Science.gov

Sample records for 30-200 kev x-rays

  1. Heliospheric X-Rays and the 1/4 keV Soft X-Ray Background Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, I. P.; Cravens, T. E.; Snowden, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    X-rays are generated throughout the heliosphere as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and interstellar neutrals. The high charge state solar wind ions resulting from these collisions are left in highly excited states and emit extreme ultraviolet or soft x-ray photons. X-rays are also generated because of charge transfer collisions with neutral hydrogen in the Earth's geocorona. Our model simulates this charge transfer mechanism. It uses the Fahr hot model to determine spatial variations of interstellar helium and hydrogen densities. It also uses published terrestrial exospheric hydrogen distributions and solar wind speed, density and temperature distributions to determine x-ray intensities due to charge transfer with geocoronal hydrogen. We used the same viewing conditions as Snowden [1995] for the 1/4 keV channel soft x-ray background map in galactic coordinates, and produce an analogous heliospheric/geocoronal x-ray intensity map. Our preliminary conclusion is that roughly 50% of the total background soft x-ray intensity in the galactic plane and 25% at high galactic latitudes can be attributed to the charge transfer process operating within the solar system, with the remaining emission coming from outside our heliosphere.

  2. Characteristic 8 keV X rays possess radiobiological properties of higher-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, Ravi; Estabrook, William; Yudelev, Mark; Rakowski, Joseph; Burmeister, Jay; Wilson, George D; Joiner, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Electronic brachytherapy systems are being developed that can deliver X rays of varying energy depending on the material of a secondary target. A copper target produces characteristic 8 keV X rays. Our aim was to determine whether 8 keV X rays might deliver greater biological effectiveness than megavoltage photons. Cells of the U251 human glioma cell line were used to compare the biological effects of 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays in terms of relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and DNA damage. The RBE at 50% and 10% survival was 2.6 and 1.9, respectively. At 50% survival, the OER for cells treated with 8 keV X rays was 1.6 compared with 3.0 for (60)Co gamma rays. The numbers of H2AX foci per Gy after treatment with 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays were similar; however, the size of the foci generated at 8 keV was significantly larger, possibly indicating more complex DNA damage. The mean area of H2AX foci generated by 8 keV X rays was 0.785 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.756-0.814) compared with 0.491 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.462-0.520) for (60)Co gamma rays (P < 0.0001). Characteristic 8 keV X rays produce two to three times the biological effectiveness of megavoltage photons, with a radiobiological profile similar to higher-LET radiations.

  3. Compton polarimeter for 10–30 keV x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, S.; Beilmann, C.; Shah, C.; Tashenov, S.

    2015-09-15

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10–30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  4. Compton polarimeter for 10-30 keV x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S.; Beilmann, C.; Shah, C.; Tashenov, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple and versatile polarimeter for x rays in the energy range of 10-30 keV. It uses Compton scattering in low-Z materials such as beryllium or boron carbide. The azimuthal distribution of the scattered x rays is sampled by an array of 12 silicon PIN diodes operated at room temperature. We evaluated the polarimetry performance using Monte-Carlo simulations and show experimental results.

  5. Microchannel plate pinhole camera for 20 to 100 keV x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.L.; Leipelt, G.R.; Nilson, D.G.

    1984-10-03

    We present the design and construction of a sensitive pinhole camera for imaging suprathermal x-rays. Our device is a pinhole camera consisting of four filtered pinholes and microchannel plate electron multiplier for x-ray detection and signal amplification. We report successful imaging of 20, 45, 70, and 100 keV x-ray emissions from the fusion targets at our Novette laser facility. Such imaging reveals features of the transport of hot electrons and provides views deep inside the target.

  6. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  7. Full characterization of a laser-produced keV x-ray betatron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Shah, R.; Corde, S.; Fitour, R.; Tafzi, A.; Burgy, F.; Douillet, D.; Lefrou, T.; Rousse, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the complete characterization of a kilo-electron-volt laser-based x-ray source. The main parameters of the electron motion (amplitude of oscillations and initial energy) in the laser wakefield have been investigated using three independent methods relying on spectral and spatial properties of this betatron x-ray source. First we will show studies on the spectral correlation between electrons and x-rays that is analyzed using a numerical code to calculate the expected photon spectra from the experimentally measured electron spectra. High-resolution x-ray spectrometers have been used to characterize the x-ray spectra within 0.8-3 keV and to show that the betatron oscillations lie within 1 µm. Then we observed Fresnel edge diffraction of the x-ray beam. The observed diffraction at the center energy of 4 keV agrees with the Gaussian incoherent source profile of full width half maximum <5 µm, meaning that the amplitude of the betatron oscillations is less than 2.5 µm. Finally, by measuring the far field spatial profile of the radiation, we have been able to characterize the electron's trajectories inside the plasma accelerator structure with a resolution better than 0.5 µm.

  8. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Fella, C.; Balles, A.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-28

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results.

  9. The Morphology of the X-ray Emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's Aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M.; Grodent, D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T.; Ford, P.

    2007-01-01

    The discovery in XMM-Newton X-ray data of X-ray emission above 2 keY from Jupiter's aurorae has led us to reexamine the Chandra ACIS-S observations taken in Feb 2003. Chandra's superior spatial resolution has revealed that the auroral X-rays with E > 2 keV are emitted from the periphery of the region emitting those with E < 1 keV. We are presently exploring the relationship of this morphology to that of the FUV emission from the main auroral oval and the polar cap. The low energy emission has previously been established as due to charge exchange between energetic precipitating ions of oxygen and either sulfur or carbon. It seems likely to us that the higher energy emission is due to precipitation of energetic electrons, possibly the same population of electrons responsible for the FUV emission. We discuss our analysis and interpretation.

  10. Local Contributions to the 0.6 Kev Diffuse X-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, D. N.

    1984-01-01

    The intensity of the X-ray background between 0.5 and 1.0 keV has surprisingly little dependence on galactic latitude. Possible mechanisms for the production of these X-rays include extragalactic emission and emission from dM stars, both of which should be strongly dependent on galatic latitude, and diffuse emission from hot gas (T approx. = 3 x 10 to the 6th power K) surrounding the Sun. These mechanisms can be distinguished by the presence or absence of absorption by gas within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun. X-ray data from the HEAO-1 LED detectors and H1 data from the recent Crawford Hill 21 cm survey are used to place limits on the 0.6 keV intensity originating within 300 pc of the Sun in the general direction of (lambda,b) = (150 deg - 30 deg).

  11. The 2-10 keV X-Ray Background Dipole and Its Cosmological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, C. A.; Jahoda, K.; Treyer, M.; Lahav, O.; Boldt, E.; Piran, T.

    2000-11-01

    The hard X-ray (>2 keV) emission of the local and distant universe as observed with the HEAO 1 A-2 experiment is reconsidered in the context of large-scale cosmic structure. Using all-sky X-ray samples of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and galaxy clusters, we remove the dominant local X-ray flux from within a redshift of ~0.02. We evaluate the dipolar and higher order harmonic structure in four X-ray colors. The estimated dipole anisotropy of the unresolved flux appears to be consistent with a combination of the Compton-Getting effect due to the Local Group motion (dipole amplitude Δ=0.0042) and remaining large-scale structure (0.0023<~Δ<~0.0085), in good agreement with the expectations of cold dark matter models. The observed anisotropy does, however, also suggest a nonnegligible Galactic contribution that is more complex than current, simple models of >2 keV Galactic X-ray emission. Comparison of the soft and hard color maps with a harmonic analysis of the 1.5 keV ROSAT all-sky data qualitatively suggests that at least a third of the faint, unresolved ~18° scale structure in the HEAO 1 A-2 data may be Galactic in origin. However, the effect on measured flux dipoles is small (<~3%). We derive an expression for dipole anisotropy and acceleration and demonstrate how the dipole anisotropy of the distant X-ray frame can constrain the amplitude of bulk motions of the universe. From observed bulk motions over a local ~50 h-1 Mpc radius volume, we determine 0.14<~Ω0.60/bX(0)<~0.59, where Ω0 is the universal density parameter and bX(0) is the present-epoch bias parameter, defined as the ratio of fluctuations in the X-ray source density and the mass density.

  12. On the origin of the 1 keV diffuse X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nousek, J. A.; Fried, P. M.; Sanders, W. T.; Kraushaar, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Soft X-ray sky survey data for high galactic latitudes are used to constrain simple geometric models for the source of the diffuse X-ray background at 1 keV. The intensity maps show two extended and enhanced features, in Eridanus and in the direction of the galactic center, with a relatively uniform sky away from these features and an observed degree of isotropy consistent with a model in which the 0.5-1.2 keV background consists of an isotropic extragalactic component and a thick disk galactic component. A temperature of 2-3 million K and an emission pressure of 0.004 per cm to the 6th pc are derived for the galactic component from an assumed spectrum of 11E to the -1.4 power photons/sq cm s sr keV. While consistent with the data, a local, isotropically distributed source model is shown to pose physical difficulties.

  13. A Review of X-ray Diagnostic Calibrations in the 2 to 100 keV Region Using the High Energy X-ray Calibration Facility (HEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Zaheer; Pond, T; Buckles, R A; Maddox, B R; Chen, C D; DeWald, E L; Izumi, N; Stewart, R

    2010-05-19

    The precise and accurate measurement of X-rays in the 2 keV to 100 keV region is crucial to the understanding of HED plasmas and warm dense matter in general. With the emergence of inertially confined plasma facilities as the premier platforms for ICF, laboratory astrophysics, and national security related plasma experiments, the need to calibrate diagnostics in the high energy X-ray regime has grown. At National Security Technologies High Energy X-ray Calibration Facility (HEX) in Livermore, California, X-ray imagers, filter-fluorescer spectrometers, crystal spectrometers, image plates, and nuclear diagnostics are calibrated. The HEX can provide measurements of atomic line radiation, X-ray flux (accuracy within 10%), and X-ray energy (accuracy within 1%). The HEX source is comprised of a commercial 160 kV X-ray tube, a fluorescer wheel, a filter wheel, and a lead encasement. The X-ray tube produces a Tungsten bremsstrahlung spectrum which causes a foil to fluoresce line radiation. To minimize bremsstrahlung in the radiation for calibration we also provide various foils as filters. For experimental purposes, a vacuum box capable of 10{sup -7} Torr, as well as HPGe and CdTe radiation detectors, are provided on an optical table. Most geometries and arrangements can be changed to meet experimental needs.

  14. Interferometric phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of VX2 rabbit cancer at 35keV X-ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Itai, Yuji; Yoneyama, Akio; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2004-05-12

    Imaging of large objects at 17.7-keV low x-ray energy causes huge x-ray exposure to the objects even using interferometric phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT). Thus, we tried to obtain PCCT images at high x-ray energy of 35keV and examined the image quality using a formalin-fixed VX2 rabbit cancer specimen with 15-mm in diameter. The PCCT system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon (220) crystal, a monolithic x-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell and an x-ray CCD camera. The PCCT at 35 keV clearly visualized various inner structures of VX2 rabbit cancer such as necrosis, cancer, the surrounding tumor vessels, and normal liver tissue. Besides, image-contrast was not degraded significantly. These results suggest that the PCCT at 35 KeV is sufficient to clearly depict the histopathological morphology of VX2 rabbit cancer specimen.

  15. Development of a collimated keV X-ray beam for probing of dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R.; Taphuoc, K.; Albert, F.; Rousse, A.; Burgy, F.; Mercier, B.; Rousseau, J.-P.; Pukhov, A.; Kiselev, S.

    2006-06-01

    Experimental findings of a fully optical, keV x-ray source of 1-2circ divergence and broadband spectrum (>5 keV bandwidth) are presented. The radiation results from the highly relativistic interaction of a 30 TW(1 J, 30 fs) laser pulse thru a 3 mm length span of He gas (ne=1× 1019 electrons/cm3). Quantitative measurements from the filtered back-illuminated CCD give 105 photons/eV, and the knife-edge technique measures the source diameter of 10 μm. These source characteristics, the measured beam of relativistic electrons, and PIC simulation indicate the radiation results from forceful transverse oscillations of the laser-accelerated electrons in response to the ionic channel formed by the laser pulse. The source brightness (107 photons/eV/mm2/mr2/shot and ultrafast duration (≤30 fs) make it applicable to both backlighting and x-ray science applications.

  16. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED

  17. A study of 2-20 KeV X-rays from the Cygnus region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Two rocket-borne proportional counters, each with 650 sq c, met area and 1.8 x 7.1 deg FWHM rectangular mechanical collimation, surveyed the Cygnus region in the 2 to 20 keV energy range on two occasions. X-ray spectral data gathered on 21 September 1970 from discrete sources in Cygnus are presented. The data from Cyg X-1, Cyg X-2, and Cyg X-3 have sufficient statistical significance to indicate mutually exclusive spectral forms for the three. Upper limits are presented for X-ray intensities above 2 keV for Cyg X-4 and Cyg X-5 (Cygnus loop). A search was made on 9 August 1971 for a diffuse component of X-rays 1.5 keV associated with an interarm region of the galaxy at galactic longitudes in the vicinity of 60 degrees. A statistically significant excess associated with a narrow disk component was detected. Several possible emission models are discussed, with the most likely candidate being a population of unresolvable low luminosity discrete sources.

  18. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  19. Static and time-resolved 10-1000 keV x-ray imaging detector options for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O.L.; Bell, P.M.; McDonald, J.W.; Park, H.-S.; Weber, F.; Moody, J.D.; Lowry, M.E.; Stewart, R.E.

    2004-10-01

    High energy (>10 keV) x-ray self-emission imaging and radiography will be essential components of many NIF high energy density physics experiments. In preparation for such experiments, we have evaluated the pros and cons of various static [x-ray film, bare charge-coupled device (CCD), and scintillator + CCD] and time-resolved (streaked and gated) 10-1000 keV detectors.

  20. Extension to Low Energies (<7keV) of High Pressure X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Itie, J.-P.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Idir, M.; Polian, A.; Couzinet, B.

    2007-01-19

    High pressure x-ray absorption has been performed down to 3.6 keV, thanks to the new LUCIA beamline (SLS, PSI) and to the use of perforated diamonds or Be gasket. Various experimental geometries are proposed, depending on the energy of the edge and on the concentration of the studied element. A few examples will be presented: BaTiO3 at the titanium K edge, Zn0.95 Mn0.05O at the manganese K edge, KCl at the potassium K edge.

  1. Microbeam of 100 keV x ray with a sputtered-sliced Fresnel zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijo, Nagao; Suzuki, Yoshio; Takano, Hidekazu; Tamura, Shigeharu; Yasumoto, Masato; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Awaji, Mitsuhiro

    2003-12-01

    Microfocusing of 100 keV x ray with a sputtered-sliced Fresnel zone plate (ss-FZP) has been performed at the 250-m-long beamline (20XU) of SPring-8. The ss-FZP with an outermost zone width 0.16 μm which is composed of 70 layers of alternating Cu and Al layers and having thickness ˜180 μm was fabricated and characterized. The minimum focal spot size attained for the first order focal beam was 0.5 μm with a focal distance 900 mm at a photon energy 100 keV. The total flux of the microprobe was ˜2×106 photons s-1 μm-2.

  2. An X-ray Raman spectrometer for EXAFS studies on minerals: bent Laue spectrometer with 20 keV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, N; Fukui, H; Tanida, H; Toyokawa, H; Cai, Y Q; Tsuei, K D

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Raman spectrometer for studies of local structures in minerals is discussed. Contrary to widely adopted back-scattering spectrometers using ≤10 keV X-rays, a spectrometer utilizing ~20 keV X-rays and a bent Laue analyzer is proposed. The 20 keV photons penetrate mineral samples much more deeply than 10 keV photons, so that high intensity is obtained owing to an enhancement of the scattering volume. Furthermore, a bent Laue analyzer provides a wide band-pass and a high reflectivity, leading to a much enhanced integrated intensity. A prototype spectrometer has been constructed and performance tests carried out. The oxygen K-edge in SiO(2) glass and crystal (α-quartz) has been measured with energy resolutions of 4 eV (EXAFS mode) and 1.3 eV (XANES mode). Unlike methods previously adopted, it is proposed to determine the pre-edge curve based on a theoretical Compton profile and a Monte Carlo multiple-scattering simulation before extracting EXAFS features. It is shown that the obtained EXAFS features are reproduced fairly well by a cluster model with a minimal set of fitting parameters. The spectrometer and the data processing proposed here are readily applicable to high-pressure studies.

  3. The Hard X-ray 20-40 keV AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Soldi, S.; Shrader, C. R.; Gehrels, N.; Produit, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled a complete, significance limited extragalactic sample based on approximately 25,000 deg(sup 2) to a limiting flux of 3 x 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second. (approximately 7,000 deg(sup 2)) to a flux limit of 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second)) in the 20 - 40 keV band with INTEGRAL. We have constructed a detailed exposure map to compensate for effects of non-uniform exposure. The flux-number relation is best described by a power-law with a slope of alpha = 1.66 plus or minus 0.11. The integration of the cumulative flux per unit area leads to f(sub 20-40 keV) = 2.6 x 10(exp -10) ergs per square centimeter per second per sr(sup -1) which is about 1% of the known 20-40 keV X-ray background. We present the first luminosity function of AGN in the 20-40 keV energy range, based on 68 extragalactic objects detected by the imager IBIS/ISGRI on-board INTEGRAL. The luminosity function shows a smoothly connected two power-law form, with an index of gamma (sub 1) = 0.9 below, and gamma (sub 2) = 2.2 above the turn-over luminosity of L(sub *), = 4.6 x 10(sup 43) ergs per second. The emissivity of all INTEGRAL AGNs per unit volume is W(sub 20-40keV)(greater than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) = 2.8 x 10(sup 38) ergs per second h(sup 3)(sub 70) Mpc(sup -3). These results are consistent with those derived in the 2-20keV energy band and do not show a significant contribution by Compton-thick objects. Because the sample used in this study is truly local (z(raised bar) = 0.022)), only limited conclusions can be drawn for the evolution of AGNs in this energy band. But the objects explaining the peak in the cosmic X-ray background are likely to be either low luminosity AGN (L(sub x) less than 10(sup 41) ergs per second) or of other type, such as intermediate mass black holes, clusters, and star forming regions.

  4. High-efficiency multilevel zone plates for keV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Fabrizio, E.; Romanato, F.; Gentili, M.; Cabrini, S.; Kaulich, B.; Susini, J.; Barrett, R.

    1999-10-01

    The development of high brilliance X-ray sources coupled with advances in manufacturing technologies has led to significant improvements in submicrometre probes for spectroscopy, diffraction and imaging applications. The generation of a small beam spot size is commonly based on three principles: total reflection (as used in optical elements involving mirrors or capillaries), refraction (such as in refractive lenses) and diffraction. The latter effect is employed in Bragg-Fresnel or Soret lenses, commonly known as Fresnel zone plate lenses. These lenses currently give the best spatial resolution, but are traditionally limited to rather soft X-rays-at high energies, their use is still limited by their efficiency. Here we report the fabrication of high-efficiency, high-contrast gold and nickel multistep (quaternary) Fresnel zone plates using electron beam lithography. We achieve a maximum efficiency of 55% for the nickel plate at 7keV. In addition to their high efficiency, the lenses offer the advantages of low background signal and effective reduction of unwanted diffraction orders. We anticipate that these lenses should have a significant impact on techniques such as microscopy, micro-fluorescence and micro-diffraction, which require medium resolution (500-100nm) and high flux at fixed energies.

  5. The detection of a 6 keV X-rays with Nb junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Garc, P.; Engelhardt, R.; Peacock, A.; Twerenbold, D.; Lumley, J.; Somekh, R.E.

    1989-03-01

    Refractory metal Nb/Al/Al-ox/Al/Nb junctions are shown to be sensitive to 6 keV X-rays over the temperature range from 2.8 to 1.4 Kelvin. For such junctions, having an observed minimum ionizing energy of 12 meV, a limiting energy resolution of 8 eV is predicted. Currently an energy resolution of 250 eV is observed at 1.4 Kelvin which is primarily dominated by system electronic noise. The Nb based junctions are shown to be very stable with respect to thermal cycling while their non-equilibrium physics can be simple scaled from the theory of Sn-junctions.

  6. SOLEX: a tunable monochromatic X-ray source in the 1-20 keV energy range for metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnelle, C.; Jonnard, P.; André, J.-M.; Avila, A.; Laporte, D.; Ringuenet, H.; Lépy, M. C.; Plagnard, J.; Ferreux, L.; Protas, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    A tunable monochromatic X-ray source covering the 1-20 keV energy range is described. The initial X-ray beam is obtained from a dedicated windowless X-ray tube. The energy selection is performed through a cylindrically bent crystal, used either in the reflection (Johann geometry) or in the transmission (Cauchois geometry) mode, by rotating the crystal holder by a 90° angle. Contrary to conventional geometries where the X-ray tube is fixed, here the direction of the exit beam impinging the X-ray detector is fixed. This setup is shown to be useful for various studies: high-resolution spectrometry, characterization of the response function and the efficiency of detectors and optical components, determination of transmission characteristics of different materials. Observations of the Lα line and Kα doublet from a copper anode are presented, that demonstrate the performance of this new setup.

  7. Charge Distribution of Kr Ions Produced Under 1.3 keV X-ray Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimov, S. V.; Dorofeev, D. L.; Zon, B. A.; Chernov, V. E.

    2017-09-01

    Charge distribution of Kr ions produced under irradiation of neutral atoms by x-ray photons with energy of 1.3 keV is calculated by the Monte Carlo method in the model of the effective atomic potential. The calculated results are in good agreement with recent experimental data and can be used in the development and operation of gas detectors controlling the intensity of free-electron x-ray lasers.

  8. High order reflectivity of graphite (HOPG) crystals for x ray energies up to 22 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T; Neumayer, P; Girard, F; Kugland, N L; Landen, O L; Niemann, C; Glenzer, S H

    2008-04-30

    We used Kr K{alpha} (12.6 keV) and Ag K{alpha} (22.1 keV) x-rays, produced by petawatt class laser pulses interacting with a Kr gas jet and a silver foil, to measure the integrated crystal reflectivity of flat Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) up to fifth order. The reflectivity in fourth order is lower by a factor of 50 when compared to first order diffraction. In second order the integrated reflectivity decreases from 1.3 mrad at 12.6 keV to 0.5 mrad at 22.1 keV. The current study indicates that HOPG crystals are suitable for measuring scattering signals from high energy x ray sources (E {ge} 20 keV). These energies are required to penetrate through the high density plasma conditions encountered in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  9. The x-ray calibration facility of the laser integration line in the 0.9-10 keV range: the high energy x-ray source and some applications.

    PubMed

    Hubert, S; Dubois, J L; Gontier, D; Lidove, G; Reverdin, C; Soullié, G; Stemmler, P; Villette, B

    2010-05-01

    The laser integration line (LIL) located at CEA-CESTA is equipped with x-ray plasma diagnostics using different kinds of x-ray components such as filters, mirrors, crystals, detectors, and cameras. The CEA-DAM of Arpajon is currently developing x-ray calibration methods and carrying out absolute calibration of LIL x-ray photodetectors. To guarantee LIL measurements, detectors such as x-ray cameras must be regularly calibrated close to the facility. A new x-ray facility is currently available to perform these absolute x-ray calibrations. This paper presents the x-ray tube based high energy x-ray source delivering x-ray energies ranging from 0.9 to 10 keV by means of an anode barrel. The purpose of this source is mainly to calibrate LIL x-ray cameras but it can also be used to measure x-ray filter transmission of plasma diagnostics. Different x-ray absolute calibrations such as x-ray streak and framing camera yields, x-ray charge-coupled device quantum efficiencies, and x-ray filter transmissions are presented in this paper. A x-ray flat photocathode detector sensitivity calibration recently performed for a CEA Z-pinch facility is also presented.

  10. CONTRIBUTION OF UNRESOLVED POINT SOURCES TO THE DIFFUSE X-RAY BACKGROUND BELOW 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Galeazzi, M.

    2009-09-01

    We present here the analysis of X-ray point sources detected in several observations available in the XMM-Newton public archive. We focused, in particular, on energies below 1 keV, which are of particular relevance to the understanding of the diffuse X-ray background (DXB). The average field of all the exposures is 0.09 deg{sup -2}. We reached an average flux sensitivity of 5.8 x 10{sup -16}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -2} in the soft band (0.5-2.0 keV) and 2.5 x 10{sup -16}ergs{sup -1}cm{sup -2} in the very soft band (0.4-0.6 keV). In this paper, we discuss the log N-log S results, the contribution to the integrated X-ray sky flux, and the properties of the cumulative spectrum from all sources. In particular, we found an excess flux at around 0.5 keV in the composite spectrum of faint sources. The excess seems to be a general property of all the fields observed suggesting an additional class of weak sources is contributing to the X-ray emission at these energies. Combining our results with previous investigations, we have also quantified the contribution of the individual components of the DXB in the 3/4 keV band.

  11. NEW OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR 0.5–5 KEV SOFT X-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry P.

    2015-03-20

    The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ∼0.2 and ∼4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially integrated solar spectral irradiance from ∼0.5 to ∼5 keV, with ∼0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5–10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ∼6, close to the predictions of nanoflare models of coronal heating. Observations during the more active 2013 flight indicate an enrichment of low first-ionization potential elements of only ∼1.6, below the usually observed value of ∼4, suggesting that abundance variations may be related to coronal heating processes. The XUV Photometer System Level 4 data product, a spectral irradiance model derived from integrated broadband measurements, significantly overestimates the spectra from both flights, suggesting a need for revision of its non-flare reference spectra, with important implications for studies of Earth ionospheric dynamics driven by solar SXRs.

  12. Origins of the 1/4 keV Soft X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2005-04-01

    Snowden and coworkers have presented a model for the 1/4 keV soft X-ray diffuse background in which the observed flux is dominated by a ~106 K thermal plasma located in a 100-300 pc diameter bubble surrounding the Sun but has significant contributions from a very patchy Galactic halo. Halo emission provides about 11% of the total observed flux and is responsible for half of the H I anticorrelation. The remainder of the anticorrelation is presumably produced by displacement of disk H I by the varying extent of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). The ROSAT R1 and R2 bands used for this work had the unique spatial resolution and statistical precision required for separating the halo and local components but provide little spectral information. Some consistency checks had been made with older observations at lower X-ray energies, but we have made a careful investigation of the extent to which the model is supported by existing sounding rocket data in the Be (73-111 eV) and B (115-188 eV) bands, where the sensitivities to the model are qualitatively different from the ROSAT bands. We conclude that the two-component model is well supported by the low-energy data. We find that these combined observations of the local component may be consistent with single-temperature thermal emission models in collisional ionization equilibrium if depleted abundances are assumed. However, different model implementations give significantly different results, offering little support for the conclusion that the astrophysical situation is so simple.

  13. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  14. X-ray filament with a strong 6.7-keV line in the Galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Shimizu, Miku; Nakashima, Shinya; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-12-01

    An elongated X-ray source with a strong K-shell line from He-like iron (Fe XXVI) is found at (RA, Dec)J2000.0 = (17h44m00{s.}0, - 29°13'40{^''.}9) in the Galactic center region. The position coincides with the X-ray thread, G359.55+0.16, which is aligned with the radio non-thermal filament. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted with an absorbed thin thermal plasma (apec) model. The best-fitting temperature, metal abundance, and column density are 4.1^{+2.7}_{-1.8} keV, 0.58^{+0.41}_{-0.32} solar, and 6.1^{+2.5}_{-1.3} × 10^{22} cm-2, respectively. These values are similar to those of the largely extended Galactic center X-ray emission.

  15. Diagnostics for the optimization of an 11 keV inverse Compton scattering x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauchat, A.-S.; Brasile, J.-P.; Le Flanchec, V.; Nègre, J.-P.; Binet, A.; Ortega, J.-M.

    2013-04-01

    In a scope of a collaboration between Thales Communications & Security and CEA DAM DIF, 11 keV Xrays were produced by inverse Compton scattering on the ELSA facility. In this type of experiment, X-ray observation lies in the use of accurate electron and laser beam interaction diagnostics and on fitted X-ray detectors. The low interaction probability between < 100 μm width, 12 ps [rms] length electron and photon pulses requires careful optimization of pulse spatial and temporal covering. Another issue was to observe 11 keV X-rays in the ambient radioactive noise of the linear accelerator. For that, we use a very sensitive detection scheme based on radio luminescent screens.

  16. Diagnostics for the optimization of an 11 keV inverse Compton scattering x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Chauchat, A.-S.; Brasile, J.-P; Le Flanchec, V.; Negre, J.-P.; Binet, A.; Ortega, J.-M.

    2013-04-19

    In a scope of a collaboration between Thales Communications and Security and CEA DAM DIF, 11 keV Xrays were produced by inverse Compton scattering on the ELSA facility. In this type of experiment, X-ray observation lies in the use of accurate electron and laser beam interaction diagnostics and on fitted X-ray detectors. The low interaction probability between < 100 {mu}m width, 12 ps [rms] length electron and photon pulses requires careful optimization of pulse spatial and temporal covering. Another issue was to observe 11 keV X-rays in the ambient radioactive noise of the linear accelerator. For that, we use a very sensitive detection scheme based on radio luminescent screens.

  17. X-ray reflectometer for single layer and multilayer coating characterization at 8 keV: An interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgew, Danielle N.; Broadway, David M.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gregory, Don A.

    2016-10-01

    An X-ray reflectometer (XRR) system has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for characterizing various soft and hard X-ray optic coatings. The XRR instrument generates X-ray radiation using a high-output rotating anode source (RAS), operational over a voltage range of 5-35 kV and a current range of 10-150 mA. Copper is used as the target material to produce an X-ray spectrum from which the Kα line at 8.048 keV is isolated for the reflectivity measurements. Five precision slits are mounted along the X-ray beam path to limit the extent of the beam at the sample and to adjust the resolution in the measurements. A goniometer consisting of two precision rotary stages controls the positions of the coating sample and the X-ray detector with respect to the beam. The detector itself is a high performance silicon drift detector used to achieve high count rate efficiency to attain good statistics in the reflectivity measurement at larger grazing angles. The X-ray reflectometer system design and capabilities are described in detail. Verification of the system is obtained through an interlaboratory study in which reflectivity measurements of a multilayer coating made at MSFC are compared with those made at two external laboratories.

  18. X-ray reflectometer for single layer and multilayer coating characterization at 8 keV: An interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Gurgew, Danielle N; Broadway, David M; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian D; Gregory, Don A

    2016-10-01

    An X-ray reflectometer (XRR) system has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for characterizing various soft and hard X-ray optic coatings. The XRR instrument generates X-ray radiation using a high-output rotating anode source (RAS), operational over a voltage range of 5-35 kV and a current range of 10-150 mA. Copper is used as the target material to produce an X-ray spectrum from which the Kα line at 8.048 keV is isolated for the reflectivity measurements. Five precision slits are mounted along the X-ray beam path to limit the extent of the beam at the sample and to adjust the resolution in the measurements. A goniometer consisting of two precision rotary stages controls the positions of the coating sample and the X-ray detector with respect to the beam. The detector itself is a high performance silicon drift detector used to achieve high count rate efficiency to attain good statistics in the reflectivity measurement at larger grazing angles. The X-ray reflectometer system design and capabilities are described in detail. Verification of the system is obtained through an interlaboratory study in which reflectivity measurements of a multilayer coating made at MSFC are compared with those made at two external laboratories.

  19. Nonabelian dark matter models for 3.5 keV X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, James M.; Frey, Andrew R. E-mail: a.frey@uwinnipeg.ca

    2014-10-01

    A recent analysis of XXM-Newton data reveals the possible presence of an X-ray line at approximately 3.55 keV, which is not readily explained by known atomic transitions. Numerous models of eV-scale decaying dark matter have been proposed to explain this signal. Here we explore models of multicomponent nonabelian dark matter with typical mass ∼ 1-10 GeV (higher values being allowed in some models) and eV-scale splittings that arise naturally from the breaking of the nonabelian gauge symmetry. Kinetic mixing between the photon and the hidden sector gauge bosons can occur through a dimension-5 or 6 operator. Radiative decays of the excited states proceed through transition magnetic moments that appear at one loop. The decaying excited states can either be primordial or else produced by upscattering of the lighter dark matter states. These models are significantly constrained by direct dark matter searches or cosmic microwave background distortions, and are potentially testable in fixed target experiments that search for hidden photons. We note that the upscattering mechanism could be distinguished from decays in future observations if sources with different dark matter velocity dispersions seem to require different values of the scattering cross section to match the observed line strengths.

  20. The diffuse X-ray spectrum from 14-200 keV as measured on OSO-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Suri, A. N.; Frost, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement of energy spectrum of the diffuse component of cosmic X-ray flux made on the OSO-5 spacecraft is described. The contributions to the total counting rate of the actively shielded X-ray detector are considered in some detail and the techniques used to eliminate the non-cosmic components are described. Positive values for the cosmic flux are obtained in seven energy channels between 14 and 200 keV and two upper limits are obtained between 200 and 254 keV. The results can be fitted by a power law spectrum. A critical comparison is made with the OSO-3 results. Conclusions show that the reported break in the energy spectrum at 40 keV is probably produced by an erroneous correction for the radioactivity induced in the detector on each passage through the intense charged particle fluxes in the South Atlantic anomaly.

  1. Possible contributions of supernova remnants to the soft X-ray diffuse background (0.1 - 1keV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Burrows, D. N.; Mccammon, D.; Kraushaar, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Almost all of the B band (0.10-0.19 keV) and C band (0.15-0.28 keV) X-rays probably originate in a hot region surrounding the Sun, which Cox and Anderson modeled as a supernova remnant. This same region may account for a significant fraction of the M band (0.5-1 keV) X-rays if the nonequilibrium models of Cox and Anderson are applicable. A population of distant SNR similar to the local region, with center-to-center spacing of about 300 pc, could provide enough galactic M band emission to fill in the dip in the count rate in the galactic plane that would otherwise be present due to absorption of both the extra galactic power law flux and any large-scale-height stellar (or galactic halo) emission.

  2. Applications of “Tender” Energy (1-5 keV) X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in Life Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, Paul; Leri, Alessandra; Tappero, Ryan

    2016-02-15

    The “tender” energy range of 1 to 5 keV, between the energy ranges of most “hard” (>5 keV) and “soft” (<1 keV) synchrotron X-ray facilities, offers some unique opportunities for synchrotron-based X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in life sciences. In particular the K absorption edges of Na through Ca offer opportunities to study local structure, speciation, and chemistry of many important biological compounds, structures and processes. This is an area of largely untapped science, in part due to a scarcity of optimized facilities. Such measurements also entail unique experimental challenges. Lastly, this brief review describes the technique, its experimental challenges, recent progress in development of microbeam measurement capabilities, and several highlights illustrating applications in life sciences.

  3. Applications of “Tender” Energy (1-5 keV) X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in Life Sciences

    DOE PAGES

    Northrup, Paul; Leri, Alessandra; Tappero, Ryan

    2016-02-15

    The “tender” energy range of 1 to 5 keV, between the energy ranges of most “hard” (>5 keV) and “soft” (<1 keV) synchrotron X-ray facilities, offers some unique opportunities for synchrotron-based X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in life sciences. In particular the K absorption edges of Na through Ca offer opportunities to study local structure, speciation, and chemistry of many important biological compounds, structures and processes. This is an area of largely untapped science, in part due to a scarcity of optimized facilities. Such measurements also entail unique experimental challenges. Lastly, this brief review describes the technique, its experimental challenges,more » recent progress in development of microbeam measurement capabilities, and several highlights illustrating applications in life sciences.« less

  4. Sub-second variations of high energy ( 300 keV) hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1986-01-01

    Subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission from solar flares were first observed with a balloon-borne detector. With the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), it is now well known that subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission occur quite frequently. Such rapid variations give constraints on the modeling of electron energization. Such rapid variations reported until now, however, were observed at relatively low energies. Fast mode data obtained by the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) has time resolution of approximately 1 ms but has no energy resolution. Therefore, rapid fluctuations observed in the fast-mode HXRBS data are dominated by the low energy hard X-rays. It is of interest to know whether rapid fluctuations are observed in high-energy X-rays. The highest energy band at which subsecond variations were observed is 223 to 1057 keV. Subsecond variations observed with HXRBS at energies greater than 300 keV are reported, and the implications discussed.

  5. An Einstein survey of the 1 keV soft X-ray background in the Galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John M.; Caillault, Jean-Pierre

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed 56 Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) observations within +/- 3 deg of the Galactic plane in order to determine the low-latitude soft X-ray background flux in the 0.56-1.73 keV band. Any detected X-ray point source which fell within our regions of study was removed from the image, enabling us to present maps of the background flux as a function of Galactic latitude along 18 meridians. These maps reveal considerable structure to the background in the Galactic plane on an angular scale of approximately 1 deg. Our results are compared with those of an earlier study of the 1 keV X-ray background along l = 25 deg by Kahn & Caillault. The double-peaked structure they found is not discernible in our results, possibly because of the presence of solar backscattered flux in their data. A model which takes into account contributions to the background by extragalactic and stellar sources, the distribution of both atomic and molecular absorbing material with the Galaxy, the energy dependence of the cross section for absorption of X-rays, and the energy dependence of the detector has been constructed and fitted to these new data to derive constraints on the scale height, temperature, and volume emissivity of the unaccounted-for X-ray-emitting material. The results of this model along l = 25 deg are roughly similar to those of the model of Kahn & Caillault along the same meridian.

  6. Relative detection efficiency of back- and front-illuminated charge-coupled device cameras for X-rays between 1 keV and 18 keV.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, J; Dousse, J-Cl; Hoszowska, J; Berset, M; Cao, W; Szlachetko, M; Kavcic, M

    2007-09-01

    High-resolution x-ray measurements were performed with a von Hamos-type bent crystal spectrometer using for the detection of the diffracted photons either a back-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) camera or a front-illuminated one. For each CCD the main x-ray emission lines (e.g., Kalpha, Kbeta, Lalpha, and Lbeta) of a variety of elements were measured in order to probe the performances of the two detectors between 1 and 18 keV. From the observed x-ray lines the linearity of the energy response, the noise level, the energy resolution, and the quantum efficiency ratio of the two CCDs were determined.

  7. 20-100 keV K(alpha) X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T

    2003-08-22

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  8. High Resolution, 20-100 keV X-ray Backlighters for ICF and HEDS Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Phillips, T. W.; Schmid, G. J.

    2002-11-01

    We are studying the feasibility of high resolution radiography using short pulse high intensity lasers. Specifically we wish to better characterize and optimize the Kalpha X-ray production and brightness created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material. We plan to utilize this Kalpha source as a backlighter to image various stages of implosions and planar driven high Z materials. Particularly interesting are the production of Kalpha's in the range 20 100 keV. In order to assess in detail the characteristics of such high energy X-ray backlighters, we are performing experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser at LLNL. We will measure Kalpha source generation efficiency as function of laser beam parameters such as pulse duration, spot size and laser beam energy. We are also developing a high resolution hard X-ray imaging detector system. This paper will present initial results from the JanUSP experiments. Reference:D.K. Bradley, O.L. Landen, A.B. Bullock, S.G. Glendinning, and R.E. Turner, "Efficient, High Spatial-Temporal Resolution, 1-100 keV X-ray Radiography," Opt. Lett. 27(2002) 134.

  9. Systematic search for spherical crystal X-ray microscopes matching 1–25 keV spectral line sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, Marius S.; Loisel, Guillaume P.

    2016-12-29

    Spherical-crystal microscopes are used as high-resolution imaging devices for monochromatic x-ray radiography or for imaging the source itself. Crystals and Miller indices (hkl) have to be matched such that the resulting lattice spacing d is close to half the spectral wavelength used for imaging, to fulfill the Bragg equation with a Bragg angle near 90° which reduces astigmatism. Only a few suitable crystal and spectral-line combinations have been identified for applications in the literature, suggesting that x-ray imaging using spherical crystals is constrained to a few chance matches. In this paper, after performing a systematic, automated search over more than 9 × 106 possible combinations for x-ray energies between 1 and 25 keV, for six crystals with arbitrary Miller-index combinations hkl between 0 and 20, we show that a matching, efficient crystal and spectral-line pair can be found for almost every Heα or Kα x-ray source for the elements Ne to Sn. Finally, using the data presented here it should be possible to find a suitable imaging combination using an x-ray source that is specifically selected for a particular purpose, instead of relying on the limited number of existing crystal imaging systems that have been identified to date.

  10. Systematic search for spherical crystal X-ray microscopes matching 1–25 keV spectral line sources

    DOE PAGES

    Schollmeier, Marius S.; Loisel, Guillaume P.

    2016-12-29

    Spherical-crystal microscopes are used as high-resolution imaging devices for monochromatic x-ray radiography or for imaging the source itself. Crystals and Miller indices (hkl) have to be matched such that the resulting lattice spacing d is close to half the spectral wavelength used for imaging, to fulfill the Bragg equation with a Bragg angle near 90° which reduces astigmatism. Only a few suitable crystal and spectral-line combinations have been identified for applications in the literature, suggesting that x-ray imaging using spherical crystals is constrained to a few chance matches. In this paper, after performing a systematic, automated search over more thanmore » 9 × 106 possible combinations for x-ray energies between 1 and 25 keV, for six crystals with arbitrary Miller-index combinations hkl between 0 and 20, we show that a matching, efficient crystal and spectral-line pair can be found for almost every Heα or Kα x-ray source for the elements Ne to Sn. Finally, using the data presented here it should be possible to find a suitable imaging combination using an x-ray source that is specifically selected for a particular purpose, instead of relying on the limited number of existing crystal imaging systems that have been identified to date.« less

  11. Systematic search for spherical crystal X-ray microscopes matching 1-25 keV spectral line sources.

    PubMed

    Schollmeier, Marius S; Loisel, Guillaume P

    2016-12-01

    Spherical-crystal microscopes are used as high-resolution imaging devices for monochromatic x-ray radiography or for imaging the source itself. Crystals and Miller indices (hkl) have to be matched such that the resulting lattice spacing d is close to half the spectral wavelength used for imaging, to fulfill the Bragg equation with a Bragg angle near 90(∘) which reduces astigmatism. Only a few suitable crystal and spectral-line combinations have been identified for applications in the literature, suggesting that x-ray imaging using spherical crystals is constrained to a few chance matches. In this article, after performing a systematic, automated search over more than 9 × 10(6) possible combinations for x-ray energies between 1 and 25 keV, for six crystals with arbitrary Miller-index combinations hkl between 0 and 20, we show that a matching, efficient crystal and spectral-line pair can be found for almost every Heα or Kα x-ray source for the elements Ne to Sn. Using the data presented here it should be possible to find a suitable imaging combination using an x-ray source that is specifically selected for a particular purpose, instead of relying on the limited number of existing crystal imaging systems that have been identified to date.

  12. Bent-crystal Laue spectrograph for measuring x-ray spectra (15keV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Failor, B. H.; Wong, S.; Riordan, J. C.; Hudson, L. T.; O'Brien, C. M.; Seltzer, S. M.; Seiler, S.; Pressley, L.; Lojewski, D. Y.

    2006-10-01

    A bent-crystal Laue {or Cauchois [J. Phys. Radium 3, 320 (1932)] geometry} spectrograph is a good compromise between sensitivity and spectral resolution for measuring x-ray spectra (15keV) from large area x-ray sources because source-size spectral broadening is mitigated. We have designed, built, and tested such a spectrograph for measuring the spectra from electron-beam x-ray sources with diameters as large as 30cm. The same spectrograph geometry has also been used to diagnose (with higher spectral resolution) smaller sources, such as x-ray tubes for mammography and laser-driven inertial fusion targets. We review our spectrograph design and describe the performance of different components. We have compared the reflectivity and spectral resolution of LiF, and Ge diffracting crystals. We have also measured the differences in sensitivity and spectral resolution using different x-ray to light converters (plastic scintillator, CsI, and Gd2O2S) fiber optically coupled to an intensified charge-coupled device camera. We have also coupled scintillating fibers to photomultiplier tubes to obtain temporal records for discrete energy channels.

  13. Systematic search for spherical crystal X-ray microscopes matching 1-25 keV spectral line sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, Marius S.; Loisel, Guillaume P.

    2016-12-01

    Spherical-crystal microscopes are used as high-resolution imaging devices for monochromatic x-ray radiography or for imaging the source itself. Crystals and Miller indices (hkl) have to be matched such that the resulting lattice spacing d is close to half the spectral wavelength used for imaging, to fulfill the Bragg equation with a Bragg angle near 90∘ which reduces astigmatism. Only a few suitable crystal and spectral-line combinations have been identified for applications in the literature, suggesting that x-ray imaging using spherical crystals is constrained to a few chance matches. In this article, after performing a systematic, automated search over more than 9 × 106 possible combinations for x-ray energies between 1 and 25 keV, for six crystals with arbitrary Miller-index combinations hkl between 0 and 20, we show that a matching, efficient crystal and spectral-line pair can be found for almost every Heα or Kα x-ray source for the elements Ne to Sn. Using the data presented here it should be possible to find a suitable imaging combination using an x-ray source that is specifically selected for a particular purpose, instead of relying on the limited number of existing crystal imaging systems that have been identified to date.

  14. keV electron heating in laser-cluster interaction probed by X-ray and electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Wachter, G.; Deiss, C.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.; Lamour, E.; Prigent, C.; Ramond, C.; Rozet, J. P.; Steydli, S.; Trassinelli, M.; Vernhet, D.

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of intense laser pulses with nanoscopic rare-gas clusters provides a testing ground for laser-atom interaction at solid-state densities. We investigate the driven electronic dynamics on the femtosecond time scale both experimentally and theoretically using two complementary observables: the laser intensity dependence of characteristic X-ray emission and of high-energy (keV) electron spectra.

  15. Anomalous X-ray galactic signal from 7.1 keV spin-3/2 dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sukanta; Goyal, Ashok; Kumar, Sanjeev E-mail: agoyal45@yahoo.com

    2016-02-01

    In order to explain the recently reported peak at 3.55 keV in the galactic X-ray spectrum, we propose a simple model. In this model, the Standard Model is extended by including a neutral spin-3/2 vector-like fermion that transforms like a singlet under SM gauge group. This 7.1 keV spin-3/2 fermion is considered to comprise a portion of the observed dark matter. Its decay into a neutrino and a photon with decay life commensurate with the observed data, fits the relic dark matter density and obeys the astrophysical constraints from the supernova cooling.

  16. Uniform large-area x-ray imaging at 9 keV using a backlit pinhole.

    PubMed

    Workman, Jonathan; Fincke, James R; Kyrala, George A; Pierce, Tim

    2005-02-20

    The development and application of point backlighting at high x-ray energies is an essential step in diagnosing radiation-driven experiments. The point-backlighting technique provides uniform backlighter irradiance over a large field of view. This technique circumvents the large laser energy required for area backlighters at energies of 9 keV and above. We present the results of a Zn 9 keV point-backlighter source using the technique of pinhole aperturing to define the source size and hence the resolution. Details of the design and application of this technique to an undriven gold-walled hohlraum are described.

  17. Dosimetric properties of high energy current (HEC) detector in keV x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Shrestha, Suman; Elshahat, Bassem; Karellas, Andrew; Sajo, Erno

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a new x-ray radiation detector. The detector employs high-energy current (HEC) formed by secondary electrons consisting predominantly of photoelectrons and Auger electrons, to directly convert x-ray energy to detector signal without externally applied power and without amplification. The HEC detector is a multilayer structure composed of thin conducting layers separated by dielectric layers with an overall thickness of less than a millimeter. It can be cut to any size and shape, formed into curvilinear surfaces, and thus can be designed for a variety of QA applications. We present basic dosimetric properties of the detector as function of x-ray energy, depth in the medium, area and aspect ratio of the detector, as well as other parameters. The prototype detectors show similar dosimetric properties to those of a thimble ionization chamber, which operates at high voltage. The initial results obtained for kilovoltage x-rays merit further research and development towards specific medical applications.

  18. Origin of the 6.4-keV line of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission - First Report -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuru, T. G.; Uchiyama, H.; Nobukawa, K. K.; Nobukawa, M.; Nakashima, S.; Koyama, K.; Torii, K.; Fukui, Y.

    2014-09-01

    We report the first results from high-statistics observation of the 6.4-keV line in the region of $l= +1.5^\\circ$ to $+3.5^\\circ$ (hereafter referred to as GC East), with the goal to uncover the origin of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). By comparing this data with that from the previous observations in the region $l=-1.5^\\circ$ to $-3.5^\\circ$ (hereafter referred to as GC West), we discovered that the 6.4-keV line is asymmetrically distributed with respect to the Galactic center, whereas the 6.7-keV line is symmetrically distributed. The distribution of the 6.4-keV line follows that of $^{13}$CO and its flux is proportional to the column density of the molecular gas. This correlation agrees with that seen between the 6.4-keV line and the cold interstellar medium (ISM) (H$_{\\rm I}$ $+$ H$_2$) in the region $|l|>4^\\circ$. This result suggests that the 6.4-keV emission is diffuse fluorescence from the cold ISM not only in GC East and West but also in the entire Galactic plane. This observational result suggests that the surface brightness of the 6.4-keV line is proportional to the column density of the cold ISM in the entire Galactic plane. For the ionizing particles, we consider X-rays and low energy cosmic-ray protons and electrons .

  19. First Limits on the 3-200 keV X-Ray Spectrum of the Quiet Sun Using RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, I. G.; Hurford, G. J.; Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P.; van Bibber, K.

    2007-04-01

    We present the first results using the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to observe solar X-ray emission not associated with active regions, sunspots, or flares (the quiet Sun). Using a newly developed chopping technique (fan-beam modulation) during seven periods of offpointing between 2005 June and 2006 October, we obtained upper limits over 3-200 keV for the quietest times when the GOES 12 1-8 Å flux fell below 10-8 W m-2. These values are smaller than previous limits in the 17-120 keV range and extend them to both lower and higher energies. The limit in 3-6 keV is consistent with a coronal temperature <=6 MK. For quiet-Sun periods when the GOES 12 1-8 Å background flux was between 10-8 and 10-7 W m-2, the RHESSI 3-6 keV flux correlates to this as a power law, with an index of 1.08+/-0.13. The power-law correlation for microflares has a steeper index of 1.29+/-0.06. We also discuss the possibility of observing quiet-Sun X-rays due to solar axions and use the RHESSI quiet-Sun limits to estimate the axion-to-photon coupling constant for two different axion emission scenarios.

  20. X-ray backlighting sources of 4 to 10 keV for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.C.; Matthews, D.L.; Koppel, L.N.

    1981-05-12

    High-intensity, short-duration x-ray pulses are necessary to diagnose the compression of laser film targets. Present target designs are such that backlighting sources ranging from a few thousand electron volts to 100 keV will be necessary. The desired source durations range from a few tens of picoseconds for flash radiography to several nanoseconds for streaked backlighting, and the source occurrence must be tightly synchronized to that of the target-irradiating laser pulse. For the latter reason, a laser-induced x-ray pulse is preferred. An initial study of the K lines of Ti, Ni, and Zn as possible backlighting sources was conducted. The conversion efficiency of laser light into line radiation was obtained as a function of laser intensity, pulse length, and wavelength. A threshold laser intensity for x-ray line production was identified. Information was obtained on the size and duration of the x-ray emission source, in relation to laser parameters. The experimental results, and their impact on backlighting capability for high-density laser function targets, are discussed.

  1. Observation of 67 keV x-rays with a scintillation detector using proportional-mode silicon avalanche photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Keisuke; Kishimoto, Shunji

    2016-07-27

    We developed a scintillation X-ray detector using a proportional-mode silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD). We report a prototype detector using a lead-loaded plastic scintillator mounted on a proportional-mode Si-APD (active area size: 3 mm in diameter), which is operated at a low temperature. Using 67.41 keV X-rays, we could measure pulse-height spectra of scintillation light with a charge-sensitive preamplifier at 20, 0, and −35°C. Time spectra of the X-ray bunch structure were successfully recorded using a wideband and 60-dB-gain amplifier in hybrid-mode operation of the Photon Factory ring. We obtained a better time resolution of 0.51 ns (full width at half-maximum) for the single-bunch X-ray peak at −35°C. We were also able to observe a linear response of the scintillation pulses up to 8 Mcps for input photon rates up to 1.4 × 10{sup 8} photons/s.

  2. Enhancement of keV X-rays from low-density cellulose triacetate (TAC) foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, S.; Kaur, Channprit; Borisenko, N. G.; Pasley, J.; Orekhov, A.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-07-01

    The interaction of a high-power laser with a low-density foam target can in some instances result in a significant enhancement in x-ray generation relative to that when the same laser is incident upon a homogenous solid. In this paper, we present x-ray emission studies from foam targets where the density is varied from under-dense to over-dense. The targets are irradiated with the first harmonic of Nd:Glass laser. The laser intensity on the target was approximately 2 × 1014 W/cm2 with the pulse duration of 500 ps. Mass-matched cellulose triacetate foam targets with densities of 2 mg/cc, 4 mg/cc, 7 mg/cc, and 20 mg/cc were used. The areal density presented by the targets on the laser beam axis was held constant at 0.2 mg/cm2 by varying the target thickness in inverse proportion to the density. The x-ray yield in the spectral range (5-8 keV) and (4.5-16 keV) was found to be enhanced by approximately 2.3 times in foam targets with the density of 2 mg/cc (under-dense) compared with foam targets with the density of 20 mg/cc (over-dense).

  3. Laser-driven 6-16 keV x-ray imaging and backlighting with spherical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Smith, I. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Laser-driven x-ray self-emission imaging or backlighting of High Energy Density Physics experiments requires brilliant sources with keV energies and x-ray crystal imagers with high spatial resolution of about 10 μ m. Spherically curved crystals provide the required resolution when operated at near-normal incidence, which minimizes image aberrations due to astigmatism. However, this restriction dramatically limits the range of suitable crystal and spectral line combinations. We present a survey of crystals and spectral lines for x-ray backlighting and self-emission imaging with energies between 6 and 16 keV. Ray-tracing simulations including crystal rocking curves have been performed to predict image brightness and spatial resolution. Results have been benchmarked to experimental data using both Sandia's 4 kJ, ns Z-Beamlet and 200 J, ps Z-Petawatt laser systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2014-15552A.

  4. Demonstration of a 13-keV Kr K-shell x-ray source at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Patterson, J. R.; Regan, S. P.

    2013-09-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (≈13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ≈10× greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1-mm-diameter, 4-mm-tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the National Ignition Facility laser beams deposited ≈700 kJ of 3ω light into the target in an ≈140 TW, 5.0-ns-duration square pulse. The Dante diagnostics measured ≈5 TW into 4π solid angle of ≥12 keV x rays for ≈4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr Heα line at 13 keV.

  5. Laboratory Measurements Compellingly Support a Charge-exchange Mechanism for the ’Dark Matter’ ~3.5 keV X-Ray Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Chintan; Dobrodey, Stepan; Bernitt, Sven; Steinbrügge, René; Crespo López-Urrutia, José R.; Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-12-01

    The reported observations of an unidentified X-ray line feature at ∼3.5 keV have driven a lively discussion about its possible dark matter origin. Motivated by this, we have measured the K-shell X-ray spectra of highly ionized bare sulfur ions following charge exchange with gaseous molecules in an electron beam ion trap, as a source of or a contributor to this X-ray line. We produced S16+ and S15+ ions and let them capture electrons in collision with those molecules with the electron beam turned off while recording X-ray spectra. We observed a charge-exchange-induced X-ray feature at the Lyman series limit (3.47 ± 0.06 keV). The inferred X-ray energy is in full agreement with the reported astrophysical observations and supports the novel scenario proposed by Gu et al.

  6. X-ray and kinetic electron emission by keV proton impacting on fusion-relevant tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianming; Zeng, Lixia; Cheng, Rui; Lei, Yu; Chen, Yanhong; Xu, Zhongfeng; Chen, Ximeng; Wang, Yuyu; Zhao, Yongtao; Xiao, Guoqing

    2017-09-01

    We have measured the electron and X-ray emission of tungsten bombarded with proton in the energy range of 50-250 keV. It is found that the total electron yield mainly consists of kinetic electron emission, which results from the excited valence electrons, and presents a similar trend to the curve of stopping power. The ratio between electron yield and electronic energy loss is not constant, but decreases with increasing incident energy. The behavior is interpreted by an expected competitive mechanism of ionization between different shell electrons of target atom. The explanation is verified by the experimental increase of M-shell X-ray emission yield, and the measured and calculated ionization cross section of core and valence electrons.

  7. Characterizations of MCP performance in the hard x-ray range (6–25 keV)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming Rochau, Greg; Moy, Ken; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-11-15

    MCP detector performance at hard x-ray energies from 6 to 25 keV was recently investigated using NSLS beamline X15A at BNL. Measurements were made with an NSTec Gen-II (H-CA-65) framing camera, based on a Photonis MCP with ∼10 μm in diameter pores, ∼12 μm center-center spacing, an L/D ratio of 46, and a bias angle of 8°. The MCP characterizations were focused on (1) energy and angle dependent sensitivity, (2) energy and angle dependent spatial resolution, (3) energy dependent gain performance, and (4) energy dependent dynamic range. These measurement corroborated simulation results using a Monte Carlo model that included hard x-ray interactions and the subsequent electron cascade in the MCP.

  8. Accretion Properties of a Sample of Hard X-Ray (<60 keV) Selected Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Mao, Y. F.; Wei, J. Y.

    2009-02-01

    We examine the accretion properties in a sample of 42 hard (3-60 keV) X-ray selected nearby broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The energy range in the sample is harder than that usually used in similar previous studies. These AGNs are mainly complied from the RXTE All Sky Survey, and complemented by the released INTEGRAL AGN catalog. The black hole masses, bolometric luminosities of AGN, and Eddington ratios are derived from their optical spectra in terms of the broad Hβ emission line. The tight correlation between the hard X-ray (3-20 keV) and bolometric/line luminosity is well identified in our sample. Also identified is a strong inverse Baldwin relationship of the Hβ emission line. In addition, all of these hard X-ray AGNs are biased toward luminous objects with a high Eddington ratio (mostly between 0.01 and 0.1) and a low column density (<1022 cm-2), which is most likely due to the selection effect of the surveys. The hard X-ray luminosity is consequently found to be strongly correlated with the black hole mass. We believe the sample completeness will be improved in the next few years by the ongoing Swift and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory missions, and by the next advanced missions, such as NuSTAR, Simbol-X, and NeXT. Finally, the correlation between RFe (= optical Fe II/Hβ) and disk temperature as assessed by T vprop (L/L Edd)M -1 BH leads us to suggest that the strength of the Fe II emission is mainly determined by the shape of the ionizing spectrum.

  9. Demonstration of a 13 keV Kr K-shell X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Patterson, J. R.; Regan, S. P.

    2013-10-01

    We report 3% conversion efficiency of laser energy into Kr K-shell (~13 keV) radiation, consistent with theoretical predictions. This is ~10 × greater than previous work. The emission was produced from a 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall gas pipe target filled with 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. 160 of the NIF laser beams deposited ~700 kJ of 3 ω light into the target in a ~140 TW, 5.0 ns duration square pulse. This laser configuration sufficiently heated the targets to optimize the K-shell x-ray emission. The Dante diagnostics measured ~5 TW into 4 π solid angle of >=12 keV x rays for ~4 ns, which includes both continuum emission and flux in the Kr Heα line at 13 keV. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under the intera- gency agreements 10027-1420 and 10027-6167.

  10. The diffuse X-ray background spectrum from 3 to 50keV. [HEAO 1 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Miller, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Rose, L. A.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    The spectrum of the extragalactic diffuse X-ray background was measured with the GSFC cosmic X-ray experiment on HEAO-1 for regions of the sky away from known point sources and more than 20 deg from the galactic plane. A total exposure of 80 sq m-sec-sr is available at present. Free-free emission from an optically thin plasma of 40 plus or minus 5 keV provides an excellent description of the observed spectrum from 3 to 50 keV. This spectral shape is confirmed by measurements from 5 separate layers of three independent detectors. With an estimated absolute precision of about 10 percent, the intensity of the emission at 10 keV is 3.2 keV/keV-sq cm-sec-sr, a value consistent with the average of previously reported spectra. No other spectral features, such as iron line emission, are evident. This spectrum is not typical of known extragalactic objects. A uniform hot intergalactic medium of approximately 36 percent of the closure density of the universe would produce such a flux, although non-uniform models indicating less total matter are probably more realistic.

  11. Measurement of 2-5 keV x-ray emission from laser-target interactions by using fluor-MCP and CsI-XRD detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Tirsell, K.G.; Leipelt, G.R.; Laird, W.B.

    1981-09-29

    For inertial confinement fusion plasma diagnostics, x-ray diode (XRD) detectors using conventional cathodes are not sensitive enough to measure x-rays above approx. 1.5 keV. However, for laser driver fusion targets, x-rays in the range of 2 to 5 keV are important because of their mobility in the target. We have successfully used fluor-microchannel plate (MCP) detectors to obtain absolute x-ray measurements in the 2 to 5 keV range. Recent data obtained from experiments on the Shiva laser system are presented. In addition, designs for a variety of channels in the range using fluor-MCP and CsI-XRD's above 1.5 keV will be discussed.

  12. Simulations of Microchannel Plate Sensitivity to <20 keV X-rays as a Function of Energy and Incident Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, Craig; Wu, M.; Rochau, G. A.

    2013-06-13

    We present results of Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP) response to x-rays in the 250 eV to 20 keV energy range as a function of both x-ray energy and impact angle. The model is based on the model presented in Rochau et al. (2006). However, while the Rochau et al. (2006) model was two-dimensional, and their results only went to 5 keV, our results have been expanded to 20 keV, and our model has been incorporated into a three-dimensional Monte Carlo MCP model that we have developed over the past several years (Kruschwitz et al. 2011). X-ray penetration through multiple MCP pore walls is increasingly important above 5 keV. The effect of x-ray penetration through multiple pores on MCP performance was studied and is presented.

  13. A New Observation of the Quiet Sun Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Stone, J.

    2012-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable with solar activity. While this is particularly true during solar flares, when emission can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude up to gamma-ray energies, even the so-called "quiet Sun" is bright in soft X-rays (SXRs), as the ~1-2 MK ambient plasma of the corona emits significant thermal bremsstrahlung up to ~5 keV. However, the actual solar SXR (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include ultra-high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystral spectrometers (e.g. Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g. GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with fair energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and XRS on MESSENGER, although they did not extend below ~1 keV. We present observations of the quiet Sun SXR emission obtained using a new SXR spectrometer flown on the third SDO/EVE underflight calibration rocket (NASA 36.286). The commercial off-the-shelf Amptek X123 silicon drift detector, with an 8-micron Be window and custom aperture, measured the solar SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution (though, due to hardware limitations, with only ~0.12 keV binning) and 2-sec cadence over ~5 minutes on 23 June 2012. Despite the rising solar cycle, activity on 23 June 2012 was abnormally low, with no visible active regions and GOES XRS emission near 2010 levels; we measured no solar counts above ~4 keV during the observation period. We compare our X123 measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including the SphinX observations during the deep solar minimum of 2009, and with upper limits of >3 keV quiet Sun emission

  14. 0.5-keV Soft X-ray attosecond continua

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, S. M.; Silva, F.; Cousin, S. L.; Hemmer, M.; Biegert, J.

    2016-01-01

    Attosecond light pulses in the extreme ultraviolet have drawn a great deal of attention due to their ability to interrogate electronic dynamics in real time. Nevertheless, to follow charge dynamics and excitations in materials, element selectivity is a prerequisite, which demands such pulses in the soft X-ray region, above 200 eV, to simultaneously cover several fundamental absorption edges of the constituents of the materials. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the exploitation of a transient phase matching regime to generate carrier envelope controlled soft X-ray supercontinua with pulse energies up to 2.9±0.1 pJ and a flux of (7.3±0.1) × 107 photons per second across the entire water window and attosecond pulses with 13 as transform limit. Our results herald attosecond science at the fundamental absorption edges of matter by bridging the gap between ultrafast temporal resolution and element specific probing. PMID:27167525

  15. Comparison of simulated and measured spectra from an X-ray tube for the energies between 20 and 35 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, M.; Emirhan, E.; Bayrak, A.; Ozben, C. S.; Yücel, E. Barlas

    2015-11-01

    Design and production of a simple and low cost X-ray imaging system that can be used for light industrial applications was targeted in the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. In this study, production, transmission and detection of X-rays were simulated for the proposed imaging device. OX/70-P dental tube was used and X-ray spectra simulated by Geant4 were validated by comparison with X-ray spectra measured between 20 and 35 keV. Relative detection efficiency of the detector was also determined to confirm the physics processes used in the simulations. Various time optimization tools were performed to reduce the simulation time.

  16. High-resolution 22-52 keV backlighter sources and application to X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, K.; Moore, A. S.; Smalyuk, V.; Wallace, K.; Gate, D.; Glendinning, S. G.; McAlpin, S.; Park, H. S.; Sorce, C.; Stevenson, R. M.

    2013-09-01

    The requirement for sources of hard X-rays suitable for high resolution radiography through large ρR targets is prominent in many aspects of current laser-driven plasma physics research. In recent work using the OMEGA EP laser facility [L. J. Waxer, M. J. Guardalben, J. H. Kelly et al., CLEO/QELS, Optical Society of America, San Jose, CA, IEEE (2008)] at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY, experiments have been performed to measure characteristics of 22-52 keV X-ray sources using high intensity short-pulse lasers. High quality point projection, two-dimensional radiography was demonstrated by irradiating microwire targets with laser intensities of 1016 W cm-2-1019 W cm-2. Microwire targets were manufactured to dimensions of 10 μm × 10 μm × 300 μm and were supported by a 100 μm × 300 μm × 6 μm low-Z substrate. Measurements of the k-α conversion efficiency and X-ray source-size are discussed and, of particular importance for radiography, the spectral purity of the backlighter is characterized to assess the relative importance of the Kα emission to bremsstrahlung background.

  17. A Catalog of Soft X-Ray Shadows, and More Contemplation of the 1/4 KeV Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Freyberg, M. J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Sanders, W. T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a catalog of shadows in the 1/4 keV soft X-ray diffuse background 4 (SXRB) that were identified by a comparison between ROSAT All-Sky Survey maps and DIRB&corrected IRAS 100 micron maps. These "shadows" are the negative correlations between the surface brightness of the SXRB and the column density of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISIM) over limited angular regions (a few degrees in extent). We have compiled an extensive but not exhaustive set of 378 shadows in the polar regions of the Galaxy (Absolute value (beta) > and approximately equal 20 deg.), and determined their foreground and background X-ray intensities (relative to the absorbing features), and the respective hardness ratios of that emission. The portion of the sky that was examined to find these shadows was restricted in general to regions where the minimum column density is less than and approximately equal to 4 x 10(exp 20) H/square cm, i.e., relatively high Galactic latitudes, and to regions away from distinct extended features in the SXRB such as supernova remnants and superbubbles. The results for the foreground intensities agree well with the recent results of a general analysis of the local 1/4 KeV emission while the background intensities show additional. but not unexpected scatter. The results also confirm the existence of a gradient in the hardness of the local 1/4 keV emission along a Galactic center/ anticenter axis with a temperature that varies from 10(exp 6.13) K to 10(exp 6.02) K, respectively. The average temperature of the foreground component from this analysis is 10(exp 6.08) K, compared to 10(exp 6.06) K in the previous analysis. Likewise, the average temperature for the distant component for the current and previous analyses are 10(exp 6.06) K and 10(exp 6.02) K, respectively. Finally, the results for the 1/4 keV halo emission are compared to the observed fluxes at 3/4 keV, where the lack of correlation suggests that the Galactic halo's 1/4 keV and 3/4 keV

  18. The Solar Flare 4: 10 keV X-ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The 4-10 keV solar flare spectrum includes highly excited lines of stripped Ca, Fe, and Ni ions as well as a continuum steeply falling with energy. Groups of lines at approximately 7 keV and approximately 8 keV, observed during flares by the broad-band RHESSI spectrometer and called here the Fe-line and Fe/Ni-line features, are formed mostly of Fe lines but with Ni lines contributing to the approximately 8 keV feature. Possible temperature indicators of these line features are discussed - the peak or centroid energies of the Fe-line feature, the line ratio of the Fe-line to the Fe/Ni-line features, and the equivalent width of the Fe-line feature. The equivalent width is by far the most sensitive to temperature. However, results will be confused if, as is commonly believed, the abundance of Fe varies from flare to flare, even during the course of a single flare. With temperature determined from the thermal continuum, the Fe-line feature becomes a diagnostic of the Fe abundance in flare plasmas. These results are of interest for other hot plasmas in coronal ionization equilibrium such as stellar flare plasmas, hot gas in galaxies, and older supernova remnants.

  19. Learning to Apply Metrology Principles to the Measurement of X-ray Intensities in the 500 eV to 110 keV Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Pond, T.; Silbernagel, C.; Torres, P.; Marlett, K.; Goldin, F.; Cyr, S.

    2011-02-08

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Livermore Operations, has two optical radiation calibration laboratories accredited by “the National Voluntary Laboratories Accreditation Program (NVLAP) which is the accrediting body of” the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and is now working towards accreditation for its X-ray laboratories. NSTec operates several laboratories with X-ray sources that generate X-rays in the energy range from 50 eV to 115 keV. These X-ray sources are used to characterize and calibrate diagnostics and diagnostic components used by the various national laboratories, particularly for plasma analysis on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). Because X-ray photon flux measurement methods that can be accredited, i.e., traceable to NIST, have not been developed for sources operating in these energy ranges, NSTec, NIST, and the National Voluntary Accreditation Program (NVLAP) together have defined a path toward the development and validation of accredited metrology methods for X-ray energies. The methodology developed for the high energy X-ray (HEX) Laboratory was NSTec’s starting point for X-ray metrology accreditation and will be the basis for the accredited processes in the other X-ray laboratories. This paper will serve as a teaching tool, by way of this example using the NSTec X-ray sources, for the process and methods used in developing an accredited traceable metrology.

  20. THE X-RAY LINE FEATURE AT 3.5 KeV IN GALAXY CLUSTER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J. E-mail: bs@cbk.pan.wroc.pl

    2015-08-10

    Recent work by Bulbul et al. and Boyarsky et al. has suggested that a line feature at ∼3.5 keV in the X-ray spectra of galaxy clusters and individual galaxies seen with XMM-Newton is due to the decay of sterile neutrinos, a dark matter candidate. This identification has been criticized by Jeltema and Profumo on the grounds that model spectra suggest that atomic transitions in helium-like potassium (K xviii) and chlorine (Cl xvi) are more likely to be the emitters. Here it is pointed out that the K xviii lines have been observed in numerous solar flare spectra at high spectral resolution with the RESIK crystal spectrometer and also appear in Chandra HETG spectra of the coronally active star σ Gem. In addition, the solar flare spectra at least indicate a mean coronal potassium abundance, which is a factor between 9 and 11 higher than the solar photospheric abundance. This fact, together with the low statistical quality of the XMM-Newton spectra, completely account for the ∼3.5 keV feature and there is therefore no need to invoke a sterile neutrino interpretation of the observed line feature at ∼3.5 keV.

  1. Identification of the Hard X-Ray Source Dominating the E > 25 keV Emission of the Nearby Galaxy M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Wik, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Ballhausen, R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Lien, A.; Williams, B.; Baganoff, F.; Boyd, P. T.; Enoto, T.; Kennea, J.; Page, K. L.; Choi, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We report the identification of a bright hard X-ray source dominating the M31 bulge above 25 keV from a simultaneous NuSTAR-Swift observation. We find that this source is the counterpart to Swift J0042.6+4112, which was previously detected in the Swift BAT All-sky Hard X-ray Survey. This Swift BAT source had been suggested to be the combined emission from a number of point sources; our new observations have identified a single X-ray source from 0.5 to 50 keV as the counterpart for the first time. In the 0.5-10 keV band, the source had been classified as an X-ray Binary candidate in various Chandra and XMM-Newton studies; however, since it was not clearly associated with Swift J0042.6+4112, the previous E < 10 keV observations did not generate much attention. This source has a spectrum with a soft X-ray excess (kT ˜ 0.2 keV) plus a hard spectrum with a power law of {{Γ }}˜ 1 and a cutoff around 15-20 keV, typical of the spectral characteristics of accreting pulsars. Unfortunately, any potential pulsation was undetected in the NuSTAR data, possibly due to insufficient photon statistics. The existing deep HST images exclude high-mass (>3 {M}⊙ ) donors at the location of this source. The best interpretation for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate-mass (<3 {M}⊙ ) companion or a symbiotic X-ray binary. We discuss other possibilities in more detail.

  2. Sub-arcsec X-Ray Telescope for Imaging The Solar Corona In the 0.25 - 1.2 keV Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Cash, Webster; Jelsma, Schuyler; Farmer, Jason

    1996-01-01

    We have developed an X-ray telescope that uses a new technique for focusing X-rays with grazing incidence optics. The telescope was built with spherical optics for all of its components, utilizing the high quality surfaces obtainable when polishing spherical (as opposed to aspherical) optics. We tested the prototype X-ray telescope in the 300 meter vacuum pipe at White Sands Missile Range, NM. The telescope features 2 degee graze angles with tungsten coatings, yielding a bandpass of 0.25-1.5 keV with a peak effective area of 0.8 sq cm at 0.83 keV. Results from X-ray testing at energies of 0.25 keV and 0.93 keV (C-K and Cu-L) verify 0.5 arcsecond performance at 0.93 keV. Results from modeling the X-ray telescope's response to the Sun show that the current design would be capable of recording 10 half arcsecond images of a solar active region during a 300 second NASA sounding rocket flight.

  3. Analysis of 20 KEV Electron Induced X-Ray Production in Skull, Femur/tibia Bones of Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rahul; Watson, Alec; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2010-04-01

    Hind-limb suspension (HLS) of rats is a NASA validated model of simulated weightlessness. This study examines the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system of rats to assess whether or not exposure of rats to HLS for one week will induce alteration of structural features in selected bones. Four groups of rats were used: two unsuspended controls and two suspended groups. Body weight, food, and water intake were monitored daily before and after suspension. X-rays were measured by a liquid nitrogen cooled Si(li) detector on a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) that provided the 20 keV electron beam. X-ray data were collected from square cross sections between 100 μm2 and 104 μm2. The bones were measured for elemental levels of calcium, phosphorus, oxygen and carbon from both control and HLS rats. The average body weight of all HLS groups decreased compared to their respective unsuspended controls. Food and water intake was also lower in both suspended groups. A correlation among HLS and control samples in terms of the distribution of the primary elements was found in the bone tissue when analyzed as a function of position along the hind-leg and within the cross sections.

  4. Enhanced room temperature oxidation in silicon and porous silicon under 10 keV x-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryckman, Judson D.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Weiss, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of enhanced oxidation on silicon and porous silicon samples exposed in air ambient to high-dose-rate 10 keV x-ray radiation at room temperature. The evolution of the radiation-induced oxide growth is monitored by ellipsometry and interferometric reflectance spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows the emergence of Si-O-Si stretching modes and corresponding suppression of SiH{sub x} and Si-Si modes in the porous silicon samples. The radiation response depends strongly on initial native oxide thickness and Si-H surface species. The enhanced oxidation mechanism is attributed to photoinduced oxidation processes wherein energetic photons are used to dissociate molecular oxygen and promote the formation of more reactive oxygen species.

  5. Enhanced room temperature oxidation in silicon and porous silicon under 10 keV x-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryckman, Judson D.; Reed, Robert A.; Weller, Robert A.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Weiss, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    We report the observation of enhanced oxidation on silicon and porous silicon samples exposed in air ambient to high-dose-rate 10 keV x-ray radiation at room temperature. The evolution of the radiation-induced oxide growth is monitored by ellipsometry and interferometric reflectance spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows the emergence of Si-O-Si stretching modes and corresponding suppression of SiHx and Si-Si modes in the porous silicon samples. The radiation response depends strongly on initial native oxide thickness and Si-H surface species. The enhanced oxidation mechanism is attributed to photoinduced oxidation processes wherein energetic photons are used to dissociate molecular oxygen and promote the formation of more reactive oxygen species.

  6. Synthetic multilayer x-ray dispersion elements for 200 A (62 eV) to 0. 62 A (20 keV) radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1983-11-01

    This final report concerns research performed at Stanford University on a program sponsored by the Department of Energy through Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Regents of the University of California (Subcontract No. 2695501) entitled Synthetic Multilayer X-ray Dispersion Elements for 200 A (62 eV) to 0.62 A (20 keV) Radiation. The thrust of the research was to investigate the synthesis process parameter dependence of the nature of the interfaces between constituent adjacent layers, the uniformity of layers, and the reflectivity for light of wavelengths 0.62 A to 200 A of synthetic multilayer crystals. Additionally, device development was to be undertaken with emphasis on spectrum analyzing dispersion elements, high energy Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray microscope mirrors, multi-keV (1 to 5 keV) X-ray applications, X-ray beam splitters and synthetic multilayers fabricated from adjoining elements in the periodic table.

  7. Image information transfer properties of x-ray intensifying screens in the energy range from 17 to 320 keV.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, A; Dick, C E

    1993-01-01

    The image information transfer properties of a number of x-ray fluorescent screens have been measured for x-ray energies from 17 to 320 keV. The detective quantum efficiency of the screens at each x-ray energy has been determined by separate measurements of the x-ray absorption efficiency and the statistical factor associated with the emission of optical photons upon absorption of an incident x-ray. Data have been recorded for both rare-earth phosphor screens and calcium tungstate screens. The value of the statistical factor for optical photon emission tends toward a constant value as the incident energy increases. Comparisons of the image information transfer properties are presented for several screens, which have been measured over a ten year interval. The utility of the screens for high-energy radiography is discussed.

  8. Identification of the Hard X-Ray Source Dominating the E > 25 keV Emission of the Nearby Galaxy M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Wik, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Ballhausen, R.; Lehmer, B. D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We report the identification of a bright hard X-ray source dominating the M31 bulge above 25 keV from a simultaneous NuSTAR-Swift observation. We find that this source is the counterpart to Swift J0042.6+4112, which was previously detected in the Swift BAT All-Sky Hard X-Ray Survey. This Swift BAT source had been suggested to be the combined emission from a number of point sources; our new observations have identified a single X-ray source from 0.5 to 50 keV as the counterpart for the first time. In the 0.5-10 keV band, the source had been classified as an X-ray Binary candidate in various Chandra and XMM-Newton studies; however, since it was not clearly associated with Swift J0042.6+4112, the previous E is less than 10keVobservations did not generate much attention. This source has a spectrum with a soft X-ray excess (kT approximately equal to 0.2 keV) plus a hard spectrum with a power law of gamma approximately equal to 1 and a cutoff around 15-20 keV, typical of the spectral characteristics of accreting pulsars. Unfortunately, any potential pulsation was undetected in the NuSTAR data, possibly due to insufficient photon statistics. The existing deep HST (Hubble Space Telescope) images exclude high-mass (greater than 3 times the radius of the moon) donors at the location of this source. The best interpretation for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate-mass (less than 3 times the radius of the moon M) companion or a symbiotic X-ray binary. We discuss other possibilities in more detail.

  9. Position detection of 17-25 keV x-rays in krypton and xenon with a resolution of 18-50 m (FWHM)

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Radeka, V.; Smith, G.C.

    1985-10-01

    Measurements have been made of x-ray position resolution in a proportional chamber with both Kr/10% CO2 and Xe/10% CO2, for the x-ray energy region 17 to 25 keV. Position resolutions in the range of 18 to 50 m (FWHM) are obtained in krypton, and in the range 50 to 100 m (FWHM) for xenon. These results are interpreted in terms of the physical limitation to resolution due to the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons emitted from the x-ray absorbing atom.

  10. Understanding Bright 13 keV Kr K-shell X-ray Sources at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Kemp, G. E.; Fournier, K. B.; Scott, H.; Patel, M.; Barrios, Widmann; Widmann, K.

    2015-11-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (CE) K-shell Kr sources are being investigated for High Energy Density experiments. These sources are 4.1 mm in diameter 4.4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 40 μm thick wall holding either 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. The CE of K-shell Kr is dependent upon the peak electron temperature in the radiating plasma. In the NIF experiments, the available energy heats the source to Te = 6-7 keV, well below the temperature of Te ~25 keV needed to optimize the Kr CE. The CE is a steep function of the peak electron temperature. A spatially averaged electron temperature can be estimated from measured He(α) and Ly(α) line ratios. Some disagreement has been observed in the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. Disagreements have been observed between the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. To help understand this issue, Kr gas pipes have been shot with 3 ω light at ?750 kJ at ~210, ~140 TW and ~120 TW power levels with 3.7, 5.2 and 6.7 ns pulses, respectively. The power and pulse length scaling of the measured CE and K-shell line ratios and their comparison to simulations will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspic

  11. Comparison between MCNP and PENELOPE for the simulation of X-ray spectra in electron microscopy in the keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roet, D.; Ceballos, C.; Van Espen, P.

    2006-10-01

    In this paper two Monte Carlo codes, MCNP (version 4C2) and PENELOPE (version 2001), were used in a cluster environment to simulate the X-ray spectra emerging from bombarding pure element bulk targets with mono energetic electrons in the keV range (30 keV). The simulation results were compared to experimental data measured on a JEOL-6300 electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray detector. The results from both codes were compared amongst each other as to find the best in terms of accuracy, ease of use and speed of the calculations.

  12. What dominates the X-ray emission of Andromeda at E>20 keV? New constraints from NuSTAR and Swift on a very bright, hard X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Antoniou, Vallia; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Lehmer, Bret; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Patricia T.; Kennea, Jamie; Page, Kim L.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to its better sensitivity and spatial resolution, NuSTAR allows us to investigate the E>10 keV properties of nearby galaxies. We now know that starburst galaxies, containing very young stellar populations, have X-ray spectra which drop quickly above 10 keV. We extend our investigation of hard X-ray properties to an older stellar population system, the bulge of M31. The NuSTAR and Swift simultaneous observations reveal a bright hard source dominating the M31 bulge above 20 keV, which is likely to be a counterpart of Swift J0042.6+4112 previously detected (but not classified) in the Swift BAT All-sky Hard X-ray Survey. This source had been classified as an XRB candidate in various Chandra and XMM-Newton studies; however, since it was not clear that it is the counterpart to the strong Swift J0042.6+4112 source at higher energies, the previous E < 10 keV observations did not generate much attention. The NuSTAR and Swift spectra of this source drop quickly at harder energies as observed in sources in starburst galaxies. The X-ray spectral properties of this source are very similar to those of an accreting pulsar; yet, we do not find a pulsation in the NuSTAR data. The existing deep HST images indicate no high mass donors at the location of this source, further suggesting that this source has an intermediate or low mass companion. The most likely scenario for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate/low mass companion similar to the Galactic Her X-1 system. We will also discuss other possibilities in more detail.

  13. New Observations of the Solar 0.5-5 keV Soft X-Ray Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry P.

    2015-03-01

    The solar corona is orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying photosphere, but how the corona attains such high temperatures is still not understood. Soft X-ray (SXR) emission provides important diagnostics for thermal processes in the high-temperature corona, and is also an important driver of ionospheric dynamics at Earth. There is a crucial observational gap between ˜0.2 and ˜4 keV, outside the ranges of existing spectrometers. We present observations from a new SXR spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD, which measured the spatially integrated solar spectral irradiance from ˜0.5 to ˜5 keV, with ˜0.15 keV FWHM resolution, during sounding rocket flights on 2012 June 23 and 2013 October 21. These measurements show that the highly variable SXR emission is orders of magnitude greater than that during the deep minimum of 2009, even with only weak activity. The observed spectra show significant high-temperature (5-10 MK) emission and are well fit by simple power-law temperature distributions with indices of ˜6, close to the predictions of nanoflare models of coronal heating. Observations during the more active 2013 flight indicate an enrichment of low first-ionization potential elements of only ˜1.6, below the usually observed value of ˜4, suggesting that abundance variations may be related to coronal heating processes. The XUV Photometer System Level 4 data product, a spectral irradiance model derived from integrated broadband measurements, significantly overestimates the spectra from both flights, suggesting a need for revision of its non-flare reference spectra, with important implications for studies of Earth ionospheric dynamics driven by solar SXRs.

  14. Efficient focusing of 8 keV X-rays with multilayer Fresnel zone plates fabricated by atomic layer deposition and focused ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Marcel; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Weigand, Markus; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-05-01

    Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) recently showed significant improvement by focusing soft X-rays down to ~10 nm. In contrast to soft X-rays, generally a very high aspect ratio FZP is needed for efficient focusing of hard X-rays. Therefore, FZPs had limited success in the hard X-ray range owing to difficulties of manufacturing high-aspect-ratio zone plates using conventional techniques. Here, employing a method of fabrication based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling, FZPs with very high aspect ratios were prepared. Such multilayer FZPs with outermost zone widths of 10 and 35 nm and aspect ratios of up to 243 were tested for their focusing properties at 8 keV and shown to focus hard X-rays efficiently. This success was enabled by the outstanding layer quality thanks to ALD. Via the use of FIB for slicing the multilayer structures, desired aspect ratios could be obtained by precisely controlling the thickness. Experimental diffraction efficiencies of multilayer FZPs fabricated via this combination reached up to 15.58% at 8 keV. In addition, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy experiments at 1.5 keV were carried out using one of the multilayer FZPs and resolved a 60 nm feature size. Finally, the prospective of different material combinations with various outermost zone widths at 8 and 17 keV is discussed in the light of the coupled wave theory and the thin-grating approximation. Al2O3/Ir is outlined as a promising future material candidate for extremely high resolution with a theoretical efficiency of more than 20% for as small an outermost zone width as 10 nm at 17 keV.

  15. Detection of 1 - 100 keV x-rays from high intensity, 500 fs laser- produced plasmas using charge-coupled devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.; Young, B.K.F.; Conder, A.D.; Stewart, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a compact, vacuum compatible, large format, charge- coupled device (CCD) camera for scientific imaging and detection of 1- 100 keV x rays in experiments at LLNL JANUS-1ps laser. A standard, front-illuminated, multi-pin phase device with 250 k electron full well capacity, low dark current (10 pA/cm{sup 2} at 20 C) and low read noise (5 electron rms) is cooled to -35 C to give the camera excellent 15-bit dynamic range and signal-to-noise response. Intensity and x-ray energy linear response were determined for optical and x-ray (<65 keV) photons and are in excellent agreement. Departure from linearity was less than 0.7%. Inherent linearity and energy dispersive characteristics of CCD cameras are well suited for hard x-ray photon counting. X-rays absorbed within the depletion and field-free regions can be distinguished by studying the pulse height spectrum. Results are presented for the detection of 1-100 keV Bremsstrahlung continuum, K-shell and L-shell fluorescence spectra emitted from high intensity (10{sup 18}W cm{sup -2}), 500 fs laser- produced plasmas.

  16. Study of 1–8 keV K-α x-ray emission from high intensity femtosecond laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, V. Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Bagchi, S.; Tayyab, M.; Gupta, P. D.

    2014-04-15

    We report an experimental study on the optimization of a laser plasma based x-ray source of ultra-short duration K-α line radiation. The interaction of pulses from a CPA based Ti:sapphire laser (10 TW, 45 fs, 10 Hz) system with magnesium, titanium, iron and copper solid target generates bright 1-8 keV K-α x-ray radiation. The x-ray yield was optimized with the laser pulse duration (at fixed fluence) which is varied in the range of 45 fs to 1.4 ps. It showed a maximum at laser pulse duration of ∼740 fs, 420 fs, 350 and 250 fs for Mg (1.3 keV), Ti (4.5 keV), Fe (6.4 keV) and Cu (8.05 keV) respectively. The x-ray yield is observed to be independent of the sign of the chirp. The scaling of the K-α yield (I{sub x} ∝ I{sub L}{sup β}) for 45 fs and optimized pulse duration were measured for laser intensities in the region of 3 × 10{sup 14} – 8 × 10{sup 17}. The x-ray yield shows a much faster scaling exponent β = 1.5, 2.1, 2.4 and 2.6 for Mg, Ti, Fe and Cu respectively at optimized pulse duration compared to scaling exponent of 0.65, 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 obtained for 45 fs duration laser pulses. The laser to x-ray energy conversion efficiencies obtained for different target materials are η{sub Mg} = 1.2 × 10{sup −5}, η{sub Ti} = 3.1 × 10{sup −5}, η{sub Fe} = 2.7 × 10{sup −5}, η{sub Cu} = 1.9 × 10{sup −5}. The results have been explained from the efficient generation of optimal energy hot electrons at longer laser pulse duration. The faster scaling observed at optimal pulse duration indicates that the x-ray source is generated at the target surface and saturation of x-ray emission would appear at larger laser fluence. An example of utilization of the source for measurement of shock-wave profiles in a silicon crystal by time resolved x-ray diffraction is also presented.

  17. High-energy (> 70 KeV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; ...

    2017-03-16

    Here, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20–30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4–9 × 10–4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70more » keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.« less

  18. Measurements of L shell X-ray yields of thick Ag target by 6-29 keV electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. L.; Tian, L. X.; Li, X. L.; An, Z.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, M. T.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the L shell X-ray yields for a thick Ag target have been measured at incident electron energies of 6-29 keV. The experimental values are compared with the Monte Carlo simulation results that are obtained by using the PENELOPE code, in which the inner-shell ionization cross sections by electron impact calculated in the theoretical frame of distorted wave Born approximation are used. The experimental and simulation values are in agreement with ~10% difference. Meanwhile, the L shell X-ray production cross sections are also obtained based on the measured L shell X-ray yields for a thick Ag target in this paper, and are compared with other experimental Ag L shell X-ray production cross section data by electron and positron impact measured previously and some theoretical models. Some factors that could affect these comparisons are also discussed in this paper.

  19. High-energy (>70 keV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Martinez, D. A.; Di Nicola, P.; Tommasini, R.; Landen, O. L.; Alessi, D.; Bowers, M.; Browning, D.; Brunton, G.; Budge, T.; Crane, J.; Di Nicola, J.-M.; Döppner, T.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Fishler, B.; Halpin, J.; Hamamoto, M.; Heebner, J.; Hernandez, V. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Homoelle, D.; Honig, J.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; LaFortune, K.; Lawson, J.; Nagel, S. R.; Negres, R. A.; Novikova, L.; Orth, C.; Pelz, L.; Prantil, M.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, M.; Sherlock, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Wegner, P.; Widmayer, C.; Williams, G. J.; Williams, W.; Whitman, P.; Yang, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20-30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4-9 × 10-4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70 keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.

  20. Wide-Band KB Optics for Spectro-Microscopy Imaging Applications in the 6-13 keV X-ray Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, E.; De Panfilis, S.; Peverini, L.; Vaerenbergh, P. van; Rocca, F.

    2007-01-19

    We present a Kirkpatrick-Baez optics (KB) system specially optimized to operate in the 6-13 keV X-ray range, where valuable characteristic lines are present. The mirrors are coated with aperiodic laterally graded (Ru/B4C)35 multilayers to define a 15% energy bandpass and to gain flux as compared to total reflection mirrors. For any X-ray energy selected the shape of each mirror can be optimized with a dynamical bending system so as to concentrate the X-ray beam into a micrometer-size spot. Once the KB mirrors are aligned at the X-ray energy corresponding to the barycenter of the XAS spectrum to be performed they remain in a steady state during the micro-XAS scans to minimize beam displacements. Results regarding the performance of the wideband KB optics and of the spectro-microscopy setup are presented, including beam stability issues.

  1. 1-to 10-keV x-ray backlighting of annular wire arrays on the Sandia Z-machine using bent-crystal imaging techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Rambo, Patrick K.; Wenger, David Franklin; Bennett, Guy R.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Smith, Ian Craig; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Anderson, Jessica E.

    2003-07-01

    Annular wire array implosions on the Sandia Z-machine can produce >200 TW and 1-2 MJ of soft x rays in the 0.1-10 keV range. The x-ray flux and debris in this environment present significant challenges for radiographic diagnostics. X-ray backlighting diagnostics at 1865 and 6181 eV using spherically-bent crystals have been fielded on the Z-machine, each with a {approx}0.6 eVspectral bandpass, 10 {micro}m spatial resolution, and a 4 mm by 20mm field of view. The Z-Beamlet laser, a 2-TW, 2-kJ Nd:glass laser({lambda} = 527 nm), is used to produce 0.1-1 J x-ray sources for radiography. The design, calibration, and performance of these diagnostics is presented.

  2. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, S. Wilhein, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.

    2015-08-15

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  3. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbach, S.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.; Wilhein, T.

    2015-08-01

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  4. Cross calibration of AGFA-D7 x-ray film against direct exposure film from 2 to 8.5 keV using laser generated x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, George A.

    2006-05-15

    Direct exposure film (DEF) is being discontinued. DEF film has been the workhorse in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and is used to record x-ray images and spectra. A previous search for a replacement [K. M. Chandler et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113111 (2005)] did not consider AGFA film. We present comparisons using the results of measurements using AGFA-D7 film, XAR, TMG, and Biomax-MS films in the same spectrometer recording a gold spectrum in the 2-4 keV range and the iron spectrum in the 5-8.5 keV range. AGFA film was found to have some unique properties useful in x-ray spectroscopy and imaging, especially when signal strength is not a concern.

  5. Cross calibration of AGFA-D7 x-ray film against direct exposure film from 2 to 8.5 keV using laser generated x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrala, George A.

    2006-05-01

    Direct exposure film (DEF) is being discontinued. DEF film has been the workhorse in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and is used to record x-ray images and spectra. A previous search for a replacement [K. M. Chandler et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113111 (2005)] did not consider AGFA film. We present comparisons using the results of measurements using AGFA-D7 film, XAR, TMG, and Biomax-MS films in the same spectrometer recording a gold spectrum in the 2-4keV range and the iron spectrum in the 5-8.5keV range. AGFA film was found to have some unique properties useful in x-ray spectroscopy and imaging, especially when signal strength is not a concern.

  6. Evidence for Halo Contributions to the 1/4 keV Diffuse Soft X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, E. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1/4-keV diffuse soft X-ray background (SXRB) apparently originates in a thermal plasma at around 106 K, but the location of this emission has proven to be difficult to determine. The finite flux in the Galactic plane and similarity of the spectrum at all latitudes led to a model where essentially all of the observed flux originated in a local hot bubble (LHB) surrounding the Sun. Snowden et al. (1998) have proposed a three-component model of the SXRB from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey R12 (1/4 keV) map which consists of an unabsorbed local component, an absorbed halo component, and an absorbed power law to represent the known contribution from AGN, which is quite small. We have investigated whether this model is consistent with the lower-energy data available from sounding rocket flights in the B and Be bands. We find that the Snowden model provides better correspondence with the low-energy Wisconsin bands than the pure LHB model. The differences are subtle because the bulk of the intensity variation in the Snowden model is still due to differences in the extent of the local bubble. We have also investigated whether the observed band ratios are fit by the emission models used. We find that with current collisional ionization equilibrium models, depleted abundances are necessary to be consistent with the observed band ratios. We also show that the model predictions depend strongly on the model version, which does little to lend confidence to their predictions. This work was supported by a NSF-REU site grant (AST-0139563) to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  7. Development of a shortpulse laser-driven 15.7 keV x-ray probe for bent-crystal imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Vargas, M.; Porter, J. L.

    2013-10-01

    High energy x-rays above 10 keV are needed to probe HEDP experiments with dense, high-Z samples. Shortpulse lasers were shown to be more efficient to generate above-10 keV x-rays than ns lasers. We have used Sandia's Z-Petawatt laser to drive a 15.7 keV, Zr K-alpha x-ray source. A set of bent-crystal spectrometers and imagers was characterized for their throughput and spectral or spatial resolution. Ray-tracing with a newly developed, GPU-accelerated Monte-Carlo code has been done to evaluate the measurements. Estimates of the system performance at the kJ level have been made to evaluate its potential application for bent-crystal backlighting or x-ray Thomson scattering at Sandia's Z-machine. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. High aspect ratio hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Burns, S; Izumi, N; Kline, J; LaCaille, G; McNaney, J; Prasad, R; Thomas, C A; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O; Author, A; Author, S G; Author, T

    2012-05-01

    We have fielded a multi-pinhole, hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure the spatially-resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions, and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel that could limit the compressibility required for ignition and burn. Our hard x-ray imaging measurements allow to set an upper limit to the DT fuel preheat, which we find is acceptable in current capsule implosions on the NIF.

  9. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  10. Close-packed arrays of transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters with high spectral resolution at 5.9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-07

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal-metal features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  11. Close-packed Arrays of Transition-edge X-ray Microcalorimeters with High Spectral Resolution at 5.9 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal metal-features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition, and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  12. Improved hard x-ray (50-80 keV) imaging of hohlraum implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, B.; Chow, R.; Palmer, N. E.; Hoover, M.; Huffman, E.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Kumar, C.; Hulbert, R. D.; Albert, F.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Hohenberger, M.; Landen, O. L.; Warrick, A.; Döppner, T.

    2016-09-01

    We recently designed, built and commissioned a new pinhole / filter assembly for the equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper we describe the design and metrology of the new diagnostic as well as the spectral and spatial response of the hard x-ray detector. The new eHXI assembly has improved the photon collection efficiency along with spectral and spatial resolution by making use of 1D imaging channels and various hard x-ray filters. In addition we added a Ross pair filter set for Au K-alpha emission (67-69 keV). The new eHXI design will improve our understanding of the sourcing of hot electrons, generated in laser-plasma-instabilities, along the vertical hohlraum axis. This information is an important input for simulating and eventually limiting the DT fuel preheat in ICF implosions.

  13. Development of 4.5 keV monochromatic X-ray radiography using the high-energy, picosecond LFEX laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Fujioka, S.; Hosoda, T.; Zhang, Z.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Nishimura, H.; Sunahara, A.; Theobald, W.; Patel, P. K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Development of a monochromatic x-ray imaging system using a high-energy short- pulse laser LFEX and a spherical crystal is reported. Irradiation of the intense short-pulse laser produces a flash of 4.51 keV Ti K-alpha x-ray while the spherically bent quartz crystal provides a narrow spectral bandwidth and high spatial resolution. This high spatiotemporal imaging technique was applied for recording 2-D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-driven Fast Ignition targets. The results show a sufficiently high spatial resolution to characterize the implosion core, suggesting that the core information extracted from the radiograph images can be used to benchmark a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic code for accurate hydrodynamic modelling and optimization of FI fuel assembly in the asymmetrical implosion.

  14. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold in the 38-50-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M T; Rae, N A; Glover, J L; Barnea, Z; de Jonge, M D; Tran, C Q; Wang, J; Chantler, C T

    2010-11-12

    We used synchrotron x rays to measure the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold at nine energies from 38 to 50 keV with accuracies of 0.1%. Our results are much more accurate than previous measurements in this energy range. A comparison of our measurements with calculated mass attenuation coefficients shows that our measurements fall almost exactly midway between the XCOM and FFAST calculated theoretical values, which differ from one another in this energy region by about 4%, even though the range includes no absorption edge. The consistency and accuracy of these measurements open the way to investigations of the x-ray attenuation in the region of the L absorption edge of gold.

  15. Absolute measurements of short-pulse, long-pulse, and capsule-implosion backlighter sources at x-ray energies greater than 10 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Laser-generated x-ray backlighters with x-ray energies > 10 keV are becoming essential diagnostic tools for many high energy density experiments. Examples include studies of high areal density cores for ignition designs, mid- to high-Z capsule implosion experiments, absolute equation of state experiments, dynamic diffraction under extreme pressures, and the study of material strength. Significant progress has been made recently using short pulse lasers, coupled to metal foil targets [1], and imploding capsules for producing high energy backlighters. Measuring the absolute x-ray flux and spectra from these sources is required for quantitative analysis of experimental data and for the design and planning of future experiments. We have performed an extensive series of experiments to measure the absolute x-ray flux and spectra on the Titan, Omega, Omega-EP, and NIF laser systems, employing single-photon-counting detectors, crystal spectrometers, and multichannel differential filtering (Ross-pair) and filter stack bremsstrahlung spectrometers. Calibrations were performed on these instruments [2] enabling absolute measurements of backlighter spectra to be made from 10 keV to 1 MeV. Various backlighter techniques that generate either quasi-monochromatic sources or broadband continuum sources will be presented and compared. For Molybdenum Kα backlighters at x-ray energy of ˜17 keV we measure conversion efficiencies of 1.3x10-4 using 1 μm wavelength short-pulse lasers at an intensity of ˜1x10^17 W/cm^2. This is a factor of ˜2 high than using 0.3 μm wavelength long-pulse lasers at an intensity of ˜1x10^16 W/cm^2. Other types of backlighter targets include capsule implosion backlighters that can generate a very bright ``white-light'' continuum x-ray source and high-Z gas filled capsules that generate a quasi-line-source of x rays. We will present and compare the absolute laser energy to x-ray conversion efficiencies for these different backlighter techniques and give

  16. Laboratory measurements compellingly support a charge-exchange mechanism for the "Dark matter" ~3.5 keV X-ray line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Chintan; Bernitt, Sven; Dobrodey, Stepan; Steinbrügge, René; Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, José R.

    2017-08-01

    A mysterious X-ray signal at 3.5 keV from nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters recently sparked tremendous interest in the scientific community and has given rise to a tide of publications attempting to explain the origin of this line [1]. It has been hypothesized that the signal is the result of decaying sterile neutrinos - a potential dark matter particle candidate - presumably based on the fact that this X-ray line is not available in the standard spectral databases and models for thermal plasmas. Cautiously, Gu et al. [2] have pointed out an alternative explanation for this phenomenon: charge exchange between bare ions of sulfur and atomic hydrogen. Their model shows that X-rays should be emitted at 3.5 keV by a set of S15+ transitions from n ≥ 9 to the ground states, where n is the principle quantum number.We tested this hypothesis in the laboratory by measuring K-shell X-ray spectra of highly ionized sulfur ions following charge exchange with gaseous molecules in an electron beam ion trap. We produced bare S16+ and H-like S15+ ions and let them capture electrons in collisions with molecules while recording X-ray spectra. The 3.5 keV transition clearly shows up in the charge-exchange induced spectrum under a broad range of conditions. The inferred X-ray energy of 3.47 ± 0.06 keV is in full accord with both the astrophysical observations and theoretical calculations, and confirms the novel scenario proposed by Gu [2]. Taking the experimental uncertainties and inaccuracies of the astrophysical measurements into account, we conclude that the charge exchange between bare sulfur and hydrogen atoms can outstandingly explain the mysterious signal at around 3.5 keV [3].[1] E. Bulbul et al., Astrophys. J. 13, 789 (2014)[2] L. Gu et al., A & A L11, 584 (2015)[3] C. Shah et al., Astrophys. J. 833, 52 (2016)

  17. M-L band x-rays (3-3.5 KeV) from palladium coated targets for isochoric radiative heating of thin foil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, B.; Dzelzainis, T.; White, S.; Li, L.; Rigby, A.; Spindloe, C.; Notley, M.; Heathcote, R.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Riley, D.

    2015-11-01

    We describe experiments designed to produce a bright M-L band x-ray source in the 3-3.5 keV region. Palladium targets irradiated with a 1015 W cm-2 laser pulse have previously been shown to convert up to ˜2% of the laser energy into M-L band x-rays with similar pulse duration to that of the incident laser. This x-ray emission is further characterized here, including pulse duration and source size measurements, and a higher conversion efficiency than previously achieved is demonstrated (˜4%) using more energetic and longer duration laser pulses (200 ps). The emission near the aluminium K-edge (1.465-1.550 keV) is also reported for similar conditions, along with the successful suppression of such lower band x-rays using a CH coating on the rear side of the target. The possibility of using the source to radiatively heat a thin aluminium foil sample to uniform warm dense matter conditions is discussed.

  18. Bragg diffraction using a 100ps 17.5 keV x-ray backlighter and the Bragg Diffraction Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B R; Park, H; Hawreliak, J; Comley, A; Elsholz, A; Van Maren, R; Remington, B A; Wark, J

    2010-05-13

    A new diagnostic for measuring Bragg diffraction from a laser-driven crystal using a 100ps 17.5 kV x-ray backlighter source is designed and tested successfully at the Omega EP laser facility on static Mo and Ta single crystal samples using a Mo Ka backlighter. The Bragg Diffraction Imager (BDI) consists of a heavily shielded enclosure and a precisely positioned beam block, attached to the main enclosure by an Aluminum arm. Image plate is used as the x-ray detector. The diffraction lines from Mo and Ta <222> planes are clearly detected with a high signal-to-noise using the 17.5 keV and 19.6 keV characteristic lines generated by a petawatt-driven Mo foil. This technique will be applied to shock and ramp-loaded single crystals on the Omega EP laser. Pulsed x-ray diffraction of shock- and ramp-compressed materials is an exciting new technique that can give insight into the dynamic behavior of materials at ultra-high pressure not achievable by any other means to date. X-ray diffraction can be used to determine not only the phase and compression of the lattice at high pressure, but by probing the lattice compression on a timescale equal to the 3D relaxation time of the material, information about dislocation mechanics, including dislocation multiplication rate and velocity, can also be derived. Both Bragg, or reflection, and Laue, or transmission, diffraction have been developed for shock-loaded low-Z crystalline structures such as Cu, Fe, and Si using nano-second scale low-energy implosion and He-{alpha} x-ray backlighters. However, higher-Z materials require higher x-ray probe energies to penetrate the samples, such as in Laue, or probe deep enough into the target, as in the case of Bragg diffraction. Petawatt laser-generated K{alpha} x-ray backlighters have been developed for use in high-energy radiography of dense targets and other HED applications requiring picosecond-scale burst of hard x-rays. While short pulse lasers are very efficient at producing high-energy x-rays

  19. Highest Historical X-ray Flux through 0.3-10 keV Band in BL Lacertae Source 1ES 1215+303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2013-02-01

    We report the highest historical X-ray flux in the BL Lacertae source 1ES 1215+303(also known as ON 325, z=0.237) through 0.3-10 keV band detected by the X-ray Telescope (XRT) onboard the Swift satellite which observed the source during about 0.5 hr on 2013 February 19. Using the data allocated at the webpage http://www.swift.psu.edu/monitoring/, it was found that the object showed the 0.3-10 keV flux of 0.48+/-0.02 cts/s which is more than 4-times higher to that derived during previous observation performed on December 8, 2011 (0.11+0.01 cts/s).

  20. Performance of a reflection-type polarizer by use of muscovite mica crystal in the soft x-ray region of 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Imazono, Takashi; Ishino, Masahiko; Koike, Masato; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hirono, Toko; Sano, Kazuo

    2005-02-01

    To develop the polarizer functioning in the soft x-ray region of 1 keV, the polarization performance of muscovite mica has been investigated theoretically with a simulation code based on dynamical theory. As the result of calculation, muscovite mica is found to be a promising candidate as a reflection-type polarizer with the reflectivity for s polarization of 0.03 at approximately 0.9 keV at the angle of incidence of 45 deg. In order to verify the polarization performance of muscovite mica experimentally, a symmetric Bragg reflection measurement of muscovite mica(002) was carried out using a linearly polarized undulator radiation. As a result, the maximum reflectivity for s polarization and the extinction ratio of muscovite mica were approximately 0.018 and 200 at 878 eV, respectively. This result indicates that muscovite mica works as a practical polarizer in the soft x-ray region.

  1. Spatial coherence properties of a compact and ultrafast laser-produced plasma keV x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Boschetto, D.; Mourou, G.; Rousse, A.; Mordovanakis, A.; Hou, Bixue; Nees, J.; Kumah, D.; Clarke, R.

    2007-01-01

    The authors use Fresnel diffraction from knife-edges to demonstrate the spatial coherence of a tabletop ultrafast x-ray source produced by laser-plasma interaction. Spatial coherence is achieved in the far field by producing micrometer-scale x-ray spot dimensions. The results show an x-ray source size of 6 {mu}m that leads to a transversal coherence length of 20 {mu}m at a distance of 60 cm from the source. Moreover, they show that the source size is limited by the spatial spread of the absorbed laser energy.

  2. Spatial coherence properties of a compact and ultrafast laser-produced plasma keV x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschetto, D.; Mourou, G.; Rousse, A.; Mordovanakis, A.; Hou, Bixue; Nees, J.; Kumah, D.; Clarke, R.

    2007-01-01

    The authors use Fresnel diffraction from knife-edges to demonstrate the spatial coherence of a tabletop ultrafast x-ray source produced by laser-plasma interaction. Spatial coherence is achieved in the far field by producing micrometer-scale x-ray spot dimensions. The results show an x-ray source size of 6μm that leads to a transversal coherence length of 20μm at a distance of 60cm from the source. Moreover, they show that the source size is limited by the spatial spread of the absorbed laser energy.

  3. Hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Dewald, E L; Divol, L; Thomas, C A; Burns, S; Celliers, P M; Izumi, N; Kline, J L; LaCaille, G; McNaney, J M; Prasad, R R; Robey, H F; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L

    2012-10-01

    We have fielded a hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager with high aspect ratio pinholes to measure the spatially resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel. First measurements show that hot electron preheat does not limit obtaining the fuel areal densities required for ignition and burn.

  4. Hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the NIFa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Thomas, C. A.; Burns, S.; Celliers, P. M.; Izumi, N.; Kline, J. L.; LaCaille, G.; McNaney, J. M.; Prasad, R. R.; Robey, H. F.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.

    2012-10-01

    We have fielded a hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager with high aspect ratio pinholes to measure the spatially resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel. First measurements show that hot electron preheat does not limit obtaining the fuel areal densities required for ignition and burn.

  5. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, F.; Kay, J. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Kane, J.; Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Reverdin, C.; May, M.; Emig, J.; Sorce, C.; Colvin, J.; Gammon, S.; Jaquez, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Fournier, K. B.

    2012-08-01

    The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5–8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were experimentally investigated: low-density iron oxide aerogels (density 6-16 mg/cm36-16 mg/cm3) and stainless steel foil-lined cavity targets (steel thickness 1-5 μm1-5 μm). The targets were irradiated by 40 beams of the OMEGA laser (500 J/beam, 1 ns pulse, wavelength 351 nm). All targets showed good coupling with the laser, with <5%<5% of the incident laser light backscattered by the resulting plasma in all cases (typically <2.5%<2.5%). The aerogel targets produced Te=2Te=2 to 3 keV, ne=0.12-0.2ne=0.12-0.2 critical density plasmas yielding a 40%–60% laser-to-x-ray total conversion efficiency (CE) (1.2%–3% in the Fe K-shell range). The foil cavity targets produced Te~2 keV, Te~2 keV, ne~0.15ne~0.15 critical density plasmas yielding a 60%–75% conversion efficiency (1.6%–2.2% in the Fe K-shell range). Time-resolved images illustrate that the volumetric heating of low-density aerogels allow them to emit a higher K-shell x-ray yield even though they contain fewer Fe atoms. However, their challenging fabrication process leads to a larger shot-to-shot variation than cavity targets.

  6. Generalized spectra model for 1-100 keV X-ray emission from Cygnus X-3 based on EXOSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, M. R.; Chitnis, V. R.; Rao, A. R.; Singh, K. P.

    1994-03-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the highly variable X-ray source, Cyg X-3, has so far defied a consistent explanation based on simple emission models. We have extracted two of the best data sets from the EXOSAT archives and performed a detailed spectral analysis for its 'high' and 'low' states. The analysis of the less frequently occurring 'low' state is presented for the first time for the EXOSAT data. Combining data from the medium-energy argon and xenon detectors and the gas scintillation proportional counter, with a better energy resolution, and carrying out a simultaneous fit, we find that the X-ray continuum in both the 'high' and 'low' state can be explained as a sum of a blackbody emission and emission from a Comptonized plasma cloud with a common absorption. The Comptonization model is sufficient as well as preferable to many other models, in explaining the observed X-ray emission up to 100 keV. In addition, we find an emission-line feature due to ionized iron (Fe XX-Fe XXVI) and absorption features due to cold iron (Fe I) as well as highly ionized iron (Fe XXV-Fe XXXVI). The presence of absorption due to Fe I has been shown for the first time here. This is the simplest and the most generalized spectral model for the 1-100 keV X-ray emission from Cyg X-3, to date. We find that the blackbody temperature derived in the 'high ' state (1.47 keV) is much lower than that derived for the 'low' state (2.40 keV) and is associated with an increase in the blackbodly radius in the 'high' state. The ratio of blackbody flux to the total flux is approximately 0.61 in the 'high' state and approximately 0.44 in the 'low' state. The Fe line energy is significantly higher in the 'high' state (approximately 6.95 keV) compared to the 'low' state (approximately 6.56 keV). The Comptonization parameter changes from 2 to approximately 15 in going from the 'high' to the 'low' state implying a highly saturated Comptonization in the 'low' state. The Comptonized region has high electron

  7. Fine pitch CdTe-based hard-X-ray polarimeter performance for space science in the 70-300 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, S.; Limousin, O.; Ferrando, P.

    2015-07-01

    X-rays astrophysical sources have been almost characterized through imaging, spectroscopy and timing analysis. Nevertheless, more observational parameters such as polarization are needed because some radiation mechanisms present in gamma-ray sources are still unclear. We have developed a CdTe based fine-pitch imaging spectrometer, Caliste to study polarization. With a 58-micron pitch and 1 keV energy resolution at 60 keV, we are able to accurately reconstruct the polarization angle and fraction of an impinging flux of photons which are scattered by 90° after Compton diffusion within the crystal. In this paper, we present the principles and the results obtained for this kind of measurements: on one hand, we compare simulations results with experimental data taken at ESRF ID15A (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) using a 35-300 keV mono-energetic polarized beam. Applying a judicious energy selection to our data set, we reach a remarkable sensitivity level characterized by a measured Quality factor of 0.78±0.02 in the 200-300 keV range; and a measured Q factor of 0.64±0.0 at 70 keV where hard X-rays mirrors are already available.

  8. ROSAT detection of an X-ray shadow in the 1/4-keV diffuse background in the Draco nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Mebold, U.; Hirth, W.; Herbstmeier, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M.

    1991-01-01

    The detection by the Roentgen satellite (ROSAT) X-ray telescope of a shadow in the 1/4-keV (C-band, 0.1 to 0.284 keV) cosmic diffuse background is reported. The location and morphology of the local minimum in X-rays are in clear agreement with a discrete H I cloud. The shadow is very deep with a minimum level at 50 percent of the surrounding emission; therefore, a minimum of 50 percent of the observed off-cloud flux must originate on the far side of the cloud. The analysis of H I velocity components links the cloud with the Draco nebula (distance of about 600 parsecs); it then follows that there is significant 1/4-keV X-ray emission at large distance (more than 400 parsecs) from the galactic plane along this line of sight. The extent of the distant emission region is uncertain, and if it indicates the existence of a hot galactic corona, it must be patchy in nature.

  9. Absolute calibration of Kodak Biomax-MS film response to x rays in the 1.5- to 8-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. L

    2006-10-15

    The absolute response of Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays in the range from 1.5- to 8-keV has been measured using a laboratory electron-beam generated x-ray source. The measurements were taken at specific line energies by using Bragg diffraction to produce monochromatic beams of x rays. Multiple exposures were taken on Biomax MS film up to levels exceeding optical densities of 2 as measured by a microdensitometer. The absolute beam intensity for each exposure was measured with a Si(Li) detector. Additional response measurements were taken with Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) so as to compare the results of this technique to previously published calibrations. The Biomax-MS results have been fitted to a semiempirical mathematical model (Knauer et al., these proceedings). Users of the model can infer absolute fluences from observed exposure levels at either interpolated or extrapolated energies. To summarize the results: Biomax MS has comparable sensitivity to DEF film below 3 keV but has reduced sensitivity above 3 keV ({approx}50%). The lower exposure results from thinner emulsion layers, designed for use with phosphor screens. The ease with which Biomax-MS can be used in place of DEF (same format film, same developing process, and comparable sensitivity) makes it a good replacement.

  10. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, F.; Kay, J. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Kane, J.; Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Reverdin, C.; May, M.; Emig, J.; Sorce, C.; Colvin, J.; Gammon, S.; Jaquez, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Fournier, K. B.

    2012-08-01

    The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5-8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were experimentally investigated: low-density iron oxide aerogels (density 6-16 mg/cm3) and stainless steel foil-lined cavity targets (steel thickness 1-5 μm). The targets were irradiated by 40 beams of the OMEGA laser (500 J/beam, 1 ns pulse, wavelength 351 nm). All targets showed good coupling with the laser, with <5% of the incident laser light backscattered by the resulting plasma in all cases (typically <2.5%). The aerogel targets produced Te=2 to 3 keV, ne=0.12-0.2 critical density plasmas yielding a 40%-60% laser-to-x-ray total conversion efficiency (CE) (1.2%-3% in the Fe K-shell range). The foil cavity targets produced Te˜ 2 keV, ne˜ 0.15 critical density plasmas yielding a 60%-75% conversion efficiency (1.6%-2.2% in the Fe K-shell range). Time-resolved images illustrate that the volumetric heating of low-density aerogels allow them to emit a higher K-shell x-ray yield even though they contain fewer Fe atoms. However, their challenging fabrication process leads to a larger shot-to-shot variation than cavity targets.

  11. 5.9-keV Mn K-shell X-ray luminosity from the decay of 55Fe in Type Ia supernova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, I. R.; Summa, A.; Krauß, F.; Sim, S. A.; Diehl, R.; Elsässer, D.; Fink, M.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Maeda, K.; Mannheim, K.; Pakmor, R.; Röpke, F. K.; Ruiter, A. J.; Wilms, J.

    2015-02-01

    We show that the X-ray line flux of the Mn Kα line at 5.9 keV from the decay of 55Fe is a promising diagnostic to distinguish between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion models. Using radiation transport calculations, we compute the line flux for two three-dimensional explosion models: a near-Chandrasekhar mass delayed detonation and a violent merger of two (1.1 and 0.9 M⊙) white dwarfs. Both models are based on solar metallicity zero-age main-sequence progenitors. Due to explosive nuclear burning at higher density, the delayed-detonation model synthesizes ˜3.5 times more radioactive 55Fe than the merger model. As a result, we find that the peak Mn Kα line flux of the delayed-detonation model exceeds that of the merger model by a factor of ˜4.5. Since in both models the 5.9-keV X-ray flux peaks five to six years after the explosion, a single measurement of the X-ray line emission at this time can place a constraint on the explosion physics that is complementary to those derived from earlier phase optical spectra or light curves. We perform detector simulations of current and future X-ray telescopes to investigate the possibilities of detecting the X-ray line at 5.9 keV. Of the currently existing telescopes, XMM-Newton/pn is the best instrument for close (≲1-2 Mpc), non-background limited SNe Ia because of its large effective area. Due to its low instrumental background, Chandra/ACIS is currently the best choice for SNe Ia at distances above ˜2 Mpc. For the delayed-detonation scenario, a line detection is feasible with Chandra up to ˜3 Mpc for an exposure time of 106 s. We find that it should be possible with currently existing X-ray instruments (with exposure times ≲5 × 105 s) to detect both of our models at sufficiently high S/N to distinguish between them for hypothetical events within the Local Group. The prospects for detection will be better with future missions. For example, the proposed Athena/X-IFU instrument could detect our delayed

  12. Efficient production of 2--10 keV x-rays by laser heated ``underdense radiators``

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L.J.; Kauffman, R.L.; Maxon, M.S.; Davis, J.F.

    1996-05-22

    The next generation of high power lasers offers the prospect of creating multi-kilovolt x-rays with {gt}10% efficiency. Such efficiencies are achieved with ``underdense radiators``, a non- traditional source of laser generated x-rays. Applications of these sources with the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) include volume preheating of experiments; bright, multi-keV backlighting; pumps for fluorescent imaging of capsule dopants and Doppler velocimetry; uniform irradiation of large test objects. This paper presents two-dimensional numerical simulations for these high power lasers with unprecedented efficiency.

  13. Saturated ablation in metal hydrides and acceleration of protons and deuterons to keV energies with a soft-x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasson, J.; Iwan, B.; Andrejczuk, A.; Abreu, E.; Bergh, M.; Caleman, C.; Nelson, A. J.; Bajt, S.; Chalupsky, J.; Chapman, H. N.; Fäustlin, R. R.; Hajkova, V.; Heimann, P. A.; Hjörvarsson, B.; Juha, L.; Klinger, D.; Krzywinski, J.; Nagler, B.; Pálsson, G. K.; Singer, W.; Seibert, M. M.; Sobierajski, R.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Vinko, S. M.; Lee, R. W.; Hajdu, J.; Tîmneanu, N.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of materials under extreme conditions have relevance to a broad area of research, including planetary physics, fusion research, materials science, and structural biology with x-ray lasers. We study such extreme conditions and experimentally probe the interaction between ultrashort soft x-ray pulses and solid targets (metals and their deuterides) at the FLASH free-electron laser where power densities exceeding 1017 W/cm2 were reached. Time-of-flight ion spectrometry and crater analysis were used to characterize the interaction. The results show the onset of saturation in the ablation process at power densities above 1016 W/cm2. This effect can be linked to a transiently induced x-ray transparency in the solid by the femtosecond x-ray pulse at high power densities. The measured kinetic energies of protons and deuterons ejected from the surface reach several keV and concur with predictions from plasma-expansion models. Simulations of the interactions were performed with a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium code with radiation transfer. These calculations return critical depths similar to the observed crater depths and capture the transient surface transparency at higher power densities.

  14. Saturated ablation in metal hydrides and acceleration of protons and deuterons to keV energies with a soft-x-ray laser.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, J; Iwan, B; Andrejczuk, A; Abreu, E; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Nelson, A J; Bajt, S; Chalupsky, J; Chapman, H N; Fäustlin, R R; Hajkova, V; Heimann, P A; Hjörvarsson, B; Juha, L; Klinger, D; Krzywinski, J; Nagler, B; Pálsson, G K; Singer, W; Seibert, M M; Sobierajski, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Vinko, S M; Lee, R W; Hajdu, J; Tîmneanu, N

    2011-01-01

    Studies of materials under extreme conditions have relevance to a broad area of research, including planetary physics, fusion research, materials science, and structural biology with x-ray lasers. We study such extreme conditions and experimentally probe the interaction between ultrashort soft x-ray pulses and solid targets (metals and their deuterides) at the FLASH free-electron laser where power densities exceeding 10(17) W/cm(2) were reached. Time-of-flight ion spectrometry and crater analysis were used to characterize the interaction. The results show the onset of saturation in the ablation process at power densities above 10(16) W/cm(2). This effect can be linked to a transiently induced x-ray transparency in the solid by the femtosecond x-ray pulse at high power densities. The measured kinetic energies of protons and deuterons ejected from the surface reach several keV and concur with predictions from plasma-expansion models. Simulations of the interactions were performed with a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium code with radiation transfer. These calculations return critical depths similar to the observed crater depths and capture the transient surface transparency at higher power densities.

  15. A compact soft x-ray (0.1-1.2 keV) calibration bench for radiometric measurements using an original versatile Rowland circle grazing incidence monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes an original Rowland circle grazing incidence spectrometer used as a monochromator for a soft x-ray Manson source in order to calibrate both the source and detectors over the 0.1-1.2 keV spectral range. The originality of the instrument lies on a patented vacuum manipulator which allows the simultaneous boarding of two detectors, one (reference) for measuring the monochromatic radiation and the second to be calibrated. In order to achieve this, the vacuum manipulator is able to interchange, in vacuum, one detector with the other in front of the exit slit of the monochromatizing stage. One purpose of this apparatus was to completely eliminate the intrinsic bremsstrahlung emission of the x-ray diode source and isolate each characteristic line for quantitative detector calibrations. Obtained spectral resolution (Δλ/λ<10-2) and spectral purity (>98%) fully meet this objective. Initially dimensioned to perform calibration of bulky x-ray cameras unfolded on the Laser MégaJoule Facility, other kinds of detector can be obviously calibrated using this instrument. A brief presentation of the first calibration of an x-ray CCD through its quantum efficiency (QE) measurement is included in this paper as example. Comparison with theoretical model for QE and previous measurements at higher energy are finally presented and discussed.

  16. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser".

    PubMed

    Boutoux, G; Batani, D; Burgy, F; Ducret, J-E; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Hulin, S; Rabhi, N; Duval, A; Lecherbourg, L; Reverdin, C; Jakubowska, K; Szabo, C I; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Consoli, F; Curcio, A; De Angelis, R; Ingenito, F; Baggio, J; Raffestin, D

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography.

  17. 950 keV X-Band Linac For Material Recognition Using Two-Fold Scintillator Detector As A Concept Of Dual-Energy X-Ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kiwoo; Natsui, Takuya; Hirai, Shunsuke; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Eiko

    2011-06-01

    One of the advantages of applying X-band linear accelerator (Linac) is the compact size of the whole system. That shows us the possibility of on-site system such as the custom inspection system in an airport. As X-ray source, we have developed X-band Linac and achieved maximum X-ray energy 950 keV using the low power magnetron (250 kW) in 2 {mu}s pulse length. The whole size of the Linac system is 1x1x1 m{sup 3}. That is realized by introducing X-band system. In addition, we have designed two-fold scintillator detector in dual energy X-ray concept. Monte carlo N-particle transport (MCNP) code was used to make up sensor part of the design with two scintillators, CsI and CdWO4. The custom inspection system is composed of two equipments: 950 keV X-band Linac and two-fold scintillator and they are operated simulating real situation such as baggage check in an airport. We will show you the results of experiment which was performed with metal samples: iron and lead as targets in several conditions.

  18. Measurement of angular dependence of M X-ray production cross-sections in Re, Bi and U at 5.96 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, G.; Tıraşoǧlu, E.; Söǧüt, Ã.-.

    2008-03-01

    The M X-ray production differential cross sections in Re, Bi and U elements have been measured at the 5.96 keV incident photon energy in an angular range 135° 155°. The measurements were performed using a 55Fe source and a Si(Li) detector. The present results contradict the predictions of Cooper and Zare [ Atomic Collision Processes, Gordon and Breach, New York (1969)] and experimental results of Kumar et al. [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. 34, 613 (2001)]. that, after photoionization of inner shells, the vacancy state has equal population of magnetic substates and the subsequent X-ray emission is isotropic, but confirm the predictions of the calculations of Flügge et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 7 (1972)] and experimental results of Sharma and Allawadhi [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. 32, 2343 (1999)] and Ertugrul [Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 119, 345 (1996)]. Total M X-ray production cross sections from the decay at the 5.96 keV photon energies are found to be in good agreement with the calculated theoretical results using the theoretical values of M shell photoionization cross section.

  19. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the "PETawatt Aquitaine Laser"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, G.; Batani, D.; Burgy, F.; Ducret, J.-E.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Hulin, S.; Rabhi, N.; Duval, A.; Lecherbourg, L.; Reverdin, C.; Jakubowska, K.; Szabo, C. I.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Consoli, F.; Curcio, A.; De Angelis, R.; Ingenito, F.; Baggio, J.; Raffestin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography.

  20. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Kingman; Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming

    2015-05-26

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a “dark” SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  1. Non-abelian dark matter solutions for Galactic gamma-ray excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Kingman; Huang, Wei-Chih; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming E-mail: wei-chih.huang@ucl.ac.uk

    2015-05-01

    We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian SU(2) DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a ''dark'' SU(2) doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and γ-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses the annihilation into the standard model fermions but not into the excited state.

  2. Measurement of high-energy (10–60 keV) x-ray spectral line widths with eV accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J. F. Feldman, U.; Glover, J. L.; Hudson, L. T.; Ralchenko, Y.; Henins, Albert; Pereira, N.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Chen, Hui; Williams, G. J.; Park, J.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution crystal spectrometer utilizing a crystal in transmission geometry has been developed and experimentally optimized to measure the widths of emission lines in the 10–60 keV energy range with eV accuracy. The spectrometer achieves high spectral resolution by utilizing crystal planes with small lattice spacings (down to 2d = 0.099 nm), a large crystal bending radius and Rowland circle diameter (965 mm), and an image plate detector with high spatial resolution (60 μm in the case of the Fuji TR image plate). High resolution W L-shell and K-shell laboratory test spectra in the 10–60 keV range and Ho K-shell spectra near 47 keV recorded at the LLNL Titan laser facility are presented. The Ho K-shell spectra are the highest resolution hard x-ray spectra recorded from a solid target irradiated by a high-intensity laser.

  3. Uranium enrichment measurements using the intensity ratios of self-fluorescence X-rays to 92* keV gamma ray in UXK alpha spectral region.

    PubMed

    Yücel, H; Dikmen, H

    2009-04-30

    In this paper, the known multigroup gamma-ray analysis method for uranium (MGAU) as one of the non-destructive gamma-ray spectrometry methods has been applied to certified reference nuclear materials (depleted, natural and enriched uranium) containing (235)U isotope in the range of 0.32-4.51% atom (235)U. Its analysis gives incorrect results for the low component (235)U in depleted and natural uranium samples where the build-up of the decay products begins to interfere with the analysis. The results reveal that the build-up of decay products seems to be significant and thus the algorithms for the presence of decay products should be improved to resulting in the correct enrichment value. For instance, for the case of (235)U analysis in depleted uranium or natural ore samples, self-induced X-rays such as 94.6 keV and 98.4 keV lying in UXK(alpha) spectral region used by MGAU can be excluded from the calculation. Because the significant increases have been observed in the intensities of uranium self-induced X-rays due to gamma-ray emissions with above 100 keV energy arising from decay products of (238)U and (235)U and these parents. Instead, the use of calibration curve to be made between the intensity ratios of self-fluorescence X-rays to 92(*)keV gamma-ray and the certified (235)U abundances is suggested for the determination of (235)U when higher amounts of decay products are detected in the gamma-ray spectrum acquired for the MGAU analysis.

  4. Development and Characterization of a 16.3 keV X-Ray Source at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; Barrios, M. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Khan, S.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Rygg, R.; Hohenberger, M.; Albert, F.; Moody, J.; Ralph, J.; Kemp, G. E.; Regan, S. P.

    2014-10-01

    X-ray sources at the National Ignition Facility are needed for radiography of in-flight capsules in inertial confinement fusion experiments and for diffraction studies of materials at high pressures. In the former case, we want to optimize signal to noise and signal over background ratios for the radiograph, in the latter case, we want to minimize high-energy emission from the backlighter that creates background on the diffraction data. Four interleaved shots at NIF were taken in one day, with laser irradiances on a Zr backlighter target ranging from 5 to 14 × 1015 W/cm2. Two shots were for source optimization as a function of laser irradiance. X-ray fluxes were measured with the time-resolved NIF X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) and the DANTE array of calibrated, filtered diodes. Two shots were optimized to make backscatter measurements with the FABS and NBI optical power systems. The backscatter levels are investigated to look for correlation with hot electron populations inferred from high-energy x rays measured with the FFLEX broadband spectrometer. Results from all shots are presented and compared with models. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Dipolar dark matter in light of the 3.5 keV x-ray line, neutrino mass, and LUX data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Sudhanwa; Sahoo, Nirakar; Sahu, Narendra

    2015-06-01

    A simple extension of the standard model (SM) providing transient magnetic moments to right-handed neutrinos is presented. In this model, the decay of the next-to-lightest right-handed heavy neutrino to the lightest one and a photon (N2→N1+γ ) can explain the ˜3.5 keV x-ray line signal observed by the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory. Beside the SM particles and heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos, the model contains a singly charged scalar (H±) and an extra Higgs doublet (Σ ). Within this minimal set of extra fields the sub-eV masses of left-handed neutrinos are also explained. Moreover, we show that the spin-independent dark matter-nucleon cross section is compatible with the latest LUX data.

  6. Zernike-type phase contrast X-ray microscopy at 4 keV photon energy with 60 nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäusler, Ulrich; Schneider, Gerd

    2004-05-01

    X-ray microscopy in the multi-keV photon energy range offers unique possibilities to study thick dense samples with high spatial resolution. When employing a high numerical aperture (N.A.) condenser zone plate sample illumination in combination with a high resolution micro zone plate objective lens, a spatial resolution of currently 60 nm is achieved. Since the absorption becomes smaller with increasing photon energy, phase contrast imaging overcomes the limitation for imaging weakly absorbing structures in amplitude contrast mode. We report here on X-ray microscopy of advanced microelectronic devices imaged in Zernike phase contrast mode. While the amplitude contrast between copper and silicon dioxide in these samples is only 7 %, negative as well as positive phase contrast were demonstrated with a contrast of 40 % and 45 %, respectively.

  7. YIELDS OF IONS AND EXCITED STATES IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS EXPOSED TO X-RAYS OF 1 TO 30 KEV ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    1999-08-18

    When x-rays from a synchrotron source are absorbed in a liquid, the x-ray energy (E{sub x}) is converted by the photoelectric effect into the kinetic energy of the electrons released. For hydrocarbons, absorption by the K-electrons of carbon dominates. Thus the energy of the photoelectron (E{sub pe}) is E{sub x}-E{sub b}, where E{sub b} is the K-shell binding energy of carbon. Additional electrons with energy equal to E{sub b} is released in the Auger process that fills the hole in the K-shell. These energetic electrons will produce many ionizations, excitations and products. The consequences of the high density of ionizations and excitations along the track of the photoelectron and special effects near the K-edge are examined here.

  8. Characterization of the PILATUS photon-counting pixel detector for X-ray energies from 1.75 keV to 60 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, T.; Brandstetter, S.; Cibik, L.; Commichau, S.; Hofer, P.; Krumrey, M.; Lüthi, B.; Marggraf, S.; Müller, P.; Schneebeli, M.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Wernecke, J.

    2013-03-01

    The PILATUS detector module was characterized in the PTB laboratory at BESSY II comparing modules with 320 μm thick and newly developed 450 μm and 1000 μm thick silicon sensors. Measurements were carried out over a wide energy range, in-vacuum from 1.75 keV to 8.8 keV and in air from 8 keV to 60 keV. The quantum efficiency (QE) was measured as a function of energy and the spatial resolution was measured at several photon energies both in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from edge profile measurements and by directly measuring the point spread function (PSF) of a single pixel in a raster scan with a pinhole beam. Independent of the sensor thickness, the measured MTF and PSF come close to those for an ideal pixel detector with the pixel size of the PILATUS detector (172 × 172 μm2). The measured QE follows the values predicted by calculation. Thicker sensors significantly enhance the QE of the PILATUS detectors for energies above 10 keV without impairing the spatial resolution and noise-free detection. In-vacuum operation of the PILATUS detector is possible at energies as low as 1.75 keV.

  9. Measurement of the x-ray mass energy-absorption coefficient of air using 3 keV to 10 keV synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Büermann, L; Grosswendt, B; Kramer, H-M; Selbach, H-J; Gerlach, M; Hoffmann, M; Krumrey, M

    2006-10-21

    For the first time absolute photon mass energy-absorption coefficients of air in the energy range 3 keV to 10 keV have been measured with relative standard uncertainties less than 1%, significantly smaller than those of up to 5% assumed hitherto for calculated data. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation was used to measure both the total radiant energy by means of silicon photodiodes calibrated against a cryogenic radiometer and the fraction of radiant energy that is deposited in dry air by means of a free air ionization chamber. The measured ionization charge was converted into energy absorbed in air by calculated effective W values of photons as a function of their energy based on new measurements of the W values in dry air for electron kinetic energies between 1 keV and 7 keV, also presented in this work. The measured absorption coefficients were compared with state-of-the art calculations and found to agree within 0.7% with data calculated earlier by Hubbell at energies above 4 keV but were found to differ by values up to 2.1% at 10 keV from more recent calculations of Seltzer.

  10. Continuous emission of keV x-rays from low-pressure, low-field, low-power-RF plasma columns and significance to mirror confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandovitz, P.; Swanson, C.; Glasser, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on observations of a continuous stream of 0.8-6.0 keV x-rays emitted from cool (bulk Te 4 eV), tenuous (ne 1010 cm-3), 4-cm-diameter hydrogen or argon plasma columns generated in an axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio, tandem mirror machine heated in one end cell by an external RF (27 MHz) antenna operating at low power, 20-600 W. The continuous emission of x-rays is evidence of the steady production of energetic electrons. The source appears to be ion-induced secondary electron emission from a floating carbon cup in the vacuum system about 2 cm from the RF antenna. The cup is charged to a high negative potential, perhaps by other secondary electrons emitted from the self-biased Pyrex vessel under the antenna. X-ray emission in the central cell increases as the mirror ratio increases, an effect we attribute to increased trapping of passing particles due to non-adiabatic scattering at the midplane of the central cell. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. An in-vacuum x-ray diffraction microscope for use in the 0.7-2.9 keV range

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, D. J.; Williams, G. J.; Clark, J. N.; Putkunz, C. T.; Abbey, B.; Nugent, K. A.; Pfeifer, M. A.; Legnini, D.; Roehrig, C.; Wrobel, E.; McNulty, I.; Huwald, E.; Riessen, G. van; Peele, A. G.; Beetz, T.; Irwin, J.; Feser, M.; Hornberger, B.

    2012-03-15

    A dedicated in-vacuum coherent x-ray diffraction microscope was installed at the 2-ID-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source for use with 0.7-2.9 keV x-rays. The instrument can accommodate three common implementations of diffractive imaging; plane wave illumination; defocused-probe (Fresnel diffractive imaging) and scanning (ptychography) using either a pinhole, focused or defocused probe. The microscope design includes active feedback to limit motion of the optics with respect to the sample. Upper bounds on the relative optics-to-sample displacement have been measured to be 5.8 nm(v) and 4.4 nm(h) rms/h using capacitance micrometry and 27 nm/h using x-ray point projection imaging. The stability of the measurement platform and in-vacuum operation allows for long exposure times, high signal-to-noise and large dynamic range two-dimensional intensity measurements to be acquired. Finally, we illustrate the microscope's stability with a recent experimental result.

  12. A search for a keV signature of radiatively decaying dark matter with Suzaku XIS observations of the X-ray diffuse background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Norio; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-06-01

    We performed the deepest search for an X-ray emission line at between 0.5 and 7 keV from non-baryonic dark matter by the Suzaku XIS. Dark matter associated with the Milky Way was selected as the target to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. From the Suzaku archive, we selected 187 data sets of blank-sky regions that were dominated by the X-ray diffuse background. The data sets were from 2005 to 2013. The instrumental responses were adjusted by multiple calibration data sets of the Crab Nebula. We also improved the technique of subtracting lines of instrumental origin. These energy spectra were well described by X-ray emission due to charge exchange around the Solar System, hot plasma in and around the Milky Way, and the superposition of extra-galactic point sources. A signal of a narrow emission-line was searched for, and the significance of detection was evaluated in consideration of the blind search method (the Look-elsewhere Effect). Our results exhibited no significant detection of an emission line feature from dark matter. The 3 σ upper limit for the emission line intensity between 1 and 7 keV was ˜ 10-2 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1, or ˜ 5 × 10-4 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 per M⊙ pc-2, assuming a dark matter distribution with the Galactic rotation curve. The parameters of sterile neutrinos as candidates of dark-matter were also constrained.

  13. The Nature of Hard X-Ray (3–24 keV) Detected Luminous Infrared Galaxies in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Kenta; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the nature of far-infrared (70 μm) and hard X-ray (3–24 keV) selected galaxies in the COSMOS field detected with both Spitzer and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). By matching the Spitzer-COSMOS catalog with the NuSTAR-COSMOS catalog, we obtain a sample consisting of a hyperluminous infrared galaxy with {log}({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )≥slant 13, 12 ultraluminous infrared galaxies with 12≤slant {log} ({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )≤slant 13, and 10 luminous infrared galaxies with 11≤slant {log} ({L}{IR}/{L}ȯ )≤slant 12, i.e., 23 Hy/U/LIRGs in total. Using their X-ray hardness ratios, we find that 12 sources are obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with absorption column densities of {N}{{H}}> {10}22 cm‑2, including several Compton-thick ({N}{{H}}∼ {10}24 cm‑2) AGN candidates. On the basis of the infrared (60 μm) and intrinsic X-ray luminosities, we examine the relation between star formation (SF) and AGN luminosities of the 23 Hy/U/LIRGs. We find that the correlation is similar to that of the optically selected AGNs reported by Netzer, whereas local, far-infrared selected U/LIRGs show higher SF-to-AGN luminosity ratios than the average of our sample. This result suggests that our Hy/U/LIRGs detected both with Spitzer and NuSTAR are likely situated in a transition epoch between AGN-rising and cold-gas diminishing phases in SF-AGN evolutional sequences. The nature of a Compton-thick AGN candidate newly detected above 8 keV with NuSTAR (ID 245 in Civano et al.) is briefly discussed.

  14. 2-20 ns interframe time 2-frame 6.151 keV x-ray imaging on the recently upgraded Z Accelerator: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. R.; Smith, I. C.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Robertson, G.; Atherton, B. W.; Jones, M. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' recently upgraded 26MA Z Accelerator, the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151keV (1s2-1s2p triplet line of He-like Mn) curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004); G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), complex hydrodynamics, and other high-energy-density physics experiments. For example, this diagnostic has recently afforded microgram-scale mass perturbation measurements on an imploding ignition-scale 1mg ICF capsule [G. R. Bennett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 205003 (2007)], where the perturbation was initiated by a surrogate deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel fill tube. Using an angle-time multiplexing technique, ZBL now has the capability to provide two spatially and temporally separated foci in the Z chamber, allowing "two-frame" imaging to be performed, with an interframe time range of 2-20ns. This multiplexing technique allows the full area of the four-pass amplifiers to be used for the two pulses, rather than split the amplifiers effectively into two rectangular sections, with one leg delayed with respect to the other, which would otherwise double the power imposed onto the various optics thereby halving the damage threshold, for the same irradiance on target. The 6.151keV two frame technique has recently been used to image imploding wire arrays, using a 7.3ns interframe time. The diagnostic will soon be converted to operate with p-rather than s-polarized laser light for enhanced laser absorption in the Mn foil, plus other changes (e.g., operation at the possibly brighter 6.181keV Mn 1s2-1s2p singlet line), to increase x-ray yields. Also, a highly sensitive inline multiframe ultrafast (1ns gate time

  15. 2-20 ns interframe time 2-frame 6.151 keV x-ray imaging on the recently upgraded Z Accelerator: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G R; Smith, I C; Shores, J E; Sinars, D B; Robertson, G; Atherton, B W; Jones, M C; Porter, J L

    2008-10-01

    When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' recently upgraded 26 MA Z Accelerator, the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57 nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151 keV (1s(2)-1s2p triplet line of He-like Mn) curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004); G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), complex hydrodynamics, and other high-energy-density physics experiments. For example, this diagnostic has recently afforded microgram-scale mass perturbation measurements on an imploding ignition-scale 1 mg ICF capsule [G. R. Bennett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 205003 (2007)], where the perturbation was initiated by a surrogate deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel fill tube. Using an angle-time multiplexing technique, ZBL now has the capability to provide two spatially and temporally separated foci in the Z chamber, allowing "two-frame" imaging to be performed, with an interframe time range of 2-20 ns. This multiplexing technique allows the full area of the four-pass amplifiers to be used for the two pulses, rather than split the amplifiers effectively into two rectangular sections, with one leg delayed with respect to the other, which would otherwise double the power imposed onto the various optics thereby halving the damage threshold, for the same irradiance on target. The 6.151 keV two frame technique has recently been used to image imploding wire arrays, using a 7.3 ns interframe time. The diagnostic will soon be converted to operate with p-rather than s-polarized laser light for enhanced laser absorption in the Mn foil, plus other changes (e.g., operation at the possibly brighter 6.181 keV Mn 1s(2)-1s2p singlet line), to increase x-ray yields. Also, a highly sensitive inline multiframe ultrafast (1 ns

  16. Hidden axion dark matter decaying through mixing with QCD axion and the 3.5 keV X-ray line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2014-12-01

    Hidden axions may be coupled to the standard model particles through a kinetic or mass mixing with QCD axion. We study a scenario in which a hidden axion constitutes a part of or the whole of dark matter and decays into photons through the mixing, explaining the 3.5 keV X-ray line signal. Interestingly, the required long lifetime of the hidden axion dark matter can be realized for the QCD axion decay constant at an intermediate scale, if the mixing is sufficiently small. In such a two component dark matter scenario, the primordial density perturbations of the hidden axion can be highly non-Gaussian, leading to a possible dispersion in the X-ray line strength from various galaxy clusters and near-by galaxies. We also discuss how the parallel and orthogonal alignment of two axions affects their couplings to gauge fields. In particular, the QCD axion decay constant can be much larger than the actual Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking.

  17. Ultrasoft 1.5 keV aluminum K X rays are efficient producers of complex chromosome exchange aberrations as revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C S; Stevens, D L; Savage, J R

    1996-08-01

    The electron pairs generated by ultrasoft 1.5 keV aluminum K X-ray photons deposit their energy in tracks of length < 70 nm and provide an ideal tool for analyzing the spatial distribution of breaks and misrepair processes. We have undertaken the analysis of changes in chromosome structure produced by aluminum K X rays in untransformed HF12 human fibroblasts in G1 phase using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Multicolored chromosome-specific DNA probes for chromosomes 1 and 2 and an alpha-satellite pan-centromeric probe were used to examine in vitro radiation-induced chromosome-type exchange aberrations. After mean doses of 0.37-2.93 Gy the relative frequencies of complex exchanges, derived from three or more breaks in two or more chromosomes, ranged from 15-35%. For the classic break-age-and-rejoining theory to hold, very large interaction distances are needed to account for this high frequency of multibreak interactions, unless many sites pre-exist where several different chromosomes come very close together. Alternatively, damaged DNA may be able to interact with adjacent undamaged DNA, obviating the need for large rejoining distances.

  18. The Origin of the Local 1/4-KeV X-Ray Flux in Both Charge Exhange and a Hot Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The solar neighbourhood is the closest and most easily studied sample of the Galactic interstellar medium, an understanding of which is essential for models of star formation and galaxy evolution. Observations of an unexpectedly intense diffuse flux of easily absorbed 1/4-kiloelectronvolt X-rays coupled with the discovery that interstellar space within about a hundred parsecs of the Sun is almost completely devoid of cool absorbing gas, led to a picture of a 'local cavity' filled with X-ray-emitting hot gas, dubbed the local hot bubble. This model was recently challenged by suggestions that the emission could instead be readily produced within the Solar System by heavy solar-wind ions exchanging electrons with neutral H and He in interplanetary space, potentially removing the major piece of evidence for the local existence of million-degree gas within the Galactic disk. Here we report observations showing that the total solar wind charge-exchange contribution is approximately 40 percent of the 1/4-keV flux in the Galactic plane. The fact that the measured flux is not dominated by charge exchange supports the notion of a million-degree hot bubble extending about a hundred parsecs from the Sun.

  19. The Origin of the Local 1/4-KeV X-Ray Flux in Both Charge Exhange and a Hot Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Robertson, I. P.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    The solar neighbourhood is the closest and most easily studied sample of the Galactic interstellar medium, an understanding of which is essential for models of star formation and galaxy evolution. Observations of an unexpectedly intense diffuse flux of easily absorbed 1/4-kiloelectronvolt X-rays coupled with the discovery that interstellar space within about a hundred parsecs of the Sun is almost completely devoid of cool absorbing gas, led to a picture of a 'local cavity' filled with X-ray-emitting hot gas, dubbed the local hot bubble. This model was recently challenged by suggestions that the emission could instead be readily produced within the Solar System by heavy solar-wind ions exchanging electrons with neutral H and He in interplanetary space, potentially removing the major piece of evidence for the local existence of million-degree gas within the Galactic disk. Here we report observations showing that the total solar wind charge-exchange contribution is approximately 40 percent of the 1/4-keV flux in the Galactic plane. The fact that the measured flux is not dominated by charge exchange supports the notion of a million-degree hot bubble extending about a hundred parsecs from the Sun.

  20. Hidden axion dark matter decaying through mixing with QCD axion and the 3.5 keV X-ray line

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: kitajima@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    Hidden axions may be coupled to the standard model particles through a kinetic or mass mixing with QCD axion. We study a scenario in which a hidden axion constitutes a part of or the whole of dark matter and decays into photons through the mixing, explaining the 3.5 keV X-ray line signal. Interestingly, the required long lifetime of the hidden axion dark matter can be realized for the QCD axion decay constant at an intermediate scale, if the mixing is sufficiently small. In such a two component dark matter scenario, the primordial density perturbations of the hidden axion can be highly non-Gaussian, leading to a possible dispersion in the X-ray line strength from various galaxy clusters and near-by galaxies. We also discuss how the parallel and orthogonal alignment of two axions affects their couplings to gauge fields. In particular, the QCD axion decay constant can be much larger than the actual Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking.

  1. Note: On the generation of sub-300 keV flash-X-rays using rod-pinch diode: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Satyanarayana, N.; Rajawat, R. K.; Basu, Shibaji; Rao, A. Durga Prasad; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-09-15

    Generation of flash X-rays (FXRs) at less than 500 keV is described with emphasis on experimental investigation. The pulser is a Tesla transformer-Water transmission line based pulsed power generator operating in double resonance mode to power a rod-pinch diode. The configuration of aspect ratio reported here falls much below the normally reported ratios for the rod-pinch diode operation. Experimental investigation at such low pulsed voltage has revealed “flowering” of the anode tip and “pitting” of the perspex window. A possible explanation in terms of Lorentz body force is discussed rather than the pinch mechanism generally suggested in literature. The experimental investigation for the FXR generation is corroborated by measuring the radiation dose using CaSO{sub 4} (Dy) thermo luminescent dosimeters.

  2. Measurement of L X-ray fluorescence cross-sections for elements with 45 ⩽ Z ⩽ 50 using synchrotron radiation at 8 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzi, Edgardo V.; Badiger, Nagappa M.; Grad, Gabriela B.; Barrea, Raúl A.; Figueroa, Rodolfo G.

    2011-10-01

    The L shell fluorescence cross-sections of the elements in range 45 ⩽ Z ⩽ 50 have been determined at 8 keV using Synchrotron radiation. The individual L X-ray photons, Ll, Lα, LβI, LβII, LγI and LγII produced in the target were measured with high resolution Si( Li) detector. The experimental set-up provided a low background by using linearly polarized monoenergetic photon beam, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The experimental cross-sections obtained in this work were compared with available experimental data from Scofield [1,2] Krause [3,4] and Scofield and Puri et al. [5,6]. These experimental values closely agree with the theoretical values calculated using Scofield and Krause data, except for the case of Lγ, where values measured of this work are slighter higher.

  3. Spatial distribution and broad-band spectral characteristics of the diffuse X-ray background, 0.1 - 1.0 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.; Burrows, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary maps covering more than 85 percent of the sky are presented for three energy bands: the B band, the C band, and the M band. The study was undertaken to find evidence that most of the diffuse X-ray background at energies less than 1 keV is local to the galaxy and that it is most probably due to thermal radiation from a low density plasma which fills a substantial fraction of interstellar space. A preliminary analysis of the data is provided including a report that most of the B and C band flux has a common origin, probably in a 10 to the 6th power K region surrounding the Sun, and that most of the M band flux does not originate from the same material.

  4. Note: On the generation of sub-300 keV flash-X-rays using rod-pinch diode: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, N.; Rajawat, R. K.; Basu, Shibaji; Rao, A. Durga Prasad; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-09-01

    Generation of flash X-rays (FXRs) at less than 500 keV is described with emphasis on experimental investigation. The pulser is a Tesla transformer-Water transmission line based pulsed power generator operating in double resonance mode to power a rod-pinch diode. The configuration of aspect ratio reported here falls much below the normally reported ratios for the rod-pinch diode operation. Experimental investigation at such low pulsed voltage has revealed "flowering" of the anode tip and "pitting" of the perspex window. A possible explanation in terms of Lorentz body force is discussed rather than the pinch mechanism generally suggested in literature. The experimental investigation for the FXR generation is corroborated by measuring the radiation dose using CaSO4 (Dy) thermo luminescent dosimeters.

  5. Note: On the generation of sub-300 keV flash-X-rays using rod-pinch diode: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, N; Rajawat, R K; Basu, Shibaji; Rao, A Durga Prasad; Mittal, K C

    2014-09-01

    Generation of flash X-rays (FXRs) at less than 500 keV is described with emphasis on experimental investigation. The pulser is a Tesla transformer-Water transmission line based pulsed power generator operating in double resonance mode to power a rod-pinch diode. The configuration of aspect ratio reported here falls much below the normally reported ratios for the rod-pinch diode operation. Experimental investigation at such low pulsed voltage has revealed "flowering" of the anode tip and "pitting" of the perspex window. A possible explanation in terms of Lorentz body force is discussed rather than the pinch mechanism generally suggested in literature. The experimental investigation for the FXR generation is corroborated by measuring the radiation dose using CaSO4 (Dy) thermo luminescent dosimeters.

  6. Response of niobium-based superconducting tunnel junctions in the soft-x-ray region 0.15{endash}6.5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoeve, P.; Rando, N.; Verveer, J.; Peacock, A.; van Dordrecht, A.; Videler, P.; Bavdaz, M.; Goldie, D.J.; Lederer, T.; Scholze, F.; Ulm, G.; Venn, R.

    1996-01-01

    The response of niobium-based superconducting tunnel junctions to irradiation with monochromatic soft x rays in the energy range of 0.15{endash}6.5 keV has been measured, using monochromatized synchrotron radiation and a {sup 55}Fe radioactive source. Nonlinearities in this response have been observed which depend on the size of the device and the thickness of the electrode in which the photon absorption takes place. The nonlinearities can be explained in terms of self-recombination of quasiparticles by means of a model based on the Rothwarf-Taylor equations. No variations in the mean energy required to produce one quasiparticle have been observed near the {ital M} and {ital L} edges of niobium. The linear dependence of the energy resolution on photon energy indicates that the resolution is dominated by spatial variations in the response of the devices. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Calculations of photo-induced X-ray production cross-sections in the energy range 1-150 keV and average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, J. M.; Guerra, M.; Parente, F.; Madeira, T. I.; Indelicato, P.; Santos, J. P.; Marques, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we calculate the K-, L- and M-shells X-ray production, and X-ray fluorescence cross-sections after photo-induced ionization, for Zn, Cd, and Hg, and for incident photon energy range from 1 to 150 keV. For this purpose, the corresponding average fluorescence yields for Zn, Cd, and Hg as well as the photoionization cross-sections were calculated using the Dirac-Fock method. Subshell fluorescence, intrashell and intershell yields are obtained consistently from radiative and radiationless transitions calculated in the exact same method. A comprehensive account of the relations between the X-ray production, X-ray fluorescence cross-sections and the photoionization cross-sections and these yields is presented. Comparisons are made with results from other authors. The obtained values for the photoionization cross-sections are in good agreement with the widely used data of Scofield in the studied energy range. However our results for the X-ray fluorescence cross sections seem to favor some data relatively to others. The energy dependence of the average fluorescence yields is discussed, in particular, the reliability of extrapolated data for lighter elements from measurements and calculations in heavier elements above the inner shell absorption edges is questioned. Tabulated data on photoionization and X-ray production cross-sections are presented for the incident photon energy range 1-150 keV in steps of 1 keV.

  8. A new grating X-ray spectrometer for 2-4 keV enabling a separate observation of In-Lβ and Sn-Lα emissions of indium tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Handa, Nobuo; Murano, Takanori; Koike, Masato; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Imazono, Takashi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Koeda, Masaru; Nagano, Tetsuya; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Oue, Yuki; Yonezawa, Zeno; Kuramoto, Satoshi

    2013-06-01

    A new multilayer-coated varied line-spaced grating, JS4000, was fabricated and tested for extending the upper limit of a grating X-ray spectrometer for electron microscopy. This grating was designed for 2-3.8 keV at a grazing incidence angle of 1.35°. It was revealed that this new multilayer structure enables us to take soft-X-ray emission spectra continuously from 1.5 to 4.3 keV at the same optical setting. The full-width at half maximum of Te-L(α1,2) (3.8 keV) emission peak was 27 eV. This spectrometer was applied to indium tin oxide particles and clearly resolved Sn-L(α) (3444 eV) and In-L(β1) (3487 eV) peaks, which could not be resolved by a widely used energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer.

  9. Structure formation in a mixed dark matter model with decaying sterile neutrino: the 3.5 keV X-ray line and the Galactic substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Akira; Kamada, Ayuki

    2016-01-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of structure formation in a mixed dark matter (MDM) model. Our model is motivated by the recently identified 3.5 keV X-ray line, which can be explained by the decay of non-resonantly produced sterile neutrinos accounting for 20-60% of the dark matter in the Universe. These non-resonantly produced sterile neutrinos have a sizable free-streaming length and hence behave effectively as warm dark matter (WDM). Assuming the rest of dark matter is composed of some cold dark matter (CDM) particles, we follow the coevolution of a mixed WDM plus CDM cosmology. Specifically, we consider the models with the warm component fraction of rwarm=0.25 and 0.50. Our MDM models predict that the comoving Jeans length at the matter-radiation equality is close to that of the thermally produced warm dark matter model with particle mass mWDM=2.4 keV, but the suppression in the fluctuation power spectrum is weaker. We perform large N-body simulations to study the structure of non-linear dark halos in the MDM models. The abundance of substructure is significantly reduced in the MDM models, and hence the so-called small-scale crisis is mitigated. The cumulative maximum circular velocity function (CVF) of at least one halo in the MDM models is in good agreement with the CVFs of the observed satellites in the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxy. We argue that the MDM models open an interesting possibility to reconcile the reported 3.5 keV line and the internal structure of galaxies.

  10. Measurement of L X-ray fluorescence cross-sections for 74W at excitation energies 12, 14, 15 and 16.5 keV with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Rani, A.; Singh, R. M.; Tiwari, M. K.; Singh, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Ll, Lα, Lβ and Lγ1 X-ray fluorescence cross-sections for 74W have been measured at excitation energies of 12, 14, 15 and 16.5 keV using synchrotron radiations. A Peltier cooled Vortex solid state detector (SII Nano Technology, USA) with an energy resolution of 138 eV at 5.96 keV X-rays was employed for analysis. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical estimates of Krause (1979), Campbell (2003) and Puri et al. (1993) and also compared with existing experimental results (Barrea and Bonzi, 2001b) of L XRF cross sections at the excitation energy of 12 and 14 keV. Present results were found to be closer to the Puri's data in comparison to existing experimental results. For the first time, to our knowledge, L XRF cross section for 74W at energies 15 and 16.5 keV are also being reported here.

  11. Ionic Liquids as a Reference Material Candidate for the Quick Performance Check of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometers for the Low Energy Range below 1 keV

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are proposed as simple and efficient test materials to evaluate the performance of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS) in the low energy range below 1 keV. By only one measurement, C Kα, N Kα, O Kα, and F Kα X-ray lines can be excited. Additionally, the S Kα line at 2.3 keV and, particularly, the S L series at 149 eV complete the picture with X-ray lines offered by the selected ILs. The well-known (certifiable) elemental composition of the ILs selected in the present study can be used to check the accuracy of results produced with the available EDS quantification routines in the low energy range, simultaneously, for several low atomic number elements. A comparison with other reference materials in use for testing the performance of EDS in the low energy range is included. PMID:27336962

  12. Determination of natural line widths of Kα X-ray lines for some elements in the atomic range 50≤Z≤65 at 59.5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kündeyi, Kadriye; Aylıkcı, Nuray Küp; Tıraşoǧlu, Engin; Kahoul, Abdelhalim; Aylıkcı, Volkan

    2017-02-01

    The semi-empirical determination of natural widths of Kα X-ray lines (Kα1 and Kα2) were performed for Sn, Sb, Te, I, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd and Tb. For the semi-empirical determination of the line widths, K shell fluorescence yields of elements were measured. The samples were excited by 59.5 keV γ rays from a 241Am annular radioactive source in order to measure the K shell fluorescence yields. The emitted K X-rays from the samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The measured K shell fluorescence yields were used for the calculation of K shell level widths. Finally, the natural widths of K X-ray lines were determined as the sums of levels which involved in the transition. The obtained values were compared with earlier studies.

  13. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboards for X-ray in the 16.63-25.30 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tousi, E. T.; Bauk, S.; Hashim, R.; Jaafar, M. S.; Abuarra, A.; Aldroobi, K. S. A.; Al-Jarrah, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The roots of Eremurus spp. were used as a bio-adhesive in the fabrication of Rhizophora spp. particleboards. The mass attenuation coefficients of Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard of six samples with two different weight percentages of the Eremurus spp. root (6% and 12%) and three various Rhizophora spp. particle sizes (≤149 μm, 149-500 μm and 500-1000 μm) were determined by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) photons in 16.63 keV and 25.30 keV of the photon energy range. The results were compared with theoretically calculated mass attenuations using the XCOM computer program for younger-age (breast 1: 75% muscle+25% fat), middle-age (breast 2: 50% muscle+50% fat), and old-age (breast 3: 25% muscle+75% fat) breasts. The results indicated that Eremurus-Rhizophora spp. particleboard is the appropriate suitable phantom in the diagnostic energy region. The mass attenuation coefficient in the low weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and the large Rhizophora spp. particle size were found very close to breast 1. Moreover the mass attenuation coefficient of the sample with high weight percentage of the bio-adhesive and small Rhizophora spp. particle size was found very close to water as a standard material phantom. In addition, the viscosity of dissolved Eremurus spp. root in water could be considerably higher than that of formaldehyde-based adhesives, which affects on some properties such as high strength and high binding.

  14. Subattosecond keV beats of the high-harmonic x-ray field produced with few-cycle mid-IR laser pulses: Magnetic-field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelina, A. S.; Emelin, M. Yu.; Ryabikin, M. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Using the theoretical description beyond the dipole approximation, we examine the impact of the electron magnetic drift caused by a strong midinfrared laser field on the feasibility and ultimate limitations of the method proposed recently [C. Hernández-García et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 033002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.033002] as a route to the generation of zeptosecond x-ray waveforms; this method relies on the interference of high-harmonic emission from multiple reencounters of the electron wave packet with the ion. We show that the electron magnetic drift serves as the spectral filter changing the relative weights of the contributions to the high-harmonic signal from different rescattering events. For a range of driving wavelengths in the midinfrared, the use of the control of the carrier-envelope phase, occasionally in combination with the spectral filtering, to cope with the magnetic drift effect is shown to facilitate the production of intense high-contrast keV beats of durations shorter than 0.8 attosecond. The limitations on the laser wavelengths usable for implementing this approach are determined by the growing unamendable imbalance between the contributions of interfering paths and by an overall decline in the efficiency of high-harmonic generation at longer driving wavelengths.

  15. Effect of external magnetic field on the Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of TixNi1-x alloys excited by 59.54 and 22.69keV photons.

    PubMed

    Perişanoğlu, Ufuk; Alım, Bünyamin; Uğurlu, Mine; Demir, Lütfü

    2016-09-01

    The effects of external magnetic field and exciting photon energies on the Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of various alloy compositions of Ti-Ni transition metal alloys have been investigated in this work using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The spectrum of characteristic K-X-ray photons from pure Ti, pure Ni and TixNi1-x (x=0.30; 0.40; 0.50; 0.60; 0.70) alloys were detected with a high resolution Si (Li) solid-state detector. Firstly, Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of pure Ti, pure Ni and TixNi1-x alloys were measured following excitation by 59.54keV γ-rays from a 200mCi (241)Am radioactive point source without any magnetic field and under 0.5 and 1T external magnetic fields, separately. Later, the same measurements were repeated under the same experimental conditions for 22.69keV X-rays from a 370 MBq(1)(0)(9)Cd radioactive point source. The results obtained for Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of pure Ti, pure Ni, Ti and Ni in various Ti-Ni alloys were evaluated in terms of both external magnetic field effect and exciting photon energy effect. When the results obtained for both exciting photon energies are evaluated in terms of changing of Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios depending on the alloy composition, the tendency of these changes are observed to be similar. Also, Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for all samples examined have changed with increasing external magnetic field. Therefore, the results obtained have shown that Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of Ti and Ni in TixNi1-x alloys are connected with the external magnetic field. The present study makes it possible to perform reliable interpretation of experimental Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for Ti, Ni and TixNi1-x alloys and can also provide quantitative information about the changes of the Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of these metals with alloy composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  17. Absolute K-shell ionization cross sections and L{alpha} and L{beta}{sub 1} x-ray production cross sections of Ga and As by 1.5-39-keV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Merlet, C.; Llovet, X.; Fernandez-Varea, J. M.

    2006-06-15

    Absolute K-shell ionization and L{alpha} and L{beta}{sub 1} x-ray production cross sections for Ga and As have been measured for incident electrons in the energy range from 1.5 to 39 keV. The cross sections were deduced from K{alpha}, L{alpha}, and L{beta}{sub 1} x-ray intensities emitted from ultrathin GaAs samples deposited onto self-supporting carbon films. The x-ray intensities were measured on an electron microprobe equipped with several wavelength-dispersive spectrometers and were converted into absolute cross sections by using estimated values of the target thickness, spectrometer efficiency, and number of incident electrons. Experimental results are compared with cross sections calculated from the plane-wave and distorted-wave Born approximations, the relativistic binary-encounter-Bethe model, the results of two widely used simple analytical formulas, and, whenever possible, experimental data from the literature.

  18. Dual crystal x-ray spectrometer at 1.8 keV for high repetition-rate single-photon counting spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Bachmann, B.; Kraus, D.; MacDonald, M. J.; Bucher, M.; Carron, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Drake, R. P.; Emig, J.; Ferguson, K. R.; Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gorkhover, T.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Krzywinski, J.; Levitan, A. L.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Osipov, T.; Pardini, T.; Peltz, C.; Skruszewicz, S.; Bostedt, C.; Fennel, T.; Döppner, T.

    2016-08-01

    With the recent development of high-repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers (FEL), it is now possible to perform x-ray scattering and emission spectroscopy measurements from thin foils or gasses heated to high-energy density conditions by integrating over many experimental shots. Since the expected signal may be weaker than the typical CCD readout noise over the region-of-interest, it is critical to the success of this approach to use a detector with high-energy resolution so that single x-ray photons may be isolated. Here we describe a dual channel x-ray spectrometer developed for the Atomic and Molecular Optics endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) for x-ray spectroscopy near the K-edge of aluminum. The spectrometer is based on a pair of curved PET (002) crystals coupled to a single pnCCD detector which simultaneously measures x-ray scattering and emission in the forward and backward directions. The signals from single x-ray photons are accumulated permitting continuous single-shot acquisition at 120 Hz.

  19. Dual crystal x-ray spectrometer at 1.8 keV for high repetition-rate single-photon counting spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Bachmann, B.; Kraus, D.; MacDonald, M. J.; Bucher, M.; Carron, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Drake, R. P.; Emig, J.; Ferguson, K. R.; Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gorkhover, T.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Krzywinski, J.; Levitan, A. L.; Meiwes-Broer, K. -H.; Osipov, T.; Pardini, T.; Peltz, C.; Skruszewicz, S.; Bostedt, C.; Fennel, T.; Döppner, T.

    2016-08-01

    The recent development of high-repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers (FEL), makes it possible to perform x-ray scattering and emission spectroscopy measurements from thin foils or gasses heated to high-energy density conditions by integrating over many experimental shots. Since the expected signal may be weaker than the typical CCD readout noise over the region-of-interest, it is critical to the success of this approach to use a detector with high-energy resolution so that single x-ray photons may be isolated. We describe a dual channel x-ray spectrometer developed for the Atomic and Molecular Optics endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) for x-ray spectroscopy near the K-edge of aluminum. The spectrometer is based on a pair of curved PET (002) crystals coupled to a single pnCCD detector which simultaneously measures x-ray scattering and emission in the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, the signals from single x-ray photons are accumulated permitting continuous single-shot acquisition at 120 Hz.

  20. Dual crystal x-ray spectrometer at 1.8 keV for high repetition-rate single-photon counting spectroscopy experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gamboa, E. J.; Bachmann, B.; Kraus, D.; ...

    2016-08-01

    The recent development of high-repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers (FEL), makes it possible to perform x-ray scattering and emission spectroscopy measurements from thin foils or gasses heated to high-energy density conditions by integrating over many experimental shots. Since the expected signal may be weaker than the typical CCD readout noise over the region-of-interest, it is critical to the success of this approach to use a detector with high-energy resolution so that single x-ray photons may be isolated. We describe a dual channel x-ray spectrometer developed for the Atomic and Molecular Optics endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)more » for x-ray spectroscopy near the K-edge of aluminum. The spectrometer is based on a pair of curved PET (002) crystals coupled to a single pnCCD detector which simultaneously measures x-ray scattering and emission in the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, the signals from single x-ray photons are accumulated permitting continuous single-shot acquisition at 120 Hz.« less

  1. Dual crystal x-ray spectrometer at 1.8 keV for high repetition-rate single-photon counting spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Bachmann, B.; Kraus, D.; MacDonald, M. J.; Bucher, M.; Carron, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Drake, R. P.; Emig, J.; Ferguson, K. R.; Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gorkhover, T.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Krzywinski, J.; Levitan, A. L.; Meiwes-Broer, K. -H.; Osipov, T.; Pardini, T.; Peltz, C.; Skruszewicz, S.; Bostedt, C.; Fennel, T.; Döppner, T.

    2016-08-01

    The recent development of high-repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers (FEL), makes it possible to perform x-ray scattering and emission spectroscopy measurements from thin foils or gasses heated to high-energy density conditions by integrating over many experimental shots. Since the expected signal may be weaker than the typical CCD readout noise over the region-of-interest, it is critical to the success of this approach to use a detector with high-energy resolution so that single x-ray photons may be isolated. We describe a dual channel x-ray spectrometer developed for the Atomic and Molecular Optics endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) for x-ray spectroscopy near the K-edge of aluminum. The spectrometer is based on a pair of curved PET (002) crystals coupled to a single pnCCD detector which simultaneously measures x-ray scattering and emission in the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, the signals from single x-ray photons are accumulated permitting continuous single-shot acquisition at 120 Hz.

  2. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of tin over the energy range of 29-60keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Paterson, David; Kanter, Elliot P.; Southworth, Stephen H.; Young, Linda; Beno, Mark A.; Linton, Jennifer A.; Jennings, Guy

    2007-03-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler , Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60keV to 0.04-3% accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2% . Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f2 is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2% persist between calculated and observed values.

  3. Simulation study of optimizing the 3-5 keV x-ray emission from pure Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M.; Fisher, J. H.; Davis, J. F.

    2014-10-01

    High-flux x-ray sources are desirable for testing the radiation hardness of materials used in various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, there is an interest to design a source with primarily mid-energy (~ 3 keV) but limited soft (< 1 keV) x-ray contributions; we focus on optimizing the 3--5 keV non-LTE emission from targets consisting of pure Ar (K-shell) or Ag (L-shell) at sub-critical densities (~nc / 10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy and thermal x rays. However, K and L-shell sources are expected to optimize at different temperatures and densities and it is a priori unclear under what target and laser conditions this will occur. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a simulation study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material as it would perform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-LTE, detailed configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Two-dimensional primary x-ray image formation and quality in angiography using absorption-edge filters in the 40- to 60-keV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Leon

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulation techniques are used to examine Pr, Gd and Yb (K-edge) filters for the x-ray imaging of iodinated blood vessels. The performance of these filters is compared to a standard 2 mm Al filter with respect to vessel contrast, patient exposure and integral absorbed dose and x-ray tube loading. Additional simulations investigate how 0.2 mm Pr, Gd or Yb filters interact with the non-isotropic x-ray spectrum and affect the background intensity and vessel contrast across the detector surface, and the uniformity of exposure and integral absorbed dose across the patient. The results show that the uniformity of the primary x-ray image is neither degraded nor improved by these filters; however, patient exposure and dose can be substantially reduced and rendered more uniform.

  5. A soft/hard x-ray beamline for surface EXAFS studies in the energy range 0. 8--15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A. A.; Hashizume, T.; Citrin, P. H.

    1989-07-01

    A new ultrahigh-vacuum x-ray beamline for surface EXAFS experiments has been constructed at the 2.5-GeV storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA. Its design minimizes or eliminates a variety of problems inherent in other beamlines, providing state-of-the-art intensity, brightness, resolution, and beam stability over an extremely wide range of energy. Performance is discussed with initial results obtained after the recent x-ray ring shutdown.

  6. Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3-5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (˜nc/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using Hydra, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from Cretin, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ˜100-150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (˜20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3-5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  7. Intense nanosecond duration source of 10-250 keV x rays suitable for imaging projectile-induced cavitation in human cadaver tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Craig N.; Holland, Glenn E.; Seely, John F.

    2005-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of a repetitive nanosecond x-ray source having a pumped field-emission x-ray tube are described. A compact Marx generator, 61 cm in length and storing 12 J energy, directly drives the field-emission tube with voltage pulses >380 kV and with <4 ns rise time from an equivalent generator impedance of 52 {omega}. The x-ray dose is 520 {mu}Sv at a distance of 30.5 cm. A numerical simulation model is used in which the x-ray tube's cathode width and anode-cathode gap spacing are permitted to change with time, while electron flow between the cathode and anode is space charge limited and nonrelativistic. The x-ray tube model is coupled to an equivalent circuit representation of the Marx generator that includes the capacitance variation with charging voltage of the BaTiO{sub 3} capacitors. The capabilities of the x-ray source for flash radiography have been demonstrated by the study of the evolution of cavitation in human cadaver legs induced by high-velocity projectiles.

  8. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  9. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  10. Identification of the Hard X-Ray Source Dominating the E > 25 keV Emission of the Nearby Galaxy M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Wik, D.; Maccarone, T.J.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Ballhausen, R.; Lehmer, B.D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We report the identification of a bright hard X-ray source dominating the M31 bulge above 25 kiloelectronvolts from a simultaneous NuSTAR-Swift observation. We find that this source is the counterpart to Swift J0042.6+4112, which was previously detected in the Swift BAT All-Sky Hard X-Ray Survey. This Swift BAT source had been suggested to be the combined emission from a number of point sources; our new observations have identified a single X-ray source from 0.5 to 50 kiloelectronvolts as the counterpart for the first time. In the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt band, the source had been classified as an X-ray Binary candidate in various Chandra and XMM-Newton studies; however, since it was not clearly associated with Swift J0042.6+4112, the previous E is less than 10 kiloelectronvolts observations did not generate much attention. This source has a spectrum with a soft X-ray excess (kT approximately equal to 0.2 kiloelectronvolts) plus a hard spectrum with a power law of gamma approximately equal to 1 and a cutoff around 15-20 kiloelectronvolts, typical of the spectral characteristics of accreting pulsars. Unfortunately, any potential pulsation was undetected in the NuSTAR data, possibly due to insufficient photon statistics. The existing deep HST (Hubble Space Telescope) images exclude high-mass (greater than 3 times the radius of the moon) donors at the location of this source. The best interpretation for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate-mass (less than 3 times the radius of the moon M) companion or a symbiotic X-ray binary. We discuss other possibilities in more detail.

  11. Validation of modelled imaging plates sensitivity to 1-100 keV x-rays and spatial resolution characterisation for diagnostics for the “PETawatt Aquitaine Laser”

    SciTech Connect

    Boutoux, G. Batani, D.; Burgy, F.; Ducret, J.-E.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Hulin, S.; Rabhi, N.; Duval, A.; Lecherbourg, L.; Reverdin, C.; Jakubowska, K.; Szabo, C. I.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Consoli, F.; Curcio, A.; De Angelis, R.; Ingenito, F.; Baggio, J.; Raffestin, D.

    2016-04-15

    Thanks to their high dynamic range and ability to withstand electromagnetic pulse, imaging plates (IPs) are commonly used as passive detectors in laser-plasma experiments. In the framework of the development of the diagnostics for the Petawatt Aquitaine Laser facility, we present an absolute calibration and spatial resolution study of five different available types of IP (namely, MS-SR-TR-MP-ND) performed by using laser-induced K-shell X-rays emitted by a solid silver target irradiated by the laser ECLIPSE at CEntre Lasers Intenses et Applications. In addition, IP sensitivity measurements were performed with a 160 kV X-ray generator at CEA DAM DIF, where the absolute response of IP SR and TR has been calibrated to X-rays in the energy range 8-75 keV with uncertainties of about 15%. Finally, the response functions have been modeled in Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulations in order to reproduce experimental data. Simulations enable extrapolation of the IP response functions to photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV, of interest, e.g., for laser-driven radiography.

  12. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  13. L-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections of Copper -29, GERMANIUM-32, RUBIDIUM-37, STRONTIUM-38, and Yttrium -39 and M-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections of Gold -79, LEAD-82, BISMUTH-83, THORIUM-90, and URANIUM-92 by 70-200 KEV Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressett, John David

    L-shell x-ray production cross sections have been measured for thin targets of _{29} Cu, _{32}Ge, _{37}Rb, _{38 }Sr, and _{39}Y. M -shell x-ray production cross sections have been measured for thin targets of _{79}Au, _{82}Pb, _ {83}Bi, _{90} Th, and _{92}U. All targets were irradiated with a beam of H^ {+} ions with energies in a range from 70 to 200 keV. Experimental cross sections are compared to other measurements at higher energies and to first Born (Plane Wave Born Approximation for direct ionization and Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers-Nikolaev approximation for electron capture) and the ECPSSR (Energy loss, Coulomb deflection, Perturbed Stationary State calculations with Relativistic effects) theoretical cross sections.

  14. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  15. Observations of celestial X-ray sources above 20 keV with the high-energy scintillation spectrometer on board OSO 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Dolan, J. H.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Beall, J. H.; Maurer, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy X-ray spectra of the Crab Nebula, Cyg- XR-1, and Cen A were determined from observations with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite, launched in June, 1975. Each of these sources was observed over two periods of 8 days or more, enabling a search for day-to-day and year to year variations in the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray emission. No variation in the light curve of the Crab pulsar was found from observations which span a 15-day period in March 1976, with demonstrable phase stability. Transitions associated with the binary phase of Cyg XR-1 and a large change in the emission from Con A are reported.

  16. ROSAT Detection of an X-ray Shadow in the 1/4-keV Diffuse Background in the Draco Nebula.

    PubMed

    Snowden, S L; Mebold, U; Hirth, W; Herbstmeier, U; Schmitt, J H

    1991-06-14

    The detection by the Roentgen satellite (ROSAT) x-ray telescope of a shadow in the 1/4-kiloelectron volt (C band, 0.1 to 0.284 kiloelectron volt) cosmic diffuse background is reported. The location and morphology of the local minimum in x-rays are in clear agreement with a discrete H I cloud. The shadow is very deep with a minimum level at 50 percent of the surrounding emission; therefore, a minimum of 50 percent of the observed off-cloud flux must originate on the far side of the cloud. The analysis of H I velocity components links the cloud with the Draco nebula (distance approximately 600 parsecs); it then follows that there is significant 1/4-kiloelectron volt x-ray emission at a large distance (>400 parsecs) from the galactic plane along this line of sight. The extent of the distant emission region is uncertain, and, if it indicates the existence of a hot galactic corona, it must be patchy in nature.

  17. Development of soft X-ray multilayer laminar-type plane gratings and varied-line-spacing spherical grating for flat-field spectrograph in the 1-8 keV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Masato; Ishino, Masahiko; Imazono, Takashi; Sano, Kazuo; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Hatayama, Masatoshi; Takenaka, Hisataka; Heimann, Philip A.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2009-08-01

    W/C and Co/SiO 2 multilayer laminar-type holographic plane gratings (groove density 1/σ = 1200 lines/mm) in the 1-8 keV region are developed. For the Co/SiO 2 grating the diffraction efficiencies of 0.41 and 0.47 at 4 and 6 keV, respectively, and for the W/C grating 0.38 at 8 keV are observed. Taking advantage of the outstanding high diffraction efficiencies into practical soft X-ray spectrographs a Mo/SiO 2 multilayer varied-line-spacing (VLS) laminar-type spherical grating (1/σ = 2400 lines/mm) is also developed for use with a flat field spectrograph in the region of 1.7 keV. For the Mo/SiO 2 multilayer grating the diffraction efficiencies of 0.05-0.20 at 0.9-1.8 keV are observed. The FWHMs of the measured line profiles of Hf-Mα 1(1644.6 eV), Si-Kα 1(1740.0 eV), and W-Mα 1 (1775.4 eV) are 13.7 eV, 8.0 eV, and 8.7 eV, respectively.

  18. High angular resolution cosmic X-ray astronomy observations in the energy range 0.15-2 keV and XUV observations of nearby stars from an attitude controlled rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. P.

    1974-01-01

    The construction of a two dimensional focusing Wolter Type I mirror system for X-ray and XUV astronomical observations from an Astrobee F sounding rocket is described. The mirror design goal will have a one degree field, a 20-arc seconds resolution, an effective area of about 50 sq cm at 1 keV and 10 sq cm at 0.25 keV on axis. A star camera provides aspect data to about 15-arc seconds. Two detectors are placed at the focus with an interchange mechanism to allow a detector change during flight. The following specific developments are reported: (1) position sensitive proportional counter development; (2) channel plate multiplier development; (3) telescope mirror development and payload structure; (4) Australian rocket flight results; (5) Comet Kohoutek He I observation; and (6) Vela, Puppis A, and Gem-Mon bright patch observations.

  19. Absolute Energy Calibration of X-ray TESs with 0.04 eV Uncertainty at 6.4 keV in a Hadron-Beam Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuno, H.; Doriese, W. B.; Bennett, D. A.; Curceanu, C.; Fowler, J. W.; Gard, J.; Gustafsson, F. P.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kuwabara, K.; Ma, Y.; Marton, J.; Noda, H.; O'Neil, G. C.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Reintsema, C. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Shi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, T.; Uhlig, J.; Ullom, J. N.; Widmann, E.; Yamada, S.; Zmeskal, J.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    A performance evaluation of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the environment of a pion beam line at a particle accelerator is presented. Averaged across the 209 functioning sensors in the array, the achieved energy resolution is 5.2 eV FWHM at Co K_{α } (6.9 keV) when the pion beam is off and 7.3 eV at a beam rate of 1.45 MHz. Absolute energy uncertainty of ± 0.04 eV is demonstrated for Fe K_{α } (6.4 keV) with in-situ energy calibration obtained from other nearby known X-ray lines. To achieve this small uncertainty, it is essential to consider the non-Gaussian energy response of the TESs and thermal cross-talk pile-up effects due to charged particle hits in the silicon substrate of the TES array.

  20. Carbon contamination of soft X-ray beamlines: dramatic anti-reflection coating effects observed in the 1 keV photon energy region.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, C; Polack, F; Silly, M G; Lagarde, B; Thomasset, M; Kubsky, S; Duval, J P; Risterucci, P; Pilette, B; Yao, I; Bergeard, N; Sirotti, F

    2011-09-01

    Carbon contamination is a general problem of under-vacuum optics submitted to high fluence. In soft X-ray beamlines carbon deposit on optics is known to absorb and scatter radiation close to the C K-edge (280 eV), forbidding effective measurements in this spectral region. Here the observation of strong reflectivity losses is reported related to carbon deposition at much higher energies around 1000 eV, where carbon absorptivity is small. It is shown that the observed effect can be modelled as a destructive interference from a homogeneous carbon thin film.

  1. Alloying effect on K shell X-ray fluorescence cross-sections and intensity ratios of Cu and Sn in Cu1Sn1-x alloys using the 59.5 keV gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M.; Olgar, M. A.; Cengiz, E.; Tıraşoglu, E.

    2016-09-01

    Kβ/Kα, intensity ratios and σKα,β production cross-sections of Cu and Sn were measured in pure metals and in different alloys which have different compositions (CuxSn1-x x=0.48, 0.41, 0.14 and 0.06). The samples were excited by 59.5 keV γ-rays from 241Am annular radioactive source. K X-rays emitted by samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Comparison of the σKβ production cross-sections and Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratio values for Cu and Sn with the theoretical and semi-empirical calculations indicates that they are in the inverse direction with concentration of constituent element in the alloys. The results show that variations in these parameters can be explained with the charge transfer process between the elements which constitute the alloys.

  2. Study of the single cluster response of a helium-isobutane drift chamber prototype using 8 keV X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoto, G.; Dabagov, S.; Hampai, D.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2015-03-01

    The identification of single clusters in the electronic signals produced by ionizing particles within a drift chamber is expected to significantly improve the performances of this kind of detectors in terms of particle identification capabilities and space resolution. In order to develop refined cluster recognition algorithms, it is essential to measure the response of the chamber and its electronics to single ionization clusters. This can be done by irradiating the chamber with X-rays. We report here on the studies performed on a drift chamber prototype for the MEG-II experiment at the X-ray facility of the INFN Frascati's National Laboratories ``XLab Frascati''. The prototype is operated with a helium-isobutane mixture and instrumented with high bandwidth custom pre-amplifiers. The results of this study have been used to develop an innovative method for cluster recognition, based on the Wiener filter technique, which has been tested on data collected at the Frascati's Beam Test Facility. As a side measurement, we also performed a study of the gas gain in a configuration which is similar to that of the MEG-II experiment.

  3. The Solar Wind Charge-eXchange Contribution to the Local Soft X-ray Background. Model to Data Comparison in the 0.1-1.0 keV Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Lallement, Rosine; Kharchenko, Vasili; Dalgarno, Alex

    2009-03-01

    The major sources of the Soft X-ray Background (SXRB), besides distinct structures as supernovae and superbubbles (e.g. Loop I), are: (i) an absorbed extragalactic emission following a power law, (ii) an absorbed thermal component (˜2×106 K) from the galactic disk and halo, (iii) an unabsorbed thermal component, supposedly at 106 K, attributed to the Local Bubble and (iv) the very recently identified unabsorbed Solar Wind Charge-eXchange (SWCX) emission from the heliosphere and the geocorona. We study the SWCX heliospheric component and its contribution to observed data. In a first part, we apply a SWCX heliospheric simulation to model the oxygen lines (3/4 keV) local intensities during shadowing observations of the MBM 12 molecular cloud and a dense filament in the south galactic hemisphere with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku telescopes. In a second part, we present a preliminary comparison of SWCX model results with ROSAT and Wisconsin surveys data in the 1/4 keV band. We conclude that, in the 3/4 keV band, the total local intensity is entirely heliospheric, while in the 1/4 keV band, the heliospheric component seems to contribute significantly to the local SXRB intensity and has potentially a strong influence on the interpretation of the ROSAT and Wisconsin surveys data in terms of Local Bubble hot gas temperature.

  4. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  5. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  6. On the existence of low-energy photons (<150 keV) in the unflattened x-ray beam from an ordinary radiotherapeutic target in a medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tsechanski, A; Krutman, Y; Faermann, S

    2005-12-07

    Low-energy photons (<150 keV) are essential for obtaining high quality x-ray radiographs. These photons are usually produced in the accelerator target, but are effectively absorbed by the flattening filter and, at least partially, by the target itself. Experimental proof is presented for the existence of low-energy photons in the unflattened x-ray beam produced by a 6 MeV electron beam normally incident on the thinner of the two existing ports of the all-Cu radiotherapeutic target of a Clinac 18 (Varian Associates) linear accelerator. A number of one-shot absorption measurements were carried out with 12 foils of Pb absorbers with thicknesses varying from 0.25 to 3 mm in steps of 0.25 mm arranged symmetrically around the central axis on a 7.2 cm radius circumference. A Kodak ECL film-screen-cassette combination was used as a detector in the absorption measurements, in which optical density was measured as a function of the thickness of the Pb absorbers. Two sets of absorption measurements were carried out: the first one with the Clinac 18 6 MV unflattened beam and the second one with the Clinac 600C 6 MV therapeutic counterpart beam. There is a striking difference between the two sets: the optical density versus Pb-absorber thickness curve shows a sharp increase in optical density at small absorber thicknesses in the case of the unflattened 6 MV x-ray beam as compared with a gently sloping dependence in the case of the 6 MV therapeutic beam. A semi-quantitative assessment of the low-energy photon contribution to the whole optical density/contrast is presented. A 0.85 mm thick Pb absorber intercepting the 6 MV unflattened x-ray beam eliminates almost totally the sharp peak in the optical density curve at small Pb-absorber thicknesses. This constitutes additional evidence for the existence of low-energy photons (<150 keV) in the unflattened 6 MV beam from the Cu therapeutic target.

  7. Cryogenically cooled bent double-Laue monochromator for high-energy undulator X-rays (50-200 keV).

    PubMed

    Shastri, S D; Fezzaa, K; Mashayekhi, A; Lee, W K; Fernandez, P B; Lee, P L

    2002-09-01

    A liquid-nitrogen-cooled monochromator for high-energy X-rays consisting of two bent Si(111) Laue crystals adjusted to sequential Rowland conditions has been in operation for over two years at the SRI-CAT sector 1 undulator beamline of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). It delivers over ten times more flux than a flat-crystal monochromator does at high energies, without any increase in energy width (DeltaE/E approximately 10(-3)). Cryogenic cooling permits optimal flux, avoiding a sacrifice from the often employed alternative technique of filtration - a technique less effective at sources like the 7 GeV APS, where considerable heat loads can be deposited by high-energy photons, especially at closed undulator gaps. The fixed-offset geometry provides a fully tunable in-line monochromatic beam. In addition to presenting the optics performance, unique crystal design and stable bending mechanism for a cryogenically cooled crystal under high heat load, the bending radii adjustment procedures are described.

  8. a New Method for the Growth of CdTe Crystals for RT X-Ray Photon Detectors in the 1-100 keV Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovergine, N.; Mancini, A. M.; Cola, A.; Prete, P.; Mazzer, M.; Quaranta, F.; Tapfer, L.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the growth of thick CdTe layers on ZnTe/(100)GaAs hybrid substrates by the novel H2 transport vapour phase epitaxy (H2T-VPE) method. High crystalline quality (100)-oriented CdTe single crystal epilayers can be fabricated under atmospheric pressure and at growth temperatures (TD) in the 600-800°C interval. Double crystal X-ray diffraction measurements performed on epilayers thicker than 30 μm show CdTe (400) peaks with FWHM<59 arcsec. CdTe samples grown under optimised conditions have mirror-like surfaces. Epilayers grown below 650°C are p-type and low resistive, but they turn n-type above 650°C, likely as a result of donor diffusion from the substrate. RT resistivities (ρ) ~ 106 Ω·cm are obtained for 675°C < TD < 700°C, but ρ decreases for higher temperatures and thinner samples. Layers grown under these conditions show RT electron concentrations in the 1014-1011 cm-3 range. The detection capability of H2T-VPE grown CdTe is demonstrated by the results of time-of-flight measurements performed at RT on Au/n-CdTe/n+-GaAs diode structures under reverse bias conditions.

  9. Transmission images and evaluation of tomographic imaging based scattered radiation from biological materials using 10, 15, 20 and 25 keV synchrotron X-rays: An analysis in terms of optimum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Akatsuka, Takao; Tromba, Giuliana

    2004-05-12

    Transmission images and tomographic imaging based scattered radiation is evaluated from biological materials, for example, Polyethylene, Poly carbonate, Plexiglas and Nylon using 10, 15, 20 and 25 keV synchrotron X-rays. The SYRMEP facility at Elettra,Trieste, Italy and the associated detection system has been used for the image acquisition. The scattered radiation is detected for each sample at three energies at an angle of 90 deg. using Si-Pin detector coupled to a multi-channel analyzer. The contribution of transmitted, Compton and fluorescence photons are assessed for a test phantom of small dimensions. The optimum analysis is performed with the use of the dimensions of the sample and detected radiation at various energies.

  10. Measurement of the mass energy-absorption coefficient of air for x-rays in the range from 3 to 60 keV.

    PubMed

    Buhr, H; Büermann, L; Gerlach, M; Krumrey, M; Rabus, H

    2012-12-21

    For the first time the absolute photon mass energy-absorption coefficient of air in the energy range of 10 to 60 keV has been measured with relative standard uncertainties below 1%, considerably smaller than those of up to 2% assumed for calculated data. For monochromatized synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring BESSY II both the radiant power and the fraction of power deposited in dry air were measured using a cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer and a free air ionization chamber, respectively. The measured absorption coefficients were compared with state-of-the art calculations and showed an average deviation of 2% from calculations by Seltzer. However, they agree within 1% with data calculated earlier by Hubbell. In the course of this work, an improvement of the data analysis of a previous experimental determination of the mass energy-absorption coefficient of air in the range of 3 to 10 keV was found to be possible and corrected values of this preceding study are given.

  11. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of research activities carried out in the area of cosmic X-ray physics is presented. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer DXS which has been flown twice as a rocket payload is described. The observation times proved to be too small for meaningful X-ray data to be obtained. Data collection and reduction activities from the Ultra-Soft X-ray background (UXT) instrument are described. UXT consists of three mechanically-collimated X-ray gas proportional counters with window/filter combinations which allow measurements in three energy bands, Be (80-110 eV), B (90-187 eV), and O (e84-532 eV). The Be band measurements provide an important constraint on local absorption of X-rays from the hot component of the local interstellar medium. Work has also continued on the development of a calorimetric detector for high-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.1 keV - 8keV energy range.

  12. Structure formation in a mixed dark matter model with decaying sterile neutrino: the 3.5 keV X-ray line and the Galactic substructure

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Akira; Kamada, Ayuki E-mail: ayuki.kamada@ucr.edu

    2016-01-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of structure formation in a mixed dark matter (MDM) model. Our model is motivated by the recently identified 3.5 keV X-ray line, which can be explained by the decay of non-resonantly produced sterile neutrinos accounting for 20–60% of the dark matter in the Universe. These non-resonantly produced sterile neutrinos have a sizable free-streaming length and hence behave effectively as warm dark matter (WDM). Assuming the rest of dark matter is composed of some cold dark matter (CDM) particles, we follow the coevolution of a mixed WDM plus CDM cosmology. Specifically, we consider the models with the warm component fraction of r{sub warm}=0.25 and 0.50. Our MDM models predict that the comoving Jeans length at the matter-radiation equality is close to that of the thermally produced warm dark matter model with particle mass m{sub WDM}=2.4 keV, but the suppression in the fluctuation power spectrum is weaker. We perform large N-body simulations to study the structure of non-linear dark halos in the MDM models. The abundance of substructure is significantly reduced in the MDM models, and hence the so-called small-scale crisis is mitigated. The cumulative maximum circular velocity function (CVF) of at least one halo in the MDM models is in good agreement with the CVFs of the observed satellites in the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxy. We argue that the MDM models open an interesting possibility to reconcile the reported 3.5 keV line and the internal structure of galaxies.

  13. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  14. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  15. The 2-79 keV X-ray spectrum of the Circinus galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: a fully Compton-thick active galactic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Puccetti, S.; Walton, D. J.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Madsen, K. K.; Koss, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Madejski, G.; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Circinus galaxy is one of the closest obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), making it an ideal target for detailed study. Combining archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data with new NuSTAR observations, we model the 2-79 keV spectrum to constrain the primary AGN continuum and to derive physical parameters for the obscuring material. Chandra's high angular resolution allows a separation of nuclear and off-nuclear galactic emission. In the off-nuclear diffuse emission, we find signatures of strong cold reflection, including high equivalent-width neutral Fe lines. This Compton-scattered off-nuclear emission amounts to 18% of the nuclear flux in the Fe line region, but becomes comparable to the nuclear emission above 30 keV. The new analysis no longer supports a prominent transmitted AGN component in the observed band. We find that the nuclear spectrum is consistent with Compton scattering by an optically thick torus, where the intrinsic spectrum is a power law of photon index Γ = 2.2-2.4, the torus has an equatorial column density of N {sub H} = (6-10) × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}, and the intrinsic AGN 2-10 keV luminosity is (2.3-5.1) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}. These values place Circinus along the same relations as unobscured AGNs in accretion rate versus Γ and L{sub X} versus L {sub IR} phase space. NuSTAR's high sensitivity and low background allow us to study the short timescale variability of Circinus at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time. The lack of detected variability favors a Compton-thick absorber, in line with the spectral fitting results.

  16. The 2-79 keV X-Ray Spectrum of the Circinus Galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: A Fully Compton-thick Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Puccetti, S.; Walton, D. J.; Koss, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Fuerst, F.; Gandhi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Luo, B.; Madejski, G.; Madsen, K. K.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Saez, C.; Stern, D.; Stuhlinger, M.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-08-01

    The Circinus galaxy is one of the closest obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), making it an ideal target for detailed study. Combining archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data with new NuSTAR observations, we model the 2-79 keV spectrum to constrain the primary AGN continuum and to derive physical parameters for the obscuring material. Chandra's high angular resolution allows a separation of nuclear and off-nuclear galactic emission. In the off-nuclear diffuse emission, we find signatures of strong cold reflection, including high equivalent-width neutral Fe lines. This Compton-scattered off-nuclear emission amounts to 18% of the nuclear flux in the Fe line region, but becomes comparable to the nuclear emission above 30 keV. The new analysis no longer supports a prominent transmitted AGN component in the observed band. We find that the nuclear spectrum is consistent with Compton scattering by an optically thick torus, where the intrinsic spectrum is a power law of photon index Γ = 2.2-2.4, the torus has an equatorial column density of N H = (6-10) × 1024 cm-2, and the intrinsic AGN 2-10 keV luminosity is (2.3-5.1) × 1042 erg s-1. These values place Circinus along the same relations as unobscured AGNs in accretion rate versus Γ and LX versus L IR phase space. NuSTAR's high sensitivity and low background allow us to study the short timescale variability of Circinus at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time. The lack of detected variability favors a Compton-thick absorber, in line with the spectral fitting results.

  17. A new spectroscopic imager for X-rays from 0.5 keV to 150 keV combining a pnCCD and a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, D. M.; Hartmann, R.; Kalok, D.; Bechteler, A.; Abboud, A.; Shokr, M.; Çonka, T.; Pietsch, U.; Strüder, L.

    2017-04-01

    By combining a low noise fully depleted pnCCD detector with a columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator an energy dispersive spatial resolving detector can be realized with a high quantum efficiency in the range from below 0.5 keV to above 150 keV. The used scintillator system increases the pulse height of gamma-rays converted in the CsI(Tl), due to focusing properties of the columnar scintillator structure by reducing the event size in indirect detection mode (conversion in the scintillator). In case of direct detection (conversion in the silicon of the pnCCD) the relative energy resolution is 0.7% at 122 keV (FWHM = 850 eV) and the spatial resolution is less than 75 μm. In case of indirect detection the relative energy resolution, integrated over all event sizes is about 9% at 122 keV with an expected spatial precision of below 75 μm.

  18. Observations and theory of X-rays and gamma-rays from radio-quiet Seyferts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziuarski, A. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment (OSSE) observations of sift gamma-ray emission from radio-quiet Seyfert galaxies as well as their theoretical implications are reviewed. For some Seyferts, the OSSE data can be combined with X-ray data from Ginga and ROSAT. Seyfert 1s have intrinsic power-law spectra with approximately 0.9 extending without a break to at least approximately 200 keV. There is some evidence for a break at higher energies. On top of this intrinsic spectrum there is a Compton reflection component, which corresponds to cold matter covering a approximately 2 pi solid angle as seen by the power-law source. Compton reflection is responsible for a hardening of the spectrum in the approximately 5-30 keV range and a softening at approximately 30-200 keV. This spectrum is then abasorbed by a partially ionized external medium. The spectra of Seyfert 2s are marginally consistent with those of Seyfert 1s modified by strong absorption. However, there are indications that their intrinsic X-ray spectra are harder than those of Seyfert 1s. This is in fact the case for NGC 4151, a Seyfert 1.5. The Seyfert spectra integrated over redshift with cosmological evolution can explain the cosmic X-ray background spectrum from 1 to 100 keV.

  19. X-Ray Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.

    2004-07-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are an exciting addition to the zoo of X-ray sources. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations have detected diffuse X-ray emission from shocked fast winds in PN interiors as well as bow-shocks of fast collimated outflows impinging on the nebular envelope. Point X-ray sources associated with PN central stars are also detected, with the soft X-ray (<0.5 keV) emission originating from the photospheres of stars hotter than ˜100,000 K, and the hard X-ray (≫0.5 keV) emission from instability shocks in the fast stellar wind itself or from a low-mass companion's coronal activity. X-ray observations of PNe offer a unique opportunity to directly examine the dynamic effects of fast stellar winds and collimated outflows, and help us understand the formation and evolution of PNe.

  20. Synchrotron Based X-Ray Strain Mapping in Fatigued Materials Subjected to Overload

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    authors [1-2]. The technique exploits the high intensity/energy white beam (30-200 KeV) x-rays of the X17 wiggler beamline at the Brookhaven National...overload aoL=25. 4 embedded overload, experiments addressed in mm and the curve has been normalized to the pre-overload this report. The red arrows...in the figure are the most deeply depressed and the red regions are the highest. Moreover, the 3-D perspective is also used in the display of the

  1. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, M. V.; Braeuninger, H.; Ondrusch, A.; Predehl, P.

    1982-01-01

    The results of high angular resolution grazing incidence scattering measurements of highly polished, coated optical flats in the X-ray spectral range of 1.5 to 6.4 keV are reported. The interpretation of these results in terms of surface microtopography is presented and the implications for grazing incidence X-ray imaging are discussed.

  2. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  3. Attenuation measurements in the x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varier, K. M.; Unnikrishnan, M. P.

    1986-04-01

    Attenuation coefficients have been measured for aluminum for x rays in the energy region 7-15 keV. The x rays were obtained by proton excitation of copper, tantalum, and lead targets. A new method has been used to extract the attenuation coefficients of the individual components of the copper K x rays and the L x rays of tantalum and lead without necessitating an analysis of the component peaks of the x-ray spectrum for each absorber.

  4. Structure determination from XAFS using high-accuracy measurements of x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of silver, 11 keV-28 keV, and development of an all-energies approach to local dynamical analysis of bond length, revealing variation of effective thermal contributions across the XAFS spectrum.

    PubMed

    Tantau, L J; Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D; Islam, M T; Payne, A T; Rae, N A; Tran, C Q

    2015-07-08

    We use the x-ray extended range technique (XERT) to experimentally determine the mass attenuation coefficient of silver in the x-ray energy range 11 kev-28 kev including the silver K absorption edge. The results are accurate to better than 0.1%, permitting critical tests of atomic and solid state theory. This is one of the most accurate demonstrations of cross-platform accuracy in synchrotron studies thus far. We derive the mass absorption coefficients and the imaginary component of the form factor over this range. We apply conventional XAFS analytic techniques, extended to include error propagation and uncertainty, yielding bond lengths accurate to approximately 0.24% and thermal Debye-Waller parameters accurate to 30%. We then introduce the FDMX technique for accurate analysis of such data across the full XAFS spectrum, built on full-potential theory, yielding a bond length accuracy of order 0.1% and the demonstration that a single Debye parameter is inadequate and inconsistent across the XAFS range. Two effective Debye-Waller parameters are determined: a high-energy value based on the highly-correlated motion of bonded atoms (σ(DW) = 0.1413(21) Å), and an uncorrelated bulk value (σ(DW) = 0.1766(9) Å) in good agreement with that derived from (room-temperature) crystallography.

  5. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  6. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  7. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  8. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  9. Skull x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Radiography of skull, chest, and cervical spine - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  11. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  12. Systematic survey of the dose enhancement in tissue-equivalent materials facing medium- and high-Z backscatterers exposed to X-rays with energies from 5 to 250 keV.

    PubMed

    Seidenbusch, M; Harder, D; Regulla, D

    2014-05-01

    The present study has been inspired by the results of earlier dose measurements in tissue-equivalent materials adjacent to thin foils of aluminum, copper, tin, gold, and lead. Large dose enhancements have been observed in low-Z materials near the interface when this ensemble was irradiated with X-rays of qualities known from diagnostic radiology. The excess doses have been attributed to photo-, Compton, and Auger electrons released from the metal surfaces. Correspondingly, high enhancements of biological effects have been observed in single cell layers arranged close to gold surfaces. The objective of the present work is to systematically survey, by calculation, the values of the dose enhancement in low-Z media facing backscattering materials with a variety of atomic numbers and over a large range of photon energies. Further parameters to be varied are the distance of the point of interest from the interface and the kind of the low-Z material. The voluminous calculations have been performed using the PHOTCOEF algorithm, a proven set of interpolation functions fitted to long-established Monte Carlo results, for primary photon energies between 5 and 250 keV and for atomic numbers varying over the periodic system up to Z = 100. The calculated results correlate well with our previous experimental results. It is shown that the values of the dose enhancement (a) vary strongly in dependence upon Z and photon energy; (b) have maxima in the energy region from 40 to 60 keV, determined by the K and L edges of the backscattering materials; and (c) are valued up to about 130 for "International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) soft tissue" (soft tissue composition recommended by the ICRP) as the adjacent low-Z material. Maximum dose enhancement associated with the L edge occurs for materials with atomic numbers between 50 and 60, e.g., barium (Z = 56) and iodine (Z = 53). Such materials typically serve as contrast media in medical X-ray diagnostics. The gradual

  13. Planetary X-rays: Relationship with solar X-rays and solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, A.

    Recently X-ray flares are observed from the low-latitude disk of giant planets Jupiter and Saturn in the energy range of 0.2-2 keV. These flares are found to occur in tandem with the occurrence of solar X-ray flare, when light travel time delay is accounted. These studies suggest that disk of outer planets Jupiter and Saturn acts as "diffuse mirror" for solar X-rays and that X-rays from these planets can be used to study flaring on the hemisphere of the Sun that in invisible to near-Earth space weather satellites. Also by proper modeling of the observed planetary X-rays the solar soft X-ray flux can be derived. X-ray flares are also observed on the Mars. On the other hand, X-rays from comets are produced mainly in charge exchange interaction between highly ionized heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Thus cometary X-rays provide a diagnostics of the solar wind properties. X-rays from Martian exosphere is also dominantly produced via charge exchange interaction between Martian corona and solar wind, providing proxy for solar wind. This paper provides a brief overview on the X-rays from some of the planets and comets and their connection with solar X-rays and solar wind, and how planetary X-rays can be used to study the Sun.

  14. Characterization and cross calibration of Agfa D4, D7, and D8 and Kodak SR45 x-ray films against direct exposure film at 4.0-5.5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, N.E.; Cowan, J.S.; Workman, J.

    2006-04-15

    Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) [B. L. Henke et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 3, 1540 (1986)] has been the standard for moderate energy (1-10 keV) x-ray diagnostic applications among the high-energy-density and inertial confinement fusion research communities. However, market forces have prompted Kodak to discontinue production of DEF, leaving these specialized communities searching for a replacement. We have conducted cross-calibration experiments and film characterizations on five possible substitutes for Kodak DEF. The film types studied were Kodak's Biomax MR (BMR) and SR45 along with Agfa's D8, D7, and D4sc. None of the films tested matched the speed of DEF. BMR and D8 were closest but D8 exhibited lower noise, with superior resolution and dynamic range. Agfa D7, Agfa D4sc, and Kodak SR45 were significantly less sensitive than BMR and D8, however, the improvements they yielded in resolution and dynamic range warrant their use if experimental constraints allow.

  15. Characterization and cross calibration of Agfa D4, D7, and D8 and Kodak SR45 x-ray films against direct exposure film at 4.0-5.5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, N. E.; Cowan, J. S.; Workman, J.

    2006-04-01

    Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) [B. L. Henke et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 3, 1540 (1986)] has been the standard for moderate energy (1-10keV) x-ray diagnostic applications among the high-energy-density and inertial confinement fusion research communities. However, market forces have prompted Kodak to discontinue production of DEF, leaving these specialized communities searching for a replacement. We have conducted cross-calibration experiments and film characterizations on five possible substitutes for Kodak DEF. The film types studied were Kodak's Biomax MR (BMR) and SR45 along with Agfa's D8, D7, and D4sc. None of the films tested matched the speed of DEF. BMR and D8 were closest but D8 exhibited lower noise, with superior resolution and dynamic range. Agfa D7, Agfa D4sc, and Kodak SR45 were significantly less sensitive than BMR and D8, however, the improvements they yielded in resolution and dynamic range warrant their use if experimental constraints allow.

  16. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  17. The protoMIRAX hard X-ray imaging balloon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, João; D'Amico, Flavio; Avila, Manuel A. C.; Penacchioni, Ana V.; Rodrigo Sacahui, J.; de Santiago, Valdivino A.; Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Strauss, Cesar; Fialho, Márcio A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The protoMIRAX hard X-ray imaging telescope is a balloon-borne experiment developed as a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a coded-aperture hard X-ray (30-200 keV) imager with a square array (13 × 13) of 2 mm-thick planar CZT detectors with a total area of 169 cm2. The total, fully-coded field-of-view is 21° × 21° and the angular resolution is 1°43'. Aims: The main objective of protoMIRAX is to carry out imaging spectroscopy of selected bright sources to demonstrate the performance of a prototype of the MIRAX hard X-ray imager. In this paper we describe the protoMIRAX instrument and all the subsystems of its balloon gondola, and we show simulated results of the instrument performance. Methods: Detailed background and imaging simulations were performed for protoMIRAX balloon flights. The 3σ sensitivity for the 30-200 keV range is ~1.9 × 10-5 photons cm-2 s-1 for an integration time of 8 h at an atmospheric depth of 2.7 g cm-2 and an average zenith angle of 30°. We developed an attitude-control system for the balloon gondola and new data handling and ground systems that also include prototypes for the MIRAX satellite. Results: We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the camera response at balloon altitudes, showing the expected background level and the detailed sensitivity of protoMIRAX. We also present the results of imaging simulations of the Crab region. Conclusions: The results show that protoMIRAX is capable of making spectral and imaging observations of bright hard X-ray source fields. Furthermore, the balloon observations will carry out very important tests and demonstrations of MIRAX hardware and software in a near space environment.

  18. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  19. The SMC SNR 1E0102.2-7219 as a calibration standard for X-ray astronomy in the 0.3 - 2.5 keV bandpass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, P.

    2009-09-01

    The flight calibration of the spectral response of CCD instruments below 1.5 keV is difficult in general because of the lack of strong lines in the on-board calibration sources typically available. We have been using E0102, the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to evaluate the response models of the ACIS CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), the EPIC CCDs on the XMM-Newton Observatory, the XIS CCDs on the Suzaku Observatory, and the XRT CCD on the Swift Observatory. E0102 has strong lines of O, Ne, and Mg below 1.5 keV and little or no Fe emission to complicate the spectrum. The spectrum of E0102 has been well characterized using high-resolution grating instruments, namely the XMM-Newton RGS and the CXO HETG, through which a consistent spectral model has been developed that can then be used to fit the lower- resolution CCD spectra. Fits with this model are sensitive to any problems with the gain calibration and the spectral redistribution model of the CCD instruments. We have also used the measured intensities of the lines to investigate the consistency of the effective area models for the various instruments around the bright O (570 eV and 654 eV) and Ne (910 eV and 1022 eV) lines. We find that the measured fluxes of the O VII triplet, the O VIII Ly-a line, the Ne IX triplet, and the Ne X Ly-a line generally agree to within +/-10% for all instruments, with 28 of our 32 fitted normalizations within +/-10% of the RGS-determined value. The maximum discrepancies, computed as the percentage difference between the lowest and highest normalization for any instrument pair, are 23% for the O VII triplet, 24% for the O VIII Ly-a line, 13% for the Ne IX triplet, and 19% for the Ne X Ly-a line. If only the CXO and XMM are compared, the maximum discrepancies are 22% for the O VII triplet, 16% for the O VIII Ly-a line, 4% for the Ne IX triplet, and 12% for the Ne X Ly-a line.

  20. The SMC SNR 1E0102.2-7219 as a calibration standard for x-ray astronomy in the 0.3-2.5 keV bandpass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Haberl, Frank; Dewey, Daniel; Beardmore, Andrew P.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Godet, Olivier; Grinberg, Victoria; Miller, Eric D.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Sembay, Steven; Smith, Randall K.

    2008-07-01

    The flight calibration of the spectral response of CCD instruments below 1.5 keV is difficult in general because of the lack of strong lines in the on-board calibration sources typically available. We have been using E0102, the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to evaluate the response models of the ACIS CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), the EPIC CCDs on the XMM-Newton Observatory, the XIS CCDs on the Suzaku Observatory, and the XRT CCD on the Swift Observatory. E0102 has strong lines of O, Ne, and Mg below 1.5 keV and little or no Fe emission to complicate the spectrum. The spectrum of E0102 has been well characterized using high-resolution grating instruments, namely the XMM-Newton RGS and the CXO HETG, through which a consistent spectral model has been developed that can then be used to fit the lower-resolution CCD spectra. Fits with this model are sensitive to any problems with the gain calibration and the spectral redistribution model of the CCD instruments. We have also used the measured intensities of the lines to investigate the consistency of the effective area models for the various instruments around the bright O (570 eV and 654 eV) and Ne (910 eV and 1022 eV) lines. We find that the measured fluxes of the O VII triplet, the O VIII Ly-a line, the Ne IX triplet, and the Ne X Ly-a line generally agree to within +/-10% for all instruments, with 28 of our 32 fitted normalizations within +/-10% of the RGS-determined value. The maximum discrepancies, computed as the percentage difference between the lowest and highest normalization for any instrument pair, are 23% for the O VII triplet, 24% for the O VIII Ly-a line, 13% for the Ne IX~triplet, and 19% for the Ne X Ly-a line. If only the CXO and XMM are compared, the maximum discrepancies are 22% for the O VII triplet, 16% for the O VIII Ly-a line, 4% for the Ne IX triplet, and 12% for the Ne X Ly-a line.

  1. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R. F.; VanSpeybroeck, L. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is the x-ray component of NASA's Great Observatories. To be launched in late 1998, AXAF will provide unprecedented capabilities for high-resolution imaging, spectrometric imaging, and high-resolution disperse spectroscopy, over the x-ray band from about 0.1 keV to 10 keV. With these capabilities, AXAF observations will address many of the outstanding questions in astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  2. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... not being scanned. Alternative Names X-ray - bone Images Skeleton Skeletal spine Osteogenic sarcoma - x-ray References ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  3. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  4. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  5. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  6. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... image. For most x-rays, the risk of cancer or defects is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray ... Geleijns J, Tack D. Medical physics: radiation risks. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard ...

  7. X-Ray Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Radiographic Image Acquisition & Processing Software for Security Markets. Used in operation of commercial x-ray scanners and manipulation of x-ray images for emergency responders including State, Local, Federal, and US Military bomb technicians and analysts.

  8. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  9. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  10. Preliminary designs for X-ray source modifications for the Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray calibration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop preliminary designs for modifications to the X-ray source of the MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Recommendations are made regarding: (1) the production of an unpolarized X-ray beam, (2) modification of the source to provide characteristic X-rays with energies up to 40 keV, and (3) addition of the capability to calibrate instruments in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region.

  11. A hybrid X-ray imaging spectrometer for NeXT and the next generation X-ray satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuru, T. G.; Tanimori, T.; Bamba, A.; Imanishi, K.; Koyama, K.; Kubo, H.; Matsumoto, H.; Miuchi, K.; Nagayoshi, M.; Orito, R.; Takada, A.; Takagi, S.; Tsujimoto, M.; Ueno, M.; Tsunemi, H.; Hayashida, K.; Miyata, E.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new type of wide band X-ray imaging spectrometer as a focal plane detector of the super mirror onboard on future X-ray missions including post Astro-E2. This camera is realized by the hybrid of back illumination CCDs and a back supportless CCD for 0.05-10 keV band, and a Micro Pixel Gas Chamber detecting X-rays at 10-80 keV.

  12. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  13. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  14. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R.

    2014-07-01

    We make a new determination of the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of relative low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources based on a source sample derived from the XMM Slew Survey (XSS). The source population is comprised of coronally-active late-type stars and binaries with hard-band X-ray luminosities in the range 10^{28-32} erg s^{-1} and cataclysmic variables (magnetic and non-magnetic) with X-ray luminosities spanning the range 10^{30-34} erg s^{-1}. We use this new estimate of the XLF, to predict the 2-10 keV X-ray source counts on the Galactic Plane at faint fluxes and show that the result is fully consistent with the available observational constraints. Similarly the predicted surface brightness, both in the full 2-10 keV band and in a restricted 6-10 keV bandpass, due to the integrated emission of faint unresolved Galactic sources, is well matched to the observed intensity of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We find that the coronally-active sources make the dominant contribution to both the faint Galactic X-ray source counts and the GRXE.

  15. Quasar x-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein satellite is used to re-examine the relationship between the soft (0.2-3.5 keV) X-ray energy index and radio-loudness. We found the following: (1) the tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray slopes than radio-quiet quasars (RQQ's) is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect; (2) there is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core-dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed; (3) for the RQQ's the soft X-ray slopes, with a mean of approximately 1.0, are consistent with the slopes found at higher energies (2-10 keV) although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies (also 2-10 keV) where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data; (4) the correlation of FeII emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 quasars. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and the line emission from the broad emission line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models; and (5) the correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and FeII equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-classes respectively imply that the observed wide range of X-ray spectral slopes is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  16. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  17. Diffractive Imaging Using Partially Coherent X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, L. W.; Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Vine, D. J.; Dilanian, R. A.; Flewett, S.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Balaur, E.; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-11

    The measured spatial coherence characteristics of the illumination used in a diffractive imaging experiment are incorporated in an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental x-ray diffraction data using 1.4 keV x rays. Conventional coherent diffractive imaging, which assumes full spatial coherence, is a limiting case of our approach. Even in cases in which the deviation from full spatial coherence is small, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of wave field reconstructions. Our formulation is applicable to x-ray and electron diffraction imaging techniques provided that the spatial coherence properties of the illumination are known or can be measured.

  18. GEMS X-ray Polarimeter Performance Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Strohmayer, Tod; Kallman, Tim; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) is an X-ray polarization telescope selected as a NASA small explorer satellite mission. The X-ray Polarimeter on GEMS uses a Time Projection Chamber gas proportional counter to measure the polarization of astrophysical X-rays in the 2-10 keV band by sensing the direction of the track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray. We have simulated the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter to polarized X-rays. We use the simulation package Penelope to model the physics of the interaction of the initial photoelectron with the detector gas and to determine the distribution of charge deposited in the detector volume. We then model the charge diffusion in the detector,and produce simulated track images. Within the track reconstruction algorithm we apply cuts on the track shape and focus on the initial photoelectron direction in order to maximize the overall sensitivity of the instrument, using this technique we have predicted instrument modulation factors nu(sub 100) for 100% polarized X-rays ranging from 10% to over 60% across the 2-10 keV X-ray band. We also discuss the simulation program used to develop and model some of the algorithms used for triggering, and energy measurement of events in the polarimeter.

  19. X-ray imaging with compound refractive lens and microfocus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, Ladislav; Dudchik, Yury; Jelinek, Vaclav; Sveda, Libor; Marsik, Jiri; Horvath, Martin; Petr, Ondrej

    2008-08-01

    Compound refractive lenses (CRL), consisting of a lot number in-line concave microlenses made of low-Z material were studied. Lenses with focal length 109 mm and 41 mm for 8-keV X-rays, microfocus X-ray tube and X-ray CCD camera were used in experiments. Obtained images show intensity distribution of magnified microfocus X-ray source focal spot. Within the experiments, one lens was also used as an objective lens of the X-ray microscope, where the copper anode X-ray microfocus tube served as a source. Magnified images of gold mesh with 5 microns bars were obtained. Theoretical limits of CRL and experimental results are discussed.

  20. Indus-2 X-ray lithography beamline for X-ray optics and material science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dhamgaye, V. P. Lodha, G. S.

    2014-04-24

    X-ray lithography is an ideal technique by which high aspect ratio and high spatial resolution micro/nano structures are fabricated using X-rays from synchrotron radiation source. The technique has been used for fabricating optics (X-ray, visible and infrared), sensors and actuators, fluidics and photonics. A beamline for X-ray lithography is operational on Indus-2. The beamline offers wide lithographic window from 1-40keV photon energy and wide beam for producing microstructures in polymers upto size ∼100mm × 100mm. X-ray exposures are possible in air, vacuum and He gas environment. The air based exposures enables the X-ray irradiation of resist for lithography and also irradiation of biological and liquid samples.

  1. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Tomokazu Hirano, Tomohiko Suyama, Motohiro

    2016-01-28

    We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.

  2. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  3. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Alan Hap

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  4. Imaging plates calibration to X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, A.; Andreoli, P.; Cipriani, M.; Claps, G.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; De Angelis, R.; Giulietti, D.; Ingenito, F.; Pacella, D.

    2016-05-01

    The growing interest for the Imaging Plates, due to their high sensitivity range and versatility, has induced, in the last years, to detailed characterizations of their response function in different energy ranges and kind of radiation/particles. A calibration of the Imaging Plates BAS-MS, BAS-SR, BAS-TR has been performed at the ENEA-Frascati labs by exploiting the X-ray fluorescence of different targets (Ca, Cu, Pb, Mo, I, Ta) and the radioactivity of a BaCs source, in order to cover the X-ray range between few keV to 80 keV.

  5. The intrinsic collective X-ray spectrum of luminous high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, S.; Khabibullin, I.

    2017-06-01

    Using a sample of 200 luminous (LX, unabs > 1038 erg s-1, where LX, unabs is the unabsorbed 0.25-8 keV luminosity) high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) candidates found with Chandra in 27 nearby galaxies, we have constructed the collective X-ray spectrum of HMXBs in the local Universe per unit star formation rate, corrected for observational biases associated with intrinsic diversity of HMXB spectra and X-ray absorption in the interstellar medium. This spectrum is well fit by a power law with a photon index Γ = 2.1 ± 0.1 and is dominated by ultraluminous X-ray sources with LX, unabs > 1039 erg s-1. Hard sources (those with the 0.25-2 to 0.25-8 keV flux ratio of <0.6) dominate above ˜2 keV, while soft and supersoft sources (with the flux ratios of 0.6-0.95 and >0.95, respectively) at lower energies. The derived spectrum probably represents the angle-integrated X-ray emission of the near- and supercritically accreting stellar mass black holes and neutron stars in the local Universe. It provides an important constraint on supercritical accretion models and can be used as a reference spectrum for calculations of the X-ray preheating of the Universe by the first generations of X-ray binaries.

  6. X-ray spectroscopy for chemistry in the 2-4 keV energy regime at the XMaS beamline: ionic liquids, Rh and Pd catalysts in gas and liquid environments, and Cl contamination in γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul B J; Nguyen, Bao N; Nicholls, Rachel; Bourne, Richard A; Brazier, John B; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Brown, Simon D; Wermeille, Didier; Bikondoa, Oier; Lucas, Christopher A; Hase, Thomas P A; Newton, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    The 2-4 keV energy range provides a rich window into many facets of materials science and chemistry. Within this window, P, S, Cl, K and Ca K-edges may be found along with the L-edges of industrially important elements from Y through to Sn. Yet, compared with those that cater for energies above ca. 4-5 keV, there are relatively few resources available for X-ray spectroscopy below these energies. In addition, in situ or operando studies become to varying degrees more challenging than at higher X-ray energies due to restrictions imposed by the lower energies of the X-rays upon the design and construction of appropriate sample environments. The XMaS beamline at the ESRF has recently made efforts to extend its operational energy range to include this softer end of the X-ray spectrum. In this report the resulting performance of this resource for X-ray spectroscopy is detailed with specific attention drawn to: understanding electrostatic and charge transfer effects at the S K-edge in ionic liquids; quantification of dilution limits at the Cl K- and Rh L3-edges and structural equilibria in solution; in vacuum deposition and reduction of [Rh(I)(CO)2Cl]2 to γ-Al2O3; contamination of γ-Al2O3 by Cl and its potential role in determining the chemical character of supported Rh catalysts; and the development of chlorinated Pd catalysts in `green' solvent systems. Sample environments thus far developed are also presented, characterized and their overall performance evaluated.

  7. Curved focusing crystals for hard X-ray astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, C. Buffagni, E.; Bonnini, E.; Korytar, D.

    2013-12-15

    A lens made by a properly arranged array of crystals can be used to focus x-rays of energy ranging from 30 to 500 keV for x-ray astronomy. Mosaic or curved crystals can be employed as x-ray optical elements. In this work self standing curved focusing Si and GaAs crystals in which the lattice bending is induced by a controlled damaging process on one side of planar crystals are characterized. Diffraction profiles in Laue geometry have been measured in crystals at x-ray energies E = 17, 59 and 120 keV. An enhancement of diffraction efficiency is found in asymmetric geometries.

  8. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  9. X-Ray Monitoring of GRBs with Lobster Eye Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sveda, L.; Pina, L.; Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Pizzichini, G.

    2004-09-28

    We present here the soft X-ray All-Sky Monitor (ASM). It is based on the current technological capabilities, sensitive in the {approx} 0.1 - 10.0 keV range with angular resolution of {approx} 3 - 4 arcmin, and has a limiting detectable flux {approx} 10-12 erg/s/cm2 for daily scans in the mentioned energy range. The ASM will play a key role in studying transient X-ray sources like XRBs, GRBs, XRFs, X-ray novae, as well as in the study of the long term variability of X-ray sources like XRBs, AGN, or stellar X-ray flares.

  10. X-Ray Background from Early Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What impact did X-rays from the first binary star systems have on the universe around them? A new study suggests this radiation may have played an important role during the reionization of our universe.Ionizing the UniverseDuring the period of reionization, the universe reverted from being neutral (as it was during recombination, the previous period)to once again being ionized plasma a state it has remained in since then. This transition, which occurred between 150 million and one billion years after the Big Bang (redshift of 6 z 20), was caused by the formation of the first objects energetic enough to reionize the universes neutral hydrogen.ROSAT image of the soft X-ray background throughout the universe. The different colors represent different energy bands: 0.25 keV (red), 0.75 keV (green), 1.5 keV (blue). [NASA/ROSAT Project]Understanding this time period in particular, determining what sources caused the reionization, and what the properties were of the gas strewn throughout the universe during this time is necessary for us to be able to correctly interpret cosmological observations.Conveniently, the universe has provided us with an interesting clue: the large-scale, diffuse X-ray background we observe all around us. What produced these X-rays, and what impact did this radiation have on the intergalactic medium long ago?The First BinariesA team of scientists led by Hao Xu (UC San Diego) has suggested that the very first generation of stars might be an important contributor to these X-rays.This hypothetical first generation, Population III stars, are thought to have formed before and during reionization from large clouds of gas containing virtually no metals. Studies suggest that a large fraction of Pop III stars formed in binaries and when those stars ended their lives as black holes, ensuing accretion from their companions could produceX-ray radiation.The evolution with redshift of the mean X-ray background intensities. Each curve represents a different

  11. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  12. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    2011-09-01

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

  13. Fan-beam monochromatic x-ray CT using fluorescent x rays excited by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyofuku, Fukai; Tokumori, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Ohki, Masafumi; Cho, Tetsuji; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Uyama, Chikao

    1999-10-01

    Monochromatic x-ray CT has several advantages over conventional CT, which utilizes bremsstrahlung white x-rays from an x-ray tube. Although various types of monochromatic x-ray CT systems using synchrotron radiation have been developed using a parallel x-ray beam for imaging of small samples with a high spatial resolution, imaging of large objects such as the human body have not been developed yet. We have developed a fan-beam monochromatic x-ray CT using fluorescent x-rays generated by irradiating metal targets by synchrotron radiation. A CdTe linear array detector of 512 mm sensitive width was used in the photon counting mode. We made phantom experiments using fluorescent x-rays ranging from 32 to 75 keV. Monochromatic x-ray CT images of a cylindrical lucite phantom filled with several contrast media have been obtained. Measured CT numbers are compared with linear attenuation coefficients, and they showed a good linearity over a wide range of contrast media concentrations.

  14. Towards brilliant, compact x-ray sources: a new x-ray photonic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Brian; Mandal, Sudeep; Salisbury, Joshua; Edic, Peter; Hopkins, Forrest; Lee, Susanne M.

    2017-05-01

    General Electric has designed an innovative x-ray photonic device that concentrates a polychromatic beam of diverging x-rays into a less divergent, parallel, or focused x-ray beam. The device consists of multiple, thin film multilayer stacks. X-rays incident on a given multilayer stack propagate within a high refractive index transmission layer while undergoing multiple total internal reflections from a novel, engineered multilayer containing materials of lower refractive index. Development of this device could lead to order-of-magnitude flux density increases, over a large broadband energy range from below 20 keV to above 300 keV. In this paper, we give an overview of the device and present GE's progress towards fabricating prototype devices.

  15. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  16. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  17. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  18. X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gray. For some types of X-ray tests, a contrast medium — such as iodine or barium — is introduced into your body to provide greater detail on the images. X-ray technology is used to examine many parts of the ...

  19. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, it is called a KUB (kidneys, ureters, bladder) x-ray.

  20. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  1. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a source that surveys the fundamentals of x-ray lasers and summarizes recent advances. The author emphasizes x-ray lasers created using high temperature plasmas as the medium. Specific topics discussed included electron-collisional excitation pumping, plasma laser pumping, and gamma-ray lasers. Numerous literature references provided.

  2. X-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to-guide for specialists. It provides comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. The book collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development.

  3. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  4. X-ray Optics Development at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Dharma P.

    2017-01-01

    Development of high resolution focusing telescopes has led to a tremendous leap in sensitivity, revolutionizing observational X-ray astronomy. High sensitivity and high spatial resolution X-ray observations have been possible due to use of grazing incidence optics (paraboloid/hyperboloid) coupled with high spatial resolution and high efficiency detectors/imagers. The best X-ray telescope flown so far is mounted onboard Chandra observatory launched on July 23,1999. The telescope has a spatial resolution of 0.5 arc seconds with compatible imaging instruments in the energy range of 0.1 to 10 keV. The Chandra observatory has been responsible for a large number of discoveries and has provided X-ray insights on a large number of celestial objects including stars, supernova remnants, pulsars, magnetars, black holes, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, clusters and our own solar system.

  5. X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, L.; Burrows, D.; Cash, W.; Cerna, D.; Gorenstein, P.; Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Jakubek, J.; Marsikova, V.; Sieger, L.; Tichy, V.

    2014-09-01

    This work addresses the issue of X-ray monitoring for astrophysical applications. The proposed wide-field optical system has not been used in space yet. The proposed novel approach is based on the use of 1D "Lobster eye" optics in combination with Timepix X-ray detector in the energy range 3 - 40 keV. The proposed project includes theoretical study and a functional sample of the Timepix X-ray detector with multifoil wide-field X-ray "Lobster eye" optics. Using optics to focus X-rays on a detector is the only solution in cases the intensity of impinging X-ray radiation is below the sensitivity of the detector, e.g. while monitoring astrophysical objects in space, or phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere. The optical system could be used in a student rocket experiment at University of Colorado. Ideal opportunity is to extend the CubeSat of Pennsylvania State University with the hard X-ray telescope demonstrator consisting of an optical module and Timepix detector.

  6. X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, T.

    In spite of the recent advances in X-ray instrumentation, polarimetry remains an area which has been virtually unexplored in the last 20 years. The scientific motivation to study polarization has increased during this time: emission models designed to repro- duce X-ray spectra can be tested using polarization, and polarization detected in other wavelength bands makes clear predictions as to the X-ray polarization. Polarization remains the only way to infer geometrical properties of sources which are too small to be spatially resolved. At the same time, there has been recent progress in instrumen- tation which is likely to allow searches for X-ray polarization at levels significantly below what was possible for early detectors. In this talk I will review the history of X-ray polarimetry, discuss some experimental techniques and the scientific problems which can be addressed by future experiments.

  7. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  8. Bone cartilage imaging with x-ray interferometry using a practical x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Makifuchi, Chiho; Kiyohara, Junko; Itou, Tsukasa; Honda, Chika; Momose, Atsushi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer for the imaging of bone cartilage using a practical X-ray tube and to develop that imaging system for clinical use. Wave-optics simulation was performed to design the interferometer with a practical X-ray tube, a source grating, two X-ray gratings, and an X-ray detector. An imaging system was created based on the results of the simulation. The specifications were as follows: the focal spot size was 0.3 mm of an X-ray tube with a tungsten anode (Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). The tube voltage was set at 40 kVp with an additive aluminum filter, and the mean energy was 31 keV. The pixel size of the X-ray detector, a Condor 486 (Fairchild Imaging, California, USA), was 15 μm. The second grating was a Ronchi-type grating whose pitch was 5.3 μm. Imaging performance of the system was examined with X-ray doses of 0.5, 3 and 9 mGy so that the bone cartilage of a chicken wing was clearly depicted with X-ray doses of 3 and 9 mGy. This was consistent with the simulation's predictions. The results suggest that X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry would be a promising tool in detecting soft tissues in the human body such as bone cartilage for the X-ray image diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further optimization of the system will follow to reduce the X-ray dose for clinical use.

  9. Comparative study of the X-ray reflectivity and in-depth profile of a-C, B₄C and Ni coatings at 0.1-2 keV.

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikov, I V; Filatova, E O; Sokolov, A A; Konashuk, A S; Siewert, F; Störmer, M; Gaudin, J; Keitel, B; Samoylova, L; Sinn, H

    2015-03-01

    The use of soft X-rays near the carbon edge of absorption (270-300 eV) greatly enhances studies in various branches of science. However, the choice of reflecting coatings for mirrors operating in free-electron and X-ray free-electron laser (FEL and XFEL) beamlines in this spectral range is not so evident and experimental justifications of the mirror efficiency are rather limited. In the present paper it is demonstrated experimentally that the reflectivity of B4C- and Ni-coated grazing-incidence mirrors is high enough for their operation in FEL or XFEL beamlines near the carbon K-edge of absorption. The minimal reflectivity of both mirrors proves to exceed 80% near the carbon absorption edge at a grazing angle of 0.6°. An in-depth profile of the chemical elements composing the reflecting coatings is reconstructed based on analysis of a set of reflectivity curves measured versus the grazing angle at different photon energies in the soft X-ray spectral region. This allows us to predict correctly the mirror reflectivity at any X-ray energy and any grazing angle.

  10. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Bionta, Richard M.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Skulina, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  11. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  12. Hard X-ray Emission from White Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Hot white dwarfs may exhibit photospheric emission at X-ray wavelengths, but their X- ray emission should be soft, mutch less than 0.5 keV. Hard X-ray emission, at approx. 1 keV, is not expected from white dwarfs, unless they are in binary systems and the hard X-ray emission is produced by a late-type companion's coronal activity or by accretion of a companion's material onto the surface of the white dwarf. We proposed to use the ROSAT archive to search for hard X-ray emission from white dwarfs in order to determine whether hard X-ray emission may provide a sensitive diagnostic for the existence of a binary companion.

  13. Different X-ray spectral evolution for black hole X-ray binaries in dual tracks of radio-X-ray correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Wu, Qingwen; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-06-10

    Recently, an 'outlier' track of radio-X-ray correlation was found, which is much steeper than the former universal correlation, where dual tracks were speculated to be triggered by different accretion processes. In this work, we test this issue by exploring hard X-ray spectral evolution in four black-hole X-ray binaries with multiple, quasi-simultaneous radio and X-ray observations. First, we find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are negatively and positively correlated with X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F{sub 3-9} {sub keV}, is below and above a critical flux, F{sub X,} {sub crit}, which are consistent with predictions of the advection-dominated accretion flow and the disk-corona model, respectively. Second, and most importantly, we find that the radio-X-ray correlations are also clearly different when the X-ray fluxes are higher and lower than the critical flux as defined by X-ray spectral evolution. The data points with F{sub 3-9} {sub keV} ≳ F{sub X,} {sub crit} have a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (F{sub X}∝F{sub R}{sup b} and b ∼ 1.1-1.4), which roughly forms the ''outlier'' track. However, the data points with anti-correlation of Γ – F{sub 3-9} {sub keV} either stay in the universal track with b ∼ 0.61 or stay in the transition track (from the universal to 'outlier' tracks or vice versa). Therefore, our results support that the universal and ''outlier'' tracks of radio-X-ray correlations are regulated by radiatively inefficient and radiatively efficient accretion model, respectively.

  14. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  15. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  16. OSO-8 X-ray observations of AM Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; Lampton, M.; Boldt, E.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations of the binary system AM Her were coincident with soft X-ray and ground-based optical measurements. In the 2-60 KeV band, variability was detected with an eclipse during phases 0.5 to 0.7 with respect to the 0. d 12892 period optical minima, synchronous with the known soft X-ray eclipse. The 2-60 KeV uneclipsed flux was 9.5 x 10 to the minus 10th power erg sq cm/sec, of which 86% lies above 10 keV. Thus AM Her contains a hard source located near the similarly eclipsed soft X-ray source. The X-ray data are interpreted in terms of thermal bremsstrahlung from accretion onto a white dwarf.

  17. Research of nested X-ray concentrator for future X-ray timing astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Lizhi; Zhao, Baosheng; Qiang, Pengfei; Liu, Duo

    2017-02-01

    X-ray grazing incidence optics are widely used in X-ray astronomy, especially for imaging payloads Wolter optics are the most workhorse. However, as there are two cascaded mirrors in Wolter type, the efficiency is quite low after two reflections. In this paper a kind of nested conical concentrator is developed with only one reflection to concentrate the X-ray photons and obtain the timing information. The mirror length is 200mm, the mirror foils cover from 38.8 to 100mm in diameter. D263T glass of 0.3mm thickness is used as mirror substrate with Iridium film deposited in order to improve the X-ray reflection. The D263T glass is slumped at 580°C with precisely machined and polished mold. 3D printed resin serves as upper mold for glass cutting. The quality of mirror substrate is mainly determined by the surface of forming mandrel. As the surface roughness is quite important for X-ray reflection, after deposition it is tested with interferometer and AFM, and the roughness is 0.6nm. Mirror integration based on visible light is built, and the conical mirrors are assembled and adjusted by real time monitoring for the focal point of visible light. With the monochromic X-ray source, the concentrator efficiency is tested as 38%@1.49keV, 20%@4.51keV. The focal point is Φ8.2mm in Xray, with 80% of its energy encircled in a 4mm width. This kind of X-ray concentrator could be used in X-ray navigation, X-ray communication and other X-ray timing astronomy.

  18. Direct x-ray sensing CCD array for intraoral dental x-ray imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John D.; Williams, Donald W.; Langford, D. S.

    1994-05-01

    A commercial prototype electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array has been developed. Image quality parameters were measured using x-ray sources at the National Institute of Standard and Technology radiation physical department in Gaithersburg, MD. Detector response to x-rays in the 10 to 70 keV energy range was measured. The beam hardening effects of human anatomy on a typical 70 kVp spectra was measured using a tissue-equivalent dental phantom.

  19. Hard x-ray nanoprobe based on refractive x-ray lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroer, C.G.; Kurapova, O.; Patommel, J.; Boye, P.; Feldkamp, J.; Lengeler, B.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, C.; Vincze, L.; Hart, A. van der; Kuechler, M.

    2005-09-19

    Based on nanofocusing refractive x-ray lenses a hard x-ray scanning microscope is currently being developed and is being implemented at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). It can be operated in transmission, fluorescence, and diffraction mode. Tomographic scanning allows one to determine the inner structure of a specimen. In this device, a monochromatic (E=21 keV) hard x-ray nanobeam with a lateral extension of 47x55 nm{sup 2} was generated. Further reduction of the beam size to below 20 nm is targeted.

  20. The X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation in radiatively efficient black-hole sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ai-Jun; Wu, Qingwen; Cao, Xiao-Feng

    2016-02-01

    We explore X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation simultaneously for four X-ray binaries (XRBs). We find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are anti- and positively correlated to X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F 3-9keV, is below and above a critical flux, F X,crit, which may be regulated by ADAF and disk-corona respectively. We find that the data points with anti-correlation of Γ-F 3-9keV follow the universal radio-X-ray correlation of F R ~ F X b (b ~ 0.5-0.7), while the data points with positive X-ray spectral evolution follow a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (b ~ 1.4, the so-called `outliers track'). The bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) share similar X-ray spectral evolution and radio-X-ray correlation as XRBs in `outliers' track, and we present a new fundamental plane of log L R=1.59+0.28 -0.22 log L X-0.22+0.19 -0.20 log M BH-28.97+0.45 -0.45 for these radiatively efficient BH sources.

  1. X-Ray Streak Camera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaanimagi, Paul Ants

    extraction field of over 8.5kV/cm using an open wire grid, demagnified electron optics and compact size. Moreover the tube used the target chamber vacuum eliminating sealing problems. The Au photocathode sensitivity was investigated over a range of thicknesses of 100(ANGSTROM) to 4000(ANGSTROM) for x-rays in the 1 -10keV range. Furthermore a 1200(ANGSTROM) thick CsI photocathode was found to be about 10 times more sensitive than the optimum 100(ANGSTROM) Au for the photocathode material. Time-resolving the x-ray emission from the high temperature and density conditions present in nanosecond CO(,2) laser produced plasmas has proven to be a valuable diagnostic. The x-ray streak camera in conjunction with a set of absorbing foil filters was used to infer the time history of the electron temperature in the plasma. Imaging the x-ray emission onto the photocathode permitted direct observation of the dynamics of the plasma. Plasma expansion velocities from the front of flat targets were measured. The presence of an annular x-ray emitting region which expands away from the focal region with a velocity up to 10('9) cm/s was observed. This region exhibits laser polarization dependent asymmetry and it is postulated that it is formed by a return current of fast electrons bombarding the front of the target.

  2. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  3. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  4. Computer-controlled Cauchois-type x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, J. M.; Kefi, M.; Avila, A.; Couillaux, P.; Bonnelle, C.

    1987-03-01

    A laboratory x-ray spectrometer designed for routine analysis in the 15-60-keV spectral range is described. It consists of a 40-cm bent-crystal transmission spectrometer in the Cauchois geometry, controlled by a microcomputer. The choice of the crystal analyzer and of the detection system is discussed. The instrument is well suited for large spectral range x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy (XAS, XES) and x-ray source diagnostics.

  5. Chandra X-Ray Sources in the LALA Cetus Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Zheng, Z. Y.; Malhotra, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Norman, C. A.; Heckman, T. M.

    2007-11-01

    The 174 ks Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer exposure of the Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey (LALA) Cetus field is the second of the two deep Chandra images on LALA fields. In this paper we present the Chandra X-ray sources detected in the Cetus field, along with an analysis of X-ray source counts, stacked X-ray spectrum, and optical identifications. A total of 188 X-ray sources were detected: 174 in the 0.5-7.0 keV band, 154 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band, and 113 in the 2.0-7.0 keV band. The X-ray source counts were derived and compared with LALA field (172 ks exposure). Interestingly, we find consistent hard-band X-ray source density, but (36+/-12)% higher soft-band X-ray source density in Cetus field. The weighted stacked spectrum of the detected X-ray sources can be fitted by a power law with photon index Γ=1.55. Based on the weighted stacked spectrum, we find that the resolved fraction of the X-ray background drops from (72+/-1)% at 0.5-1.0 keV to (63+/-4)% at 6.0-8.0 keV. The unresolved spectrum can be fitted by a power law over the range 0.5-7 keV, with a photon index Γ=1.22. We also present optical counterparts for 154 of the X-ray sources, down to a limiting magnitude of r'=25.9 (Vega), using a deep r'-band image obtained with the MMT. Optical Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  6. Imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X rays using a laboratory X-ray charge-coupled-device system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, Gerard A.; Doty, John P.; Ricker, George R.; Vallerga, John V.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a laboratory instrument for imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X-rays (300 eV to 10 keV) utilizing a virtual-phase CCD. This instrument has achieved a spatial resolution of 22 microns (limited by pixel size) with an overall array area of 584 x 390 pixels. It has achieved an energy resolution of about 140 eV FWHM for single-pixel Fe-55 X-ray events (5.9 keV) with the CCD operated at -30 C. The CCD has been operated in photon-counting mode at room temperature, and X-ray spectra with an energy resolution of about 450 eV at 5.9 keV have been obtained. The low energy X-ray sensitivity of the CCD also has been demonstrated by detecting carbon K-alpha X-rays (277eV).

  7. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  8. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.

    1983-01-01

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  9. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  10. Observation of soft X-rays from cosmic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    A binary X-ray source, an extended extragalactic X-ray source and several nearby stars were surveyed for X-ray emission. The energy spectrum and time structure of X-ray flux from the binary source, Her X-l, was investigated in the range from 0.15 to 6 KeV. This source was observed at a binary phase of 0.18 with the system near elongation normal to the line of sight. Intense pulsations were observed in optical emission lines near this binary phase. The spectrum and angular distribution of X-ray emission from the X-ray source in the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies, near M 87, was also observed. In addition, the stars Alpha Leo, Zeta Her, and Epsilon Vir were investigated. Epsilon Aur and Alpha Aur were also scanned. These stars were studied since there is increasing evidence that such objects may be transient sources of soft X-rays.

  11. Technology development for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, P. T.; Sipilä, H. J.; Koskinen, T.; Mattila, M.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy instruments lose part of their performance due to the lack of suitable components for soft X-ray region below 1 keV. Therefore, in the analysis of low atomic number elements including lithium, beryllium, boron and carbon instrument sensitivity is often limited. In this work we describe how the performance of the spectroscopy of soft X-rays is significantly improved when all devices integrated in the spectroscopic instrument are suitable for both soft and hard X-rays. This concept is based on utilizing ultra-thin SiN X-ray windows with proven performance not only as a detector window but also as an X-ray source window. By including a soft-X-ray-sensitive silicon drift detector with efficient surface charge collection in this concept the sensitivity and performance of the instrument is significantly increased.

  12. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  13. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  14. X-Rays from Saturn and its Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ron F.; Waite, J. Hunter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Tom E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004 Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S in two exposures, 00:06 to 11:00 UT on 20 January and 14:32 UT on 26 January to 01:13 UT on 27 January. Each continuous observation lasted for about one full Saturn rotation. These observations detected an X-ray flare from the Saturn's disk and indicate that the entire Saturnian X-ray emission is highly variable -- a factor of $\\sim$4 variability in brightness in a week time. The Saturn X-ray flare has a time and magnitude matching feature with the solar X-ray flare, which suggests that the disk X-ray emission of Saturn is governed by processes happening on the Sun. These observations also unambiguously detected X-rays from Saturn's rings. The X-ray emissions from rings are present mainly in the 0.45-0.6 keV band centered on the atomic OK$\\alpha$ fluorescence line at 525 eV: indicating the production of X-rays due to oxygen atoms in the water icy rings. The characteristics of X-rays from Saturn's polar region appear to be statistically consistent with those from its disk X-rays, suggesting that X-ray emission from the polar cap region might be an extension of the Saturn disk X-ray emission.

  15. X-Rays from Saturn and its Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ron F.; Waite, J. Hunter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Tom E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004 Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S in two exposures, 00:06 to 11:00 UT on 20 January and 14:32 UT on 26 January to 01:13 UT on 27 January. Each continuous observation lasted for about one full Saturn rotation. These observations detected an X-ray flare from the Saturn's disk and indicate that the entire Saturnian X-ray emission is highly variable -- a factor of $\\sim$4 variability in brightness in a week time. The Saturn X-ray flare has a time and magnitude matching feature with the solar X-ray flare, which suggests that the disk X-ray emission of Saturn is governed by processes happening on the Sun. These observations also unambiguously detected X-rays from Saturn's rings. The X-ray emissions from rings are present mainly in the 0.45-0.6 keV band centered on the atomic OK$\\alpha$ fluorescence line at 525 eV: indicating the production of X-rays due to oxygen atoms in the water icy rings. The characteristics of X-rays from Saturn's polar region appear to be statistically consistent with those from its disk X-rays, suggesting that X-ray emission from the polar cap region might be an extension of the Saturn disk X-ray emission.

  16. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  17. Refractive optical elements and optical system for high energy x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Altapova, V.; Baumbach, T.; Kluge, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Vogt, H.

    2012-05-17

    In material science, X-ray radiation with photon energies above 25 keV is used because of its penetration into high density materials. Research of the inner structure of novel materials, such as electrodes in high power batteries for engines, require X-ray microscopes operating in the hard X-ray energy range. A flexible X-ray microscope for hard X-rays with photon energies higher than 25 keV will be realized at the synchrotron source ANKA in Karlsruhe, Germany. The device will use refractive X-ray lenses as condenser as well as objective lenses.

  18. X-ray calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures can form the basis of a very high-performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-theart calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous bandpasses, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated X-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. This chapter briefly reviews the detection scheme, the state of the art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  19. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this page, ... ray views may be uncomfortable. If the whole skeleton is being imaged, the test usually takes 1 ...

  20. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  1. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  2. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    Using the XMM-Newton slew survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 1028-34 erg s-1 (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 1028 and 2.5 ± 0.6 × 10^{27} {erg s}^{-1} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}, for the ASBs and CVs, respectively, which in total is a factor of 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5° and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which ˜80 per cent of the 6-10 keV GRXE intensity is produced in this way, with the remainder attributable to X-ray scattering in the interstellar medium and/or young Galactic source populations. Much of the hard X-ray emission attributed to the ASBs is likely to be produced during flaring episodes.

  3. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. M.; Duldig, M. L.; Haynes, R. F.; Simons, L. W.; Murdin, P.; Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Wheaton, W. A.; Doty, J.

    1979-01-01

    On June 17, 1977, the X-ray burst source MXB 1636-53 was simultaneously monitored for about 4 hr with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope at a frequency of 14.7 GHz and the SAS 3 X-ray satellite (1.3-12 keV). One X-ray burst was observed; an upper limit (2 sigmas) of 200 mJy is reported for any radio burst coincident with the X-ray event. During the X-ray burst the radio/X-ray time-integrated flux ratio was no more than 375 with a 90 percent confidence. An upper limit (2 sigmas) of 22 mJy was determined for any steady 14.7-GHz source coincident with the X-ray position.

  4. The origin of the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanks, T.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Stewart, G. C.; Pounds, K. A.; Boyle, B. J.; Griffiths, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A high-resolution image from the Rosat X-ray satellite reveals many faint discrete sources in the 0.1-2-keV energy range. Optical spectroscopy of these sources performed at the Anglo-Australian Telescope shows that many of them are quasars, and the inferred density of quasars on the sky contributes at least 30 percent of the cosmic X-ray background at 1 kev.

  5. Lithium metal for x-ray refractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Nino R.; Arms, Dohn A.; Clarke, Roy; Dierker, Steve B.; Dufresne, Eric; Foster, D.

    2001-12-01

    Lithium is the best material for refractive x-ray lenses, with peak performance around 8 keV. To date we have built a prototype of Cederstrom's so-called alligator lens, and have tested the lens with beamline 7ID's 10 keV x-rays on the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratories. To date we have attained only a threefold gain, most likely limited by surface roughness that is avoidable with more careful manufacturing techniques.

  6. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  7. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  8. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  9. The ROSAT X-ray background dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, M.; Georgantopoulos, I.

    1999-06-01

    We estimate the dipole of the diffuse 1.5-keV X-ray background from the ROSAT all-sky survey map of Snowden et al. We first subtract the diffuse Galactic emission by fitting an exponential scaleheight, finite-radius, disc model to the data. We further exclude regions of low galactic latitudes, of local X-ray emission (e.g. the North Polar Spur) and model them using two different methods. We find that the ROSAT X-ray background dipole points towards (l,b) ~ (288 deg 25 deg) +/- 19 deg in consistency with the cosmic microwave background (within ~ 30 deg) its direction is also in good agreement with the HEAO-1 X-ray dipole at harder energies. The normalized amplitude of the ROSAT XRB dipole is ~ 1.7 per cent. Subtracting from the ROSAT map the expected X-ray background dipole resulting from the reflex motion of the observer with respect to the cosmic rest frame (Compton-Getting effect) we find the large-scale dipole of the X-ray emitting extragalactic sources having an amplitude D_LSS ~ 0.9 D_XRB, in general agreement with the predictions of Lahav et al. We finally estimate that the Virgo cluster is responsible for ~ 20 per cent of the total measured XRB dipole amplitude.

  10. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.

  11. The X-ray imager on AXO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.

    2001-02-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20×40 cm 2 CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  12. X-ray spectrum of Kepler's SNR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; White, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations made with the solid state spectrometer aboard the Einstein Observatory confirm Kepler's SNR as an X-ray source with an intensity between 1-3 KeV of 7.2 x 10 to the-11th power ergs/sq cm-s. The X-ray spectrum is similar to those of Cas A and Tycho, with strong line emission from the helium-like species of Si, S, and Ar. Direct comparisons to Tycho's SNR suggest a distance of Kepler's SNR of greater than or equal to 5 kpc.

  13. Hard X-ray Laue monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharyan, V. R.; Gogolev, A. S.; Kiziridi, A. A.; Batranin, A. V.; Muradyan, T. R.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies of X-ray diffraction from reflecting atomic planes (10¯11) of X-cut quartz single crystal in Laue geometry influenced by the temperature gradient were carried out. It is shown that by using the temperature gradient it is possible to reflect a hard X- ray beam with photon energy near the 100 keV with high efficiency. It has been experimentally proved that the intensity of the reflected beam can be increased by more than order depending on the value of the temperature gradient.

  14. Design studies for ITER x-ray diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for adapting conventional tokamak x-ray diagnostics to the harsh radiation environment of ITER include use of grazing-incidence (GI) x-ray mirrors or man-made Bragg multilayer (ML) elements to remove the x-ray beam from the neutron beam, or use of bundles of glass-capillary x-ray ``light pipes`` embedded in radiation shields to reduce the neutron/gamma-ray fluxes onto the detectors while maintaining usable x-ray throughput. The x-ray optical element with the broadest bandwidth and highest throughput, the GI mirror, can provide adequate lateral deflection (10 cm for a deflected-path length of 8 m) at x-ray energies up to 12, 22, or 30 keV for one, two, or three deflections, respectively. This element can be used with the broad band, high intensity x-ray imaging system (XIS), the pulseheight analysis (PHA) survey spectrometer, or the high resolution Johann x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS), which is used for ion-temperature measurement. The ML mirrors can isolate the detector from the neutron beam with a single deflection for energies up to 50 keV, but have much narrower bandwidth and lower x-ray power throughput than do the GI mirrors; they are unsuitable for use with the XIS or PHA, but they could be used with the XCS; in particular, these deflectors could be used between ITER and the biological shield to avoid direct plasma neutron streaming through the biological shield. Graded-d ML mirrors have good reflectivity from 20 to 70 keV, but still at grazing angles (<3 mrad). The efficiency at 70 keV for double reflection (10 percent), as required for adequate separation of the x-ray and neutron beams, is high enough for PHA requirements, but not for the XIS. Further optimization may be possible.

  15. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, Declan Joseph

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The laser produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, did not always agree broadly with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, were placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays were produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, that the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times.

  16. The Cambridge-Cambridge X-ray Serendipity Survey: I X-ray luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, B. J.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first results obtained from a new optical identification program of 123 faint X-ray sources with S(0.5-2 keV) greater than 2 x 10(exp -14) erg/s/sq cm serendipitously detected in ROSAT PSPC pointed observations. We have spectroscopically identified the optical counterparts to more than 100 sources in this survey. Although the majority of the sample (68 objects) are QSO's, we have also identified 12 narrow emission line galaxies which have extreme X-ray luminosities (10(exp 42) less than L(sub X) less than 10(exp 43.5) erg/s). Subsequent spectroscopy reveals them to be a mixture of star-burst galaxies and Seyfert 2 galaxies in approximately equal numbers. Combined with potentially similar objects identified in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, these X-ray luminous galaxies exhibit a rate of cosmological evolution, L(sub X) varies as (1 + z)(exp 2.5 +/- 1.0), consistent with that derived for X-ray QSO's. This evolution, coupled with the steep slope determined for the faint end of the X-ray luminosity function (Phi(L(sub X)) varies as L(sub X)(exp -1.9)), implies that such objects could comprise 15-35% of the soft (1-2 keV) X-ray background.

  17. First Terrestrial Soft X-Ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G. Randall; Elsner, Ronald F.; Oestgaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2007-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged with energetic photons in the 0.1-10keV range using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid- December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth's soft (< 2 keV) X-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter's X-ray aurora, where a pulsating X-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft X-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable 0ntense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft X-ray signal is bremsstrahlung and characteristic K-shell line emissions of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere produced by electrons.

  18. Search for X-ray emission from Nova Cygni 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Brecher, K.; Buff, J.; Clark, G. W.; Joss, P. C.; Matilsky, T.

    1976-01-01

    A search for X-rays from Nova Cygni 1975 was carried out before, during, and after the time of optical maximum. No X-rays were detected over the spectral range 0.1-50 keV. On the basis of these results a strong upper limit of .0001 has been placed on the ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity for this nova, consistent with effective temperatures of about 10,000 K. If Nova Cygni 1975 is a virgin nova, its low mass exchange rate would imply that any associated X-ray emission would not be detectable by present techniques.

  19. Coded aperture imaging for fluorescent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, A.; MacDowell, A. A.; Marchesini, S.; Parkinson, D. Y.

    2014-06-15

    We employ a coded aperture pattern in front of a pixilated charge couple device detector to image fluorescent x-rays (6–25 KeV) from samples irradiated with synchrotron radiation. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays, and given a known source plane, allow for a large numerical aperture x-ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop and fabricate the free standing No-Two-Holes-Touching aperture pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the recorded encoded pattern were developed by means of a ray tracing technique and confirmed by experiments on standard samples.

  20. Start of Eta Car's X-ray Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Liburd, Jamar; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using quicklook data from the XRay Telescope on Swift shows that the flux on July 30, 2014 was 4.9 plus or minus 2.0×10(exp-12) ergs s(exp-1)cm(exp-2). This flux is nearly equal to the X-ray minimum flux seen by RXTE in 2009, 2003.5, and 1998, and indicates that Eta Car has reached its X-ray minimum, as expected based on the 2024-day period derived from previous 2-10 keV observations with RXTE.

  1. 'HEXE' - X-ray observatory in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-06-01

    An overview is given of the design concept and scientific goals of the High-Energy X-ray Experiment (HEXE), developed in the FRG (by the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics and the Astronomical Institute of Tuebingen University) for operation on the Soviet space station Mir. HEXE was launched to LEO using a Kvant vehicle on March 31, 1987; after initial docking problems, it was joined to Mir by two cosmonauts in a 3-hour EVA on April 12. HEXE has dimensions 45 x 45 x 75 cm and weight 180 kg; it employs an 800-sq-cm Tl-doped NaI/CsI phoswich detector for 15-250-keV X-rays, complementing the other Mir instruments: the ESTEC high-pressure gas-scintillation proportional counter (3-100 keV), the Soviet high-energy detector (20-800 keV), and the Dutch-British X-ray camera (2-30 keV). The Mir observations are intended to explore the energy spectra and time evolution of compact galactic and extragalactic objects.

  2. Search for X rays from the planet Jupiter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    Actively collimated balloon-borne scintillation counters employing a special phoswich anticoincidence technique were flown a total of 5 times from Palestine, Texas. Jupiter was observed for a total of 133 min, and an upper limit to the flux of X rays present at the observation time is .016 X rays/sq cm sec in the energy range 30-100 keV. Three separate calculations are made to estimate the flux of Jovian X rays at the earth. These estimates range from .000000001 to .1 X rays/sq cm sec in the energy range 30-100 keV. It is concluded that, since there was no decametric emission at the time of the flight and there had been no significant solar activity for several days prior to the flight, no X rays were being generated at the time of the observation.

  3. X-ray emission from LINERs observed with ASCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Y.

    We searched for evidence of the presence of AGN in LINERs using X-ray images and spectra up to 10 keV obtained with ASCA. We detected hard point-like nuclear sources with X-ray luminosities of 1040 - 1041 ergs s-1 from LINER 1s. Their Hα luminosities are positively correlated with the X-ray luminosities. These facts strongly support that these LINER 1s are ionized by low luminosity AGN. LINER 2s in the present sample have systematically lower X-ray to Hα luminosity ratio (LXLHα) suggesting that there exist other ionizing source or that the AGN is heavily obscured even at energies above 2 keV. X-ray properties of low luminosity AGNs are also discussed.

  4. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Cravens, T. E.; Howell, R. R.; Metzger, A. E.; Ostgaard, N.; Maurellis, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of solar system planetary bodies are now known to radiate in the soft x-ray energy (<5 keV) regime. These include planets (Earth, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn): bodies having thick atmosphere and with/without intrinsic magnetic field; planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, Ganymede): bodies with no/thin atmosphere; and comets and Io plasma torus: bodies having extended tenuous atmosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of soft x-rays from these objects. whereas in the hard x-ray energy range (>10 keV) x-rays mainly result from electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the x-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms.

  5. Statistical Study of Hard X-ray Footpoint Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, J.

    2003-12-01

    We show statistical characteristics of hard X-ray footpoint sources derived from THE YOHKOH FLARE IMAGE CATALOGUE. We use many hard X-ray images over the whole YOHKOH mission period (1991/08 - 2001/12) and the study is concentrated on following two points. 1) Average height of hard X-ray footpoint sources in the four HXT(Hard X-ray Telescope) energy bands (14-23, 23-33, 33-53, 53-93 keV). 2) Spectral characteristics of hard X-ray footpoint sources. We mainly revealed that A) the hard X-ray emission comes from just above the Hα emitting region and the accelerated electrons loose their energy within 1000 km length leading to the high density around footpoints, and that B) Many hard X-ray footpoint sources show a broken power-law spectrum with very hard spectrum in the low energy range (20-30 keV), suggesting a cut off energy of accelerated electrons is around 20 keV - 30 keV at least.

  6. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging using a tabletop Talbot-Lau interferometer with multiline embedded x-ray targets.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Takayoshi; Morimoto, Naoki; Fujino, Sho; Nagatomi, Takaharu; Oshima, Keni-chi; Harada, Jimpei; Omote, Kazuhiko; Osaka, Naohisa; Hosoi, Takuji; Watanabe, Heiji

    2013-01-15

    We demonstrate hard x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) using a tabletop Talbot-Lau interferometer in which the x-ray source and source grating are replaced with an x-ray source with multiline metal targets embedded in a diamond substrate. This source realizes an array of linear x-ray sources of a few micrometers width without fabrication difficulty because of the shallow penetration depth of electrons irradiated to the metal targets. This enhances the coherence of x rays from each linear source and allows XPCI within 45 cm source-detector distance under 1.2 W input power for 8 keV x rays.

  7. Glass Monocapillary X-ray Optics And Their Applications In X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Feser, M.; Huang, E.; Lyon, A.; Yun, W.

    2010-04-01

    Elliptical, parabolic and Wolter type glass monocapillaries were fabricated for use as x-ray condensers in the energy range of 250 eV to 20 keV. On a routine basis a diameter error of +/-0.4 μm and straightness error of 0.8 μm (peak to valley) can be reached. The final test of condensers was performed at-wavelength by imaging the far field x-ray reflection intensity distribution using a laboratory microfocus x-ray source. For medium length condensers with a total length <80 mm, a total slope error of 40 μrad rms was obtained. The applications in full-field x-ray microscopes and the future effort in developing capillary Wolter mirrors based on this technology are reported.

  8. The superconducting high-resolution soft X-ray spectrometer at the advanced biological and environmental X-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O. B.; George, S. J.; Cramer, S. P.

    2007-11-01

    We have built a 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction X-ray spectrometer for chemical analysis of dilute samples in the soft X-ray band. It offers an energy resolution of ˜10-20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, a solid angle coverage of ˜10 -3, and can be operated at total rates of up to ˜10 6 counts/s. Here, we describe the spectrometer performance in speciation measurements by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray facility at the ALS synchrotron.

  9. Clocking femtosecond X rays.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Rudati, J; Mills, D M; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Kao, C C; Siddons, D P; Lowney, D P; Macphee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Pahl, R; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Düsterer, S; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Schulte-Schrepping, H; Tschentscher, Th; Schneider, J; Hignette, O; Sette, F; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; van der Spoel, D; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Akre, R A; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Luening, K; Hastings, J B

    2005-03-25

    Linear-accelerator-based sources will revolutionize ultrafast x-ray science due to their unprecedented brightness and short pulse duration. However, time-resolved studies at the resolution of the x-ray pulse duration are hampered by the inability to precisely synchronize an external laser to the accelerator. At the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source at the Stanford Linear-Accelerator Center we solved this problem by measuring the arrival time of each high energy electron bunch with electro-optic sampling. This measurement indirectly determined the arrival time of each x-ray pulse relative to an external pump laser pulse with a time resolution of better than 60 fs rms.

  10. Explorer Program: X-ray Timing Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This booklet describes the X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE), one in a series of Explorer missions administered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Office of Space Science and managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The X-ray astronomy observatory is scheduled for launch into low-Earth orbit by Delta 2 expendable launch vehicle in late summer of 1995. The mission is expected to operate for at least 2 years and will carry out in-depth timing and spectral studies of the X-ray sources in the 2 to 200 kilo-electron Volt (keV) range. XTE is intended to study the temporal and broad-band spectral phenomena associated with stellar and galactic systems containing compact objects, including neutron stars, white dwarfs, and black holes.

  11. Instrumentation for X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert A.; Decher, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Less than five decades ago, the first X-ray observations of the sky were made using simple devices such as film and geiger counters with crude collimators. These instruments were carried aloft by sounding rockets and made observations lasting only a few minutes at most. Today, orbiting observatories, utilizing high-resolution charged coupled devices (CCD's) at the focus of arc sec optics, have lifetimes measured in years. To maintain the pace of discovery in X-ray astronomy, detectors must continue to evolve into devices of ever increasing sensitivity and sophistication. Further progress depends upon a host of technologies: grazing incidence optics, proportional counters, semiconductors, calorimeters, etc. In this article we present a brief qualitative overview of these technologies and of the principles behind them, as well as some examples of how they are employed in scientific missions for X-ray observations at energies up to 100 keV.

  12. [The X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer Based on Pyroelectric Effect].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi-fan; Fan, Rui-rui; Guo, Dong-ya; Zhang, Chun-lei; Gao, Min; Wang, Jin-zhou; Liu, Ya-qing; Zhou, Da-wei; Wang, Huan-yu

    2016-02-01

    Pyroelectric X-ray generator is implemented, and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is accomplished by combining the pyroelectric X-ray generator with a high energy resolution silicon drift detector. Firstly, the parameters of the X-ray generator are decided by analyzing and calculating the influence of the thickness of the pyroelectriccrystal and the thickness of the target on emitted X-ray. Secondly, the emitted X-ray is measured. The energy of emitted X-ray is from 1 to 27 keV, containing the characteristic X-ray of Cu and Ta, and the max counting rate is more than 3 000 per second. The measurement also proves that the detector of the spectrometer has a high energy resolution which the FWMH is 210 eV at 8. 05 keV. Lastly, samples of Fe, Ti, Cr and high-Ti basalt are analyzed using the spectrometer, and the results are agreed with the elements of the samples. It shows that the spectrometer consisting of a pyroelectric X-ray generator and a silicon drift detector is effective for element analysis. Additionally, because each part of the spectrometer has a small volume, it can be easily modified to a portable one which is suitable for non-destructive, on-site and quick element analysis.

  13. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  14. X-ray Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    Material irradiated by X-rays produces backscattered radiation which is commonly known as the Reflection Spectrum. It consists of a structured continuum, due at high energies to the competition between photoelectric absorption and electron scattering enhanced at low energies by emission from the material itself, together with a complex line spectrum. We briefly review the history of X-ray reflection in astronomy and discuss various methods for computing the reflection spectrum from cold and ionized gas, illustrated with results from our own work reflionx. We discuss how the reflection spectrum can be used to obtain the geometry of the accretion flow, particularly the inner regions around black holes and neutron stars.

  15. Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-05-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

  16. The High Energy X-ray Probe (HEX-P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona; HEX-P Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Energy X-ray Probe (HEX-P) is a probe-class ( 500M) next-generation high-energy X-ray observatory with broadband (2-200 keV) response and 40 times the sensitivity of any previous mis-sion in the 10-80 keV band, and >500 times the sensitivity of any previous mission in the 80-200 keV band. Intended to launch contemporaneously with Athena, HEX-P will provide fundamental new discoveries that range from resolving 90% of the X-ray background at its peak, to measuring the cosmic evolution of black hole spin, to studying faint X-ray populations in nearby galaxies. Based on NuSTAR heritage, HEX-P requires only modest technology development, and could easily be executed within the next decade.

  17. Observing soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium with X-ray calorimeter on a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Mccammon, D.; Skinner, M.; Kelley, R.; Moseley, H.; Schoelkopf, R.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    For an X-ray calorimeter working at 0.1 K, the energy resolution ideally can be as good as one eV for a practical detector. A detector with a resolution of 17 eV FWHM at 6 keV has been constructed. It is expected that this can be improved by a factor of two or more. With X-ray calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket, it should be possible to observe soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium over the energy range 0.07 to 1 keV. Here, a preliminary design for an X-ray calorimeter rocket experiment and the spectrum which might be observed from an equilibrium plasma are presented. For later X-ray calorimeter sounding rocket experiments, it is planned to add an aluminum foil mirror with collecting area of about 400 sq cm to observe line features from bright supernova remnants.

  18. X-Ray Superflares on CC Eri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Subhajeet; Pandey, J. C.; Airapetian, V. S.; Misra, Kuntal

    2017-05-01

    We present an in-depth study of two superflares (F1 and F2) detected on an active binary star CC Eridani by the Swift observatory. These superflares triggered the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the hard X-ray band on 2008 October 16 and 2012 February 24. The rise phases of both the flares were observed only with BAT, whereas the decay phases were observed simultaneously with the X-ray Telescope. It has been found that the flares decay faster in the hard X-ray band than in the soft X-ray band. Both flares F1 and F2 are highly energetic with respective peak X-ray luminosities of ˜{10}32.2 and ˜{10}31.8 erg s-1 in 0.3-50 keV energy band, which are larger than any other flares previously observed on CC Eri. The time-resolved spectral analysis during the flares shows the variation in the coronal temperature, emission measure, and abundances. The elemental abundances are enhanced by a factor of ˜8 to the minimum observed in the post-flare phase for the flare F1. The observed peak temperatures in these two flares are found to be 174 and 128 MK. Using the hydrodynamic loop modeling, we derive loop lengths for both the flares as 1.2 ± 0.1 × 1010 cm and 2.2 ± 0.6 × 1010 cm, respectively. The Fe Kα emission at 6.4 keV is also detected in the X-ray spectra and we model the Kα emission feature as fluorescence from the hot flare source irradiating the photospheric iron. These superflares are the brightest, hottest, and shortest in duration observed thus far on CC Eri.

  19. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  20. X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1972-01-01

    The preliminary results from the Sco X-1 and Cyg X-1 obtained from the Apollo 15 X-ray detector data are presented along with preliminary results of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric data of the lunar surface composition. The production of the characteristic X-rays following the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface is described along with the X-ray spectrometer. Preliminary analyses of the astronomical X-ray observation and the X-ray fluorescence data are presented.

  1. Moon: lunar albedo for soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Albedo of the Moon for soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV photons) is determined on the basis of the X-ray luminosity of the Moon detected and measured for the first time by orbital space telescope ROSAT in 1990. It is found that the lunar albedo for the solar soft X-rays is less than the lunar visual region albedo almost thousand times. The data allow to estimate more correctly X-ray luminosity of dusty comets like Hyakutake C/1996 B2 and Hale-Bopp C/1995 O1 due to scattering of solar soft X-rays and to reveal thus the dominant mechanism for production of X-rays in dusty comets.

  2. X-Ray Microdiffraction at Megabar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H.

    2003-12-01

    High-pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) provides unique, important sources of structural information of minerals in the Earth's deep interior, but encounters major limitations. The restriction to forward diffraction geometry (2θ less than 90° ) severely limits the accuracy. With the 50-5 μ m size x-ray beam typically used to probe samples at 30-200 GPa, the number of crystals covered by the x-ray beam is often too few for good polycrystalline XRD, but too numerous for single-crystal XRD. Single-crystal XRD method with monochromatic x-ray source and 2-d detector works satisfactorily for crystal size larger than 20 μ m, but when the crystal is significantly less than 5 μ m, the sample signals are often overwhelmed by the background. Energy dispersive XRD with polychromatic x-radiation has been used successfully to determine unit-cell parameters of smaller single crystals, but the intensity information is unusable for structural refinement because this method requires rotation of the small crystal relative to the small x-ray beam. Recent integration of panoramic diamond anvil cell1 (PDAC) with synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction2 (XRMD) method has finally overcome these limitations and can potentially revolutionize the high-pressure XRD field. This XRMD method focuses polychromatic x-radiation to submicrometer size to resolve very small single crystals, and collects Laue spots with a 2-d CCD detector. The PDAC allows complete forward, 90° , and back scatterings, while the background signal is minimized by directing the incident x-ray beam through single-crystal diamonds (i.e., avoiding the beryllium seats and gasket). The incident beam can be changed to monochromatic, tuned through the full energy (wavelength) range, and focused to the identical submicrometer spot for d-spacing determination of each Laue spot. All polychromatic Laue spots are collected simultaneously from the same x-ray sampled volume, thus reliable for structure determination. The development

  3. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  4. Inter-satellites x-ray communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Huan; Li, Bao-quan

    2017-02-01

    An inter-satellite X-ray communication system is presented in this paper. X-ray has a strong penetrating power without almost attenuation for transmission in outer space when the energy of X-ray photons is more than 10KeV and the atmospheric pressure is lower than 10-1 Pa, so it is convincing of x-ray communication in inter-satellite communication and deep space exploration. Additionally, using X-ray photons as information carriers can be used in some communication applications that laser communication and radio frequency (RF) communication are not available, such as ionization blackout area communication. The inter-satellites X-ray communication system, including the grid modulated X-ray source, the high-sensitivity X-ray detector and the transmitting and receiving antenna, is described explicitly. As the X-ray transmitter, a vacuum-sealed miniature modulated X-ray source has been fabricated via the single-step brazing process in a vacuum furnace. Pulse modulation of X-rays, by means of controlling the voltage value of the grid electrode, is realized. Three focusing electrodes, meanwhile, are used to make the electron beam converge and finally 150μm focusing spot diameter is obtained. The X-ray detector based on silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) is chosen as the communication receiver on account of its high temporal resolution and non-vacuum operating environment. Furthermore, considering x-ray emission characteristic and communication distance of X-rays, the multilayer nested rotary parabolic optics is picked out as transmitting and receiving antenna. And as a new concept of the space communication, there will be more important scientific significance and application prospects, called "Next-Generation Communications".

  5. Neck x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... look at cervical vertebrae. These are the 7 bones of the spine in the neck. ... A neck x-ray can detect: Bone joint that is out of position (dislocation) Breathing in a foreign object Broken bone (fracture) Disk problems (disks ...

  6. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test if you have signs of: A fracture Tumor Arthritis (inflammation of the joints) Normal Results The x-ray shows normal structures for the age of the person. What Abnormal Results Mean ... bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Arthritis Other conditions for ...

  7. Are There Intrinsically X-Ray Quiet Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, S. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Laor, A.; Elvis, Martin; Mathur, S.; Wills, Beverly J.; Iyomoto, N.; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Recent ROSAT studies have identified a significant population of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) that are notably faint in soft X-rays relative to their optical fluxes. Are these AGN intrinsically X-ray weak or are they just highly absorbed? Brandt, Laor & Wills have systematically examined the optical and UV spectral properties of a well-defined sample of these soft X-ray weak (SXW) AGN drawn from the Boroson & Green sample of all the Palomar Green AGN 00 with z < 0.5. We present ASCA observations of three of these SXW AGN: PG 1011-040, PG 1535+547 (Mrk 486), and PG 2112+059. In general, our ASCA observations support the intrinsic absorption scenario for explaining soft X-ray weakness; both PG 1535+547 and PG 2112+059 show significant column densities (NH is approximately 10(exp 22) - 10(exp 23)/sq cm) of absorbing gas. Interestingly, PG 1011-040 shows no spectral evidence for X-ray absorption. The weak X-ray emission may result from very strong absorption of a partially covered source, or this AGN may be intrinsically X-ray weak. PG 2112+059 is a Broad Absorption Line (BAL) QSO, and we find it to have the highest X-ray flux known of this class. It shows a typical power-law X-ray continuum above 3 keV; this is the first direct evidence that BAL QSOs indeed have normal X-ray continua underlying their intrinsic absorption. Finally, marked variability between the ROSAT and ASCA observations of PG 1535+547 and PG 2112+059 suggests that the soft X-ray weak designation may be transient, and multi-epoch 0.1-10.0 KeV X-ray observations are required to constrain variability of the absorber and continuum.

  8. X-Ray Telescope Onboard Astro-E. II. Ground-Based X-Ray Characterization.

    PubMed

    Shibata, R; Ishida, M; Kunieda, H; Endo, T; Honda, H; Misaki, K; Ishida, J; Imamura, K; Hidaka, Y; Maeda, M; Tawara, Y; Ogasaka, Y; Furuzawa, A; Watanabe, M; Terashima, Y; Yoshioka, T; Okajima, T; Yamashita, K; Serlemitsos, P J; Soong, Y; Chan, K W

    2001-08-01

    X-ray characterization measurements of the x-ray telescope (XRT) onboard the Astro-E satellite were carried out at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan) x-ray beam facility by means of a raster scan with a narrow x-ray pencil beam. The on-axis half-power diameter (HPD) was evaluated to be 1.8?-2.2?, irrespective of the x-ray energy. The on-axis effective areas of the XRTs for x-ray imaging spectrometers (XISs) were approximately 440, 320, 240, and 170 cm(2) at energies of 1.49, 4.51, 8.04, and 9.44 keV, respectively. Those of the x-ray spectrometer (XRS) were larger by 5-10%. The replication method introduced for reflector production significantly improved the imaging capability of the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophyics (ASCA) XRT, whose HPD is ~3.6?. The increase in the effective area by a factor of 1.5-2.5, depending upon the x-ray energy, compared with that of the ASCA, was brought about by mechanical scale up and longer focal lengths. The off-axis HPDs were almost the same as those obtained on the optical axis. The field of view is defined as the off-axis angle at which the effective area becomes half of the on-axis value. The diameter of the field of view was ~19? at 1.49 keV, decreasing with increasing x-ray energy, and became ~13? at 9.44 keV. The intensity of stray light and the distribution of this kind of light on the focal plane were measured at the large off-axis angles 30? and 60?. In the entire XIS field of view (25.4 mm x 25.4 mm), the intensity of the stray light caused by a pointlike x-ray source became at most 1% of the same pointlike source that was on the optical axis.

  9. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  10. Thin Shell, Segmented X-Ray Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Thin foil mirrors were introduced as a means of achieving high throughput in an X-ray astronomical imaging system in applications for which high angular resolution were not necessary. Since their introduction, their high filling factor, modest mass, relative ease of construction, and modest cost have led to their use in numerous X-ray observatories, including the Broad Band X-ray Telescope, ASCA, and Suzaku. The introduction of key innovations, including epoxy replicated surfaces, multilayer coatings, and glass mirror substrates, has led to performance improvements, and in their becoming widely used for X-ray astronomical imaging at energies above 10 keV. The use of glass substrates has also led to substantial improvement in angular resolution, and thus their incorporation into the NASA concept for the International X-ray Observatory with a planned 3 in diameter aperture. This paper traces the development of foil mirrors from their inception in the 1970's through their current and anticipated future applications.

  11. X-ray properties of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, W. H.-M.; Helfand, D. J.; Lucy, L. B.

    1980-01-01

    The X-ray properties of 111 catalogued quasars have been examined with the imaging proportional counter on board the Einstein Observatory. Thirty-five of the objects, of redshift between 0.064 and 3.53, were detected as X-ray sources. The 0.5-4.5-keV X-ray properties of these quasars are correlated with their optical and radio continuum properties and with their redshifts and variability characteristics. The X-ray luminosity of quasars tends to be highest for those objects which are bright in the optical and radio regimes and which exhibit optically violent variability. These observations suggest that quasars should be divided into two classes on the basis of radio luminosities, spectra, evolution and underlying morphology and that quasars can make up a significant portion of the diffuse soft X-ray background only if the slope of the optical quasar log N-log S relation is steeper than 2 to m sub b of about 21.5.

  12. Tunable Monochromatic X-ray Source Based on Parametric X-ray Radiation at LEBRA, Nihon University

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Y.; Sato, I.; Hayakawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Kuwada, T.; Sakai, T.; Nogami, K.; Nakao, K.; Inagaki, M.; Mori, A.

    2007-01-19

    The monochromatic X-ray source based on parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) was developed by using the electron beam from the 125-MeV linac at Nihon University. The X-ray generating system consists of two silicon perfect-crystal plates to offer a wide tunability. The system has actually been providing the energy dispersive monochromatic X-ray beam in the region of 6 to 20 keV, using Si(111)-plane for the target and the second crystals. Since the X-ray beam from the PXR generator has rather high energy resolution and coherency, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurement and phase-contrast imaging are possible applications of PXR. Actually, preliminary experiments on energy dispersive XAFS measurement and refraction-contrast imaging have been successfully carried out using the PXR beam.

  13. A soft X-ray lag detected in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We performed time-lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2-4 keV, 4-10 keV, and 10-20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a timescale of days in a flaring episode by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method. In the episode, a peak and a centroid in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of ˜ 5 d in 2-4 keV versus 4-10 keV and in 4-10 keV versus 10-20 keV, and ˜ 10 d in 2-4 keV versus 10-20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation by a single energy injection with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags in these three energy bands reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons, by assuming the magnetic field and minimum Lorentz factor estimated from a broad-band spectral energy distribution. Alternatively, if the phenomenon is interpreted as cooling of Comptonizing electrons in a corona covering the accretion disk, the temperature of the corona producing the variable X-rays should be ˜ 10 keV for reconciliation with the soft lag in the energy range of 2-20 keV.

  14. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  15. Spectral unfolds of PITHON Flash X-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Riordan, John C.

    2007-11-01

    Using a differential absorption spectrometer we obtained experimental spectral information for the PITHON Flash X-ray Machine located in San Leandro, California at L-3 Communications. Spectral information we obtained pertained to the 200 keV to 800 keV endpoint operation of PITHON. We also obtained data on the temporal behavior of high energy and low energy spectral content.

  16. Development of heavy mineral and heavy element database of soil sediments in Japan using synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction and high-energy (116 keV) X-ray fluorescence analysis: 1. Case study of Kofu and Chiba region.

    PubMed

    Bong, Willy Shun Kai; Nakai, Izumi; Furuya, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Hiroko; Abe, Yoshinari; Osaka, Keiichi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Itou, Masayoshi; Imai, Noboru; Ninomiya, Toshio

    2012-07-10

    We have started the construction of a nationwide forensic soil sediment database for Japan based on the heavy mineral and trace heavy element compositions of stream sediments collected at 3024 points all over Japan obtained by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRD) and high-energy synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis (HE-SR-XRF). In this study, the performance of both techniques was demonstrated by analyzing soil sediments from two different geological regions, the Kofu and Chiba regions in Kanto province, to construct database that can be applied in the future to provenance analysis of soil evidence from a crime scene. The sediments from the quaternary volcanic lithology of the Chiba region were found to be dominated by heavy minerals of volcanic origin - orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and amphibole, and the REEs (rare earth elements) within the region showed similar geochemical behavior. On the other hand, four distinct heavy mineral groups were identified in the sediments of the Kofu region, where there is a great variety of underlying bedrock, and the geochemical behavior of the REEs in the sediments also varied accordingly to their geological origins. As such, our study shows that high-resolution SR-XRD data can provide information on the spatial distribution patterns of heavy minerals in stream sediments, playing an important role in determining their likely geographical origin. Meanwhile, the highly sensitive HE-SR-XRF data allow us to study the geochemical behavior of trace heavy elements, especially the REEs in the sediments, providing additional support to further constrain the likely geographical origin of the sediments determined by heavy minerals.

  17. The Hard X-Ray Telescope Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Joensen, K.; Romaine, S.; Worrall, D.; Cameron, R.; Weisskopf, M.; Ramsey, B.; Bilbro, J.; Kroeger, R.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A.; Smither, R.; Christensen, F.; Citterio, O.; von Ballmoos, P.

    1995-12-01

    The Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) mission concept contains focusing telescopes that collectively, observe simultaneously from the ultraviolet to 100 keV and in several narrow bands extending to 1 MeV. In pointed observations HXT is expected to have an order of magnitude more sensitivity and much finer angular resolution in the 10 to 100 keV band than all current and currently planned future missions, and considerably more sensitivity for detecting narrow lines in the 100 keV to 1 MeV regime. The detectors are small, cooled arrays of relatively low mass with very good energy resolution and some polarization sensitivity. HXT contains two types of hard X-ray telescopes. One type, called the modular modular telescope (MMT) utilizes a novel type of multilayer coating and small graze angles to extend the regime of focusing to 100keV. There is a two stage imaging detector at each focus, a CCD for X-rays < 10 keV followed down stream by either a germanium strip array or cadmium zinc telluride array for 10-100 keV X-rays. The other type of telescope, called the Laue Crystal Telescope (LCT) is a single adjustable array of several hundred Ge crystals that focus by Laue scattering. Individual picomotors adjust the angle of each crystal to diffract photons of a fixed energy to the same point along the optic axis where they converge upon a movable array of cooled germanium detectors. The LCT will have high sensitivity for detecting narrow X-ray lines of known energy such as those expected from Type 1 supernova. The UV monitor is a three telescope system that provides coverage in the ultraviolet band for study of time correlated changes across the broad electromagnetic spectrum of an AGN such as are expected in ``reverberation'' models. A WWW page will be created as a public bulletin board. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG8-1194

  18. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken; Yoshida, Tessei

    2013-03-20

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  19. Mapping of auroral x-rays from rocket overflights

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.A.; Barcus, J.R.; Treinish, L.A.; Vondrak, R.R.

    1982-04-01

    In March 1978, two Nike Tomahawk payloads were launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, to observe the structure of bremsstrhlung x rays and precipitating particles during both nighttime and daytime observe x rays in four spectral ranges (5--10 keV, 10--20 keV, 20--40 keV, and >40 keV). Particle contamination of the detectors was avoided with broom magnet shielding techniques. By virtue of the payloads' approximate 20/sup 0/ coning angle (about 10.5-s period), the detectors scanned wide regions on either side of the trajectory paths. This has permitted construction (using computer color graphics) of the time averaged (approx.4 min) x ray source regions near 100 km, a height consistent with Chatanika radar electron density maps obtained during each flight period. X ray image maps for both flights exhibit enhanced source regions well outside the rocket trajectory planes. For the nighttime overflight, Chatanika radar scan data and Fort Yukon riometer data were used to verify the presence of an x ray imaged enhancement of electron precipitation, approximately 30 km to the east of the rocket trajectory plane. The daytime x ray data also exhibited several regions of enhanced emission, but outside the region scanned by Chatanika radar. A comparison of the x ray emissions from the two events shows the daytime x ray spectral distributions to be significantly harder but less intense that the nighttime distributions. Furthermore, for both events, spectra compared within and nearby each enhanced emitting region exhibit characteristics of a two component spectrum, such that the bright regions show an increased flux primarily in the low-energy component. Electron fluxes measured on each of the two flights with Geiger tubes are mainly isotropic over the downward hemisphere at night but show anisotropic pitch angle characteristics by day, consistent with the concept that the enhancement of the low-energy x ray flux component is predominantly induced by electrons filling the loss cone.

  20. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoonwoo; Marsh, Roark; Gibson, David; Anderson, Gerald; Barty, Christopher; Tajima, Toshiki

    2016-10-01

    The scaling of laser-Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources is dependent upon high-current, low-emittance accelerator operation and implementation of efficient laser-electron interaction architectures. Laser-Compton X-rays have been produced using the unique compact X-band linear accelerator at LLNL operated in a novel multibunch mode, and results agree extremely well with modeling predictions. An Andor X-ray CCD camera and image plates have been calibrated and used to characterize the 30 keV laser-Compton X-ray beam. The X-ray source size and the effect of scintillator blur have been measured. K-edge absorption measurements using thin metallic foils confirm the production of narrow energy spread X-rays and results validate X-ray image simulations. Future plans for medically relevant imaging will be discussed with facility upgrades to enable 250 keV X-ray production. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Broadband X-Ray Observations of the Narrow-Line X-Ray Galaxy NGC 5506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Mihara, T.; Otani, C.; Matsuoka, M.; Awaki, H.

    1999-04-01

    To address the nature of the Fe Kα line profile and the soft X-ray excess in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5506, we have performed a broadband X-ray analysis of data obtained with ASCA and ROSAT. Variations of up to 70% in the 2-10 keV band flux are detected during a 1 day ASCA observation performed in 1997 January, while no significant change in the 2-10 keV continuum shape is found. The ASCA spectrum consists of an absorbed power law, a ``soft excess'' below 2 keV, and an Fe Kα emission line at 6.4 keV. The ``soft excess'' can be well described either by thermal emission from very low-abundance material at a temperature kT~=0.8 keV or by scattered/leaking flux from the primary power law plus a small amount of thermal emission. The luminosity of the thermal emission in the former case is 1.2×1040 ergs s-1 over the 0.5-2 keV band, while the excess is ~1% of the intrinsic hard X-ray continuum in the latter case. Analysis of ROSAT HRI data confirms that the soft X-ray emission is extended on kpc scales in this object, and the extended component may account for most of the soft X-ray excess observed by the ASCA. The result suggests that in type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the ``soft excess'' comes at least partly from an extended region, causing a serious problem for the model in which the source is partially covered. We argue that the generally low abundances are a drawback for the single temperature thermal model and favor a scattering-dominated model. The scatterer is likely to be relatively cold (kT<<1 keV) in this object. The Fe Kα profile is complex and cannot be satisfactorily modeled by a single Gaussian. Models of either double Gaussians, or a narrow Gaussian plus a line from a relativistic accretion disk viewed at an inclination of about 40deg+/-10deg provide good fits to the data. However, the inclination of the disk can be substantially larger if there is a small amount of excessive Fe K edge absorption. The intermediate inclinations for narrow-line X-ray

  2. The hard X-ray perspective on the soft X-ray excess

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Ranjan V.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Fabian, Andrew C.; Gallo, Luigi C.; Walton, Dominic

    2014-04-10

    The X-ray spectra of many active galactic nuclei exhibit a 'soft excess' below 1 keV, whose physical origin remains unclear. Diverse models have been suggested to account for it, including ionized reflection of X-rays from the inner part of the accretion disk, ionized winds/absorbers, and Comptonization. The ionized reflection model suggests a natural link between the prominence of the soft excess and the Compton reflection hump strength above 10 keV, but it has not been clear what hard X-ray signatures, if any, are expected from the other soft X-ray candidate models. Additionally, it has not been possible up until recently to obtain high-quality simultaneous measurements of both soft and hard X-ray emission necessary to distinguish these models but upcoming joint XMM-NuSTAR programs provide precisely this opportunity. In this paper, we present an extensive analysis of simulations of XMM-NuSTAR observations, using two candidate soft excess models as inputs, to determine whether such campaigns can disambiguate between them by using hard and soft X-ray observations in tandem. The simulated spectra are fit with the simplest 'observer's model' of a blackbody and neutral reflection to characterize the strength of the soft and hard excesses. A plot of the strength of the hard excess against the soft excess strength provides a diagnostic plot which allows the soft excess production mechanism to be determined in individual sources and samples using current state-of-the-art and next generation hard X-ray enabled observatories. This approach can be straightforwardly extended to other candidate models for the soft excess.

  3. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission From Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of soft (0.25 - 2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays, even during flares from the active Sun, charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains fall to account for the observed emission. On the other hand, bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range may account for a substantial fraction of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT.

  4. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Barbee, T.; Bionta, R.; Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C.; Yun, W.

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  5. Planetary X ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies for an X-ray experiment using solid state detectors and for an experiment using a proportional counter for investigating Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres are reported. Background counting rates through the forward aperture and leakage fluxes are discussed for each design. It is concluded that the best choice of instrument appears to have following the characteristics: (1) two separate multiwire proportional counters for redundancy; (2) passive collimation to restrict the field to about 5 deg, wiregrid modulation collimation to about 0.1 deg angular resolution; (3) no active shielding system around the counter body; and (4) light passive shielding around any portion of the counter body exposed to space to absorb most of the cosmic X-ray background.

  6. Parabolic refractive X-ray lenses: a breakthrough in X-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengeler, Bruno; Schroer, Christian G.; Benner, Boris; Günzler, Til Florian; Kuhlmann, Marion; Tümmler, Johannes; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina

    2001-07-01

    Refractive X-ray lenses, considered for a long time as unfeasible, have been realized with a rotational parabolic profile at our institute: The main features of the new lenses are: they focus in two directions and are free of spherical aberration. By varying the number of individual lenses in the stack the focal length can be chosen in a typical range from 0.5 to 2 m for photon energies between about 6 and 60 keV. The aperture of the lens is about 1 mm matching the angular divergence of undulator beams at 3d generation synchrotron radiation sources. They cope without problems with the heat load from the white beam of an undulator. Finally, they are easy to align and to operate. Refractive X-ray lenses can be used with hard X-rays in the same way as glass lenses can be used for visible light, if it is take into account that the numerical aperture is small (of the order 10 -4). Being high-quality optical elements, the refractive X-ray lenses can be used for generating a focal spot in the μm range with a gain of a factor 1000 and more, or for imaging purposes as in a hard X-ray microscope. Recent examples from microanalysis, microtomography, fluorescence tomography, X-ray microscopy will be shown to demonstrate the state of the art. Possible new developments will be discussed.

  7. First Terrestrial Soft X-ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Ostegaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2004-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-1) aboard the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid-December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth s soft (<2 keV) x-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter s x-ray aurora, where a pulsating x-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft x-ray observations of Earth s aurora show that it is highly variable (intense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft x-ray signal is produced by electron bremsstrahlung.

  8. X-ray luminosity functions of different morphological and X-ray type AGN populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Pérez García, A. M.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Fernández Lorenzo, M.; Lara-López, M. A.; Gallego, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Alfaro, E.; Castañeda, H.; González-Serrano, J. I.; González, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Luminosity functions are one of the most important observational clues when studying galaxy evolution over cosmic time. In this paper we present the X-ray luminosity functions for X-ray detected AGN in the SXDS and GWS fields. The limiting fluxes of our samples are 9.0 ×10-15 and 4.8 ×10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV band in the two fields, respectively. We carried out analysis in three X-ray bands and in two redshift intervals up to z≤1.4. Moreover, we derive the luminosity functions for different optical morphologies and X-ray types. We confirm strong luminosity evolution in all three bands, finding the most luminous objects at higher redshift. However, no signs of density evolution are found in any tested X-ray band. We obtain similar results for compact and early-type objects. Finally, we observe the ``Steffen effect'', where X-ray type-1 sources are more numerous at higher luminosities in comparison with type-2 sources.

  9. One-dimensional focusing X-ray telescope for stellar X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helava, H.; Mitchell, D.; Novick, R.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Wolff, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A one-dimensional X-ray telescope of the Kirkpatrick-Baez design is described. The instrument consists of a grazing-incidence X-ray telescope and a multiwire proportional counter. The optics were provided with a gold reflecting surface to yield an energy response from below 0.25 to above 4.0 keV. The angular resolution of the system is 6 min by 9.5 deg over a 1.1 deg by 9.5 deg field of view.

  10. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  11. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  12. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  13. Development of a hard X-ray delay line for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and jitter-free pump-probe experiments at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    Roseker, Wojciech; Franz, Hermann; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Ehnes, Anita; Leupold, Olaf; Zontone, Federico; Lee, Sooheyong; Robert, Aymeric; Grübel, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    A hard X-ray delay line capable of splitting and delaying single X-ray pulses has been developed with the aim of performing X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and X-ray pump-probe experiments at hard X-ray free-electron laser sources. The performance of the device was tested with 8.39 keV synchrotron radiation. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been demonstrated. The feasibility of the device for performing XPCS studies was tested by recording static speckle patterns. The achieved speckle contrast of 56% indicates the possibility of performing ultra-fast XPCS studies with the delay line.

  14. X-Ray Focusing Mirror Fabricated With Bent-Polishing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Takano, Hidekazu

    2004-05-12

    A total reflection x-ray mirror is fabricated with a new method called as 'bent-polishing'. Focusing properties of a microbeam are evaluated at undulator beamline BL47XU of SPring-8. The measured focal spot size is 0.16 {mu}m at an x-ray energy of 8 keV. Spot size of smaller than 0.5 {mu}m is kept at the x-ray energy up to 28 keV.

  15. X-Ray Attenuation Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.; Toor, A.

    2000-03-03

    To minimize the pulse-to-pulse variation, the LCLS FEL must operate at saturation, i.e. 10 orders of magnitude brighter spectral brilliance than 3rd-generation light sources. At this intensity, ultra-high vacuums and windowless transport are required. Many of the experiments, however, will need to be conducted at a much lower intensity thereby requiring a reliable means to reduce the x-ray intensity by many orders of magnitude without increasing the pulse-to-pulse variation. In this report we consider a possible solution for controlled attenuation of the LCLS x-ray radiation. We suggest using for this purpose a windowless gas-filled cell with the differential pumping. Although this scheme is easily realizable in principle, it has to be demonstrated that the attenuator can be made short enough to be practical and that the gas loads delivered to the vacuum line of sight (LOS) are acceptable. We are not going to present a final, optimized design. Instead, we will provide a preliminary analysis showing that the whole concept is robust and is worth further study. The spatial structure of the LCLS x-ray pulse at the location of the attenuator is shown in Fig. 1. The central high-intensity component, due to the FEL, has a FWHM of {approx}100 {micro}m. A second component, due to the undulator's broad band spontaneous radiation is seen as a much lower intensity ''halo'' with a FWHM of 1 mm. We discuss two versions of the attenuation cell. The first is directed towards a controlled attenuation of the FEL up to the 4 orders of magnitude in the intensity, with the spontaneous radiation halo being eliminated by collimators. In the second version, the spontaneous radiation is not sacrificed but the FEL component (as well as the first harmonic of the spontaneous radiation) gets attenuated by a more modest factor up to 100. We will make all the estimates assuming that the gas used in the attenuator is Xenon and that the energy of the FEL is 8.25 keV. At lower FEL energies the

  16. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  17. Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  18. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  19. Encapsulating X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Bradley, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor-deposited polymer shields crystals from environment while allowing X rays to pass. Polymer coating transparental to X rays applied to mercuric iodide detector in partial vacuum. Coating protects crystal from sublimation, chemical attack, and electrical degradation.

  20. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  1. Proton induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and selective x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sokaras, D.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Fliegauf, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Karydas, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    We present the analytical features and performance of an x-ray spectroscopy end station of moderate energy resolution operating with proton-induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams. The apparatus was designed, installed and operated at the 5.5 MV Tandem VdG Accelerator Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. 'Demokritos,' Athens. The setup includes a two-level ultrahigh vacuum chamber that hosts in the lower level up to six primary targets in a rotatable holder; there, the irradiation of pure element materials-used as primary targets-with few-MeV high current ({approx}{mu}A) proton beams produces intense quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams of selectable energy. In the chamber's upper level, a six-position rotatable sample holder hosts the targets considered for x-ray spectroscopy studies. The proton-induced x-ray beam, after proper collimation, is guided to the sample position whereas various filters can be also inserted along the beam's path to eliminate the backscattered protons or/and to absorb selectively components of the x-ray beam. The apparatus incorporates an ultrathin window Si(Li) spectrometer (FWHM 136 eV at 5.89 keV) coupled with low-noise electronics capable of efficiently detecting photons down to carbon K{alpha}. Exemplary soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and results of selective x-ray fluorescence analysis are presented.

  2. High Resolution X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster

    2002-01-01

    NAG5-5020 covered a period of 7.5 years during which a great deal of progress was made in x-ray optical techniques under this grant. We survived peer review numerous times during the effort to keep the grant going. In 1994, when the grant started we were actively pursuing the application of spherical mirrors to improving x-ray telescopes. We had found that x-ray detectors were becoming rapidly more sophisticated and affordable, but that x-ray telescopes were only being improved through the intense application of money within the AXAF program. Clearly new techniques for the future were needed. We were successful in developing and testing at the HELSTF facility in New Mexico a four reflection coma-corrected telescope made from spheres. We were able to demonstrate 0.3 arcsecond resolution, almost to the diffraction limit of the system. The community as a whole was, at that time, not particularly interested in looking past AXAF (Chandra) and the effort needed to evolve. Since we had reached the diffraction limit using non-Wolter optics we then decided to see if we could build an x-ray interferometer in the laboratory. In the lab the potential for improved resolution was substantial. If synthetic aperture telescopes could be built in space, then orders of magnitude improvement would become feasible. In 1998 NASA, under the direction of Dr. Nick White of Goddard, started a study to assess the potential and feasibility of x-ray interferometry in space. My work became of central interest to the committee because it indicated that such was possible. In early 1999 we had the breakthrough that allowed us build a practical interferometer. By using flats and hooking up with the Marshall Space Flight Center facilities we were able to demonstrate fringes at 1.25keV on a one millimeter baseline. This actual laboratory demonstration provided the solid proof of concept that NASA needed.

  3. Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E.; Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A.

    2011-09-09

    For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (<100 nm) full-field imaging. To obtain high image quality at reasonable exposure times, custom-tailored matched pairs of condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

  4. The X-Ray Background and the AGN Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasinger, G.

    The deepest X-ray surveys performed with ROSAT were able to resolve as much as 70-80% of the 1-2 keV X-ray background into resolved sources. Optical follow-up observations were able to identify the majority of faint X-ray sources as active galactic nuclei (AGN) out to redshifts of 4.5 as well as a sizeable fraction as groups of galaxies out to redshifts of 0.7. A new population of X-ray luminous, optically innocent narrow emission line galaxies (NELGs) at the faintest X-ray fluxes is still a matter of debate, most likely many of them are also connected to AGN. First deep surveys with the Japanese ASCA satellite give us a glimpse of the harder X-ray background where the bulk of the energy density resides. Future X-ray observatories (XMM and AXAF) will be able to resolve the harder X-ray background. For the first time we are now in a position to study the cosmological evolution of the X-ray luminosity function of AGN, groups of galaxies and galaxies and simultaneously constrain their total luminosity output over cosmic time.

  5. Development of miniaturized electron probe X-ray microanalyzer.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Imanishi, Akira; Kawai, Jun

    2011-11-15

    A miniaturized electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA) with a small chamber including the electron source and the sample stage was realized using a pyroelectric crystal as an electron source. The EPMA we propose is the smallest reported so far. Performance of the EPMA was evaluated by investigating energy of obtained continuous X-rays and lower detection limits of transition metals (titanium, iron, and nickel). End point energy (Duane-Hunt limit) of continuous X-rays of 45 keV was obtained. However, it is expected that the EPMA can analyze characteristic X-rays with energy less than 20 keV. The EPMA was able to measure titanium, iron, and nickel wires whose projected areas were more than 0.03 mm(2).

  6. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  12. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  13. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  17. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  18. Hard X-ray observations of ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray flux upper limits of 2-10 keV for ultraluminous infrared galaxies were drawn from the HEAO A-1 data base. The hard X-ray luminosities of these sources are much weaker relative to their total luminosities than would be expected for Seyfert 1 galaxies or quasi-stellar objects. Because of the low level of interstellar extinction for hard X-rays, this result suggests that the ultraluminous galaxies are not powered by embedded QSOs that are otherwise similar to other QSOs. Three other possibilities are: (1) the infrared galaxies may contain a form of X-ray-quiet active nucleus; (2) the X-ray sources in active nuclei may not turn on until after the circumnuclear gas has cleared; or (3) the bulk of the infrared luminosity in these galaxies may be generated by intense circumnuclear star formation.

  19. Hard X-ray observations of ultraluminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, G.H.

    1988-08-01

    X-ray flux upper limits of 2-10 keV for ultraluminous infrared galaxies were drawn from the HEAO A-1 data base. The hard X-ray luminosities of these sources are much weaker relative to their total luminosities than would be expected for Seyfert 1 galaxies or quasi-stellar objects. Because of the low level of interstellar extinction for hard X-rays, this result suggests that the ultraluminous galaxies are not powered by embedded QSOs that are otherwise similar to other QSOs. Three other possibilities are: (1) the infrared galaxies may contain a form of X-ray-quiet active nucleus; (2) the X-ray sources in active nuclei may not turn on until after the circumnuclear gas has cleared; or (3) the bulk of the infrared luminosity in these galaxies may be generated by intense circumnuclear star formation. 27 references.

  20. An X-Ray Survey of Colliding Wind Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, M.; Fehon, G.; Savoy, M. R.; Cartagena, C. A.; Cohen, D. H.; Owocki, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    We have compiled a list of 35 O + O binaries and 86 Wolf-Rayet (WR) binaries in the Milky Way and Magellanic clouds detected with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT satellites to probe the connection between their X-ray properties and their system characteristics. Of the WR binaries with published model parameters, all have log LX > 32, kT > 1 keV and log LX/Lbol > -7. The most X-ray luminous WR binaries are typically very long period systems. The WR binaries show a nearly four-order of magnitude spread in X-ray luminosity, even among among systems with very similar WR primaries. Among the O + O binaries, short-period systems have soft X-ray spectra and longer period systems show harder X-ray spectra again with a large spread in LX/Lbol.

  1. Scattering of x rays from low-Z materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, J.L.; Kissel, L.D.; Catron, H.C.; Hansen, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    X rays incident on thin beryllium, boron, carbon, and other low-Z materials undergo both elastic and inelastic scattering as well as diffraction from the crystalline or crystalline-like structure of the material. Unpolarized monoenergetic x rays in the 1.5 to 8.0-keV energy range were used to determine the absolute scattering efficiency of thin beryllium, carbon, and boron foils. These measurements are compared to calculated scattering efficiencies predicted by single-atom theories. In addition, the relative scattering efficiency versus x-ray energy was measured for other low-Z foils using unpolarized bremsstrahlung x rays. In all the low-Z foils examined, we observed Bragg-like x-ray diffraction due to the ordered structure of the materials.

  2. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    X-rays from a 25-hJ plasma focus apparatus were observed with pinhole cameras. The cameras consist of 0.4 mm diameter pinholes in 2 cm thick lead housing enclosing an X-ray intensifying screen at the image plane. Pictures recorded through thin aluminum foils or plastic sheets for X-ray energies sub gamma smaller than 15 keV show distributed X-ray emissions from the focussed plasma and from the anode surface. However, when thick absorbers are used, radial filamentary structure in the X-ray emission from the anode surface is revealed. Occasionally larger structures are observed in addition to the filaments. Possible mechanisms for the filamentary structure are discussed.

  3. Direct three-dimensional coherently scattered x-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Congwu; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Eaker, Diane R.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: It has been shown that coherently scattered x rays can be used to discriminate and identify specific components in a mixture of low atomic weight materials. The authors demonstrated a new method of doing coherently scattered x-ray tomography with a thin sheet of x ray. Methods: A collimated x-ray fan-beam, a parallel polycapillary collimator, and a phantom consisting of several biocompatible materials of low attenuation-based contrast were used to investigate the feasibility of the method. Because of the particular experimental setup, only the phantom translation perpendicular to the x-ray beam is needed and, thus, there is no need of Radon-type tomographic reconstruction, except for the correction of the attenuation to the primary and scattered x rays, which was performed by using a conventional attenuation-based tomographic image data set. The coherent scatter image contrast changes with momentum transfer among component materials in the specimen were investigated with multiple x-ray sources with narrow bandwidth spectra generated with anode and filter combinations of Cu/Ni (8 keV), Mo/Zr (18 keV), and Ag/Pd (22 keV) and at multiple scatter angles by orienting the detector and polycapillary collimator at different angles to the illuminating x ray. Results: The contrast among different materials changes with the x-ray source energy and the angle at which the image was measured. The coherent scatter profiles obtained from the coherent scatter images are consistent with the published results. Conclusions: This method can be used to directly generate the three-dimensional coherent scatter images of small animal, biopsies, or other small objects with low atomic weight biological or similar synthetic materials with low attenuation contrast. With equipment optimized, submillimeter spatial resolution may be achieved.

  4. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were studied. These devices produce dense high temperature plasmas, which emit X rays of hundreds of KeV energy and one to ten billion neutrons per pulse. The processes in the devices seem related to solar flare phenomena, and would also be of interest for controlled thermonuclear fusion applications. The high intensity, short duration bursts of X rays and neutrons could also possibly be used for pumping nuclear lasers.

  5. Burning DT Plasmas with Ultrafast Soft X-Ray Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2012-10-01

    Fast ignition with narrowband, coherent ultrafast soft x-ray pulsesfootnotetextS. X. Hu, V. N. Goncharov, and S. Skupsky, ``Burning Plasmas with Ultrashort Soft-X-Ray Flashing,'' to be published in Physics of Plasmas. has been investigated for cryogenic deuterium--tritium (DT) plasma conditions achieved on the OMEGA Laser System. In contrast to using hard x-rays (hν = 3 to 6 keV) proposed in the original x-ray fast-ignition proposal, we find that soft x-ray sources with hν 500-eV photons can be more suitable for igniting the dense DT plasmas. Two-dimensional radiation--hydrodynamics simulations have identified the breakeven conditions for realizing such a ``hybrid'' ignition scheme (direct-drive compression with soft x-ray heating) with 50-μm-offset targets: an ˜10-ps soft x-ray pulse (hν 500 eV) with a total energy of 500 to 1000 J to be focused into a 10-μm spot size. A variety of x-ray pulse parameters have also been investigated for optimization. It is noted that an order of magnitude increase in neutron yield has been predicted even with x-ray energy as low as ˜50 J. Scaling this idea to a 1-MJ large-scale NIF target, a gain above ˜30 can be reached with the same soft x-ray pulse at 1.65-kJ energy. Even though such energetic x-ray sources do not currently exist, we hope that the proposed ignition scheme may stimulate efforts on generating powerful soft x-ray sources in future. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  6. The Scanning X-Ray Microprobe at the Esrf ``X-Ray Microscopy'' Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susini, J.; Salomé, M.; Fayard, B.; Ortega, R.; Kaulich, B.

    The development of high brilliance X-ray sources coupled with advances in manufacturing technologies of focusing optics has led to significant improvements in submicrometer probes for spectroscopy, diffraction and imaging applications. For instance, X-ray microscopy in the 1-10 keV energy range is better-suited for analyzing trace elements in fluorescence yield. This article will be biased towards submicron fluorescence microscopy developed on the ID21 beamline at the ESRF. The main technical developments, involving new focusing lenses or novel phase contrast method, are presented. Strengths and weaknesses of X-ray microscopy and spectromicroscopy techniques are discussed and illustrated by examples in biology, materials science and geology.

  7. The Solar X-Ray Limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marina; Hudson, Hugh S.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Krucker, Säm; Schwartz, Richard A.

    2017-07-01

    We describe a new technique to measure the height of the X-ray limb with observations from occulted X-ray flare sources as observed by the RHESSI (the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Spectroscopic Imager) satellite. This method has model dependencies different from those present in traditional observations at optical wavelengths, which depend upon detailed modeling involving radiative transfer in a medium with complicated geometry and flows. It thus provides an independent and more rigorous measurement of the “true” solar radius, which means that of the mass distribution. RHESSI’s measurement makes use of the flare X-ray source’s spatial Fourier components (the visibilities), which are sensitive to the presence of the sharp edge at the lower boundary of the occulted source. We have found a suitable flare event for analysis, SOL2011-10-20T03:25 (M1.7), and report a first result from this novel technique here. Using a four-minute integration over the 3-25 keV photon energy range, we find {R}{{X} - {ray}}=960.11+/- 0.15+/- 0.29 arcsec, at 1 au, where the uncertainties include statistical uncertainties from the method and a systematic error. The standard VAL-C model predicts a value of 959.94 arcsec, which is about 1σ below our value.

  8. Optimizing RHESSI X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, Chang; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    RHESSI X-ray imaging is possible with angular resolution as fine as 2 arcsec (FWHM) at energies from as low as 3 keV to >100 keV. However, taking full advantage of this capability has proven to be challenging given the Fourier-transform imaging technique that is used, specific instrumental considerations that must be taken into account, and the many different options of the available image reconstruction algorithms. Such considerations as the best reconstruction algorithm to use, the optimal weighting of the different Fourier components, deciding between short image integration times and rapid imaging cadence, the different energy ranges covered by the 9 detectors, the effect of pulse pile-up and albedo, etc. must all be taken into account in obtaining and interpreting RHESSI X-ray images. This poster describes different techniques for optimizing the image reconstruction depending on the science objectives - identifying compact or extended sources, searching for source motion, obtaining the best photometry, determining the believability of different features in an image, etc. The emphasis is on making full use of data from all the RHESSI detectors, including the ones behind the finest grids when warranted by the source structure. This is the case for the hard X-ray emission along the ribbons of the flare on 2005 May 13 reported by Liu et al. (2007) and this event will be used as an example.

  9. Optimizing RHESSI X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, Chang; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    RHESSI X-ray imaging is possible with angular resolution as fine as 2 arcsec (FWHM) at energies from as low as 3 keV to >100 keV. However, taking full advantage of this capability has proven to be challenging given the Fourier-transform imaging technique that is used, specific instrumental considerations that must be taken into account, and the many different options of the available image reconstruction algorithms. Such considerations as the best reconstruction algorithm to use, the optimal weighting of the different Fourier components, deciding between short image integration times and rapid imaging cadence, the different energy ranges covered by the 9 detectors, the effect of pulse pile-up and albedo, etc. must all be taken into account in obtaining and interpreting RHESSI X-ray images. This poster describes different techniques for optimizing the image reconstruction depending on the science objectives - identifying compact or extended sources, searching for source motion, obtaining the best photometry, determining the believability of different features in an image, etc. The emphasis is on making full use of data from all the RHESSI detectors, including the ones behind the finest grids when warranted by the source structure. This is the case for the hard X-ray emission along the ribbons of the flare on 2005 May 13 reported by Liu et al. (2007) and this event will be used as an example.

  10. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  11. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  12. Silicon avalanche photodiodes for direct detection of X-rays.

    PubMed

    Baron, Alfred Q R; Kishimoto, Shunji; Morse, John; Rigal, Jean Marie

    2006-03-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are discussed as fast X-ray detectors for synchrotron radiation. The emphasis is on ;direct' detection, where the X-ray is absorbed within the silicon APD itself, and, therefore, on use with medium-energy X-rays, <30 keV. The impact of APD structure on device performance is examined, and representative data from many different commercial devices are presented. Specific areas discussed include signal shapes, high-rate behavior, time resolution and pulse-height response. Data from several APD arrays are also presented, as is a detailed description of an integrated package system. Tables are included comparing commercially available devices, including arrays.

  13. X-ray phase imaging with a grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Weitkamp, Timm; Diaz, Ana; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco; Cloetens, Peter; Ziegler, Eric

    2005-08-08

    Using a high-efficiency grating interferometer for hard X rays (10-30 keV) and a phase-stepping technique, separate radiographs of the phase and absorption profiles of bulk samples can be obtained from a single set of measurements. Tomographic reconstruction yields quantitative three-dimensional maps of the X-ray refractive index, with a spatial resolution down to a few microns. The method is mechanically robust, requires little spatial coherence and monochromaticity, and can be scaled up to large fields of view, with a detector of correspondingly moderate spatial resolution. These are important prerequisites for use with laboratory X-ray sources.

  14. Cryogenic X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Enju; Wiegart, Lutz; Pernot, Petra; Howells, Malcolm; Timmins, Joanna; Zontone, Federico; Madsen, Anders

    2009-11-06

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

  15. SNR 1E 0102.2-7219 as an X-ray calibration standard in the 0.5-1.0 keV bandpass and its application to the CCD instruments aboard Chandra, Suzaku, Swift and XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Beardmore, Andrew P.; Foster, Adam; Haberl, Frank; Miller, Eric D.; Pollock, Andrew M. T.; Sembay, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Context. The flight calibration of the spectral response of charge-coupled device (CCD) instruments below 1.5 keV is difficult in general because of the lack of strong lines in the on-board calibration sources typically available. This calibration is also a function of time due to the effects of radiation damage on the CCDs and/or the accumulation of a contamination layer on the filters or CCDs. Aims: We desire a simple comparison of the absolute effective areas of the current generation of CCD instruments onboard the following observatories: Chandra ACIS-S3, XMM-Newton (EPIC-MOS and EPIC-pn), Suzaku XIS, and Swift XRT and a straightforward comparison of the time-dependent response of these instruments across their respective mission lifetimes. Methods: We have been using 1E 0102.2-7219, the brightest supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to evaluate and modify the response models of these instruments. 1E 0102.2-7219 has strong lines of O, Ne, and Mg below 1.5 keV and little or no Fe emission to complicate the spectrum. The spectrum of 1E 0102.2-7219 has been well-characterized using the RGS gratings instrument on XMM-Newton and the HETG gratings instrument on Chandra. As part of the activities of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), we have developed a standard spectral model for 1E 0102.2-7219 and fit this model to the spectra extracted from the CCD instruments. The model is empirical in that it includes Gaussians for the identified lines, an absorption component in the Galaxy, another absorption component in the SMC, and two thermal continuum components with different temperatures. In our fits, the model is highly constrained in that only the normalizations of the four brightest lines/line complexes (the O vii Heα triplet, O viii Lyα line, the Ne ix Heα triplet, and the Ne x Lyα line) and an overall normalization are allowed to vary, while all other components are fixed. We adopted this approach to

  16. Obscuration properties of hard X-ray selected AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, C.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a great tool to infer the characteristics of the circumnuclear material in AGN, which can be achieved by studying both absorbed and reprocessed X-ray radiation. Because of the limited effect of absorption, hard X-ray (>10 keV) selected samples of AGN are extremely well suited to study the char- acteristics and the evolution of the torus. In my talk I will report on the results obtained by studying the broad-band X-ray emission (0.3--150 keV) of the 830 AGN reported in the Swift/BAT 70 months catalog. Our work is to date the largest study of broad-band X-ray observations of AGN ever performed, and combines observations carried out by the major X-ray facilities of the past decade, for a total of more than 1,500 X-ray spectra. Our catalog is complemented by multi-wavelength data, spanning from radio to gamma-rays. In my presentation will focus on the evolution of the spectral and absorption properties of AGN, and discuss about the link between obscuration and the physical characteristics of the SMBH, such as Eddington ratio, luminosity and black hole mass.

  17. Two dimensional x-ray phase imaging using single grating interferometer with embedded x-ray targets.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Fujino, Sho; Yamazaki, Amane; Ito, Yasuhiro; Hosoi, Takuji; Watanabe, Heiji; Shimura, Takayoshi

    2015-06-29

    Using multidot metal targets embedded in a diamond substrate, we created a single-grating Talbot-Lau interferometer and used it to capture two dimensional (2D) x-ray phase images. The ensemble of these targets constitutes a tiny virtual array of x-ray source and enables x-ray phase-contrast imaging with no source or absorption grating within a 1 m source-detector distance for 8 keV x-rays. We directly resolved a dot-pattern self-image of the phase grating with 6 µm pitch by using an x-ray image detector with 24 µm pixels and obtained 2D differential-phase and dark-field images from a single-exposure. Using the 2D differential-phase images, we also obtained a phase image with no streak artifacts.

  18. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of GX 339-4 in an X-ray high state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Maejima, Y.; Bradt, H. V.; Remillard, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Optical emission, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays have been observed simultaneously from the black hole candidate GX 3339-4 in a typical high state. Each of these components is interpreted as arising from a characteristic region of the accretion disk. Considered as a black hole, GX 339-4 lacks the variable 2 keV blackbody component that would be emitted from the 'solid' surface of a neutron star in the low-mass neutron star binaries. The X-ray emission in the high state is therefore extremely soft and stable in time. The intermediate disk region is optically thick and geometrically thin. The observed soft X-ray component with a 'disk blackbody' spectrum comes from this region. The innermost disk region is dynamically unstable due to the effect of general relativity and possibly due to radiation pressure. This region is responsible for the generation of the hard X-ray tail through Comptonization.

  19. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Alexander, David M.; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Desai, Meera A.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg{}2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ˜4× and ˜8 × 10{}32 erg s{}-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3-10 and 10-40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources suggests that magnetic cataclysmic variables constitute a large fraction (>40%-60%). Both spectral analysis and logN-logS distributions of the NuSTAR sources indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Γ = 1.5-2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high plasma temperatures than the field population.

  20. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Jaesub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shou; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg(sup 2) region around Sgr?A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of approx. 4× and approx. 8 ×10(exp 32) erg/s at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3-10 and 10-40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources suggests that magnetic cataclysmic variables constitute a large fraction (>40%-60%). Both spectral analysis and logN-logS distributions of the NuSTAR sources indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Lambda = 1.5-2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high plasma temperatures than the field population.

  1. Clusters in intense x-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2012-06-01

    Free-electron lasers can deliver extremely intense, coherent x-ray flashes with femtosecond pulse length, opening the door for imaging single nanoscale objects in a single shot. All matter irradiated by these intense x-ray pulses, however, will be transformed into a highly-excited non-equilibrium plasma within femtoseconds. During the x-ray pulse complex electron dynamics and the onset of atomic disorder will be induced, leading to a time-varying sample. We have performed first experiments about x-ray laser pulse -- cluster interaction with a combined spectroscopy and imaging approach at both, the FLASH free electron laser in Hamburg (Germany) and the LCLS x-ray free-electron laser in Stanford (California). Atomic clusters are ideal for investigating the light - matter interaction because their size can be tuned from the molecular to the bulk regime, thus allowing to distinguish between intra and inter atomic processes. Imaging experiments with xenon clusters show power-density dependent changes in the scattering patterns. Modeling the scattering data indicates that the optical constants of the clusters change during the femtosecond pulse due to the transient creation of high charge states. The results show that ultra fast scattering is a promising approach to study transient states of matter on a femtosecond time scale. Coincident recording of time-of-flight spectra and scattering patterns allows the deconvolution of focal volume and particle size distribution effects. Single-shot single-particle experiments with keV x-rays reveal that for the highest power densities an highly excited and hot cluster plasma is formed for which recombination is suppressed. Time resolved infrared pump -- x-ray probe experiments have started. Here, the clusters are pumped into a nanoplasma state and their time evolution is probed with femtosecond x-ray scattering. The data show strong variations in the scattering patterns stemming from electronic reconfigurations in the cluster

  2. Foil X-ray Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Soong, Yang

    1996-09-01

    Nested thin foil reflectors have made possible light weight, inexpensive and fast grazing incidence X-ray mirrors for astronomical spectroscopy over a broad band. These mirrors were developed at Goddard for the US Shuttle program and were flown on NASA's shuttleborne Astro-l mission in December 1990. Presently, the Japan/US collaborative spectroscopic mission ASCA, nearing its third year of successful operation in earth orbit, carries, four such mirrors, weighing less than 40 kg and giving total effective areas of ˜ 1200 and 420 cm2 at l and 8 keV respectively. The ˜ 420 kg observatory is the best possible example of how conical foil mirrors opened areas of research that could not have been otherwise addressed with available resources. In this paper, we will briefly review the development and performance of our first generation foil mirrors. We will also describe progress toward improving their imaging capability to prime them for use in future instruments. Such a goal is highly desirable, if not necessary for this mirror technology to remain competitive for future applications.

  3. Hard X-ray delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    High time resolution hard X-ray rates with good counting statistics over 5 energy intervals were obtained using a large area balloon-borne scintillation detector during the 27 June 1980 solar flare. The impulsive phase of the flare was comprised of a series of major bursts of several to several tens of seconds long. Superimposed on these longer bursts are numerous smaller approximately 0.5 to 1.0 second spikes. The time profiles for different energies were cross-correlated for the major bursts. The rapid burst decay rates and the simultaneous peaks below 120 keV both indicate a rapid electron energy loss process. Thus, the flux profiles reflect the electron acceleration/injection process. The fast rate data was obtained by a burst memory in 8 and 32 msec resolution over the entire main impulsive phase. These rates will be cross-correlated to look for short time delays and to find rapid fluctuations. However, a cursory examination shows that almost all fluctuations, down to the 5% level, were resolved with 256 msec bins.

  4. Hard X ray imaging telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, P.

    1990-03-01

    This final report covers the work carried out under the LLNL Contract Number B063682, Subcontractor Regents University of California at Santa Barbara. The research carried out under this contract involves the construction of a telemetry, target acquisition and guidance system, and of a light-weight gondola to house an x ray spectrometer. This work is part of the design and construction of the balloon experiment, GRATIS, which will perform the first arcminute imaging of cosmic sources in the 30 to 200 keV energy band. Observations conducted with GRATIS are expected to provide data relevant to several key problems in high energy astrophysics including the physical processes responsible for the high energy tail observed in the soft gamma-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies and the origin of both the diffuse and point source components of the gamma-ray emission from the Galactic Center. This report discusses the scientific motivations for this experiment, presents several aspects of the design and construction of the hardware components, gives an overview of the stabilized platform, and demonstrates the expected performance and sensitivity.

  5. ANS hard X-ray experiment development program. [emission from X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsignault, D.; Gursky, H.; Frank, R.; Kubierschky, K.; Austin, G.; Paganetti, R.; Bawdekar, V.

    1974-01-01

    The hard X-ray (HXX) experiment is one of three experiments included in the Dutch Astronomical Netherlands Satellite, which was launched into orbit on 30 August 1974. The overall objective of the HXX experiment is the detailed study of the emission from known X-ray sources over the energy range 1.5-30keV. The instrument is capable of the following measurements: (1) spectral content over the full energy range with an energy resolution of approximately 20% and time resolution down to 4 seconds; (2) source time variability down to 4 milliseconds; (3) silicon emission lines at 1.86 and 2.00keV; (4) source location to a limit of one arc minute in ecliptic latitude; and (5) spatial structure with angular resolution of the arc minutes. Scientific aspects of experiment, engineering design and implementation of the experiment, and program history are included.

  6. Hard x-ray imaging polarimeter for PolariS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Kim, Juyong; Sadamoto, Masaaki; Yoshinaga, Keigo; Gunji, Shuichi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Nakamori, Takeshi; Yoneyama, Tomokage; Ikeyama, Yuki; Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Hard X-ray imaging polarimeters are developed for the X-ray γ-ray polaeimtery satellite PolariS. The imaging polarimter is scattering type, in which anisotropy in the direction of Compton scattering is employed to measure the hard X-ray (10-80 keV) polarization, and is installed on the focal planes of hard X-ray telescopes. We have updated the design of the model so as to cover larger solid angles of scattering direction. We also examine the event selection algorithm to optimize the detection efficiency of recoiled electrons in plastic scintillators. We succeed in improving the efficiency by factor of about 3-4 from the previous algorithm and criteria for 18-30 keV incidence. For 23 keV X-ray incidence, the recoiled electron energy is about 1 keV. We measured the efficiency to detect recoiled electrons in this case, and found about half of the theoretical limit. The improvement in this efficiency directly leads to that in the detection efficiency. In other words, however, there is still a room for improvement. We examine various process in the detector, and estimate the major loss is primarily that of scintillation light in a plastic scintillator pillar with a very small cross section (2.68mm squared) and a long length (40mm). Nevertheless, the current model provides the MDP of 6% for 10mCrab sources, which are the targets of PolariS.

  7. Hard X-Ray Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Francesca; Bassani, L.; Venturi, T.; Molina, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Malizia, A.; La Franca, F.; Landi, R.

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in AGN with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT AGN catalogues. They represent 7-10% of the total AGN population and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities and high Eddington ratios. The radio morphology is typical of FRII galaxies and all of them have an optical classification and a measure of the column density. The observed fraction of absorbed AGN is around 40% among the total sample, and 75% among type 2 AGN. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is 2-3%. In this talk we will discuss the obscuration characteristics of radio galaxies compared to non-radio galaxies selected at hard X-rays.

  8. The microchannel x-ray telescope status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, D.; Meuris, A.; Pinsard, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Tourrette, T.; Osborne, J. P.; Willingale, R.; Sykes, J. M.; Pearson, J. F.; Le Duigou, J. M.; Mercier, K.

    2016-07-01

    We present design status of the Microchannel X-ray Telescope, the focussing X-ray telescope on board the Sino- French SVOM mission dedicated to Gamma-Ray Bursts. Its optical design is based on square micro-pore optics (MPOs) in a Lobster-Eye configuration. The optics will be coupled to a low-noise pnCCD sensitive in the 0.2{10 keV energy range. With an expected point spread function of 4.5 arcmin (FWHM) and an estimated sensitivity adequate to detect all the afterglows of the SVOM GRBs, MXT will be able to provide error boxes smaller than 60 (90% c.l.) arc sec after five minutes of observation.

  9. Bone densitometry using x-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Shukla, S; Ganezer, K

    2010-10-21

    In contrast to the two distinct energy regions that are involved in dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for bone densitometry, the complete spectrum of a beam transmitted through two layers of different materials is utilized in this study to calculate the areal density of each material. Test objects constructed from aluminum and Plexiglas were used to simulate cortical bone and soft tissue, respectively. Solid-state HPGe (high-purity germanium) detectors provided high-resolution x-ray spectra over an energy range of approximately 20-80 keV. Areal densities were obtained from spectra using two methods: a system of equations for two spectral regions and a nonlinear fit of the entire spectrum. Good agreement with the known areal densities of aluminum was obtained over a wide range of PMMA thicknesses. The spectral method presented here can be used to decrease beam hardening at a small number of bodily points selected for examination.

  10. X-Ray Polarimetry with GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2011-01-01

    The polarization properties of cosmic X-ray sources are still largely unexplored. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) will carry out the first sensitive X-ray polarization survey of a wide range of sources including; accreting compact objects (black holes and neutron stars), AGN, supernova remnants, magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars. GEMS employs grazing-incidence foil mirrors and novel time-projection chamber (TPC) polarimeters leveraging the photoelectric effect to achieve high polarization sensitivity in the 2 - 10 keV band. I will provide an update of the project status, illustrate the expected performance with several science examples, and provide a brief overview of the data analysis challenges

  11. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main

    We study a detailed broad-band X-ray/UV emission from the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 based on two XMM-Newton and single Swift/XRT observations. Both XMM-Newton observations show the soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV when the best-fit 2 - 10 keV power law is extrapolated down to 0.3 keV. We find the blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc and Comptonized disc emission both describe the observed soft excess well. We find a remarkable trend of decreasing UV flux with increasing soft X-ray excess and power law emission. We suggest that this could be due to that the external edge of corona hide a fraction of accretion disk. Co-Author: Prof. Gulab C. Dewangan (IUCAA), Prof. Ranjeev Misra (IUCAA), Pramod Kumar (Nanded university)

  12. Monochromatic X-ray imaging using a combination of doubly curved crystal and polycapillary X-ray lens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C A

    2015-01-01

    A monochromatic X-ray imaging setup based on a combination of a doubly curved crystal and a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens was designed. In this setup, the bent crystal optic was used not only to monochromatize but also to focus the divergent X-ray beam from a conventional X-ray source to form a monochromatic X-ray focal spot with a size of 426 × 467 μm2 at 17.5 keV. The beam expanding from this focal point was focused by the polycapillary optic to obtain a focal spot which was then used as the monochromatic X-ray imaging virtual source. The output focal spot size of the focusing polycapillary optic at 17.5 keV was 97 μm. Compared with the beam expansion after the focal spot of the bent crystal optic, the beam expansion after the focal spot of the focusing polycapillary optic was relatively large. This was helpful for magnifying the X-ray image of the sample. The focused beam was helpful to decrease the exposure time for imaging small samples.

  13. X-ray scalpel—a new device for targeted x-ray brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, George; Strumban, Emil; Sozontov, Evgeny; Jenrow, Kenneth

    2007-03-01

    The basic design and performance of a novel x-ray scalpel device for interstitial radiosurgery are reported. The x-ray scalpel is comprised of a capillary optics collimator conjugated with a high brilliance microfocus x-ray tube and a thin hollow needle (tip) attached to the collimator. The device is capable of producing a high dose rate (about 140 Gy min-1 in water-like absorber at the exit window), 0.7 mm diameter, quasi-parallel beam that can be delivered to a targeted site by a minimally invasive procedure. Contrary to insertable x-ray tubes or radionuclides used in brachytherapy and complying with the 1/r2 radiation attenuation law, the dose rate for a quasi-parallel beam decreases with distance as μ exp(-μr), where μ is the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficient in the exposed medium. Moreover, the shape, energy and the dose attenuation curve of the x-ray beam can be adjusted. Two versions of the x-ray scalpel device (5.4 keV and 20.2 keV) are described. We present results from our first test of the x-ray scalpel as a controllable source of focal radiation for producing radiation necrosis in rat brain tissue. Irradiation was transdurally delivered to the rat cerebral cortex for 10 min at a dose rate of 20 Gy min-1.

  14. Li metal for x-ray refractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Nino R.; Arms, Dohn A.; Clarke, Roy; Dierker, Steve B.; Dufresne, Eric; Foster, D.

    2004-01-27

    Lithium metal is the best material for refractive lenses that must focus x-rays with energies below 15 keV, but to date no lens from Li has been reported. This letter demonstrates focusing of 10 keV x-rays with a one-dimensional sawtooth lens made from Li. The lens theoretical gain is 4.5, with manufacturing imperfections likely responsible for the threefold gain that is observed. Despite the Li reactivity the lens is stable over months of operation if kept under vacuum.

  15. Measurements of the hard-x-ray reflectivity of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Zhong, Z

    2007-01-10

    In connection with the design of a hard-x-ray telescope for the Constellation X-Ray Observatory we measured the reflectivity of an iridium-coated zerodur substrate as a function of angle at 55, 60, 70, and 80 keV at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The optical constants were derived from the reflectivity data. The real component of the index of refraction is in excellent agreement with theoretical values at all four energies. However, the imaginary component, which is related to the mass attenuation coefficient, is 50% to 70% larger at 55, 60, and 70 keV than theoretical values.

  16. A hard X-ray polarimeter utilizing Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, H.; Noma, M.; Niizeki, H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a 50-cm-diam prototype of a novel Compton-scattering-type polarimeter for hard X-rays in the energy range 30-100 keV. The characteristics of the prototype polarimeter were investigated for various conditions. It was found that, with polarized X-rays from a simple polarizer, the detection efficiency and the modulation factor of the polarimeter with a 40-mm thick scatterer were 3.2 percent and 0.57 percent, respectively, at about 60 keV.

  17. A New Measurement of the Cosmic X-ray Background

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, A.

    2009-05-11

    I present a new analytical description of the cosmic X-ray background (CXRB) spectrum in the 1.5-200 keV energy band, obtained by combining the new measurement performed by the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) with the recently published Swift burst alert telescope (BAT) measurement. A study of the cosmic variance in the XRT band (1.5-7 keV) is also presented. I find that the expected cosmic variance (expected from LogN-LogS) scales as {omega}{sup -0.3}(where {omega} is the surveyed area) in very good agreement with XRT data.

  18. X-ray variability patterns and radio/X-ray correlations in Cyg X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Skinner, Gerald K.; Pooley, Guy G.; Lubiński, Piotr

    2011-09-01

    We have studied the X-ray variability patterns and correlations of the radio and X-ray fluxes in all spectral states of Cyg X-1 using X-ray data from the All-Sky Monitor onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Burst And Transient Source Experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Burst Alert Telescope onboard Swift. In the hard state, the dominant spectral variability is a changing of normalization with a fixed spectral shape, while in the intermediate state, the slope changes, with a pivot point around 10 keV. In the soft state, the low-energy X-ray emission dominates the bolometric flux which is only loosely correlated with the high-energy emission. In black hole binaries in the hard state, the radio flux is generally found to depend on a power of the X-ray flux, FR∝FpX. We confirm this for Cyg X-1. Our new finding is that this correlation extends to the intermediate and soft states, provided the broad-band X-ray flux in the Comptonization part of the spectrum (excluding the blackbody component) is considered instead of a narrow-band medium-energy X-ray flux. We find an index p≃ 1.7 ± 0.1 for 15-GHz radio emission, decreasing to p≃ 1.5 ± 0.1 at 2.25 GHz. We conclude that the higher value at 15 GHz is due to the effect of free-free absorption in the wind from the companion. The intrinsic correlation index remains uncertain. However, based on a theoretical model of the wind in Cyg X-1, it may to be close to ≃1.3, which, in the framework of accretion/jet models, would imply that the accretion flow in Cyg X-1 is radiatively efficient. The correlation with the flux due to Comptonization emission indicates that the radio jet is launched by the hot electrons in the accretion flow in all spectral states of Cyg X-1. On the other hand, we are able to rule out the X-ray jet model. Finally, we find that the index of the correlation, when measured using the X-ray flux in a narrow energy band, strongly depends on the band chosen and is, in general

  19. Bent diamond-crystal x-ray spectrographs for x-ray free-electron laser noninvasive diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    We report on the manufacturing and X-ray tests of bent diamond-crystal X-ray spectrographs, designed for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) spectra in the spectral range from 5 to 15 keV. The key component is a curved, 20-μm thin, single crystalline diamond triangular plate in the (110) orientation. The radius of curvature can be varied between R = 0:6 m and R = 0:1 m in a controlled fashion, ensuring imaging in a spectral window of up to 60 eV for 8 keV X-rays. All of the components of the bending mechanism (about 10 parts) are manufactured from diamond, thus ensuring safe operations in intense XFEL beams. The spectrograph is transparent to 88% for 5-keV photons, and to 98% for 15-keV photons. Therefore, it can be used for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray spectra during XFEL operations.

  20. Application of X-ray imaging techniques to auroral monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Burstein, P.

    1981-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic particles into the ionosphere produces bremsstrahlung X-rays and K-alpha line emission from excited oxygen and nitrogen. If viewed from a spacecraft in a highly elliptical polar orbit, this soft (0.3 - 3.0 keV) X-radiation will provide an almost uninterrupted record of dayside and nightside auroras. A grazing incidence X-ray telescope especially designed for such auroral monitoring is described. High photon collection efficiency will permit exposure times of approximately 100 seconds during substorms. Spectrophotometry will allow users to derive the energy spectrum of the precipitating particles. If placed in a 15 earth-radius orbit, the telescope can produce auroral X-ray images with 30 km resolution. Absolute position of X-ray auroras can be established with a small optical telescope co-aligned with the X-ray telescope. Comparison of X-ray and optical images will establish the height and global distribution of X-ray aurorae, relative to well-known optical auroras, thus melding the new X-ray results with knowledge of optical auroras.

  1. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  2. Burning plasmas with ultrashort soft-x-ray flashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2012-07-01

    Fast ignition with narrow-band coherent x-ray pulses has been revisited for cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma conditions achieved on the OMEGA Laser System. In contrast to using hard-x-rays (hv = 3-6 keV) proposed in the original x-ray fast-ignition proposal, we find that soft-x-ray sources with hv ≈ 500 eV photons can be suitable for igniting the dense DT-plasmas achieved on OMEGA. Two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have identified the break-even conditions for realizing such a "hybrid" ignition scheme (direct-drive compression with soft-x-ray heating) with 50-μm-offset targets: ˜10 ps soft-x-ray pulse (hv ≈ 500 eV) with a total energy of 500-1000 J to be focused into a 10 μm spot-size. A variety of x-ray pulse parameters have also been investigated for optimization. It is noted that an order of magnitude increase in neutron yield has been predicted even with x-ray energy as low as ˜50 J. Scaling this idea to a 1 MJ large-scale target, a gain above ˜30 can be reached with the same soft-x-ray pulse at 1.65 kJ energy. Even though such energetic x-ray sources do not currently exist, we hope that the proposed ignition scheme may stimulate efforts on generating powerful soft-x-ray sources in the near future.

  3. Burning plasmas with ultrashort soft-x-ray flashing

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2012-07-15

    Fast ignition with narrow-band coherent x-ray pulses has been revisited for cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma conditions achieved on the OMEGA Laser System. In contrast to using hard-x-rays (hv = 3-6 keV) proposed in the original x-ray fast-ignition proposal, we find that soft-x-ray sources with hv Almost-Equal-To 500 eV photons can be suitable for igniting the dense DT-plasmas achieved on OMEGA. Two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have identified the break-even conditions for realizing such a 'hybrid' ignition scheme (direct-drive compression with soft-x-ray heating) with 50-{mu}m-offset targets: {approx}10 ps soft-x-ray pulse (hv Almost-Equal-To 500 eV) with a total energy of 500-1000 J to be focused into a 10 {mu}m spot-size. A variety of x-ray pulse parameters have also been investigated for optimization. It is noted that an order of magnitude increase in neutron yield has been predicted even with x-ray energy as low as {approx}50 J. Scaling this idea to a 1 MJ large-scale target, a gain above {approx}30 can be reached with the same soft-x-ray pulse at 1.65 kJ energy. Even though such energetic x-ray sources do not currently exist, we hope that the proposed ignition scheme may stimulate efforts on generating powerful soft-x-ray sources in the near future.

  4. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  5. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  6. Imaging of X rays for magnetospheric investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, William L.; Voss, Henry D.; Datlowe, Dayton W.

    1992-06-01

    Precipitation of energetic electrons from the magnetosphere into the auroral zone produces x- ray bremsstrahlung. Although in-situ electron spectrometers can provide detailed information at the point of observation, only x-ray imagers can provide large scale maps of the 1 to 300 keV energy electron precipitation. X-ray imaging provides complete day and night coverage of the electron energy spectra at each position. Early x-ray images, such as those obtained from 1979 - 1983, served to demonstrate the importance of narrow elongated arcs of energetic electron precipitation in the auroral zone. They also characterized the spectral parameters and precipitation rates required for understanding source and loss mechanisms in the magnetosphere, but they were limited in field of view and to one map for each pass over the emitting regions. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE), soon to be launched on a TIROS satellite, will make time-space mappings by scanning a 16 pixel pinhole camera. These data will distinguish intensity variations of a fixed auroral feature from motion of a steadily radiating features. However, the spatial deconvolution is complex and features stay in the field of view for only approximately 10 minutes. These problems will be resolved by a high altitude (approximately 9 Re) imaging spectrometer PIXIE on the ISTP/GGS Polar Satellite to be launched in 1994. PIXIE's position sensitive proportional counter will continuously image the entire auroral zone for periods of hours. The resulting images will be important for understanding how the electrons are accelerated in the magnetosphere and why and where they precipitate into the atmosphere. Future needs and plans for next generation imagers will be discussed.

  7. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  8. X-rays of IC443 - remnant of Tang dynasty supernova.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenru

    Hard X-rays with energies up to 20 keV were observed from IC443 by the X-ray satellite Ginga. The X-ray flux below 6 keV is found consistent with that of earlier observations with Einstein and HEAO 1, and the X-ray spectrum smoothly extends to 20 keV. The feature of Fe K line is not conspicuous; an upper limit of the equivalent width for its emission is 250 eV. It is likely that the hard X-rays are emitted from a shock-heated plasma with a temperature higher than 10 keV and a number density smaller than 0.1 cm-3 which is probably located in the SW and W regions of IC443. This model predicts the age of IC443 to be about 1000 years. It is suggested that IC443 is the remnant of a supernova in AD 837.

  9. New micro pore optics for x-ray pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ge; Zhang, Qindong; Xu, Zhao; Zhang, Zhengjun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xu, Wei; Li, Jingwen; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Solutions of focusing pulsars X-ray is a key factor in improving the accuracy of pulsar navigation. Based on the focusing principle of lobster eye grazing incidence, new micro pore optics (MPO) for pulsar navigation which is glass-substrated X-ray MPO is researched and developed. The effective areas on MPO when single grazing incidence or double grazing incidence happens are analyzed in detail and the first generation of MPO is produced. By illumination of parallel X-ray beam with 1.49keV and 8.05keV on the MPO, it is found that the crossing focusing image can be clearly visible, and the arm of cross image of 1.49keV and 8.05keV are is respectively 30mm and 17mm in length. Moreover, the center intensity was significantly higher than the cross arm which is consistent with theoretical calculation. Besides, the angular resolution of first generation of MPO with 8.05keV parallel X-ray beam illuminated is 4.19'.

  10. Quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography by the balanced filter method using a conventional x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2004-12-01

    A quasimonochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) system utilizing balanced filters has recently been developed for acquiring quantitative CT images. This system consisted of basic components such as a conventional x-ray generator for radiography, a stage for mounting and rotating objects, and an x-ray line sensor camera. Metallic sheets of Er and Yb were used as the balanced filters for obtaining quasimonochromatic incident x rays that include the characteristic lines of the W Kalpha doublet from a tungsten target. The mean energy and energy width of the quasimonochromatic x rays were determined to be 59.0 and 1.9 keV, respectively, from x-ray spectroscopic measurements using a high-purity Ge detector. The usefulness of the present x-ray CT system was demonstrated by obtaining spatial distributions of the linear attenuation coefficients of three selected samples--a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom, a 3.5 cm diameter aluminum rod, and a human head phantom. The results clearly indicate that this apparatus is surprisingly effective for estimating the distribution of the linear attenuation coefficients without any correction of the beam-hardening effect. Thus, implementing the balanced filter method on an x-ray CT scanner has promise in producing highly quantitative CT images.

  11. The study of diffuse soft X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anjali

    The cosmic X-ray background was discovered at the dawn of the X-ray astronomy: during the first successful rocket flight launched to study the X-ray emission from the Moon, the presence of a residual diffuse emission was also "serendipitously" revealed. In the intervening decades, observations with improving angular and spectral resolution have enhanced our understanding of the components that make up this background. Above 1 keV, the emission is highly isotropic on large angular scales, has extragalactic origin, and about ~80 percent has been resolved into discrete sources (Mushotzky et al. 2000, Hasinger et al. 1998). Our current interpretation of the diffuse X-ray emission below 1 keV uses a combination of 5 components, solar wind charge exchange, Local Bubble, Galactic halo, intergalactic gas, and unresolved point sources. Resolving the different components is made particularly difficult by the similar spectral emission of most components, X-ray lines of heavily ionized metals, which are poorly resolved by the energy resolution of CCD cameras onboard current X-ray satellites with typical observing times. The goal of this investigation is to assess the integral emission of the major components of the diffuse Soft X-Ray Background. In the first part of my project, I analyzed the shadow observations performed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku X-ray observatories. Shadow observations offer a tool to separate the fore ground component, due to the Local Bubble and, possibly, charge exchange within the solar system, from the background component, due primarily to the Galactic Halo and unidentified point sources. In the second part of my project, I studied the contribution of unresolved point sources and intergalactic medium to the diffuse Soft X-ray Background.

  12. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  13. British X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, K. A.

    1986-09-01

    The development of solar and cosmic X-ray studies in the UK, in particular the Skylark and Ariel programs, is discussed. The characteristics and capabilities of the X-ray emulsion detector developed to monitor the solar X-radiation in the Skylark program, and of the proportional counter spectrometer developed for solar X-ray measurements on the Ariel I satellite are described. The designs and functions of the pin-hole camera, the Bragg crystal spectrometer, and the X-ray spectroheliograph are exmained. The Skylark observations of cosmic X-ray sources and high-resolution solar spectra, and the Ariel 5 data on cosmic X-ray sources are presented. Consideration is given to the Ariel 6, the U.S. Einstein Observatory, Exosat, and ASTRO-C.

  14. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  15. Plasma x-ray radiation source.

    PubMed

    Popkov, N F; Kargin, V I; Ryaslov, E A; Pikar', A S

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the results of studies on a plasma x-ray source, which enables one to obtain a 2.5-krad radiation dose per pulse over an area of 100 cm2 in the quantum energy range from 20 to 500 keV. Pulse duration is 100 ns. Spectral radiation distributions from a diode under various operation conditions of a plasma are obtained. A Marx generator served as an initial energy source of 120 kJ with a discharge time of T/4 = 10-6 s. A short electromagnetic pulse (10-7 s) was shaped using plasma erosion opening switches.

  16. X-Ray Polarization Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    anatomic structures. Johns and Yaffe (2), building on the work of Alvarez and Macovski (3) and that of Lehmann et al (4), discuss a method for...sources of contrast related to both the wave and par- ticulate nature of x rays. References 1. Johns PC, Yaffe MJ. X-ray characterization of normal and...application to mammography. Med Phys 1985; 12:289–296. 3. Alvarez RE, Macovski A. Energy-selective reconstructions in x-ray computerized tomography. Phys

  17. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  18. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  19. MAXI/GSC detection of onset of X-ray outburst from Be/X-ray binary pulsar 4U 0115+63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Ishikawa, M.; Sugawara, Y.; Isobe, N.; Shimomukai, R.; Serino, M.; Nakahira, S.; Iwakiri, W.; Shidatsu, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Sugita, S.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Harita, S.; Muraki, Y.; Morita, K.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Kitaoka, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Tsunemi, H.; Yoneyama, T.; Negoro, H.; Kawase, T.; Sakamaki, A.; Ueda, Y.; Hori, T.; Tanimoto, A.; Oda, S.; Tsuboi, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Kawai, H.; Yamauchi, M.; Hanyu, C.; Hidaka, K.; Kawamuro, T.; Yamaoka, K.

    2017-08-01

    On 2017 July 27 (MJD 57961), the MAXI/GSC nova-alert system (Negoro et al. 2016) detected an X-ray flux increase from Be/X-ray binary pulsar 4U 0115+63. Subsequent monitoring observations have revealed that the 4-10 keV flux is still increasing steadily.

  20. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  1. The X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, D.; Jonge, M. D. de; Howard, D. L.; Lewis, W.; McKinlay, J.; Starritt, A.; Kusel, M.; Ryan, C. G.; Kirkham, R.; Moorhead, G.; Siddons, D. P.

    2011-09-09

    A hard x-ray micro-nanoprobe has commenced operation at the Australian Synchrotron providing versatile x-ray fluorescence microscopy across an incident energy range from 4 to 25 keV. Two x-ray probes are used to collect {mu}-XRF and {mu}-XANES for elemental and chemical microanalysis: a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror microprobe for micron resolution studies and a Fresnel zone plate nanoprobe capable of 60-nm resolution. Some unique aspects of the beamline design and operation are discussed. An advanced energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence detection scheme named Maia has been developed for the beamline, which enables ultrafast x-ray fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  3. Note: Application of laser produced plasma Kα x-ray probe in radiation biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Sato, Katsutoshi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Ishino, Masahiko; Ohshima, Shinsuke; Okano, Yasuaki; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Tetruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2010-02-01

    A dedicated radiation biology x-ray generation and exposure system has been developed. 8.0 keV in energy x-ray pulses generated with a femtosecond-laser pulse was used to irradiate sample cells through a custom-made culture dish with a silicon nitride membrane. The x-ray irradiation resulted in DNA double-strand breaks in the nucleus of a culture cell that were similar to those obtained with a conventional x-ray source, thus demonstrating the feasibility of radiobiological studies utilizing a single burst of x-rays focused on single cell specimens.

  4. Note: Application of laser produced plasma K alpha x-ray probe in radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Sato, Katsutoshi; Hasegawa, Noboru; Ishino, Masahiko; Ohshima, Shinsuke; Okano, Yasuaki; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Tetruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2010-02-01

    A dedicated radiation biology x-ray generation and exposure system has been developed. 8.0 keV in energy x-ray pulses generated with a femtosecond-laser pulse was used to irradiate sample cells through a custom-made culture dish with a silicon nitride membrane. The x-ray irradiation resulted in DNA double-strand breaks in the nucleus of a culture cell that were similar to those obtained with a conventional x-ray source, thus demonstrating the feasibility of radiobiological studies utilizing a single burst of x-rays focused on single cell specimens.

  5. Observation of soft X-rays from extended sources. [such as Perseus star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts were directed toward surveying several supernova remnants for the emission of soft X-rays. Rather than attempt to detect such faint X-ray emission, the program was redirected to observe the spectrum and angular structure of the extended X-ray source in the Perseus cluster of galaxies and the super-nova remnant Puppis A. An attempt was made to detect X-ray line emission from Puppis A with a Bragg crystal spectrometer. Observations provide evidence for the presence of X-ray line emission in the spectrum of Puppis A near .65 keV.

  6. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  7. BAT X-Ray Survey. I. Methodology and X-Ray Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Greiner, J.; Kanbach, G.; Rau, A.; Strong, A. W.; Kennea, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    We applied the maximum likelihood (ML) method, as an image reconstruction algorithm, to the BAT X-Ray Survey (BXS). This method was specifically designed to preserve the full statistical information in the data and to avoid mosaicking of many exposures with different pointing directions, thus reducing systematic errors when co-adding images. We reconstructed, in the 14-170 keV energy band, the image of a 90 × 90 deg2 sky region, centered on (R .A ., decl .) = (105°, - 25°) , which BAT surveyed with an exposure time of ~1 Ms (in 2005 November). The best sensitivity in our image is ~0.85 mcrab or 2.0 × 10-11 ergs cm-2. We detect 49 hard X-ray sources above the 4.5 σ level; of these, only 12 were previously known as hard X-ray sources (>15 keV). Swift XRT observations allowed us to firmly identify the counterparts for 15 objects, while 2 objects have Einstein IPC counterparts (Harris et al. 1990); in addition to those, we found a likely counterpart for 13 objects by correlating our sample with the ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (Voges et al. 1999). Seven objects remain unidentified. Analysis of the noise properties of our image shows that ~75% of the area is surveyed to a flux limit of ~1 mcrab. This study shows that the coupling of the ML method to the most sensitive, all-sky surveying, hard X-ray instrument, BAT, is able to probe for the first time the hard X-ray sky to the millicrab flux level. The successful application of this method to BAT demonstrates that it could also be applied with advantage to similar instruments such as INTEGRAL IBIS.

  8. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tien-Lin

    2006-03-01

    Using the brilliant undulator radiation available from the third generation synchrotron sources, hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has become an emerging field in the recent years. With the excitation energy used in HAXPES one can benefits from the large mean free path of fast electrons (˜ 5 nm for electrons of 6 keV kinetic energy) in probing the bulk electronic properties of materials. For high-resolution studies, photon energy bandwidth narrower than 100 meV is also readily achievable in the hard x-ray range with crystal monochromators. In addition, working with hard x-ray offers the possibility for combining photoelectron spectroscopy with x-ray standing wave (XSW) method. With the high spatial resolution from XSWs, this unique combination can provide site-specific, chemical and electronic information for studying surfaces, buried interfaces, thin films and bulk crystals. In this talk, I will briefly mention some HAXPES experiments detecting electrons up to 14.5 keV [1,2]. I will then sketch the principle of combining XSWs with HAXPES and present results from some recent applications using this combination: (1) chemical state-specific surface structure determination with core-level photoemission, (2) site-specific valence x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and (3) XSW imaging with core-level photoemission. [1] S. Thiess, C. Kunz, B.C.C. Cowie, T.-L. Lee, M. Renier, and J. Zegenhagen. Solid State Communications 132, 589 (2004) [2] C. Kunz, S. Thiess, B.C.C. Cowie, T.-L. Lee, and J. Zegenhagen, Nuclear Instruments and Methods A 547, 73 (2005).

  9. X-ray photonics: Bending X-rays with nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    X-ray counterparts of visible light optical elements are notoriously difficult to realize because the refractive index of all materials is close to unity. It has now been demonstrated that curved waveguides fabricated on a silicon chip can channel and deflect X-ray beams by consecutive grazing reflections.

  10. X-rays from a microsecond X-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Appartaim, R. K.

    2013-08-28

    The characteristics of x-rays emitted by X-pinches driven by discharging a current of ∼320 kA with a quarter period of 1 μs in crossed 25 μm wires have been investigated. The x-ray emissions are studied using filtered silicon photodiodes, diamond radiation detectors, and pinhole cameras. The results show that predominantly x-rays from the microsecond X-pinch tend to be emitted in two distinct sets of bursts. The first is predominantly “soft,” i.e., with photon energy hν < 5 keV, followed by a second set of bursts beginning up to 100 ns following the initial bursts, and usually consisting of higher photon energies. Our results show, however, that the x-ray emissions do not contain a significant component with hν > 10 keV as might be expected from electron beam activity within the plasma or from the X-pinch diode. High-resolution images obtained with the observed x-rays suggest a well-defined small source of soft x-rays that demonstrates the potential of the microsecond X-pinch.

  11. Soft diffuse X-rays in the southern galactic hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Nousek, J. A.; Fried, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    A map is presented of the soft X-ray diffuse background flux in the C band (approximately 0.13-0.28 keV) covering almost all of the southern galactic hemisphere. A comparison at constant galactic latitude of both C band and B band (about 0.1-0.18 keV) soft X-ray data with neutral-hydrogen maps shows that the intensity does decrease with increasing neutral-hydrogen column density but in a manner that is inconsistent with photoelectric absorption. It is suggested that the inverse correlation is a displacement effect. X-ray emission regions appear to be where the cool gas is not. Further, the evidence against photoelectric absorption implies that the bulk of the cool gas is beyond the X-ray emitting regions. Fewer than 10 to the 20th power H atoms per sq cm can be between the sun and the X-ray emitting regions. The sun appears to be surrounded by a soft X-ray emission region consisting of gas at a temperature of about 1 million K.

  12. Ground-based x-ray calibration of the Astro-H soft x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Ryo; Hayashi, Takayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Ishida, Manabu; Tomikawa, Kazuki; Sato, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Okajima, Takashi; Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Mori, Hideyuki; Izumiya, Takanori; Minami, Sari

    2014-07-01

    The X-ray astronomy satellite Astro-H, planned to be launched in 2015, will have several instruments for covering a wide energy band from a few hundreds eV to 600 keV. There are four X-ray telescopes, and two of them are soft X-ray telescopes (SXTs) covering up to about 15 keV. One is for an X-ray micro-calorimeter detector (SXS) and the other is for an X-ray CCD detector (SXI). The design of the SXTs is a conical approximation of the Wolter Type-I optics, which is also adopted for the telescopes on the previous mission Suzaku launched in 2005. It consists 203 thin-foil reflectors coated with gold monolayer (2000 Å) on the aluminum substrate (101.6 mm length) with the thickness of 0.15, 0.23 and 0.31 mm. These are nested confocally within the radius of 58 to 225 mm. The focal length of SXTs is 5.6 m. The weight is as light as ~ 43 kg per telescope. We present the current status of the calibration activity of two SXTs (SXT-1 and SXT-2). The developments of two SXTs were completed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). First X-ray measurements with a diverging beam at the GSFC 100m beamline found an angular resolution at 8.0 keV to be 1.1 and 1.0 arcmin (HPD) for SXT-1 and SXT-2, respectively. The full characterization of the X-ray performance has been now continuously calibrated with the 30m X-ray beamline facility at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) of Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) in Japan. We adopted a raster scan method with a narrow X-ray pencil beam with the divergence of ~ 15". X-ray characterization of the two SXTs has been measured from May and December 2013, respectively. In the case of SXT-1, the on-axis effective area was approximately 580, 445, 370, 270, 185 and 90 cm2 at energies of 1.5, 4.5, 8.0, 9.4, 11.1 and 12.9 keV respectively. The effective area of SXT-2 is 2% larger than that of SXT-1 irrespective to X-ray energy. The on-axis angular resolution of SXT-1 was evaluated as 1.3 - 1.5 arcmin (HPD) in the 1

  13. Performance of the PRAXyS X-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakiri, W.B.; Black, J. K.; Cole, R.; Enoto, T.; Hayato, A.; Hill, J. E.; Jahoda, K.; Kaaret, P.; Kitaguchi, T.; Kubota, M.; Marlowe, H.; McCurdy, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tamagawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) polarimeter for the Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) Small Explorer was evaluated using polarized and unpolarized X-ray sources. The PRAXyS mission will enable exploration of the universe through X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV energy band. We carried out performance tests of the polarimeter at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (BNL-NSLS) and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The polarimeter was tested with linearly polarized, monochromatic X-rays at 11 different energies between 2.5 and 8.0 keV. At maximum sensitivity, the measured modulation factors at 2.7, 4.5 and 8.0 keV are 27%, 43% and 59%, respectively and the measured angle of polarization is consistent with the expected value at all energies. Measurements with a broadband, unpolarized X-ray source placed a limit of less than 1% on false polarization in the PRAXyS polarimeter.

  14. Performance of the PRAXyS X-Ray Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakiri, W.B.; Black, J. K.; Cole, R.; Enoto, T.; Hayato, A.; Hill, J. E.; Jahoda, K.; Kaaret, P.; Kitaguchi, T.; Kubota, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) polarimeter for the Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) Small Explorer was evaluated using polarized and unpolarized X-ray sources. The PRAXyS mission will enable exploration of the universe through X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV energy band. We carried out performance tests of the polarimeter at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (BNL-NSLS) and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The polarimeter was tested with linearly polarized, monochromatic X-rays at 11 different energies between 2.5 and 8.0 keV. At maximum sensitivity, the measured modulation factors at 2.7, 4.5 and 8.0 keV are 27%, 43% and 59%, respectively and the measured angle of polarization is consistent with the expected value at all energies. Measurements with a broadband, unpolarized X-ray source placed a limit of less than 1% on false polarization in the PRAXyS polarimeter.

  15. Performance of the PRAXyS X-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakiri, W. B.; Black, J. K.; Cole, R.; Enoto, T.; Hayato, A.; Hill, J. E.; Jahoda, K.; Kaaret, P.; Kitaguchi, T.; Kubota, M.; Marlowe, H.; McCurdy, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tamagawa, T.

    2016-12-01

    The performance of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) polarimeter for the Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) Small Explorer was evaluated using polarized and unpolarized X-ray sources. The PRAXyS mission will enable exploration of the universe through X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV energy band. We carried out performance tests of the polarimeter at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source (BNL-NSLS) and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The polarimeter was tested with linearly polarized, monochromatic X-rays at 11 different energies between 2.5 and 8.0 keV. At maximum sensitivity, the measured modulation factors at 2.7, 4.5 and 8.0 keV are 27%, 43% and 59%, respectively and the measured angle of polarization is consistent with the expected value at all energies. Measurements with a broadband, unpolarized X-ray source placed a limit of less than 1% on false polarization in the PRAXyS polarimeter.

  16. An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic on MSTa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.; Almagri, A. F.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; O'Connell, R.

    2010-10-01

    An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic is used to measure the distribution of fast electrons in MST and to determine Zeff and the particle diffusion coefficient Dr. A radial array of 12 CdZnTe hard-x-ray detectors measures 10-150 keV Bremsstrahlung from fast electrons, a signature of reduced stochasticity and improved confinement in the plasma. A new Si soft-x-ray detector measures 2-10 keV Bremsstrahlung from thermal and fast electrons. The shaped output pulses from both detector types are digitized and the resulting waveforms are fit with Gaussians to resolve pileup and provide good time and energy resolution. Lead apertures prevent detector saturation and provide a well-known etendue, while lead shielding prevents pickup from stray x-rays. New Be vacuum windows transmit >2 keV x-rays, and additional Al and Be filters are sometimes used to reduce low energy flux for better resolution at higher energies. Measured spectra are compared to those predicted by the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D to deduce Zeff and Dr.

  17. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, Gabriella; Denes, Peter; Gruener, Sol; Lessner, Elianne

    2012-08-01

    (and two computing hurdles that result from the corresponding increase in data volume) for the detector community to overcome in order to realize the full potential of BES neutron and X-ray facilities. Resolving these detector impediments will improve scientific productivity both by enabling new types of experiments, which will expand the scientific breadth at the X-ray and neutron facilities, and by potentially reducing the beam time required for a given experiment. These research priorities are summarized in the table below. Note that multiple, simultaneous detector improvements are often required to take full advantage of brighter sources. High-efficiency hard X-ray sensors: The fraction of incident particles that are actually detected defines detector efficiency. Silicon, the most common direct-detection X-ray sensor material, is (for typical sensor thicknesses) 100% efficient at 8 keV, 25%efficient at 20 keV, and only 3% efficient at 50 keV. Other materials are needed for hard X-rays. Replacement for 3He for neutron detectors: 3He has long been the neutron detection medium of choice because of its high cross section over a wide neutron energy range for the reaction 3He + n —> 3H + 1H + 0.764 MeV. 3He stockpiles are rapidly dwindling, and what is available can be had only at prohibitively high prices. Doped scintillators hold promise as ways to capture neutrons and convert them into light, although work is needed on brighter, more efficient scintillator solutions. Neutron detectors also require advances in speed and resolution. Fast-framing X-ray detectors: Today’s brighter X-ray sources make time-resolved studies possible. For example, hybrid X-ray pixel detectors, initially developed for particle physics, are becoming fairly mature X-ray detectors, with considerable development in Europe. To truly enable time-resolved studies, higher frame rates and dynamic range are required, and smaller pixel sizes are desirable. High-speed spectroscopic X-ray detectors

  18. New position-sensitive hard X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    The design and features of a new prototype Lixiscope (Low intensity X-ray imaging scope) is described. It is shown that in addition to good spatial and temporal resolution in the 20 keV to 200 keV region, it is capable of single-photon counting, imaging as well as good energy resolution. It is concluded that the device is well suited for future low-flux applications in astronomy, medicine, and industry.

  19. A new technique for measuring the polarization from celestial X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Minamitani, Takahisa; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1993-09-01

    The detection of polarized X-rays from cosmic X-ray sources will give useful information about the magnetic fields and matter surrounding these sources. Up to now only one experiment, OSO-8, has measured the degree of polarization from a cosmic X-ray source. In the past we demonstrated a novel new technique using an intensified camera coupled to a gas-filled proportional counter which can be used to measure X-ray polarization by imaging the tracks of photoelectrons ejected when X-rays are absorbed in the detector volume. These tracks contain information about the location of the X-ray interaction point and its polarization. In the lab we have obtained modulation factors of about 30 percent for 60 keV polarized X-rays. Here we discuss preliminary work done towards building a large-area hard X-ray imaging polarimeter which will be able to measure X-ray polarization from bright cosmic X-ray sources at energies between 40 keV and 100 keV.

  20. Solar Hard X-ray Observations with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Andrew; Smith, D. M.; Krucker, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Hurford, G. J.; White, S. M.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Stern, D.

    2012-05-01

    High-sensitivity imaging of coronal hard X-rays allows detection of freshly accelerated nonthermal electrons at the acceleration site. A few such observations have been made with Yohkoh and RHESSI, but a leap in sensitivity could help pin down the time, place, and manner of reconnection. Around the time of this meeting, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR), a NASA Small Explorer for high energy astrophysics that uses grazing-incidence optics to focus X-rays up to 80 keV, will be launched. Three weeks will be dedicated to solar observing during the baseline two-year mission. NuSTAR will be 200 times more sensitive than RHESSI in the hard X-ray band. This will allow the following new observations, among others: 1) Extrapolation of the micro/nanoflare distribution by two orders of magnitude down in flux; 2) Search for hard X-rays from network nanoflares (soft X-ray bright points) and evaluation of their role in coronal heating; 3) Discovery of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung from the electron beams driving type III radio bursts, and measurement of their electron spectrum; 4) Hard X-ray studies of polar soft X-ray jets and impulsive solar energetic particle events at the edge of coronal holes; 5) Study of coronal bremsstrahlung from particles accelerated by coronal mass ejections as they are first launched; 6) Study of particles at the coronal reconnection site when flare footpoints and loops are occulted; 7) Search for weak high-temperature coronal plasmas in active regions that are not flaring; and 8) Search for hypothetical axion particles created in the solar core via the hard X-ray signal from their conversion to X-rays in the coronal magnetic field. NuSTAR will also serve as a pathfinder for a future dedicated space mission with enhanced capabilities, such as a satellite version of the FOXSI sounding rocket.