization twist opens new possibilities for developing alternative materials in bulk and thin-film forms. PMID:27586824

  18. A Compact Polarization Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karl E.; Rust, David M.; Chen, Hua

    1995-01-01

    A new type of image detector has been designed to analyze the polarization of light simultaneously at all picture elements (pixels) in a scene. The Integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a custom-designed charge-coupled device with signal-analysis circuitry, all integrated on a silicon chip. The IDID should simplify the design and operation of imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmospheric and solar research. Other applications include environmental monitoring and robot vision. Innovations in the IDID include two interleaved 512 x 1024 pixel imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane), large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 6) electrons per pixel), simultaneous readout and display of both images at 10(exp 6) pixels per second, and on-chip analog signal processing to produce polarization maps in real time. When used with a lithium niobate Fabry-Perot etalon or other color filter that can encode spectral information as polarization, the IDID can reveal tiny differences between simultaneous images at two wavelengths.

  19. POLARBEAR CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, H.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapmann, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M. A.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Fuller, G.; Ghribi, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaffe, A.; Jaehnig, G.; Kaneko, Y.; Katayama, N.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Kimura, N.; Kisner, T.; Lee, A. T.; Le Jeune, M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; O'Brient, R.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Shimizu, A.; Shimon, M.; Shimmin, C.; Sholl, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, T.; Tucker, C.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    POLARBEAR is a ground-based experiment in the Atacama desert in hile, measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. One of the science goals of POLARBEAR is to detect the B-mode polarization pattern of the CMB produced by primordial gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation. The detection of the B-mode polarization provides strong evidence for inflationary cosmological models. POLARBEAR is expected to reach a sensitivity to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.025 at 95% confidence level, using the data from two years of observation. With a beam size of 3.5 arcminutes, POLARBEAR is also sensitive to B-mode polarization signals at small-angular scales produced by weak gravitational lensing of large-scale structure. POLARBEAR is expected to provide a constraint on the sum of neutrino masses because of their effect on the large-scale structure. POLARBEAR was deployed in late 2011 and started observing in early 2012 at 150 GHz with an array of 1,274 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. The current status of the POLARBEAR experiment is reported.

  20. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  1. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  2. Artificial polarization components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescato, L.; Gluch, Ekkehard; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert

    1990-07-01

    High frequency surface relief structures are optically anisotropic and show interesting polarisation properties 1 . These properties can be used to produce polarizations components such as wave plates polarizers. polarizing beamsplitters etc. Our experimental results show that even gratings with relatively low spatial frequency ( periods A ) exhibit a strong phase retardation and can be used as quarter-wave plates. k INTRODUC11ON The artificial birefringence exhibited by ultrahigh frequency gratings of dielectric materials can be used to produce various polarization components2 . Such components have applications in integrated optics as well as in free space optics. In order to produce the high spatial frequencies complex processes such as electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching are needed. We show in this paper that sinusoidal holographic gratings in photoresist exhibit also a strong phase ret even at relatively long periods. L EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS To obtain the phase retardation of a lower frequency ( period A ) grating a simple setup as used by Enger and 2 can be applied. In our case however there are three measurements necessary to obtain the phase retardation because transmission of the two perpendicularly polarized beams is different from each other. I GRATING PRODUCTION grating 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 period (pmj 0. 74 0. 74 0. 61 0. 54 0. 46 0. 32 0. 54 0. 54 0. 54 ne (sec) 60

  3. Polarization analysis of optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1989-01-01

    For most optical systems it is typically assumed that the transmitted wavefront has uniform (or Gaussian) amplitude and constant polarization state. This is the default assumption of geometrical optics. This paper considers methods suitable for analyzing systems for which this assumption is not valid. Such methods of polarization analysis include polarization ray tracing and polarization aberration theory. Definitions of the basic classes of polarization phenomena and a review of the Jones calculus are included to form a basis for the discussion.

  4. 200 keV Xe+ ions irradiation effects on Zr-Ti binary films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weipeng; Chai, Maosheng; Feng, Wei; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2015-05-01

    200 keV Xenon irradiation experiments were performed on magnetron sputtered Zr-Ti films under different doses up to 9 * 1015 ions/cm2. XRD, FE-SEM, AFM, HRTEM, nano-indentation and white light interferometer characterizations were applied to study the structural and mechanical properties modification introduced by the bombardment. Upon Xenon irradiation, structure of film matrix kept stable while the crystallinity of the top surface degraded significantly. Meanwhile, properties of irradiated films such as hardness, modulus and sheet resistance evolved with the same tendency, i.e. increased firstly and decrease with further increasing the irradiation dose. By selective area irradiation, competition between the surface sputtering and swelling was revealed, by which surface defects evolution was highlighted. The micro-defects evolution during Xenon irradiation was believed to be responsible for the macro-properties' modification.

  5. Excess astrophysical photons from a 0.1-1 keV cosmic axion background.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Joseph P; Marsh, M C David

    2013-10-11

    Primordial decays of string theory moduli at z~10(12) naturally generate a dark radiation cosmic axion background with 0.1-1 keV energies. This cosmic axion background can be detected through axion-photon conversion in astrophysical magnetic fields to give quasithermal excesses in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray bands. Substantial and observable luminosities may be generated even for axion-photon couplings <10(-11) GeV(-1). We propose that axion-photon conversion may explain the observed excess emission of soft x rays from galaxy clusters, and may also contribute to the diffuse unresolved cosmic x-ray background. We list a number of correlated predictions of the scenario. PMID:24160588

  6. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fella, C.; Balles, A.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results.

  7. Preliminary resolved resonance region evaluation of copper-63 from 0 to 300 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, V.; Forget, B.; Leal, L.; Guber, K.

    2012-07-01

    A new preliminary evaluation of Cu-63 was done in the energy region from 0 to 300 keV extending the resolved resonance region of the previous, ENDF/B-VII.0, evaluation three-fold. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and one from the Massachusetts Inst. of Technology Nuclear Reactor (MITR). A total of 275 new resonances were identified and a corresponding set of external resonances was approximated to mock up the external levels. The negative external levels (bound level) were modified to match the thermal cross section values. A preliminary benchmarking calculation was made using 11 ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. (authors)

  8. Point Defect Cluster Formation in Iron Displacement Cascades Up to 50 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1998-11-30

    The results of molecular dynamics displacement cascade simulations in iron at energies up to 50 keV and temperatures of 100, 600, and 900K are summarized, with a focus on the characterization of interstitial and vacancy clusters that are formed directly within the cascade. The fraction of the surviving point defects contained in clusters, and the size distributions of these in-cascade clusters have been determined. Although the formation of true vacancy clusters appears to be inhibited in iron, a significant degree of vacancy site correlation was observed. These well correlated arrangements of vacancies can be considered nascent clusters, and they have been observed to coalesce during longer term Monte Carlo simulations which permit short range vacancy diffusion. Extensive interstitial clustering was observed. The temperature and cascade energy dependence of the cluster size distributions are discussed in terms of their relevance to microstructural evolution and mechanical property changes in irradiated iron-based alloys.

  9. A 75-keV, 145-mA proton injector

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, T. L.; Hansborough, L. D.; Kerstiens, D. M.; Schneider, J. D.; Smith, H. V.; Stettler, M. W.; Thuot, M. E.; Warren, D. S.; Zaugg, T. J.; Arvin, A. A.; Bolt, A. S.; Sherman, Joseph D.

    2001-01-01

    A dc and pulsed-mode 75-keV proton injector has been developed and is used in characterization of a continuous-wave (cw) 6.7-MeV, 100-mA radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ). The injector is used frequently at the full RFQ design power (100-mA, 6.7-MeV) where the RFQ admittance (1rms, normalized) is 0.23 ({pi}mm-mrad). The injector includes a 2.45-GHz microwave proton source and a beam space-charge-neutralized, two magnetic-solenoid, low-energy beam-transport system (LEBT). The design RFQ beam transmission of 95% has been demonstrated at 100-mA RFQ output current.

  10. 350 keV accelerator based PGNAA setup to detect nitrogen in bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Al-Matouq, Faris A.; Khiari, F. Z.; Gondal, M. A.; Rehman, Khateeb-ur; Isab, A. A.; Raashid, M.; Dastageer, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen concentration was measured in explosive and narcotics proxy material, e.g. anthranilic acid, caffeine, melamine, and urea samples, bulk samples through thermal neutron capture reaction using 350 keV accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation (PGNAA) setup. Intensity of 2.52, 3.53-3.68, 4.51, 5.27-5.30 and 10.38 MeV prompt gamma rays of nitrogen from the bulk samples was measured using a cylindrical 100 mm×100 mm (diameter×height ) BGO detector. Inspite of interference of nitrogen gamma rays from bulk samples with capture prompt gamma rays from BGO detector material, an excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated yields of nitrogen gamma rays has been obtained. This is an indication of the excellent performance of the PGNAA setup for detection of nitrogen in bulk samples.

  11. Active detection of shielded SNM with 60-keV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Dietrich, D; Hall, J; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Newby, R; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W

    2008-07-08

    Fissile materials, e.g. {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, can be detected non-invasively by active neutron interrogation. A unique characteristic of fissile material exposed to neutrons is the prompt emission of high-energy (fast) fission neutrons. One promising mode of operation subjects the object to a beam of medium-energy (epithermal) neutrons, generated by a proton beam impinging on a Li target. The emergence of fast secondary neutrons then clearly indicates the presence of fissile material. Our interrogation system comprises a low-dose 60-keV neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 6}/s), and a 1 m{sup 2} array of scintillators for fast neutron detection. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate the detectability of small quantities (370 g) of HEU shielded by steel (200 g/cm{sup 2}) or plywood (30 g/cm{sup 2}), with a typical measurement time of 1 min.

  12. A 9 keV electron-impact liquid-gallium-jet x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Otendal, M.; Tuohimaa, T.; Vogt, U.; Hertz, H. M.

    2008-01-15

    We demonstrate a high-brightness compact 9 keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on a liquid-gallium-jet anode. A {approx}30 W, 50 kV electron gun is focused onto the {approx}20 m/s, 30 {mu}m diameter liquid-gallium-jet anode to produce an {approx}10 {mu}m full width at half maximum x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is >2x10{sup 10} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2}x0.1% BW). Calculation and experiments show potential for increasing this brightness by approximately three orders of magnitude, making the source suitable for laboratory-scale x-ray crystallography and hard x-ray microscopy.

  13. Silicon-carbon bond inversions driven by 60-keV electrons in graphene.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Kotakoski, Jani; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Mangler, Clemens; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ayala, Paola; Meyer, Jannik C; Ramasse, Quentin

    2014-09-12

    We demonstrate that 60-keV electron irradiation drives the diffusion of threefold-coordinated Si dopants in graphene by one lattice site at a time. First principles simulations reveal that each step is caused by an electron impact on a C atom next to the dopant. Although the atomic motion happens below our experimental time resolution, stochastic analysis of 38 such lattice jumps reveals a probability for their occurrence in a good agreement with the simulations. Conversions from three- to fourfold coordinated dopant structures and the subsequent reverse process are significantly less likely than the direct bond inversion. Our results thus provide a model of nondestructive and atomically precise structural modification and detection for two-dimensional materials.

  14. X-ray grating interferometry at photon energies over 180 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Yaniz, M.; Koch, F.; Zanette, I.; Rack, A.; Meyer, P.; Kunka, D.; Hipp, A.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-04-01

    We report on the implementation and characterization of grating interferometry operating at an x-ray energy of 183 keV. With the possibility to use this technique at high x-ray energies, bigger specimens could be studied in a quantitative way. Also, imaging strongly absorbing specimens will benefit from the advantages of the phase and dark-field signals provided by grating interferometry. However, especially at these high photon energies the performance of the absorption grating becomes a key point on the quality of the system, because the grating lines need to keep their small width of a couple of micrometers and exhibit a greater height of hundreds of micrometers. The performance of high aspect ratio absorption gratings fabricated with different techniques is discussed. Further, a dark-field image of an alkaline multicell battery highlights the potential of high energy x-ray grating based imaging.

  15. Ion Source Development For The Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S.

    2011-09-26

    Currently there is a Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade for the replacement of the 40 year old Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) Cockcroft-Walton accelerators with a new ion source and 200 MHz Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ). The slit type magnetron being used now will be replaced with a round aperture magnetron similar to the one used at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Operational experience from BNL has shown that this type of source is more reliable with a longer lifetime due to better power efficiency. The current source development effort is to produce a reliable source with >60 mA of H{sup -} beam current, 15 Hz rep-rate, 100 {mu}s pulse width, and a duty factor of 0.15%. The source will be based on the BNL design along with development done at FNAL for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS).

  16. Ion source development for the proposed FNAL 750keV injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D.S.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Currently there is a Proposed FNAL 750keV Injector Upgrade for the replacement of the 40 year old Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) Cockcroft-Walton accelerators with a new ion source and 200MHz Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ). The slit type magnetron being used now will be replaced with a round aperture magnetron similar to the one used at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Operational experience from BNL has shown that this type of source is more reliable with a longer lifetime due to better power efficiency. The current source development effort is to produce a reliable source with >60mA of H- beam current, 15Hz rep-rate, 100s pulse width, and a duty factor of 0.15%. The source will be based on the BNL design along with development done at FNAL for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS).

  17. Neutral beam injector for 475 keV MARS sloshing ions

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, D.M.; Hamilton, G.W.

    1983-12-13

    A neutral beam injector system which produces 5 MW of 475 keV D/sup 0/ neutrals continuously on target has been designed. The beamline is intended to produce the sloshing ion distribution required in the end plug region of the conceptual MARS tandem mirror commercial reactor. The injector design utilizes the LBL self-extraction negative ion source and Transverse Field Focusing (TFF) accelerator to generate a long, ribbon ion beam. A laser photodetachment neutralizer strips over 90% of the negative ions. Magnetic and neutron shield designs are included to exclude the fringe fields of the end plug and provide low activation by the neutron flux from the target plasma. The use of a TFF accelerator and photodetachment neutralizer produces a total system electrical efficiency of about 63% for this design.

  18. Laser acceleration and deflection of 963 keV electrons with a silicon dielectric structure

    DOE PAGES

    Leedle, Kenneth J.; Pease, R. Fabian; Byer, Robert L.; Harris, James S.

    2015-02-12

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultrasmall and ultrafast science, but their size and cost have prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives such as the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a 5 nJ, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and suboptical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercialmore » lasers and subfemtosecond electron beam experiments.« less

  19. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS OF CASCADES OVERLAP IN TUNGSTEN WITH 20-KEV PRIMARY KNOCK-ON ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-04-16

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the mutual influence of two subsequent cascades in tungsten. The influence is studied using 20-keV primary knock-on atoms, to induce one cascade after another separated by 15 ps, in a lattice temperature of 1025 K (i.e. 0.25 of the melting temperature of the interatomic potential). The center of mass of the vacancies at the peak damage during the cascade is taken as the location of the cascade. The distance between this location to that of the next cascade is taken as the overlap parameter. Empirical fits describing the number of surviving vacancies and interstitial atoms as a function of overlap are presented.

  20. Spectroscopy in the 10 keV to 10 MeV range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Spectral lines in the 10 keV to 1 MeV range carry information of fundamental importance on many astronomical objects. Since the lines are directly related to specific physical processes this information is model independent and gives the physical conditions in the objects. At the sensitivities achieved to date, approximately 0.0001 to 0.001 phsq cm. sec for steady sources and approximately 0.01 to 1 ph/sq cm sec for transient sources, lines were detected from the galactic center, gamma-ray bursts and transients, X-ray pulsators, the Crab pulsar and solar flares. Future instruments with a factor of approximately 100 sensitivity improvement will allow detailed spectroscopic study of these classes of objects as well as supernova remnants, active galaxies and the interstellar medium. This sensitivity improvement can be obtained through the use of detector technology already proven in balloon and satellite instruments.

  1. A neutron source with an effective energy of 0-5 keV.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J R; Bending, R C

    1976-01-01

    Calculations indicate that an assembly consisting of an antimony-beryllium source at the centre of a 4 cm radius water sphere surrounded by a 1 mm thick shell of boron-10 will emit neutrons with a broad spectrum at intermediate energies. A device based on this design was constructed using a water-filled, boron-carbide loaded, plastic shell with an antimony-beryllium source located at the centre. The output spectrum was calculated by Monte Carlo program and the computed total yield agreed well with measurements made with a manganese bath system. The main peak has an effective energy of 0-5 keV and the total yield is 18% of the antimony-beryllium source strength. Experience with this source suggests some possible avenues for future development.

  2. Multigap RPC time resolution to 511 keV annihilation photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, G.; Gabusi, M.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Ratti, S. P.; Tamborini, A.; Vitulo, P.

    2015-05-01

    The time resolution of Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) to 511 keV gamma rays has been investigated using a 22Na source and four detectors. The MRPCs time resolution has been derived from the Time-of-Flight information, measured from pairs of space correlated triggered events. A GEANT4 simulation has been performed to analyze possible setup contributions and to support experimental results. A time resolution (FWHM) of 312 ps and 376 ps has been measured for a single MRPC with four 250 μm gas gaps by considering respectively one and two independent pairs of detectors. These values, endorsed by the GEANT4 simulation, represent a good result compared to those reported in the literature.

  3. Solution of controversy over 1583-keV levels in sup 204 Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, W.H.; Julin, R.; Kantele, J.; Kumpulainen, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Data from {sup 204}Pb({ital p},{ital p}{prime}){sup 204}Pb conversion-electron and gamma-ray experiments, together with previous results, prove the existence of two levels (0{sup +} and 2{sup +}) at 1583-keV excitation energy in {sup 204}Pb. Modified values (limits) of the {rho}{sub 21}{sup 2} and {ital X}{sub 211} are 0.0013{lt}{rho}{sub 21}{sup 2}{lt}0.015 and {ital X}{sub 211}{gt}0.073. New experimental evidence indicates that all the three observed excited {ital O}{sup +} states in {sup 204}Pb can be explained as belonging to the four-neutron-hole valence space and, therefore, there is no clear candidate for the proton 2p-2h intruder state in this nucleus.

  4. The study of the guiding process for 10 keV electrons by planar Plexiglass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanina, K. A.; Zhukova, P. N.; Kubankin, A. S.; Thu Hoai, Le; Nazhmudinov, R. M.; Oleinik, A. N.; Pokhil, G. P.

    2014-05-01

    Experimental study of electron beam reflection from a single planar surface of Plexiglas was made. The distinct guiding effect for the part of the beam was observed for 10 keV electrons within angles of incidence from 0 to +3 degrees. The experiments using Poly plates showed a number of features of the process such as the dependence of the reflection on the plate surface quality and material of the surfaces, the divisions of the beam into two parts with different behaviour depend on tilt angle and the beam current value, the effect of an elevation angle of the beam in compare with initial beam trace at negative and zero tilt angles of the plate.

  5. 200 keV electron mini-accelerators for scientific and applied purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarezov, I. V.

    2006-12-01

    Created in BINP, 200 keV electron mini-accelerators with different types of high voltage generators are described: cascade generator with serial capacitance connection generator with high voltage step-up transformer and voltage-doubling circuit of rectification generators on the base of pulse and Tesla step-up transformers. Described are their circuit and design performance peculiarities and fields of application.

  6. The XMM-Newton slew survey in the 2-10 keV band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.; Saxton, R. D.; Read, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The on-going XMM-Newton Slew Survey (XSS) provides coverage of a significant fraction of the sky in a broad X-ray bandpass. Although shallow by contemporary standards, in the "classical" 2-10 keV band of X-ray astronomy, the XSS provides significantly better sensitivity than any currently available all-sky survey. Aims: We investigate the source content of the XSS, focussing on detections in the hard 2-10 keV band down to a very low threshold (≥ 4 counts net of background). At the faint end, the survey reaches a flux sensitivity of roughly 3 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 (2-10 keV). Methods: Our starting point was a sample of 487 sources detected in the XSS (up to and including release XMMSL1d2) at high galactic latitude in the hard band. Through cross-correlation with published source catalogues from surveys spanning the electromagnetic spectrum from radio through to gamma-rays, we find that 45% of the sources have likely identifications with normal/active galaxies. A further 18% are associated with other classes of X-ray object (nearby coronally active stars, accreting binaries, clusters of galaxies), leaving 37% of the XSS sources with no current identification. We go on to define an XSS extragalactic sample comprised of 219 galaxies and active galaxies selected in the XSS hard band. We investigate the properties of this extragalactic sample including its X-ray log N - log S distribution. Results: We find that in the low-count limit, the XSS is, as expected, strongly affected by Eddington bias. There is also a very strong bias in the XSS against the detection of extended sources, most notably clusters of galaxies. A significant fraction of the detections at and around the low-count limit may be spurious. Nevertheless, it is possible to use the XSS to extract a reasonably robust sample of extragalactic sources, excluding galaxy clusters. The differential log N - log S relation of these extragalactic sources matches very well to the HEAO-1 A2 all-sky survey

  7. A search for the 478 keV line from the decay of nucleosynthetic Be-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael J.; Leising, Mark D.; Share, Gerald H.

    1991-01-01

    Unstable Be-7 (half-life 53.28 days) is expected to be present in the ejecta of classical novae. If the frequency of novae in the central Galaxy is high enough, a nearly steady state abundance of Be-7 will be present there. Data accumulated during transits of the Galactic center across the aperture of the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Spectrometer have been searched for evidence of the 478 keV gamma-ray line resulting from Be-7 decay. A 3-sigma upper limit of 0.00016 gamma/sq cm s has been placed on the emission in this line from the central radian of the Galactic plane. Less stringent limits have been set on the production of Be-7 in Nova Aquilae 1982, Nova Vulpeculae 1984 No. 2, and Nova Centauri 1986 from observations with the same instrument.

  8. Measurements of anomalous elastic scattering of 59.54-keV photons

    SciTech Connect

    Baraldi, C.; Casnati, E.; Tartari, A.; Andreis, M.; Singh, B.

    1996-12-01

    Coherent scattering cross sections of 59.54-keV photons on target foils of {sup 64}Gd, {sup 66}Dy, {sup 68}Er, {sup 70}Yb, {sup 72}Hf, and {sup 73}Ta at 60{degree}, 90{degree}, and 120{degree} have been measured to provide information on the region of {ital K} anomalous elastic scattering. The results are compared with the values calculated by the second perturbative order {ital S} matrix and by two procedures based on the form-factor approximation corrected by the anomalous scattering factors. Agreement of the {ital S} matrix values is very satisfactory, on the whole, and that of the values given by the form-factor approximations is fairly good. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Mechanisms of O2 Sputtering from Water Ice by keV Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Vidal, R. A.; Shi, J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    We have conducted experiments on the sputtering of water ice by 100 keV Ar(+) between 20 and 150 K. Our findings indicate that the temperature dependence of the total sputtering yield is heavily influenced by the thermal and irradiation history of the ice, showing a complex dependence on irradiation fluence that is correlated to the ejection of O2 molecules. The results suggest that O2 produced by the ions inside the ice diffuses to the surface where it is trapped and then ejected via sputtering or thermal desorption. A high concentration of O2 can trap in a subsurface layer during bombardment at 130 K, which we relate to the formation of hydrogen and its escape from that region. A simple model allows us to determine the depth profile of the absolute concentration of O2 trapped in the ice.

  10. Evolution of nanodot morphology on polycarbonate (PC) surfaces by 40 keV Ar+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Meetika; Chawla, Mahak; Gupta, Divya; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper we have discussed the effect of 40 keV Ar+ ions irradiation on nanoscale surface morphology of Polycarbonate (PC) substrate. Specimens were sputtered at off normal incidences of 30°, 40° and 50° with the fluence of 1 × 1016 Ar+cm-2. The topographical behaviour of specimens was studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) technique. AFM study demonstrates the evolution of nano dot morphology on PC specimens on irradiating with 1 × 1016 Ar+cm-2. Average size of dots varied from 37-95 nm in this specified range of incidence while density of dots varied from 0.17-3.0 × 107 dotscm-2. Such variations in morphological features have been supported by estimation of ion range and sputtering yield through SRIM simulations.

  11. Magnetospheric polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S. I.; Kan, J. R.

    Mount Denali (McKinley), the Alaska Range, and countless glaciers welcomed all 86 participants of the Chapman Conference on the Magnetospheric Polar Cap, which was held on the University of Alaska, Fairbanks campus (UAF), on August 6-9, 1984. The magnetospheric polar cap is the highest latitude region of the earth which is surrounded by the ring of auroras (the auroral oval). This particular region of the earth has become a focus of magnetospheric physicists during the last several years. This is because a number of upper atmospheric phenomena in the polar cap are found to be crucial in understanding the solar wind—magnetosphere interaction. The conference was opened by J. G. Roederer, who was followed by the UAF Chancellor, P. J. O'Rourke, who officially welcomed the participants.

  12. A lunar polar expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-01-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  13. Polarized electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Polarized electron sources for high energy accelerators took a significant step forward with the introduction of a new laser-driven photocathode source for the SLC in 1992. With an electron beam polarization of >80% and with {approximately}99% uptime during continuous operation, this source is a key factor in the success of the current SLC high-energy physics program. The SLC source performance is used to illustrate both the capabilities and the limitations of solid-state sources. The beam requirements for future colliders are similar to that of the SLC with the addition in most cases of multiple-bunch operation. A design for the next generation accelerator source that can improve the operational characteristics and at least minimize some of the inherent limitations of present sources is presented. Finally, the possibilities for producing highly polarized electron beams for high-duty-factor accelerators are discussed.

  14. South Polar Scarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-438, 31 July 2003

    The terrain of the south polar residual ice cap, made up mostly of frozen carbon dioxide, has come to be known by many as 'swiss cheese terrain,' because many areas of the cap resemble slices of swiss cheese. However, not all of the south polar cap looks like a tasty lunch food. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a series of curving scarps formed by erosion and sublimation of carbon dioxide from the south polar cap. This area is located near 86.3oS, 51.2oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left; the area is about 1.5 km (0.9 mi) wide.

  15. North Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a 1.4 m/pixel (5 ft/pixel) view of a typical martian north polar ice cap texture. The surface is pitted and rough at the scale of several meters. The north polar residual cap of Mars consists mainly of water ice, while the south polar residual cap is mostly carbon dioxide. This picture is located near 85.2oN, 283.2oW. The image covers an area approximately 1 km wide by 1.4 km high (0.62 by 0.87 miles). Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  16. North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of finely-detailed layers in the martian north polar region. The polar ice cap, which is made up of frozen water (whereas the south polar cap is mostly frozen carbon dioxide), is underlain by a thick sequence of layers. Some have speculated that these layers may record the history of changes in martian climate during the past few hundreds of millions of years. This picture is located near 86.0oN, 30.2oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  18. Preparation of radiotherapy glass by phosphorus ion implantation at 100 keV.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, M; Miyaji, F; Kokubo, T; Takaoka, G H; Yamada, I; Suzuki, Y; Kajiyama, K

    1997-01-01

    A chemically durable glass containing a large amount of phosphorus is useful for in situ irradiation of cancers. It can be activated to be a beta emitter (half-life of 14.3 days) by neutron bombardment. Microspheres of the activated glass injected into the tumors can irradiate the tumors directly with beta rays without irradiating neighboring normal tissues. In the present study a P+ ion was implanted into a pure silica glass in a plate form at 100 keV in order to find the fundamental conditions for obtaining such a glass. Little phosphorus was present in the surface region, at least to a depth of 2.4 nm for doses of 5 x 10(16) and 1 x 10(17) cm-2, whereas an appreciable amount of it was distributed on the glass surface and a part of it was oxidized for doses above 5 x 10(17) cm-2. The glasses implanted with doses of 5 x 10(16) and 1 x 10(17) cm-2 hardly released the P and Si into water at 95 degrees C, even after 7 days, whereas the glasses implanted with doses above 5 x 10(17) cm-2 released appreciable amounts of these elements. Implantation energies of 20 and 50 keV (even at doses of 5 x 10(16) and 1 x 10(17) cm-2, respectively), formed oxidized phosphorus on the glass surfaces and gave appreciable release of the P and Si into the hot water. This indicates that a chemically durable glass containing a larger amount of phosphorus could be obtained if a P+ ion is implanted at higher energies to localize in a deeper region of the glass surface.

  19. keV sterile neutrino dark matter from singlet scalar decays: basic concepts and subtle features

    SciTech Connect

    Merle, Alexander; Totzauer, Maximilian

    2015-06-08

    We perform a detailed and illustrative study of the production of keV sterile neutrino Dark Matter (DM) by decays of singlet scalars in the early Universe. In the current study we focus on providing a clear and general overview of this production mechanism. For the first time we study all regimes possible on the level of momentum distribution functions, which we obtain by solving a system of Boltzmann equations. These quantities contain the full information about the production process, which allows us to not only track the evolution of the DM generation but to also take into account all bounds related to the spectrum, such as constraints from structure formation or from avoiding too much dark radiation. In particular we show that this simple production mechanism can, depending on the regime, lead to strongly non-thermal DM spectra which may even feature more than one peak in the momentum distribution. These cases could have particularly interesting consequences for cosmological structure formation, as their analysis requires more refined tools than the simplistic estimate using the free-streaming horizon. Here we present the mechanism including all concepts and subtleties involved, for now using the assumption that the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom is constant during DM production, which is applicable in a significant fraction of the parameter space. This allows us to derive analytical results to back up our detailed numerical computations, thus leading to the most comprehensive picture of keV sterile neutrino DM production by singlet scalar decays that exists up to now.

  20. QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Yoon, Peter H.

    2012-07-01

    We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

  1. Low-energy electrons (5-50 keV) in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganushkina, N. Y.; Liemohn, M. W.; Amariutei, O. A.; Pitchford, D.

    2014-01-01

    Transport and acceleration of the 5-50 keV electrons from the plasma sheet to geostationary orbit were investigated. These electrons constitute the low-energy part of the seed population for the high-energy MeV particles in the radiation belts and are responsible for surface charging. We modeled one nonstorm event on 24-30 November 2011, when the presence of isolated substorms was seen in the AE index. We used the Inner Magnetosphere Particle Transport and Acceleration Model (IMPTAM) with the boundary at 10 RE with moment values for the electrons in the plasma sheet. The output of the IMPTAM modeling was compared to the observed electron fluxes in 10 energy channels (from 5 to 50 keV) measured on board the AMC 12 geostationary spacecraft by the Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II with electrostatic analyzer instrument. The behavior of the fluxes depends on the electron energy. The IMPTAM model, driven by the observed parameters such as Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) By and Bz, solar wind velocity, number density, dynamic pressure, and the Dst index, was not able to reproduce the observed peaks in the electron fluxes when no significant variations are present in those parameters. We launched several substorm-associated electromagnetic pulses at the substorm onsets during the modeled period. The observed increases in the fluxes can be captured by IMPTAM when substorm-associated electromagnetic fields are taken into account. Modifications of the pulse front velocity and arrival time are needed to exactly match the observed enhancements.

  2. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  3. Low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies (6 to 16 keV) at SSRL beamline 1-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipe, N. E.; Chatterji, S.; Fassò, A.; Kase, K. R.; Seefred, R.; Olko, P.; Bilski, P.; Soares, C.

    1997-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities provide a unique opportunity for low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies because of the availability of monochromatic x-ray beams. Results of such studies performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) are described. Polish lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), MTS-N(LiF:Mg, Ti- 0.4 mm thick), MCP-N (LiF:Mg, Cu, P - 0.4 mm thick) were exposed free in air to monochromatic x-rays (6-16 keV). These exposures were monitored with an SSRL ionization chamber. The responses (counts/Gy) of MTS-N and MCP-N were generally found to increase with increasing energy. The response at 16 keV is about 3 and 4 times higher than the response at 6 keV for MTS-N and MCP-N, respectively. Irradiation at 6 keV indicates a fairly linear dose response for both type of TLDs over a dose range of 0.01 to 0.4 Gy. In addition there appears to be no significant difference in responses between irradiating the TLDs from the front and the back sides. The energy response of the PTW ionization chamber type 23342 relative to the SSRL ionization chamber is within ±4.5% between 6 and 16 keV. Both the TLDs and the PTW ionization chamber can also be used for beam dosimetry.

  4. DISPLACEMENT CASCADE SIMULATION IN TUNGSTEN UP TO 200 KEV OF DAMAGE ENERGY AT 300, 1025, AND 2050 K

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-09-22

    We generated molecular dynamics database of primary defects that adequately covers the range of tungsten recoil energy imparted by 14-MeV neutrons. During this semi annual period, cascades at 150 and 200 keV at 300 and 1025 K were simulated. Overall, we included damage energy up to 200 keV at 300 and 1025 K, and up to 100 keV at 2050 K. We report the number of surviving Frenkel pairs (NF) and the size distribution of defect clusters. The slope of the NF curve versus cascade damage energy (EMD), on a log-log scale, changes at a transition energy (μ). For EMD > μ, the cascade forms interconnected damage regions that facilitate the formation of large clusters of defects. At 300 K and EMD = 200 keV, the largest size of interstitial cluster and vacancy cluster is 266 and 335, respectively. Similarly, at 1025 K and EMD = 200 keV, the largest size of interstitial cluster and vacancy cluster is 296 and 338, respectively. At 2050 K, large interstitial clusters also routinely form, but practically no large vacancy clusters do

  5. CONTRIBUTION OF UNRESOLVED POINT SOURCES TO THE DIFFUSE X-RAY BACKGROUND BELOW 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Galeazzi, M.

    2009-09-01

    We present here the analysis of X-ray point sources detected in several observations available in the XMM-Newton public archive. We focused, in particular, on energies below 1 keV, which are of particular relevance to the understanding of the diffuse X-ray background (DXB). The average field of all the exposures is 0.09 deg{sup -2}. We reached an average flux sensitivity of 5.8 x 10{sup -16}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -2} in the soft band (0.5-2.0 keV) and 2.5 x 10{sup -16}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -2} in the very soft band (0.4-0.6 keV). In this paper, we discuss the log N-log S results, the contribution to the integrated X-ray sky flux, and the properties of the cumulative spectrum from all sources. In particular, we found an excess flux at around 0.5 keV in the composite spectrum of faint sources. The excess seems to be a general property of all the fields observed suggesting an additional class of weak sources is contributing to the X-ray emission at these energies. Combining our results with previous investigations, we have also quantified the contribution of the individual components of the DXB in the 3/4 keV band.

  6. Femtosecond polarization pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Brixner, T; Gerber, G

    2001-04-15

    We report computer-controlled femtosecond polarization pulse shaping where intensity, momentary frequency, and light polarization are varied as functions of time. For the first time to our knowledge, a pulse shaper is used to modulate the degree of ellipticity as well as the orientation of the elliptical principal axes within a single laser pulse by use of a 256-pixel two-layer liquid-crystal display inside a zero-dispersion compressor. Interferometric stability of the setup is not required. Complete pulse characterization is achieved by dual-channel spectral interferometry. This technology has a large range of applications, especially in the field of quantum control.

  7. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  8. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  9. Linking ultracold polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Avdeenkov, A V; Bohn, John L

    2003-01-31

    We predict that pairs of polar molecules can be weakly bound together in an ultracold environment, provided that a dc electric field is present. The field that links the molecules together also strongly influences the basic properties of the resulting dimer, such as its binding energy and predissociation lifetime. Because of their long-range character, these dimers will be useful in disentangling cold collision dynamics of polar molecules. As an example, we estimate the microwave photoassociation yield for OH-OH cold collisions.

  10. Physics with Polarized Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Lenisa, Paolo

    2008-04-30

    Polarized antiprotons will provide access to a wealth of double- (and single-) spin observables, thereby opening a window to physics uniquely accessible with the HESR at FAIR. This include a first direct measurement of the transversity distribution of the valence quarks in the proton and a first measurement of the moduli and phase of the time-like electric and magnetic form factors G{sub E,M} of the proton. Additional applications of a polarized antiproton beam can be forseen in hadron spectroscopy, and nucleon-antinucleon scattering.

  11. South Polar Variety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    28 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of linear troughs and mesas formed in the frozen carbon dioxide of the martian south polar residual cap. This image, obtained in May 2005, is a reminder that not all of the south polar cap landscapes resemble 'swiss cheese.'

    Location near: 86.7oS, 24.8oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  12. Polar Ozone Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, a great deal of attention has been focused on the polar regions to both identify the chemistry and physics of the large losses, and to provide an understanding of the future of polar ozone. In this review talk, I will discuss the secular trends of ozone in both the Antarctic and Arctic regions, and I will review some of the principal research results of the last few years. In particular, I will emphasize some of the results from the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign that occurred over the course of the winter of 1999-2000.

  13. North Polar Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-334, 18 April 2003

    This composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle daily global images shows a north polar dust storm on March 7, 2003. Similar late summer storms occurred nearly every day from late February well into April 2003; these were also seen in late summer in 1999 and 2001. The white features at the top of the image are the water ice surfaces of the north polar residual cap. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  14. North Polar Layer Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 November 2004 Both the north and south polar ice caps overlie a thick accumulation of layered material. For more than three decades, these deposits have been assumed to consist of a mixture of dust and ice. This October 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the north polar layers exposed on a slope located near 79.1oN, 348.4oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  15. North Polar Scarp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    3 March 2004 The north polar cap of Mars overlies a series of layered materials. The upper-most layers are light-toned and may include ice and perhaps dust. The lower layers may be less icy and contain some amount of dark sand. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an exposure of north polar layers located near 83.9oN, 237.9oW. This view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  16. South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows landforms created by sublimation processes on the south polar residual cap of Mars. The bulk of the ice in the south polar residual cap is frozen carbon dioxide.

    Location near: 86.6oS, 342.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  17. Femtosecond polarization pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Brixner, T; Gerber, G

    2001-04-15

    We report computer-controlled femtosecond polarization pulse shaping where intensity, momentary frequency, and light polarization are varied as functions of time. For the first time to our knowledge, a pulse shaper is used to modulate the degree of ellipticity as well as the orientation of the elliptical principal axes within a single laser pulse by use of a 256-pixel two-layer liquid-crystal display inside a zero-dispersion compressor. Interferometric stability of the setup is not required. Complete pulse characterization is achieved by dual-channel spectral interferometry. This technology has a large range of applications, especially in the field of quantum control. PMID:18040384

  18. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  19. STUDYING THE POLARIZATION OF HARD X-RAY SOLAR FLARES WITH THE GAMMA RAY POLARIMETER EXPERIMENT (GRAPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertley, Camden

    2014-01-01

    The degree of linear polarization of hard X-rays (50-500 keV) can provide a better understanding of the particle acceleration mechanisms and the emission of radiation during solar flares. Difficulties in measuring the linear polarization has limited the ability of past experiments to place constraints on solar flare models. The Gamma RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a balloon-borne Compton polarimeter designed to measure polarization in the 50 - 500 keV energy range. This energy range minimizes the thermal contamination that can potentially affect measurements at lower energies. This research focuses on the analysis of data acquired during the first high altitude balloon flight of the GRAPE payload in 2011. During this 26 hour balloon flight two M-class flares were observed. The analysis effort includes the development of a Monte Carlo simulation of the full instrument payload with the GEANT4 toolkit. The simulations were used in understanding the background environment, creating a response matrix for the deconvolution of the energy loss spectra, and determining the modulation factor for a 100% linearly polarized source. We report on the results from the polarization analysis of the solar flare data. The polarization and spectral data can be used to further our understanding of particle acceleration in the context of current solar flare models.

  20. Degeneracy at 1871 keV in {sup 112}Cd and implications for neutrinoless double electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K. L.; Garrett, P. E.; Demand, G. A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Austin, R. A. E.; Colosimo, S.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D. S.; Hackman, G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Cross, D.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2009-09-15

    High-statistics {beta}-decay measurements of {sup 112}Ag and {sup 112}In were performed to study the structure of the {sup 112}Cd nucleus. The precise energies of the doublet of levels at 1871 keV, for which the 0{sup +} member has been suggested as a possible daughter state following neutrinoless double electron capture of {sup 112}Sn, were determined to be 1871.137(72) keV (0{sub 4}{sup +} level) and 1870.743(54) keV (4{sub 2}{sup +} level). The nature of the 0{sub 4}{sup +} level, required for the calculation of the nuclear matrix element that would be needed to extract a neutrino mass from neutrinoless double electron capture to this state, is suggested to be of intruder origin.

  1. Demonstration of a 13-keV Kr K-shell x-ray source at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Patterson, J. R.; Regan, S. P.

    2013-09-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (≈13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ≈10× greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1-mm-diameter, 4-mm-tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the National Ignition Facility laser beams deposited ≈700 kJ of 3ω light into the target in an ≈140 TW, 5.0-ns-duration square pulse. The Dante diagnostics measured ≈5 TW into 4π solid angle of ≥12 keV x rays for ≈4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr Heα line at 13 keV.

  2. Calibration of SIOM-5FW film in the range of 0.1-4 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Reverdin, C.; Ioannou, I.

    2006-06-01

    The SIOM-5FW film produced for the sub-keV x-ray detection range was calibrated here in a wide energy range (0.1-4keV). A single set of parameters valid in the whole measured energy range was determined for the calibration of the Shangai 5F (SIOM-5FW) film from a parametric fit of the data. The sensitivity of the SIOM-5FW film was measured to be four times lower than that of the Kodak DEF film at 2.5keV photon energy. Modeling of the DEF and SIOM-5FW films provides a good comparison of their sensitivity in the 0.1-10keV range.

  3. The diffuse X-ray spectrum from 14-200 keV as measured on OSO-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Suri, A. N.; Frost, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement of energy spectrum of the diffuse component of cosmic X-ray flux made on the OSO-5 spacecraft is described. The contributions to the total counting rate of the actively shielded X-ray detector are considered in some detail and the techniques used to eliminate the non-cosmic components are described. Positive values for the cosmic flux are obtained in seven energy channels between 14 and 200 keV and two upper limits are obtained between 200 and 254 keV. The results can be fitted by a power law spectrum. A critical comparison is made with the OSO-3 results. Conclusions show that the reported break in the energy spectrum at 40 keV is probably produced by an erroneous correction for the radioactivity induced in the detector on each passage through the intense charged particle fluxes in the South Atlantic anomaly.

  4. Demonstration of a 13-keV Kr K-shell x-ray source at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Fournier, K B; May, M J; Colvin, J D; Barrios, M A; Patterson, J R; Regan, S P

    2013-09-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (≈13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ≈10× greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1-mm-diameter, 4-mm-tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the National Ignition Facility laser beams deposited ≈700 kJ of 3ω light into the target in an ≈140 TW, 5.0-ns-duration square pulse. The Dante diagnostics measured ≈5 TW into 4π solid angle of ≥12 keV x rays for ≈4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr He_{α} line at 13 keV.

  5. Optical neutron polarizers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A neutron wave will be refracted by an appropriately varying potential. Optical neutron polarizers use spatially varying, spin- dependent potentials to refract neutrons of opposite spin states into different directions, so that an unpolarized beam will be split into two beams of complementary polarization by such a device. This paper will concentrate on two methods of producing spin-dependent potentials which are particularly well-suited to polarizing cold neutron beams, namely thin-film structures and field-gradient techniques. Thin-film optical devices, such as supermirror multilayer structures, are usually designed to deviate only one spin-state, so that they offer the possibility of making insertion (transmission) polarizers. Very good supermirrors may now be designed and fabricated, but it is not always straightforward to design mirror-based devices which are useful in real (divergent beam) applications, and some practical configurations will be discussed. Field-gradient devices, which are usually based on multipolar magnets, have tended to be too expensive for general use, but this may change with new developments in superconductivity. Dipolar and hexapolar configurations will be considered, with emphasis on the focusing characteristics of the latter. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  7. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A.

    1999-01-01

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  8. Optical polarizer material

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  9. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  10. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  11. North Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    North polar ice cap of Mars, as seen during mid summer in the northern hemisphere. The reddish areas consist of eolian dust, bright white areas consist of a mixture of water ice and dust, and the dark blue areas consist of sand dunes forming a huge 'collar' around the polar ice cap. (The colors have been enhanced with a decorrelation stretch to better show the color variability.) Shown here is an oblique view of the polar region, as seen with the Viking 1 spacecraft orbiting Mars over latitude 39 degrees north. The spiral bands consist of valleys which form by a combination of the Coriolis forces, wind erosion, and differential sublimation and condensation. In high-resolution images the polar caps are seen to consist of thick sequences of layered deposits, suggesting that cyclical climate changes have occurred on Mars. Cyclical climate changes are readily explained by quasi-periodic changes in the amount and distribution of solar heating resulting from perturbations in orbital and axial elements. Variations in the Earth's orbit have also been linked to the terrestrial climate changes during the ice ages.

  12. Titan's Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Schinder, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini CIRS and Radio-Occultation measurements obtained in 2004-2015 have tracked the evolution of temperatures and winds in Titan's polar atmosphere, as the winter season shifted from the northern hemisphere to the southern. The dissolution of the strong circumpolar vortex initially seen in the northern hemisphere has been gradual. There is no evidence of the rapid distortion and disruption forced by planetary waves that can occur on Earth. Indeed, neither Cassini experiment has identified any thermal signature attributable to planetary-scale waves. The south-polar region has turned wintry fairly abruptly: temperature and zonal wind maps from CIRS data show that the 1-mbar temperatures at high southern latitudes in late autumn are already much colder than those at the corresponding latitudes in the north in midwinter, when the first extensive polar measurements were obtained. The south-polar region now has a strong circumpolar vortex, with maximum stratospheric winds occurring near 60° S, in contrast to the northern hemisphere in winter, where the polar vortex was much broader, extending to 20°-30° N. Potential vorticity maps now indicate steep meridional gradients at high southern latitudes, implying a barrier to efficient mixing between the polar region and lower latitudes. Radio-occultations have higher vertical resolution than CIRS, and they have recently probed latitudes as high as 65° in both hemispheres (latitudes closer to the pole are precluded because of the geometry of Earth occultations and the season). Above 80 km at these latitudes, where the radiative damping times are small enough that temperatures have large seasonal variations, the stratosphere in the north has warmed, and it has become much colder in the south. The abrupt transition region with negative vertical temperature gradient between 80 and 100 km, which was seen at high northern latitudes in winter, has weakened, but it is still visible. In the south, one can see the early stage of

  13. Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations of the North Polar Spur: Charge exchange or ISM absorption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-10-01

    By revisiting the Suzaku and XMM-Newton data of the North Polar Spur, we discovered that the spectra are inconsistent with the traditional model consisting of pure thermal emission and neutral absorption. The most prominent discrepancies are the enhanced O vii and Ne ix forbidden-to-resonance ratios, and a high O viii Lyβ line relative to other Lyman series. A collisionally ionized absorption model can naturally explain both features, while a charge exchange component can only account for the former. By including the additional ionized absorption, the plasma in the North Polar Spur can be described by a single-phase collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) component with a temperature of 0.25 keV, and nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and iron abundances of 0.4-0.8 solar. The abundance pattern of the North Polar Spur is well in line with those of the Galactic halo stars. The high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio reported in previous studies can be migrated to the large transmission of the O viii Lyα line. The ionized absorber is characterized by a balance temperature of 0.17-0.20 keV and a column density of 3-5 × 1019 cm-2. Based on the derived abundances and absorption, we speculate that the North Polar Spur is a structure in the Galactic halo, so that the emission is mostly absorbed by the Galactic interstellar medium in the line of sight.

  14. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  15. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  16. Search for 511 keV emission in satellite galaxies of the Milky Way with INTEGRAL/SPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Thomas; Diehl, Roland; Vincent, Aaron C.; Guglielmetti, Fabrizia; Krause, Martin G. H.; Boehm, Celine

    2016-10-01

    Context. The positron (e+) annihilation γ-ray signal in the Milky Way (MW) shows a puzzling morphology: a very bright bulge and a very low surface-brightness disk. A coherent explanation of the e+ origin, propagation through the Galaxy and subsequent annihilation in the interstellar medium has not yet been found. Tentative explanations involve e+s from radioactivity, X-ray binaries, and dark matter (DM). Aims: Dwarf satellite galaxies (DSGs) are believed to be dominated by DM and hence are promising candidates in the search for 511 keV emission as a result of DM annihilation into e+e--pairs. The goal of this study is to constrain possible 511 keV γ-ray signals from 39 DSGs of the MW and to test the annihilating DM scenario. Methods: We used the spectrometer SPI on INTEGRAL to extract individual spectra for the studied objects in the range 490-530 keV. As the diffuse galactic 511 keV emission dominates the overall signal, we modelled the large-scale morphology of the MW accordingly and included this in a maximum likelihood analysis. Alternatively, a distance-weighted stacked spectrum was determined, representing an average DSG seen in 511 keV. Results: Only Reticulum II (Ret II) shows a 3.1σ signal. Five other sources show tentative 2σ signals. The ratio of mass to 511 keV luminosity, Υ511, shows a marginal trend towards higher values for intrinsically brighter objects in contrast to the mass-to-light ratio, ΥV in the V band, which is generally used to uncover DM in DSGs. Conclusions: All derived 511 keV flux values or upper limits are above the flux level implied by a DM interpretation of the MW bulge signal. The signal detected from Ret II is unlikely to be related to a DM origin alone, otherwise, the MW bulge would be ~100 times brighter in 511 keV than what is seen with SPI. Ret II is exceptional considering the DSG sample and rather points to enhanced recent star formation activity if its origins are similar to processes in the MW. Understanding this

  17. Relative dissociation fractions of CF4 under 15–30 keV H‑, C‑ and O‑ negative ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dedong; Fan, Yikui; Zhao, Zilong; Min, Guangxin; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-08-01

    The relative dissociation fractions to produce the fragments of CF4 molecule are studied under the impact of 15 keV to 30 keV H‑, C‑ and O‑ negative ions. By using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the recoil ions and ion pairs originating from the target molecule CF4 are detected and identified in coincidence with scattered ions in q = 0 and q = +1 charge states. The fractions for the production of the fragment ions are obtained relative to the {\\text{CF} }3+ yield, while that of the ion pairs relative to the (C+, F+) coincidence yield.

  18. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  19. Enhanced polarization by the coherent heterophase interface between polar and non-polar phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi-Yeop; Sung, Kil-Dong; Rhyim, Youngmok; Yoon, Seog-Young; Kim, Min-Soo; Jeong, Soon-Jong; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Ryu, Jungho; Kim, Sung-Dae; Choi, Si-Young

    2016-03-01

    A piezoelectric composite containing the ferroelectric polar (Bi(Na0.8K0.2)0.5TiO3: f-BNKT) and the non-polar (0.94Bi(Na0.75K0.25)0.5TiO3-0.06BiAlO3: BNKT-BA) phases exhibits synergetic properties which combine the beneficial aspects of each phase, i.e., the high saturated polarization (Ps) of the polar phase and the low coercive field (Ec) of the non-polar phase. To understand the origin of such a fruitful outcome from this type of polar/non-polar heterophase structure, comprehensive studies are conducted, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and finite element method (FEM) analyses. The TEM results show that the polar/non-polar composite has a core/shell structure in which the polar phase (core) is surrounded by a non-polar phase (shell). In situ electrical biasing TEM experiments visualize that the ferroelectric domains in the polar core are aligned even under an electric field of ~1 kV mm-1, which is much lower than its intrinsic coercive field (~3 kV mm-1). From the FEM analyses, we can find that the enhanced polarization of the polar phase is promoted by an additional internal field at the phase boundary which originates from the preferential polarization of the relaxor-like non-polar phase. From the present study, we conclude that the coherent interface between polar and non-polar phases is a key factor for understanding the enhanced piezoelectric properties of the composite.A piezoelectric composite containing the ferroelectric polar (Bi(Na0.8K0.2)0.5TiO3: f-BNKT) and the non-polar (0.94Bi(Na0.75K0.25)0.5TiO3-0.06BiAlO3: BNKT-BA) phases exhibits synergetic properties which combine the beneficial aspects of each phase, i.e., the high saturated polarization (Ps) of the polar phase and the low coercive field (Ec) of the non-polar phase. To understand the origin of such a fruitful outcome from this type of polar/non-polar heterophase structure, comprehensive studies are conducted, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and finite element

  20. Global Geospace Science/Polar Plasma Laboratory: POLAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science (GGS) Project is discussed as part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. The objectives of Polar Plasma Laboratory (POLAR), one of the two spacecraft to be used by the Project to fill critical gaps in the scientific understanding of solar and plasma physics, are outlined. POLAR Laboratory is described, along with POLAR instrumentation, support subsystems, and orbits. Launch vehicle and injection into orbit are also addressed.

  1. General relativistic x ray (UV) polarization rotations as a quantitative test for black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Richard F.

    1989-01-01

    It is now 11 years since a potentially easily observable and quantitative test for black holes using general relativistic polarization rotations was proposed (Stark and Connors 1977, and Connors and Stark 1977). General relativistic rotations of the x ray polarization plane of 10 to 100 degrees with x ray energy (between 1 and 100 keV) are predicted for black hole x ray binaries. (Classically, by symmetry, there is no rotation.) Unfortunately, x ray polarimetry has not been taken sufficiently seriously during this period, and this test has not yet been performed. A similar (though probably less clean) effect is expected in the UV for supermassive black holes in some quasars active galactic nuclei. Summarizing: (1) a quantitative test (proposed in 1977) for black holes exists; (2) x ray polarimetry of galactic x ray binaries sensitive to at least 1/2 percent between 1 keV and 100 keV is needed (polarimetry in the UV of quasars and AGN will also be of interest); and (3) proportional counters using timerise discrimination were shown in laboratory experiments able to perform x ray polarimetry and this and other methods need to be developed.

  2. Effects of combined irradiation of 500 keV protons and atomic oxygen on polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Zhilyakov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chirskaia, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Polyimide films are widely used on the spacecraft surface as thermal control coating, films in different constuctions, etc. However, the space ionizing radiation of different types can alter the mechanical, optical and electrical properties of polyimide films. For example, it is well known that 20-100 keV proton irradiation causes breaking of chemical bonds and destruction of the surface layer in polyimide, deterioration of its optical properties, etc. In low-Earth orbits serious danger for polymeric materials is atomic oxygen of the upper atmosphere of the Earth, which is the main component in the range of heights of 200-800 km. Due to the orbital spacecraft velocity, the collision energy of oxygen atoms with the surface ( 5 eV) enhances their reactivity and opens additional pathways of their reaction with near-surface layers of materials. Hyperthermal oxygen atom flow causes erosion of the polyimide surface by breaking chemical bonds and forming of volatiles products (primarily, CO and CO _{2}), which leads to mass losses and degradation of material properties. Combined effect of protons and oxygen plasma is expected to give rise to synergistic effects enhancing the destruction of polyimide surface layers. This paper describes experimental investigation of polyimide films sequential irradiation with protons and oxygen plasma. The samples were irradiated by 500 keV protons at fluences of 10 ^{14}-10 ^{16} cm ^{-2} produced with SINP cascade generator KG-500 and 5-20 eV neutral oxygen atoms at fluence of 10 ^{20} cm ^{-2} generated by SINP magnetoplasmodynamics accelerator. The proton bombardment causes the decrease in optical transmission coefficient of samples, but their transmittance recovers partially after the exposure to oxygen plasma. The results of the comparative analysis of polyimide optical transmission spectra, Raman and XPS spectra obtained at different stages of the irradiation of samples, data on mass loss of samples due to erosion of the surface are

  3. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  4. Analytical polarization calculations beyond SLIM

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.P. , Notkestrasse, 85, 2000 Hamburg 52, Federal Republic of Germany )

    1989-05-05

    A comparison is made between the theories of Bell and Leinaas and of Derbenev and Kondratenko for the spin polarization in electron storage rings. A calculation of polarization in HERA using the program SMILE of Mane is presented.

  5. Polarity of the Amphibian Egg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    Amphibian egg polarity and the mechanism which generates the polarity is addressed. Of particular concern is the question of whether the activation rotation which responds to gravity is a prerequisite for normal development.

  6. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  7. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  8. Polar basal melting on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Stephen M.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal requirements and implications of polar basal melting on Mars are discussed in detail. The composition, geology, origin, and evolution of the Martian polar terrains are summarized. Thermal calculations and flow calculations of the basal melt are discussed. The significance of the basal melting for the origin of major polar reentrants, the storage of an ancient Martian ice sheet, the mass balance of the polar terrain, and basal melting at temperate latitudes is examined.

  9. Polarization of a Helium-Neon Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Edwin R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves measuring the intensity of laser light passed by a linear polarizer. Discusses polarization effects, orthogonal polarizations, instrumentation, and further experiments. (JRH)

  10. Polarization perception device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsel L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.

  11. Common Magnets, Unexpected Polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mark

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, I discuss a "misconception" in magnetism so simple and pervasive as to be typically unnoticed. That magnets have poles might be considered one of the more straightforward notions in introductory physics. However, the magnets common to students' experiences are likely different from those presented in educational contexts. This leads students, in my experience, to frequently and erroneously attribute magnetic poles based on geometric associations rather than actual observed behavior. This polarity discrepancy can provide teachers the opportunity to engage students in authentic inquiry about objects in their daily experiences. I've found that investigation of the magnetic polarities of common magnets provides a productive context for students in which to develop valuable and authentic scientific inquiry practices.

  12. Polar Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Hoffman, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At this writing we have received all the CDROMs for the grant period. We have completed generating our timing tables past September 20, 2001. The calibration of the instrument has been checked for the entire mission up to the end of December 2000 and the key parameters provided to the project until the end of December 2000. These data are available to other experimenters over the web at http://www-ssc.igpp.ucla.edu/forms/polar/. High resolution spun data, 8 samples per see, have been created up to November, 2000 and have been made available to the community over the world wide web. This is a new data set that was a major effort this year. Our near term plans are to continue to provide key parameter data to the Polar project with the highest possible speed and to continue to reduce all high resolution magnetometer data and provide these data to the scientific community over the web.

  13. Circularly polarized microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Y. T.; Engst, B.; Lee, R. Q. H.

    1985-01-01

    A simple microstrip antenna can be made to radiate EM waves of any polarization, in particular, the circular polarization (CP) without any phasing network and power divider. A simple and accurate theory for this family of antennas was developed. However, the CP bandwidth, (CPBW) the bandwidth in which the axial ratio (AR) is less than a certain specified value, is very small. Most of the experimental designs were made for a feed placed along the diagonal of the patch. It is shown that there are practically infinitely many possible designs with different feed location. The speculation that other designs might give a wider bandwidth is clarified and an effective method for broadening the bandwidth is shown.

  14. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, Ettore

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission and its use to investigate magnetic fields will be reviewed along with our current understanding of the galactic magnetic field and the data sets available. We will then focus on the future perspective discussing RM-synthesis - the new powerful instrument devised to unlock the information encoded in such an emission - and the surveys currently in progress like S-PASS and GMIMS.

  15. The polar bear phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Maw, P.K. ); Lane, M.T.

    1990-02-01

    Results from measuring the thermal profile of polar bear pelts, reflectiveness of the pelts, and total thermal conversion data lead to the conclusion that the pelts from an ultra-efficient thermal diode for solar-thermal conversion. The transfer of the thermal energy from the surface of the fur to the skin where it is absorbed cannot be thermal, and therefore must be radiative. This process must have an efficiency of better than 90:0090 percent to account for measured values. The radiative transfer process is not known at present. To understand it, a detailed knowledge of the microscopic parameters of the pelts must be obtained. This is the current thrust of the polar solar research. If the process can be understood and synthesized,it will provide a major breakthrough in the area of solar-thermal energy conversion.

  16. North Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 December 2004 For 25 December, the MOC team thought that a visit to a north polar site would be timely. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows, at about 1.5 meters per pixel (5 feet per pixel) resolution, a view of the north polar ice cap of Mars. That the material includes water ice has been known since the mid-1970s, when Viking orbiter observations confirmed that the cap gives off water vapor in the summertime, as the ice is subliming away. The surface shown here, observed by MOC during northern summer in November 2004, is pitted and somewhat grooved. Dark material on pit floors might be trapped, windblown dust. The picture covers an area about 1 km (0.62 mi) across, and is located near 86.8oN, 293.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    13 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope on which layered materials are exposed by erosion in the north polar region of Mars. Wind streaks are also evident in this summertime scene. The layers that make up the material beneath the ice of the north polar residual cap are typically considered to be a mixture of some amount of dust and ice, but the proportions of these constituents are not known.

    Location near: 82.6oN, 298.1oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  18. Summer South Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    13 April 2004 The martian south polar residual ice cap is composed mainly of frozen carbon dioxide. Each summer, a little bit of this carbon dioxide sublimes away. Pits grow larger, and mesas get smaller, as this process continues from year to year. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of a small portion of the south polar cap as it appeared in mid-summer in January 2004. The dark areas may be places where the frozen carbon dioxide contains impurities, such as dust, or places where sublimation of ice has roughened the surface so that it appears darker because of small shadows cast by irregularities in the roughened surface. The image is located near 86.9oS, 7.6oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  19. Polarization Perception Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S. (Inventor); Coulson, Kinsell L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A polarization perception device comprises a base and a polarizing filter having opposite broad sides and a centerline perpendicular thereto. The filter is mounted on the base for relative rotation and with a major portion of the area of the filter substantially unobstructed on either side. A motor on the base automatically moves the filter angularly about its centerline at a speed slow enough to permit changes in light transmission by virtue of such movement to be perceived as light-dark pulses by a human observer, but fast enough so that the light phase of each such pulse occurs prior to fading of the light phase image of the preceding pulse from the observer's retina. In addition to an observer viewing a scene in real time through the filter while it is so angularly moved, or instead of such observation, the scene can be photographed, filmed or taped by a camera whose lens is positioned behind the filter.

  20. North Polar Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows banded terrain of the north polar region of Mars. The bands are exposures of layered material, possibly composed of dust and ice. The dark, rounded to elliptical mounds in this image might be the locations of ancient sand dunes that were completely buried in the north polar layered material. In more recent times, these mounds have been exhumed from within the layered material. Alternatively, the dark features are not ancient, exhumed dunes, but perhaps the remnants of a dark layer of material that once covered the entire area shown in the image. These features are located near 79.9oN, 31.4oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Undulator Production of Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Bugg

    2008-08-27

    E-166 at SLAC has demonstrated the feasibilty of production of polarized positrons for the International Linear Collider using a helical undulator to produce polarized photons which are converted in a thin target to polarized positrons. The success of the experim ent has resulted in the choice of this technique for the baseline design of ILC.

  2. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  3. Animated Displays IV: Linear Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes several demonstrations that can be easily reproduced to help students understand optical polarization. Displays and supplement text include polarization by reflection; polarization by scattering; liquid crystals; optical activity; calcite; birefringent plastics; retardation plates; photoelasticity; and the "Optical Barber Pole." Contains…

  4. Polarization induced doped transistor

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  5. North Polar Layers, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This view shows the basal layers of Mars' north polar layered deposits. The floor of Chasma Boreale is at the bottom of the image. This is a sub-image of a larger view imaged by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Oct. 1, 2006. The resolution is 64 centimeters (25 inches) per pixel, and the scene is 568 meters (621 yards) wide.

  6. South Polar Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 July 2004 This full-resolution (1.5 meters, 5 feet, per pixel) Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows mesa tops and depressions formed in layered carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap. The image is located near 87.0oS, 341.9oW, and covers an area about 1.5 km (0.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  7. North Polar Sand Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-417, 10 July 2003

    The martian north polar ice cap is surrounded by fields of dark, windblown sand dunes. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dunes near 76.5oN, 264.7oW. The steep dune slip faces indicate wind transport of sand from the lower left toward the upper right. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  8. Martian polar geological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple arcs of rugged mountains and adjacent plains on the surface of Mars were examined. These features, located in the southern polar region were photographed by Mariner 9. Comparisons are made with characteristics of a lunar basin and mare; Mare imbrium in particular. The martian feature is interpreted to have originated in the same way as its lunar analog- by volcanic flooding of a large impact basin. Key data and methodology leading to this conclusion are cited.

  9. Nonabelian dark matter models for 3.5 keV X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, James M.; Frey, Andrew R. E-mail: a.frey@uwinnipeg.ca

    2014-10-01

    A recent analysis of XXM-Newton data reveals the possible presence of an X-ray line at approximately 3.55 keV, which is not readily explained by known atomic transitions. Numerous models of eV-scale decaying dark matter have been proposed to explain this signal. Here we explore models of multicomponent nonabelian dark matter with typical mass ∼ 1-10 GeV (higher values being allowed in some models) and eV-scale splittings that arise naturally from the breaking of the nonabelian gauge symmetry. Kinetic mixing between the photon and the hidden sector gauge bosons can occur through a dimension-5 or 6 operator. Radiative decays of the excited states proceed through transition magnetic moments that appear at one loop. The decaying excited states can either be primordial or else produced by upscattering of the lighter dark matter states. These models are significantly constrained by direct dark matter searches or cosmic microwave background distortions, and are potentially testable in fixed target experiments that search for hidden photons. We note that the upscattering mechanism could be distinguished from decays in future observations if sources with different dark matter velocity dispersions seem to require different values of the scattering cross section to match the observed line strengths.

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Amino Acid Damage upon keV Ion Beam Irradiation Through FTIR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qing; Ke, Zhigang; Su, Xi; Yuan, Hang; Zhang, Shuqing; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-06-01

    Ion beam irradiation induces important biological effects and it is a long-standing task to acquire both qualitative and quantitative assessment of these effects. One effective way in the investigation is to utilize Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy because it can offer sensitive and non-invasive measurements. In this paper a novel protocol was employed to prepare biomolecular samples in the form of thin and transversely uniform solid films that were suitable for both infrared and low-energy ion beam irradiation experiments. Under the irradiation of N+ and Ar+ ion beams of 25 keV with fluence ranging from 5×1015 ions/cm2 to 2.5×10 ions/cm2, the ion radio-sensitivity of four amino acids, namely, glycine, tyrosine, methionine and phenylalanine, were evaluated and compared. The ion beam irradiation caused biomolecular decomposition accompanied by molecular desorption of volatile species and the damage was dependent on ion type, fluence, energy and types of amino acids. The effectiveness of application of FTIR spectroscopy to the quantitative assessment of biomolecular damage dose effect induced by low-energy ion radiation was thus demonstrated.

  11. Monte Carlo calculations of energy deposition distributions of electrons below 20 keV in protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhenyu; Liu, Wei

    2014-05-01

    The distributions of energy depositions of electrons in semi-infinite bulk protein and the radial dose distributions of point-isotropic mono-energetic electron sources [i.e., the so-called dose point kernel (DPK)] in protein have been systematically calculated in the energy range below 20 keV, based on Monte Carlo methods. The ranges of electrons have been evaluated by extrapolating two calculated distributions, respectively, and the evaluated ranges of electrons are compared with the electron mean path length in protein which has been calculated by using electron inelastic cross sections described in this work in the continuous-slowing-down approximation. It has been found that for a given energy, the electron mean path length is smaller than the electron range evaluated from DPK, but it is large compared to the electron range obtained from the energy deposition distributions of electrons in semi-infinite bulk protein. The energy dependences of the extrapolated electron ranges based on the two investigated distributions are given, respectively, in a power-law form. In addition, the DPK in protein has also been compared with that in liquid water. An evident difference between the two DPKs is observed. The calculations presented in this work may be useful in studies of radiation effects on proteins.

  12. Teflon impregnated anatase TiO2 nanoparticles irradiated by 80 keV Xe+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanam, Rizwin; Paul, Nibedita; Kumar, P.; Kanjilal, D.; Ahmed, Gazi A.; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2014-10-01

    We report the effect of 80 keV Xe+ ion irradiation on the morphological and optical responses of TiO2 nanoparticles spread over commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon). These nanoparticles were synthesized via a convenient, sol-gel approach with titanium isopropoxide as the main precursor. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies we found that, the nanoparticles crystallize in anatase phase and with a preferential orientation of crystallites along (1 0 1) plane. Upon irradiation at a fluence of 1.25 × 1017 ions/cm2, the nanoparticle dimension was found to increase from a value of ∼9 nm to ∼20-30 nm. Essentially, particle growth is predicted as a consequence of swelling behavior accompanied by the formation of Xe van der Waal crystals in isolated regions of nano-titania. Evidence of nanoripples was also witnessed on the surface of the irradiated nano-titania. The morphological evolution was assessed both by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies (AFM and TEM) independently. From the UV-Vis optical absorption studies, the estimated optical band gap was found to drop with increasing fluence, while refractive index exhibited a remarkable improvement. Photoluminescence (PL) studies have revealed that, the band edge emission and those due to the self trapped excitons (STE) and other oxygen vacancy related ones were manifested considerably as a result of Xe ion irradiation.

  13. High-accuracy x-ray line standards in the 3-keV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesser, S.; Boucard, S.; Covita, D. S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Hennebach, M.; Hirtl, A.; Indelicato, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Simons, L. M.; Stingelin, L.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Wasser, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2013-08-01

    A set of 14 high-accuracy x-ray transition energies in the 2.4-3.1 keV range is presented, which can be used as x-ray standards. They were measured in two- to four-electron sulfur, chlorine, and argon ions produced in an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source, using a single spherically bent crystal spectrometer. The results include the first measurement of six transitions and improve the accuracy of six other experimental values. These measurements considerably extend the set of high-accuracy x-ray energies reported for highly charged ions. Their relative uncertainties range from 1 to 10 ppm. Theory only reaches such a precision in one- and two-electron ions. Our results thus have two distinct applications. On the one hand, they test predictions in two-electron ions [Artemyev, Shabaev, Yerokhin, Plunien, and Soff, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.71.062104 71, 062104 (2005)], at the precision level of some two-photon QED contributions. We observe an agreement with theory for most of the transitions. On the other hand, the three- and four-electron ion transitions provide new benchmark energies for the calculation of missing theoretical contributions, such as Auger shifts or electronic correlations. Spectra were analyzed with an x-ray tracing simulation that contains all the relevant physics of the spectrometer.

  14. ON THE SPECTRAL HARDENING AT {approx}>300 keV IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Kong, X.; Zank, G.; Chen, Y.

    2013-05-20

    It has long been noted that the spectra of observed continuum emissions in many solar flares are consistent with double power laws with a hardening at energies {approx}>300 keV. It is now widely believed that at least in electron-dominated events, the hardening in the photon spectrum reflects an intrinsic hardening in the source electron spectrum. In this paper, we point out that a power-law spectrum of electrons with a hardening at high energies can be explained by the diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at a termination shock with a finite width. Our suggestion is based on an early analytical work by Drury et al., where the steady-state transport equation at a shock with a tanh profile was solved for a p-independent diffusion coefficient. Numerical simulations with a p-dependent diffusion coefficient show hardenings in the accelerated electron spectrum that are comparable with observations. One necessary condition for our proposed scenario to work is that high-energy electrons resonate with the inertial range of the MHD turbulence and low-energy electrons resonate with the dissipation range of the MHD turbulence at the acceleration site, and the spectrum of the dissipation range {approx}k {sup -2.7}. A {approx}k {sup -2.7} dissipation range spectrum is consistent with recent solar wind observations.

  15. Dynamics of charge evolution in glass capillaries for 230-keV Xe23+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimi, A.; Ikeda, T.; Maunoury, L.; Zhou, C. L.; Guillous, S.; Mery, A.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Khemliche, H.; Roncin, P.; Merabet, H.; Tanis, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    We have measured the transmission of 230-keV (10-keV/q) Xe23+ ions through insulating tapered glass capillaries of microscopic dimensions. The dynamics of charging and discharging processes have been investigated, evidencing an unexpected slow alignment of the beam along the capillary axis. Oscillations of the exiting beam position have been observed during the charging process associated to the formation of charge patches on the capillary inner walls. The emerging ions are guided with a characteristic guiding angle falling on a universal curve proposed for PET polymer nanocapillaries. This result, very similar to the channeling process, is somewhat surprising in view of the significant differences between the straight nanocapillary polymer foils and the tapered microscopic single glass capillary used here. The transmitted ions show no evidence of energy loss or charge changing except for the production of a small neutral fraction that was determined to be due to ions that had become neutralized to form atoms rather than due to photon emission. These results thus test and confirm the validity of transmission and guiding and provide insight into the dynamics of higher-energy ions than have been previously studied in this regard, allowing a determination of the maximum energy for which the guiding process might occur.

  16. Friction and wear measurements of 50 keV N implanted stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeyama, Masami; Miyagawa, Soji; Clissold, Ronald A.; Wielunski, Leszek S.; Swain, Michael V.

    1997-05-01

    Features of friction, wear and hardness of 50 keV nitrogen implanted 13Cr type, C and V rich stainless steel was studied. The implantation was carried out at room temperature (300 K) or about 800 K to the doses of 1 × 10 18 and 5 × 10 17 ions/cm 2. Friction coefficient was measured using steel or silicon nitride balls with the loads of 98 to 980 mN. Friction coefficient depended on upper contact ball materials and loads, and changed from an initial value of 0.1 to final values between 0.2 and 0.8. After implantation, the surface became softer due to amorphization, however, it became relatively harder around the projected range of implanted N. 800 K implantation reduced the amorphization and enhanced diffusion of nitrogen. For the silicon nitride ball, implanted surfaces showed a lower friction coefficient than unimplanted region, particularly for 800 K implantation. When the friction coefficient increased, a considerable amount of adhered debris was observed on stainless steel surfaces.

  17. Relief evolution of HOPG under high-fluence 30 keV argon ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, N. N.; Borisov, A. M.; Mashkova, E. S.; Shemukhin, A. A.; Shulga, V. I.; Virgiliev, Yu. S.

    2015-07-01

    The results of the experimental study of sputtering and erosion of the basal plane of HOPG under irradiation with 30-keV Ar+ in the range from RT to 400 °C are presented. It has been found that developed at elevated (⩾250 °C) temperatures needle-like microscopic relief results in twofold sputtering yield increase (Y ≈ 2) in comparison with sputtering of a surface with an etch pits microscopic relief at the temperatures less than the ion-induced texture transition temperature Tt ≈ 150 °C. The effects of ion-induced graphite relief on high-dose sputtering have been studied using binary-collision computer simulation. The relief was modeled as a sine function surface along two mutually perpendicular surface axes. The simulation has shown that at some parameters of the relief the essential part of the bombarding ions undergoes inclined incidence on the walls of surface hillocks, which increases the density of ion-atom collisions near the surface and, correspondingly, the ejection of atoms. This effect leads to non-monotonic behavior of the sputtering yield on the relief aspect ratio (amplitude/period). The sputtering yield decreases upon reaching the maximum at aspect ratio of 4, and becomes lower than that for a flat surface. The simulation permits to estimate the relation of amplitude to period of relief at T < Tt.

  18. High-efficiency multilevel zone plates for keV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Fabrizio, E.; Romanato, F.; Gentili, M.; Cabrini, S.; Kaulich, B.; Susini, J.; Barrett, R.

    1999-10-01

    The development of high brilliance X-ray sources coupled with advances in manufacturing technologies has led to significant improvements in submicrometre probes for spectroscopy, diffraction and imaging applications. The generation of a small beam spot size is commonly based on three principles: total reflection (as used in optical elements involving mirrors or capillaries), refraction (such as in refractive lenses) and diffraction. The latter effect is employed in Bragg-Fresnel or Soret lenses, commonly known as Fresnel zone plate lenses. These lenses currently give the best spatial resolution, but are traditionally limited to rather soft X-rays-at high energies, their use is still limited by their efficiency. Here we report the fabrication of high-efficiency, high-contrast gold and nickel multistep (quaternary) Fresnel zone plates using electron beam lithography. We achieve a maximum efficiency of 55% for the nickel plate at 7keV. In addition to their high efficiency, the lenses offer the advantages of low background signal and effective reduction of unwanted diffraction orders. We anticipate that these lenses should have a significant impact on techniques such as microscopy, micro-fluorescence and micro-diffraction, which require medium resolution (500-100nm) and high flux at fixed energies.

  19. ART: Surveying the Local Universe at 2-11 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Adams, M. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Bubarev, M. V.; Hassinger, G.; Pravlinski, M.; Predehl, P.; Romaine, S. E.; Swartz, D. A.; Urry, C. M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Astronomical Rontgen Telescope (ART) is a medium-energy x-ray telescope system proposed for the Russian-led mission Spectrum Rontgen-Gamma (SRG). Optimized for performance over the 2-11-keV band, ART complements the softer response of the SRG prime instrument-the German eROSITA x-ray telescope system. The anticipated number of ART detections is 50,000-with 1,000 heavily-obscured (N(sub H)> 3x10(exp 23)/sq cm) AGN-in the SRG 4-year all-sky survey, plus a comparable number in deeper wide-field (500 deg(sup 2) total) surveys. ART's surveys will provide a minimally-biased, nearly-complete census of the local Universe in the medium-energy x-ray band (including Fe-K lines), at CCD spectral resolution. During long (approx.100-ks) pointed observations, ART can obtain statistically significant spectral data up to about 15 keY for bright sources and medium-energy x-ray continuum and Fe-K-line spectra of AGN detected with the contemporaneous NuSTAR hard-x-ray mission.

  20. Monochromatic 8.05-keV Flash Radiography of Imploded Cone-in-Shell Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Ivancic, S.; Marshall, F. J.; McKiernan, G.; Mileham, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Beg, F. N.; Jarrott, C.; Giraldez, E.; Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M. S.; Key, M. H.; McLean, H.; Santos, J.

    2012-10-01

    Fast ignition has the potential of high fusion gains through the ignition of massive DT fuel assemblies. The cone-in-shell target concept might be one way of achieving this goal. Integrated experiments on OMEGA have demonstrated ˜4% coupling efficiency of short-pulse laser energy into the compressed target.footnotetextW. Theobald et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056305 (2011). An improved target design has been developed with a low-Z cone tip. The goal was to validate 2-D radiation--hydrodynamic modeling predictions of the new target design. The technique used was flash radiography from a monochromatic 8.05-keV x-ray source.footnotetext J. A. King et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 191501 (2005). Cu foils were irradiated by the 1.5-kJ, 10-ps OMEGA EP short-pulse laser to generate a bright Cu Kα area backlighter source, which was used in combination with monochromatic imaging with a spherical Bragg crystal to backlight the cone-in-shell implosions at various times around peak compression. Flash radiography provides high-quality images of the fuel assembly with ˜10-ps time resolution and ˜10-μm spatial resolution. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC52-08NA28302 and DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  1. The 3 H(d , γ) Reaction at Ec . m . <= 300 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C. E.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; O'Donnell, J. E.; Richard, A. L.; Sayre, D. B.

    2015-04-01

    The 3 H(d , γ) 5He reaction has been measured using a 500-keV pulsed deuteron beam incident on a stopping titanium tritide target at the Edwards Accelerator Laboratory. The time-of-flight technique has been used to distinguish the γ-rays from neutrons in the bismuth germinate (BGO) γ-ray detector. A stilbene scintillator and an NE-213 scintillator have been used to detect the neutrons from the 3 H(d , n) α reaction using both the pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. A newly designed target holder with a silicon surface barrier detector to simultaneously measure α-particles to normalize the number of neutrons, along with a new titanium tritide target, was incorporated for subsequent measurements. The γ-rays have been measured at laboratory angles of 0 °, 45 °, 90 °, and 135 °. Information about the γ-ray energy distribution for the unbound ground state and first excited state of 5He can be obtained experimentally by comparing the BGO data to Monte Carlo simulations. The 3 H(d , γ) /3 H(d , n) branching ratio has also been measured. Data analysis is currently underway for the subsequent measurements. This work is supported in part by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the U.S. D.O.E. (NNSA) through Grant No. DE-NA0001837.

  2. Two-color ionization of hydrogen close to threshold with keV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondera, Mihai; Florescu, Viorica; Bachau, Henri

    2014-09-01

    In a recent Letter [H. Bachau, M. Dondera, and V. Florescu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 073001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.073001] we considered the hydrogen atom in interaction with an electromagnetic field consisting in the coherent superposition of two keV pulses centered around two frequencies ω1 and ω2 that differ by a few atomic units. The analysis of the results obtained from the resolution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation focused on stimulated Compton scattering (SCS). We have developed in parallel an approach based on perturbation theory and it proved to be an appropriate and useful tool in complement to the nonperturbative approach. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the electron spectra obtained for ℏω1= 55 a.u. and two values of ℏω2, 50 and 54 a.u. Emphasis is put on the case ℏω2=54 a.u., where the electron emitted through SCS has the lowest energy, showing in particular that in the vicinity of the ionization threshold the cross section increases as ℏω1-ℏω2 decreases. We calculate photoelectron energy and angular distributions at various relative directions of propagation of the pulses. We discuss the limitations of the approximations underlying the numerical and analytical approaches used in this work.

  3. The poker face of the Majoron dark matter model: LUX to keV line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Sinha, Kuver

    2014-07-01

    We study the viability of pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons (Majorons) arising in see-saw models as dark matter candidates. Interestingly the stability of the Majoron as dark matter is related to the scale that sets the see-saw and leptogenesis mechanisms, while its annihilation and scattering cross section off nuclei can be set through the Higgs portal. For O (GeV)- O (TeV) Majorons, we compute observables such as the abundance, scattering cross section, Higgs invisible decay width, and emission lines and compare with current data in order to outline the excluded versus still viable parameter space regions. We conclude that the simplest Majoron dark matter models coupling through the Higgs portal, except at the Higgs resonance, are excluded by current direct detection data for Majorons lighter than 225 GeV and future runnings are expected to rule out decisively the 1 GeV-1 TeV window. Lastly, we point out that light keV-scale Majorons whose relic density is set by thermal freeze-in from sterile neutrinos can account for the keV line observed by XMM-Newton observatory in the spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters, within a see-saw model with a triplet Higgs.

  4. A DATABASE OF >20 keV ELECTRON GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT AT 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Agueda, N.; Sanahuja, B.; Vainio, R.

    2012-10-15

    We use interplanetary transport simulations to compute a database of electron Green's functions, i.e., differential intensities resulting at the spacecraft position from an impulsive injection of energetic (>20 keV) electrons close to the Sun, for a large number of values of two standard interplanetary transport parameters: the scattering mean free path and the solar wind speed. The nominal energy channels of the ACE, STEREO, and Wind spacecraft have been used in the interplanetary transport simulations to conceive a unique tool for the study of near-relativistic electron events observed at 1 AU. In this paper, we quantify the characteristic times of the Green's functions (onset and peak time, rise and decay phase duration) as a function of the interplanetary transport conditions. We use the database to calculate the FWHM of the pitch-angle distributions at different times of the event and under different scattering conditions. This allows us to provide a first quantitative result that can be compared with observations, and to assess the validity of the frequently used term beam-like pitch-angle distribution.

  5. Solar Wind ˜20-200 keV Superhalo Electrons at Quiet Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua; Yang, Liu; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Pei, Zhongtian; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2015-04-01

    High-energy superhalo electrons are present in the interplanetary medium (IPM) even in the absence of any significant solar activity, carrying important information on electron acceleration in the solar wind. We present a statistical survey of ˜20-200 keV superhalo electrons measured at 1 AU by the WIND 3D Plasma & Energetic Particle instrument during quiet-time periods from 1995 January through 2013 December. The selected 242 quiet-time samples mostly occur during the rising, maximum and decay phases of solar cycles. The observed omnidirectional differential flux of these quiet-time superhalo electrons generally fits to a power-law spectrum J=A× {{(\\frac{E}{{{m}e}{{c}2}})}-β }, with β ranging from ˜1.6 to ˜3.7 and the integrated density nsup ranging from 10-8 to 10-5 cm-3. In solar cycle 23 (24), the distribution of β has a broad maximum between 2.4 and 2.8 (2.0 and 2.4). Both β and the logarithm of nsup show no obvious correlation with sunspot number, solar flares, solar wind core population, etc. These superhalo electrons may form a quiet-time energetic electron background/reservoir in the IPM. We propose that they may originate from nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or could be formed in the IPM due to further acceleration and/or long-distance propagation effects.

  6. MULTI-KEV X-RAY YIELDS FROM HIGH-Z GAS TARGETS FIELDED AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Fournier, K B; May, M J; Colvin, J D; Thomas, C A; Marrs, R E; Compton, S M; Moody, J D; Bond, E J; Davis, J F

    2010-11-04

    The authors report on modeling of x-ray yield from gas-filled targets shot at the OMEGA laser facility. The OMEGA targets were 1.8 mm long, 1.95 mm in diameter Be cans filled with either a 50:50 Ar:Xe mixture, pure Ar, pure Kr or pure Xe at {approx} 1 atm. The OMEGA experiments heated the gas with 20 kJ of 3{omega} ({approx} 350 nm) laser energy delivered in a 1 ns square pulse. the emitted x-ray flux was monitored with the x-ray diode based DANTE instruments in the sub-keV range. Two-dimensional x-ray images (for energies 3-5 keV) of the targets were recorded with gated x-ray detectors. The x-ray spectra were recorded with the HENWAY crystal spectrometer at OMEGA. Predictions are 2D r-z cylindrical with DCA NLTE atomic physics. Models generally: (1) underpredict the Xe L-shell yields; (2) overpredict the Ar K-shell yields; (3) correctly predict the Xe thermal yields; and (4) greatly underpredict the Ar thermal yields. However, there are spreads within the data, e.g. the DMX Ar K-shell yields are correctly predicted. The predicted thermal yields show strong angular dependence.

  7. Polarization effects in thallium bromide x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozorezov, A.; Wigmore, J. K.; Gostilo, V.; Shorohov, M.; Owens, A.; Quarati, F.; Webb, M. A.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of a detailed experimental study of polarization effects in thallium bromide planar x-ray detectors. Measurements were carried out in the range 10-100 keV by scanning a highly focused x-ray beam, 50 {mu}m in diameter, from a synchrotron source across the detector. Above a certain radiation threshold the detector response showed a systematic degradation of its spectroscopic characteristics, peak channel position, peak height, and energy resolution. Using a pump-and-probe technique, we studied the dynamics of spectral degradation, the spatial extent and relaxation of the polarized region, and the dependence of the detector response on bias voltage and temperature. For comparison, we modeled polarization effects induced by the charging of traps by both electrons and holes using a model based on recent theoretical work of Bale and Szeles. We calculated the charge collection efficiency and spectral line shapes as functions of exposure time, beam position, count rate, and photon energy, and obtained credible agreement with experimental results.

  8. Probing magnetar magnetosphere through X-ray polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverna, R.; Muleri, F.; Turolla, R.; Soffitta, P.; Fabiani, S.; Nobili, L.

    2014-02-01

    The study of magnetars is of particular relevance since these objects are the only laboratories where the physics in ultra-strong magnetic fields can be directly tested. Until now, spectroscopic and timing measurements at X-ray energies in soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) have been the main source of information about the physical properties of a magnetar and of its magnetosphere. Spectral fitting in the ˜0.5-10 keV range allowed us to validate the `twisted magnetosphere' model, probing the structure of the external field and estimating the density and velocity of the magnetospheric currents. Spectroscopy alone, however, may fail in disambiguating the two key parameters governing magnetospheric scattering (the charge velocity and the twist angle) and is quite insensitive to the source geometry. X-ray polarimetry, on the other hand, can provide a quantum leap in the field by adding two extra observables, the linear polarization degree and the polarization angle. Using the bright AXP 1RXS J170849.0-400910 as a template, we show that phase-resolved polarimetric measurements can unambiguously determine the model parameters, even with a small X-ray polarimetry mission carrying modern photoelectric detectors and existing X-ray optics. We also show that polarimetric measurements can pinpoint vacuum polarization effects and thus provide indirect evidence for ultra-strong magnetic fields.

  9. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  10. South Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    2 July 2004 Beneath the ice caps of both martian poles lies extensive deposits of layered material. Whether the material includes ice is unknown. In the north polar region, some of the layers contain dark sand, others may consist of dust cemented by ice. The south polar layers are a little bit more challenging to understand. In most places, they have been covered by thin mantles of debris that mask the true nature of the layered material. This is the case, even in the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown here. South polar layers were eroded to provide this spectacular view, but later the materials were almost uniformly covered with a material that, when the image is viewed at full resolution (click on image, above), has become cracked. This picture is located near 82.0oS, 72.4oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  11. Synchrotron polarization in blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by ≳ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  12. Pliocene geomagnetic polarity epochs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Cox, A.; Doell, Richard R.; Gromme, C.S.

    1967-01-01

    A paleomagnetic and K-Ar dating study of 44 upper Miocene and Pliocene volcanic units from the western United States suggests that the frequency of reversals of the earth's magnetic field during Pliocene time may have been comparable with that of the last 3.6 m.y. Although the data are too limited to permit the formal naming of any new polarity epochs or events, four polarity transitions have been identified: the W10 R/N boundary at 3.7 ?? 0.1 m.y., the A12 N/R boundary at 4.9 ?? 0.1 m.y., the W32 N/R boundary at 9.0 ?? 0.2m.y., and the W36 R/N boundary at 10.8 ?? 0.3 - 1.0 m.y. The loss of absolute resolution of K-Ar dating in older rocks indicates that the use of well defined stratigraphic successions to identify and date polarity transitions will be important in the study of Pliocene and older reversals. ?? 1967.

  13. Observational consistency and future predictions for a 3.5 keV ALP to photon line

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Pedro D.; Conlon, Joseph P.; Day, Francesca V.; Marsh, M.C. David; Rummel, Markus

    2015-04-09

    Motivated by the possibility of explaining the 3.5 keV line through dark matter decaying to axion-like particles that subsequently convert to photons, we study ALP-photon conversion for sightlines passing within 50 pc of the galactic centre. Conversion depends on the galactic centre magnetic field which is highly uncertain. For fields at low or mid-range of observational estimates (10–100 μG), no observable signal is possible. For fields at the high range of observational estimates (a pervasive poloidal mG field over the central 150 pc) it is possible to generate sufficient signal to explain recent observations of a 3.5 keV line in the galactic centre. In this scenario, the galactic centre line signal comes predominantly from the region with z>20pc, reconciling the results from the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes. The dark matter to ALP to photon scenario also naturally predicts the non-observation of the 3.5 keV line in stacked galaxy spectra. We further explore predictions for the line flux in galaxies and suggest a set of galaxies that is optimised for observing the 3.5 keV line in this model.

  14. 3.55 keV photon lines from axion to photon conversion in the Milky Way and M31

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Day, Francesca V. E-mail: francesca.day@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We further explore a scenario in which the recently observed 3.55 keV photon line arises from dark matter decay to an axion-like particle (ALP) of energy 3.55 keV, which then converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. This ALP scenario is well-motivated by the observed morphology of the 3.55 keV flux. For this scenario we study the expected flux from dark matter decay in the galactic halos of both the Milky Way and Andromeda (M31). The Milky Way magnetic field is asymmetric about the galactic centre, and so the resulting 3.55 keV flux morphology differs significantly from the case of direct dark matter decay to photons. However the Milky Way magnetic field is not large enough to generate an observable signal, even with ASTRO-H. In contrast, M31 has optimal conditions for a → γ conversion and the intrinsic signal from M31 becomes two orders of magnitude larger than for the Milky Way, comparable to that from clusters and consistent with observations.

  15. Radial Profile of the 3.5 keV Line Out to R200 in the Perseus Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franse, Jeroen; Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Boyarsky, Alexey; Markevitch, Maxim; Bautz, Mark; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro; Loewenstein, Mike; McDonald, Michael; Miller, Eric; Randall, Scott W.; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Smith, Randall K.

    2016-10-01

    The recent discovery of the unidentified emission line at 3.5 keV in galaxies and clusters has attracted great interest from the community. As the origin of the line remains uncertain, we study the surface brightness distribution of the line in the Perseus cluster since that information can be used to identify its origin. We examine the flux distribution of the 3.5 keV line in the deep Suzaku observations of the Perseus cluster in detail. The 3.5 keV line is observed in three concentric annuli in the central observations, although the observations of the outskirts of the cluster did not reveal such a signal. We establish that these detections and the upper limits from the non-detections are consistent with a dark matter decay origin. However, absence of positive detection in the outskirts is also consistent with some unknown astrophysical origin of the line in the dense gas of the Perseus core, as well as with a dark matter origin with a steeper dependence on mass than the dark matter decay. We also comment on several recently published analyses of the 3.5 keV line.

  16. Hard x-ray broad band Laue lenses (80-600 keV): building methods and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilli, E.; Frontera, F.; Rosati, P.; Liccardo, V.; Squerzanti, S.; Carassiti, V.; Caroli, E.; Auricchio, N.; Stephen, J. B.

    2015-09-01

    We present the status of the LAUE project devoted to develop a technology for building a 20 meter long focal length Laue lens for hard X-/soft gamma-ray astronomy (80-600 keV). The Laue lens is composed of bent crystals of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs, 220) and Germanium (Ge, 111), and, for the first time, the focusing property of bent crystals has been exploited for this field of applications. We show the preliminary results concerning the adhesive employed to fix the crystal tiles over the lens support, the positioning accuracy obtained and possible further improvements. The Laue lens petal that will be completed in a few months has a pass band of 80-300 keV and is a fraction of an entire Laue lens capable of focusing x-rays up to 600 keV, possibly extendable down to ~20-30 keV with suitable low absorption crystal materials and focal length. The final goal is to develop a focusing optics that can improve the sensitivity over current telescopes in this energy band by 2 orders of magnitude.

  17. Charge state distributions and charge exchange cross sections of carbon in helium at 30-258 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Seiler, Martin; Suter, Martin; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    With the introduction of helium stripping in radiocarbon (14C) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), higher +1 charge state yields in the 200 keV region and fewer beam losses are observed compared to nitrogen or argon stripping. To investigate the feasibility of even lower beam energies for 14C analyses the stripping characteristics of carbon in helium need to be further studied. Using two different AMS systems at ETH Zurich (myCADAS and MICADAS), ion beam transmissions of carbon ions for the charge states -1, +1, +2 and +3 were measured in the range of 258 keV down to 30 keV. The correction for beam losses and the extraction of charge state yields and charge exchange cross sections will be presented. An increase in population of the +1 charge state towards the lowest measured energies up to 75% was found as well as agreement with previous data from literature. The findings suggest that more compact radiocarbon AMS systems are possible and could provide even higher efficiency than current systems operating in the 200 keV range.

  18. The Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter - POLAR onboard the China’s Spacelab “Tiangong-2”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianchao; BAO, T. W.; BATSCH, T.; BRITVITCH, I.; CADOUX, F.; DONG, Y. W.; GAUVIN, N.; HAJDAS, W.; KOLE, M.; LECHANOINE-LELUC, C.; LI, L.; MARCINKOWSKI, R.; ORSI, S.; POHL, M.; PRODUIT, N.; RAPIN, D.; RUTCZYNSKA, A.; RYBKA, D.; SZABELSKI, J.; WANG, R. J.; WU, B. B.; XIAO, H. L.; ZHANG, S. N.; ZHANG, Y. J.; ZWOLINSKA, A.

    2015-08-01

    POLAR is a novel compact space-borne Compton polarimeter conceived for a precise measurement of hard X-ray/Gamma-ray polarization and optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in the energy range 50 - 500 keV. The future detailed measurement of the polarization of GRB will lead to a better understanding of its radiation region geometry and emission mechanisms. Thanks to its remarkable properties on large effective area, field of view (4.14 sr or 1/3 of the visible sky) and obvious modulation factor, POLAR will be able to reach a minimum detectable polarization (1-σ level) of about 3% for several GRB measurements per year. POLAR consists of 25 detector modular units (DMU). Each DMU is composed of 64 low-Z plastic scintillator bars, read out by a flat-panel multi-anode photomultipliers and ASIC front-end electronics. The incoming photons undergo Compton scattering in the bars and produce a modulation pattern. Simulations and hard X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments have shown that the polarization degree and angle can be retrieved from this pattern with the accuracy necessary for pinning down the GRB mechanisms. A full flight model of POLAR has been constructed, in view of a flight on the Chinese spacelab TG-2 expected in 2016. The design of POLAR, Monte-Carlo simulation analysis as well as the performance test results will be all addressed in details in this talk.

  19. Studies of total bremsstrahlung in thick targets of Al, Ti, Sn and Pb for 90Sr beta particles in the photon energy region of 1-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Total bremsstrahlung (BS) spectra in thick targets of Al, Ti, Sn and Pb produced by beta emitter 90Sr (End point energy=546 keV) are studied in the photon energy range of 1-100 keV. The experimentally measured BS spectra are compared with the theoretical spectral distributions calculated from Elwert corrected (non relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [EBH] theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) Bethe-Heitler [Fmod BH] theory for ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and the Avdonina and Pratt [Fmod BH+PB] theory, which include the contribution of polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) into OB. The present results are indicating the correctness of Fmod BH+PB theory in the low energy region, where PB dominates into the BS, but at the middle and higher photon energy region of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, the Fmod BH theory is more close to the experimental results. The description of the bremsstrahlung process in stripped atom (SA) approximation, which indicates the suppression of the bremsstrahlung at higher energy ends due to the production of PB in the low energy region, needs further considerations. Hence, the present measurements for BS for different target materials indicates that the considerations of the screening effects along with other secondary effects during the interaction of incident electrons with the target nuclei are important while describing the production of bremsstrahlung, particularly for the higher energy regions.

  20. Neutron transmission and capture measurements and analysis of /sup 60/Ni from 1 to 450 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Perey, C.M.; Harvey, J.A.; Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.; Perey, F.G.

    1982-11-01

    High-resolution transmission and capture measurements of /sup 60/Ni-enriched targets have been made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) from a few eV to 1800 keV in transmission and from 2.5 keV to 5 MeV in capture . The transmission data from 1 to 450 keV were analyzed with a multi-level R-matrix code which uses the Bayes' theorem for the fitting process. This code provides the energies and neutron widths of the resonances inside the 1- to 450-keV region as well as a possible parameterization for outside resonances to describe the smooth cross section in this region. The capture data were analyzed with a least-squares fitting code using the Breit-Wigner formula. From 2.5 to 450 keV, 166 resonances were seen in both sets of data. Correspondence between the energy scales shows a discontinuity around 300 keV which makes the matching of resonances at higher energies difficult. Eighty-nine resonances were seen in the capture data only. Average parameters for the 30 observed s-wave resonances were deduced. The average level spacing D/sub 0/ was found to be equal to 15.2 +- 1.5 keV, the strength function, S/sub 0/, equal to (2.2 +- 0.6) x 10/sup -4/ and the average radiation width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../, equal to 1.30 +- 0.07 eV. The staircase plot of the reduced level widths and the plot of the Lorentz-weighted strength function averaged over various energy intervals show possible evidence for doorway states. The level densities calculated with the Fermi-gas model for l = 0 and for l > 0 resonances were compared with the cumulative number of observed resonances, but the analysis is not conclusive. The average capture cross section as a function of the neutron incident energy is compared to the tail of the giant electric dipole resonance prediction.

  1. The Context for IMAP: Voyager and INCA Observations of the Heliosheath at E > 5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.

    2016-04-01

    The basic premise of the proposed Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) is detailed scientific understanding of the Heliosheath (HS) and beyond, a region of space explored in situ by Voyager 1 (V1) since 2004, Voyager 2 (V2) since 2007, and remotely via energetic neutral atoms (ENA) by the Cassini/INCA (Ion and Neutral CAmera) since 2003 and IBEX since 2009. The IMAP instrumentation proposed for this purpose combines and extends the IBEX and INCA ENA energy ranges (0.3- 20 keV and 3-200 keV, for low and high energy, respectively). All three missions-Voyagers, Cassini/INCA, and IBEX- have made discovery-class measurements in the HS, the Voyagers providing in situ ion intensities at E > 30 keV, while INCA images ENA in the range 5 < E < 55 keV, and IBEX 0.3 < E < 6 keV. The partial overlap in energy coverage between Voyager ions and INCA ENA allows for the possibility of observing the intensity and time evolution of ions in the HS, thought to give rise to the ENAs via charge-exchange, and the resultant ENA images in the inner heliosphere and their spatial and/or temporal variability. Unfortunately, no such "ground truth" ion measurements are possible at Voyager in the ENA energy range imaged by IBEX. Some of the key findings from the Voyager and Cassini/INCA measurements are as follows: (1) The HS contains a hot plasma population that carries a substantial part (30-50 %) of the total pressure at E > 5 keV, the rest residing below that range, resulting in a beta (particle/magnetic pressure) always > 1, typically >10. (2) The width of the HS in the direction of V1 is ~ 30 AU, but is thought to be larger (40-70 AU) in the southern ecliptic where V2 currently travels.. (3) The ENA intensities at E > 5 keV exhibit a correlation with the solar cycle (SC) over the period 2003 to 2015, with minimum intensities in the anti-nose direction observed ~ 1.5 yrs after solar minimum followed by a recovery thereafter. (4) The in situ ion measurements at V2 within the HS

  2. A New Observation of the Quiet Sun Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Stone, J.

    2012-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable with solar activity. While this is particularly true during solar flares, when emission can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude up to gamma-ray energies, even the so-called "quiet Sun" is bright in soft X-rays (SXRs), as the ~1-2 MK ambient plasma of the corona emits significant thermal bremsstrahlung up to ~5 keV. However, the actual solar SXR (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include ultra-high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystral spectrometers (e.g. Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g. GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with fair energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and XRS on MESSENGER, although they did not extend below ~1 keV. We present observations of the quiet Sun SXR emission obtained using a new SXR spectrometer flown on the third SDO/EVE underflight calibration rocket (NASA 36.286). The commercial off-the-shelf Amptek X123 silicon drift detector, with an 8-micron Be window and custom aperture, measured the solar SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution (though, due to hardware limitations, with only ~0.12 keV binning) and 2-sec cadence over ~5 minutes on 23 June 2012. Despite the rising solar cycle, activity on 23 June 2012 was abnormally low, with no visible active regions and GOES XRS emission near 2010 levels; we measured no solar counts above ~4 keV during the observation period. We compare our X123 measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including the SphinX observations during the deep solar minimum of 2009, and with upper limits of >3 keV quiet Sun emission

  3. X-ray Polarization from High Mass Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    The next new astrophysical window will be the advent of measurements of X-ray polarization in the 2-10 keV energy range. This will begin in the next 5 years with the launch -- of small missions such as GEMS in the US and Polarix in Italy, and may continue with IXO in the next decade. Among other things, polarization allows for potentially -- sensitive tests of the geometry of astrophysical sources, on scales which are far too small to be imaged directly. Objects which are circularly symmetric on the sky will produce no net linear polarization, a fact which led to the discovery that Seyfert galaxies are non- spherical. There is only one source in the sky whose X-ray polarization is known, the Crab nebula. Owing to visibility constraints, it is likely that the first astronomical X-ray polarimetry observations will be of objects which have never before been observed with this technique. This motivates thorough and accurate modeling of the polarization properties of the brightest and (otherwise) best understood X-ray sources, for use as calibrators and test sources for X-ray polarimetry. The sources best suited for this are X-ray binaries, in particular those in which the dominant gas component comes from a strong stellar wind from a supergiant companion star. These 'high mass X-ray binaries' (HMXBs) are among the brightest sources in the sky, their orbital elements are relatively well understood, and their orbital variability provides a predictably changing view with respect to an important source of polarization: the strong stellar wind from the companion star. In some HMXBs the X-ray source is luminous enough to ionize the wind almost completely, so the light observed during and near eclipse, and its polarization, is dominated by electron scattering. Modeling these sources is relatively straightforward, though such models do not yet exist, and these can be considered as calibration sources for astrophysical X-ray polarimeters. More generally, spectral observations

  4. NuSTAR Resolves the First Dual AGN above 10 keV in SWIFT J2028.5+2543

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael J.; Glidden, Ana; Baloković, Mislav; Stern, Daniel; Lamperti, Isabella; Assef, Roberto; Bauer, Franz; Ballantyne, David; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Farrah, Duncan; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Gehrels, Neil; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Markwardt, Craig; Masini, Alberto; Ricci, Claudio; Treister, Ezequiel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-06-01

    We have discovered heavy obscuration in the dual active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) source SWIFT J2028.5+2543 using Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). While an early XMM-Newton study suggested the emission was mainly from NGC 6921, the superior spatial resolution of NuSTAR above 10 keV resolves the Swift/BAT emission into two sources associated with the nearby galaxies MCG +04-48-002 and NGC 6921 (z = 0.014) with a projected separation of 25.3 kpc (91″). NuSTAR's sensitivity above 10 keV finds both are heavily obscured to Compton-thick levels (N H ≈ (1-2) × 1024 cm-2) and contribute equally to the BAT detection ({L}10-50 {keV}{{int}} ≈ 6 × 1042 erg s-1). The observed luminosity of both sources is severely diminished in the 2-10 keV band ({L} 2-10 {keV}{{obs}}\\lt 0.1× {L} 2-10 {keV}{{int}}), illustrating the importance of >10 keV surveys like those with NuSTAR and Swift/BAT. Compared to archival X-ray data, MCG +04-48-002 shows significant variability (>3) between observations. Despite being bright X-ray AGNs, they are difficult to detect using optical emission-line diagnostics because MCG +04-48-002 is identified as a starburst/composite because of the high rates of star formation from a luminous infrared galaxy while NGC 6921 is only classified as a LINER using line detection limits. SWIFT J2028.5+2543 is the first dual AGN resolved above 10 keV and is the second most heavily obscured dual AGN discovered to date in the X-rays other than NGC 6240.

  5. NuSTAR Resolves the First Dual AGN above 10 keV in SWIFT J2028.5+2543

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Michael J.; Glidden, Ana; Baloković, Mislav; Stern, Daniel; Lamperti, Isabella; Assef, Roberto; Bauer, Franz; Ballantyne, David; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Farrah, Duncan; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Gehrels, Neil; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Markwardt, Craig; Masini, Alberto; Ricci, Claudio; Treister, Ezequiel; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-06-01

    We have discovered heavy obscuration in the dual active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) source SWIFT J2028.5+2543 using Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). While an early XMM-Newton study suggested the emission was mainly from NGC 6921, the superior spatial resolution of NuSTAR above 10 keV resolves the Swift/BAT emission into two sources associated with the nearby galaxies MCG +04-48-002 and NGC 6921 (z = 0.014) with a projected separation of 25.3 kpc (91″). NuSTAR's sensitivity above 10 keV finds both are heavily obscured to Compton-thick levels (N H ≈ (1–2) × 1024 cm‑2) and contribute equally to the BAT detection ({L}10-50 {keV}{{int}} ≈ 6 × 1042 erg s‑1). The observed luminosity of both sources is severely diminished in the 2–10 keV band ({L} 2-10 {keV}{{obs}}\\lt 0.1× {L} 2-10 {keV}{{int}}), illustrating the importance of >10 keV surveys like those with NuSTAR and Swift/BAT. Compared to archival X-ray data, MCG +04-48-002 shows significant variability (>3) between observations. Despite being bright X-ray AGNs, they are difficult to detect using optical emission-line diagnostics because MCG +04-48-002 is identified as a starburst/composite because of the high rates of star formation from a luminous infrared galaxy while NGC 6921 is only classified as a LINER using line detection limits. SWIFT J2028.5+2543 is the first dual AGN resolved above 10 keV and is the second most heavily obscured dual AGN discovered to date in the X-rays other than NGC 6240.

  6. Hybrid-Polarity SAR Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, R. K.; Freeman, A.

    2009-04-01

    A space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) designed to provide quantitative information on a global scale implies severe requirements to maximize coverage and to sustain reliable operational calibration. These requirements are best served by the hybrid-polarity architecture, in which the radar transmits in circular polarization, and receives on two orthogonal linear polarizations, coherently, retaining their relative phase. This paper reviews those advantages,summarizes key attributes of hybrid-polarity dual- and quadrature-polarized SARs including conditions under which the signal-to-noise ratio is conserved, and describes the evolution of this architecture from first principles.

  7. Sensitivity of VIIRS Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The design of an optical system typically involves a sensitivity analysis where the various lens parameters, such as lens spacing and curvatures, to name two parameters, are (slightly) varied to see what, if any, effect this has on the performance and to establish manufacturing tolerances. A sinular analysis was performed for the VIIRS instruments polarization measurements to see how real world departures from perfectly linearly polarized light entering VIIRS effects the polarization measurement. The methodology and a few of the results of this polarization sensitivity analysis are presented and applied to the construction of a single polarizer which will cover the VIIRS VIS/NIR spectral range. Keywords: VIIRS, polarization, ray, trace; polarizers, Bolder Vision, MOXTEK

  8. ON THE POLARIZATION PROPERTIES OF MAGNETAR GIANT FLARE PULSATING TAILS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2015-12-10

    Three giant flares have been detected so far from soft gamma-ray repeaters, each characterized by an initial short hard spike and a pulsating tail. The observed pulsating tails are characterized by a duration of ∼100 s, an isotropic energy of ∼10{sup 44} erg, and a pulse period of a few seconds. The pulsating tail emission likely originates from the residual energy after the intense energy release during the initial spike, which forms a trapped fireball composed of a photon-pair plasma in a closed-field-line region of the magnetars. Observationally the spectra of pulsating tails can be fitted by the superposition of a thermal component and a power-law component, with the thermal component dominating the emission in the early and late stages of the pulsating-tail observations. In this paper, assuming that the trapped fireball is from a closed-field-line region in the magnetosphere, we calculate the atmospheric structure of the optically thick trapped fireball and the polarization properties of the trapped fireball. By properly treating the photon propagation in a hot, highly magnetized, electron–positron pair plasma, we tally photons in two modes (O mode and E mode) at a certain observational angle through Monte Carlo simulations. Our results suggest that the polarization degree depends on the viewing angle with respect to the magnetic axis of the magnetar, and can be as high as Π ≃ 30% in the 1–30 keV band, and Π ≃ 10% in the 30–100 keV band, if the line of sight is perpendicular to the magnetic axis.

  9. The Swift/Fermi GRB 080928 from 1 eV to 150 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonbas, Eda; Rossi, A.; Schulze, S.; Klose, S.; Kann, D. A.; Ferrero, P.; NicuesaGuelbenzu, A.; Rau, A.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Filgas, R.; KuepcuYoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, F.; Szokoly, G.; Yoldas, A.; Krimm, H. A.; Johannesson, G.; Panaitescu, A.; Yuan, F.; Pandey, S. B.; Akerlof, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive study of the Gamma-Ray Burst 080928 and of its afterglow. GRB 08092 was a long burst detected by Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM, It is one of the exceptional cases where optical emission was already detected when the GRB itself was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. for nearly 100 seconds simultaneous optical X-ray and gamma-ray data provide a coverage of the spectral energy distribution of the transient source from about 1 eV to 150 keV. Here we analyze the prompt emission, constrain its spectral propertIes. and set lower limits on the initial Lorentz factor of the relativistic outflow, In particular. we show that the SED during the main prompt emission phase is in agreement with synchrotron radiation. We construct the optical/near-infrared light curve and the spectral energy distribution based on Swift/UVOT. ROTSE-Illa (Australia) and GROND (La Silla) data and compare it to the X-ray light curve retrieved from the Swift/XRT repository. We show that its bumpy shape can be modeled by multiple energy injections into the forward shock. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the temporal and spectral evolution of the first strong flare seen in the early X-ray light curve can be explained by large-angle emission. Finally, we report on the results of our search for the GRB host galaxy, for which only a deep upper limit can be provided.

  10. South Polar Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    5 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the south polar residual cap. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left, thus the somewhat kidney bean-shaped features are pits, not mounds. These pits and their neighboring polygonal cracks are formed in a material composed mostly of carbon dioxide ice. The image is located near 87.0oS, 5.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  11. South Polar Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    4 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a polgyon-cracked surface, into which deep, somewhat kidney-bean-shaped pits have formed. These are landscapes of the martian south polar residual cap. This view was captured during May 2005.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 5.1oW Image width: 1.5 km (0.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season Southern Spring

  12. Italian Polar Metadata System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, S.; Nativi, S.; Leone, C.; Migliorini, S.; Mazari Villanova, L.

    2012-04-01

    Italian Polar Metadata System C.Leone, S.Longo, S.Migliorini, L.Mazari Villanova, S. Nativi The Italian Antarctic Research Programme (PNRA) is a government initiative funding and coordinating scientific research activities in polar regions. PNRA manages two scientific Stations in Antarctica - Concordia (Dome C), jointly operated with the French Polar Institute "Paul Emile Victor", and Mario Zucchelli (Terra Nova Bay, Southern Victoria Land). In addition National Research Council of Italy (CNR) manages one scientific Station in the Arctic Circle (Ny-Alesund-Svalbard Islands), named Dirigibile Italia. PNRA started in 1985 with the first Italian Expedition in Antarctica. Since then each research group has collected data regarding biology and medicine, geodetic observatory, geophysics, geology, glaciology, physics and atmospheric chemistry, earth-sun relationships and astrophysics, oceanography and marine environment, chemistry contamination, law and geographic science, technology, multi and inter disciplinary researches, autonomously with different formats. In 2010 the Italian Ministry of Research assigned the scientific coordination of the Programme to CNR, which is in charge of the management and sharing of the scientific results carried out in the framework of the PNRA. Therefore, CNR is establishing a new distributed cyber(e)-infrastructure to collect, manage, publish and share polar research results. This is a service-based infrastructure building on Web technologies to implement resources (i.e. data, services and documents) discovery, access and visualization; in addition, semantic-enabled functionalities will be provided. The architecture applies the "System of Systems" principles to build incrementally on the existing systems by supplementing but not supplanting their mandates and governance arrangements. This allows to keep the existing capacities as autonomous as possible. This cyber(e)-infrastructure implements multi-disciplinary interoperability following

  13. North Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image illustrates very well the detailed, pitted nature of the north polar residual ice cap. As water ice sublimes away a little bit each summer, dark-floored pits have formed, trapping dust and other debris.

    Location near: 85.1oN, 284.6oW 200 m scale bar = 219 yards Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  14. South Polar Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the results of erosion acting upon a layer of material in the south polar region of Mars. The elliptical pit in the lower left corner of the image was once buried beneath this eroding layer, as well. The processes that eroded the material, and the composition of the material, are unknown. The image is located near 80.7oS, 300.9oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the top.

  15. South Polar Depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a circular depression and a suite of eroding mesas of carbon dioxide. These features occur in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The eroding carbon dioxide creates landforms reminiscent of 'Swiss cheese.' The circular feature might indicate the location of a filled, buried impact crater.

    Location near: 86.8oS, 111.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  16. 'Endurance' Untouched (polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a polar projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  17. Polar Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupsky, S.

    2003-10-01

    Direct drive offers the potential of higher target gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) than x-ray drive: The initial direct-drive target design had a 1-D gain of 45 and consisted primarily of a pure cryogenic DT shell. Using the expected levels of target and laser nonuniformities for the NIF, two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations predicted target gains around 30.(P.W. McKenty et al.), Phys. Plasmas 8, 2315 (2001). More-recent designs have shown that higher target gains could be obtained by replacing a portion of the DT shell with ``wetted'' CH foam and by using adiabat shaping: (1) Higher-Z material (C) in the foam increases laser absorption by about 40% (from 60% absorption to 85%).(S. Skupsky et al.), in Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001, edited by K. Tanaka et al. (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), p. 240. (2) Adiabat shaping allows the main portion of the fuel to be placed on a lower adiabat without compromising target stability.(V.N. Goncharov et al.), Phys. Plasmas 10, 1906 (2003). These direct-drive concepts can be tested on the NIF, long before that facility is converted to a direct-drive (spherically symmetric) irradiation configuration. Using the NIF x-ray-drive beam configuration, some of the near-polar beams could be pointed to better illuminate the target's equator. These more-oblique, equatorial beams will have lower absorption and reduced drive efficiency than the polar beams. One strategy to compensate for the difference in polar and equatorial drive is to reduce the irradiation at the poles and employ different pulse shapes to accommodate the time-dependent variations in drive and absorption. This concept of polar direct drive (PDD) has been studied using the 2-D hydrocode DRACO to determine the requirements for achieving ignition and moderate target gain for the NIF. Experiments on the OMEGA laser will examine the effects of oblique irradiation on target drive. Results of simulations for different direct-drive target designs

  18. Polarization of radiation of point-like source reflected from turbulent magnetized atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silant'ev, N. A.; Gnedin, Yu. N.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the multiple scattering of the light from a point-like source located above the semi-infinite electron, turbulent, and magnetized atmospheres. The frozen magnetic field has both the regular B0 and stochastic B' components (B= B_0+ B'). The stochastic Faraday rotations due to fluctuations B' decrease the intensity of each separate polarized beam (the extinction factor is proportional to λ^4< B'^2>). This decrease at large λ dominates the usual decrease (∝λ^2B_0 cosΘ_0) caused by summing beams with very different Faraday's rotation angles. This effect changes the spectrum of polarization degree as compared with what is influenced by the regular magnetic field. We calculated the integral (observed) polarization of the reflected radiation with the inclusion of unpolarized radiation going directly from the point-like source. We present the observed polarization for various degrees of true absorption of the radiation into the atmosphere and the values of magnetic energy fluctuations. The spectra of polarization in the optical (λ =0-1 μm), infrared (λ =1-5 μ m), and X-ray (E=1-50 keV) regions of the wavelengths are presented. We discuss the possibility of estimating parameters of magnetic field fluctuations from the observation of the spectra of polarization in AGNs with the X-ray excesses and in the turbulent accretion disk in NGC 4258.

  19. CHANDRA DISCOVERY OF AN INTERMEDIATE POLAR IN BAADE'S WINDOW

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, JaeSub; Van den Berg, Maureen; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Zhao Ping; Laycock, Silas

    2009-07-10

    We have discovered an intermediate polar (IP) in the 100 ks Chandra observation of Baade's window (BW), a low extinction region at about 4 deg. south of the Galactic center. The source exhibits large X-ray modulations at a period of 1028.4 s in the 0.3-8 keV band. The X-ray spectral fit with a power-law model shows that the integrated spectrum is intrinsically hard (photon index {gamma} = 0.44 {+-} 0.05) and moderately absorbed (N{sub H} = 1.5 {+-} 1.0 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}). The relatively poor statistics only allow for a mild constraint on the presence of an iron emission line (equivalent width = 0.5 {+-} 0.3 keV at 6.7 keV). Quantile analysis reveals that the modulations in the X-ray flux strongly correlate with spectral changes that are dominated by varying internal absorption. The X-ray spectrum of the source is heavily absorbed (N{sub H} > 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) during the faint phases, while the absorption is consistent with the field value ({approx}10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}) during the bright phases. These X-ray properties are typical signatures of IPs. Images taken with the IMACS camera on the Magellan 6.5 m telescope show a faint (V {approx} 22), relatively blue object (B {sub 0} - V {sub 0} {approx}> 0.05) within the 2{sigma} error circle of the Chandra source, which is a good candidate for being the optical counterpart. If we assume a nominal range of absolute V magnitude for a cataclysmic variable (M{sub V} {approx} 5.5-10.5) and the known reddening in the region (A{sub V} = 1.4 at >3 kpc), the source would likely be at a distance of 2-10 kpc and not in the local solar neighborhood. The corresponding average X-ray luminosity would be 6 x 10{sup 31} -10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} in the 2-8 keV band. Assuming the space density of IPs follows the stellar distribution, which is highly concentrated in the Galactic bulge, the source is probably a relatively bright IP ({approx}10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} if it is at 8 kpc) belonging to the Galactic bulge X

  20. Polarized light interaction with tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-07-01

    This tutorial-review introduces the fundamentals of polarized light interaction with biological tissues and presents some of the recent key polarization optical methods that have made possible the quantitative studies essential for biomedical diagnostics. Tissue structures and the corresponding models showing linear and circular birefringence, dichroism, and chirality are analyzed. As the basis for a quantitative description of the interaction of polarized light with tissues, the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium is used. This theory employs the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters to predict the polarization properties of single- and multiple-scattered optical fields. The near-order of scatterers in tissues is accounted for to provide an adequate description of tissue polarization properties. Biomedical diagnostic techniques based on polarized light detection, including polarization imaging and spectroscopy, amplitude and intensity light scattering matrix measurements, and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography are described. Examples of biomedical applications of these techniques for early diagnostics of cataracts, detection of precancer, and prediction of skin disease are presented. The substantial reduction of light scattering multiplicity at tissue optical clearing that leads to a lesser influence of scattering on the measured intrinsic polarization properties of the tissue and allows for more precise quantification of these properties is demonstrated.

  1. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  2. Measurement of Lα and Lβ1,3,4 fluorescence cross sections of La, Ce, Pr and Nd induced by photons of energies between 7.01 keV and 8.75 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Herrera, J.; Miranda, J.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents measurement results of x-ray production cross sections of Lα and Lβ1,3,4 emitted by four lanthanoid elements (La, Ce, Pr and Nd), after irradiation with Kα and Kβ X rays of the elements Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn (covering energies between 7.01 keV and 8.75 keV). Primary x-rays were induced in turn by the irradiation of thick targets of these elements with a beam of x-rays produced by a tube with an Rh anode, operating at 50 kV and 850 μA. The experimental results are compared with theoretical cross sections predicted using known tabulations of photoelectric cross sections. Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) atomic parameters were used for these calculations. An acceptable match between experiment and both sets of tabulated data is found.

  3. Tissue morphodynamics: Translating planar polarity cues into polarized cell behaviors.

    PubMed

    Devenport, Danelle

    2016-07-01

    The ability of cells to collectively orient and align their behaviors is essential in multicellular organisms for unidirectional cilia beating, collective cell movements, oriented cell divisions, and asymmetric cell fate specification. The planar cell polarity pathway coordinates a vast and diverse array of collective cell behaviors by intersecting with downstream pathways that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and intercellular signaling. How the planar polarity pathway translates directional cues to produce polarized cell behaviors is the focus of this review.

  4. Polar Rain Gradients and Field-Aligned Polar Cap Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Wing, S.; Newell, P. T.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Gosling, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    ACE SWEPAM measurements of solar wind field-aligned electrons have been compared with simultaneous measurements of polar rain electrons precipitating over the polar cap and detected by DMSP spacecraft. Such comparisons allow investigation of cross-polarcap gradients in the intensity of otherwise-steady polar rain. The generally good agreement of the distribution functions, f, from the two data sources confirms that direct entry of solar electrons along open field lines is indeed the cause of polar rain. The agreement between the data sets is typically best on the side of the polar cap with most intense polar rain but the DMSP f's in less intense regions can be brought into agreement with ACE measurements by shifting all energies by a fixed amounts that range from tens to several hundred eV. In most cases these shifts are positive which implies that field-aligned potentials of these amounts exist on polar cap field lines which tend to retard the entry of electrons and produce the observed gradients. These retarding potentials undoubtedly appear in order to prevent the entry of low-energy electrons and maintain charge quasi-neutrality that would otherwise be violated since most tailward flowing magnetosheath ions are unable to follow polar rain electrons down to the polar cap. In more limited regions near the boundary of the polar cap there is sometimes evidence for field-aligned potentials of the opposite sign that accelerate polar rain electrons. A solar electron burst is also studied and it is concluded that electrons from such bursts can enter the magnetotail and precipitate in the same manner as polar rain.

  5. Experiments with Fermilab polarized proton and polarized antiproton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yokosawa, A.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize activities concerning the Fermilab polarized beams. They include a brief description of the polarized-beam facility, measurements of beam polarization by polarimeters, asymmetry measurements in the {pi}{degree} production at high p{sub {perpendicular}} and in the {Lambda} ({Sigma}{degree}), {pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{degree} production at large x{sub F}, and {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(pp, {bar p}p) measurements. 18 refs.

  6. Conversion of sunflower multiband radiometer polarization measurements to polarization parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, Larry L.

    1995-01-01

    The data processing analysis and conversion of polarization measurements to polarization parameters from the Sunflower multiband radiometer is presented in this final report. Included is: (1) the actual data analysis; (2) the comparison of the averaging techniques and the percent polarization derived from the original and averaged I, Q, U parameters; (3) the polarizer angles used in conversion; (4) the Matlab files; (5) the relative ground size, field of view location, and view zenith angles, and (6) the summary of all the sky data for all dates.

  7. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  8. Polarization imaging apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin Kevin (Inventor); Chen, Qiushui (Inventor); Zhao, Hongzhi (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus measures the Stokes image of a sample. The apparatus consists of an optical lens set 11, a linear polarizer 14 with its optical axis 18, a first variable phase retarder 12 with its optical axis 16 aligned 22.5.degree. to axis 18, a second variable phase retarder 13 with its optical axis 17 aligned 45.degree. to axis 18, a imaging sensor 15 for sensing the intensity images of the sample, a controller 101 and a computer 102. Two variable phase retarders 12 and 13 were controlled independently by a computer 102 through a controller unit 101 which generates a sequential of voltages to control the phase retardations of VPRs 12 and 13. A set of four intensity images, I.sub.0, I.sub.1, I.sub.2 and I.sub.3 of the sample were captured by imaging sensor 15 when the phase retardations of VPRs 12 and 13 were set at (0,0), (.pi.,0), (.pi.,.pi.) and (.pi./2,.pi.), respectively Then four Stokes components of a Stokes image, S.sub.0, S.sub.1, S.sub.2 and S.sub.3 were calculated using the four intensity images.

  9. Polar drive on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Marshall, F. J.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D.; Epstein, R.; Frenje, J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marozas, J. A.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-11-01

    High-convergence polar-drive experiments are being conducted on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commum. 133, 495 (1997)] using triple-picket laser pulses. The goal of OMEGA experiments is to validate modeling of oblique laser deposition, heat conduction in the presence of nonradial thermal gradients in the corona, and implosion energetics in the presence of laser-plasma interactions such as crossed-beam energy transfer. Simulated shock velocities near the equator, where the beams are obliquely incident, are within 5% of experimentally inferred values in warm plastic shells, well within the required accuracy for ignition. High, near-one-dimensional areal density is obtained in warm-plastic-shell implosions. Simulated backlit images of the compressing core are in good agreement with measured images. Outstanding questions that will be addressed in the future relate to the role of cross-beam transfer in polar drive irradiation and increasing the energy coupled into the target by decreasing beam obliquity.

  10. Polar ice melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Jack G.

    Shrinking polar ice caps may be causing the earth's sea level to rise and its days to lengthen. ‘Rising mean sea level is a significant indication of global climate change,’ R. Etkins and E. Epstein report, pointing out that global sea levels have risen slightly more than one-tenth of an inch each year, on the average, since 1940, for a total of nearly 5 inches (Science, 215, 287-289, 1982). This is triple the rate of rise measured during the preceding half century, from 1890 to 1940.Etkins and Epstein estimate that more than 10,000 cubic miles of polar ice, most of it presumably from Antarctic ice sheets, must have melted in the past 40 years. They calculate that transfer of this great mass to the equivalent of a thin layer of water spread over the world's oceans also would tend to reduce the speed of the earth's rotation. This would lengthen each day by about one-thousandth of a second, they say, accounting for about three-fourths of the actual increase in the length of the day observed by scientists over the past 40 years.

  11. On Helium 1083 nm Line Polarization during the Impulsive Phase of an X1 Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.; Kleint, Lucia; Sainz Dalda, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of the He i 1083 nm multiplet (1s2s{}3{S}1-1s2p{}3{P}2,1,0o) during the X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48, obtained with the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope. While scanning active region NOAA 12017, the FIRS slit crossed a flare ribbon during the impulsive phase, when the helium line intensities turned into emission at ≲twice the continuum intensity. Their linear polarization profiles are of the same sign across the multiplet including 1082.9 nm, intensity-like, at ≲5% of the continuum intensity. Weaker Zeeman-induced linear polarization is also observed. Only the strongest linear polarization coincides with hard X-ray (HXR) emission at 30-70 keV observed by RHESSI. The polarization is generally more extended and lasts longer than the HXR emission. The upper J = 0 level of the 1082.9 nm component is unpolarizable thus, lower-level polarization is the culprit. We make non-LTE radiative transfer calculations in thermal slabs optimized to fit only intensities. The linear polarizations are naturally reproduced, through a systematic change of sign with wavelength of the radiation anisotropy when slab optical depths of the 1082.9 component are ≲1. Neither are collisions with beams of particles needed, nor can they produce the same sign of polarization of the 1082.9 and 1083.0 nm components. The He i line polarization merely requires heating sufficient to produce slabs of the required thickness. Widely different polarizations of Hα, reported previously, are explained by different radiative anisotropies arising from slabs of different optical depths.

  12. Checking the potassium origin of the new emission line at 3.5 keV using the K XIX line complex at 3.7 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

    2015-11-01

    It is currently unclear whether the new line at ˜3.5 keV, recently detected in various samples of galaxy clusters, the Andromeda galaxy and the central part of our Galaxy, is caused by potassium emission lines. By using the latest astrophysical atomic emission line data base, AtomDB v. 3.0.2, we show that the most promising method to check its potassium origin directly will be the study of the K XIX emission line complex at ˜3.7 keV using forthcoming X-ray imaging spectrometers such as the Soft X-ray spectometer onboard the Astro-H mission or the microcalorimeter onboard the Micro-X sounding rocket experiment. In order to further reduce the remaining (factor of ˜3-5) uncertainty of the 3.7/3.5 keV ratio, more precise modelling should be performed, including the removal of significant spatial inhomogeneities, a detailed treatment of background components, and the extension of the modelled energy range.

  13. Polarized proton beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.

    2010-10-04

    The polarized beam for RHIC is produced in the optically-pumped polarized H{sup -} ion source and then accelerated in Linac to 200 MeV for strip-injection to Booster and further accelerated 24.3 GeV in AGS for injection in RHIC. In 2009 Run polarized protons was successfully accelerated to 250 GeV beam energy. The beam polarization of about 60% at 100 GeV beam energy and 36-42% at 250 GeV beam energy was measured with the H-jet and p-Carbon CNI polarimeters. The gluon contribution to the proton spin was studied in collisions of longitudinally polarized proton beams at 100 x 100 GeV. At 250 x 250 GeV an intermediate boson W production with the longitudinally polarized beams was studied for the first time.

  14. Overcoming Polarization Aberrations In Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Eric W.

    1988-06-01

    A long-standing problem in polarized light microscopy has been the inability, due to polarization aberrations, to achieve simultaneously high spatial resolution and high contrast. The rotation of the plane of polarization at oblique interfaces between crossed polars causes the pupil function to resemble a dark cross rather than being uniformly dark. Likewise, the point spread function has the visual appearance of a four-leaf clover rather than the ideal Airy disk, and is also space-variant. Images formed with these systems are severely degraded. In this paper the theory of polarization aberrations is applied to the analysis of three solutions to this problem: Reducing the system aperture to block troublesome high-aperture rays; the AVEC-POL method, in which high bias compensation introduces counterbalancing aberrations; and the polarization rectifier, an optical element designed to introduce equal and opposite rotations of the electric vector.

  15. The determination of absolute intensity of 234mPa's 1001 keV gamma emission using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Begy, Robert-Csaba; Cosma, Constantin; Timar, Alida; Fulea, Dan

    2009-05-01

    The 1001 keV gamma line of (234m)Pa became important in gamma spectrometric measurements of samples with (238)U content with the advent of development of HpGe detectors of great dimension and high efficiency. In this study the emission probability of the 1001 keV (Y(gamma)) peak of (234m)Pa, was determined by gamma-ray spectrometric measurements performed on glass with Uranium content using Monte Carlo simulation code for efficiency calibration. This method of calculation was not applied for the values quoted in literature so far, at least to our knowledge. The measurements gave an average of 0.836 +/- 0.022%, a value that is in very good agreement to some of the recent results previously presented.

  16. The determination of absolute intensity of 234mPa's 1001 keV gamma emission using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Begy, Robert-Csaba; Cosma, Constantin; Timar, Alida; Fulea, Dan

    2009-05-01

    The 1001 keV gamma line of (234m)Pa became important in gamma spectrometric measurements of samples with (238)U content with the advent of development of HpGe detectors of great dimension and high efficiency. In this study the emission probability of the 1001 keV (Y(gamma)) peak of (234m)Pa, was determined by gamma-ray spectrometric measurements performed on glass with Uranium content using Monte Carlo simulation code for efficiency calibration. This method of calculation was not applied for the values quoted in literature so far, at least to our knowledge. The measurements gave an average of 0.836 +/- 0.022%, a value that is in very good agreement to some of the recent results previously presented. PMID:19384056

  17. Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope with spherical multilayer mirrors around 2.5keV photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ning; Du, Xuewei; Wang, Qiuping; Cao, Zhurong; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-09-01

    A Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) x-ray microscope has been developed for the diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The KB microscope system works around 2.5keV with the magnification of 20. It consists of two spherical multilayer mirrors. The grazing angle is 3.575° at 2.5keV. The influence of the slope error of optical components and the alignment errors is simulated by SHADOW software. The mechanical structure which can perform fine tuning is designed. Experiment result with Manson x-ray source shows that the spatial resolution of the system is about 3-4μm over a field of view of 200μm.

  18. Optical constants for hard x-ray multilayers over the energy range E = 35 - 180 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, David L.; Donguy, Soizik; Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2004-02-01

    We have determined experimentally optical constants for eight thin film materials that can be used in hard X-ray multilayer coatings. Thin film samples of Ni.97V.03, Mo, W, Pt, C, B4C, Si and SiC were deposited by magnetron sputtering onto superpolished optical flats. Optical constants were determined from fits to reflectance-vs-incidence angle measurements made using synchrotron radiation over the energy range E=35 180 keV. We have also measured the X-ray reflectance of a prototype W/SiC multilayer coating over the energy range E=35 100 keV, and we compare the measured reflectance with a calculation using the newly derived optical constants.

  19. Improved energy of the 21.5 keV M1 + E2 nuclear transition in 151Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoyatov, A. Kh.; Kovalík, A.; Filosofov, D. V.; Ryšavý, M.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Baimukhanova, A.

    2016-05-01

    Using internal conversion electron spectroscopy, improved energy 21 541.5±0.5 eV was determined for the 21.5keV M1 + E2 nuclear transition in 151Eu populated in the electron capture decay of 151Gd . This value was found to agree well with the present adopted value but is much more accurate. A value of 0.0305±0.0011 derived for the E2 admixture parameter \\vertδ(E2/M1)\\vert from the measured conversion electron line intensities corresponds to the present adopted value. A possible effect of nuclear structure on the multipolarity of the 21.5 keV transition was also investigated.

  20. Development of a 110-m-mA, 75-keV proton injector for high-current, CW linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, J.D.; Bolme, G.O.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1996-09-01

    A dc proton injector is being developed for a 6.7 MeV CW RFQ at Los Alamos. The RFQ input beam requirements are 75 keV energy, 110 mA dc proton current, and 0.20 {pi}mm-mrad rms normalized emittance. The injector has now produced a 75-keV, 117-mA dc proton beam (130 mA total current) with the required emittance. The emittance has been measured after a 2.1 m long two-solenoid beam transport system. The measured emittance can be explained in terms of the ion source emittance and beam transport through the focusing elements. Measured proton fractions are 90-92% of the beam current. Engineering of the accelerating column high-voltage design is being improved to increase the injector reliability. Injector design details and status are presented.

  1. YAP imager and its application with high-energy X-ray beams up to 150 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, K.; Toyokawa, H.; Suzuki, M.; Kudo, T.; Nomachi, M.; Sugaya, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Gorin, A.; Manuilov, I.; Riazantsev, A.; Kuroda, K.

    2003-09-01

    An X-ray imaging detector called YAP imager has been developed for high-energy X-ray region at the SPring-8 facility. It possesses a [128×128] matrix of YAlO 3:Ce crystals, each element having a volume of 1×1×6 mm 3. A NIM logic module using programmable logic device chip was also developed as a position encoder. The YAP imager has been applied for some applications with a thermal barrier coating material and multi-layer metal sheets targets in the incident X-ray energy region of 70-150 keV. Direct X-ray beam profile at 100 keV was also measured.

  2. Construction of a 300-keV compact ion microbeam system with a three-stage acceleration lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yasuyuki; Ohkubo, Takeru; Kojima, Takuji; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen ion microbeams were experimentally formed at beam energies below 150 keV using a 300-keV compact microbeam system that was constructed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. This paper is a preliminary report on the performance of the three-stage acceleration lens used in the compact microbeam system. This system consists of a three-stage acceleration lens and a plasma-type ion source. Since the three-stage acceleration lens was designed to simultaneously accelerate and focus the ion beam, the compact microbeam system is only about 1-m high and can be placed in a small experimental room. To evaluate the effectiveness of the three-stage acceleration lens, experimentally measured beam sizes are compared with theoretically calculated ones. The calculated and measured beam sizes were consistent within 10%. This shows that the three-stage acceleration lens is effective as a focusing lens for forming microbeams.

  3. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Garwin, E. L.; Kirby, R. E.; Luh, D.-A.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C. Y.; Sheppard, J. C.; Turner, J.; Prepost, R.

    2005-08-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting RF structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a DC-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  4. Polarized neutrons and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, R.; Endoh, Y.; Felcher, G.; Majkrzak, C.; Mezei, F.; Pynn, R.; Shirane, G.

    1985-01-01

    The role of polarized neutrons in the study of magnetic and nonmagnetic materials is discussed. magnetic structure, spin density, nuclear magnetism and spin dynamics are listed as magnetic properties which may be accessed by polarized neutrons. Low dimensional magnets, disordered magnetic systems, surface magnetism are discussed as well as topography and depolarization. Polarization techniques are discussed for both study state and pulsed modes. 4 refs. (WRF)

  5. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.

    2004-11-19

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  6. TIME-RESOLVED 1-10 keV CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR THE Z MACHINE AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect

    D. V. Morgan; S. Gardner; R. Liljestrand; M. Madlener; S. Slavin; M. Wu

    2003-06-01

    We have designed, fabricated, calibrated, and fielded a fast, time-resolved 1-10 keV crystal spectrometer to observe the evolution of wire pinch spectra at the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. The instrument has two convex cylindrical crystals (PET and KAP). Both crystals Bragg reflect x-rays into an array of ten silicon diodes, providing continuous spectral coverage in twenty channels from 1.0 to 10 keV. The spectral response of the instrument has been calibrated from 1.0 to 6.3 keV at beamline X8A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The time response of the 1-mm2 silicon detectors was measured with the Pulsed X-ray Source at Bechtel Nevada's Los Alamos Operations, where 2-nanosecond full-width half-maximum (FWHM) waveforms with 700-picosecond rise times typically were observed. The spectrometer has been fielded recently on several experimental runs at the Z Machine. In this paper, we present the time-resolved spectra resulting from the implosions of double-nested tungsten wire arrays onto 5-mm diameter foam cylinders. We also show the results obtained for a double-nested stainless steel wire array with no target cylinder. The spectrometer was located at the end of a 7.1-meter beamline on line-of sight (LOS)21/22, at an angle 12{sup o} above the equatorial plane, and was protected from the debris field by a customized dual-slit fast valve. The soft detector channels below 2.0 keV recorded large signals at pinch time coinciding with signals recorded on vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs). On experiment Z993, the spectrometer channels recorded a second pulse with a hard x-ray emission spectrum several nanoseconds after pinch time.

  7. Cross section measurements of the B10(d,n0)C11 reaction below 160 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stave, S.; Ahmed, M. W.; Antolak, A. J.; Blackston, M. A.; Crowell, A. S.; Doyle, B. L.; Henshaw, S. S.; Howell, C. R.; Kingsberry, P.; Perdue, B. A.; Rossi, P.; Prior, R. M.; Spraker, M. C.; Weller, H. R.

    2008-05-01

    New data were taken at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory to investigate the plausibility of using low energy deuterons and the B10(d,n)C11 reaction as a portable source of 6.3 MeV neutrons. Analysis of the data at and below incident deuteron energies of 160 keV indicates an n0 neutron cross section that is lower than previous estimates by at least three orders of magnitude. In separate runs, deuterons with two different energies (160 and 140 keV) were stopped in a B10 target. The resulting n0 neutrons of approximately 6.3 MeV were detected at angles between 0° and 150°. The angle integrated yields were used to determine the astrophysical S factor for this reaction assuming a constant value for the S factor below 160 keV. The cross sections reported between 130 and 160 keV were calculated using the extracted value of the S factor. The measured n0 cross section is several orders of magnitude smaller than previous results, thus eliminating B10(d,n)C11 as a portable source of intense neutrons with low energy deuteron beams on the order of tens of microamps. In order to gain insight into the reaction dynamics at these low energies the cross section results have been compared with results from calculations using the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) and a detailed Hauser-Feshbach calculation performed by the authors. The angular distribution is consistent with the Hauser-Feshbach calculation suggesting a statistical compound nucleus reaction rather than a direct reaction.

  8. Statistical Properties of Local AGNs Inferred from the RXTE 3-20 keV All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M.; Sazonov, S. Yu.

    We have recently ([1]) performed an all-sky survey in the 3-20 keV band from the data accumulated during satellite slews in 1996-2002 - the RXTE slew survey (XSS). For 90% of the sky at |b|>10° , a flux limit for source detection of 2.5×10-11 erg/s/sq.cm(3-20 keV) or lower was achieved, while a combined area of 7000 sq.deg was sampled to record flux levels (for such very large-area surveys) below 10-11 erg/s/sq.cm. A catalog contains 294 X-ray sources. 236 of these sources were identified with a single known astronomical object. Of particular interest are 100 identified active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and 35 unidentified sources. The hard spectra of the latter suggest that many of them will probably also prove AGNs when follow-up observations are performed. Most of the detected AGNs belong to the local population (z<0.1). In addition, the hard X-ray band of the XSS (3-20 keV) as compared to most previous X-ray surveys, performed at photon energies below 10 keV, has made possible the detection of a substantial number of X-ray absorbed AGNs (mostly Seyfert 2 galaxies). These properties make the XSS sample of AGNs a valuable one for the study of the local population of AGNs. We carried out a thorough statistical analysis of the above sample in order to investigate several key properties of the local population of AGNs, in particular their distribution in intrinsic absorption column density (NH) and X-ray luminosity function ([2]). Knowledge of these characteristics provides important constraints for AGN unification models and synthesis of the cosmic X-ray background, and is further needed to understand the details of the accretion-driven growth of supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies.

  9. Polar-direct-drive simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Skupsky, S.; Bonino, M.J.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.

    2006-05-15

    Polar direct drive (PDD) [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] will allow direct-drive ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] as it is configured for x-ray drive. Optimal drive uniformity is obtained via a combination of beam repointing, pulse shapes, spot shapes, and/or target design. This article describes progress in the development of standard and 'Saturn' [R. S. Craxton and D. W. Jacobs-Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 0952002 (2005)] PDD target designs. Initial evaluation of experiments on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)] and simulations were carried out with the two-dimensional hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056304 (2005)]. This article adds to this body of work by including fusion particle production and transport as well as radiation transport within the two-dimensional DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] hydrodynamics simulations used to model experiments. Forty OMEGA beams arranged in six rings to emulate the NIF x-ray-drive configuration are used to perform direct-drive implosions of CH shells filled with D{sub 2} gas. Target performance was diagnosed with framed x-ray backlighting and by the measured fusion yield. Saturn target experiments have resulted in {approx}75% of the yield from energy-equivalent, symmetrically irradiated implosions. The results of the two-dimensional PDD simulations performed with DRACO are in good agreement with experimental x-ray radiographs. DRACO is being used to further optimize standard PDD designs. In addition, DRACO simulations of NIF-scale PDD designs show ignition with a gain of 20 and the development of a 40 {mu}m radius, 10 keV region with a neutron-averaged {rho}r of 1270 mg/cm{sup 2} near stagnation.

  10. The ^3H(p,γ)^4He Reaction below 80 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon, R. S.; Kelley, J. H.; Nelson, S. O.; Schreiber, E. C.; Saburov, K.; Wulf, E. A.; Weller, H. R.; Prior, R. M.; Spraker, M.; Tilley, D. R.

    1999-10-01

    Significant advances in three body theory have resulted in excellent agreement with experimental radiative capture measurements(E. A. Wulf et al.), submitted to PRL. and emphasize the importance of MEC effects at energies below 100 keV(G. Schmid et al.), PRC 56, 2565 (1997).. Preliminary work has begun in applying these techniques to the four-body problem(A. Fonseca,W. Glöckle,A. Kievsky,H. Witala, (private communication).). In order to provide accurate experimental data for these forthcoming theoretical predictions, low energy polarized proton capture on tritium is being studied at TUNL. Preliminary results of these studies, which include a determination of the absolute cross section and measurements of the angular distributions of analyzing powers and cross sections, will be presented. Implications of these measurements will be discussed along with plans for future studies.

  11. Polar Cap Plasma and Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Heather A.; Craven, Paul D.; Comfort, Richard H.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation will describe the character of the polar cap plasma in 10% AGU Spring 1998 particular the convection velocities at the perigee (about 1.8 Re) and apogee( about 8.9 Re) of Polar in relationship to Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and solar wind parameters. This plasma is thought to be due to several sources; the polar wind, cleft ion fountain, and auroral outflow. The plasma in the polar cap tends to be mostly field-aligned. At any given point in the polar cap, this plasma could be from a different regions since convection of magnetic field lines can transport this material. it is quite difficult to study such a phenomena with single point measurements. Current knowledge of the polar cap plasma obtained by in situ measurements will be presented along with recent results from the Polar mission. This study also examines the direct electrical coupling between the magnetosphere and ionosphere by comparing convection velocities measured by the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) instruments in magnetosphere and measurements of the ionosphere by ground-based radars. At times such a comparison is difficult because the Polar satellite at apogee spends a large amount of time in the polar cap which is a region that is not coverage well by the current SuperDam coherent radars. This is impart due to the lack of irregularities that returns the radar signal.

  12. Neptune may have polar rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.; Borderies, N. J.

    1989-08-01

    Perturbations from Neptune's highly inclined satellite Triton can maintain rings passing nearly over Neptune's poles. These hypothetical polar rings are nearly perpendicular to Triton's orbit as well, and lie within several degrees of the plane of Voyager II's trajectory through the Neptunian system. Polar rings can coexist with equatorial rings at different radii. A randomly oriented torus of debris around Neptune has a probability of several percent to settle into a polar ring. Voyager II stands a significant chance of encountering a polar ring.

  13. Optimizing dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornet, Aurélien; Jannin, Sami

    2016-03-01

    This article is a short review of some of our recent developments in dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP). We present the basic principles of d-DNP, and motivate our choice to step away from conventional approaches. We then introduce a modified d-DNP recipe that can be summed up as follows: Using broad line polarizing agents to efficiently polarize 1H spins. Increasing the magnetic field to 6.7 T and above. Applying microwave frequency modulation. Applying 1H-13C cross polarization. Transferring hyperpolarized solution through a magnetic tunnel.

  14. Polarization signals in mantis shrimps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Roberts, Nicholas; Marshall, Justin

    2009-08-01

    While color signals are well known as a form of animal communication, a number of animals communicate using signals based on patterns of polarized light reflected from specialized body parts or structures. Mantis shrimps, a group of marine crustaceans, have evolved a great diversity of such signals, several of which are based on photonic structures. These include resonant scattering devices, structures based on layered dichroic molecules, and structures that use birefringent layers to produce circular polarization. Such biological polarizers operate in different spectral regions ranging from the near-UV to medium wavelengths of visible light. In addition to the structures that are specialized for signal production, the eyes of many species of mantis shrimp are adapted to detect linearly polarized light in the ultraviolet and in the green, using specialized sets of photoreceptors with oriented, dichroic visual pigments. Finally, a few mantis shrimp species produce biophotonic retarders within their photoreceptors that permit the detection of circularly polarized light and are thus the only animals known to sense this form of polarization. Mantis shrimps use polarized light in species-specific signals related to mating and territorial defense, and their means of manipulating light's polarization can inspire designs for artificial polarizers and achromatic retarders.

  15. Organelle positioning and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Bornens, Michel

    2008-11-01

    In spite of conspicuous differences in their polarized architecture, swimming unicellular eukaryotes and migrating cells from metazoa display a conserved hierarchical interlocking of the main cellular compartments, in which the microtubule network has a dominant role. A microtubule array can organize the distribution of endomembranes owing to a cell-wide and polarized extension around a unique nucleus-associated structure. The nucleus-associated structure in animal cells contains a highly conserved organelle, the centriole or basal body. This organelle has a defined polarity that can be transmitted to the cell. Its conservative mode of duplication seems to be a core mechanism for the transmission of polarities through cell division.

  16. Discovery of a 6.4 keV Emission Line in a Burst from SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Ibrahim, Alaa I.

    2000-01-01

    We present evidence of a 6.4 key emission line during a burst from the soft gamma repeater SGR 1900+14. The Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) monitored this source extensively during its outburst in the summer of 1998. A strong burst observed on 1998 August 29 revealed a number of unique properties. The burst exhibits a precursor and is followed by a long (approx. 10(exp 3) s) tail modulated at the 5.16 s stellar rotation period. The precursor has a duration of approx. equals 0.85 s and shows both significant spectral evolution as well as an emission feature centered near 6.4 keV during the first 0.3 s of the event, when the X-ray spectrum was hardest. The continuum during the burst is well fit with an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with the temperature ranging from approx. equals 40 to 10 keV. The line is strong, with an equivalent width of approx. 400 eV, and is consistent with Fe K(alpha) fluorescence from relatively coot material. If the rest-frame energy is indeed 6.4 keV, then the lack of an observed redshift indicates that the source is at least approx. 80 km above the neutron star surface. We discuss the implications of the line detection in the context of models for SGRs.

  17. Analysis of experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental data on neutron-proton scattering in the energy range between 0 and 150 keV are analyzed by using various sets of effective-range parameters. It is shown that, in contrast to the parameters corresponding to the phase shifts of a Nijmegen group, the parameters corresponding to the experimental phase shifts reported by a group from George Washington University (GWU group) lead to very good agreement between the calculated cross sections and their experimental counterparts in the energy region under consideration. On the basis of the experimental value of the cross section for neutron—proton scattering at an energy of 2 keV, the total cross section for neutron-proton scattering at zero energy was found to be σ 0 = 20.428(16) b, which is in very good agreement with a value of σ 0 = 20.423(9) b, which was obtained as the weighted mean of the cross sections presented by Houke and Hurst. It is shown that, in the energy region around several tens of keV units, the effective-range parameters matched with Dilg’s cross-section value of σ 0 = 20.491(14) b lead to calculated cross sections whose values are in excess of their experimental counterparts.

  18. Galaxy Clusters in the Swift/BAT era II: 10 more Clusters detected above 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Reimer, O.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; /Palermo Observ.

    2010-10-27

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/BAT all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are: Bullet, Abell 85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and Abell 3667) we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For Abell 3667 the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT = {approx}13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely thermal origin.

  19. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE SWIFT/BAT ERA. II. 10 MORE CLUSTERS DETECTED ABOVE 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Reimer, O.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.

    2010-12-20

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are Bullet, A85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters, we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters' emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and A3667), we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law-like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For A3667, the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT {approx} 13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely a thermal origin.

  20. Searching for the 3.5 keV Line in the Stacked Suzaku Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, Esra; Markevitch, Maxim; Foster, Adam; Miller, Eric; Bautz, Mark; Loewenstein, Mike; Randall, Scott W.; Smith, Randall K.

    2016-11-01

    We perform a detailed study of the stacked Suzaku observations of 47 galaxy clusters, spanning a redshift range of 0.01–0.45, to search for the unidentified 3.5 keV line. This sample provides an independent test for the previously detected line. We detect a 2σ -significant spectral feature at 3.5 keV in the spectrum of the full sample. When the sample is divided into two subsamples (cool-core and non-cool core clusters), the cool-core subsample shows no statistically significant positive residuals at the line energy. A very weak (∼ 2σ confidence) spectral feature at 3.5 keV is permitted by the data from the non-cool-core clusters sample. The upper limit on a neutrino decay mixing angle of {\\sin }2(2θ )=6.1× {10}-11 from the full Suzaku sample is consistent with the previous detections in the stacked XMM-Newton sample of galaxy clusters (which had a higher statistical sensitivity to faint lines), M31, and Galactic center, at a 90% confidence level. However, the constraint from the present sample, which does not include the Perseus cluster, is in tension with previously reported line flux observed in the core of the Perseus cluster with XMM-Newton and Suzaku.

  1. The Crossroads between the Galactic Disk and Interstellar Space, Ablaze in 3/4 keV Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.

    2016-04-01

    The halo is the crossroads between the Galactic disk and intergalactic space. This region is inhabited by hot gas that has risen from the disk, gas heated in situ, and hot material that has fallen in from intergalactic space. Owing to high spectral resolution observations made by by XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra of the hot plasma's 3/4 keV emission and absorption, increasingly sophisticated and CPU intensive computer modeling, and an awareness that charge exchange can contaminate 3/4 keV observations, we are now better able to understand the hot halo gas than ever before.Spectral analyses indicate that the 3/4 keV emission comes from T ~ 2.2 million Kelvin gas. Although observations suggest that the gas may be convectively unstable and the spectra's temperature is similar to that predicted by recent sophisticated models of the galactic fountain, the observed emission measure is significantly brighter than that predicted by fountain models. This brightness disparity presents us with another type of crossroads: should we continue down the road of adding physics to already sophisticated modeling or should we seek out other sources? In this presentation, I will discuss the galactic fountain crossroads, note the latitudinal and longitudinal distribution of the hot halo gas, provide an update on charge exchange, and explain how shadowing observations have helped to fine tune our understanding of the hot gas.

  2. Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Patterson, J. R.; Regan, S. P.

    2013-10-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (~13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ~10 × greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the NIF laser beams deposited ~700 kJ of 3 ω light into the target in a ~140 TW, 5.0 ns duration square pulse. This laser configuration sufficiently heated the targets to optimize the K-shell x-ray emission. The Dante diagnostics measured ~5 TW into 4 π solid angle of >=12 keV x rays for ~4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr Heα line at 13 keV. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under the intera- gency agreements 10027-1420 and 10027-6167.

  3. THE X-RAY LINE FEATURE AT 3.5 KeV IN GALAXY CLUSTER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J. E-mail: bs@cbk.pan.wroc.pl

    2015-08-10

    Recent work by Bulbul et al. and Boyarsky et al. has suggested that a line feature at ∼3.5 keV in the X-ray spectra of galaxy clusters and individual galaxies seen with XMM-Newton is due to the decay of sterile neutrinos, a dark matter candidate. This identification has been criticized by Jeltema and Profumo on the grounds that model spectra suggest that atomic transitions in helium-like potassium (K xviii) and chlorine (Cl xvi) are more likely to be the emitters. Here it is pointed out that the K xviii lines have been observed in numerous solar flare spectra at high spectral resolution with the RESIK crystal spectrometer and also appear in Chandra HETG spectra of the coronally active star σ Gem. In addition, the solar flare spectra at least indicate a mean coronal potassium abundance, which is a factor between 9 and 11 higher than the solar photospheric abundance. This fact, together with the low statistical quality of the XMM-Newton spectra, completely account for the ∼3.5 keV feature and there is therefore no need to invoke a sterile neutrino interpretation of the observed line feature at ∼3.5 keV.

  4. Variable Gap Undulator for 1.5-48 Kev Free Electron Laser at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-17

    We study the feasibility of generating femtosecond duration Free-Electron Laser with a variable photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron bunch with the same characteristics of the LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) bunch, and a planar undulator with additional focusing. We assume that the electron bunch energy can be changed, and the undulator has a variable gap, allowing a variable undulator parameter. It is assumed to be operated in an ultra-low charge and ultra-short pulse regime. We study the feasibility of a tunable, short pulse, X-ray FEL with photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron beam like the one in the LCLS and a 2:5 cm period, variable gap, planar undulator. The beam energy changes from 4.6 to 13.8 GeV, the electorn charge is kept at 10 pC, and the undulator parameter varies from 1 to 3. The undulator length needed to saturate the 48 keV FEL is about 55 m, with a peak power around 5 GW. At longer wavelength the saturation length is as short as 15 m, and the peak power around 20 GW. The results from the analytical models and the GENESIS simulations show that the system is feasible. The large wavelength range, full tunability and short, few femtosecond pulses, together with the large peak power, would provide a powerful research tool.

  5. Novel Method to Study Neutron Capture of U235 and U238 Simultaneously at keV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Belgya, T.; Bichler, M.; Buczak, K.; Dillmann, I.; Käppeler, F.; Lederer, C.; Mengoni, A.; Quinto, F.; Steier, P.; Szentmiklosi, L.

    2014-05-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the main uranium isotopes, U235 and U238, were measured simultaneously for keV energies, for the first time by combining activation technique and atom counting of the reaction products using accelerator mass spectrometry. New data, with a precision of 3%-5%, were obtained from mg-sized natural uranium samples for neutron energies with an equivalent Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kT ˜25 keV and for a broad energy distribution peaking at 426 keV. The cross-section ratio of U235(n ,γ)/U238(n ,γ) can be deduced in accelerator mass spectrometry directly from the atom ratio of the reaction products U236/U239, independent of any fluence normalization. Our results confirm the values at the lower band of existing data. They serve as important anchor points to resolve present discrepancies in nuclear data libraries as well as for the normalization of cross-section data used in the nuclear astrophysics community for s-process studies.

  6. The first MAXI/SSC catalog of X-ray sources in 0.7-7.0 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Hiroshi; Uchida, Daiki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Imatani, Ritsuko; Kimura, Masashi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Hanayama, Takanori; Yoshidome, Koshiro

    2016-06-01

    We present the first source catalog of the Solid-state Slit Camera (SSC) of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) mission on the International Space Station, using the 45-month data from 2010 August to 2014 April in the 0.7-7.0 keV bands. Sources are searched for in two energy bands, 0.7-1.85 keV (soft) and 1.85-7.0 keV (hard), the limiting sensitivity of 3 and 4 mCrab are achieved, and 140 and 138 sources are detected in the soft and hard energy bands, respectively. Combining the two energy bands, 170 sources are listed in the MAXI/SSC catalog. All but 2 sources are identified with 22 galaxies including AGNs, 29 cluster of galaxies, 21 supernova remnants, 75 X-ray binaries, 8 stars, 5 isolated pulsars, and 9 non-categorized objects. Comparing the soft-band fluxes at the brightest end in our catalog with the ROSAT survey, which was performed about 20 years ago, 10% of the cataloged sources are found to have changed flux since the ROSAT era.

  7. Decaying vector dark matter as an explanation for the 3.5 keV line from galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Farzan, Yasaman; Akbarieh, Amin Rezaei E-mail: am_rezaei@physics.sharif.ir

    2014-11-01

    We present a Vector Dark Matter (VDM) model that explains the 3.5 keV line recently observed in the XMM-Newton observatory data from galaxy clusters. In this model, dark matter is composed of two vector bosons, V and V', which couple to the photon through an effective generalized Chern-Simons coupling, g{sub V}. V' is slightly heavier than V with a mass splitting m{sub V'} – m{sub V} ≅ 3.5 keV. The decay of V' to V and a photon gives rise to the 3.5 keV line. The production of V and V' takes place in the early universe within the freeze-in framework through the effective g{sub V} coupling when m{sub V'} < T < Λ, Λ being the cut-off above which the effective g{sub V} coupling is not valid. We introduce a high energy model that gives rise to the g{sub V} coupling at low energies. To do this, V and V' are promoted to gauge bosons of spontaneously broken new U(1){sub V} and U(1){sub V'} gauge symmetries, respectively. The high energy sector includes milli-charged chiral fermions that lead to the g{sub V} coupling at low energy via triangle diagrams.

  8. Applications of non-periodic multilayer optics for high-resolution x-ray microscopes below 30 keV.

    PubMed

    Troussel, Ph; Dennetiere, D; Rousseau, A; Darbon, S; Høghøj, P; Hedacq, S; Krumrey, M

    2012-10-01

    Multilayer mirrors with enhanced bandwidth were developed with special performances for dense plasma diagnostics and mainly for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging. The multilayer coatings are designed to provide broadband x-ray reflectance at low grazing incidence angles. They are deposited onto toroidal mirror substrates. Our research is directed at the development of non-periodic (depth graded) W∕Si multilayer specifically designed for use in the 1 to 30 keV photon energy band. First, we present a study for a 5 to 22 keV x-ray spectral window at 0.45° grazing angle. The goal is to obtain a high and constant reflectivity. Second, we have modeled a broadband mirror coating for harder x-rays in the range from 10 to 30 keV, with a non-periodic structure containing 300 W∕SiC layers with periods in the range from 0.8 to 4 nm, designed for 0.35° grazing incidence angle.

  9. Polarized tritium target development

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Work began on the development of a completely sealed polarized tritium target for experiments at CEBAF. Because of the similarities between optical pumping of tritium and hydrogen, all prototype work is done with hydrogen. We constructed a test station for filling glassware with hydrogen, where we can dissociate molecular hydrogen and monitor the purity of the gas. A simple two-cell glass system was constructed, consisting of a region in which the molecular hydrogen is dissociated with an RF discharge and a region where the atoms can be optically pumped. So far, a clean discharge was obtained in the glassware. With this system, we plan to investigate ways to eliminate the discharge from the optical pumping region and test the quality of the discharge once the pumping cell is coated with drifilm.

  10. Polar Cap Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows kidney bean-shaped pits, and other pits, formed by erosion in a landscape of frozen carbon dioxide. This images shows one of about a dozen different patterns that are common in various locations across the martian south polar residual cap, an area that has been receiving intense scrutiny by the MGS MOC this year, because it is visible on every orbit and in daylight for most of 2005.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 6.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  11. South Polar Artwork

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-456, 18 August 2003

    Nature has created some interesting artwork on the south polar residual cap of Mars. This July 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example. The patterns in this picture are formed by erosion and sublimation of multiple layers of frozen carbon dioxide. The artwork is ephemeral and changing with each passing summer. By the end of the coming southern summer, the scarps in this area will have retreated an average of 3 meters (3.3 yards); some of the smaller buttes and ridges will have vanished. This picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is located near 86.6oS, 358.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  12. Interferometric Polarization Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T. (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); Moseley, Samuel H. (Inventor); Novak, Giles A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A signal conditioning module provides a polarimeter capability in a photometric system. The module may include multiple variable delay polarization modulators. Each modulator may include an input port, and a first arm formed to include a first reflector and first rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The first reflector may direct an input radiation signal to the first rooftop mirror. Each modulator also may include an output port and a second arm formed to include a second reflector and second rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The second reflector can guide a signal from the second rooftop mirror towards the output port to provide an output radiation signal. A beamsplitting grid may be placed between the first reflector and the first rooftop mirror, and also between the second reflector and the second rooftop mirror. A translation apparatus can provide adjustment relative to optical path length vis-a-vis the first arm, the second arm and the grid.

  13. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  14. Imaging with polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Martin; Manke, Ingo; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Strobl, Markus; Banhart, John

    2009-04-01

    Neutrons have zero net electrical charge and can thus penetrate deeply into matter, but their intrinsic magnetic moment makes them highly sensitive to magnetic fields. These properties have been combined with radiographic (2D) and tomographic (3D) imaging methods to provide a unique technique to probe macroscopic magnetic phenomena both within and around bulk matter. Based on the spin-rotation of a polarized neutron beam as it passes through a magnetic field, this method allows the direct, real-space visualization of magnetic field distributions. It has been used to investigate the Meissner effect in a type I (Pb) and a type II (YBCO) superconductor, flux trapping in a type I (Pb) superconductor, and the electromagnetic field associated with a direct current flowing in a solenoid. The latter results have been compared to predictions calculated using the Biot-Savart law and have been found to agree well.

  15. Polar research from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    In the polar regions and climate change section, the topics of ocean/atmosphere heat transfer, trace gases, surface albedo, and response to climate warming are discussed. The satellite instruments section is divided into three parts. Part one is about basic principles and covers, choice of frequencies, algorithms, orbits, and remote sensing techniques. Part two is about passive sensors and covers microwave radiometers, medium-resolution visible and infrared sensors, advanced very high resolution radiometers, optical line scanners, earth radiation budget experiment, coastal zone color scanner, high-resolution imagers, and atmospheric sounding. Part three is about active sensors and covers synthetic aperture radar, radar altimeters, scatterometers, and lidar. There is also a next decade section that is followed by a summary and recommendations section.

  16. South Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    8 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an area adjacent to the south polar residual cap that hosts several intricate fracture networks. Each network consists of multiple fractures radiating from a central location. Their origin is not understood -- some investigators have speculated that these are sites of release of carbon dioxide from beneath the ground, but this explanation seems inadequate to explain all attributes of the features. MOC images have shown that these features have not been changing from year to year during the course of the MGS mission.

    Location near: 87.1oS, 234.1oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  17. Frosty North Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-349, 3 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is a springtime view of frost-covered layers revealed by an eroded scarp in the martian north polar cap. The layers are thought to consist of a mixture of dust, ice, and possibly sand. Some layers are known to be a source for dark sand that occurs in nearby dunes. During the summer, this surface would be considerably darker because most of the bright frost sublimes away during the spring season. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide near 85.2oN, 4.4oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  18. South Polar Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-337, 21 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 'swiss cheese' pattern of frozen carbon dioxide on the south polar residual cap. Observation of these materials over two Mars years has revealed that the scarps that bound the mesas and small buttes are retreating-the carbon dioxide ice is subliming away-at a rate of about 3 meters (3 yards) per Mars year in some places. The picture covers an area about 900 m (about 900 yards) wide near 87.1oS, 93.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  19. South Polar 'Poodle'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-422, 15 July 2003

    Have you ever stared up at the clouds in the sky and seen the shapes of animals, people, or objects? Sometimes when the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) team is looking at newly-returned pictures from Mars, the same thing happens. This is a picture of pits and scarps in the frozen south polar carbon dioxide ice cap. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper right. At the bottom of the picture is a feature that resembles a long, thin poodle; its head faces to the left, the tail to the right. This picture is located near 86.9oS, 55.8oW.

  20. Interferometric polarization control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); Moseley, Samuel H. (Inventor); Novak, Giles A. (Inventor); Chuss, David T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A signal conditioning module provides a polarimeter capability in a photometric system. The module may include multiple variable delay polarization modulators. Each modulator may include an input port, and a first arm formed to include a first reflector and first rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The first reflector may direct an input radiation signal to the first rooftop mirror. Each modulator also may include an output port and a second arm formed to include a second reflector and second rooftop mirror arranged in opposed relationship. The second reflector can guide a signal from the second rooftop mirror towards the output port to provide an output radiation signal. A beamsplitting grid may be placed between the first reflector and the first rooftop mirror, and also between the second reflector and the second rooftop mirror. A translation apparatus can provide adjustment relative to optical path length vis-a-vis the first arm, the second arm and the grid.

  1. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  2. Cretaceous polar climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.M.; Horrell, M.A.; Lottes, A.L.; Gierlowski, T.C.

    1988-02-01

    The Cretaceous, like most Phanerozoic periods, was characterized by ice-free poles. Some still argue that the glaciers and sea ice were there, and that the tillites, etc, have been eroded or remain undiscovered. However, diverse floras, dense forests, and coal-forming cypress swamps, and dinosaurs, crocodilians, and lungfish are known from areas that were certainly at 75/degree/-80/degree/ north and south paleolatitude in the Cretaceous, implying that the coastal basins did not experience hard freezes. No deep marine connections to the North Pole existed in the Cretaceous, so oceanic polar heat transport can be discounted. However, the five north-south trending epeiric or rift-related seaways that connected or nearly connected the Tethys to the Arctic would have dampened the seasonal temperature cycle, bring maritime climates deep into the North American and Eurasian continents and, more importantly, would have served as an energy source and channel for winter storms, much as the Gulf Stream does today. Cyclones have a natural tendency to move poleward, because of the increase in the Coriolis Parameter, and they transport both sensible and latent heat. The coastal regions of the relatively warm polar ocean in the Cretaceous would have received continuous precipitation during the winter because cyclones would be entering from as many as five directions. Coastal rainfall would also have been abundant in the summer but for a different reason; the land-sea temperature profile would reverse, with the warm land surface drawing in moisture, while clear ice-free conditions over the ocean would allow for solar warming.

  3. Cretaceous polar climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, A.M.; Horrell, M.A.; Lottes, A.L.; Gierlowski, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Cretaceous, like most Phanerozooic periods, was characterized by ice-free poles. Some still argue that the glacier and sea ice were there, and that the tillites, etc, have been eroded or remain undiscovered. However, diverse floras, dense forests, coal-forming cypress swamps, and dinosaurs, crocodilians, and lungfish are known from areas that were certainly at 75/sup 0/-80/sup 0/ north and south paleolatitude in the Cretaceous, implying that the coastal basins did not experience hard freezes. No deep marine connections to the North Pole existed in the Cretaceous, so oceanic polar heat transport can be discounted. However, the five north-south trending epeiric or rift-related seaways that connected or nearly connected the Tethys to the Arctic would have dampened the seasonal temperature cycle, bringing maritime climates deep into the North American and Eurasian continents and, more importantly, would have served as an energy source and channel for winter storms, much as the Gulf Stream does today. Cyclones have a natural tendency to move poleward, because of the increase in the Coriolis Paramteter, and they transport both sensible and latent heat. The coastal regions of the relatively warm polar ocean in the Cretaceous would have received continuous precipitation during the winter because cyclones would be entering from as many as five directions. Coastal rainfall would also have been abundant in the summer but for a different reason; the land-sea temperature profile would reverse, with the warm land surface drawing in moisture, while clear ice-free conditions over the ocean would allow for solar warming.

  4. Polarization effects in radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Konchatnij, M. I. Korchin, A. Yu.; Merenkov, N. P.

    2015-02-15

    The polarization effects in the one-meson radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton, τ → π{sup −}γν{sub τ}, are investigated. The inner bremsstrahlung and structural amplitudes are taken into account. The asymmetry of the differential decay width caused by the τ-lepton polarization and the Stokes parameters of the emitted photon itself are calculated depending on the polarization of the decaying τ lepton. These physical quantities are estimated numerically for an arbitrary direction of the τ lepton polarization 3-vector in the rest frame. The vector and axial-vector form factors describing the structure-dependent part of the decay amplitude are determined using the chiral effective theory with resonances (RχT)

  5. Circularly Polarized MHOHG with Bichromatic Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Mauger, Francois; Uzer, Turgay

    2016-05-01

    Circularly polarized MHOHG-Molecular High Order Harmonic Generation is shown to occur efficiently with intense ultrashort bichromatic circularly polarized pulses due to frequent electron-parent -ion recollision with co-or counter-rotating incident circular pulses as predicted in 1995. We show in this context that molecules offer a very robust and efficient frameworkfor the production of circularly polarized harmonics for the generation of single circularly polarized ``attosecond'' pulses. The efficiency of such new MHOHG is shown to depend on the compatibility of the symmetry of the molecular medium with the net electric field generated by the combination of the laser pulses.Using a time-dependent symmetry analysis with concrete examples such as H 2 + vs H 3 + we show how all the features(harmonic order and ∧ polarization) of MHOHG can be explained and predicted.

  6. Dynamic nuclear polarization of 17O: direct polarization.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization of (17)O was studied using four different polarizing agents: the biradical TOTAPOL and the monoradicals trityl and SA-BDPA, as well as a mixture of the latter two. Field profiles, DNP mechanisms, and enhancements were measured to better understand and optimize directly polarizing this low-gamma quadrupolar nucleus using both mono- and biradical polarizing agents. Enhancements were recorded at <88 K and were >100 using the trityl (OX063) radical and <10 with the other polarizing agents. The >10,000-fold savings in acquisition time enabled a series of biologically relevant small molecules to be studied with small sample sizes and the measurement of various quadrupolar parameters. The results are discussed with comparison to room temperature studies and GIPAW quantum chemical calculations. These experimental results illustrate the strength of high field DNP and the importance of radical selection for studying low-gamma nuclei.

  7. Polar observations of ion/electron bursts at the pre-dawn polar cap boundary: evidence for internal reconnection of overdraped lobe flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2008-08-01

    Observations made by Polar of ion-electron bursts on the dawn side of the polar cap are presented. They occurred when conditions external to the magnetosphere corresponded to that of the sheath region of a magnetic cloud, which was characterized by very high densities/dynamic pressure and a magnetic field which was strong in all components and which was tilted antisunward (Bx<0) and northward (Bz>0) with its clock angle lying between 20 and 90° (By: 8 15 nT). A clear temporal development in the energy range spanned by the individual ion bursts (from 0.2 2 keV to 1 10 keV) was present. We relate this to a corresponding temporal evolution in the cloud sheath field and plasma. We analyze the solar wind-magnetosphere aspects of the observations using the concepts of (i) (i) overdraped lobe flux, (ii) Bx- and By-regulated sequential reconnections in opposite hemispheres (magnetopause and internal modes), and (iii) newly-closed magnetic flux. In particular, we find that the most energetic ion bursts (accompanied by bi-directionally streaming electrons at 1 10 keV and intense magnetosheath-origin fluxes) are located on newly closed field lines generated by internal reconnection occurring between overdraped lobe field lines and the closed geomagnetic field. This result corroborates a topology of lobe reconnection under conditions of dipole tilt and/or nonzero IMF Bx component advanced by Watanabe et al. (2006), which in our case is adapted to nonzero IMF By conditions.

  8. Portable imaging polarized light analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashar, Nadav; Cronin, Thomas W.; Johnson, George; Wolff, Lawrence B.

    1995-06-01

    Many animals, both marine and terrestrial, are sensitive to the orientation of the e-vector of partially linearly polarized light (PLPL). This sensitivity is used for navigation, spatial orientation, and detection of large bodies of water. However, it is not clear what other information animals may receive from polarized light. Natural light fields, both in the sky and underwater, are known to be partially polarized. Additionally, natural objects reflect light that is polarized at specific orientations. Sensors capable of measuring the characteristics of PLPL, namely partial polarization and orientation, throughout an image are not yet available. By placing 2 twisted nematic liquid crystals (TNLCs) and a fixed polarizing filter in series in front of a video camera, and by controlling the angles of rotation of the orientation of polarization produced by the TNLCs, we are able to fully analyze PLPL throughout a full image on a single pixel basis. As a recording device we use a small camcorder. The sensor can be operated autonomously, with the images analyzed at a later stage, or it can be connected (in a future phase) via a frame grabber to a personal computer which analyzes the information online. The analyzed image can be presented as a false color image, where hue represents orientation of polarization and saturation represents partial polarization. Field measurements confirm that PLPL is a characteristic distributed both under water and on land. Marine background light is strongly horizontally polarized. Light reflected from leaves is polarized mainly according to their spatial orientation. Differences between PLPL reflected from objects or animals and their background can be used to enhance contrast and break color camouflage. Our sensor presents a new approach for answering questions related to the ecology of vision and is a new tool for remote sensing.

  9. Dependence of Cell Survival on Iododeoxyuridine Concentration in 35-keV Photon-Activated Auger Electron Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dugas, Joseph P.; Varnes, Marie E.; Sajo, Erno; Welch, Christopher E.; Ham, Kyungmin; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and compare Chinese hamster ovary cell survival curves using monochromatic 35-keV photons and 4-MV x-rays as a function of concentration of the radiosensitizer iododeoxyuridine (IUdR). Methods and Materials: IUdR was incorporated into Chinese hamster ovary cell DNA at 16.6 {+-} 1.9%, 12.0 {+-} 1.4%, and 9.2 {+-} 1.3% thymidine replacement. Cells were irradiated from 1 to 8 Gy with 35-keV synchrotron-generated photons and conventional radiotherapy 4-MV x-rays. The effects of the radiation were measured via clonogenic survival assays. Surviving fraction was plotted vs. dose and fit to a linear quadratic model. Sensitization enhancement ratios (SER{sub 10}) were calculated as the ratio of doses required to achieve 10% surviving fraction for cells without and with DNA-incorporated IUdR. Results: At 4 MV, SER{sub 10} values were 2.6 {+-} 0.1, 2.2 {+-} 0.1, and 1.5 {+-} 0.1 for 16.6%, 12.0%, and 9.2% thymidine replacement, respectively. At 35 keV, SER{sub 10} values were 4.1 {+-} 0.2, 3.0 {+-} 0.1, and 2.0 {+-} 0.1, respectively, which yielded SER{sub 10} ratios (35 keV:4 MV) of 1.6 {+-} 0.1, 1.4 {+-} 0.1, and 1.3 {+-} 0.1, respectively. Conclusions: SER{sub 10} increases monotonically with percent thymidine replacement by IUdR for both modalities. As compared to 4-MV x-rays, 35-keV photons produce enhanced SER{sub 10} values whose ratios are linear with percent thymidine replacement and assumed to be due to Auger electrons contributing to enhanced dose to DNA. Although this Auger effectiveness factor is less than the radiosensitization factor of IUdR, both could be important for the clinical efficacy of IUdR radiotherapy.

  10. Experimental Test in a Tokamak of Fusion with Spin-Polarized D and 3He

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, Arnold; Sandorfi, Andrew

    2007-06-13

    An experiment to test polarization retention of highly polarized D and 3He fusion fuels prior to their fusion reactions in a tokamak is in preparation. The fusion reaction rate with 100% vector polarized reactants is expected from simple theory to increase by a factor of 1.5. With presently available polarizations, fusion reaction enhancements of {approx}15% are achievable and of significant interest, while several avenues for obtaining higher polarizations are open. The potential for survival of initial fusion fuel polarizations at {approx}108 K plasma core temperatures ({approx}5KeV) throughout the time interval preceding fusion burn was addressed in a seminal paper in 1982. While the positive conclusion from those calculations suggests that reaction enhancements are indeed feasible, this crucial factor has never been tested in a high temperature plasma core because of difficulties in preparation and injection of sufficiently polarized fusion fuels into a high temperature reactor fusion plasma. Our solution to these problems employs a new source of highly polarized D in the form of solid HD which has been developed and used in our laboratories. Solid HD is compatible with fusion physics in view of its simplicity of elemental composition and very long (weeks) relaxation times at 4K temperature, allowing efficient polarization-preserving cold-transfer operations. Containment and polarization of the HD within polymer capsules, similar to those used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), is an innovation which simplifies the cold-transfer of polarized fuel from the dilution refrigerator polarization-production apparatus to other liquid helium temperature cryostats, for storage, transport and placement into the barrel of a cryogenic pellet gun for firing at high velocity into the reactor. The other polarized fuel partner, 3He, has been prepared as a polarized gas for applications including high-energy polarized targets and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. It

  11. Experimental Test in a Tokamak of Fusion with Spin-Polarized D and 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honig, Arnold; Sandorfi, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    An experiment to test polarization retention of highly polarized D and 3He fusion fuels prior to their fusion reactions in a tTokamak is in preparation. The fusion reaction rate with 100% vector polarized reactants is expected from simple theory to increase by a factor of 1.5. With presently available polarizations, fusion reaction enhancements of ˜15% are achievable and of significant interest, while several avenues for obtaining higher polarizations are open. The potential for survival of initial fusion fuel polarizations at ˜108 K plasma core temperatures (˜5KeV) throughout the time interval preceding fusion burn was addressed in a seminal paper in 1982. While the positive conclusion from those calculations suggests that reaction enhancements are indeed feasible, this crucial factor has never been tested in a high temperature plasma core because of difficulties in preparation and injection of sufficiently polarized fusion fuels into a high temperature reactorfusion plasma. Our solution to these problems employs a new source of highly polarized D in the form of solid HD which has been developed and used in our laboratories. Solid HD is compatible with fusion physics in view of its simplicity of elemental composition and very long (weeks) relaxation times at 4K temperature, allowing efficient polarization-preserving cold-transfer operations. Containment and polarization of the HD within polymer capsules, similar to those used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), is an innovation which simplifies the cold-transfer of polarized fuel from the dilution refrigerator polarization-production apparatus to other liquid helium temperature cryostats, for storage, transport and placement into the barrel of a cryogenic pellet gun for firing at high velocity into the reactor. The other polarized fuel partner, 3He, has been prepared as a polarized gas for applications including high-energy polarized targets and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. It will be introduced

  12. The polar wind: Recent observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Abe, Takumi; Peterson, W. K.

    2007-11-01

    The polar wind is an ambipolar outflow of thermal plasma from the high-latitude ionosphere to the magnetosphere, and it primarily consists of H+, He+ and O+ ions and electrons. Statistical and episodic studies based primarily on ion composition observations on the ISIS-2, DE-1, Akebono and Polar satellites over the past four decades have confirmed the existence of the polar wind. These observations spanned the altitude range from 1000 to ˜50,500 km, and revealed several important features in the polar wind that are unexpected from “classical” polar wind theories. These include the day night asymmetry in polar wind velocity, which is 1.5 2.0 times larger on the dayside; appreciable O+ flow at high altitudes, where the velocity at 5000 10,000 km is of 1 4 km/s; and significant electron temperature anisotropy in the sunlit polar wind, in which the upward-to-downward electron temperature ratio is 1.5 2. These features are attributable to a number of “non-classical” polar wind ion acceleration mechanisms resulting from strong ionospheric convection, enhanced electron and ion temperatures, and escaping atmospheric photoelectrons. The observed polar wind has an averaged ion temperature of ˜0.2 0.3 eV, and a rate of ion velocity increase with altitude that correlates strongly with electron temperature and is greatest at low altitudes (<4000 km for H+). The rate of velocity increase below 4000 km is larger at solar minimum than at solar maximum. Above 4000 km, the reverse is the case. This suggests that the dominant polar wind ion acceleration process may be different at low and high altitudes, respectively. At a given altitude, the polar wind velocity is highly variable, and is on average largest for H+ and smallest for O+. Near solar maximum, H+, He+, and O+ ions typically reach a velocity of 1 km/s near 2000, 3000, and 6000 km, respectively, and velocities of 12, 7, and 4 km/s, respectively, at 10,000 km altitude. Near solar minimum, the velocity of all three

  13. Create a Polarized Light Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students to polarized light using a problem-solving approach. After illustrating the concept using a slinky and poster board with a vertical slot, students solve the problem of creating a polarized light show using Polya's problem-solving methods. (MDH)

  14. Polarization in Meson Production Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, L.D.

    2000-12-31

    A comprehensive formalism for describing polarization observables in meson production reactions is presented. Particular attention is given to the complications that arise when the final state contains three particles. A general formula for the partial wave expansion of the polarization observables is presented, and a number of applications of the formalism are discussed.

  15. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  16. Geomorphology of Triton's polar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    One of Triton's most debated puzzles is the nature, distribution, and transport of its atmospheric volatiles. The full potential of constraints provided by detailed observations of the morphology and distribution of the polar deposits has not been realized. The objective of this study is characterization of the morphology, distribution, stratigraphy, and geologic setting of Triton's polar materials.

  17. Polarization Imaging and Insect Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Adam S.; Ohmann, Paul R.; Leininger, Nick E.; Kavanaugh, James A.

    2010-01-01

    For several years we have included discussions about insect vision in the optics units of our introductory physics courses. This topic is a natural extension of demonstrations involving Brewster's reflection and Rayleigh scattering of polarized light because many insects heavily rely on optical polarization for navigation and communication.…

  18. Polarization correlations of Dirac particles

    SciTech Connect

    Caban, Pawel; Dziegielewska, Agnieszka; Karmazyn, Anna; Okrasa, Malgorzata

    2010-03-15

    We calculate the polarization correlation function in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type experiments with relativistic spin-1/2 particles. This function depends monotonically on the particle momenta. Moreover, we also show that the polarization correlation function violates the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality and the degree of this violation can depend on the particle momenta and the motion of observers.

  19. The soft gamma-ray spectrum of A0535+26: Detection of an absorption feature at 110 keV by OSSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, J. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kurfess, J. D.; Kinzer, R. L.; Starr, C. H.; Jung, G. V.; Kendziorra, E.; Maisack, M.; Staubert, R.

    1995-01-01

    We present soft gamma-ray observations by the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) of the transient X-ray binary pulsar A0535+26. The observations were made 1994 February 8-17, immediately prior to the peak of a giant outburst. The phase averaged spectrum is complex and cannot be described by a single-component model. We find that structure in the spectrum above 100 keV can best be modeled by an absorption feature near 110 keV, which we interepret as the signature of cyclotron resonant scattering. Because of OSSE's 45 keV threshold, we are unable to make a definitive statement on the presence of a 55 keV absorption line; however, we can conclude that if this line does exist, it must have a smaller optical depth than the line at 110 keV. A first harmonic (=fundamental) cyclotron resonance at 110 keV corresponds to a magnetic field strength at the surface of the neutron star of approximately 1 x 10(exp 13) G (approximately 5 x 10(exp 12) G if the first harmonic is at 55 keV).

  20. Disk reprocessing in three dimensions - emerging spectra and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosmann, R.; Tamborra, F.; Marin, F.; Mouchet, M.; Dumont, A.; Dovčiak, M.

    2015-07-01

    We present the latest results from our ongoing computation of a new X-ray reprocessing model for irradiated, ionized accretion disks observed e.g. in active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. Combining a semi-analytical radiative transfer method (TITAN) with Monte-Carlo simulations (STOKES), we obtain a grid of reprocessed intensity and polarization spectra across an energy range of 0.1--100 keV with sufficient energy resolution to be applied to NuSTAR and even Astro-H observations. The model includes all polar and, for the first time, also azimuthal dependencies of the local incident and emission angles. As it was shown previously, these dependencies matter once the observed spectrum at infinity is computed by a relativistic ray-tracing routine. The Monte-Carlo treatment of the disk reprocessing also allows us to investigate in detail the impact of thermal and turbulent velocity on the line transfer, which can affect the observed amount of soft X-ray emission. Finally, we explore the impact of the high and low energy cutoff of the irradiating spectrum on the reprocessing and we determine the timing response of the disk spectrum as a function of photon energy. We conduct a comparison of our results with existing X-ray reprocessing models.

  1. Scattering Polarization in the Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, C. U.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Scattering polarization from the photosphere observed close to the solar limb has recently become of interest to study turbulent magnetic fields, abundances, and radiative transfer effects. We extend these studies by measuring the scattering polarization off the limb, i.e. in the chromosphere. However, instrumental effects are much more pronounced and more complicated than those affecting on-disk measurements. In particular, scattered light from the telescope mirrors leads to a new type of instrumental polarization that we describe in detail. The differences between the linearly polarized spectra on the disk and off the limb are often very substantial. Here we show the profiles of HeI D(sub 3), the OI triplet at 777 nm, and the Nal D lines. The change in the latter is in reasonable agreement with the recent modeling efforts of atomic polarization in the lower level by Landi Degl'Innocenti (1998).

  2. Generalized expression for polarization density

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lu; Hahm, T. S.

    2009-06-15

    A general polarization density which consists of classical and neoclassical parts is systematically derived via modern gyrokinetics and bounce kinetics by employing a phase-space Lagrangian Lie-transform perturbation method. The origins of polarization density are further elucidated. Extending the work on neoclassical polarization for long wavelength compared to ion banana width [M. N. Rosenbluth and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)], an analytical formula for the generalized neoclassical polarization including both finite-banana-width and finite-Larmor-radius effects for arbitrary radial wavelength in comparison to banana width and gyroradius is derived. In additional to the contribution from trapped particles, the contribution of passing particles to the neoclassical polarization is also explicitly calculated. The generalized analytic expression agrees very well with the previous numerical results for a wide range of radial wavelength.

  3. Multispectral polarized scene projector (MPSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiping; Wei, Hong; Guo, Lei; Wang, Shenggang; Li, Le; Lippert, Jack R.; Serati, Steve; Gupta, Neelam; Carlen, Frank R.

    2011-06-01

    This newly developed prototype Multispectral Polarized Scene Projector (MPSP), configured for the short wave infrared (SWIR) regime, can be used for the test & evaluation (T&E) of spectro-polarimetric imaging sensors. The MPSP system generates both static and video images (up to 200 Hz) with 512×512 spatial resolution with active spatial, spectral, and polarization modulation with controlled bandwidth. It projects input SWIR radiant intensity scenes from stored memory with user selectable wavelength (850-1650 nm) and bandwidth (12-100 nm), as well as polarization states (six different states) controllable on a pixel by pixel basis. The system consists of one spectrally tunable liquid crystal filter with variable bandpass, and multiple liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulators (SLMs) for intensity control and polarization modulation. In addition to the spectro-polarimetric sensor test, the instrument also simulates polarized multispectral images of military scenes/targets for hardware-in-the loop (HIL) testing.

  4. Narrowband polarization in maritime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Gary; Schoonmaker, Jon; Dirbas, Joe; Davies, Adam; Petrosyuk, Irina; Podobna, Yulia; Contarino, Mike

    2007-04-01

    Narrow band polarization imagery of the sea surface was collected over water from the Coronado Bay Bridge in San Diego, CA. The MANTIS (Multi-mission Adaptive Narrowband Imaging Sensor) system was configured to simultaneously collect four linearly polarized images at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° polarization angles respectively. All images were collected using a 550 nm filter with a 40 nm band pass. Images were made while scanning over the maximum range of elevation and azimuthal angles possible from the 70 meter high bridge platform. Methodology and results are presented. Representative results are given including derived Stokes parameters and Degree of Polarization for reflected light for an elevation scan at a fixed azimuth together with examples of polarization and Stokes parameter imagery.

  5. Saturn's elusive nightside polar arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radioti, A.; Grodent, D.; Gérard, J.-C.; Milan, S. E.; Fear, R. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Bonfond, B.; Pryor, W.

    2014-09-01

    Nightside polar arcs are some of the most puzzling auroral emissions at Earth. They are features which extend from the nightside auroral oval into the open magnetic field line region (polar cap), and they represent optical signatures of magnetotail dynamics. Here we report the first observation of an arc at Saturn, which is attached at the nightside main oval and extends into the polar cap region, resembling a terrestrial transpolar arc. We show that Earth-like polar arcs can exceptionally occur in a fast rotational and internally influenced magnetosphere such as Saturn's. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the polar arc at Saturn is related to tail reconnection and we address the role of solar wind in the magnetotail dynamics at Saturn.

  6. Generalized Expression for Polarization Density

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2009-04-23

    A general polarization density which consists of classical and neoclassical parts is system-atically derived via modern gyrokinetics and bounce-kinetics by employing a phase-space Lagrangian Lie-transform perturbation method. The origins of polarization density are further elucidated. Extending the work on neoclassical polarization for long wavelength compared to ion banana width [M. N. Rosenbluth and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)], an analytical formula for the generalized neoclassical polarization including both finite-banana-width (FBW) and finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) effects for arbitrary radial wavelength in comparison to banana width and gyroradius is derived. In additional to the contribution from trapped particles, the contribution of passing particles to the neoclassical polarization is also explicitly calculated. Our analytic expression agrees very well with the previous numerical results for a wide range of radial wavelength.

  7. U.S. polar icebreakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham, Lawson W.

    1984-04-01

    An interagency study of the nation's polar ice-breaking requirements through the end of the century was recently completed. The Polar Icebreaker Requirements Study (PIRS) Group presented fleet size alternatives and recommended that the Icebreaker User Council define the capabilities required for new icebreakers. The User Council consists of representatives from the U.S. Navy, National Science Foundation, the Maritime Administration, and the U.S. Coast Guard.Polar icebreakers are needed for three basic purposes: (1) resupply of Antarctic and Greenland stations, (2) logistical support of polar operations, and (3) scientific research. One of the PIRS recommendations was that any new icebreaker designs should enhance science support while meeting the requirements for escort and logistics. The U.S. Coast Guard will soon begin the preliminary design for a new class of polar icebreakers.

  8. E166: Polarized Positrons & Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, K.Peter; /DESY

    2011-12-06

    A proof-of-principle experiment has been carried out in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to demonstrate production of polarized positrons in a manner suitable for implementation at the International Linear Collider (ILC). A helical undulator of 2.54 mm period and 1 -m length produced circularly polarized photons with a first harmonic endpoint energy of 8 MeV when traversed by a 46.6 GeV electron beam. The polarized photons were converted to polarized positrons in a 0.2-radiation-length tungsten target. The polarization of these positrons was measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter to have peak value in excess of 80%.

  9. Jupiter Polar Winds Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Bands of eastward and westward winds on Jupiter appear as concentric rotating circles in this movie composed of Cassini spacecraft images that have been re-projected as if the viewer were looking down at Jupiter's north pole and the planet were flattened.

    The sequence covers 70 days, from October 1 to December 9, 2000. Cassini's narrow-angle camera captured the images of Jupiter's atmosphere in the near-infrared region of the spectrum.

    What is surprising in this view is the coherent nature of the high-latitude flows, despite the very chaotic, mottled and non-banded appearance of the planet's polar regions. This is the first extended movie sequence to show the coherence and longevity of winds near the pole and the features blown around the planet by them.

    There are thousands of spots, each an active storm similar to the size to the largest of storms on Earth. Large terrestrial storms usually last only a week before they dissolve and are replaced by other storms. But many of the Jovian storms seen here, while occasionally changing latitude or merging with each other, persist for the entire 70 days. Until now, the lifetime of the high-latitude features was unknown. Their longevity is a mystery of Jovian weather.

    Cassini collected images of Jupiter for months before and after it passed the planet on December 30, 2000. Six or more images of the planet in each of several spectral filters were taken at evenly spaced intervals over the course of Jupiter's 10-hour rotation period. The entire sequence was repeated generally every other Jupiter rotation, yielding views of every sector of the planet at least once every 20 hours.

    The images used for the movie shown here were taken every 20 hours through a filter centered at a wavelength of 756 nanometers, where there are almost no absorptions in the planet's atmosphere. The images covering each rotation were mosaiced together to form a cylindrical map extending from 75 degrees north to 75 degrees south in

  10. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  11. The Polarization from Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahoda, Keith; Kallman, Timothy; Tamagawa, Toru; Kaaret, Philip; Hill, Joanne; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Black, J. Kevin

    2016-07-01

    The PRAXyS mission, currently in a NASA Phase A study, will be the first mission dedicated to X-ray Polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Polarization is an expected feature of non-symmetric sources; most of the bright X-ray sources are associated with black holes and neutron star systems or other sources which are intrinsically asymmetric. Propagation through the intense gravitational and magnetic fields near these sources introduces additional polarization signatures. Polarization is thus a probe of structure on scales many orders of magnitude to small for any current imaging capability. PRAXyS will survey the polarization characteristics of emission from stellar mass black holes in our galaxy, the super massive black holes at the heart of active galaxies and blazars, neutron stars powered by rotation, accretion, or magnetic fields, and other high energy sources. We present measured performance characteristics of the PRAXyS instrumentation that provides both the estimated sensitivity to polarization and the upper limits to instrumental systematic effects. We also present the opportunities for community involvement via rapid data release and vigorous guest observer and theory programs.

  12. Large-Area Balloon-Borne Polarized Gamma Ray Observer (PoGO)

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, V.; Chen, P.; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Mizuno, T.; Ng, J.; Tajima, H.; Thurston, T.; Bogaert, G.; Fukazawa, Y.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Barbier, L.; Bloser, P.; Harding, A.; Hunter, S.; Krizmanic, J.; Mitchell, J.; Streitmatter, R.; Fernholz, R.; Groth, E.; /NASA, Goddard /Princeton U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Kista /Stockholm U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /Yamagata U.

    2005-06-30

    We are developing a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGO), to measure polarization of soft gamma rays (30-200 keV) using asymmetry in azimuth angle distribution of Compton scattering. PoGO is designed to detect 10% polarization in 100mCrab sources in a 6-8 hour observation and bring a new dimension to studies on gamma ray emission/transportation mechanism in pulsars, AGNs, black hole binaries, and neutron star surface. The concept is an adaptation to polarization measurements of well-type phoswich counter consisting of a fast plastic scintillator (the detection part), a slow plastic scintillator (the active collimator) and a BGO scintillator (the bottom anti-counter). PoGO consists of close-packed array of 217 hexagonal well-type phoswich counters and has a narrow field-of-view ({approx} 5 deg{sup 2}) to reduce possible source confusion. A prototype instrument has been tested in the polarized soft gamma-ray beams at Advanced Photon Source (ANL) and at Photon Factory (KEK). On the results, the polarization dependence of EGS4 has been validated and that of Geant4 has been corrected.

  13. MLS110213:022733+130617: a new eclipsing polar above the period gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, K. M. G.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Oliveira, A. S.; Almeida, L. A.; Cieslinski, D.; Costa, J. E. R.; Jablonski, F. J.

    2015-08-01

    This study confirms MLS110213:022733+130617 as a new eclipsing polar. We performed optical spectroscopic, polarimetric and photometric follow-up of this variable source identified by the Catalina Real Time Transient Survey. Using the mid-eclipse times, we estimated an orbital period of 3.787 h, which is above the orbital period gap of the cataclysmic variables (CVs). There are nine other known polars with longer orbital periods, and only two of them are eclipsing. We identified high- and low-brightness states and high polarization modulated with the orbital period. The spectra are typical of polars, with strong high ionization emission lines and inverted Balmer decrement. The He II 4686 Å line is as strong as H β. We modelled the photometric and polarimetric bright-state light curves using the CYCLOPS code. Our modelling suggests an extended emitting region on the white dwarf (WD) surface, with a mean temperature of 9 keV and B in the range 18-33, although the possibility that it could be a two-pole accretor cannot yet be ruled out. The WD mass estimated from the shock temperature is 0.67 M⊙. The derived parameters are consistent with the eclipse profile. The distance was estimated as 406 ± 54 pc using the period-luminosity-colours method. MLS110213 populates a rare sub-group of polars, near the upper limit of the period distribution, important to understand the evolution of mCVs.

  14. Lunar true polar wander inferred from polar hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Siegler, M A; Miller, R S; Keane, J T; Laneuville, M; Paige, D A; Matsuyama, I; Lawrence, D J; Crotts, A; Poston, M J

    2016-03-24

    The earliest dynamic and thermal history of the Moon is not well understood. The hydrogen content of deposits near the lunar poles may yield insight into this history, because these deposits (which are probably composed of water ice) survive only if they remain in permanent shadow. If the orientation of the Moon has changed, then the locations of the shadowed regions will also have changed. The polar hydrogen deposits have been mapped by orbiting neutron spectrometers, and their observed spatial distribution does not match the expected distribution of water ice inferred from present-day lunar temperatures. This finding is in contrast to the distribution of volatiles observed in similar thermal environments at Mercury's poles. Here we show that polar hydrogen preserves evidence that the spin axis of the Moon has shifted: the hydrogen deposits are antipodal and displaced equally from each pole along opposite longitudes. From the direction and magnitude of the inferred reorientation, and from analysis of the moments of inertia of the Moon, we hypothesize that this change in the spin axis, known as true polar wander, was caused by a low-density thermal anomaly beneath the Procellarum region. Radiogenic heating within this region resulted in the bulk of lunar mare volcanism and altered the density structure of the Moon, changing its moments of inertia. This resulted in true polar wander consistent with the observed remnant polar hydrogen. This thermal anomaly still exists and, in part, controls the current orientation of the Moon. The Procellarum region was most geologically active early in lunar history, which implies that polar wander initiated billions of years ago and that a large portion of the measured polar hydrogen is ancient, recording early delivery of water to the inner Solar System. Our hypothesis provides an explanation for the antipodal distribution of lunar polar hydrogen, and connects polar volatiles to the geologic and geophysical evolution of the Moon

  15. Measurement of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance strength in the 26gAl (p, gamma)27 Si reaction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Parikh, A; José, J; Buchmann, L; Caggiano, J A; Chen, A A; Clark, J A; Crawford, H; Davids, B; D'Auria, J M; Davis, C; Deibel, C; Erikson, L; Fogarty, L; Frekers, D; Greife, U; Hussein, A; Hutcheon, D A; Huyse, M; Jewett, C; Laird, A M; Lewis, R; Mumby-Croft, P; Olin, A; Ottewell, D F; Ouellet, C V; Parker, P; Pearson, J; Ruprecht, G; Trinczek, M; Vockenhuber, C; Wrede, C

    2006-06-30

    The strength of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance in the 26gAl(p, gamma)27 reaction has been measured in inverse kinematics using the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We measure a value of omega gamma = 35 +/- 7 microeV and a resonance energy of Ec.m. = 184 +/- 1 keV, consistent with p-wave proton capture into the 7652(3) keV state in 27Si, and discuss the implications of these values for 26GAl nucleosynthesis in typical oxygen-neon white-dwarf novae.

  16. Measurement of the Ec.m.=184keV Resonance Strength in the Al26g(p,γ)Si27 Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C.; Parikh, A.; José, J.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Chen, A. A.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, H.; Davids, B.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C.; Deibel, C.; Erikson, L.; Fogarty, L.; Frekers, D.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Huyse, M.; Jewett, C.; Laird, A. M.; Lewis, R.; Mumby-Croft, P.; Olin, A.; Ottewell, D. F.; Ouellet, C. V.; Parker, P.; Pearson, J.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wrede, C.

    2006-06-01

    The strength of the Ec.m.=184keV resonance in the Al26g(p,γ)Si27 reaction has been measured in inverse kinematics using the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF’s ISAC facility. We measure a value of ωγ=35±7μeV and a resonance energy of Ec.m.=184±1keV, consistent with p-wave proton capture into the 7652(3) keV state in Si27, and discuss the implications of these values for Al26g nucleosynthesis in typical oxygen-neon white-dwarf novae.

  17. Mass attenuation coefficient of the Earth, Moon and Mars samples over 1keV-100GeV energy range.

    PubMed

    Camargo Moreira, Anderson; Roberto Appoloni, Carlos

    2006-09-01

    This work presents the calculation of the mass attenuation coefficient (micro) of lunar, Martian and terrestrial samples in function of the energy. WinXCOM software was employed to determine the micro values for the samples in the range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The obtained values were practically the same for energies larger than 100 keV, but marked differences among the samples were observed for energies below 25 keV, which is the energy range of interest for the XRF system used in space probes.

  18. Measurement of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance strength in the 26gAl (p, gamma)27 Si reaction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Parikh, A; José, J; Buchmann, L; Caggiano, J A; Chen, A A; Clark, J A; Crawford, H; Davids, B; D'Auria, J M; Davis, C; Deibel, C; Erikson, L; Fogarty, L; Frekers, D; Greife, U; Hussein, A; Hutcheon, D A; Huyse, M; Jewett, C; Laird, A M; Lewis, R; Mumby-Croft, P; Olin, A; Ottewell, D F; Ouellet, C V; Parker, P; Pearson, J; Ruprecht, G; Trinczek, M; Vockenhuber, C; Wrede, C

    2006-06-30

    The strength of the Ec.m. = 184 keV resonance in the 26gAl(p, gamma)27 reaction has been measured in inverse kinematics using the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We measure a value of omega gamma = 35 +/- 7 microeV and a resonance energy of Ec.m. = 184 +/- 1 keV, consistent with p-wave proton capture into the 7652(3) keV state in 27Si, and discuss the implications of these values for 26GAl nucleosynthesis in typical oxygen-neon white-dwarf novae. PMID:16907298

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGNs from RXTE 3-20keV All-Sky Survey (Sazonov+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S. Yu.; Revnivtsev, M. G.

    2004-05-01

    Catalog of 95 identified AGNs serendipitously detected at |b|>10deg during the RXTE slew survey (XSS, ) is presented. Most of these AGNs belong to the local population (z<0.1). For each source the following information is provided: AGN class, count rate in two energy bands 3-8keV and 8-20keV, observed and intrinsic (absorption-corrected) luminosity in the 3-20keV band, intrinsic absorption column density. Also a catalog of 35 AGN candidates, composed of unidentified XSS sources is presented. (2 data files).

  20. A liquid crystal tunable polarization filters for polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dong-Feng; Winker, Bruce; Wen, Bing; Mansell, John; Zachery, Karen; Taber, Donald; Chang, Tallis; Choi, Sung; Ma, Jian; Wang, Xiaomin; Sage, Keith

    2008-08-01

    We report a new familiy of polarimetric imaging cameras based on tunable liquid crystal components. Our camera designs use a dual frequency liquid crystal tunable filter that rotates the polarization of incoming light, in front of a single linear polarizer. The unique features of this approach include fast switching speed, high transmission throughput, no mechanical moving parts, broad bandwidth, high contrast ratio, wide viewing angle, and compact/monolithic architecture. This paper discusses these tunable liquid crystal polarimetric imaging camera architectures (time division, amplitude division), the benefits of our design, the analysis of laboratory and field data, and the applicability of polarization signatures in imaging.