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Sample records for 30-day hospital mortality

  1. Relationships between in-hospital and 30-day standardized hospital mortality: implications for profiling hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G. E.; Baker, D. W.; Norris, D. G.; Way, L. E.; Harper, D. L.; Snow, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates and the association between in-hospital mortality and hospital discharge practices. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: A secondary analysis of data for 13,834 patients with congestive heart failure who were admitted to 30 hospitals in northeast Ohio in 1992-1994. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was conducted. DATA COLLECTION: Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients' medical records and were used to develop multivariable models that estimated the risk of in-hospital and 30-day (post-admission) mortality. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for in-hospital and 30-day mortality were determined by dividing observed death rates by predicted death rates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In-hospital SMRs ranged from 0.54 to 1.42, and six hospitals were classified as statistical outliers (p <.05); 30-day SMRs ranged from 0.63 to 1.73, and seven hospitals were outliers. Although the correlation between in-hospital SMRs and 30-day SMRs was substantial (R = 0.78, p < .001), outlier status changed for seven of the 30 hospitals. Nonetheless, changes in outlier status reflected relatively small differences between in-hospital and 30-day SMRs. Rates of discharge to nursing homes or other inpatient facilities varied from 5.4 percent to 34.2 percent across hospitals. However, relationships between discharge rates to such facilities and in-hospital SMRs (R = 0.08; p = .65) and early post-discharge mortality rates (R = 0.23; p = .21) were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: SMRs based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality were relatively similar, although classification of hospitals as statistical outliers often differed. However, there was no evidence that in-hospital SMRs were biased by differences in post-discharge mortality or discharge practices. PMID:10737447

  2. Measuring hospital mortality rates: are 30-day data enough? Ischemic Heart Disease Patient Outcomes Research Team.

    PubMed Central

    Garnick, D W; DeLong, E R; Luft, H S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We compare 30-day and 180-day postadmission hospital mortality rates for all Medicare patients and those in three categories of cardiac care: coronary artery bypass graft surgery, acute myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. DATA SOURCES/COLLECTION. Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) hospital mortality data for FY 1989. STUDY DESIGN. Using hospital level public use files of actual and predicted mortality at 30 and 180 days, we constructed residual mortality measures for each hospital. We ranked hospitals and used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to compare 0-30, 31-180, and 0-180-day postadmission mortality. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. For the admissions we studied, we found a broad range of hospital performance when we ranked hospitals using the 30-day data; some hospitals had much lower than predicted 30-day mortality rates, while others had much higher than predicted mortality rates. Data from the time period 31-180 days postadmission yield results that corroborate the 0-30 day postadmission data. Moreover, we found evidence that hospital performance on one condition is related to performance on the other conditions, but that the correlation is much weaker in the 31-180-day interval than in the 0-30-day period. Using ROC curves, we found that the 30-day data discriminated the top and bottom fifths of the 180-day data extremely well, especially for AMI outcomes. CONCLUSIONS. Using data on cumulative hospital mortality from 180 days postadmission does not yield a different perspective from using data from 30 days postadmission for the conditions we studied. PMID:7860319

  3. Hypotension During Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure Is Independently Associated With 30-Day Mortality: Findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Heizer, Gretchen; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Hasselblad, Vic; Mills, Roger M.; McMurray, John J.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes associated with episodes of hypotension while hospitalized are not well understood. Methods and Results Using data from ASCEND-HF, we assessed factors associated with inhospital hypotension and subsequent 30-day outcomes. Patients were classified as having symptomatic or asymptomatic hypotension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital hypotension, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between hypotension and 30-day outcomes. We also tested for treatment interaction with nesiritide on 30-day outcomes and the association between inhospital hypotension and renal function at hospital discharge. Overall, 1555/7141 (21.8%) patients had an episode of hypotension, of which 73.1% were asymptomatic and 26.9% were symptomatic. Factors strongly associated with in-hospital hypotension included randomization to nesiritide (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.76–2.23; p<0.001), chronic metolazone therapy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.60; p<0.001), and baseline orthopnea (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13–1.52; p=0.001) or S3 gallop (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06–1.40; p=0.006). In-hospital hypotension was associated with increased hazards of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.57–2.61; p<0.001), 30-day heart failure (HF) hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34–1.86; p<0.001), and 30-day all-cause hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.22–1.61; p<0.001). Nesiritide had no interaction on the relationship between hypotension and 30-day outcomes (interaction p=0.874 for death, p=0.908 for death/HF hospitalization, p=0.238 death/all-cause hospitalization). Conclusions Hypotension while hospitalized for acute decompensated HF is an independent risk factor for adverse 30-day outcomes, and its occurrence highlights the need for modified treatment strategies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  4. Predictors of 30-Day Mortality and 90-Day Functional Recovery after Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage : Hospital Based Multivariate Analysis in 585 Patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify independent predictors of mortality and functional recovery in patients with primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH) and to improve functional outcome in these patients. Methods Data were collected retrospectively on 585 patients with supratentorial PICH admitted to the Stroke Unit at our hospital between 1st January 2004 and the 31st July 2008. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, the associations between all selected variables and 30-day mortality and 90-day functional recoveries after PICH was evaluated. Results Ninety-day functional recovery was achieved in 29.1% of the 585 patients and 30-day mortality in 15.9%. Age (OR=7.384, p=0.000), limb weakness (OR=6.927, p=0.000), and hematoma volume (OR=5.293, p=0.000) were found to be powerful predictors of 90-day functional recovery. Furthermore, initial consciousness (OR=3.013, p=0.014) hematoma location (lobar, OR=2.653, p=0.003), ventricular extension of blood (OR=2.077, p=0.013), leukocytosis (OR=2.048, p=0.008), alcohol intake (drinker, OR=1.927, p=0.023), and increased serum aminotransferase (OR=1.892, p=0.035) were found to be independent predictors of 90-day functional recovery after PICH. On the other hand, a pupillary abnormality (OR=4.532, p=0.000) and initial unconsciousness (OR=3.362, p=0.000) were found to be independent predictors of 30-day mortality after PICH. Conclusion The predictors of mortality and functional recovery after PICH identified during this analysis may assist during clinical decision-making, when advising patients or family members about the prognosis of PICH and when planning intervention trials. PMID:19609417

  5. Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Lindman, Anja Schou

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of patient administrative data (PAS) for calculating 30-day mortality after hip fracture as a quality indicator, by a retrospective study of medical records. Methods We used PAS data from all Norwegian hospitals (2005–2009), merged with vital status from the National Registry, to calculate 30-day case-mix adjusted mortality for each hospital (n = 51). We used stratified sampling to establish a representative sample of both hospitals and cases. The hospitals were stratified according to high, low and medium mortality of which 4, 3, and 5 hospitals were sampled, respectively. Within hospitals, cases were sampled stratified according to year of admission, age, length of stay, and vital 30-day status (alive/dead). The final study sample included 1043 cases from 11 hospitals. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. Diagnostic and clinical information from the medical records and PAS were used to define definite and probable hip fracture. We used logistic regression analysis in order to estimate systematic between-hospital variation in unmeasured confounding. Finally, to study the consequences of unmeasured confounding for identifying mortality outlier hospitals, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Results The estimated overall positive predictive value was 95.9% for definite and 99.7% for definite or probable hip fracture, with no statistically significant differences between hospitals. The standard deviation of the additional, systematic hospital bias in mortality estimates was 0.044 on the logistic scale. The effect of unmeasured confounding on outlier detection was small to moderate, noticeable only for large hospital volumes. Conclusions This study showed that PAS data are adequate for identifying cases of hip fracture, and the effect of unmeasured case mix variation was small. In conclusion, PAS data are adequate for calculating 30-day mortality after hip-fracture as a quality

  6. Vitamin D Status Predicts 30 Day Mortality in Hospitalised Cats

    PubMed Central

    Titmarsh, Helen; Kilpatrick, Scott; Sinclair, Jennifer; Boag, Alisdair; Bode, Elizabeth F.; Lalor, Stephanie M.; Gaylor, Donna; Berry, Jacqueline; Bommer, Nicholas X.; Gunn-Moore, Danielle; Reed, Nikki; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency, defined as low serum concentrations of the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been associated with the development of numerous infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders in humans. In addition, vitamin D insufficiency has been found to be predictive of mortality for many disorders. However, interpretation of human studies is difficult since vitamin D status is influenced by many factors, including diet, season, latitude, and exposure to UV radiation. In contrast, domesticated cats do not produce vitamin D cutaneously, and most cats are fed a commercial diet containing a relatively standard amount of vitamin D. Consequently, domesticated cats are an attractive model system in which to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and health outcomes. The hypothesis of this study was that vitamin D status would predict short term, all-cause mortality in domesticated cats. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, together with a wide range of other clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters, were measured in 99 consecutively hospitalised cats. Cats which died within 30 days of initial assessment had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations than cats which survived. In a linear regression model including 12 clinical variables, serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile was significantly predictive of mortality. The odds ratio of mortality within 30 days was 8.27 (95% confidence interval 2.54-31.52) for cats with a serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that low serum 25(OH)D concentration status is an independent predictor of short term mortality in cats. PMID:25970442

  7. New consensus definition for acute kidney injury accurately predicts 30-day mortality in cirrhosis with infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Florence; O’Leary, Jacqueline G; Reddy, K Rajender; Patton, Heather; Kamath, Patrick S; Fallon, Michael B; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Subramanian, Ram M.; Malik, Raza; Maliakkal, Benedict; Thacker, Leroy R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims A consensus conference proposed that cirrhosis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) be defined as an increase in serum creatinine by >50% from the stable baseline value in <6 months or by ≥0.3mg/dL in <48 hrs. We prospectively evaluated the ability of these criteria to predict mortality within 30 days among hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and infection. Methods 337 patients with cirrhosis admitted with or developed an infection in hospital (56% men; 56±10 y old; model for end-stage liver disease score, 20±8) were followed. We compared data on 30-day mortality, hospital length-of-stay, and organ failure between patients with and without AKI. Results 166 (49%) developed AKI during hospitalization, based on the consensus criteria. Patients who developed AKI had higher admission Child-Pugh (11.0±2.1 vs 9.6±2.1; P<.0001), and MELD scores (23±8 vs17±7; P<.0001), and lower mean arterial pressure (81±16mmHg vs 85±15mmHg; P<.01) than those who did not. Also higher amongst patients with AKI were mortality in ≤30 days (34% vs 7%), intensive care unit transfer (46% vs 20%), ventilation requirement (27% vs 6%), and shock (31% vs 8%); AKI patients also had longer hospital stays (17.8±19.8 days vs 13.3±31.8 days) (all P<.001). 56% of AKI episodes were transient, 28% persistent, and 16% resulted in dialysis. Mortality was 80% among those without renal recovery, higher compared to partial (40%) or complete recovery (15%), or AKI-free patients (7%; P<.0001). Conclusions 30-day mortality is 10-fold higher among infected hospitalized cirrhotic patients with irreversible AKI than those without AKI. The consensus definition of AKI accurately predicts 30-day mortality, length of hospital stay, and organ failure. PMID:23999172

  8. Hyperkalemia is Associated with Increased 30-Day Mortality in Hip Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Norring-Agerskov, Debbie; Madsen, Christian Medom; Abrahamsen, Bo; Riis, Troels; Pedersen, Ole B; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Bathum, Lise; Lauritzen, Jes Bruun; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2017-02-17

    Abnormal plasma concentrations of potassium in the form of hyper- and hypokalemia are frequent among hospitalized patients and have been linked to poor outcomes. In this study, we examined the prevalence of hypo- and hyperkalemia in patients admitted with a fractured hip as well as the association with 30-day mortality in these patients. A total of 7293 hip fracture patients (aged 60 years or above) with admission plasma potassium measurements were included. Data on comorbidity, medication, and death was retrieved from national registries. The association between plasma potassium and mortality was examined using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities. The prevalence of hypo- and hyperkalemia on admission was 19.8% and 6.6%, respectively. The 30-day mortality rates were increased for patients with hyperkalemia (21.0%, p < 0.0001) compared to normokalemic patients (9.5%), whereas hypokalemia was not significantly associated with mortality. After adjustment for age, sex, and individual comorbidities, hyperkalemia was still associated with increased risk of death 30 days after admission (HR = 1.93 [1.55-2.40], p < 0.0001). After the same adjustments, hypokalemia remained non-associated with increased risk of 30-day mortality (HR = 1.06 [0.87-1.29], p = 0.6). Hyperkalemia, but not hypokalemia, at admission is associated with increased 30-day mortality after a hip fracture.

  9. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and 30-day mortality among patients with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Farzin; Ahmadpoor, Amin; Amra, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the most life-threatening form of venous thrombosis which causes the majority of mortalities in this category. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been indicated as one of the risk factors for thromboembolism because of hemostatic alterations. The present study was designed to seek for the relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality of patients with PE. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted among 137 consecutive patients referred to hospital with symptoms of PE and preliminary stable hemodynamic. Confirmation of PE was made by multislice computed tomography pulmonary angiography and in the case of contraindication; V/Q lung scan and Doppler sonography were done. A STOP-Bang Questionnaire was used to determine patients with high- and low-risk of OSA. Patients were followed up for 1-month, and their survivals were recorded. Results: This study showed that there was no relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality (P = 0.389). Chronic kidney disease (P = 0.004), hypertension (P = 0.003), main thrombus (P = 0.004), and segmental thrombus (P = 0.022) were associated with 30-day mortality. In the logistic regression analysis, history of chronic kidney disease was diagnosed as a risk factor for 30-day mortality among the PE patients (P = 0.029, odds ratio = 4.93). Conclusion: Results of this study showed 30-day mortality was not affected by OSA directly. In fact, it was affected by complications of OSA such as hypertension and thrombus. Also, positive history of chronic kidney disease increased the risk of 30-day mortality. PMID:26622255

  10. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Causes and Predictors of 30-Day Mortality Following Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Fahad Siddique; Aqil, Adeel; Akinbamijo, Babawande; Mushtaq, Vhaid; Kapoor, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Background A fracture neck of femur is the leading cause of injury-related mortality in the elderly population. The 30-day mortality figure is a well utilised marker of clinical outcome following a fracture neck of femur. Current studies fail to analyse all patient demographic, biochemical and comorbid parameters associated with increased 30-day mortality. We aimed to assess medical risk factors for mortality, which are easily identifiable on admission for patients presenting with a fractured neck of femur. Methods A retrospective review of a prospectively populated database was undertaken to identify all consecutive patients with a fracture neck of femur between October 2008 and March 2011. All factors related to the patient, injury and surgery were identified. The primary outcome of interest was 30-day mortality. Univariate and subsequent multivariate analyses using a backward stepwise likelihood ratio Cox regression model were performed in order to establish all parameters that significantly increased the risk of death. Results A total of 1,356 patients were included in the study. The 30-day mortality was 8.7%. The most common causes of death included pneumonia, sepsis and acute myocardial infarction. Multiple regression analysis revealed male gender, increasing age, admission source other than the patient's own home, admission haemoglobin of less than 10 g/dL, a history of myocardial infarction, concomitant chest infection during admission, increasing Charlson comorbidity score and liver disease to be significant predictors of mortality. Conclusions This study has elucidated risk factors for mortality using clinical and biochemical information which are easily gathered at the point of hospitalization. These results allow for identification of vulnerable patients who may benefit from a prioritisation of resources. PMID:28261422

  11. 30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Sahar; Lindman, Anja Schou; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Tomic, Oliver; Helgeland, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Background The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC) reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no), as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator. Methods and Findings Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture) are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall) 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days) is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated

  12. Integrated systems of stroke care and reduction in 30-day mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Aravind; Lindsay, Patrice; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K.; Côté, Robert; Joiner, Ian; Hakim, Antoine M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between the presence of integrated systems of stroke care and stroke case-fatality across Canada. Methods: We used the Canadian Institute of Health Information's Discharge Abstract Database to retrospectively identify a cohort of stroke/TIA patients admitted to all acute care hospitals, excluding the province of Quebec, in 11 fiscal years from 2003/2004 to 2013/2014. We used a modified Poisson regression model to compute the adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of 30-day in-hospital mortality across time for provinces with stroke systems compared to those without, controlling for age, sex, stroke type, comorbidities, and discharge year. We conducted surveys of stroke care resources in Canadian hospitals in 2009 and 2013, and compared resources in provinces with integrated systems to those without. Results: A total of 319,972 patients were hospitalized for stroke/TIA. The crude 30-day mortality rate decreased from 15.8% in 2003/2004 to 12.7% in 2012/2013 in provinces with stroke systems, while remaining 14.5% in provinces without such systems. Starting with the fiscal year 2009/2010, there was a clear reduction in relative mortality in provinces with stroke systems vs those without, sustained at aIRR of 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.79–0.92) in the 2011/2012, 2012/2013, and 2013/2014 fiscal years. The surveys indicated that facilities in provinces with such systems were more likely to care for patients on a stroke unit, and have timely access to a stroke prevention clinic and telestroke services. Conclusion: In this retrospective study, the implementation of integrated systems of stroke care was associated with a population-wide reduction in mortality after stroke. PMID:26850979

  13. Predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with spontaneous primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Safatli, Diaa A.; Günther, Albrecht; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwarz, Falko; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a life threatening entity, and an early outcome assessment is mandatory for optimizing therapeutic efforts. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 342 patients with spontaneous primary ICH to evaluate possible predictors of 30-day mortality considering clinical, radiological, and therapeutical parameters. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. Results: From 342 patients (mean age: 67 years, mean Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] on admission: 9, mean ICH volume: 62.19 ml, most common hematoma location: basal ganglia [43.9%]), 102 received surgical and 240 conservative treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25.15%. In a multivariate analysis, GCS (Odds ratio [OR] =0.726, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.661–0.796, P < 0.001), bleeding volume (OR = 1.012 per ml, 95% CI = 1.007 – 1.017, P < 0.001), and infratentorial hematoma location (OR = 5.381, 95% CI = 2.166-13.356, P = 0.009) were significant predictors for the 30-day mortality. After receiver operating characteristics analysis, we defined a “high-risk group” for an unfavorable short-term outcome with GCS <11 and ICH volume >32 ml supratentorially or 21 ml infratentorially. Using Pearson correlation, we found a correlation of 0.986 between ICH score and 30-day mortality (P < 0.001), 0.853 between FUNC score and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001), and 0.924 between ICH-GS and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001). Conclusions: GCS score on admission together with the baseline volume and localization of the hemorrhage are strong

  14. Analysis of weekend effect on 30-day mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Noad, Rebecca; Stevenson, Michael; Herity, Niall A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several publications have demonstrated increased 30-day mortality in patients admitted on Saturdays or Sundays compared with weekdays. We sought to determine whether this was true for two different cohorts of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results Thirty-day mortality data were obtained for 3757 patients who had been admitted to the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust with acute MI between 2009 and 2015. They were subdivided into those presenting with ST elevation MI (n=2240) and non-ST elevation MI (n= 1517). We observed no excess 30-day mortality in those admitted over weekends. Conclusion Excess mortality in patients admitted at weekends is not a universal finding. This may mean that that there are patient subgroups with proportionately greater weekend hazard and points to the need for more detailed understanding of the weekend effect.

  15. Preadmission use of SSRIs alone or in combination with NSAIDs and 30-day mortality after peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gasse, Christiane; Christensen, Steffen; Riis, Anders; Mortensen, Preben B; Adamsen, Sven; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increases the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and this risk is amplified by concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The aim of the study was to examine the impact of SSRI use alone or in combination with NSAIDs on 30-day mortality after peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). MATERIAL AND METHODS. A population-based cohort study of patients with a first hospitalization with PUB in three Danish counties was carried out between 1991 and 2005 using medical databases. We calculated 30-day mortality rate ratios (MRRs) associated with the use of SSRIs, alone or in combination with NSAIDs, adjusted for important covariates. RESULTS. Of 7415 patients admitted with PUB, 5.9% used SSRIs only, and 3.8% used SSRIs in combination with NSAIDs, with a 30-day mortality of 11.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Compared with patients who used neither SSRIs nor NSAIDs, the adjusted 30-day MRR was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.76-1.36) for current users of SSRIs and 0.89 (0.62-1.28) for the combined use of SSRIs with NSAIDs. There was a 2.11-fold (95% CI 1.35-3.30) increased risk of death associated with SSRI use starting within 60 days of admission; for those younger than 80 years, the adjusted MRR was 1.54 (0.72-3.29), and 2.57 (1.47-4.49) for those older than 80 years. CONCLUSIONS. Use of SSRIs, alone or in combination with NSAIDs, was not associated with increased 30-day mortality following PUB. However, increased mortality was found in patients who started SSRI therapy, particularly among those older than 80 years. We can only speculate on whether this finding is due to pharmacological action or confounding factors.

  16. Surgeon volume and 30 day mortality for brain tumours in England

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Matt; Treasure, Peter; Greenberg, David; Brodbelt, Andrew; Collins, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that surgeons who perform more operations have better outcomes. However, in patients with brain tumours, all of the evidence comes from the USA. Methods: We examined all English patients with an intracranial neoplasm who had an intracranial resection in 2008–2010. We included surgeons who performed at least six operations over 3 years, and at least one operation in the first and last 6 months of the period. Results: The analysis data set comprised 9194 operations, 163 consultant neurosurgeons and 30 centres. Individual surgeon volumes varied widely (7–272; median=46). 72% of operations were on the brain, and 30 day mortality was 3%. A doubling of surgeon load was associated with a 20% relative reduction in mortality. Thirty day mortality varied between centres (0·95–8·62%) but was not related to centre workload. Conclusions: Individual surgeon volumes correlated with patient 30 day mortality. Centres and surgeons in England are busier than surgeons and centres in the USA. There is no relationship between centre volume and 30 day mortality in England. Services in the UK appear to be adequately arranged at a centre level, but would benefit from further surgeon sub-specialisation. PMID:27764843

  17. Factors associated with 30-day mortality in elderly inpatients with community acquired pneumonia during 2 influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Torner, Núria; Izquierdo, Conchita; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Chamorro, Judith; Espejo, Elena; Fernández-Sierra, Amelia; Domínguez, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) refers to pneumonia unrelated to hospitals or extended-care facilities. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with 30-day mortality in patients with CAP aged ≥ 65 y admitted to 20 hospitals in 7 Spanish regions during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 influenza seasons. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with 30-day mortality. The adjusted model included variables selected by backward elimination with a cut off of < 0.02. A total of 1928 CAP cases were recorded; 60.7% were male, 46.67% were aged 75-84 years, and 30-day mortality was 7.6% (n = 146). Pneumococcal vaccination had a significant protective effect (OR 0.68, 95% CI, 0.48-0.96; p = 0.03) and influenza vaccination in any 3 preceding seasons slight protective effect against CAP (OR 0.72, 95% CI, 0.51-1.02;p = 0.06). Factors significantly associated with 30-day mortality were having a degree of dependence (aOR 3.67, 95% CI, 2.34-5.75; p < 0,001); age ≥ 85 y (OR 3.01, 95% CI, 1.71-5.30; p < 0.001), liver impairment (aOR 2.41, 95% CI, 1.10-5.31; p = 0.03); solid organ neoplasm (aOR 2.24, 95% CI, 1.46-3.45; p < 0.001), impaired cognitive function (aOR 1.93, 95% CI, 1.22-3.05; p = 0.005), and ICU admittance (aOR2.56, 95% CI, 1.27-5.16; p = 0.009); length of stay (aOR 1.56, 95% CI, 1.02 - 2.40; p = 0.04) and cardio-respiratory resuscitation (aOR 7.75, 95% CI, 1.20 - 49.98; p = 0.03). No association was observed for other comorbidities such as chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD) or heart conditions in the adjusted model. Offering both pneumococcal and influenza vaccination to the elderly may improve 30-day mortality in patients with CAP.

  18. Readmission for Acute Exacerbation within 30 Days of Discharge Is Associated with a Subsequent Progressive Increase in Mortality Risk in COPD Patients: A Long-Term Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Mónica; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Liapikou, Adamantia; Huerta, Arturo; Gabarrús, Albert; Chetta, Alfredo; Soler, Nestor; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Twenty per cent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are readmitted for acute exacerbation (AECOPD) within 30 days of discharge. The prognostic significance of early readmission is not fully understood. The objective of our study was to estimate the mortality risk associated with readmission for acute exacerbation within 30 days of discharge in COPD patients. Methods The cohort (n = 378) was divided into patients readmitted (n = 68) and not readmitted (n = 310) within 30 days of discharge. Clinical, laboratory, microbiological, and severity data were evaluated at admission and during hospital stay, and mortality data were recorded at four time points during follow-up: 30 days, 6 months, 1 year and 3 years. Results Patients readmitted within 30 days had poorer lung function, worse dyspnea perception and higher clinical severity. Two or more prior AECOPD (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.51–4.05) was the only variable independently associated with 30-day readmission. The mortality risk during the follow-up period showed a progressive increase in patients readmitted within 30 days in comparison to patients not readmitted; moreover, 30-day readmission was an independent risk factor for mortality at 1 year (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.10–5.59). In patients readmitted within 30 days, the estimated absolute increase in the mortality risk was 4% at 30 days (number needed to harm NNH, 25), 17% at 6-months (NNH, 6), 19% at 1-year (NNH, 6) and 24% at 3 years (NNH, 5). Conclusion In conclusion a readmission for AECOPD within 30 days is associated with a progressive increased long-term risk of death. PMID:26943928

  19. Half of 30-Day Hospital Readmissions Among HIV-Infected Patients Are Potentially Preventable

    PubMed Central

    Kitchell, Ellen; Etherton, Sarah Shelby; Duarte, Piper; Halm, Ethan A.; Jain, Mamta K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thirty-day readmission rates, a widely utilized quality metric, are high among HIV-infected individuals. However, it is unknown how many 30-day readmissions are preventable, especially in HIV patients, who have been excluded from prior potentially preventable readmission analyses. We used electronic medical records to identify all readmissions within 30 days of discharge among HIV patients hospitalized at a large urban safety net hospital in 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed whether readmissions were potentially preventable using both published criteria and detailed chart review, how readmissions might have been prevented, and the phase of care deemed suboptimal (inpatient care, discharge planning, post-discharge). Of 1137 index admissions, 213 (19%) resulted in 30-day readmissions. These admissions occurred among 930 unique HIV patients, with 130 individuals (14%) experiencing 30-day readmissions. Of these 130, about half were determined to be potentially preventable using published criteria (53%) or implicit chart review (48%). Not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) greatly increased the odds of a preventable readmission (OR 5.9, CI:2.4–14.8). Most of the preventable causes of readmission were attributed to suboptimal care during the index hospitalization. Half of 30-day readmission in HIV patients are potentially preventable. Increased focus on early ART initiation, adherence counseling, management of chronic conditions, and appropriate timing of discharge may help reduce readmissions in this vulnerable population. PMID:26154066

  20. Predictors of 30-day mortality and the risk of recurrent systemic thromboembolism in cancer patients suffering acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jung; An, Sang Joon; Oh, Kyungmi; Mo, Heejung; Kang, Min Kyoung; Han, Moon-Ku; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Ko, Sang-Bae; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Background Stroke in cancer patients is not rare but is a devastating event with high mortality. However, the predictors of mortality in stroke patients with cancer have not been well addressed. D-dimer could be a useful predictor because it can reflect both thromboembolic events and advanced stages of cancer. Aim In this study, we evaluate the possibility of D-dimer as a predictor of 30-day mortality in stroke patients with active cancer. Methods We included 210 ischemic stroke patients with active cancer. The 30-day mortality data were collected by reviewing medical records. We also collected follow-up D-dimer levels in 106 (50%) participants to evaluate the effects of treatment response on D-dimer levels. Results Of the 210 participants, 30-day mortality occurred in 28 (13%) patients. Higher initial NIHSS scores, D-dimer levels, and CRP levels as well as frequent cryptogenic mechanism, systemic metastasis, multiple vascular territory lesion, hemorrhagic transformation, and larger infarct volume were related to 30-day mortality. In the multivariate analysis, D-dimer [adjusted OR (aOR) = 2.19; 95% CI, 1.46–3.28, P < 0.001] predicted 30-day mortality after adjusting for confounders. The initial NIHSS score (aOR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00–1.14, P = 0.043) and hemorrhagic transformation (aOR = 3.02; 95% CI, 1.10–8.29, P = 0.032) were also significant independent of D-dimer levels. In the analysis of D-dimer changes after treatment, the mortality group showed no significant decrease in D-dimer levels, despite treatment, while the survivor group showed the opposite response. Conclusions D-dimer levels may predict 30-day mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients with active cancer. PMID:28282388

  1. 30-Day Mortality and Late Survival with Reinterventions and Readmissions after Open and Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Kristina A; Landon, Bruce E; Cotterill, Philip; O'Malley, A. James; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Late survival is similar after EVAR and open AAA repair despite a perioperative benefit with EVAR. AAA-related reinterventions are more common after EVAR while laparotomy related reinterventions are more common after open repair. The impact of reinterventions on survival, however, is unknown. We therefore evaluate the rate of reinterventions and readmission after initial AAA repair along with 30-day mortality and the effect upon long term survival. Methods We identified AAA and laparotomy-related reinterventions for propensity score matched cohorts of Medicare beneficiaries (n=45,652) undergoing EVAR and open repair from 2001-2004. Follow-up was up to 6 years. Hospitalizations for ruptured AAA without repair and for bowel obstruction or ventral hernia without abdominal surgery were also recorded. Event rates were calculated per year and are also presented through 6 years of follow-up as events per 100 person years. Thirty day mortality was calculated for each reintervention or readmission. Results Through 6 years, overall reinterventions or readmissions were similar between repair methods but slightly more common after EVAR (7.6 vs. 7.0 per 100 person years, RR 1.1, P < .001). Overall 30 day mortality with any reintervention or readmission was 9.1%. EVAR patients had more ruptures (0.50 vs. 0.09, RR 5.7, P < .001) with a mortality of 28%, but these were uncommon. EVAR patients also had more AAA-related reinterventions through 6 years (3.7 vs. 0.9, RR 4.0, P < .001) (mortality 5.6%), the majority of which were minor endovascular reinterventions (2.4 vs. 0.2, RR 11.4, P < .001) with a 30 day mortality of 3.0%. However, minor open (0.8 vs. 0.5, RR 1.4, P < .001) (mortality 6.9%) and major reinterventions (0.4 vs. 0.2, RR 2.4, P < .001) (mortality 12.1%) were also more common after EVAR than open repair. Conversely, EVAR patients had fewer laparotomy related reinterventions than open patients (1.4 vs. 3.0, RR 0.5, P < .001) (mortality 8.1%) and readmissions

  2. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing And 30-Day Readmissions: Are Hospitals Ready?

    PubMed

    Haley, D Rob; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between a hospital's Total Performance Score (TPS) and unplanned readmissions, a multivariate linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between hospital TPS and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Hospital TPS was significantly and inversely related to AMI, HF, and PN readmission rates. The higher the hospital TPS, the lower the readmission rates for patients with AMI, HF, and PN. Hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid patients had higher readmission rates for all three conditions. The TPS methodology will likely evolve to include additional measures or dimensions to assess hospital quality and payment. Policymakers and hospital administrators should consider other structure elements and process measures to assess and improve patient safety and quality.

  3. Early inpatient calculation of laboratory-based 30-day readmission risk scores empowers clinical risk modification during index hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Horne, Benjamin D; Budge, Deborah; Masica, Andrew L; Savitz, Lucy A; Benuzillo, José; Cantu, Gabriela; Bradshaw, Alejandra; McCubrey, Raymond O; Bair, Tami L; Roberts, Colleen A; Rasmusson, Kismet D; Alharethi, Rami; Kfoury, Abdallah G; James, Brent C; Lappé, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    Improving 30-day readmission continues to be problematic for most hospitals. This study reports the creation and validation of sex-specific inpatient (i) heart failure (HF) risk scores using electronic data from the beginning of inpatient care for effective and efficient prediction of 30-day readmission risk.

  4. Impact of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Total Joint Arthroplasty on 30-Day Hospital Readmission Rates and Unplanned Episodes of Care.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Odum, Susan M; Vegari, David N; Mokris, Jeffrey G; Beaver, Walter B

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a study comparing 30-day readmission rates between patients undergoing outpatient versus inpatient total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty. A retrospective review of 137 patients undergoing outpatient total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and 106 patients undergoing inpatient (minimum 2-day hospital stay) TJA was conducted. Unplanned hospital readmissions and unplanned episodes of care were recorded. All patients completed a telephone survey. Seven inpatients and 16 outpatients required hospital readmission or an unplanned episode of care following hospital discharge. Readmission rates were higher for TKA than THA. The authors found no statistical differences in 30-day readmission or unplanned care episodes.

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis patients are not at increased risk for 30-day cardiovascular events, infections, or mortality after total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Serious infection, cardiovascular disease, and mortality are increased in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether RA affects the risk for these complications after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is unknown, we hypothesize that it does. We compared the occurrence of 30-day postoperative complications and mortality in a large cohort of RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients undergoing hip or knee TJA. Methods Analyses included 7-year data from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The 30-day complications were compared by diagnosis by using logistic regression, and long-term mortality was examined by using Cox proportional hazards regression. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and clustering by surgical site. Additional covariates included sociodemographics, comorbidities, health behaviors, and operative risk factors. Results The 34,524 patients (839 RA, 33,685 OA) underwent knee (65.9%) or hip TJA. Patients were 95.7% men with a mean (SD) age of 64.4 (10.7) years and had 3,764 deaths over a mean follow-up of 3.7 (2.3) years. Compared with OA patients, those with RA were significantly more likely to require a return to the operating room (odds ratio (OR), 1.45 (95% CI, 1.08 to 1.94), but had similar rates of 30-day postoperative infection, OR 1.02 (0.72 to 1.47), cardiovascular events, OR 0.69 (0.37 to 1.28), and mortality, OR 0.94 (0.38 to 2.33). RA was associated with a significantly higher long-term mortality; hazard ratio (HR), 1.22 (1.00 to 1.49). Conclusion In this study of US veterans, RA patients were not at an increased risk for short-term mortality or other major complications after TJA, although they returned to the operating room more often and had increased long-term mortality. PMID:24252350

  6. A Model to Predict Duration of Ventilation and 30-Day Mortality in Patients with Traumatic Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-02

    Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per...2 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...383 PATTERN OF HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS AND OUTCOME OF ACUTE ALUMINIUM PHOSPHIDE POISONING IN AN INDIAN ICU RANVIR SINGH1, diptimala agrawal2, vivek

  7. Length of stay, wait time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures after the opening of a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michel; Hopman, Wilma; Yach, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background In September 2011, Kingston General Hospital (KGH) opened a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room. Previously, 1 weekend operating room (OR) was used by all surgical services. We assessed the impact this dedicated weekend trauma room had on hospital length of stay (LOS), time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures. Methods Patients admitted between Oct. 1, 2009, and Sept. 30, 2012, were identified through our trauma registry, representing the 2 years before and 1 year after the opening of the orthopedic weekend trauma room. We documented type of fracture, mode of fixation, age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, time to OR, LOS, discharge disposition and 30-day mortality. We excluded patients with multiple fractures, open fractures and those requiring trauma team activation. Results Our study included 609 patients (405 pre- and 204 post–trauma room opening). Mean LOS decreased from 11.6 to 9.4 days (p = 0.005) and there was a decreasing trend in mean time to OR from 31.5 to 28.5 hours (p = 0.16). There was no difference in 30-day mortality (p = 0.24). The LOS decreased by an average of 2 days following opening of the weekend trauma room (p = 0.031) and by an average of 2.2 additional days if the patient was admitted on the weekend versus during the week (p = 0.024). Conclusion The weekend trauma OR at KGH significantly decreased the LOS and appears to have decreased wait times to surgery. Further analysis is needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the current strategy, the long-term outcome of this patient population and the impact the additional orthopedic weekend trauma room has had on other surgical services (i.e., general surgery) and their patients. PMID:27668332

  8. Predicting 30-Day Readmissions in an Asian Population: Building a Predictive Model by Incorporating Markers of Hospitalization Severity

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lian Leng; Liu, Nan; Wang, Sijia; Thumboo, Julian; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background To reduce readmissions, it may be cost-effective to consider risk stratification, with targeting intervention programs to patients at high risk of readmissions. In this study, we aimed to derive and validate a prediction model including several novel markers of hospitalization severity, and compare the model with the LACE index (Length of stay, Acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, Emergency department visits in past 6 months), an established risk stratification tool. Method This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients ≥ 21 years of age, who were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Singapore from January 1, 2013 through May 31, 2015. Data were extracted from the hospital’s electronic health records. The outcome was defined as unplanned readmissions within 30 days of discharge from the index hospitalization. Candidate predictive variables were broadly grouped into five categories: Patient demographics, social determinants of health, past healthcare utilization, medical comorbidities, and markers of hospitalization severity. Multivariable logistic regression was used to predict the outcome, and receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to compare our model with the LACE index. Results 74,102 cases were enrolled for analysis. Of these, 11,492 patient cases (15.5%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. A total of fifteen predictive variables were strongly associated with the risk of 30-day readmissions, including number of emergency department visits in the past 6 months, Charlson Comorbidity Index, markers of hospitalization severity such as ‘requiring inpatient dialysis during index admission, and ‘treatment with intravenous furosemide 40 milligrams or more’ during index admission. Our predictive model outperformed the LACE index by achieving larger area under the curve values: 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77–0.79) versus 0.70 (95% CI: 0.69–0.71). Conclusion Several factors are important for

  9. Long-acting bronchodilators with or without inhaled corticosteroids and 30-day readmission in patients hospitalized for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bishwakarma, Raju; Zhang, Wei; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Sharma, Gulshan

    2017-01-01

    Background The ability of a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and long-acting beta 2 agonists (LABAs; long-acting bronchodilators, LABDs) with or without inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) to reduce early readmission in hospitalized patients with COPD is unknown. Methods We studied a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare parts A, B and D and hospitalized for COPD in 2011. We examined prescriptions filled for LABDs with or without ICSs (LABDs±ICSs) within 90 days prior to and 30 days after hospitalization. Primary outcome was the 30-day readmission rate between “users” and “nonusers” of LABDs±ICSs. Propensity score matching and sensitivity analysis were performed by limiting analysis to patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). Among 6,066 patients hospitalized for COPD, 3,747 (61.8%) used LABDs±ICSs during the specified period. The “user” and “nonuser” groups had similar rates of all-cause emergency room (ER) visits and readmissions within 30 days of discharge date (22.4% vs 20.7%, P-value 0.11; 18.0% vs 17.8%, P-value 0.85, respectively). However, the “users” had higher rates of COPD-related ER visits (5.3% vs 3.4%, P-value 0.0006), higher adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.47 (95% CI, 1.11–1.93) and readmission (7.8% vs 5.0%, P-value <0.0001 and aOR 1.48 [95% CI, 1.18–1.86]) than “nonusers”. After propensity score matching, the aOR of COPD-related ER visits was 1.45 (95% CI, 1.07–1.96) and that of readmission was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.04–1.73). The results were similar when restricted to patients hospitalized for AECOPD. Conclusion Use of LABDs±ICSs did not reduce 30-day readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD. PMID:28203071

  10. Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Provisions of the Affordable Care Act that increase hospitals’ financial accountability for preventable readmissions have heightened interest in identifying system-level interventions to reduce readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationship between hospital nursing; i.e. nurse work environment, nurse staffing levels, and nurse education, and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Method and Design Analysis of linked data from California, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that included information on the organization of hospital nursing (i.e., work environment, patient-to-nurse ratios, and proportion of nurses holding a BSN degree) from a survey of nurses, as well as patient discharge data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Robust logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between nursing factors and 30-day readmission. Results Nearly one-quarter of heart failure index admissions (23.3% [n=39,954]); 19.1% (n=12,131) of myocardial infarction admissions; and 17.8% (n=25,169) of pneumonia admissions were readmitted within 30-days. Each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse’s workload was associated with a 7% higher odds of readmission for heart failure (OR=1.07, [1.05–1.09]), 6% for pneumonia patients (OR=1.06, [1.03–1.09]), and 9% for myocardial infarction patients (OR=1.09, [1.05–1.13]). Care in a hospital with a good versus poor work environment was associated with odds of readmission that were 7% lower for heart failure (OR = 0.93, [0.89–0.97]); 6% lower for myocardial infarction (OR = 0.94, [0.88–0.98]); and 10% lower for pneumonia (OR = 0.90, [0.85–0.96]) patients. Conclusions Improving nurses’ work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. PMID:23151591

  11. A contemporary risk model for predicting 30-day mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine S.L.; Ludman, Peter F.; Hulme, William; de Belder, Mark A.; Stables, Rodney; Chowdhary, Saqib; Mamas, Mamas A.; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The current risk model for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the UK is based on outcomes of patients treated in a different era of interventional cardiology. This study aimed to create a new model, based on a contemporary cohort of PCI treated patients, which would: predict 30 day mortality; provide good discrimination; and be well calibrated across a broad risk-spectrum. Methods and results The model was derived from a training dataset of 336,433 PCI cases carried out between 2007 and 2011 in England and Wales, with 30 day mortality provided by record linkage. Candidate variables were selected on the basis of clinical consensus and data quality. Procedures in 2012 were used to perform temporal validation of the model. The strongest predictors of 30-day mortality were: cardiogenic shock; dialysis; and the indication for PCI and the degree of urgency with which it was performed. The model had an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.85 on the training data and 0.86 on validation. Calibration plots indicated a good model fit on development which was maintained on validation. Conclusion We have created a contemporary model for PCI that encompasses a range of clinical risk, from stable elective PCI to emergency primary PCI and cardiogenic shock. The model is easy to apply and based on data reported in national registries. It has a high degree of discrimination and is well calibrated across the risk spectrum. The examination of key outcomes in PCI audit can be improved with this risk-adjusted model. PMID:26942330

  12. Nonclinical Factors Associated with 30-Day Mortality after Lung Cancer Resection: An Analysis of 215,000 Patients Using the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Melvan, John N; Sancheti, Manu S; Gillespie, Theresa; Nickleach, Dana C; Liu, Yuan; Higgins, Kristin; Ramalingam, Suresh; Lipscomb, Joseph; Fernandez, Felix G

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical variables associated with 30-day mortality after lung cancer surgery are well known. However, the effects of non-clinical factors, including insurance coverage, household income, education, type of treatment center, and area of residence, on short term survival are less appreciated. We studied the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint endeavor of the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons and the American Cancer Society, to identify disparities in 30-day mortality after lung cancer resection based on these non-clinical factors. Study Design We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of patients undergoing lung cancer resection from 2003-2011, using the NCDB. Data were analyzed using a multivariable logistic regression model to identify risk factors for 30-day mortality. Results 215,645 patients underwent lung cancer resection during our study period. We found that clinical variables such as age, gender, comorbidity, cancer stage, preoperative radiation, extent of resection, positive surgical margins, and tumor size were associated with 30-day mortality after resection. Non-clinical factors including living in lower income neighborhoods with a lesser proportion of high school graduates, and receiving cancer care at a non-academic medical center were also independently associated with increased 30-day postoperative mortality. Conclusions This study represents the largest analysis of 30-day mortality for lung cancer resection to date from a generalizable national cohort. Our results demonstrate that, in addition to known clinical risk factors, several non-clinical factors are associated with increased 30-day mortality after lung cancer resection. These disparities require further investigation to improve lung cancer patient outcomes. PMID:26206651

  13. Adding Laboratory Data to Hospital Claims Data to Improve Risk Adjustment of Inpatient/30-Day Postdischarge Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Hannan, Edward L; Naessens, James M; Whitman, Kay; Reband, Agnes; Qian, Feng; Schindler, Joseph; Sonneborn, Mark; Roland, Jaclyn; Hyde, Linda; Dennison, Barbara A

    Numerical laboratory data at admission have been proposed for enhancement of inpatient predictive modeling from administrative claims. In this study, predictive models for inpatient/30-day postdischarge mortality and for risk-adjusted prolonged length of stay, as a surrogate for severe inpatient complications of care, were designed with administrative data only and with administrative data plus numerical laboratory variables. A comparison of resulting inpatient models for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, coronary artery bypass grafting, and percutaneous cardiac interventions demonstrated improved discrimination and calibration with administrative data plus laboratory values compared to administrative data only for both mortality and prolonged length of stay. Improved goodness of fit was most apparent in acute myocardial infarction and percutaneous cardiac intervention. The emergence of electronic medical records should make the addition of laboratory variables to administrative data an efficient and practical method to clinically enhance predictive modeling of inpatient outcomes of care.

  14. The HOSPITAL score and LACE index as predictors of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university-affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hudali, Tamer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions are common, expensive, and a key target of the Medicare Value Based Purchasing (VBP) program. Validated risk assessment tools such as the HOSPITAL score and LACE index have been developed to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission so they can be targeted for interventions aimed at reducing the rate of readmission. This study aims to evaluate the utility of HOSPITAL score and LACE index for predicting hospital readmission within 30 days in a moderate-sized university affiliated hospital in the midwestern United States. Materials and Methods All adult medical patients who underwent one or more ICD-10 defined procedures discharged from the SIU-SOM Hospitalist service from Memorial Medical Center (MMC) from October 15, 2015 to March 16, 2016, were studied retrospectively to determine if the HOSPITAL score and LACE index were a significant predictors of hospital readmission within 30 days. Results During the study period, 463 discharges were recorded for the hospitalist service. The analysis includes data for the 432 discharges. Patients who died during the hospital stay, were transferred to another hospital, or left against medical advice were excluded. Of these patients, 35 (8%) were readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days. A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the HOSPITAL score for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.75 (95% CI [0.67–0.83]), indicating good discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the HOSPITAL score in this setting was 0.069, indicating good overall performance. The Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness of fit test shows a χ2 value of 3.71 with a p value of 0.59. A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the LACE index for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.58 (95% CI [0.48–0.68]), indicating poor discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the LACE index in this setting was 0.082, indicating good overall performance

  15. Community Level Association between Home Health and Nursing Home Performance on Quality and Hospital 30-day Readmissions for Medicare Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Pandolfi, Michelle M; Fine, Jonathan; Metersky, Mark L; Wang, Changqin; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Galusha, Deron; Nuti, Sudhakar V; Murugiah, Karthik; Spenard, Ann; Elwell, Timothy; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated whether community-level home health agencies and nursing home performance is associated with community-level hospital 30-day all-cause risk-standardized readmission rates for Medicare patients used data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service from 2010 to 2012. Our final sample included 2,855 communities that covered 4,140 hospitals with 6,751,713 patients, 13,060 nursing homes with 1,250,648 residents, and 7,613 home health agencies providing services to 35,660 zipcodes. Based on a mixed effect model, we found that increasing nursing home performance by one star for all of its 4 measures and home health performance by 10 points for all of its 6 measures is associated with decreases of 0.25% (95% CI 0.17-0.34) and 0.60% (95% CI 0.33-0.83), respectively, in community-level risk-standardized readmission rates.

  16. The Risk of Acute Kidney Injury and Its Impact on 30-Day and Long-Term Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Katrin; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Kaleschke, Gerrit; Kerckhoff, Gregor; Malyar, Nasser; Meyborg, Matthias; Reinecke, Holger; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Background. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is widely used in high risk patients (pts) with aortic stenosis. Underlying chronic kidney disease implicates a high risk of postprocedural acute kidney injury (AKI). We analyzed its occurrence, impact on hospital stay, and mortality. Methods. 150 consecutive pts underwent TAVI in our institution (mean age 81 ± 7 years; logistic EuroSCORE 24 ± 15%). AKI definition was a creatinine rise of 26.5 μmol/L or more within 48 hours postprocedural. Ten patients on chronic hemodialysis were excluded. Results. AKI occurred in 28 pts (20%). Baseline creatinine was higher in AKI pts (126.4 ± 59.2 μmol/L versus 108.7 ± 45.1 μmol/L, P = 0.09). Contrast media use was distributed evenly. Both, 30-day mortality (29% versus 7%, P < 0.0001) and long-term mortality (43% versus 18%, P < 0.0001) were higher; hospital stay was longer in AKI pts (20 ± 12 versus 15 ± 10 days, P = 0.03). Predicted renal failure calculated STS Score was similar (8.0 ± 5.0% [AKI] versus 7.1 ± 4.0% [non-AKI], P = 0.32) and estimated lower renal failure rates than observed. Conclusion. AKI remains a frequent complication with increased mortality in TAVI pts. Careful identification of risk factors and development of more suitable risk scores are essential. PMID:23365748

  17. Classifying emergency 30-day readmissions in England using routine hospital data 2004–2010: what is the scope for reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Blunt, Ian; Bardsley, Martin; Grove, Amy; Clarke, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    Background Many health systems across the globe have introduced arrangements to deny payment for patients readmitted to hospital as an emergency. The purpose of this study was to develop an exploratory categorisation based on likely causes of readmission, and then to assess the prevalence of these different types. Methods Retrospective analysis of 82 million routinely collected National Health Service hospital records in England (2004–2010) was undertaken using anonymised linkage of records at person-level. Numbers of 30-day readmissions were calculated. Exploratory categorisation of readmissions was applied using simple rules relating to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnostic codes for both admission and readmission. Results There were 5 804 472 emergency 30-day readmissions over a 6-year period, equivalent to 7.0% of hospital discharges. Readmissions were grouped into hierarchically exclusive categories: potentially preventable readmission (1 739 519 (30.0% of readmissions)); anticipated but unpredictable readmission (patients with chronic disease or likely to need long-term care; 1 141 987 (19.7%)); preference-related readmission (53 718 (0.9%)); artefact of data collection (16 062 (0.3%)); readmission as a result of accident, coincidence or related to a different body system (1 101 818 (19.0%)); broadly related readmission (readmission related to the same body system (1 751 368 (30.2%)). Conclusions In this exploratory categorisation, a large minority of emergency readmissions (eg, those that are potentially preventable or due to data artefacts) fell into groups potentially amenable to immediate reduction. For other categories, a hospital's ability to reduce emergency readmission is less clear. Reduction strategies and payment incentives must be carefully tailored to achieve stated aims. PMID:24668396

  18. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease: An Observational Study of a Historical Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-04-01

    Estimating patient survival has hitherto been the main focus when treating metastatic bone disease (MBD) in the appendicular skeleton. This has been done in an attempt to allocate the patient to a surgical procedure that outlives them. No questions have been addressed as to whether the extent of the surgery and thus the surgical trauma reduces survival in this patient group. We wanted to evaluate if perioperative parameters such as blood loss, extent of bone resection, and duration of surgery were risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients having surgery due to MBD in the appendicular skeleton. We retrospectively identified 270 consecutive patients who underwent joint replacement surgery or intercalary spacing for skeletal metastases in the appendicular skeleton from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013. We collected intraoperative (duration of surgery, extent of bone resection, and blood loss), demographic (age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologist score [ASA score], and Karnofsky score), and disease-specific (primary cancer) variables. An association with 30-day mortality was addressed using univariate and multivariable analyses and calculation of odds ratio (OR). All patients were included in the analysis. ASA score 3 + 4 (OR 4.16 [95% confidence interval, CI, 1.80-10.85], P = 0.002) and Karnofsky performance status below 70 (OR 7.34 [95% CI 3.16-19.20], P < 0.001) were associated with increased 30-day mortality in univariate analysis. This did not change in multivariable analysis. No parameters describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality.

  19. Radiologic Findings and Patient Factors Associated with 30-Day Mortality after Surgical Evacuation of Subdural Hematoma in Patients Less Than 65 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myung-Hoon; Ryu, Je Il; Kim, Choong Hyun; Kim, Jae Min; Cheong, Jin Hwan; Yi, Hyeong-Joong

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to evaluate the associations between 30-day mortality and various radiological and clinical factors in patients with traumatic acute subdural hematoma (SDH). During the 11-year study period, young patients who underwent surgery for SDH were followed for 30 days. Patients who died due to other medical comorbidities or other organ problems were not included in the study population. Methods From January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2014, 318 consecutive surgically-treated traumatic acute SDH patients were registered for the study. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to analyze 30-day survival rates. We also estimated the hazard ratios of various variables in order to identify the independent predictors of 30-day mortality. Results We observed a negative correlation between 30-day mortality and Glasgow coma scale score (per 1-point score increase) (hazard ratio [HR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52–0.70; p<0.001). In addition, use of antithrombotics (HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.27–4.33; p=0.008), history of diabetes mellitus (HR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.20–4.32; p=0.015), and accompanying traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.27–3.58; p=0.005) were positively associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusion We found significant associations between short-term mortality after surgery for traumatic acute SDH and lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores, use of antithrombotics, history of diabetes mellitus, and accompanying traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage at admission. We expect these findings to be helpful for selecting patients for surgical treatment of traumatic acute SDH, and for making accurate prognoses. PMID:28264246

  20. Utility of models to predict 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions: an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip R; Roberts, Pamela; Goh, Louise; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update previous systematic review of predictive models for 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions. Design Systematic review. Setting/data source CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE from 2011 to 2015. Participants All studies of 28-day and 30-day readmission predictive model. Outcome measures Characteristics of the included studies, performance of the identified predictive models and key predictive variables included in the models. Results Of 7310 records, a total of 60 studies with 73 unique predictive models met the inclusion criteria. The utilisation outcome of the models included all-cause readmissions, cardiovascular disease including pneumonia, medical conditions, surgical conditions and mental health condition-related readmissions. Overall, a wide-range C-statistic was reported in 56/60 studies (0.21–0.88). 11 of 13 predictive models for medical condition-related readmissions were found to have consistent moderate discrimination ability (C-statistic ≥0.7). Only two models were designed for the potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions and had C-statistic >0.8. The variables ‘comorbidities’, ‘length of stay’ and ‘previous admissions’ were frequently cited across 73 models. The variables ‘laboratory tests’ and ‘medication’ had more weight in the models for cardiovascular disease and medical condition-related readmissions. Conclusions The predictive models which focused on general medical condition-related unplanned hospital readmissions reported moderate discriminative ability. Two models for potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions showed high discriminative ability. This updated systematic review, however, found inconsistent performance across the included unique 73 risk predictive models. It is critical to define clearly the utilisation outcomes and the type of accessible data source before the selection of the predictive model. Rigorous validation of the predictive models with moderate-to-high discriminative

  1. Development, Validation and Deployment of a Real Time 30 Day Hospital Readmission Risk Assessment Tool in the Maine Healthcare Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shiying; Wang, Yue; Jin, Bo; Shin, Andrew Young; Zhu, Chunqing; Huang, Min; Zheng, Le; Luo, Jin; Hu, Zhongkai; Fu, Changlin; Dai, Dorothy; Wang, Yicheng; Culver, Devore S.; Alfreds, Shaun T.; Rogow, Todd; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G.; Widen, Eric; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Identifying patients at risk of a 30-day readmission can help providers design interventions, and provide targeted care to improve clinical effectiveness. This study developed a risk model to predict a 30-day inpatient hospital readmission for patients in Maine, across all payers, all diseases and all demographic groups. Methods Our objective was to develop a model to determine the risk for inpatient hospital readmission within 30 days post discharge. All patients within the Maine Health Information Exchange (HIE) system were included. The model was retrospectively developed on inpatient encounters between January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 from 24 randomly chosen hospitals, and then prospectively validated on inpatient encounters from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013 using all HIE patients. Results A risk assessment tool partitioned the entire HIE population into subgroups that corresponded to probability of hospital readmission as determined by a corresponding positive predictive value (PPV). An overall model c-statistic of 0.72 was achieved. The total 30-day readmission rates in low (score of 0–30), intermediate (score of 30–70) and high (score of 70–100) risk groupings were 8.67%, 24.10% and 74.10%, respectively. A time to event analysis revealed the higher risk groups readmitted to a hospital earlier than the lower risk groups. Six high-risk patient subgroup patterns were revealed through unsupervised clustering. Our model was successfully integrated into the statewide HIE to identify patient readmission risk upon admission and daily during hospitalization or for 30 days subsequently, providing daily risk score updates. Conclusions The risk model was validated as an effective tool for predicting 30-day readmissions for patients across all payer, disease and demographic groups within the Maine HIE. Exposing the key clinical, demographic and utilization profiles driving each patient’s risk of readmission score may be useful to providers

  2. Effect of Hospital Use of Oral Nutritional Supplementation on Length of Stay, Hospital Cost, and 30-Day Readmissions Among Medicare Patients With COPD

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Julia Thornton; Linthicum, Mark T.; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Partridge, Jamie S.; LaVallee, Chris; Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Patients with COPD are at a high risk of nutritional deficiency, which is associated with declines in respiratory function, lean body mass and strength, and immune function. Although oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) has been associated with improvements in some of these domains, the impact of hospital ONS on readmission risk, length of stay (LOS), and cost among hospitalized patients is unknown. METHODS: Using the Premier Research Database, we first identified Medicare patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of COPD. We then identified hospitalizations in which ONS was provided, and used propensity-score matching to compare LOS, hospitalization cost, and 30-day readmission rates in a one-to-one matched sample of ONS and non-ONS hospitalizations. To further address selection bias among patients prescribed ONS, we also used instrumental variables analysis to study the association of ONS with study outcomes. Model covariates included patient and provider characteristics and a time trend. RESULTS: Out of 10,322 ONS hospitalizations and 368,097 non-ONS hospitalizations, a one-to-one matched sample was created (N = 14,326). In unadjusted comparisons in the matched sample, ONS use was associated with longer LOS (8.7 days vs 6.9 days, P < .0001), higher hospitalization cost ($14,223 vs $9,340, P < .0001), and lower readmission rates (24.8% vs 26.6%, P = .0116). However, in instrumental variables analysis, ONS use was associated with a 1.9-day (21.5%) decrease in LOS, from 8.8 to 6.9 days (P < .01); a hospitalization cost reduction of $1,570 (12.5%), from $12,523 to $10,953 (P < .01); and a 13.1% decrease in probability of 30-day readmission, from 0.34 to 0.29 (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: ONS may be associated with reduced LOS, hospitalization cost, and readmission risk in hospitalized Medicare patients with COPD. PMID:25357165

  3. Low serum albumin and total lymphocyte count as predictors of 30 day hospital readmission in patients 65 years of age or older.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge is a target for health care cost savings through the medicare Value Based Purchasing initiative. Because of this focus, hospitals and health systems are investing considerable resources into the identification of patients at risk of hospital readmission and designing interventions to reduce the rate of hospital readmission. Malnutrition is a known risk factor for hospital readmission. Materials and Methods. All medical patients 65 years of age or older discharged from Memorial Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 31, 2012 who had a determination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count on hospital admission were studied retrospectively. Admission serum albumin levels and total lymphocyte counts were used to classify the nutritional status of all patients in the study. Patients with a serum albumin less than 3.5 grams/dL and/or a TLC less than 1,500 cells per mm3 were classified as having protein energy malnutrition. The primary outcome investigated in this study was hospital readmission for any reason within 30 days of discharge. Results. The study population included 1,683 hospital discharges with an average age of 79 years. The majority of the patients were female (55.9%) and had a DRG weight of 1.22 (0.68). 219 patients (13%) were readmitted within 30 days of hospital discharge. Protein energy malnutrition was common in this population. Low albumin was found in 973 (58%) patients and a low TLC was found in 1,152 (68%) patients. Low albumin and low TLC was found in 709 (42%) of patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis shows any laboratory evidence of PEM is a significant (p < 0.001) predictor of hospital readmission. Low serum albumin (p < 0.001) and TLC (p = 0.018) show similar trends. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis showed low serum albumin (Hazard Ratio 3.27, 95% CI [2.30-4.63]) and higher DRG weight (Hazard Ratio 1.19, 95% CI [1.03-1.38]) to be significant independent

  4. Low serum albumin and total lymphocyte count as predictors of 30 day hospital readmission in patients 65 years of age or older

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge is a target for health care cost savings through the medicare Value Based Purchasing initiative. Because of this focus, hospitals and health systems are investing considerable resources into the identification of patients at risk of hospital readmission and designing interventions to reduce the rate of hospital readmission. Malnutrition is a known risk factor for hospital readmission. Materials and Methods. All medical patients 65 years of age or older discharged from Memorial Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 31, 2012 who had a determination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count on hospital admission were studied retrospectively. Admission serum albumin levels and total lymphocyte counts were used to classify the nutritional status of all patients in the study. Patients with a serum albumin less than 3.5 grams/dL and/or a TLC less than 1,500 cells per mm3 were classified as having protein energy malnutrition. The primary outcome investigated in this study was hospital readmission for any reason within 30 days of discharge. Results. The study population included 1,683 hospital discharges with an average age of 79 years. The majority of the patients were female (55.9%) and had a DRG weight of 1.22 (0.68). 219 patients (13%) were readmitted within 30 days of hospital discharge. Protein energy malnutrition was common in this population. Low albumin was found in 973 (58%) patients and a low TLC was found in 1,152 (68%) patients. Low albumin and low TLC was found in 709 (42%) of patients. Kaplan–Meier analysis shows any laboratory evidence of PEM is a significant (p < 0.001) predictor of hospital readmission. Low serum albumin (p < 0.001) and TLC (p = 0.018) show similar trends. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis showed low serum albumin (Hazard Ratio 3.27, 95% CI [2.30–4.63]) and higher DRG weight (Hazard Ratio 1.19, 95% CI [1.03–1.38]) to be significant independent

  5. An investigation of quality improvement initiatives in decreasing the rate of avoidable 30-day, skilled nursing facility-to-hospital readmissions: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mileski, Michael; Topinka, Joseph Baar; Lee, Kimberly; Brooks, Matthew; McNeil, Christopher; Jackson, Jenna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The main objective was to investigate the applicability and effectiveness of quality improvement initiatives in decreasing the rate of avoidable 30-day, skilled nursing facility (SNF)-to-hospital readmissions. Problem The rate of rehospitalizations from SNF within 30 days of original discharge has increased within the last decade. Setting The research team participants conducted a literature review via Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PubMed to collect data about quality improvement implemented in SNFs. Results The most common facilitator was the incorporation of specialized staff. The most cited barriers were quality improvement tracking and implementation. Conclusion These strategy examples can be useful to acute care hospitals attempting to lower bounce back from subacute care providers and long-term care facilities seeking quality improvement initiatives to reduce hospital readmissions. PMID:28182162

  6. External Validation of a Case-Mix Adjustment Model for the Standardized Reporting of 30-Day Stroke Mortality Rates in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ping; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Xianwei; Liu, Liping; Ji, Ruijun; Meng, Xia; Jing, Jing; Tong, Xu; Guo, Li; Wang, Yilong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose A case-mix adjustment model has been developed and externally validated, demonstrating promise. However, the model has not been thoroughly tested among populations in China. In our study, we evaluated the performance of the model in Chinese patients with acute stroke. Methods The case-mix adjustment model A includes items on age, presence of atrial fibrillation on admission, National Institutes of Health Stroke Severity Scale (NIHSS) score on admission, and stroke type. Model B is similar to Model A but includes only the consciousness component of the NIHSS score. Both model A and B were evaluated to predict 30-day mortality rates in 13,948 patients with acute stroke from the China National Stroke Registry. The discrimination of the models was quantified by c-statistic. Calibration was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results The c-statistic of model A in our external validation cohort was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.79–0.82), and the c-statistic of model B was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.81–0.84). Excellent calibration was reported in the two models with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (0.892 for model A, p<0.001; 0.927 for model B, p = 0.008). Conclusions The case-mix adjustment model could be used to effectively predict 30-day mortality rates in Chinese patients with acute stroke. PMID:27846282

  7. The Effect of Cuts in Medicare Reimbursement on Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Seshamani, Meena; Schwartz, J Sanford; Volpp, Kevin G

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine if patients treated at hospitals under different levels of financial strain from the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 had differential changes in 30-day mortality, and whether vulnerable patient populations such as the uninsured were disproportionately affected. Data Source Hospital discharge data from all general acute care hospitals in Pennsylvania from 1997 to 2001. Study Design A multivariate regression analysis was performed retrospectively on 30-day mortality rates, using hospital discharge data, hospital financial data, and death certificate information from Pennsylvania. Data Collection We used 370,017 hospital episodes with one of four conditions identified by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality as inpatient quality indicators were extracted. Principal Findings The average magnitude of Medicare payment reduction on overall net revenues was estimated at 1.8 percent for hospitals with low BBA impact and 3.6 percent for hospitals with a high impact in 1998, worsening to 2 and 4.8 percent, respectively, by 2001. Operating margins decreased significantly over the time period for all hospitals (p<.05). While unadjusted mortality rates demonstrated a disproportionate rise in mortality for patients from high impact hospitals from 1997 to 2000, adjusted analyses show no consistent, significant difference in the rate of change in mortality between high-impact and low-impact hospitals (p = .04–.94). Similarly, uninsured patients did not experience greater increases in mortality in high-impact hospitals relative to low-impact hospitals. Conclusions An analysis of hospitalizations in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania did not find an adverse impact of increased financial strain from the BBA on patient mortality either among all patients or among the uninsured. PMID:16704507

  8. Worse Prognosis in Heart Failure Patients with 30-Day Readmission

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Ying-Chang; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Liu, Kuan-Liang; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wen, Ming-Shien; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) readmission results in substantial expenditure on HF management. This study aimed to evaluate the readmission rate, outcome, and predictors of HF readmission. Methods Patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF < 40%) who were admitted for acute decompensation of de novo HF were enrolled to analyze readmission rate, mortality and predictors of readmission. Results A total of 433 de novo HF patients with LVEF < 40% were enrolled during the period August 2013 to December 2014. The in-hospital and 6-month mortality rates were 3.9% and 15.2%, respectively. In those patients surviving the index HF hospitalization, the 30-day and 6-month readmission rates were 10.9% and 27%, respectively. At the end of the 6-month follow-up, the readmission group had higher mortality than the non-readmission group (27.66% vs. 10.36%; p = 0.001). The survivors of the 30-day readmission had similar mortality rates at 6 months, regardless of the cause of readmission (cardiovascular vs. non-cardiovascular: 25% vs. 30.43%, p = 0.677). Among all the parameters, prescription of beta blockers independently reduced the risk of 30-day readmission (odds ratio 0.15; 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.99; p = 0.049). Conclusions Those HF patients who suffered from 30-day readmission had worse prognosis at the 6-month follow-up. Regardless of the readmission causes, the patients surviving the 30-day readmission had similar mortality rates at 6-month follow-up. These results underscored the importance of reducing readmission as a means to improve HF outcome. PMID:27899857

  9. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  10. Post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (≥65years old): A study of 453 consecutive elderly spine surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Wang, Timothy Y; Back, Adam G; Lydon, Emily; Reddy, Gireesh B; Karikari, Isaac O; Gottfried, Oren N

    2017-03-02

    In the last decade, costs of U.S. healthcare expenditures have been soaring, with billions of dollars spent on hospital readmissions. Identifying causes and risk factors can reduce soaring readmission rates and help lower healthcare costs. The aim of this is to determine if post-operative delirium in the elderly is an independent risk factor for 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery. The medical records of 453 consecutive elderly (≥65years old) patients undergoing spine surgery at Duke University Medical Center from 2008 to 2010 were reviewed. We identified 17 (3.75%) patients who experienced post-operative delirium according to DSM-V criteria. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and post-operative complication rates were collected for each patient. Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium had an increased length of hospital stay (10.47days vs. 5.70days, p=0.009). Complication rates were similar between the cohorts with the post-operative delirium patients having increased UTI and superficial surgical site infections. In total, 12.14% of patients were re-admitted within 30-days of discharge, with post-operative delirium patients experiencing approximately a 4-fold increase in 30-day readmission rates (Delirium: 41.18% vs. No Delirium: 11.01%, p=0.002). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (p=0.03). Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium after spine surgery is an independent risk factor for unplanned readmission within 30-days of discharge. Preventable measures and early awareness of post-operative delirium in the elderly may help reduce readmission rates.

  11. Predictive value of NT-proBNP for 30-day mortality in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: a comparison with the GRACE and TIMI risk scores

    PubMed Central

    Schellings, Dirk AAM; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Dambrink, Jan-Henk E; Gosselink, AT Marcel; Kedhi, Elvin; Roolvink, Vincent; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; van’t Hof, Arnoud WJ

    2016-01-01

    Background The biomarker N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) predicts outcome in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). Whether NT-proBNP has incremental prognostic value beyond established risk strategies is still questionable. Purpose To evaluate the predictive value of NT-proBNP for 30-day mortality over and beyond the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) and Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk scores in patients with NSTE-ACS. Methods Patients included in our ACS registry were candidates. NT-proBNP levels on admission were measured and the GRACE and TIMI risk scores were assessed. We compared the predictive value of NT-proBNP to both risk scores and evaluated whether NT-proBNP improves prognostication by using receiver operator curves and measures of discrimination improvement. Results A total of 1324 patients were included and 50 patients died during follow-up. On logistic regression analysis NT-proBNP and the GRACE risk score (but not the TIMI risk score) both independently predicted mortality at 30 days. The predictive value of NT-proBNP did not differ significantly compared to the GRACE risk score (area under the curve [AUC]) 0.85 vs 0.87 p=0.67) but was considerably higher in comparison to the TIMI risk score (AUC 0.60 p<0.001). Adjustment of the GRACE risk score by adding NT-proBNP did not improve prognostication: AUC 0.86 (p=0.57), integrated discrimination improvement 0.04 (p=0.003), net reclassification improvement 0.12 (p=0.21). Conclusion In patients with NSTE-ACS, NT-proBNP and the GRACE risk score (but not the TIMI risk score) both have good and comparable predictive value for 30-day mortality. However, incremental prognostic value of NT-proBNP beyond the GRACE risk score could not be demonstrated. PMID:27920547

  12. Long-term mortality of hospitalized pneumonia in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.

    PubMed

    Myint, P K; Hawkins, K R; Clark, A B; Luben, R N; Wareham, N J; Khaw, K-T; Wilson, A M

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about cause-specific long-term mortality beyond 30 days in pneumonia. We aimed to compare the mortality of patients with hospitalized pneumonia compared to age- and sex-matched controls beyond 30 days. Participants were drawn from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk prospective population study. Hospitalized pneumonia cases were identified from record linkage (ICD-10: J12-J18). For this study we excluded people with hospitalized pneumonia who died within 30 days. Each case identified was matched to four controls and followed up until the end June 2012 (total 15 074 person-years, mean 6·1 years, range 0·08-15·2 years). Cox regression models were constructed to examine the all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality using date of pneumonia onset as baseline with binary pneumonia status as exposure. A total of 2465 men and women (503 cases, 1962 controls) [mean age (s.d.) 64·5 (8·3) years] were included in the study. Between a 30-day to 1-year period, hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were 7·3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 5·4-9·9] and 5·9 (95% CI 3·5-9·7), respectively (with very few respiratory deaths within the same period) in cases compared to controls after adjusting for age, sex, asthma, smoking status, pack years, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes, physical activity, waist-to-hip ratio, prevalent cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. All outcomes assessed also showed increased risk of death in cases compared to controls after 1 year; respiratory cause of death being the most significant during that period (HR 16·4, 95% CI 8·9-30·1). Hospitalized pneumonia was associated with increased all-cause and specific-cause mortality beyond 30 days.

  13. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  14. Beyond volume: hospital-based healthcare technology as a predictor of mortality for cardiovascular patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Yunhwan; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-06-01

    To examine whether hospital-based healthcare technology is related to 30-day postoperative mortality rates after adjusting for hospital volume of cardiovascular surgical procedures.This study used the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database from 2002 to 2013, which was released by the Korean National Health Insurance Service. A total of 11,109 cardiovascular surgical procedure patients were analyzed. The primary analysis was based on logistic regression models to examine our hypothesis.After adjusting for hospital volume of cardiovascular surgical procedures as well as for all other confounders, the odds ratio (OR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals was 1.567-times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.069-2.297) than in those with high healthcare technology. We also found that, overall, cardiovascular surgical patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals, regardless of the extent of cardiovascular surgical procedures, had the highest 30-day mortality rate.Although the results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume-mortality relationship in cardiovascular surgical patients, the independent effect of hospital-based healthcare technology is strong, resulting in a lower mortality rate. As hospital characteristics such as clinical pathways and protocols are likely to also play an important role in mortality, further research is required to explore their respective contributions.

  15. Hospital Strategies for Reducing Risk-Standardized Mortality Rates in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.; Spatz, Erica S.; Herrin, Jeph; Cherlin, Emily J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Ting, Henry H.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite recent improvements in survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), U.S. hospitals vary 2-fold in their 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs). Nevertheless, information is limited on hospital-level factors that may be associated with RSMRs. Objective To identify hospital strategies that were associated with lower RSMRs. Design Cross-sectional survey of 537 hospitals (91% response rate) and weighted multivariate regression by using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to determine the associations between hospital strategies and hospital RSMRs. Setting Acute care hospitals with an annualized AMI volume of at least 25 patients. Participants Patients hospitalized with AMI between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Measurements Hospital performance improvement strategies, characteristics, and 30-day RSMRs. Results In multivariate analysis, several hospital strategies were significantly associated with lower RSMRs and in aggregate were associated with clinically important differences in RSMRs. These strategies included holding monthly meetings to review AMI cases between hospital clinicians and staff who transported patients to the hospital (RSMR lower by 0.70 percentage points), having cardiologists always on site (lower by 0.54 percentage points), fostering an organizational environment in which clinicians are encouraged to solve problems creatively (lower by 0.84 percentage points), not cross-training nurses from intensive care units for the cardiac catheterization laboratory (lower by 0.44 percentage points), and having physician and nurse champions rather than nurse champions alone (lower by 0.88 percentage points). Fewer than 10% of hospitals reported using at least 4 of these 5 strategies. Limitation The cross-sectional design demonstrates statistical associations but cannot establish causal relationships. Conclusion Several strategies, which are currently implemented by relatively few hospitals, are

  16. Comparing three clinical prediction rules for primarily predicting the 30-day mortality of patients with pulmonary embolism: The “Simplified Revised Geneva Score,” the “Original PESI,” and the “Simplified PESI”

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Fereyduni, Farid; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar; Kheyri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) should be evaluated for the clinical probability of PE using an applicable risk score. The Geneva prognostic score, the PE Severity Index (PESI), and its simplified version (sPESI) are well-known clinical prognostic scores for PE. The purpose of this study was to analyze these clinical scores as prognostic tools. Materials and Methods: A historical cohort study was conducted on patients with acute PE in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, from June 2013 to August 2014. To compare survival in the 1-month follow-up and factor-analyze mortality from the survival graph, Kaplan–Meier, and log-rank logistic regression were applied. Results: Two hundred and twenty four patients were assigned to two “low risk” and “high risk” groups using the three versions of “Simplified PESI, Original PESI, and Simplified Geneva.” They were followed for a period of 1 month after admission. The overall mortality rate within 1 month from diagnosis was about 24% (95% confidence interval, 21.4–27.2). The mortality rate of low risk PE patients was about 4% in the PESI, 17% in the Geneva, and <1% in the simplified PESI scales (P < 0.005). The mortality rate among high risk patients was 33%, 33.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Among patients with acute PE, the simplified PESI model was able to accurately predict mortality rate for low risk patients. Among high risk patients, however, the difference between the three models in predicting prognosis was not significant. PMID:27656606

  17. Accidents in Canada: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Paddon, P

    1989-01-01

    For Canadians under 45, accidents are the leading cause of both death and hospitalization. For the Canadian population as a whole, accidents rank fourth as a cause of death, after cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and respiratory disease. This article analyzes accident mortality and hospitalization in Canada using age-specific rates, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR), and potential years of life lost (PYLL). The six major causes of accidental death for men are motor vehicle traffic accidents (MVTA), falls, drowning, fires, suffocation and poisoning. For women, the order is slightly different: MVTA, falls, fires, suffocation, poisoning and drowning. From 1971 to 1986, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for accidents decreased by 44% for men and 39% for women. The largest decrease occurred in the under 15 age group. Accidents accounted for 11.5% of total hospital days in 1985, and 8% of hospital discharges. Because young people have the highest rates of accidental death, potential years of life lost (PYLL) are almost as high for accidents as for cardiovascular disease, although CVD deaths outnumbered accidental deaths by almost five to one in 1985.

  18. Hypocapnia and Hypercapnia Are Predictors for ICU Admission and Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Laserna, Elena; Sibila, Oriol; Aguilar, Patrick R.; Mortensen, Eric M.; Anzueto, Antonio; Blanquer, Jose M.; Sanz, Francisco; Rello, Jordi; Marcos, Pedro J.; Velez, Maria I.; Aziz, Nivin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to examine in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) the association between abnormal Paco2 and ICU admission and 30-day mortality. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted at two tertiary teaching hospitals. Eligible subjects were admitted with a diagnosis of CAP. Arterial blood gas analyses were obtained with measurement of Paco2 on admission. Multivariate analyses were performed using 30-day mortality and ICU admission as the dependent measures. Results: Data were abstracted on 453 subjects with a documented arterial blood gas analysis. One hundred eighty-nine patients (41%) had normal Paco2 (35-45 mm Hg), 194 patients (42%) had a Paco2 < 35 mm Hg (hypocapnic), and 70 patients (15%) had a Paco2 > 45 mm Hg (hypercapnic). In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for severity of illness, hypocapnic patients had greater 30-day mortality (OR = 2.84; 95% CI, 1.28-6.30) and a higher need for ICU admission (OR = 2.88; 95% CI, 1.68-4.95) compared with patients with normal Paco2. In addition, hypercapnic patients had a greater 30-day mortality (OR = 3.38; 95% CI, 1.38-8.30) and a higher need for ICU admission (OR = 5.35; 95% CI, 2.80-10.23). When patients with COPD were excluded from the analysis, the differences persisted between groups. Conclusion: In hospitalized patients with CAP, both hypocapnia and hypercapnia were associated with an increased need for ICU admission and higher 30-day mortality. These findings persisted after excluding patients with CAP and with COPD. Therefore, Paco2 should be considered for inclusion in future severity stratification criteria to appropriate identified patients who will require a higher level of care and are at risk for increased mortality. PMID:22677348

  19. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A; Wolkewitz, Martin; Davey, Peter G; Koller, Walter; Berger, Jutta; Nagler, Jan; Icket, Claudine; Kalenic, Smilja; Horvatic, Jasminka; Seifert, Harald; Kaasch, Achim J; Paniara, Olga; Argyropoulou, Athina; Bompola, Maria; Smyth, Edmond; Skally, Mairead; Raglio, Annibale; Dumpis, Uga; Kelmere, Agita Melbarde; Borg, Michael; Xuereb, Deborah; Ghita, Mihaela C; Noble, Michelle; Kolman, Jana; Grabljevec, Stanko; Turner, David; Lansbury, Louise; Grundmann, Hajo

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  20. Mortality, Length of Stay, and Inpatient Charges for Heart Failure Patients at Public versus Private Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study compared in-hospital mortality within 30 days of admission, lengths of stay, and inpatient charges among patients with heart failure admitted to public and private hospitals in South Korea. Materials and Methods We obtained health insurance claims data for all heart failure inpatients nationwide between November 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012. These data were then matched with hospital-level data, and multi-level regression models were examined. A total of 8406 patients from 253 hospitals, including 31 public hospitals, were analyzed. Results The in-hospital mortality rate within 30 days of admission was 0.92% greater and the mean length of stay was 1.94 days longer at public hospitals than at private hospitals (mortality: 5.18% and 4.26%, respectively; LOS: 12.08 and 10.14 days, respectively). The inpatient charges were 11.4% lower per case and 24.5% lower per day at public hospitals than at private hospitals. After adjusting for patient- and hospital-level confounders, public hospitals had a 1.62-fold higher in-hospital mortality rate, a 16.5% longer length of stay, and an 11.7% higher inpatient charge per case than private hospitals, although the charges of private hospitals were greater in univariate analysis. Conclusion We recommend that government agencies and policy makers continue to monitor quality of care, lengths of stay in the hospital, and expenditures according to type of hospital ownership to improve healthcare outcomes and reduce spending. PMID:25837196

  1. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  2. Advancing Age and 30-Day Adverse Outcomes Following Non-Emergent General Surgical Operations

    PubMed Central

    Gajdos, Csaba; Kile, Deidre; Hawn, Mary T.; Finlayson, Emily; Henderson, William G.; Robinson, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    Background While some single center studies have demonstrated that major surgical operations are safe to perform in older adults, most multicenter database studies find advancing age to independently predict adverse postoperative outcomes. We hypothesized that thirty-day postoperative mortality, complications, failure to rescue rates and postoperative length of stay will increase with advancing age. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) Participants Patients undergoing non-emergent major general surgical operations between 2005 and 2008 were studied. Measures Postoperative outcomes of interest were complications occurring within 30 days of the index operation, return to OR within 30 days, failure to rescue after a postoperative complication, post-surgical length of stay and 30 day mortality. Results A total of 165,600 patients were studied. The rates of postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, and each type of postoperative complication increased as age increased. The rates of failure to rescue after each type of postoperative complication also increased with age. Mortality rates in patients ≥80 following renal insufficiency (43.3%), stroke (36.5%), myocardial infarction (35.6%), and pulmonary complications (25-39%) were particularly high. Median postoperative length of stay increased with age following surgical site infection, UTI, pneumonia, return to OR, and overall morbidity, but not after venous thromboembolism, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency, failure to wean from the ventilator or reintubations. Conclusion Thirty-day mortality, complications and failure to rescue rates increase with advancing age following non-emergent general surgical operations. Patients over 80 years of age have especially high mortality following renal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary complications. As patient age advances, surgeons need to be

  3. Hospital resource intensity and cirrhosis mortality in United States

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Amit K; Chakrabarti, Apurba K; Mellinger, Jessica L; Volk, Michael L; Day, Ryan; Singer, Andrew L; Hewitt, Winston R; Reddy, Kunam S; Moss, Adyr A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether hospital characteristics predict cirrhosis mortality and how much variation in mortality is attributable to hospital differences. METHODS We used data from the 2005-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the American Hospital Association Annual survey to identify hospitalizations for decompensated cirrhosis and corresponding facility characteristics. We created hospital-specific risk and reliability-adjusted odds ratios for cirrhosis mortality, and evaluated patient and facility differences based on hospital performance quintiles. We used hierarchical regression models to determine the effect of these factors on mortality. RESULTS Seventy-two thousand seven hundred and thirty-three cirrhosis admissions were evaluated in 805 hospitals. Hospital mean cirrhosis annual case volume was 90.4 (range 25-828). Overall hospital cirrhosis mortality rate was 8.00%. Hospital-adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for mortality ranged from 0.48 to 1.89. Patient characteristics varied significantly by hospital aOR for mortality. Length of stay averaged 6.0 ± 1.6 days, and varied significantly by hospital performance (P < 0.001). Facility level predictors of risk-adjusted mortality were higher Medicaid case-mix (OR = 1.00, P = 0.029) and LPN staffing (OR = 1.02, P = 0.015). Higher cirrhosis volume (OR = 0.99, P = 0.025) and liver transplant program status (OR = 0.83, P = 0.026) were significantly associated with survival. After adjusting for patient differences, era, and clustering effects, 15.3% of variation between hospitals was attributable to differences in facility characteristics. CONCLUSION Hospital characteristics account for a significant proportion of variation in cirrhosis mortality. These findings have several implications for patients, providers, and health care delivery in liver disease care and inpatient health care design. PMID:28348492

  4. Association between the Value-Based Purchasing pay for performance program and patient mortality in US hospitals: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jose F; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) program—the US pay for performance program introduced by Medicare to incentivize higher quality care—on 30 day mortality for three incentivized conditions: acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. Design Observational study. Setting 4267 acute care hospitals in the United States: 2919 participated in the HVBP program and 1348 were ineligible and used as controls (44 in general hospitals in Maryland and 1304 critical access hospitals across the United States). Participants 2 430 618 patients admitted to US hospitals from 2008 through 2013. Main outcome measures 30 day risk adjusted mortality for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia using a patient level linear spline analysis to examine the association between the introduction of the HVBP program and 30 day mortality. Non-incentivized, medical conditions were the comparators. A secondary outcome measure was to determine whether the introduction of the HVBP program was particularly beneficial for a subgroup of hospital—poor performers at baseline—that may benefit the most. Results Mortality rates of incentivized conditions in hospitals participating in the HVBP program declined at −0.13% for each quarter during the preintervention period and −0.03% point difference for each quarter during the post-intervention period. For non-HVBP hospitals, mortality rates declined at −0.14% point difference for each quarter during the preintervention period and −0.01% point difference for each quarter during the post-intervention period. The difference in the mortality trends between the two groups was small and non-significant (difference in difference in trends −0.03% point difference for each quarter, 95% confidence interval −0.08% to 0.13% point difference, P=0.35). In no subgroups of hospitals was HVBP associated with better outcomes, including poor performers at baseline

  5. The relationship between hospital market competition, evidence-based performance measures, and mortality for chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jared Lane K; Lo Sasso, Anthony T

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the Joint Commission's ORYX initiative and the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file from 2003 to 2006, this study employed a fixed-effects approach to examine the relationship between hospital market competition, evidence-based performance measures, and short-term mortality at seven days, 30 days, 90 days, and one year for patients with chronic heart failure. We found that, on average, higher adherence with most of the Joint Commission's heart failure performance measures was not associated with lower mortality; the level of market competition also was not associated with any differences in mortality. However, higher adherence with the discharge instructions and left ventricular function assessment indicators at the 80th and 90th percentiles of the mortality distribution was associated with incrementally lower mortality rates. These findings suggest that targeting evidence-based processes of care might have a stronger impact in improving patient outcomes.

  6. Ares I-X 30 Day Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ess, Bob; Smith, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation represents the 30 day report on the Ares I-X test flight. Included in the review is information on the following areas: (1) Ground Systems, (2) Guidance, Navigation and Control, (3) Roll Response, (4) Vehicle Response, (5) Control System Performance, (6) Structural Damping, (7) Thrust Oscillation, (8) Stage Separation, (9) Connector Assessment, (10) USS Splashdown, (11) Data Recorder and (12) FS Hardware Assessment.

  7. Hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in the thrombolytic era

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, N; O'Rorke, C; Codd, M; McCann, H; McGarry, K; Sugrue, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the management and outcome of an unselected consecutive series of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to a tertiary referral centre.
DESIGN—A historical cohort study over a three year period (1992-94) of consecutive unselected admissions with acute myocardial infarction identified using the HIPE (hospital inpatient enquiry) database and validated according to MONICA criteria for definite or probable acute myocardial infarction.
SETTING—University teaching hospital and cardiac tertiary referral centre.
RESULTS—1059 patients were included. Mean age was 67 years; 60% were male and 40% female. Rates of coronary care unit (CCU) admission, thrombolysis, and predischarge angiography were 70%, 28%, and 32%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 18%. Independent predictors of hospital mortality by multivariate analysis were age, left ventricular failure, ventricular arrhythmias, cardiogenic shock, management outside CCU, and reinfarction. Hospital mortality in a small cohort from a non-tertiary referral centre was 14%, a difference largely explained by the lower mean age of these patients (64 years). Five year survival in the cohort was 50%. Only age and left ventricular failure were independent predictors of mortality at follow up.
CONCLUSIONS—In unselected consecutive patients the hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction remains high (18%). Age and the occurrence of left ventricular failure are major determinants of short and long term mortality after acute myocardial infarction.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; mortality; thrombolysis PMID:10212164

  8. Predictors of early dyspnoea relief in acute heart failure and the association with 30-day outcomes: findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Stebbins, Amanda; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Felker, G. Michael; Heizer, Gretchen M.; Atar, Dan; Teerlink, John R.; Califf, Robert M.; Massie, Barry M.; Hasselblad, Vic; Starling, Randall C.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the characteristics associated with early dyspnoea relief during acute heart failure (HF) hospitalization, and its association with 30-day outcomes. Methods and results ASCEND-HF was a randomized trial of nesiritide vs. placebo in 7141 patients hospitalized with acute HF in which dyspnoea relief at 6 h was measured on a 7-point Likert scale. Patients were classified as having early dyspnoea relief if they experienced moderate or marked dyspnoea improvement at 6 h. We analysed the clinical characteristics, geographical variation, and outcomes (mortality, mortality/HF hospitalization, and mortality/hospitalization at 30 days) associated with early dyspnoea relief. Early dyspnoea relief occurred in 2984 patients (43%). In multivariable analyses, predictors of dyspnoea relief included older age and oedema on chest radiograph; higher systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, and natriuretic peptide level; and lower serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), sodium, and haemoglobin (model mean C index = 0.590). Dyspnoea relief varied markedly across countries, with patients enrolled from Central Europe having the lowest risk-adjusted likelihood of improvement. Early dyspnoea relief was associated with lower risk-adjusted 30-day mortality/HF hospitalization [hazard ratio (HR) 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68–0.96] and mortality/hospitalization (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74–0.99), but similar mortality. Conclusion Clinical characteristics such as respiratory rate, pulmonary oedema, renal function, and natriuretic peptide levels are associated with early dyspnoea relief, and moderate or marked improvement in dyspnoea was associated with a lower risk for 30-day outcomes. PMID:23159547

  9. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization and 30-Day Rehospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Julie C.; Intrator, Orna; Karuza, Jurgis; Wetle, Terrie; Mor, Vincent; Katz, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between features of nursing home (NH) medical staff organization and residents’ 30-day rehospitalizations. Design Cross-sectional study combining primary data collected from a survey of medical directors, NH resident assessment data (minimum data set), Medicare claims, and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Setting A total of 202 freestanding US nursing homes. Participants Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were hospitalized and subsequently admitted to a study nursing home. Measurements Medical staff organization dimensions derived from the survey, NH residents’ characteristics derived from minimum data set data, hospitalizations obtained from Part A Medicare claims, and NH characteristics from the OSCAR database and from www.ltcfocus.org. Study outcome defined within a 30-day window following an index hospitalization: rehospitalized, otherwise died, otherwise survived and not rehospitalized. Results Thirty-day rehospitalizations occurred for 3788 (20.3%) of the 18,680 initial hospitalizations. Death was observed for 884 (4.7%) of residents who were not rehospitalized. Adjusted by hospitalization, resident, and NH characteristics, nursing homes having a more formal appointment process for physicians were less likely to have 30-day rehospitalization (b = −0.43, SE = 0.17), whereas NHs in which a higher proportion of residents were cared for by a single physician were more likely to have rehospitalizations (b = 0.18, SE = 0.08). Conclusion This is the first study to show a direct relationship between features of NH medical staff organization and resident-level process of care. The relationship of a more strict appointment process and rehospitalizations might be a consequence of more formalized and dedicated medical practice with a sense of ownership and accountability. A higher volume of patients per physician does not appear to improve quality of care. PMID:22682694

  10. Measuring Hospital-Wide Mortality-Pitfalls and Potential.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Simon J; Goldmann, Don A; Perla, Rocco J; Parry, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Risk-adjusted hospital-wide mortality has been proposed as a key indicator of system-level quality. Several risk-adjusted measures are available, and one-the hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) - is publicly reported in a number of countries, but not in the United States. This paper reviews potential uses of such measures. We conclude that available methods are not suitable for interhospital comparisons or rankings and should not be used for pay-for-performance or value-based purchasing/payment. Hospital-wide mortality is a relatively imprecise, crude measure of quality, but disaggregation into condition- and service-line-specific mortality can facilitate targeted improvement efforts. If tracked over time, both observed and expected mortality rates should be monitored to ensure that apparent improvement is not due to increasing expected mortality, which could reflect changes in case mix or coding. Risk-adjusted mortality can be used as an initial signal that a hospital's mortality rate is significantly higher than statistically expected, prompting further inquiry.

  11. The importance of in-hospital mortality for patients requiring free tissue transfer for head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, P; Klatt, J; Schmelzle, R; Li, L

    2013-09-01

    Mortality is a rare but disastrous complication of microvascular head and neck reconstruction. The investigators attempt to identify the procedure-related mortality cases and analyse the causes of death. A retrospective analysis of 804 consecutive free flap procedures during a 19-year period was performed and fatal cases were identified (n=42 deaths). Multivariate logistic regression was employed to determine the association of in-hospital mortality with patient-related characteristics. The 30-day post-operative mortality rate was 1% (8 out of 804 patients), and the in-hospital mortality rate (post-operative deaths in-hospital before or after the 30th post-operative day without discharge) was 5.2% (42 out of 804 patients). Cancer recurrence and metastases related pneumonia were the most common causes of death (n=26, 62%), followed by cardiac, pulmonary, infectious and hepatic/renal aetiologies. Logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with stage IV disease and an operation time of >9h were significantly associated with post-operative mortality. Malignancy-related conditions were the most common causes of death following free flap transfer for head and neck reconstruction. For patients with stage IV head and neck cancer, this aggressive surgical approach should be cautiously justified due to its association with post-operative mortality. To shorten the operation time, experienced microsurgical operation teams are necessary.

  12. Factors affecting morbidity, mortality and survival in patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer in a district general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Macadam, Robert; Yeomans, Neil; Wilson, Jonathan; Case, William; White, Clive; Lovegrove, John; Lyndon, Philip

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This is a review of elective rectal cancer surgery during 1993-1999 at a single district general hospital to investigate the variables that affected the care of these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study of patients presenting with rectal adenocarcinoma to a district general hospital where total mesorectal excision was practiced over a 7-year period was performed to identify factors associated with complications, death and disease recurrence. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients developed a total of 89 complications and 30-day mortality was 8.3%. Overall, 81% of all resections and 86% of potentially curative resections were free of tumour at the circumferential resection margin. A positive circumferential resection margin and 30-day mortality were both associated with increased postoperative blood transfusion volume. Twenty-nine recurrences were detected during the follow-up period (mean, 21.7 months) and circumferential margin involvement by tumour, Dukes' stage, pre-operative functional status (ASA grade) and length of hospital stay correlated with disease-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical outcomes in lower volume hospitals are comparable with those reported by larger centres. PMID:16176691

  13. Myocardial revascularisation in women: evaluation of hospital mortality and morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Cloin, E.C.W.; Noyez, L.

    2006-01-01

    Background Although women are reported to be at higher risk for mortality and morbidity after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), there is no consensus in literature. Method Pre-, peri- and postoperative hospital data of 8578 patients undergoing an isolated myocardial revascularisation from January 1987 to December 2004 were analysed. Of these patients, 2083 (24.3%) were female. Results Female patients were significantly older (p=0.001), and risk factors as diabetes (p=0.001), hypertension (p=0.001), hyperlipidaemia (p=0.001) were significantly more prevalent than in men. The incidence of preoperative myocardial infarction (p=0.001) and triple-vessel disease (p=0.001) was lower, but the incidence of unstable angina (NYHA IV) (p=0.001) was significantly higher than in men. Significantly fewer women (p=0.04) received an arterial graft. Postoperatively, there was no significant difference in the registered morbidity, with the exception of a lower incidence of female patients with non-sinus rhythm (p=0.001) and a higher incidence of pulmonary problems (p=0.006). Hospital mortality was not significantly different between the genders: 3.5 vs. 3.4% (p=0.9). A preoperative myocardial infarction was identified as the only independent predictor for hospital mortality. Conclusion The preoperative profiles of women and men undergoing CABG are dissimilar. However, the incidences of hospital mortality, and morbidity were not statistically different. Female gender was not identified as predictor for death or adverse outcome. PMID:25696593

  14. Cumulative lactate and hospital mortality in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both hyperlactatemia and persistence of hyperlactatemia have been associated with bad outcome. We compared lactate and lactate-derived variables in outcome prediction. Methods Retrospective observational study. Case records from 2,251 consecutive intensive care unit (ICU) patients admitted between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, all lactate measurements, and in-hospital mortality were recorded. The time integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold of 2.2 mmol/L (lactate-time-integral), maximum lactate (max-lactate), and time-to-first-normalization were calculated. Survivors and nonsurvivors were compared and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were applied. Results A total of 20,755 lactate measurements were analyzed. Data are srpehown as median [interquartile range]. In nonsurvivors (n = 405) lactate-time-integral (192 [0–1881] min·mmol/L) and time-to-first normalization (44.0 [0–427] min) were higher than in hospital survivors (n = 1846; 0 [0–134] min·mmol/L and 0 [0–75] min, respectively; all p < 0.001). Normalization of lactate <6 hours after ICU admission revealed better survival compared with normalization of lactate >6 hours (mortality 16.6% vs. 24.4%; p < 0.001). AUC of ROC curves to predict in-hospital mortality was the largest for max-lactate, whereas it was not different among all other lactate derived variables (all p > 0.05). The area under the ROC curves for admission lactate and lactate-time-integral was not different (p = 0.36). Conclusions Hyperlactatemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in a heterogeneous ICU population. In our patients, lactate peak values predicted in-hospital mortality equally well as lactate-time-integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold. PMID:23446002

  15. Case-mix adjusted hospital mortality is a poor proxy for preventable mortality: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Girling, Alan J; Hofer, Timothy P; Wu, Jianhua; Chilton, Peter J; Nicholl, Jonathan P; Mohammed, Mohammed A; Lilford, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Risk-adjustment schemes are used to monitor hospital performance, on the assumption that excess mortality not explained by case mix is largely attributable to suboptimal care. We have developed a model to estimate the proportion of the variation in standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) that can be accounted for by variation in preventable mortality. The model was populated with values from the literature to estimate a predictive value of the SMR in this context—specifically the proportion of those hospitals with SMRs among the highest 2.5% that fall among the worst 2.5% for preventable mortality. The extent to which SMRs reflect preventable mortality rates is highly sensitive to the proportion of deaths that are preventable. If 6% of hospital deaths are preventable (as suggested by the literature), the predictive value of the SMR can be no greater than 9%. This value could rise to 30%, if 15% of deaths are preventable. The model offers a ‘reality check’ for case mix adjustment schemes designed to isolate the preventable component of any outcome rate. PMID:23069860

  16. [Neonatal morbidity and hospital mortality of preterm triplets.

    PubMed

    Lamshing-Salinas, Priscilla; Rend Ón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Iglesias-Leboreiro, José; Bernárdez-Zapata, Isabel; Braverman-Bronstein, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    Background: multiple gestations have caused an increase in vulnerable preterm births. Our objective was to analyze neonatal morbidity and mortality in preterm triplets. Methods: we analyzed a cohort of 30 triplets in an obstetrics and gynecology hospital. Data were obtained during pregnancy, childbirth and neonatal period: birth order, sex, weight, height, malformations, advanced resuscitation, assisted ventilation, intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, days of hospitalization, and death. Results: 90 infants were analyzed. There was an omphalopagus con-joined twins case; 42 (70 %) had between 30-33 weeks and six between 24-29; 19 (21 %) had low weight for gestational age, and 18 (30 %) had a major malformation; 27 % required ventilatory support, 33 % sepsis, 32 % necrotizing enterocolitis, 21 % pulmonary hypertension, 14 % bronchopulmonary dysplasia and 2 % intraventricular hemorrhage, without statistically significant differences related to the order, presentation at birth, sex and number of placentas and amniotic sacs. Eight 24-week triplets died, four over 28 weeks, and a siamese (p = 38). There was no difference in hospital days between triplets. Conclusions: the triplets mortality is low and mainly associated with extreme prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction and sepsis.

  17. Avoidable 30-Day Readmissions Among Patients With Stroke and Other Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nahab, Fadi; Takesaka, Jennifer; Mailyan, Eugene; Judd, Lilith; Culler, Steven; Webb, Adam; Frankel, Michael; Choi, Dennis; Helmers, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited data on factors associated with 30-day readmissions and the frequency of avoidable readmissions among patients with stroke and other cerebrovascular disease. Methods: University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) database records were used to identify patients discharged with a diagnosis of stroke or other cerebrovascular disease at a university hospital from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009 and readmitted within 30 days to the index hospital. Logistic regression models were used to identify patient and clinical characteristics associated with 30-day readmission. Two neurologists performed chart reviews on readmissions to identify avoidable cases. Results: Of 2706 patients discharged during the study period, 174 patients had 178 readmissions (6.4%) within 30 days. The only factor associated with 30-day readmission was the index length of stay >10 days (vs <5 days; odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% CI [1.4, 3.7]). Of 174 patients readmitted within 30 days (median time to readmission 10 days), 92 (53%) were considered avoidable readmissions including 38 (41%) readmitted for elective procedures within 30 days of discharge, 27 (29%) readmitted after inadequate outpatient care coordination, 15 (16%) readmitted after incomplete initial evaluations, 8 (9%) readmitted due to delayed palliative care consultation, and 4 (4%) readmitted after being discharged with inadequate discharge instructions. Only 5% of the readmitted patients had outpatient follow-up recommended within 1 week. Conclusions: More than half of the 30-day readmissions were considered avoidable. Coordinated timing of elective procedures and earlier outpatient follow-up may prevent the majority of avoidable readmissions among patients with stroke and other cerebrovascular disease. PMID:23983857

  18. Unexpectedly Higher Morbidity and Mortality of Hospitalized Elderly Patients Associated with Rhinovirus Compared with Influenza Virus Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ivan F. N.; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; To, Kelvin K. W.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Zhu, Shawn H. S.; Zhang, Ricky; Chan, Tuen-Ching; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Rhinovirus is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in adults, especially among the elderly and immunocompromised. Nevertheless, its clinical characteristics and mortality risks have not been well described. A retrospective analysis on a prospective cohort was conducted in a single teaching hospital center over a one-year period. We compared adult patients hospitalized for pneumonia caused by rhinovirus infection with those hospitalized for influenza infection during the same period. All recruited patients were followed up for at least 3 months up to 15 months. Independent risk factors associated with mortality for rhinovirus infection were identified. Between 1 March 2014 and 28 February 2015, a total of 1946 patients were consecutively included for analysis. Of these, 728 patients were hospitalized for rhinovirus infection and 1218 patients were hospitalized for influenza infection. Significantly more rhinovirus patients were elderly home residents and had chronic lung diseases (p < 0.001), whereas more influenza patients had previous stroke (p = 0.02); otherwise, there were no differences in the Charlson comorbidity indexes between the two groups. More patients in the rhinovirus group developed pneumonia complications (p = 0.03), required oxygen therapy, and had a longer hospitalization period (p < 0.001), whereas more patients in the influenza virus group presented with fever (p < 0.001) and upper respiratory tract symptoms of cough and sore throat (p < 0.001), and developed cardiovascular complications (p < 0.001). The 30-day (p < 0.05), 90-day (p < 0.01), and 1-year (p < 0.01) mortality rate was significantly higher in the rhinovirus group than the influenza virus group. Intensive care unit admission (odds ratio (OR): 9.56; 95% confidence interval (C.I.) 2.17–42.18), elderly home residents (OR: 2.60; 95% C.I. 1.56–4.33), requirement of oxygen therapy during hospitalization (OR: 2.62; 95% C.I. 1.62–4.24), and hemoglobin level <13

  19. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients starting hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Kim, Ha Yeon; Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Chang Seong; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2015-01-01

    Background Incident hemodialysis patients have the highest mortality in the first several months after starting dialysis. This study evaluated the in-hospital mortality rate after hemodialysis initiation, as well as related risk factors. Methods We examined in-hospital mortality and related factors in 2,692 patients starting incident hemodialysis. The study population included patients with acute kidney injury, acute exacerbation of chronic kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. To determine the parameters associated with in-hospital mortality, patients who died in hospital (nonsurvivors) were compared with those who survived (survivors). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality were determined using logistic regression analysis. Results Among all patients, 451 (16.8%) died during hospitalization. The highest risk factor for in-hospital mortality was cardiopulmonary resuscitation, followed by pneumonia, arrhythmia, hematologic malignancy, and acute kidney injury after bleeding. Albumin was not a risk factor for in-hospital mortality, whereas C-reactive protein was a risk factor. The use of vancomycin, inotropes, and a ventilator was associated with mortality, whereas elective hemodialysis with chronic kidney disease and statin use were associated with survival. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy was not associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion Incident hemodialysis patients had high in-hospital mortality. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, infections such as pneumonia, and the use of inotropes and a ventilator was strong risk factors for in-hospital mortality. However, elective hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease was associated with survival. PMID:26484040

  20. The 30-day prognosis of chronic-disease patients after contact with the out-of-hours service in primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Anders Helles; Moth, Grete; Christensen, Morten Bondo; Vestergaard, Mogens; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Little is known about the prognosis of patients with chronic disease who contact the out-of-hours (OOH) service in primary care. The characteristics of contacts with the Danish out-of-hours service and daytime general practice, hospitalization, and death were studied during a 30-day follow-up period in patients with chronic heart diseases. Design. Cohort study. Setting and subjects. The study was based on data from 11 897 adults aged 18 + years from a Danish survey of OOH contacts, including information on consultation type. Reason for encounter (RFE) was categorized by OOH GPs at triage as either “exacerbation” or “new health problem”. Registry data were used to identify eligible patients, and the cohort was followed for 30 days after OOH contact through nationwide registries on healthcare use and mortality. Main outcome measures. The 30-day prognosis of chronic-disease patients after OOH contact. Results. Included patients with chronic disease had a higher risk of new OOH contact, daytime GP contact, and hospitalization than other patients during the 30-day follow-up period. OOH use was particularly high among patients with severe mental illness. A strong association was seen between chronic disease and risk of dying during follow-up. Conclusion. Patients with chronic disease used both daytime general practice and the out-of-hours service more often than others during the 30-day follow-up period; they were more often hospitalized and had higher risk of dying. The findings call for a proactive approach to future preventive day care and closer follow-up of this group, especially patients with psychiatric disease. PMID:25471829

  1. Serum C-reactive protein predicts early mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, ShaoMing; Waili, Yulituzi; Qi, XiaoTing; Chen, YueMei; Lou, YuFeng; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether CRP could serve as a potential surrogate marker for 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis (HBV-DeCi). This was a retrospective cohort study that included 140 patients with HBV-DeCi. All patients were followed up for 1-month. A panel of clinical and biochemical variables were analyzed for potential associations with outcomes using multiple regression models. The serum CRP was significantly higher in nonsurviving patients than in surviving patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CRP levels (odds ratio: 1.047, P = 0.002) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.370, P = 0.001) were independent predictors for mortality. Serum CRP is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 1-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-DeCi. PMID:28121954

  2. Serum C-reactive protein predicts early mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, ShaoMing; Waili, Yulituzi; Qi, XiaoTing; Chen, YueMei; Lou, YuFeng; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether CRP could serve as a potential surrogate marker for 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis (HBV-DeCi).This was a retrospective cohort study that included 140 patients with HBV-DeCi. All patients were followed up for 1-month. A panel of clinical and biochemical variables were analyzed for potential associations with outcomes using multiple regression models.The serum CRP was significantly higher in nonsurviving patients than in surviving patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CRP levels (odds ratio: 1.047, P = 0.002) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.370, P = 0.001) were independent predictors for mortality.Serum CRP is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 1-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-DeCi.

  3. Characteristics of older adults rehospitalized within 7 and 30 days of discharge: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hain, Debra J; Tappen, Ruth; Diaz, Sanya; Ouslander, Joseph G

    2012-08-01

    Rehospitalization within 30 days consumes a significant portion of health care costs; therefore, interventions aimed at reducing the risk of rehospitalization are needed. A retrospective study was conducted examining rehospitalization rates and diagnoses according to discharge location and comparing characteristics of older adults within 7 and 30 days of discharge from a community hospital. Data on rehospitalization for Medicare fee-for-service patients (75 and older) over a 12-month period were obtained from the information technology department of a not-for-profit community hospital. A total of 6,809 patients were discharged, with 12% rehospitalized within 30 days. Skilled nursing facilities had the highest rehospitalization rates (15%), followed by home with home health care (13%) and then home with self-care (8%). The highest rehospitalization rates were in areas where nursing has a strong presence, suggesting that nurses can play an important role in the development of interventions aimed at reducing rehospitalizations.

  4. A comparison of the surgical mortality due to colorectal perforation at different hospitals with data from 10,090 cases in the Japanese National Clinical Database

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Miyata, Hiroaki; Sato, Yasuto; Saida, Yoshihisa; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal perforation has a high rate of mortality. We compared the incidence and fatality rates of colorectal perforation among different hospitals in Japan using data from the nationwide surgical database. Patients were registered in the National Clinical Database (NCD) between January 1st, 2011 and December 31st, 2013. Patients with colorectal perforation were identified from surgery records by examining if acute diffuse peritonitis (ADP) and diseases associated with a high probability of colorectal perforation were noted. The primary outcome measures included the 30-day postsurgery mortality and surgical mortality of colorectal perforation. We analyzed differences in the observed-to-expected mortality (O/E) ratio between the two groups of hospitals, that is, specialized and non-specialized, using the logistic regression analysis forward selection method. There were 10,090 cases of disease-induced colorectal perforation during the study period. The annual average postoperative fatality rate was 11.36%. There were 3884 patients in the specialized hospital group and 6206 in the non-specialized hospital group. The O/E ratio (0.9106) was significantly lower in the specialized hospital group than in the non-specialized hospital group (1.0704). The experience level of hospitals in treating cases of colorectal perforation negatively correlated with the O/E ratio. We conducted the first study investigating differences among hospitals with respect to their fatality rate of colorectal perforation on the basis of data from a nationwide database. Our data suggest that patients with colorectal perforation should choose to be treated at a specialized hospital or a hospital that treats five or more cases of colorectal perforation per year. The results of this study indicate that specialized hospitals may provide higher quality medical care, which in turn proves that government policy on healthcare is effective at improving the medical system in Japan. PMID:28079809

  5. 77 FR 59354 - Removal of 30-Day Residency Requirement for Per Diem Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... reasons other than hospital care, such as when a veteran travels to visit family members. This proposed... payments, stating: ``We believe that 30 days is a minimal amount of time for demonstrating that a veteran... State home within a specific period of time, or communicates that he or she will not be returning....

  6. 77 FR 59318 - Removal of 30-Day Residency Requirement for Per Diem Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... reasons other than hospital care, such as when a veteran travels to visit family members. This rule also... 30 days is a minimal amount of time for demonstrating that a veteran intends to be a resident at the... State home within a specific period of time, or communicates that he or she will not be returning....

  7. Incidence and influence of hospitalization for recurrent syncope and its effect on short- and long-term all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.

    PubMed

    Ruwald, Martin H; Numé, Anna-Karin; Lamberts, Morten; Hansen, Carolina M; Hansen, Morten L; Vinther, Michael; Kober, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hansen, Jim; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2014-05-15

    Recurrence of syncope is a common event, but the influence of recurrent syncope on the risk of death has not previously been investigated on a large scale. We examined the prognostic impact of recurrent syncope in a nationwide cohort of patients with syncope. All patients (n = 70,819) hospitalized from 2001 to 2009 in Denmark with a first-time diagnosis of syncope aged from 15 to 90 years were identified from national registries. Recurrence of syncope was incorporated as a time-dependent variable in multivariable-adjusted Cox models on the outcomes of 30-day, 1-year, and long-term all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death. During a mean follow-up of 3.9 ± 2.6 years, a total of 11,621 patients (16.4%) had at least 1 hospitalization for recurrent syncope, with a median time to recurrence of 251 days (33 to 364). A total of 14,270 patients died, and 3,204 deaths were preceded by a hospitalization for recurrent syncope. The long-term risk of all-cause death was significantly associated with recurrent syncope (hazard ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 2.54 to 2.75) compared with those with no recurrence. On 1-year mortality, recurrent syncope was associated with a 3.2-fold increase in risk and on 30-day mortality associated with a threefold increase. The increased mortality risk was consistent over age groups 15 to 39, 40 to 59, and 60 to 89 years, and a similar pattern of increase in both long-term and short-term risk of cardiovascular death was evident. In conclusion, recurrent syncope is independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality across all age groups exhibiting a high prognostic influence. Increased awareness on high short- and long-term risk of adverse events in subjects with recurrent syncope is warranted for future risk stratification.

  8. Factors associated with poor hospital mortality rates after the National Health Insurance program.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li

    2015-03-01

    The study examined whether hospital mortality rates have improved since National Health Insurance (NHI) in Taiwan and what factors affect the hospital mortality rates. The related hospital data were collected from databases belonging to the NHI Annual Statistics Information. In addition, panel data analysis and stepwise regression are used to indicate the determinants of hospital mortality rates from 1995 to 2008. The evidence shows that mortality rates have not improved since the NHI; competition, the elderly, family income, the poor, the number of clinical departments, length of stay, new technology, public hospitals and family medical expenses-all affect mortality rates. Moreover, longer length of stay, increase in the number of elderly and low-income families, and inequality of resource allocation have led to high mortality rates. Policy makers first have to realize what drives them to change and then set the benchmarks for their improvement.

  9. [Mediastinitis after sternotomy. Mortality and hospital length of stay. Groupe parisien détude des sternotomies].

    PubMed

    Lucet, J C; Batisse, D; Brücker, G

    1997-04-01

    The morbidity of deep sternal wound infections after sternotomy was assessed by a case-controlled study. The 41 cases were identified by a prospective enquiry over 4 months in 10 centres of cardiac surgery in the Paris region. The cases were compared with 41 non-infected controls, paired by centre, age, gender, ASA anaesthetic risk, stage of cardiac failure and type of surgery. The criteria of pairing were respected in 96% of cases. The mortality was 12% in the study population and 5% in the controls. Thirty-two of the 41 cases required reoperation for the sternal wound infection, usually to insert Redon drains after debridement of the wound. The total duration of the hospital stay was 53 days in the study cases and 30 days in controls, a median prolongation of the hospital stay of 23 days. The authors conclude that deep wound infection after sternotomy is responsible for almost doubling the duration of hospital stay. The economic consequences alone justify active research into the prevention of this complication.

  10. 77 FR 62518 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request (30-Day FRN); Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... their full effect if received within 30 days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection... ovarian cancer can reduce mortality from these cancers which currently cause an estimated 255,700 deaths... term effects of the screening on cancer incidence and mortality for the four targeted cancers....

  11. 78 FR 29147 - 30-Day Notice and Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... SECURITY United States Secret Service 30-Day Notice and Request for Comments SUMMARY: The Department of... United States Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, and sent via electronic mail to oira... additional information or copies of the form(s) and instructions should be directed to: United States...

  12. 78 FR 18373 - Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... CONTROL POLICY Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. ] The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) proposes the collection of information concerning... of the President, Office of National Drug Control Policy, Research & Data Analysis, Washington,...

  13. 75 FR 160 - Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 1 (Monday, January 4, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 160] [FR Doc No: E9-31132] OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) proposes...

  14. Analysis of 30-Day Postdischarge Morbidity and Readmission after Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Carcinoma: A Single-Center Study of 2107 Patients With Prospective Data

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Oh; Kyu Park, Young; Ran Jung, Mi; Yeop Ryu, Seong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract PD morbidity and readmission pose a substantial clinical and economic burden to the healthcare system. Comprehensive PD complications and readmission data are essential for developing initiatives to improve patient care. No previous studies have extensively investigated PD complications after gastric cancer surgery. We investigated the incidence, types, treatment, and risk factors of 30-day postdischarge (PD) complications after gastric cancer surgery. Between 2010 and 2013, data concerning complications and readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge were prospectively collected in 2107 patients undergoing gastric cancer surgery. In total, 1642 patients (77.9%) underwent distal gastrectomy, 418 (19.8%) total gastrectomy, and 47 (2.3%) other procedures. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were 17.4% and 0.6%, respectively, with a mean 8.8-day hospital stay. Sixty-one patients (2.9%) developed 30-day PD morbidity (58 local and 3 systemic complications), accounting for 16.6% of overall morbidity; 47 (2.2%) were readmitted; and 7 (0.3%) underwent a reoperation. The mean time to PD complications was 9.5 days after index hospital discharge. The most common complication was intra-abdominal abscess (n = 14), followed by wound, ascites, and anastomosis leakage. No mortality occurred resulting from PD complications. In the univariate and multivariate analyses, underlying comorbidity (hypertension and liver cirrhosis) and obesity were independent risk factors for developing PD complications. The early PD period is a vulnerable time for surgical patients with substantial risk of complication and readmission. Tailored discharge plans along with appropriate PD patient support are essential for improving the quality of patient care. PMID:25789945

  15. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality.

  16. Hospital Costs and Inpatient Mortality among Children Undergoing Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Romley, John A; Chen, Alex Y; Goldman, Dana P; Williams, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between hospital costs and risk-adjusted inpatient mortality among children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) in U.S. acute-care hospitals. Data Sources/Study Settings Retrospective cohort study of 35,446 children in 2003, 2006, and 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Study Design Cross-sectional logistic regression of risk-adjusted inpatient mortality and hospital costs, adjusting for a variety of patient-, hospital-, and community-level confounders. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We identified relevant discharges in the KID using the AHRQ Pediatric Quality Indicator for pediatric heart surgery mortality, and linked these records to hospital characteristics from American Hospital Association Surveys and community characteristics from the Census. Principal Findings Children undergoing CHD surgery in higher cost hospitals had lower risk-adjusted inpatient mortality (p = .002). An increase from the 25th percentile of treatment costs to the 75th percentile was associated with a 13.6 percent reduction in risk-adjusted mortality. Conclusions Greater hospital costs are associated with lower risk-adjusted inpatient mortality for children undergoing CHD surgery. The specific mechanisms by which greater costs improve mortality merit further exploration. PMID:24138064

  17. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  18. The Relationship Between Nurse Staffing and 30-Day Readmission for Adults With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Karen K.; Danesh, Valerie; Funk, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to better understand the relationship between nurse staffing and 30-day excess readmission ratios for patients with heart failure in the top US adult cardiology and heart surgery hospitals. BACKGROUND Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years and is the most frequent diagnosis associated with 30-day hospital readmission in the United States. METHODS A secondary data analysis was conducted using nurse staffing data from 661 cardiology and heart surgery hospitals from the 2013 US News & World Report “Best Hospitals” survey. These data were combined with excess readmission ratios from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospital Compare database from 2013. An independent-samples t test was used to compare staffing (low/high) and excess hospital readmissions rates. RESULTS A significant difference (P = .021) was found between the low nurse staffing group (n = 358) and the high nurse staffing group (n = 303). Hospitals with a lower nurse staffing index had a significantly higher excess readmission rate. CONCLUSION These data provide further support to the body of research showing a positive relationship between nurse staffing and positive outcomes. PMID:26579974

  19. Body Mass Index and Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Receiving Care in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Camprubi, Mercedes; Cabrera, Sandra; Sans, Jordi; Vidal, Georgina; Salvadó, Teresa; Bardají, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, some controversy has arisen with regard to its effect on hospital mortality in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Methods. Clinical and anthropometric variables were analyzed in patients consecutively admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital between 2009 and 2010, and the correlation of those variables with hospital mortality was examined. Results. A total of 824 patients with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina were analyzed. Body mass index was an independent factor in hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.739 (IC 95%: 0.597 − 0.916), P = 0.006). Mortality in normal weight (n = 218), overweight (n = 399), and obese (n = 172) subjects was 6.1%, 3.1%, and 4.1%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions. There is something of a paradox in the relationship between body mass index and hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in that the mortality rate decreases as body mass index increases. However, no statistically significant differences have been found in normal weight, overweight, or obese subjects. PMID:22900151

  20. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  1. Improving neonatal mortality in an Ethiopian referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Crawford

    2014-01-01

    Ethiopia has one of the world's poorest neonatal mortality rates (1). As a British paediatrician working for one year, the main aim was to improve neonatal care in a referral hospital's neonatal unit. An initial project looking at all admissions to the unit over the month of October 2012, revealed the death rate within the unit was 21% of all admissions. Of the 55 admissions only 43 (75%) had a temperature recorded at admission. 29 (67%) of these were hypothermic, and of these 29 initially hypothermic babies, 19 (65%) remained hypothermic or did not have another temperature documented during their stay. Only 33 (56%) had a heart rate and respiratory rate recorded on admission and only 11 (19%) had any further vital signs recorded during their stay. 19 of the admitted infants had a diagnosis of low birth weight and 10 (53%) of these either died or left against medical advice. With this information regular basic neonatal care teaching sessions for doctors and nursing staff were initiated. Vital signs charts were introduced and unit specific protocols were written. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) was trialled and found to be effective, and CPAP training was given to all nurses and doctors on the unit. A room was set aside to be used solely as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC). The nurses were taken to a very effective neonatal unit as an ‘experience sharing’ trip to help with motivation and a grant was also obtained for basic equipment. After 6 months the project was repeated for all the admissions during February 2013. The death rate had progressively fallen and was 10% in February. 54 patients (98%) had a temperature taken on admission and of these, 27 (49%) were hypothermic. 25 (93%) of these hypothermic infants had subsequent temperatures documented which were normal. 54 (98%) had heart rate and respiratory rate recorded on admission and 50 (90%) had them recorded at least daily during their stay. Of the 22 babies with low birth weight (40%), only 4 (18

  2. Morbidity associated with 30-day surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Rocque, Brandon G

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Morbidity associated with surgical site infection (SSI) following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgical procedures is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute morbidity and mortality associated with SSI after nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide cohort. METHODS The authors reviewed data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (NSQIP-P) 2012-2014 database, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients. Procedures were categorized by Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. CSF shunts were excluded. Deep and superficial SSIs occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were identified. Deep SSIs included deep wound infections, intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis. The following outcomes occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were analyzed, along with postoperative time to complication development: sepsis, wound disruption, length of postoperative stay, readmission, reoperation, and death. RESULTS A total of 251 procedures associated with a 30-day SSI were identified (2.7% of 9296 procedures). Superficial SSIs were more common than deep SSIs (57.4% versus 42.6%). Deep SSIs occurred more frequently after epilepsy or intracranial tumor procedures. Superficial SSIs occurred more frequently after skin lesion, spine, Chiari decompression, craniofacial, and myelomeningocele closure procedures. The mean (± SD) postoperative length of stay for patients with any SSI was 9.6 ± 14.8 days (median 4 days). Post-SSI outcomes significantly associated with previous SSI included wound disruption (12.4%), sepsis (15.5%), readmission (36.7%), and reoperation (43.4%) (p < 0.001 for each). Post-SSI sepsis rates (6.3% vs 28.0% for superficial versus deep SSI, respectively; p < 0.001), wound disruption rates (4.9% vs 22.4%, p < 0.001), and reoperation rates (23.6% vs 70.1%, p < 0.001) were significantly greater for patients

  3. In Nonagenarians, Acute Kidney Injury Predicts In-Hospital Mortality, while Heart Failure Predicts Hospital Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lin, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of admitted patients worldwide. We investigate the determinants of hospital length of stay and outcomes in patients aged 90 years and older. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all admitted patients aged >90 years from the general medical wards in a tertiary referral medical center between August 31, 2009 and August 31, 2012. Patients’ clinical characteristics, admission diagnosis, concomitant illnesses at admission, and discharge diagnosis were collected. Each patient was followed until discharge or death. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to study factors associated with longer hospital length of stay (>7 days) and in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 283 nonagenarian in-patients were recruited, with 118 (41.7%) hospitalized longer than one week. Nonagenarians admitted with pneumonia (p = 0.04) and those with lower Barthel Index (p = 0.012) were more likely to be hospitalized longer than one week. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with lower Barthel Index (odds ratio [OR] 0.98; p = 0.021) and those with heart failure (OR 3.05; p = 0.046) had hospital stays >7 days, while patients with lower Barthel Index (OR 0.93; p = 0.005), main admission nephrologic diagnosis (OR 4.83; p = 0.016) or acute kidney injury (OR 30.7; p = 0.007) had higher in-hospital mortality. Conclusion In nonagenarians, presence of heart failure at admission was associated with longer hospital length of stay, while acute kidney injury at admission predicted higher hospitalization mortality. Poorer functional status was associated with both prolonged admission and higher in-hospital mortality. PMID:24223127

  4. Incidence, Causes and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission After Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; Anthony, Chris A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Gao, Yubo; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service has identified several quality metrics, including unplanned readmission within 30 days of surgery, to assess and compare surgeons and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes and risk factors for unplanned 30-day readmission after total shoulder arthroplasty. Methods We identified patients undergoing primary elective shoulder arthroplasty performed at American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) participating hospitals in 2013. Cases were stratified by readmission status. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to assess patient demographics, comorbidities and operative variables predicting unplanned readmission. Results 2779 patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty were identified, with 74 (2.66%) requiring unplanned readmissions within 30 days of surgery. The most common surgical causes for unplanned readmission were surgical site infections (18.6%), dislocations (16.3%) and venous thromboembolism (14.0%). Medical causes for readmission were responsible for 51% of unplanned readmissions. Multivariate analysis identified patient age >75 (OR 2.62, 95% CI: 1.27 - 5.41), and ASA class of 3 (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.01 - 3.18) or 4 (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.31 - 10.08) as independent risk factors for unplanned readmission. Predictive modeling estimated that patients with ASA class of 4 and age >75 are 17.4 times more likely (95% CI 1.77-171.09) to be readmitted within 30 days of shoulder arthroplasty. Conclusion Unplanned readmission after shoulder arthroplasty is infrequent and medical complications account for more than 50% of occurrences. The risk of readmission exponentially increases when age and preoperative comorbidity burden are increased. PMID:27528839

  5. Impact on mortality following first acute myocardial infarction of distance between home and hospital: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L; Lang, C C; Sullivan, F M; Boyle, P; Wang, J; Pringle, S D; MacDonald, T M

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of distance between home and acute hospital on mortality outcome of patients experiencing an incident myocardial infarction (MI). Design: Cohort study using a record linkage database. Setting: Tayside, Scotland, UK. Patients: 10 541 patients with incident acute MI between 1994 and 2003 were identified from Tayside hospital discharge data and from death certification data. Main outcome measures: MI mortality in the community, all-cause mortality in hospital and all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results: 4133 subjects died following incident MI in the community (that is, were not hospitalised), 6408 patients survived to be hospitalised and 1010 of these (15.8%) died in hospital. Of 5398 discharged from hospital, 1907 (35.3%) died during a median of 3.2 years of follow-up. After adjustment for rurality and other known risk factors, distance between home and admitting hospital was significantly associated with increased mortality both before hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.05, 95% CI 1.00 to 4.21 for >9 miles and 1.46, 1.09 to 1.95 for 3–9 miles when compared to <3 miles) and after hospitalisation (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.90, 1.19 to 3.02 and 1.27, 0.96 to 1.68). However, there was no effect of distance on in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR 0.95, 0.45 to 2.03 and 1.02, 0.66 to 1.58). Conclusion: The distance between home and hospital of admission may predict mortality in subjects experiencing a first acute MI. This association was found both before and after hospitalisation. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this association. However these data provide support for policies that locate services for acute MI closer to where patients live. PMID:17984217

  6. Assessing Risk and Preventing 30-Day Readmissions in Decompensated Heart Failure: Opportunity to Intervene?

    PubMed

    Dunbar-Yaffe, Richard; Stitt, Audra; Lee, Joseph J; Mohamed, Shanas; Lee, Douglas S

    2015-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients are at high risk of hospital readmission, which contributes to substantial health care costs. There is great interest in strategies to reduce rehospitalization for HF. However, many readmissions occur within 30 days of initial hospital discharge, presenting a challenge for interventions to be instituted in a short time frame. Potential strategies to reduce readmissions for HF can be classified into three different forms. First, patients who are at high risk of readmission can be identified even before their initial index hospital discharge. Second, ambulatory remote monitoring strategies may be instituted to identify early warning signs before acute decompensation of HF occurs. Finally, strategies may be employed in the emergency department to identify low-risk patients who may not need hospital readmission. If symptoms improve with initial therapy, low-risk patients could be referred to specialized, rapid outpatient follow-up care where investigations and therapy can occur in an outpatient setting.

  7. What do hospital mortality rates tell us about quality of care?

    PubMed

    Goodacre, Steve; Campbell, Mike; Carter, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Hospital mortality rates could be useful indicators of quality of care, but careful statistical analysis is required to avoid erroneously attributing variation in mortality to differences in health care when it is actually due to differences in case mix. The summary hospital mortality indicator is currently used by the English National Health Service (NHS). It adjusts mortality rates up to 30 days after discharge for patient age, sex, type of admission, year of discharge, comorbidity, deprivation and diagnosis. Such risk-adjustment methods have been used to identify poor performance, most notably at mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust, but their use is subject to a number of limitations. Studies exploring whether variation in risk-adjusted mortality can be explained by variation in healthcare have reached conflicting conclusions. Furthermore, concerns have been raised that the proportion of preventable deaths among hospital admissions is too small to produce a reliable 'signal' in risk-adjusted mortality rates. This provides hospital managers, regulators and clinicians with a considerable dilemma. Variation in mortality rates cannot be ignored, as they might indicate unacceptable variation in healthcare and avoidable mortality, but they also cannot be reliably used to judge the quality of healthcare, based on current evidence.

  8. Effects of hospital closure on mortality rates of the over-65 long-stay psychiatric population.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G A; Whyte, J

    1998-12-01

    The closure of this 100-year-old hospital has allowed us to look at the effect on mortality of moving the whole over-65 long-stay population to other settings. Our results confirm that there is a slight excess of deaths during and immediately after these moves, but that there is no longer-term effect on mortality rates.

  9. A 6-Point TACS Score Predicts In-Hospital Mortality Following Total Anterior Circulation Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Adrian D; Gollop, Nicholas D; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Clark, Allan B; Metcalf, Anthony K; Bowles, Kristian M; Flather, Marcus D; Potter, John F

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Little is known about the factors associated with in-hospital mortality following total anterior circulation stroke (TACS). We examined the characteristics and comorbidity data for TACS patients in relation to in-hospital mortality with the aim of developing a simple clinical rule for predicting the acute mortality outcome in TACS. Methods A routine data registry of one regional hospital in the UK was analyzed. The subjects were 2,971 stroke patients with TACS (82% ischemic; median age=81 years, interquartile age range=74–86 years) admitted between 1996 and 2012. Uni- and multivariate regression models were used to estimate in-hospital mortality odds ratios for the study covariates. A 6-point TACS scoring system was developed from regression analyses to predict in-hospital mortality as the outcome. Results Factors associated with in-hospital mortality of TACS were male sex [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.19], age (AOR=4.96 for ≥85 years vs. <65 years), hemorrhagic subtype (AOR=1.70), nonlateralization (AOR=1.75), prestroke disability (AOR=1.73 for moderate disability vs. no symptoms), and congestive heart failure (CHF) (AOR=1.61). Risk stratification using the 6-point TACS Score [T=type (hemorrhage=1 point) and territory (nonlateralization=1 point), A=age (65–84 years=1 point, ≥85 years=2 points), C=CHF (if present=1 point), S=status before stroke (prestroke modified Rankin Scale score of 4 or 5=1 point)] reliably predicted a mortality outcome: score=0, 29.4% mortality; score=1, 46.2% mortality [negative predictive value (NPV)=70.6%, positive predictive value (PPV)=46.2%]; score=2, 64.1% mortality (NPV=70.6, PPV=64.1%); score=3, 73.7% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=73.7%); and score=4 or 5, 81.2% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=81.2%). Conclusions We have identified the key determinants of in-hospital mortality following TACS and derived a 6-point TACS Score that can be used to predict the prognosis of particular patients. PMID:27819414

  10. Discharge to a rehabilitation facility is associated with decreased 30-day readmission in elective spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Abt, Nicholas B; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Murphy, Meghan; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Fogelson, Jeremy; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine independent predictors of discharge disposition to rehabilitation or skilled care (SC) facilities and investigate whether discharge location is associated with unplanned readmission and/or reoperation rates. All elective spinal surgery patients in a national surgical registry were analyzed using between 2011 and 2012. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess for predictors of discharge to rehabilitation or SC facilities versus home as well as to determine whether discharge disposition was significantly associated with the 30-day unplanned readmission or reoperation. Of 34,023 elective spinal surgery patients, the distribution of discharge locations was as follows: 30,606 (90.0%) discharged home, 1674 (4.9%) discharged to rehabilitation, and 1743 (5.1%) discharged to SC. Patients discharged home were associated with the lowest complication rate relative to rehabilitation and SC facilities. Following multivariable regression analysis, there was a significant increase in the odds of discharge to rehabilitation associated with age, male gender, current smoking, ASA class three and four, history of diabetes, operative time, total hospital length of stay, preoperative neurologic morbidity and having at least one postoperative morbidity event. Moreover, there were 804 (4.06%) 30-day unplanned readmissions and 822 (2.45%) unplanned reoperations. After risk adjustment, discharge to rehabilitation was independently associated with decreased odds of 30-day unplanned readmission (OR=0.41; p=0.008) but not reoperation.

  11. Derivation and validation of a 30-day heart failure readmission model.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lisa M; Gavin, Michael; Piatkowski, Gail; Chang, James D; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2014-11-01

    In 2006, there were >1 million hospital admissions for heart failure (HF), and the estimated cost to the United States in 2009 was >$37.2 billion. Better models to target aggressive therapy to patients at the highest risk for readmission are clearly needed. We studied 3,413 consecutive admissions for HF based on discharge diagnosis codes from October 2007 to August 2011 from a single academic center. We randomly generated derivation and validation sets in a 3:1 ratio. We used generalized estimating equations to develop our models, accounting for repeated hospitalizations and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test to examine model calibration. The 30-day readmission rate was 24.2% in the derivation set. Of 25 candidate variables, the best fitting model included creatinine, troponin, hematocrit, and hyponatremia at discharge; race; zip code of residence; discharge hour; and number of hospitalizations in the previous year. Insignificant variables included intravenous diuretic use on day of discharge, discharge service, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, age, and gender. The risk of 30-day readmission increased with increasing decile of predicted risk in both the validation and derivation cohorts. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.69 in the derivation set and 0.66 in the validation set. In conclusion, we derived and validated a simple model relating discharge-specific characteristics at risk of 30-day readmission. Application of this approach may facilitate targeted intervention to reduce the burden of rehospitalization in patients with HF, but our results suggest that the best readmission models may require incorporation of both clinical and local system factors for optimal prediction.

  12. Can better infrastructure and quality reduce hospital infant mortality rates in Mexico?

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Nelly; Marrufo, Grecia M

    2007-02-01

    Preliminary evidence from hospital discharges hints enormous disparities in infant hospital mortality rates. At the same time, public health agencies acknowledge severe deficiencies and variations in the quality of medical services across public hospitals. Despite these concerns, there is limited evidence of the contribution of hospital infrastructure and quality in explaining variations in outcomes among those who have access to medical services provided at public hospitals. This paper provides evidence to address this question. We use probabilistic econometric methods to estimate the impact of material and human resources and hospital quality on the probability that an infant dies controlling for socioeconomic, maternal and reproductive risk factors. As a measure of quality, we calculate for the first time for Mexico patient safety indicators developed by the AHRQ. We find that the probability to die is affected by hospital infrastructure and by quality. In this last regard, having been treated in a hospital with the worse quality incidence doubles the probability to die. This paper also presents evidence on the contribution of other risk factors on perinatal mortality rates. The conclusions of this paper suggest that lower infant mortality rates can be reached by implementing a set of coherent public policy actions including an increase and reorganization of hospital infrastructure, quality improvement, and increasing demand for health by poor families.

  13. Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    Tebeu, Pierre-Marie; Pierre-Marie, Tebeu; Halle-Ekane, Gregory; Gregory, Halle-Ekane; Da Itambi, Maxwell; Maxwell, Da Itambi; Enow Mbu, Robinson; Robinson, Enow Mbu; Mawamba, Yvette; Yvette, Mawamba; Fomulu, Joseph Nelson; Nelson, Fomulu Joseph

    2015-01-01

    More than 550,000 women die yearly from pregnancy-related causes. Fifty percent (50%) of the world estimate of maternal deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa alone. There is insufficient information on the risk factors of maternal mortality in Cameroon. This study aimed at establishing causes and risk factors of maternal mortality. This was a case-control study from 1st January, 2006 to 31st December, 2010 after National Ethical Committee Approval. Cases were maternal deaths; controls were women who delivered normally. Maternal deaths were obtained from the delivery room registers and in-patient registers. Controls for each case were two normal deliveries following identified maternal deaths on the same day. Variables considered were socio-demographic and reproductive health characteristics. Epi Info 3.5.1 was used for analysis. The mean MMR was 287.5/100,000 live births. Causes of deaths were: postpartum hemorrhage (229.2%), unsafe abortion (25%), ectopic pregnancy (12.5%), hypertension in pregnancy (8.3%), malaria (8.3%), anemia (8.3%), heart disease (4.2%), and pneumonia (4.2%), and placenta praevia (4.2%). Ages ranged from 18 to 41 years, with a mean of 27.7 ± 5.14 years. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal death (OR=78.33; CI: (8.66- 1802.51)). The mean MMR from 2006 to 2010 was 287.5/100,000 live births. Most of the causes of maternal deaths were preventable. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal mortality. Key words: Maternal mortality, causes, risk factors, Cameroon.

  14. Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report

    PubMed Central

    Tebeu, Pierre-Marie; Halle-Ekane, Gregory; Da Itambi, Maxwell; Mbu, Robinson Enow; Mawamba, Yvette; Fomulu, Joseph Nelson

    2015-01-01

    More than 550,000 women die yearly from pregnancy-related causes. Fifty percent (50%) of the world estimate of maternal deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa alone. There is insufficient information on the risk factors of maternal mortality in Cameroon. This study aimed at establishing causes and risk factors of maternal mortality. This was a case-control study from 1st January, 2006 to 31st December, 2010 after National Ethical Committee Approval. Cases were maternal deaths; controls were women who delivered normally. Maternal deaths were obtained from the delivery room registers and in-patient registers. Controls for each case were two normal deliveries following identified maternal deaths on the same day. Variables considered were socio-demographic and reproductive health characteristics. Epi Info 3.5.1 was used for analysis. The mean MMR was 287.5/100,000 live births. Causes of deaths were: postpartum hemorrhage (229.2%), unsafe abortion (25%), ectopic pregnancy (12.5%), hypertension in pregnancy (8.3%), malaria (8.3%), anemia (8.3%), heart disease (4.2%), and pneumonia (4.2%), and placenta praevia (4.2%). Ages ranged from 18 to 41 years, with a mean of 27.7 ± 5.14 years. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal death (OR=78.33; CI: (8.66- 1802.51)). The mean MMR from 2006 to 2010 was 287.5/100,000 live births. Most of the causes of maternal deaths were preventable. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal mortality. Key words: Maternal mortality, causes, risk factors, Cameroon. PMID:26401210

  15. Evaluation of the HCFA model for the analysis of mortality following hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, H; Bailey, R C; Skellan, K J; Stewart, J D; Hartz, A J; Kuhn, E M; Rimm, A A

    1992-01-01

    From 1987 through 1990, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) evaluated variations in the mortality rates experienced by patients admitted to hospitals participating in the Medicare program. This study was conducted to evaluate the adequacy of the model used for that purpose. Detailed clinical data were gathered on 42,773 patients admitted to 84 statistically selected hospitals. The effect of risk adjustment using the HCFA model, which is based on claims data, was compared to a risk-adjustment model based on physiologic and clinical data. Models that include claims data were markedly superior to those containing only demographic characteristics in predicting the probability of patient death, and the addition of clinical data resulted in further improvement. The correlation of ranks of hospitals based on a model that uses only the claims data and on one that uses, in addition, clinical data, was .91. As a screen for the identification of "high (mortality) outlier" hospitals, the claims model had moderate sensitivity (81 percent) and specificity (79 percent), a high negative predictive value (90 percent), and a low positive predictive value (64 percent) when compared to the clinical model. The two mortality models gave similar results when used to determine which structural characteristics of hospitals were related to mortality rates: hospitals with a higher proportion of registered nurses or board-certified physician specialists, or with a greater level of access to high-technology equipment had lower risk-adjusted mortality rates. These data suggest that the current claims-based risk-adjustment procedure may satisfactorily be used to characterize variations in mortality rates associated with hospitalization. The procedure could also be used as a basis for further epidemiological analyses of factors that affect the probability of patient death. However, it does not positively identify outlier hospitals as providers of problematic care. PMID:1500289

  16. The Frequency and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in a Tertiary Hospital: Which Factors Affect Mortality?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Arı, Derya; Ozkan, Gulsum; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kubra

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. Incidence and mortality rates vary from country to country, and according to different in-hospital monitoring units and definitions of AKI. The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting frequency of AKI and mortality in our hospital. We retrospectively evaluated data for 1550 patients diagnosed with AKI and 788 patients meeting the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline AKI criteria out of a total of 174 852 patients hospitalized in our institution between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Staging was performed based on KDIGO Clinical Practice for Acute Kidney Injury and RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function and End-stage renal failure). Demographic and biochemical data were recorded and correlations with mortality were assessed. The frequency of AKI in our hospital was 0.9%, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 34.6%. At multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.87-0.92; P < 0.001), monitoring in the intensive care unit (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09-0.38; P < 0.001), urine output (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.03-7.89; P < 0.001), duration of oliguria (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.69; P < 0.001), length of hospitalization (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88; P < 0.001), dialysis requirement (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.12-4.71; P < 0.05), APACHE II score (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.24; P < 0.001), and albumin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001) were identified as independent determinants affecting mortality. Frequency of AKI and associated mortality rates in our regional reference hospital were compatible with those in the literature. This study shows that KDIGO criteria are more sensitive in determining AKI. Mortality was not correlated with staging based on RIFLE or KDIGO. Nonetheless, our identification of urine output as one of the independent determinants of mortality suggests that this

  17. Developing a simple preinterventional score to predict hospital mortality in adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Meng-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Chi; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite gaining popularity, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) remains a controversial therapy for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adult patients due to its equivocal survival benefits. The study was aimed at identifying the preinterventional prognostic predictors of hospital mortality in adult VV-ECMO patients and developing a practical mortality prediction score to facilitate clinical decision-making. This retrospective study included 116 adult patients who received VV-ECMO for severe ARF in a tertiary referral center, from 2007 to 2015. The definition of severe ARF was PaO2/ FiO2 ratio < 70 mm Hg under advanced mechanical ventilation (MV). Preinterventional variables including demographic characteristics, ventilatory parameters, and severity of organ dysfunction were collected for analysis. The prognostic predictors of hospital mortality were generated with multivariate logistic regression and transformed into a scoring system. The discriminative power on hospital mortality of the scoring system was presented as the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The overall hospital mortality rate was 47% (n = 54). Pre-ECMO MV day > 4 (OR: 4.71; 95% CI: 1.98–11.23; P < 0.001), pre-ECMO sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score >9 (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.36–7.36; P = 0.01), and immunocompromised status (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.07–7.89; P = 0.04) were independent predictors of hospital mortality of adult VV-ECMO. A mortality prediction score comprising of the 3 binary predictors was developed and named VV-ECMO mortality score. The total score was estimated as follows: VV-ECMO mortality score = 2 × (Pre-ECMO MV day > 4) + 1 × (Pre-ECMO SOFA score >9) + 1 × (immunocompromised status). The AUROC of VV-ECMO mortality score was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67–0.85; P < 0.001). The corresponding hospital mortality rates to VV-ECMO mortality scores were 18% (Score 0), 35% (Score 1), 56

  18. Five-Year Mortality and Hospital Costs Associated with Surviving Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Michael A.; Haddow, Catriona; Dobbie, Richard; Rowan, Kathryn M.; Wild, Sarah H.; Murray, Gordon D.; Walsh, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of critical illness experience significant morbidity, but the impact of surviving the intensive care unit (ICU) has not been quantified comprehensively at a population level. Objectives: To identify factors associated with increased hospital resource use and to ascertain whether ICU admission was associated with increased mortality and resource use. Methods: Matched cohort study and pre/post-analysis using national linked data registries with complete population coverage. The population consisted of patients admitted to all adult general ICUs during 2005 and surviving to hospital discharge, identified from the Scottish Intensive Care Society Audit Group registry, matched (1:1) with similar hospital control subjects. Five-year outcomes included mortality and hospital resource use. Confounder adjustment was based on multivariable regression and pre/post within-individual analyses. Measurements and Main Results: Of 7,656 ICU patients, 5,259 survived to hospital discharge (5,215 [99.2%] matched to hospital control subjects). Factors present before ICU admission (comorbidities/pre-ICU hospitalizations) were stronger predictors of hospital resource use than acute illness factors. In the 5 years after the initial hospital discharge, compared with hospital control subjects, the ICU cohort had higher mortality (32.3% vs. 22.7%; hazard ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.22–1.46; P < 0.001), used more hospital resources (mean hospital admission rate, 4.8 vs. 3.3/person/5 yr), and had 51% higher mean 5-year hospital costs ($25,608 vs. $16,913/patient). Increased resource use persisted after confounder adjustment (P < 0.001) and using pre/post-analyses (P < 0.001). Excess resource use and mortality were greatest for younger patients without significant comorbidity. Conclusions: This complete, national study demonstrates that ICU survivorship is associated with higher 5-year mortality and hospital resource use than hospital control

  19. The relationship between distance to hospital and patient mortality in emergencies: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, Jon; West, James; Goodacre, Steve; Turner, Janette

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Reconfiguration of emergency services could lead to patients with life‐threatening conditions travelling longer distances to hospital. Concerns have been raised that this could increase the risk of death. We aimed to determine whether distance to hospital was associated with mortality in patients with life‐threatening emergencies. Methods We undertook an observational cohort study of 10 315 cases transported with a potentially life‐threatening condition (excluding cardiac arrests) by four English ambulance services to associated acute hospitals, to determine whether distance to hospital was associated with mortality, after adjustment for age, sex, clinical category and illness severity. Results Straight‐line ambulance journey distances ranged from 0 to 58 km with a median of 5 km, and 644 patients died (6.2%). Increased distance was associated with increased risk of death (odds ratio 1.02 per kilometre; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.03; p<0.001). This association was not changed by adjustment for confounding by age, sex, clinical category or illness severity. Patients with respiratory emergencies showed the greatest association between distance and mortality. Conclusion Increased journey distance to hospital appears to be associated with increased risk of mortality. Our data suggest that a 10‐km increase in straight‐line distance is associated with around a 1% absolute increase in mortality. PMID:17711952

  20. Predictors of in-hospital mortality following redo cardiac surgery: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Isa; Cayli, Murat; Gulcan, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Redo cardiac operations represent one of the main challenges in heart surgery. The purpose of the study was to analyze the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing reoperative cardiac surgery by a single surgical team. Methods A total of 1367 patients underwent cardiac surgical procedures and prospectively entered into a computerized database. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the reoperative cardiac surgery (n = 109) and control group (n = 1258). Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the possible predictors of hospital mortality. Results Mean age was 56 ± 13, and 46% were female in redo group. In-hospital mortality was 4.6 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.11. EuroSCORE (6 vs. 3; p < 0.01), cardiopulmonary bypass time (90 vs. 71 min; p < 0.01), postoperative bleeding (450 vs. 350 ml; p < 0.01), postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) (29 vs. 16%; p < 0.01), and inotropic support (58 vs. 31%; p = 0.001) were significantly different. These variables were entered into uni- and multivariate regression analysis. Postoperative AF (OR1.76, p = 0.007) and EuroSCORE (OR 1.42, p < 0.01) were significant risk factors predicting hospital mortality. Conclusions Reoperative cardiac surgery can be performed under similar risks as primary operations. Postoperative AF and EuroSCORE are predictors of in-hospital mortality for redo cases. PMID:26527452

  1. Reductions in hospital admissions and mortality rates observed after integrating emergency care: a natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Vazeer; Palmer, Christopher R; Bennett, Tom J H; Robinson, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Reducing emergency admissions is a priority for the NHS. A single hospital's emergency care system was reorganised with the principles of front-loaded investigations, integration of specialties, reduced duplication, earlier decision making by senior clinicians and a combined emergency assessment area. The authors relocated our Medical Assessment Unit into our emergency department in 2006. The authors evaluated changes in admissions and mortality before and after 2006, compared with other similar hospitals. Design Quasi-experimental before and after study using routinely collected data. Setting and participants 1 acute hospital in England, the intervention site, was compared with 23 other English hospitals between 2001 and 2009. Outcome measures Our outcome measures were hospital standardised mortality ratios (HSMRs) for non-elective admissions and standardised admission ratios (SARs). Results The authors observed a statistically and clinically significant decrease in HSMR and SAR. The intervention hospital had the lowest HSMR and SAR of all the hospitals in our sample. This was statistically significant, p=0.0149 and p=0.0002, respectively. Conclusion Integrating emergency care in one location is associated with a meaningful reduction in mortality and emergency admissions to hospital. PMID:22858459

  2. Assisted ventilation in COPD – association between previous hospitalizations and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Toft-Petersen, Anne Pernille; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Weinreich, Ulla Møller; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2016-01-01

    Background In general, previous studies have shown an association between prior exacerbations and mortality in COPD, but this association has not been demonstrated in the subpopulation of patients in need of assisted ventilation. We examined whether previous hospitalizations were independently associated with mortality among patients with COPD ventilated for the first time. Patients and methods In the Danish National Patient Registry, we established a cohort of patients with COPD ventilated for the first time from 2003 to 2011 and previously medicated for obstructive airway diseases. We assessed the number of hospitalizations for COPD in the preceding year, age, sex, comorbidity, mode of ventilation, survival to discharge, and days to death beyond discharge. Results The cohort consisted of 6,656 patients of whom 66% had not been hospitalized for COPD in the previous year, 18% once, 8% twice, and 9% thrice or more. In-hospital mortality was 45%, and of the patients alive at discharge, 11% died within a month and 39% within a year. In multivariate models, adjusted for age, sex, mode of ventilation, and comorbidity, odds ratios for in-hospital death were 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–1.44), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.19–1.72), and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.30–1.87) with one, two, and three or more hospitalizations, respectively. Hazard ratios for death after discharge from hospital were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.19–1.46), 1.76 (95% CI: 1.52–2.02), and 2.07 (95% CI: 1.80–2.38) with one, two, and three or more hospitalizations, respectively. Conclusion Preceding hospitalizations for COPD are associated with in-hospital mortality and after discharge in the subpopulation of patients with COPD with acute exacerbation treated with assisted ventilation for the first time. PMID:27217743

  3. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field.

  4. Coronary artery surgery in women compared with men: analysis of coronary risk factors and in-hospital mortality in a single centre.

    PubMed Central

    Barbir, M.; Lazem, F.; Ilsley, C.; Mitchell, A.; Khaghani, A.; Yacoub, M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine differences in coronary risk factors between women and men and their relation to in-hospital mortality associated with coronary artery bypass grafting. DESIGN--Prospective observational study. SETTING--A regional cardiothoracic centre. PATIENTS--482 (362 (75%) men and 120 (25%) women) consecutive patients who had primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. RESULTS--The women were on average three years older than the men (63 v 60 years, P < 0.001). Women more frequently had hypertension (47% v 33%, P < 0.01), diabetes mellitus (21% v 10%, P < 0.005), hypothyroidism (9% v 2%, P < 0.003), and a family history of premature coronary heart disease (49% v 31%, P < 0.0006). More of the men were cigarette smokers (67% v 45%, P > 0.00001). Many of the women and men had dyslipidaemia. Postmenopausal women had a higher concentration of serum total cholesterol than men of a comparable age, (7.3 mmol/l v 6.5 mmol/l, P = 0.0002). Although arterial grafts were often used in both sexes, they were more often used in men than in women (91% v 78% respectively, P = 0.0003). In-hospital mortality was 2.1% (1.4% in men and 4.2% in women, P = 0.14). The estimated one year probability of survival in men who had survived 30 days was 0.99 with 95% confidence interval 0.98 to approximately 1 while that for women was 0.97 with 95% confidence interval 0.91 to approximately 1. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative history of diabetes mellitus was a predictor of mortality (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION--There were differences in the incidence and type of risk factors in men and women who had coronary artery bypass grafting. Preoperative diabetes mellitus was a predictor of in-hospital mortality. PMID:8011402

  5. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Milla, Emilio; Olalla, Julián; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Martos, Francisco; Matute-Cruz, Petra; Carmona-López, Guadalupe; Fornieles, Yolanda; Cayuela, Aurelio; García-Alegría, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848) diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72%) of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93). Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality. PMID:19344518

  6. Trends in hospital discharges, management and in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland between 1998 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the late nineties, no study has assessed the trends in management and in-hospital outcome of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Switzerland. Our objective was to fill this gap. Methods Swiss hospital discharge database for years 1998 to 2008. AMI was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis code I21 according to the ICD10 classification. Invasive treatments and overall in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Overall, 102,729 hospital discharges with a diagnosis of AMI were analyzed. The percentage of hospitalizations with a stay in an Intensive Care Unit decreased from 38.0% in 1998 to 36.2% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Percutaneous revascularizations increased from 6.0% to 39.9% (p for trend < 0.001). Bare stents rose from 1.3% to 16.6% (p for trend < 0.001). Drug eluting stents appeared in 2004 and increased to 23.5% in 2008 (p for trend < 0.001). Coronary artery bypass graft increased from 1.0% to 3.0% (p for trend < 0.001). Circulatory assistance increased from 0.2% to 1.7% (p for trend < 0.001). Among patients managed in a single hospital (not transferred), seven-day and total in-hospital mortality decreased from 8.0% to 7.0% (p for trend < 0.01) and from 11.2% to 10.1%, respectively. These changes were no longer significant after multivariate adjustment for age, gender, region, revascularization procedures and transfer type. After multivariate adjustment, differing trends in revascularization procedures and in in-hospital mortality were found according to the geographical region considered. Conclusion In Switzerland, a steep rise in hospital discharges and in revascularization procedures for AMI occurred between 1998 and 2008. The increase in revascularization procedures could explain the decrease in in-hospital mortality rates. PMID:23530470

  7. Urban-rural variation in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional injury in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Boland, M; Staines, A; Fitzpatrick, P; Scallan, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore urban-rural differences in the mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional injuries in the Republic of Ireland. Design: Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) in residents of urban and non-city areas (called rural areas) from all causes of unintentional injury were calculated using Central Statistics Office mortality data from 1980–2000. Hospital admission data (Hospital In-Patient Enquiry) from 1993–2000 were used to calculate standardised hospital admission ratios (SARs) in urban and rural residents. Population data were obtained from the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 censuses. Results: The rate of unintentional injury mortality was significantly higher in rural residents for all-cause unintentional injury mortality (SMR 103.0, 95% confidence interval 101 to 105), and specifically for deaths related to motor vehicle trauma (MVT), drowning, machinery, and firearms. There were significantly higher SMRs in urban residents for falls and poisoning. The rate of unintentional injury hospital admission was significantly higher in rural residents for all-cause unintentional injury (SAR 104.6, 95% confidence interval 104 to 105) and specifically for injuries from falls, MVT, being struck by or against an object, injuries in pedal cyclists, fire/burn injuries, and machinery injuries. SARs were significantly higher in residents of urban areas for poisoning and injuries in pedestrians. Conclusions: There are urban-rural differences in mortality and admissions for injuries in Ireland. Possible reasons for the higher rural mortality rates are higher case fatality in MVT and rural exposure to hazardous farm machinery, firearms, and open areas of water. This information could assist in targeting prevention programmes under the proposed National Injury Prevention Strategy. PMID:15691988

  8. Development and implementation of a real-time 30-day readmission predictive model.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Patrick R; Greenwald, Jeffrey L; Crevensten, Gwen C; Chueh, Henry C; Zai, Adrian H

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals are under great pressure to reduce readmissions of patients. Being able to reliably predict patients at increased risk for rehospitalization would allow for tailored interventions to be offered to them. This requires the creation of a functional predictive model specifically designed to support real-time clinical operations. A predictive model for readmissions within 30 days of discharge was developed using retrospective data from 45,924 MGH admissions between 2/1/2012 and 1/31/2013 only including factors that would be available by the day after admission. It was then validated prospectively in a real-time implementation for 3,074 MGH admissions between 10/1/2013 and 10/31/2013. The model developed retrospectively had an AUC of 0.705 with good calibration. The real-time implementation had an AUC of 0.671 although the model was overestimating readmission risk. A moderately discriminative real-time 30-day readmission predictive model can be developed and implemented in a large academic hospital.

  9. Observations from Mortality Trends at The Children’s Hospital, Accra, 2003-2013

    PubMed Central

    Tette, Edem M. A.; Neizer, Margaret L.; Nyarko, Mame Yaa; Sifah, Eric K.; Sagoe-Moses, Isabella A.; Nartey, Edmund T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Facility-based studies provide an unparalleled opportunity to assess interventions deployed in hospitals to reduce child mortality which is not easily captured in the national data. We examined mortality trends at the Princess Marie Louise Children’s Hospital (PML) and related it to interventions deployed in the hospital and community to reduce child mortality and achieve the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4). Methods The study was a cross-sectional review of data on consecutive patients who died at the hospital over a period of 11 years, between 2003 and 2013. The total admissions for each year, the major hospital-based and population-based interventions, which took place within the period, were also obtained. Results Out of a total of 37,012 admissions, 1,314 (3.6%) deaths occurred and admissions tripled during the period. The average annual change in mortality was -7.12% overall, -7.38% in under-fives, and -1.47% in children ≥5 years. The majority of the deaths, 1,187 (90.3%), occurred in under-fives. The observed decrease in under-five (and overall) mortality rate occurred in a specific and peculiar pattern. Most of the decrease occurred during the period between 2003 and 2006. After that there was a noticeable increase from 2006 to 2008. Then, the rate slowly decreased until the end of the study period in 2013. There was a concomitant decline in malaria mortality following a pattern similar to the decline observed in other parts of the continent during this period. Several interventions might have contributed to the reduction in mortality including the change in malaria treatment policy, improved treatment of malnutrition and increasing paediatric input. Conclusion Under-fives mortality at PML has declined considerably; however, the reduction in mortality in older children has been minimal and thus requires special attention. Data collection for mortality reviews should be planned and commissioned regularly in hospitals to assess the effects

  10. Primary and Secondary Spontaneous Pneumothorax: Prevalence, Clinical Features, and In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Sho; Yamaoka, Masatoshi; Sekiya, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Hitoshi; Kawakami, Naoki; Araki, Yuichi; Wakai, Yoko; Saito, Kazuhito; Inagaki, Masaharu; Matsumiya, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Background. Optimal treatment practices and factors associated with in-hospital mortality in spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) are not fully understood. We evaluated prevalence, clinical characteristics, and in-hospital mortality among Japanese patients with primary or secondary SP (PSP/SSP). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed and stratified 938 instances of pneumothorax in 751 consecutive patients diagnosed with SP into the PSP and SSP groups. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality in SSP were identified by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results. In the SSP group (n = 327; 34.9%), patient age, requirement for emergency transport, and length of stay were greater (all, p < 0.001), while the prevalence of smoking (p = 0.023) and number of surgical interventions (p < 0.001) were lower compared to those in the PSP group (n = 611; 65.1%). Among the 16 in-hospital deceased patients, 12 (75.0%) received emergency transportation and 10 (62.5%) exhibited performance status (PS) of 3-4. In the SSP group, emergency transportation was an independent factor for in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 16.37; 95% confidence interval, 4.85–55.20; p < 0.001). Conclusions. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of PSP and SSP differ considerably. Patients with SSP receiving emergency transportation should receive careful attention. PMID:28386166

  11. Hospital Based Emergency Department Visits Attributed to Child Physical Abuse in United States: Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Asad, Rahimullah; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Rampa, Sankeerth; Speicher, David G.; Rotta, Alexandre T.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe nationally representative outcomes of physical abuse injuries in children necessitating Emergency Department (ED) visits in United States. The impact of various injuries on mortality is examined. We hypothesize that physical abuse resulting in intracranial injuries are associated with worse outcome. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all payer hospital based ED database, for the years 2008–2010. All ED visits and subsequent hospitalizations with a diagnosis of “Child physical abuse” (Battered baby or child syndrome) due to various injuries were identified using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) codes. In addition, we also examined the prevalence of sexual abuse in this cohort. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine the association between mortality and types of injuries after adjusting for a multitude of patient and hospital level factors. Results Of the 16897 ED visits that were attributed to child physical abuse, 5182 (30.7%) required hospitalization. Hospitalized children were younger than those released treated and released from the ED (1.9 years vs. 6.4 years). Male or female partner of the child’s parent/guardian accounted for >45% of perpetrators. Common injuries in hospitalized children include- any fractures (63.5%), intracranial injuries (32.3%) and crushing/internal injuries (9.1%). Death occurred in 246 patients (13 in ED and 233 following hospitalization). Amongst the 16897 ED visits, 1.3% also had sexual abuse. Multivariable analyses revealed each 1 year increase in age was associated with a lower odds of mortality (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.96, p<0.0001). Females (OR = 2.39, 1.07–5.34, p = 0.03), those with intracranial injuries (OR = 65.24, 27.57–154.41, p<0.0001), or crushing/internal injury (OR = 4.98, 2.24–11.07, p<0

  12. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  13. Mortality in a pediatric secondary-care hospital in post-conflict Liberia in 2009

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Thomaz Bittencourt; Farhat, Sylvia Costa Lima; Reid, Tony; Schvartsman, Cláudio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe and analyze the causes of death in a pediatric secondary-care hospital (run by Médecins sans Frontières), in Monrovia, Liberia, 6 years post-civil war, to determine the quality of care and mortality in a setting with limited resources. Methods: Data were retrospectively collected from March 2009 to October 2009. Patient charts and laboratory records were reviewed to verify cause of death. Additionally, charts of patients aged over 1 month with an infectious cause of death were analyzed for decompensated septic shock, or fluid-refractory septic shock. Results: Of 8,254 admitted pediatric patients, 531 died, with a mortality rate of 6.4%. Ninety percent of deaths occurred in children <5 years old. Most deaths occurred within 24 hours of admission. The main cause of death (76%) was infectious disease. Seventy-eight (23.6%) patients >1 month old with infectious disease met the criteria for septic shock, and 28 (8.6%) for decompensated or fluid-refractory septic shock. Conclusion: Since the end of Liberia's devastating civil war, Island Hospital has improved care and mortality outcomes, despite operating with limited resources. Based on the available data, mortality in Island Hospital appears to be lower than that of other Liberian and African institutions and similar to other hospitals run by Médecins sans Frontières across Africa. This can be explained by the financial and logistic support of Médecins sans Frontières. The highest mortality burden is related to infectious diseases and neonatal conditions. The mortality of sepsis varied among different infections. This suggests that further mortality reduction can be obtained by tackling sepsis management and improving neonatal care. PMID:24488377

  14. Association of In-Hospital Mortality and Dysglycemia in Septic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shen-Che; Chen, Chun-Kuei; Chen, Jih-Chang; Chan, Yi-Lin; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Blaney, Gerald N.; Liu, Zhen-Ying; Wu, Cho-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background The associations between dysglycemia and mortality in septic patients with and without diabetes are yet to be confirmed. Our aim was to analyze the association of diabetes and sepsis mortality, and to examine how dysglycemia (hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glucose variability) affects in-hospital mortality of patients with suspected sepsis in emergency department (ED) and intensive care units. Methods Clinically suspected septic patients admitted to ED were included, and stratified into subgroups according to in-hospital mortality and the presence of diabetes. We analyzed patients’ demographics, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory parameters, admission glucose levels and severity of sepsis. Odds ratio of mortality was assessed after adjusting for possible confounders. The correlations of admission glucose and CoV (blood glucose coefficients of variation) and mortality in diabetes and non-diabetes were also tested. Results Diabetes was present in 58.3% of the patients. Diabetic patients were older, more likely to have end-stage renal disease and undergoing hemodialysis, but had fewer malignancies, less sepsis severity (lower Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis Score), less steroid usage in emergency department, and lower in-hospital mortality rate (aOR:0.83, 95% CI 0.65–0.99, p = 0.044). Hyperglycemia at admission (glucose≥200 mg/dL) was associated with higher risks of in-hospital mortality among the non-diabetes patients (OR:1.83 vs. diabetes, 95% CI 1.20–2.80, p = 0.005) with the same elevated glucose levels at admission. In addition, CoV>30% resulted in higher risk of death as well (aOR:1.88 vs. CoV between 10 and 30, 95%CI 1.24–2.86 p = 0.003). Conclusions This study indicates that while diabetes mellitus seems to be a protective factor in sepsis patients, hyper- or hypoglycemia status on admission, and increased blood glucose variation during hospital stays, were independently associated with increased odds ratio of mortality. PMID

  15. The Change in Body Weight During Hospitalization Predicts Mortality in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Komaki, Tomo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Arimura, Tadaaki; Shiga, Yuhei; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Kitajima, Ken; Iwata, Atsushi; Morito, Natsumi; Yahiro, Eiji; Fujimi, Kanta; Matsunaga, Akira; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background In our experience, the change in body weight (BW) during hospitalization varies greatly in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF). Since the clinical significance of a change in BW is not clear, we investigated whether a change in BW could predict mortality. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 130 patients (72 males; aged 68 ± 10 years) who were hospitalized due to acute decompensated HF and followed for 2 years after discharge. The change in the BW index during hospitalization (ΔBWI) was calculated as (BW at hospital admission minus BW at hospital discharge)/body surface area at hospital discharge. Results The patients were divided into quartiles according to ΔBWI, and the 2-year mortality rates in the quartiles with the lowest, second, third and highest ΔBWI were 18.8%, 12.1%, 3.1% and 9.1%, respectively. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis after adjusting for variables with a P value less than 0.05, ΔBWI was independently associated with 2-year mortality (P = 0.0002), and the quartile with the lowest ΔBWI had a higher relative risk (RR) for 2-year mortality than the quartile with the highest ΔBWI (RR: 7.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.03 - 53.99, P = 0.04). Conclusion In conclusion, ΔBWI was significantly associated with 2-year mortality after discharge, which indicates that ΔBWI might be a simple predictor of prognosis in acute decompensated HF. PMID:28179967

  16. Inpatient child mortality by travel time to hospital in a rural area of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Manongi, Rachel; Mtei, Frank; Mtove, George; Nadjm, Behzad; Muro, Florida; Alegana, Victor; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Todd, Jim; Reyburn, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association, if any, between child mortality and distance to the nearest hospital. METHODS The study was based on data from a 1-year study of the cause of illness in febrile paediatric admissions to a district hospital in north-east Tanzania. All villages in the catchment population were geolocated, and travel times were estimated from availability of local transport. Using bands of travel time to hospital, we compared admission rates, inpatient case fatality rates and child mortality rates in the catchment population using inpatient deaths as the numerator. RESULTS Three thousand hundred and eleven children under the age of 5 years were included of whom 4.6% died; 2307 were admitted from <3 h away of whom 3.4% died and 804 were admitted from ≥3 h away of whom 8.0% died. The admission rate declined from 125/1000 catchment population at <3 h away to 25/1000 at ≥3 h away, and the corresponding hospital deaths/catchment population were 4.3/1000 and 2.0/1000, respectively. Children admitted from more than 3 h away were more likely to be male, had a longer pre-admission duration of illness and a shorter time between admission and death. Assuming uniform mortality in the catchment population, the predicted number of deaths not benefiting from hospital admission prior to death increased by 21.4% per hour of travel time to hospital. If the same admission and death rates that were found at <3 h from the hospital applied to the whole catchment population and if hospital care conferred a 30% survival benefit compared to home care, then 10.3% of childhood deaths due to febrile illness in the catchment population would have been averted. CONCLUSIONS The mortality impact of poor access to hospital care in areas of high paediatric mortality is likely to be substantial although uncertainty over the mortality benefit of inpatient care is the largest constraint in making an accurate estimate. PMID:24661618

  17. The application of a Poisson model to the annual distribution of daily mortality at six Montreal hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Zweig, J P; Csank, J Z

    1978-01-01

    The daily distributions of annual mortality for varying numbers of years between 1965 and 1975 were investigated in three geriatric hospitals and three general hospitals in the Montreal area. Nearly all the observed mortality distributions were found to mimic the classical Poisson distribution, with little departure. In two of the larger hospitals, the matching of the daily mortality distributions with their Poisson models met stringent statistical criteria. In one of them it was even possible to predict the expected mortality frequencies merely from a knowledge of the annual totals. The remaining four hospitals, which included the three geriatric institutions, also exhibited mortalities regarded as highly suggestive of Poisson distributions, although in one of the geriatric hospitals the mortality distribution tended to be somewhat erratic in this respect. PMID:711981

  18. Identification of patients at risk for early out-of-hospital mortality after redocoronary artery surgery

    PubMed Central

    van Eck, F.M.; Noyez, L.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective Analyse risk factors and construct a predictive model for identification of patients at risk of early out-of-hospital mortality after coronary reoperations (RECABG). Methods 505 patients, discharged from hospital after a RECABG (1987-1998), were studied by univariate and multivariate analysis. A stepwise selective procedure (p<0.05) was used to identify a subset of variables with prognostic value for early out-of-hospital mortality. This subset was used to calculate a prognostic score 'S' and a predicted probability 'p' for early out-of-hospital mortality, p=1/1+ e-s. Sensitivity analysis was used for evaluation. Results The best predictive variables for early out-of-hospital mortality were diabetes (p=0.002), lung disease (p=0.05), emergency operation (p=0.0001) and a perioperative myocardial infarction (p=0.0001). Emergency operation (p=0.001) and antegrade/retrograde cardioplegia (p<0.0000) were independent predictors of a perioperative myocardial infarction. The prognostic accuracy (ROC area) was 86%. Patients were classified into low risk (5%), intermediate risk (15%), high risk (30%) and very high risk (≥40%). A predicted probability of ≥0.40 was used as cut-off point. The specificity of this test was 99%, sensitivity 33%, predictive value of a positive test 79%, and 95% for a negative test. Conclusion The results show that patients discharged from hospital after RECABG can be stratified according to their early out-of-hospital risk. A perioperative myocardial infarction is the major independent risk factor and can be affected by use of retrograde cardioplegia. PMID:25696148

  19. INFLUENCE OF ALTERNATIVE PM COMPONENTS IN MASS ASSOCIATIONS WITH PHILADELPHIA, PA MORTALITY AND HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological analyses of hospital admissions and mortality data have indicated that adverse human health effects are associated with present-day ambient particualte matter (PM) pollution levels. However, the PM mass measurement is chemically non-specific, ignoring the fact th...

  20. Changes in U.S. Hospitalization and Mortality Rates following Smoking Bans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shetty, Kanaka D.; DeLeire, Thomas; White, Chapin; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2011-01-01

    U.S. state and local governments have increasingly adopted restrictions on smoking in public places. This paper analyzes nationally representative databases, including the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, to compare short-term changes in mortality and hospitalization rates in smoking-restricted regions with control regions. In contrast with smaller…

  1. Assessment of malnutrition in hip fracture patients: effects on surgical delay, hospital stay and mortality.

    PubMed

    Symeonidis, Panagiotis D; Clark, David

    2006-08-01

    The importance of malnutrition in elderly hip fracture patients has long been recognised. All patients operated upon for a hip fracture over a five-year period were assessed according to two nutritional markers : a) serum albumin levels and b) peripheral blood total lymphocyte count. Patients were subdivided into groups according to the four possible combinations of these results. Outcomes according to four clinical outcome parameters were validated: a) waiting time to operation b) length of hospitalisation, c) in-hospital mortality, and d) one-year postoperative mortality. Significant differences were found between malnourished patients and those with normal laboratory values with regard to surgical delay and one year postoperative mortality. Malnourished patients were also more likely to be hospitalised longer than a month and to die during their hospital stay, but the difference was not significant. The combination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count can be used as an independent prognostic factor in hip fracture patients.

  2. Public-private settlement and hospital mortality per sources of payment

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Juliana Pires; Martins, Mônica; Leite, Iuri da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if the adjusted hospital mortality varies according to source of payment of hospital admissions, legal nature, and financing settlement of hospitals. METHODS Cros-ssectional study with information source in administrative databases. Specific hospital admission reasons were selected considering the volume of hospital admissions and the list of quality indicators proposed by the North-American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Were analyzed 852,864 hospital admissions of adults, occurred in 789 hospitals between 2008 and 2010, in Sao Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, applying multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS At hospital admission level, showed higher chances of death male patients in more advanced age groups, with comorbidity, who used intensive care unit, and had the Brazilian Unified Health System as source of payment. At the level of hospitals, in those located in the mean of the distribution, the adjusted probability of death in hospital admissions financed by plan or private was 5.0%, against 9.0% when reimbursed by the Brazilian Unified Health System. This probability increased in hospital admissions financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System in hospitals to two standard deviations above the mean, reaching 29.0%. CONCLUSIONS In addition to structural characteristics of the hospitals and the profile of the patients, interventions aimed at improving care should also consider the coverage of the population by health plans, the network shared between beneficiaries of plans and users of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the standard of care to the various sources of payment by hospitals and, most importantly, how these factors influence the clinical performance. PMID:27463256

  3. Etiologies, Trends, and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Prashant; Lahewala, Sopan; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Thakore, Kosha; Amin, Aditi; Tripathi, Byomesh; Kumar, Varun; Shah, Harshil; Shah, Mahek; Panaich, Sidakpal; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Badheka, Apurva; Gidwani, Umesh; Gopalan, Radha

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the most common discharge diagnosis across the United States, and these patients are particularly vulnerable to readmissions, increasing attention to potential ways to address the problem. The study cohort was derived from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's National Readmission Data 2013, sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. HF was identified using appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Readmission was defined as a subsequent hospital admission within 30 days after discharge day of index admission. Readmission causes were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes in primary diagnosis filed. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission. Hierarchical 2-level logistic models were used to evaluate study outcomes. From a total 301,892 principal admissions (73.4% age ≥65 years and 50.6% men), 55,857 (18.5%) patients were readmitted with a total of 64,264 readmissions during the study year. Among the etiologies of readmission, cardiac causes (49.8%) were most common (HF being most common followed by coronary artery disease and arrhythmias), whereas pulmonary causes were responsible for 13.1% and renal causes for 8.9% of the readmissions. Significant predictors of increased 30-day readmission included diabetes (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, p value: 1.06, 1.03 to 1.08, p <0.001), chronic lung disease (1.13, 1.11 to 1.16, p <0.001), renal failure/electrolyte imbalance (1.12, 1.10 to 1.15, p <0.001), discharge to facilities (1.07, 1.04 to 1.09, p <0.001), lengthier hospital stay, and transfusion during index admission. In conclusion, readmission after a hospitalization for HF is common. Although it may be necessary to readmit some patients, the striking rate of readmission demands efforts to further clarify the determinants of readmission and develop strategies in terms of quality of care and care transitions to

  4. Cerebral infarction in diabetes: Clinical pattern, stroke subtypes, and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rivas, Antoni; García-Eroles, Luis; de Marcos, Lourdes; Massons, Joan; Oliveres, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    Background To compare the characteristics and prognostic features of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes and without diabetes, and to determine the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in people with diabetes and ischemic stroke. Methods Diabetes was diagnosed in 393 (21.3%) of 1,840 consecutive patients with cerebral infarction included in a prospective stroke registry over a 12-year period. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, clinical events, stroke subtypes, neuroimaging data, and outcome in ischemic stroke patients with and without diabetes were compared. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results People with diabetes compared to people without diabetes presented more frequently atherothrombotic stroke (41.2% vs 27%) and lacunar infarction (35.1% vs 23.9%) (P < 0.01). The in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was 12.5% and 14.6% in those without (P = NS). Ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, subacute onset, 85 years old or more, atherothrombotic and lacunar infarcts, and thalamic topography were independently associated with ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes, whereas predictors of in-hospital mortality included the patient's age, decreased consciousness, chronic nephropathy, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation Conclusion Ischemic stroke in people with diabetes showed a different clinical pattern from those without diabetes, with atherothrombotic stroke and lacunar infarcts being more frequent. Clinical factors indicative of the severity of ischemic stroke available at onset have a predominant influence upon in-hospital mortality and may help clinicians to assess prognosis more accurately. PMID:15833108

  5. Race, Rehabilitation, and 30-Day Readmission After Elective Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Erik S.; Richardson, Diane M.; Thomasson, Arwin M.; Nelson, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To examine racial variations in access to postacute care (PAC) and rehabilitation (Rehab) services following elective total knee arthroplasty and whether where patients go after surgery for PAC/Rehab is associated with 30-day readmission to acute care facility. Materials and Methods: Sample consisted of 129 522 patients discharged from 169 hospitals in the State of Pennsylvania between fiscal years 2008 and 2012. We used multinomial regression models to assess the relationship between patient race and discharge destination after surgery, for patients aged 18 to 64 years and for those aged 65 and older. We used multivariable (MV) regression and propensity score (PS) approaches to examine the relationship between patient discharge destination after surgery for PAC/Rehab and 30-day readmission, controlling for key individual- and facility-level factors. Results: Lower proportions of younger patients compared to those older than 65 were discharged to inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs; 5.8% vs 12.6%, respectively) and skilled nursing facilities (SNFs; 15.2% vs 32.7%, respectively) compared to home-based Rehab (self-care; 23.3% vs 14.2%, respectively). Compared to whites, African American patients had significantly higher odds of discharge to IRF (age < 65, odds ratio = 2.04; age ≥ 65, odds ratio = 1.64) and to SNF (age < 65, odds ratio = 2.86; age ≥ 65, odds ratio = 2.19) and discharge to home care in patients younger than 65 years (odds ratio = 1.31). The odds of 30-day readmission among patients discharged to an IRF (MV odds ratio = 7.76; PS odds ratio = 8.34) and SNF (MV odds ratio = 2.01; PS odds ratio = 1.83) were significantly higher in comparison to patients discharged home with self-care. Conclusion: African American patients with knee replacement are more likely to be discharged to inpatient Rehab settings following surgery. Inpatient Rehab is significantly associated with 30-day readmission to acute care facility. PMID:26623166

  6. [Evolution of neonatal mortality at the Blida University Teaching Hospital (Algeria) between 1999 and 2006].

    PubMed

    Bezzaoucha, A; El Kebboub, A; Aliche, A

    2010-02-01

    Within the framework of the active information system set up by the department of epidemiology on hospital mortality at the Blida (Algeria) University Teaching Hospital (CHU), a study was carried out to assess the importance and evolution of neonatal mortality recorded at the CHU in the last eight years (1999-2006) as well as the causes of neonatal death. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) was used to encode the nature of the causal disease. Using the software EpiInfo™ in its sixth version performed data entry, monitoring and analysis. On the whole, 2,167 neonatal deaths were recorded at the CHU during the study period, representing a proportional mortality of 25.4%. Early neonatal mortality (0-6 days) accounted for 83.4% of all neonatal mortality. Nearly two thirds of early neonatal deaths occurred in the first three days of life. The monthly evolution of the number of early neonatal deaths revealed a significant rising trend during the study period (P < 0.05) without identification of seasonal effect. The sex ratio was practically the same for early and late neonatal mortality, respectively 1.4 and 1.5. Prematurity accounted for 42.1% of the deaths in early neonatal deaths, followed by respiratory distress syndrome and infection, respectively 17.0 and 14.4%. Infections, with a relative frequency of 36.2%, represented the most common cause for the late neonatal mortality. The rate of early neonatal mortality during the study period, when this one took for denominator the number of newborns admitted in neonatology to express the mortality of service, was 15.6%. Throughout the study period, the rate of early neonatal mortality, without counting the deaths among transferred newborms, could be estimated at 19.2 per 1,000 live births, while the overall neonatal mortality rate could be estimated at 22.3 per 1,000 live births. No significant temporal tendency was pointed out. The CHU of Blida is not characterized by a lower risk of neonatal mortality

  7. Relationship between Early Physician Follow-Up and 30-Day Readmission after Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yu-Chi; Chang, Guann-Ming; Chang, Hsien-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmission rates after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure are important patient outcome metrics. Early post-discharge physician follow-up has been promoted as a method of reducing 30-day readmission rates. However, the relationships between early post-discharge follow-up and 30-day readmission for AMI and heart failure are inconclusive. We used nationwide population-based data to examine associations between 7-day physician follow-up and 30-day readmission, and further associations of 7-day same physician (during the index hospitalization and at follow-up) and cardiologist follow-up with 30-day readmission for non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or heart failure. Methods We analyzed all patients 18 years or older with NSTEMI and heart failure and discharged from hospitals in 2010 in Taiwan through Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Cox proportional hazard models with robust sandwich variance estimates and propensity score weighting were performed after adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics to test associations between 7-day physician follow-up and 30-day readmission. Results The study population for NSTEMI and heart failure included 5,008 and 13,577 patients, respectively. Early physician follow-up was associated with a lower hazard ratio of readmission compared with no early physician follow-up for patients with NSTEMI (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39–0.57), and for patients with heart failure (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.48–0.60). Same physician follow-up was associated with a reduced hazard ratio of readmission compared with different physician follow-up for patients with NSTEMI (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.48–0.65), and for patients with heart failure (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.62–0.76). Conclusions For each condition, patients who have an outpatient visit with a physician within 7 days of discharge have a lower risk of 30-day readmission. Moreover

  8. 9 CFR 96.12 - Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 30 days; disposition. 96.12 Section 96.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... STATES § 96.12 Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition. Foreign animal casings... period of 30 days after arrival in the United States, subject to the ability of Division inspectors...

  9. 17 CFR 41.12 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 41.12 Section 41.12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY... underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of sale for... U.S.C. 1a(25)) for the first 30 days of trading, if: (1) Such index would not have been a...

  10. 7 CFR 27.58 - Postponed classification; must be within 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. 27... Classification § 27.58 Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. If thereafter the classification of the cotton be desired, notice thereof shall be filed not later than the expiration of 30 days after the...

  11. 17 CFR 41.12 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 41.12 Section 41.12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of... narrow-based security index under section 1a(35) of the Act (7 U.S.C. 1a(35)) for the first 30 days...

  12. 43 CFR 4.1186 - Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement... Expedited Review of Section 521(a)(2) Or 521(a)(3) Orders of Cessation § 4.1186 Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement. (a) Any person qualified to receive a 30-day decision may waive that right— (1)...

  13. 7 CFR 27.58 - Postponed classification; must be within 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. 27... Classification § 27.58 Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. If thereafter the classification of the cotton be desired, notice thereof shall be filed not later than the expiration of 30 days after the...

  14. 43 CFR 4.1186 - Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement... Expedited Review of Section 521(a)(2) Or 521(a)(3) Orders of Cessation § 4.1186 Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement. (a) Any person qualified to receive a 30-day decision may waive that right— (1)...

  15. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special 30-day rules for certain reportable... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(d)-3 Special 30-day rules for... certification of notified payee underreporting) within 30 days after the establishment or acquisition...

  16. 43 CFR 4.1186 - Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement... Expedited Review of Section 521(a)(2) Or 521(a)(3) Orders of Cessation § 4.1186 Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement. (a) Any person qualified to receive a 30-day decision may waive that right— (1)...

  17. 9 CFR 96.12 - Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 30 days; disposition. 96.12 Section 96.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... STATES § 96.12 Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition. Foreign animal casings... period of 30 days after arrival in the United States, subject to the ability of Division inspectors...

  18. 43 CFR 4.1186 - Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement... Expedited Review of Section 521(a)(2) Or 521(a)(3) Orders of Cessation § 4.1186 Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement. (a) Any person qualified to receive a 30-day decision may waive that right— (1)...

  19. 7 CFR 27.58 - Postponed classification; must be within 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. 27... Classification § 27.58 Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. If thereafter the classification of the cotton be desired, notice thereof shall be filed not later than the expiration of 30 days after the...

  20. 9 CFR 96.12 - Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 30 days; disposition. 96.12 Section 96.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... STATES § 96.12 Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition. Foreign animal casings... period of 30 days after arrival in the United States, subject to the ability of Division inspectors...

  1. 7 CFR 27.58 - Postponed classification; must be within 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. 27... Classification § 27.58 Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. If thereafter the classification of the cotton be desired, notice thereof shall be filed not later than the expiration of 30 days after the...

  2. 43 CFR 4.1186 - Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement... Expedited Review of Section 521(a)(2) Or 521(a)(3) Orders of Cessation § 4.1186 Waiver of the 30-day decision requirement. (a) Any person qualified to receive a 30-day decision may waive that right— (1)...

  3. 17 CFR 41.12 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 41.12 Section 41.12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY... underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of sale for... U.S.C. 1a(25)) for the first 30 days of trading, if: (1) Such index would not have been a...

  4. 7 CFR 27.58 - Postponed classification; must be within 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. 27... Classification § 27.58 Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. If thereafter the classification of the cotton be desired, notice thereof shall be filed not later than the expiration of 30 days after the...

  5. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special 30-day rules for certain reportable... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(d)-3 Special 30-day rules for... certification of notified payee underreporting) within 30 days after the establishment or acquisition...

  6. 9 CFR 96.12 - Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 30 days; disposition. 96.12 Section 96.12 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... STATES § 96.12 Uncertified casings not disinfected in 30 days; disposition. Foreign animal casings... period of 30 days after arrival in the United States, subject to the ability of Division inspectors...

  7. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  8. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  9. Effect of β-adrenergic antagonists on in-hospital mortality after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Christopher; Alaigh, Vivek; Fortunato, Gil; Staff, Ilene; Sansing, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke accounts for 85–90% of all strokes and currently has very limited therapeutic options. Recent studies of β-adrenergic antagonists suggest they may have neuroprotective effects that lead to improved functional outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke, however there is limited data in patients. We aimed to determine whether there was an improvement in mortality rates among patients who were taking β-blockers during the acute phase of their ischemic stroke. Methods A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database of ischemic stroke patients was performed. Patients who were on β-adrenergic antagonists both at home and during the first three days of hospitalization were compared to patients who were not on β-adrenergic antagonists to determine the association with patient mortality rates. Results The study included a patient population of 2804 patients. In univariate analysis, use of β-adrenergic antagonists was associated with older age, atrial fibrillation, hypertension and more severe initial stroke presentation. Despite this, multivariable analysis revealed a reduction in in-hospital mortality among patients who were treated with β-adrenergic antagonists (odds ratio 0.657; 95% confidence interval 0.655–0.658). Conclusions The continuation of home β-adrenergic antagonist medication during the first three days of hospitalization after an ischemic stroke is associated with a decrease in patient mortality. This supports the work done in rodent models suggesting neuroprotective effects of β-blockers after ischemic stroke. PMID:26163891

  10. Early post-surgical cognitive dysfunction is a risk factor for mortality among hip fracture hospitalized older persons.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, C; Bonamassa, L; Pelini, L; Prioletta, I; Cianferotti, L; Metozzi, A; Benvenuti, E; Brandi, G; Guazzini, A; Santoro, G C; Mecocci, P; Black, D; Brandi, M L

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the relationship between cognitive dysfunction or delirium detected in the early post-surgical phase and the 1-year mortality among 514 hip fracture hospitalized older persons. Patients with early cognitive dysfunction or delirium experienced a 2-fold increased mortality risk. Early post-operative cognitive dysfunction and delirium are negative prognostic factors for mortality.

  11. Incidence And Risk Factors For 30-Day Readmissions After Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T; Gao, Yubo; Pugely, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unplanned hospital readmission following orthopedic procedures results in significant expenditures for the Medicare population. In order to reduce expenditures, hospital readmission has become an important quality metric for Medicare patients. The purpose of the present study is to determine the incidence and risk factors for 30-day readmissions after hip fracture surgery. Methods Patients over the age of 18 years who underwent hip fracture surgery, including open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), intramedullary nailing, hemi-arthroplasty, or total hip arthroplasty, between the years 2012 and 2013 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Overall, 17,765 patients were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed in order to determine patient and surgical factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results There were 1503 patients (8.4%) readmitted within 30-days of their index procedure. Of the patients with a reason listed for readmission, 27.4% were for procedurally related reasons, including wound complications (16%), peri-prosthetic fractures (4.5%) and prosthetic dislocations (6%). 72.6% of readmissions were for medical reasons, including sepsis (7%), pneumonia (14%), urinary tract infection (6.3%), myocardial infarction (2.7%), renal failure (2.7%), and stroke (2.3%). In the subsequent multivariate analysis, pre-operative dyspnea, COPD, hypertension, disseminated cancer, a bleeding disorder, pre-operative hematocrit of <36, pre-operative creatinine of >1.2, an ASA class of 3 or 4, and the operative procedure type were each independently associated with readmissions risk (p<0.05 for each). Conclusions The overall rate of readmission following hip fracture surgery was moderate. Surgeons should consider discharge optimization in the at risk cohorts identified here, particularly patients with multiple medical comorbidities or an elevated ASA class, and

  12. Association between delirium superimposed on dementia and mortality in hospitalized older adults: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Curiati, Jose A. E.; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospitalized older adults with preexisting dementia have increased risk of having delirium, but little is known regarding the effect of delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) on the outcomes of these patients. Our aim was to investigate the association between DSD and hospital mortality and 12-mo mortality in hospitalized older adults. Methods and findings This was a prospective cohort study completed in the geriatric ward of a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. We included 1,409 hospitalizations of acutely ill patients aged 60 y and over from January 2009 to June 2015. Main variables and measures included dementia and dementia severity (Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly, Clinical Dementia Rating) and delirium (Confusion Assessment Method). Primary outcomes were time to death in the hospital and time to death in 12 mo (for the discharged sample). Comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed at admission, and additional clinical data were documented upon death or discharge. Cases were categorized into four groups (no delirium or dementia, dementia alone, delirium alone, and DSD). The no delirium/dementia group was defined as the referent category for comparisons, and multivariate analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for possible confounders (sociodemographic information, medical history and physical examination data, functional and nutritional status, polypharmacy, and laboratory covariates). Overall, 61% were women and 39% had dementia, with a mean age of 80 y. Dementia alone was observed in 13% of the cases, with delirium alone in 21% and DSD in 26% of the cases. In-hospital mortality was 8% for patients without delirium or dementia, 12% for patients with dementia alone, 29% for patients with delirium alone, and 32% for DSD patients (Pearson Chi-square = 112, p < 0.001). DSD and delirium alone were independently associated with in-hospital mortality, with respective hazard ratios

  13. Factors Impacting Mortality in the Pre-Hospital Period After Road Traffic Accidents in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Ananthnarayan; Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Sandhya; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Background India currently has the dubious distinction of experiencing the highest number of road traffic accidents in the world. Objectives We believe that this study on road traffic accidents may help to identify factors in the pre-hospital setting that may influence mortality rates. Patients and Methods A prospective observational study was carried out in a metro area in India over a period of one year. The study included consecutive patients admitted to the trauma service after road traffic accidents. Demographic information, time and place of accident, and details regarding the vehicle and the events leading up to the hospital admission were recorded. Injury severity, management in the hospital, and final outcomes in terms of mortality were noted. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results A total of 773 patients were enrolled. Of these, there were 197 deaths and 576 survivors. The majority of patients were aged 15 - 40 years (67%) and were male (87.84%). More accidents occurred at night (58.2%) than during the day (41.8%). Mortality was not significantly associated with age, sex, or time of accident. City roads (38.9%) saw more accidents than highways (26.13%), but highway accidents were more likely to be fatal. Two-wheeler riders (37.65%) and pedestrians (35.75%) formed the majority of our study population. Mortality was significantly associated with crossing the road on foot (P = 0.004). Pillion riders on two-wheeler vehicles were more likely to experience poor outcomes (relative risk [RR] = 1.9, P = 0.001). Front-seat occupants in four-wheeler vehicles were at an increased risk of not surviving the accident (61.98%; RR=2.56, P = 0.01). Lack of safety gear, such as helmets, seat belts, and airbags, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.05). Delays in transfers of patients to the hospital and a lack of pre-hospital emergency services was significantly associated with increased mortality (P = 0.000). Conclusions A lack of respect for the

  14. Emergency department evaluation and 30-day readmission after craniotomy for primary brain tumor resection in New York State.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon

    2017-01-06

    OBJECTIVE Fragmentation of care has been recognized as a major contributor to 30-day readmissions after surgical procedures. The authors investigated the association of evaluation in the hospital where the original procedure was performed with the rate of 30-day readmissions for patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) after craniotomy for primary brain tumor resection. METHODS A cohort study was conducted, involving patients who were evaluated in the ED within 30 days after discharge following a craniotomy for primary brain tumor resection between 2009 and 2013, and who were registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database of New York State. A propensity score-adjusted model was used to control for confounding, whereas a mixed-effects model accounted for clustering at the hospital level. RESULTS Of the 610 patients presenting to the ED, 422 (69.2%) were evaluated in a hospital different from the one where the original procedure was performed (28.9% were readmitted), and 188 (30.8%) were evaluated at the original hospital (20.3% were readmitted). In a multivariable analysis, the authors demonstrated that being evaluated in the ED of the original hospital was associated with a decreased rate of 30-day readmission (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.41-0.98). Similar associations were found in a mixed-effects logistic regression model (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40-0.96) and a propensity score-adjusted model (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.41-0.98). This corresponds to one less readmission per 12 patients evaluated in the hospital where the original procedure was performed. CONCLUSIONS Using a comprehensive all-payer cohort of patients in New York State who were evaluated in the ED after craniotomy for primary brain tumor resection, the authors identified an association of assessment in the hospital where the original procedure was performed with a lower rate of 30-day readmissions. This underscores the potential importance of continuity of care in

  15. The role of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in predicting hospital mortality for percutaneous coronary interventions in the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Charles; Rao, Sunil V; Gregg, Mary; Phillips, Richard C; Reisman, Mark; Tucker, Eben; Goss, J Richard

    2009-01-01

    Published mortality models for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), including the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program (COAP) model, have not considered the effect of out-ofhospital cardiac arrest. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the inclusion of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest altered the COAP mortality model for PCI. The COAP PCI database contains extensive demographic, clinical, procedural and outcome information, including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which was added to the data collection form in 2006. This study included 15,586 consecutive PCIs performed in 31 Washington State hospitals in 2006. Using development and test sets, the existing COAP PCI logistic regression mortality model was examined to assess the effect of out-of-hospital arrest on in-hospital mortality. Overall, 2% of individuals undergoing PCI had cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival. Among 8 hospitals with PCI volumes < 120 cases per year, 4 had cardiac arrest volumes that exceeded 10% of total volume, whereas none of the centers with > 120 cases per year did. In-hospital mortality was 19% in the arrest group and was 1.0% in remaining procedures (p < 0.0001). In the new multivariate model, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was highly associated with mortality (odds ratio = 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.28-9.25). When evaluated in the test set, the new model had excellent discrimination (c-statistic = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.85-0.93). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an important determinant of risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality for PCI, particularly for hospitals with low volumes and relatively high volumes of cardiac arrest cases.

  16. Analysis of in hospital mortality and long-term survival excluding in hospital mortality after open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Jun Gyo; Cho, Yong-Pil; Han, Young Jin; Noh, Min Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to confirm the factors that affect the mortality associated with the open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) and to analyze the long-term survival rates. Methods A retrospective review was performed on a prospectively collected database that included 455 consecutive patients who underwent open surgical repair for AAA between January 2001 and December 2012. We divided our analysis into in-hospital and postdischarge periods and analyzed the risk factors that affected the long-term survival of rAAA patients. Results Of the 455 patients who were initially screened, 103 were rAAA patients, and 352 were non-rAAA (nAAA) patients. In the rAAA group, 25 patients (24.2%) died in the hospital and 78 were discharged. Long-term survival was significantly better in the nAAA group (P = 0.001). The 2-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates of the rAAA patients were 87%, 73.4%, and 54.1%, respectively. Age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–.08; P < 0.001) and aneurysm rupture (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.12–.44; P = 0.01) significantly affected long-term survival. Conclusion Preoperative circulatory failure is the most common cause of death for in-hospital mortality of rAAA patients. After excluding patients who have died during the perioperative period, age is the only factor that affects the survival of rAAA patients. PMID:27904852

  17. International Validity of the “HOSPITAL” Score to Predict 30-day Potentially Avoidable Readmissions in Medical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Donzé, Jacques D.; Williams, Mark V.; Robinson, Edmondo J.; Zimlichman, Eyal; Aujesky, Drahomir; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kripalani, Sunil; Metlay, Joshua P.; Wallington, Tamara; Fletcher, Grant S.; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Schnipper, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Identification of patients at high risk of potentially avoidable readmission allows hospitals to efficiently direct additional care transitions services to the patients most likely to benefit. OBJECTIVE To externally validate the “HOSPITAL” score in an international multicenter study to assess its generalizability. DESIGN International multicenter retrospective cohort study. SETTING 9 large hospitals across 4 different countries. PARTICIPANTS All adult patients consecutively discharged alive from a medical department between January and December, 2011 (117,065 participants). Patients transferred to another acute care facility were excluded. EXPOSURES The “HOSPITAL” score includes the following predictors at discharge: Hemoglobin, discharge from an Oncology service, Sodium level, Procedure during the index admission, Index Type of admission (urgent), number of Admissions during the last 12 months, and Length of stay. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES 30-day potentially avoidable readmission to the index hospital using the SQLape algorithm. RESULTS Of all medical discharges, 14.5% (n=16,992) were followed by a 30-day readmission, and 9.7% (n=11,307) were followed by a 30-day potentially avoidable readmission. The discriminatory power of the “HOSPITAL” score to predict potentially avoidable readmission was good with a C-statistic of 0.72 (95% CI 0.72-0.72). As in the derivation study, patients were classified into 3 risk categories: low (62%), intermediate (24%), and high risk (14%). The estimated proportions of potentially avoidable readmission for each risk category matched the observed proportion, resulting in an excellent calibration (Pearson goodness of fit test P=0.89). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The “HOSPITAL” score identified patients at high risk of 30-day potentially avoidable readmission with moderately high discrimination and excellent calibration when applied to a large international multicenter cohort of medical patients. This score

  18. Predictors of Hospitalized Exacerbations and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Santibáñez, Miguel; Garrastazu, Roberto; Ruiz-Nuñez, Mario; Helguera, Jose Manuel; Arenal, Sandra; Bonnardeux, Cristina; León, Carlos; García-Rivero, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) carry significant consequences for patients and are responsible for considerable health-care costs—particularly if hospitalization is required. Despite the importance of hospitalized exacerbations, relatively little is known about their determinants. This study aimed to analyze predictors of hospitalized exacerbations and mortality in COPD patients. Methods This was a retrospective population-based cohort study. We selected 900 patients with confirmed COPD aged ≥35 years by simple random sampling among all COPD patients in Cantabria (northern Spain) on December 31, 2011. We defined moderate exacerbations as events that led a care provider to prescribe antibiotics or corticosteroids and severe exacerbations as exacerbations requiring hospital admission. We observed exacerbation frequency over the previous year (2011) and following year (2012). We categorized patients according to COPD severity based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] grades 1–4). We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) by logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, COPD severity, and frequent exacerbator phenotype the previous year. Results Of the patients, 16.4% had ≥1 severe exacerbations, varying from 9.3% in mild GOLD grade 1 to 44% in very severe COPD patients. A history of at least two prior severe exacerbations was positively associated with new severe exacerbations (adjusted OR, 6.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.53–12.83) and mortality (adjusted OR, 7.63; 95%CI, 3.41–17.05). Older age and several comorbidities, such as heart failure and diabetes, were similarly associated. Conclusions Hospitalized exacerbations occurred with all grades of airflow limitation. A history of severe exacerbations was associated with new hospitalized exacerbations and mortality. PMID:27362765

  19. Impact of Peri-Operative Acute Kidney Injury as a Severity Index for 30-day Readmission After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jeremiah R.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Ross, Cathy S.; Kramer, Robert S.; Magnus, Patrick C.; Chaisson, Kristine; Boss, Richard A.; Helm, Robert E.; Horton, Susan R.; Hofmaster, Patricia; Desaulniers, Helen; Blajda, Pamela; Westbrook, Benjamin M.; Duquette, Dennis; LeBlond, Kelly; Quinn, Reed D.; Jones, Cheryl; DiScipio, Anthony W.; Malenka, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Of patients undergoing cardiac surgery in the United States, 15–20% are re-hospitalized within 30-days. Current models to predict readmission have not evaluated the association between severity of post-operative acute kidney injury (AKI) and 30-day readmissions. Methods We collected data from 2,209 consecutive patients who underwent either coronary artery bypass (CABG) or valve surgery at seven member hospitals of the Northern New England Cardiovascular Disease Study Group Cardiac Surgery Registry (NNE) between July 2008 and December 2010. Administrative data at each hospital was searched to identify all patients readmitted to the index hospital within 30 days of discharge. We defined AKI Stages by the AKI Network definition of 0.3 or 50% increase (Stage 1), 2-fold increase (stage 2) and a 3-fold or 0.5 increase if the baseline serum creatinine was at least 4.0 (mg/dL) or new dialysis (stage 3). We evaluate the association between stages of AKI and 30-day readmission using multivariate logistic regression. Results There were 260 patients readmitted within 30-days (12.1%). The median time to readmission was 9 (IQR 4–16) days. Patients not developing AKI following cardiac surgery had a 30-day readmission rate of 9.3% compared to patients developing AKI stage 1 (16.1%), AKI stage 2 (21.8%) and AKI stage 3 (28.6%, p <0.001). Adjusted odds ratios for AKI stage 1 (1.81; 1.35, 2.44), stage 2 (2.39; 1.38, 4.14) and stage 3 (3.47; 1.85–6.50). Models to predict readmission were significantly improved with the addition of AKI stage (c-statistic 0.65, p = 0.001) and net reclassification rate of 14.6% (95%CI: 5.05% to 24.14%, p = .003). Conclusions In addition to more traditional patient characteristics, the severity of post-operative AKI should be used when assessing a patient’s risk for readmission. PMID:24119985

  20. Association of azithromycin with mortality and cardiovascular events among older patients hospitalized with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Eric M.; Halm, Ethan A.; Pugh, Mary Jo; Copeland, Laurel A.; Metersky, Mark; Fine, Michael J.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Alvarez, Carlos A.; Frei, Christopher R.; Good, Chester; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Downs, John R.; Anzueto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Importance Although clinical practice guidelines recommend combination therapy with macrolides, including azithromycin, as first line therapy for patients hospitalized with pneumonia, recent research suggests that azithromycin may be associated with increased cardiovascular events. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the association of azithromycin use with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. Design Retrospective, cohort study comparing older patients hospitalized with pneumonia between fiscal years 2002–2012 prescribed azithromycin therapy and patients receiving other guideline-concordant antibiotic therapy Setting This study was conducted using national Department of Veterans Affairs administrative data of patients hospitalized at any Veterans Administration acute care hospital. Participants Patients were included if they were ≥65 years of age hospitalized with pneumonia and received antibiotic therapy concordant with national clinical practice guidelines. Main Outcome Measures Outcomes included 30 and 90-day all-cause mortality, and 90-day cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and any cardiac event. Propensity score matching was used to control for the possible effects of known confounders with conditional logistic regression. Results Out of the 73,690 patients from 118 hospitals identified, propensity-matched groups were composed of 31,863 azithromycin-exposed and 31,863 matched unexposed. There were no significant differences in potential confounders between groups after matching. 90-day mortality was significantly lower in those who received azithromycin (exposed- 17.4% vs. unexposed- 22.3%, odds ratio [OR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–0.76). However, we found significant increased odds of myocardial infarctions (5.1% vs. 4.4%, OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.08–1.25) but not any cardiac event (43.0% vs. 42.7%, OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.98–1.05), cardiac arrhythmias (25

  1. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  2. Patient characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality in children following tracheotomy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G; Graham, Robert J; Roberson, David W; Rhein, Lawrence; Graham, Dionne A; Zhou, Jing; O’Brien, Jane; Putney, Heather; Goldmann, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify children at risk for in-hospital mortality following tracheotomy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 25 746 876 US hospitalisations for children within the Kids’ Inpatient Database 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. Participants 18 806 hospitalisations of children ages 0–18 years undergoing tracheotomy, identified from ICD-9-CM tracheotomy procedure codes. Main outcome measure Mortality during the initial hospitalisation when tracheotomy was performed in relation to patient demographic and clinical characteristics (neuromuscular impairment (NI), chronic lung disease, upper airway anomaly, prematurity, congenital heart disease, upper airway infection and trauma) identified with ICD-9-CM codes. Results Between 1997 and 2006, mortality following tracheotomy ranged from 7.7% to 8.5%. In each year, higher mortality was observed in children undergoing tracheotomy who were aged <1 year compared with children aged 1–4 years (mortality range: 10.2–13.1% vs 1.1–4.2%); in children with congenital heart disease, compared with children without congenital heart disease (13.1–18.7% vs 6.2–7.1%) and in children with prematurity, compared with children who were not premature (13.0–19.4% vs 6.8–7.3%). Lower mortality was observed in children with an upper airway anomaly compared with children without an upper airway anomaly (1.5–5.1% vs 9.1–10.3%). In 2006, the highest mortality (40.0%) was observed in premature children with NI and congenital heart disease, who did not have an upper airway anomaly. Conclusions Congenital heart disease, prematurity, the absence of an upper airway anomaly and age <1 year were characteristics associated with higher mortality in children following tracheotomy. These findings may assist provider communication with children and families regarding early prognosis following tracheotomy. PMID:20522454

  3. Relationship between platelet count and 30-day clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary interventions. Pooled analysis of four ISAR trials.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Raisuke; Ndrepepa, Gjin; Mehilli, Julinda; Bruskina, Olga; Schulz, Stefanie; Schömig, Albert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2007-10-01

    Platelets play an important role in the development of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of platelet count on the outcome of patients undergoing PCI after pre-treatment with clopidogrel is unknown. The study included 5,256 patients enrolled in four randomized trials - ISAR-REACT, ISAR-SMART2, ISAR-SWEET, and ISAR-REACT2 - which assessed the value of abciximab in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing PCI after pre-treatment with 600 mg of clopidogrel. Platelet count was measured at baseline before PCI. Primary endpoint was the 30-day incidence of MACE, secondary endpoint was mortality. The tertiles of platelet counts were: lower tertile (<198 x 10(9)/L; n = 1,726), middle tertile (198-244 x 10(9)/L; n = 1,750) and upper tertile (>244 x 10(9)/L; n = 1,780). The 30-day incidence of MACE was 6.7% (n = 116) among patients of the lower tertile, 6.3% (n = 111) among patients of the middle tertile, and 7.0% (n = 124) among patients of the upper tertile (P = 0.76). The 30-day mortality was 1.2% (n = 22) among patients of the upper tertile, 0.5% (n = 9) among patients of middle tertile and 0.6% (n = 11) among patients of the lower tertile (P = 0.04). Q-wave myocardial infarction occurred in 1.3% of patients (n = 23) in the upper tertile, 0.7% of patients (n = 13) in the middle tertile and 0.5% of patients (n = 8) in the lower tertile (P = 0.02). Platelet count was an independent correlate of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.08-6.67; P = 0.033 for the third vs. the first tertile). In conclusion, in patients with CAD undergoing PCI after pre-treatment with 600 mg clopidogrel, baseline platelet count predicts 30-day mortality.

  4. Sex Differences in the Rate, Timing and Principal Diagnoses of 30-Day Readmissions in Younger Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Rachel P.; Ranasinghe, Isuru; Wang, Yongfei; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Murugiah, Karthik; Nuti, Sudhakar V.; Hsieh, Angela F.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Young women (<65 years) experience a 2–3-fold greater mortality risk than younger men after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it is unknown whether they are at higher risk for 30-day readmission, and if this association varies by age. We examined sex differences in the rate, timing and principal diagnoses of 30-day readmissions, including the independent effect of sex following adjustment for confounders. Methods and Results We included patients aged 18–64 years with a principal diagnosis of AMI. Data was utilized from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Inpatient Database for California (07–09). Readmission diagnoses were categorized using an aggregated version of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Condition Categories, and readmission timing was determined from the day after discharge. Of 42,518 younger patients with AMI (26.4% female), 4,775 (11.2%) had at least one readmission. The 30-day all-cause readmission rate was higher for women (15.5% vs. 9.7%, P<0.0001). For both sexes, readmission risk was highest on days 2–4 after discharge and declined thereafter, and women were more likely to present with non-cardiac diagnoses (44.4% vs. 40.6%, P=0.01). Female sex was associated with a higher rate of 30-day readmission, which persisted after adjustment (HR=1.22, 95% CI 1.15, 1.30). There was no significant interaction between age and sex on readmission. Conclusions Compared with men, younger women have a higher risk for readmission, even after adjustment for confounders. The timing of 30-day readmission was similar in women and men, and both sexes were susceptible to a wide range of causes for readmission. PMID:26085455

  5. Nutritional status, hospitalization and mortality among patients with sickle cell anemia in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Sharon E.; Makani, Julie; Fulford, Anthony J.; Komba, Albert N.; Soka, Deogratius; Williams, Thomas N.; Newton, Charles R.; Marsh, Kevin; Prentice, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Reduced growth is common in children with sickle cell anemia, but few data exist on associations with long-term clinical course. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of malnutrition at enrolment into a hospital-based cohort and whether poor nutritional status predicted morbidity and mortality within an urban cohort of Tanzanian sickle cell anemia patients. Design and Methods Anthropometry was conducted at enrolment into the sickle cell anemia cohort (n=1,618; ages 0.5–48 years) and in controls who attended screening (siblings, walk-ins and referrals) but who were found not to have sickle cell anemia (n=717; ages 0.5–64 years). Prospective surveillance recorded hospitalization at Muhimbili National Hospital and mortality between March 2004 and September 2009. Results Sickle cell anemia was associated with stunting (OR=1.92, P<0.001, 36.2%) and wasting (OR=1.66, P=0.002, 18.4%). The greatest growth deficits were observed in adolescents and in boys. Independent of age and sex, lower hemoglobin concentration was associated with increased odds of malnutrition in sickle cell patients. Of the 1,041 sickle cell anemia patients with a body mass index z-score at enrolment, 92% were followed up until September 2009 (n=908) or death (n=50). Body mass index and weight-for-age z-score predicted hospitalization (hazard ratio [HZR]=0.90, P=0.04 and HZR=0.88, P=0.02) but height-for-age z-score did not (HZR=0.93, NS). The mortality rate of 2.5 per 100 person-years was not associated with any of the anthropometric measures. Conclusions In this non-birth-cohort of sickle cell anemia with significant associated undernutrition, wasting predicted an increased risk of hospital admission. Targeted nutritional interventions should prioritize treatment and prevention of wasting. PMID:21459787

  6. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    PubMed

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  7. Hospitalization rates, length of stay and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of HIV infected patients from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lara E; Ribeiro, Sayonara R; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Luz, Paula M

    2016-12-03

    In this study, we evaluated trends in hospitalization rates, length of stay and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 2007 through 2013. Among the 3991 included patients, 1861 hospitalizations occurred (hospitalization rate of 10.44/100 person-years, 95% confidence interval 9.98-10.93/100 person-years). Hospitalization rates decreased annually (per year incidence rate ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.89-0.95) as well as length of stay (median of 15 days in 2007 vs. 11 days in 2013, p-value for trend<0.001), and in-hospital mortality (13.4% in 2007 to 8.1% in 2013, p-value for trend=0.053). Our results show that, in a middle-income setting, hospitalization rates are decreasing over time and non-AIDS hospitalizations are currently more frequent than those related to AIDS. Notwithstanding, compared with high-income settings, our patients had longer length of stay and higher in-hospital mortality. Further studies addressing these outcomes are needed to provide information that may guide protocols and interventions to further reduce health-care costs and in-hospital mortality.

  8. Morbidity, Mortality, and Seasonality of Influenza Hospitalizations in Egypt, November 2007-November 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kandeel, Amr; Labib, Manal; Said, Mayar; El-Refai, Samir; El-Gohari, Amani; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza typically comprises a substantial portion of acute respiratory infections, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, influenza epidemiology data are lacking in Egypt. We describe seven years of Egypt’s influenza hospitalizations from a multi-site influenza surveillance system. Methods Syndromic case definitions identified individuals with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to eight hospitals in Egypt. Standardized demographic and clinical data were collected. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were tested for influenza using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and typed as influenza A or B, and influenza A specimens subtyped. Results From November 2007–November 2014, 2,936/17,441 (17%) SARI cases were influenza-positive. Influenza-positive patients were more likely to be older, female, pregnant, and have chronic condition(s) (all p<0.05). Among them, 53 (2%) died, and death was associated with older age, five or more days from symptom onset to hospitalization, chronic condition(s), and influenza A (all p<0.05). An annual seasonal influenza pattern occurred from July–June. Each season, the proportion of the season’s influenza-positive cases peaked during November–May (19–41%). Conclusions In Egypt, influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality and influenza SARI hospitalization patterns mirror those of the Northern Hemisphere. Additional assessment of influenza epidemiology in Egypt may better guide disease control activities and vaccine policy. PMID:27607330

  9. [The comparative evaluation of tendencies in population mortality and particular characteristics of hospitalization under diseases of blood circulation system].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, T M; Belov, V B; Lushkina, N P

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of data bases established that in the Russian Federation population mortality of diseases of blood circulation system in toto and of main diseases included in this class (100-199 of ICD-10) is significantly higher than in European countries. The population mortality is determined both by morbidity and quality of medical care in case of development of disease. In Russia, the increase of number of cases of hospitalization per one patient passed away due to these causes. This indicator was lower in comparison with corresponding indicators characterizing levels of hospitalization in EU countries. In Russia, to decrease mortality of this pathology it is needed to extend indications for hospitalization.

  10. Unplanned 30-Day Readmissions in a General Internal Medicine Hospitalist Service at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Joanna-Grace M.; Gadiraju, Sahitya; Hiremath, Adarsh; Lin, Heather Yan; Farroni, Jeff; Halm, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hospital readmissions are considered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid as a metric for quality of health care delivery. Robust data on the readmission profile of patients with cancer are currently insufficient to determine whether this measure is applicable to cancer hospitals as well. To address this knowledge gap, we estimated the unplanned readmission rate and identified factors influencing unplanned readmissions in a hospitalist service at a comprehensive cancer center. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed unplanned 30-day readmission of patients discharged from the General Internal Medicine Hospitalist Service at a comprehensive cancer center between April 1, 2012, and September 30, 2012. Multiple independent variables were studied using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models, with generalized estimating equations to identify risk factors associated with readmissions. Results: We observed a readmission rate of 22.6% in our cohort. The median time to unplanned readmission was 10 days. Unplanned readmission was more likely in patients with metastatic cancer and those with three or more comorbidities. Patients discharged to hospice were less likely to be readmitted (all P values < .01). Conclusion: We observed a high unplanned readmission rate among our population of patients with cancer. The risk factors identified appear to be related to severity of illness and open up opportunities for improving coordination with primary care physicians, oncologists, and other specialists to manage comorbidities, or perhaps transition appropriate patients to palliative care. Our findings will be instrumental for developing targeted interventions to help reduce readmissions at our hospital. Our data also provide direction for appropriate application of readmission quality measures in cancer hospitals. PMID:26152375

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus–Associated Mortality in Hospitalized Infants and Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Jacob; Korgenski, Kent; Sheng, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of pediatric hospitalization, but the mortality rate and estimated annual deaths are based on decades-old data. Our objective was to describe contemporary RSV-associated mortality in hospitalized infants and children aged <2 years. METHODS: We queried the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) for 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 and the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) administrative data from 2000 to 2011 for hospitalizations with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes for RSV infection and mortality. RESULTS: The KID data sets identified 607 937 RSV-associated admissions and 550 deaths (9.0 deaths/10 000 admissions). The PHIS data set identified 264 721 RSV-associated admissions and 671 deaths (25.4 deaths/10 000 admissions) (P < .001 compared with the KID data set). The 2009 KID data set estimated 42.0 annual deaths (3.0 deaths/10 000 admissions) for those with a primary diagnosis of RSV. The PHIS data set identified 259 deaths with a primary diagnosis of RSV, with mortality rates peaking at 14.0/10 000 admissions in 2002 and 2003 and decreasing to 4.0/10 000 patients by 2011 (odds ratio: 0.27 [95% confidence interval: 0.14–0.52]). The majority of deaths in both the KID and PHIS data sets occurred in infants with complex chronic conditions and in those with other acute conditions such as sepsis that could have contributed to their deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Deaths associated with RSV are uncommon in the 21st century. Children with complex chronic conditions account for the majority of deaths, and the relative contribution of RSV infection to their deaths is unclear. PMID:25489019

  12. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted. PMID:26986122

  13. Does social isolation predict hospitalization and mortality among HIV+ and uninfected older Veterans?

    PubMed Central

    Greysen, S. Ryan; Horwitz, Leora I.; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Gordon, Kirsha; Ohl, Michael E.; Justice, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Aging, HIV, and social isolation may affect acute care utilization and outcomes. Our objectives were to compare levels of social isolation in aging Veterans with and without HIV and determine associations with hospital admission and mortality. Study Design, Participants, and Setting The Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) is a longitudinal study of HIV+ and uninfected Veterans at eight VA Medical Centers nationally. We analyzed data for 1,836 Veterans age ≥55 enrolled in VACS from 2002–2008. Measurements We created a Social Isolation Score (SIS) using baseline survey responses about: relationship status, number of friends/family and frequency of visits, and involvement in volunteer work, religious or self-help groups, or other community activities. We compared scores by age and HIV status and used multivariable regression to assess effects of social isolation scores on hospital admission and all-cause mortality. Results Mean SIS was higher for HIV+ patients with increasing difference by age (p=.01 for trend). Social isolation was also more prevalent for HIV+ (59%) compared to uninfected patients (51%; p<.001). In multivariable regression analysis of HIV+ and uninfected groups combined, adjusted for demographic and clinical features, isolation was independently associated with increased risk of incident hospitalization (HR=1.25, 95% CI=1.09–1.42) as well as risk of all-cause mortality (HR=1.28, 95% CI=1.06–1.54). Risk estimates calculated for HIV+ and uninfected groups separately were not significantly different. Conclusions Social isolation is associated with increased risk of hospitalization and death among both HIV+ and uninfected older Veterans. Despite similar effects in both groups, the population level impact of social isolation may be greater in those who are HIV+ because of the higher prevalence of social isolation, particularly among the oldest patients. PMID:23927911

  14. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  15. Hospitalizations, Costs, and Mortality among Infants with Critical Congenital Heart Disease: How Important Is Timely Detection?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Cora; Dawson, April; Grosse, Scott D.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Olney, Richard S.; Tanner, Jean Paul; Kirby, Russell S.; Correia, Jane A.; Watkins, Sharon M.; Cassell, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was recently added to the U.S. Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for newborns. States considering screening requirements may want more information about the potential impact of screening. This study examined potentially avoidable mortality among infants with late detected CCHD and assessed whether late detection was associated with increased hospital resource use during infancy. METHODS This was a state-wide, population-based, observational study of infants with CCHD (n =3603) born 1998 to 2007 identified by the Florida Birth Defects Registry. We examined 12 CCHD conditions that are targets of newborn screening. Late detection was defined as CCHD diagnosis after the birth hospitalization. Deaths potentially avoidable through screening were defined as those that occurred outside a hospital following birth hospitalization discharge and those that occurred within 3 days of an emergency readmission. RESULTS For 23% (n =825) of infants, CCHD was not detected during the birth hospitalization. Death occurred among 20% (n =568/2,778) of infants with timely detected CCHD and 8% (n =66/825) of infants with late detected CCHD, unadjusted for clinical characteristics. Potentially preventable deaths occurred in 1.8% (n =15/825) of infants with late detected CCHD (0.4% of all infants with CCHD). In multivariable models adjusted for selected characteristics, late CCHD detection was significantly associated with 52% more admissions, 18% more hospitalized days, and 35% higher inpatient costs during infancy. CONCLUSION Increased CCHD detection at birth hospitals through screening may lead to decreased hospital costs and avoid some deaths during infancy. Additional studies conducted after screening implementation are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24000201

  16. No evidence for race and socioeconomic status as independent predictors of 30-day readmission rates following orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Tracey; Yoon, Richard S; Hutzler, Lorraine; Band, Philip; Liublinksa, Victoria; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services considers readmissions within 30 days of discharge to be a quality indicator. Hospitals' and eventually physicians' readmission rates will be used to determine payment for services. It is imperative that health care providers understand which patients are at risk for readmission so that they can apply the appropriate preventive interventions. The research team analyzed all orthopedic admissions and readmissions at their institution from September 2008 to April 2011 in this study. Preparing for the next stage in health care reform, identifying any preoperative factors that may place certain patients into a "high-risk" category for readmission following an orthopedic procedure is of paramount importance. This data analysis of more than 13 000 patients noted that race-based and income-based risk factors did not translate into significant risk factors or predictors of 30-day readmission following orthopedic admission.

  17. Pre-Stage Acute Kidney Injury Can Predict Mortality and Medical Costs in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin Young; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    The significance of minimal increases in serum creatinine below the levels indicative of the acute kidney injury (AKI) stage is not well established. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-stage AKI (pre-AKI) on clinical outcomes. We enrolled a total of 21,261 patients who were admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. Pre-AKI was defined as a 25–50% increase in peak serum creatinine levels from baseline levels during the hospital stay. In total, 5.4% of the patients had pre-AKI during admission. The patients with pre-AKI were predominantly female (55.0%) and had a lower body weight and lower baseline levels of serum creatinine (0.63 ± 0.18 mg/dl) than the patients with AKI and the patients without AKI (P < 0.001). The patients with pre-AKI had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (25.1%) and malignancy (32.6%). The adjusted hazard ratio of in-hospital mortality for pre-AKI was 2.112 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.143 to 3.903]. In addition, patients with pre-AKI had an increased length of stay (7.7 ± 9.7 days in patients without AKI, 11.4 ± 11.4 days in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) and increased medical costs (4,061 ± 4,318 USD in patients without AKI, 4,966 ± 5,099 USD in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) during admission. The adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality for pre-AKI during the follow-up period of 2.0 ± 0.6 years was 1.473 (95% CI, 1.228 to 1.684). Although the adjusted hazard ratio of pre-AKI for overall mortality was not significant among the patients admitted to the surgery department or who underwent surgery, pre-AKI was significantly associated with mortality among the non-surgical patients (adjusted HR 1.542 [95% CI, 1.330 to 1.787]) and the patients admitted to the medical department (adjusted HR 1.384 [95% CI, 1.153 to 1.662]). Pre-AKI is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and increased medical costs during admission. More attention

  18. Arterial hyperoxia and in-hospital mortality after resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hyperoxia has recently been reported as an independent risk factor for mortality in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. We examined the independent relationship between hyperoxia and outcomes in such patients. Methods We divided patients resuscitated from nontraumatic cardiac arrest from 125 intensive care units (ICUs) into three groups according to worst PaO2 level or alveolar-arterial O2 gradient in the first 24 hours after admission. We defined 'hyperoxia' as PaO2 of 300 mmHg or greater, 'hypoxia/poor O2 transfer' as either PaO2 < 60 mmHg or ratio of PaO2 to fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 ) < 300, 'normoxia' as any value between hypoxia and hyperoxia and 'isolated hypoxemia' as PaO2 < 60 mmHg regardless of FiO2. Mortality at hospital discharge was the main outcome measure. Results Of 12,108 total patients, 1,285 (10.6%) had hyperoxia, 8,904 (73.5%) had hypoxia/poor O2 transfer, 1,919 (15.9%) had normoxia and 1,168 (9.7%) had isolated hypoxemia (PaO2 < 60 mmHg). The hyperoxia group had higher mortality (754 (59%) of 1,285 patients; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 56% to 61%) than the normoxia group (911 (47%) of 1,919 patients; 95% CI, 45% to 50%) with a proportional difference of 11% (95% CI, 8% to 15%), but not higher than the hypoxia group (5,303 (60%) of 8,904 patients; 95% CI, 59% to 61%). In a multivariable model controlling for some potential confounders, including illness severity, hyperoxia had an odds ratio for hospital death of 1.2 (95% CI, 1.1 to 1.6). However, once we applied Cox proportional hazards modelling of survival, sensitivity analyses using deciles of hypoxemia, time period matching and hyperoxia defined as PaO2 > 400 mmHg, hyperoxia had no independent association with mortality. Importantly, after adjustment for FiO2 and the relevant covariates, PaO2 was no longer predictive of hospital mortality (P = 0.21). Conclusions Among patients admitted to the ICU after cardiac arrest, hyperoxia did not have a robust or

  19. Regionalization and Local Hospital Closure in Norwegian Maternity Care—The Effect on Neonatal and Infant Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Grytten, Jostein; Monkerud, Lars; Skau, Irene; Sørensen, Rune

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study whether neonatal and infant mortality, after adjustments for differences in case mix, were independent of the type of hospital in which the delivery was carried out. Data The Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided detailed medical information for all births in Norway. Study Design Hospitals were classified into two groups: local hospitals/maternity clinics versus central/regional hospitals. Outcomes were neonatal and infant mortality. The data were analyzed using propensity score weighting to make adjustments for differences in case mix between the two groups of hospitals. This analysis was supplemented with analyses of 13 local hospitals that were closed. Using a difference-in-difference approach, the effects that these closures had on neonatal and infant mortality were estimated. Principal Finding Neonatal and infant mortality were not affected by the type of hospital where the delivery took place. Conclusion A regionalized maternity service does not lead to increased neonatal and infant mortality. This is mainly because high-risk deliveries were identified well in advance of the birth, and referred to a larger hospital with sufficient perinatal resources to deal with these deliveries. PMID:24476021

  20. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Wolf, Achim; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services. Method We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder) on outcomes. Results Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949) after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%), and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613) with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied—substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:27196309

  1. Associated mortality and clinical characteristics of nosocomial Pseudomonas maltophilia in a university hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, A J; Hoffmann, K K; Wenzel, R P

    1986-01-01

    We studied the spectrum of clinical disease in 99 patients with nosocomial Pseudomonas maltophilia isolates at the University of Virginia Hospital from 1981 through 1984. The annual rate of isolation increased from 7.1 to 14.1 per 10,000 patient discharges. A crude mortality rate of 43% was documented in all patients from whom the organism was cultured, and the data include 12 patients with nosocomial bacteremia (four deaths). Risk factors associated with death for patients having a P. maltophilia isolate included the following: requirement for care in any intensive care unit during hospitalization (P = 0.0001), patient age over 40 years (P = 0.002), and a pulmonary source for the P. maltophilia isolate (P = 0.003). All P. maltophilia isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 60% of the isolates were resistant to all aminoglycosides (amikacin, tobramycin, and gentamicin), and more than 75% of the isolates were resistant to all beta-lactam antibiotics. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern allows for a niche exploitable in the hospital microbial environment by an organism with a marked associated mortality. PMID:3487553

  2. Hospitalizations and mortality in the United States for adults with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Baraona, Fernando; Gurvitz, Michelle; Landzberg, Michael J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2013-04-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is common in patients with Down syndrome (DS), and these patients are living longer lives. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of hospitalizations in adults with DS and CHD in the United States. Hospitalizations from 1998 to 2009 for adults aged 18 to 64 years with and without DS with CHD diagnoses associated with DS (atrioventricular canal defect, ventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, and patent ductus arteriosus) were analyzed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Outcomes of interest were (1) in-hospital mortality, (2) common co-morbidities, (3) cardiac procedures, (4) hospital charges, and (5) length of stay. Multivariate modeling adjusted for age, gender, CHD diagnosis, and co-morbidities. There were 78,793 ± 2,653 CHD admissions, 9,088 ± 351 (11.5%) of which were associated with diagnoses of DS. The proportion of admissions associated with DS (DS/CHD) decreased from 15.2 ± 1.3% to 8.5 ± 0.9%. DS was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4 to 2.4), especially in women (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.7 to 3.4). DS/CHD admissions were more commonly associated with hypothyroidism (OR 7.7, 95% CI 6.6 to 9.0), dementia (OR 82.0, 95% CI 32 to 213), heart failure (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.9 to 2.5), pulmonary hypertension (OR 2.5, 95% CI 2.2 to 2.9), and cyanosis or secondary polycythemia (OR 4.6, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.6). Conversely, DS/CHD hospitalizations were less likely to include cardiac procedures or surgery (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.4) and were associated with lower charges ($23,789 ± $1,177 vs $39,464 ± $1,371, p <0.0001) compared to non-DS/CHD admissions. In conclusion, DS/CHD hospitalizations represent a decreasing proportion of admissions for adults with CHD typical of DS; patients with DS/CHD are more likely to die during hospitalization but less likely to undergo a cardiac procedure.

  3. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Mortality among Veterans Hospitalized for Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Banta, Jim E.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Young, Alexander S.; Kominski, Gerald; Cunningham, William E.

    2011-01-01

    A Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach was used to examine the impact of comorbid mental illness on mortality of veterans admitted to Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in fiscal year 2001 with a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure (n= 15,497). Thirty percent had a psychiatric diagnosis, 4.7% died during the index hospitalization and 11.5% died during the year following discharge. Among those with mental illness, 23.6% had multiple psychiatric disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models found dementia to be positively associated with inpatient mortality. Depression alone (excluding other psychiatric disorders) was positively associated with one-year mortality. Primary care visits were associated with a reduced likelihood of both inpatient and one-year mortality. Excepting dementia, VA patients with a mental illness had comparable or higher levels of primary care visits than those having no mental illness. Patients with multiple psychiatric disorders had more outpatient care than those with one psychiatric disorder. PMID:20968262

  4. Incidence and causes of maternal mortality in five Kampala hospitals, 1980-1986.

    PubMed

    Kampikaho, A; Irwig, L M

    1991-08-01

    This report presents results of a descriptive study to estimate the mortality rate, identify the type and the causes of maternal deaths. The study was conducted in 1987 in Kampala hospitals for a period covering seven years from 1st January 1980 to 31st December, 1986. The non abortion maternal mortality rate (NAMMR) was 2.65 per 1000 deliveries while the abortion related maternal mortality rate (ARMMR) was 3.58 per 1000 abortions. There was a statistically significant increase in NAMMR while the increase in ARMMR was almost significant over the seven year period. Of all maternal deaths, 80 per cent were non abortion while 20 per cent were abortion related. The commonest immediate causes of death, in order of importance, were sepsis, haemorrhage, ruptured uterus, anaesthesia and anaemia. The commonest patient management factors which contributed to death, in order of importance, were lack of blood for transfusion, lack of drugs and intravenous fluids, theatre problems and doctor related factors. We feel that a lot happens to the pregnant mother before she finally reaches a health unit for delivery and that there is a great need to improve on the community's gynaecological and obstetrical services as well as ambulance and emergency services. We also feel that maternal mortality in developing countries could be reduced if the health workers were imaginative in respect to each patient, tried not to operate as though they were working in a developed country, and created relevant solutions for the local problems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Effect of air pollution control on mortality and hospital admissions in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Dockery, Douglas W; Rich, David Q; Goodman, Patrick G; Clancy, Luke; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; George, Prethibha; Kotlov, Tania

    2013-07-01

    During the 1980s the Republic of Ireland experienced repeated severe pollution episodes. Domestic coal burning was a major source of this pollution. In 1990 the Irish government introduced a ban on the marketing, sale, and distribution of coal in Dublin. The ban was extended to Cork in 1995 and to 10 other communities in 1998 and 2000. We previously reported decreases in particulate black smoke (BS*) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations, measured as total gaseous acidity, in Dublin after the 1990 coal ban (Clancy et al. 2002). In the current study we explored and compared the effectiveness of the sequential 1990, 1995, and 1998 bans in reducing community air pollution and in improving public health. We compiled records of daily BS, total gaseous acidity (SO2), and counts of cause-specific deaths from 1981 to 2004 for Dublin County Borough (1990 ban), county Cork (1995 ban), and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1998 ban). We also compiled daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive diagnoses for Cork County Borough (1991 to 2004) and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1993 to 2004). We compared pre-ban and post-ban BS and SO2 concentrations for each city. Using interrupted time-series methods, we estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized mortality rates in each city or county after the corresponding local coal ban. We regressed weekly age- and sex-standardized mortality rates against an indicator of the post- versus pre-ban period, adjusting for influenza epidemics, weekly mean temperature, and a season smooth of the standardized mortality rates in Coastal counties presumably not affected by the bans. We compared these results with similar analyses in Midlands counties also presumably unaffected by the bans. We also estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized, weekly hospital admissions rates normalized for underreporting in each city or county after the 1995

  6. Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Utility in Prediction of 30-Day Readmission Rate in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Junhong; Zhu, Xiang; Malhotra, Divyanshu; Li, Shenjing; Virkram, Fnu; Chada, Aditya; Jiang, Haibing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common diagnoses associated with hospital readmission. We designed this prospective study to evaluate whether Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) score is associated with 30-day readmission in patients hospitalized with decompensated HF. Methods and Results. We enrolled 240 patients who met the study criteria. Forty-eight (20%) patients were readmitted for decompensated HF within thirty days of hospital discharge, and 192 (80%) patients were not readmitted. Compared to readmitted patients, nonreadmitted patients had a higher average KCCQ score (40.8 versus 32.6, P = 0.019) before discharge. Multivariate analyses showed that a high KCCQ score was associated with low HF readmission rate (adjusted OR = 0.566, P = 0.022). The c-statistic for the base model (age + gender) was 0.617. The combination of home medication and lab tests on the base model resulted in an integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) increase of 3.9%. On that basis, the KCQQ further increased IDI of 2.7%. Conclusions. The KCCQ score determined before hospital discharge was significantly associated with 30-day readmission rate in patients with HF, which may provide a clinically useful measure and could significantly improve readmission prediction reliability when combined with other clinical components. PMID:27872790

  7. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  8. The clinical impacts of apparent embolic event and the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Jeon, Doosoo; Cho, Woo Hyun; Kim, Yun Seong

    2014-12-01

    Embolic event is a common and important complication of infective endocarditis (IE). The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical impacts of embolic event in patients with IE and the predictors of in-hospital mortality. Data was collected in Pusan National University Hospital and Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital between January 2009 and December 2010. One hundred ten patients were included. Embolic events occur in 39 of 110 patients (35.5%). Brain (n = 18, 38.5%) was the main site of embolic infarction. Patients with embolism showed higher in-hospital mortality (46.2% vs. 8.5%, respectively, P = 0.03), more frequent ICU admission (53.8% vs. 35.2%, respectively, P = 0.045) and more accompanying other cardiac complication (43.6% vs. 21.1%, respectively, P = 0.017). The in-hospital mortality rate was 18.2%. On the logistic regression analysis of the predictors for in-hospital mortality, age (RR, 1.079; 95% CI, 1.036-1.123, P = 0.001), embolic event (RR, 3.510; 95% CI, 1.271-9.69, P = 0.015) and staphylococcal infection (RR, 5.098; 95% CI, 1.308-18.508, P = 0.023) were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Embolic events in IE are associated with poor in-hospital outcome; and these data about embolic events and the predictors of in-hospital mortality may improve the management of this disease in hospitals.

  9. 78 FR 52005 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Project Construction Contract...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... August 21, 2013 Part IV Department of Housing and Urban Development 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily... Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard at...

  10. 77 FR 48160 - Division of Cardiovascular Devices 30-Day Notices and Annual Reports; Public Workshop; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... following public workshop entitled ``Division of Cardiovascular Devices 30-Day Notices and Annual Reports... requirements applicable to premarket approval applications (PMAs), 30-day notices and annual reports... periodic (annual) report. This workshop is intended to focus on manufacturing method and procedure...

  11. 43 CFR 4.1187 - Procedure if 30-day decision requirement is not waived.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Procedure if 30-day decision requirement is...-day decision requirement is not waived. If the applicant does not waive the 30-day decision... a response to the application for review shall file a written response within 5 working days...

  12. 78 FR 64141 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certificate of Housing Counseling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... October 25, 2013 Part III Department of Housing and Urban Development 30-Day Notice of Proposed... / Notices#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certificate of Housing Counseling: Homeownership and Certificate of Housing Counseling:...

  13. 43 CFR 4.1187 - Procedure if 30-day decision requirement is not waived.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedure if 30-day decision requirement...-day decision requirement is not waived. If the applicant does not waive the 30-day decision... a response to the application for review shall file a written response within 5 working days...

  14. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry... days after entry. Allowance in duties for merchandise abandoned to the Government in accordance with... which the merchandise being abandoned appears. (b) Application within 30 days. The importer shall...

  15. 43 CFR 4.1187 - Procedure if 30-day decision requirement is not waived.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedure if 30-day decision requirement...-day decision requirement is not waived. If the applicant does not waive the 30-day decision... a response to the application for review shall file a written response within 5 working days...

  16. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry... days after entry. Allowance in duties for merchandise abandoned to the Government in accordance with... which the merchandise being abandoned appears. (b) Application within 30 days. The importer shall...

  17. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry... days after entry. Allowance in duties for merchandise abandoned to the Government in accordance with... which the merchandise being abandoned appears. (b) Application within 30 days. The importer shall...

  18. Cryptococcal meningitis in a tertiary hospital in Pretoria, mortality and risk factors - A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hiesgen, J; Schutte, C; Olorunju, S; Retief, J

    2017-04-01

    Aim This retrospective cohort study analyzes the impact of possible risk factors on the survival chance of patients with cryptococcal meningitis. These factors include the patient's socio-economic background, age, gender, presenting symptoms, comorbidities, laboratory findings and, in particular, non-adherence versus adherence to therapy. Methods Data were collected from all adult patients admitted to Kalafong Hospital with laboratory confirmed cryptococcal meningitis over a period of 24 months. We analyzed the data by the presentation of descriptive summary statistics, logistic regression was used to assess factors which showed association between outcome of measure and factor. Furthermore, multivariable logistic regression analysis using all the factors that showed significant association in the cross tabulation was applied to determine which factors had an impact on the patients' mortality risk. Results A total of 87 patients were identified. All except one were HIV-positive, of which 55.2% were antiretroviral therapy naïve. A history of previous tuberculosis was given by 25 patients (28.7%) and 49 (56.3%) were on tuberculosis treatment at admission or started during their hospital stay. In-hospital mortality was 31%. Statistical analysis showed that antiretroviral therapy naïve patients had 9.9 (CI 95% 1.2-81.2, p < 0.0032) times greater odds of dying compared to those on antiretroviral therapy, with 17 from 48 patients (35.4%) dying compared with 1 out of 21 patients (4.8%) on treatment. Defaulters had 14.7 (CI 95% 1.6-131.6, p < 0.016) times greater odds of dying, with 9 from 18 patients dying (50%), compared to the non-defaulters. In addition, patients who presented with nausea and vomiting had a 6.3 (95% CI 1.7-23.1, p < 0.005) times greater odds of dying (18/47, 38.3%); this remained significant when adjusted for antiretroviral therapy naïve patients and defaulters. Conclusion Cryptococcal meningitis is still a common opportunistic infection

  19. Relationship Between Quality of Care for Hospitalized Vulnerable Elders and Post-Discharge Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vineet M.; Fish, Melissa; Basu, Anirban; Olson, Jared; Plein, Colleen; Suresh, Kalpana; Sachs, Greg; Meltzer, David O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship between quality of hospital care, as measured by ACOVE quality indicators, and post-discharge mortality for hospitalized seniors. Design Observational cohort study Setting Single academic medical center Participants Patients age 65 and over who were identified as “vulnerable” using the Vulnerable Elder Survey (VES-13) Measurements Adherence to 16 ACOVE measures through chart audit; Post-discharge mortality obtained through Social Security Death Index Results 856 inpatient vulnerable elders were enrolled. Mean quality of care score was 59.5% (SD 19.2) and 495 (26.7%) died within one year of discharge. In multivariate logistic regression, controlling for sociodemographic and disease severity variables (Charlson comorbidity score, VES-13 score, number of quality indicators triggered, length of stay, baseline ADL limitations, code status), higher quality of care appeared to be associated with a lower risk of death at one year. For each 10% increase in quality score, patients were 7% less likely to die [OR 0.93 (0.87-1.00), p=0.045]. In Cox proportional hazard models, those hospitalized patients receiving quality of care better than the median quality score were less likely to die 1 year period post-discharge [HR 0.82, 95% CI (0.68-1.00), p=0.05]. Those patients that received a nutritional status assessment were less likely to die one year after discharge [HR 0.61, 95% CI (0.40-0.93), p=0.022]. Conclusion Higher quality of care for hospitalized seniors, as measured by ACOVE measures, may be associated with a lower likelihood of death 1 year after discharge. Given these findings, future work testing interventions to improve adherence to these quality indicators is warranted. PMID:20863323

  20. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Fernando; Figueiredo, Francisco Winter dos Santos; Paiva, Laércio da Silva; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Santos, Edige Felipe de Sousa; Martins, Bruno Luis; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60–I64). Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference) and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0. Results There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15–49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54) in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32) in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90). During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67) in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11) in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05). There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group. Conclusion We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults. PMID:27332892

  1. Complications and 30-day Outcomes Associated With Venous Thromboembolism in the Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgical Population

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Dustin; Sherrod, Brandon; McGwin, Gerald; Ponce, Brent; Gilbert, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The risk of morbidity associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE) after pediatric orthopaedic surgery remains unclear despite increased use of thromboprophylaxis measures. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Pediatric database was queried for patients undergoing an orthopaedic surgical procedure between 2012 and 2013. Upper extremity and skin/subcutaneous surgeries were excluded. Associations between VTE and procedure, demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and 30-day postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Results Of 14,776 cases, 15 patients (0.10%) experienced postoperative VTE. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurred in 13 patients (0.09%), and pulmonary embolism developed in 2 patients (0.01%). The procedure with the highest VTE rate was surgery for infection (1.2%). Patient factors associated with the development of VTE included hyponatremia (P = 0.003), abnormal partial thromboplastin time (P = 0.046), elevated aspartate transaminase level (P = 0.004), and gastrointestinal (P = 0.011), renal (P = 0.016), and hematologic (P = 0.019) disorders. Nearly half (46.2%) of DVTs occurred postdischarge. Complications associated with VTE included prolonged hospitalization (P = <0.001), pneumonia (P = <0.001), unplanned intubation (P = 0.003), urinary tract infection (P = 0.003), and central line-associated bloodstream infection (P = <0.001). Most of the postoperative complications (66.7%) occurred before VTE diagnosis, and no patients with VTE died. Conclusion In the absence of specified risk factors, thromboprophylaxis may be unnecessary for this population. PMID:26855119

  2. Population attributable risks of patient, child and organizational risk factors for perinatal mortality in hospital births.

    PubMed

    Poeran, Jashvant; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; de Graaf, Johanna P; Birnie, Erwin; Steegers, Eric A P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the contributing role of maternal, child, and organizational risk factors in perinatal mortality by calculating their population attributable risks (PAR). The primary dataset comprised 1,020,749 singleton hospital births from ≥22 weeks' gestation (The Netherlands Perinatal Registry 2000-2008). PARs for single and grouped risk factors were estimated in four stages: (1) creating a duplicate dataset for each PAR analysis in which risk factors of interest were set to the most favorable value (e.g., all women assigned 'Western' for PAR calculation of ethnicity); (2) in the primary dataset an elaborate multilevel logistic regression model was fitted from which (3) the obtained coefficients were used to predict perinatal mortality in each duplicate dataset; (4) PARs were then estimated as the proportional change of predicted- compared to observed perinatal mortality. Additionally, PARs for grouped risk factors were estimated by using sequential values in two orders: after PAR estimation of grouped maternal risk factors, the resulting PARs for grouped child, and grouped organizational factors were estimated, and vice versa. The combined PAR of maternal, child and organizational factors is 94.4 %, i.e., when all factors are set to the most favorable value perinatal mortality is expected to be reduced with 94.4 %. Depending on the order of analysis, the PAR of maternal risk factors varies from 1.4 to 13.1 %, and for child- and organizational factors 58.7-74.0 and 7.3-34.3 %, respectively. In conclusion, the PAR of maternal-, child- and organizational factors combined is 94.4 %. Optimization of organizational factors may achieve a 34.3 % decrease in perinatal mortality.

  3. [Early and late hospital mortality in myocardial infarction. Causes and prognostic factors. Apropos of 140 cases].

    PubMed

    Hannachi, N; Derbal, F; Ezzine, M; Ezzaouia, K; Ben Ismail, M

    1986-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the causes of early and late in-hospital mortality of myocardial infarction, to define elements of prognosis and to attempt to prevent the fatal outcome of the coronary disease. This study concerns 107 men and 33 women, between the ages of 30 and 83 years (mean age 62.8 years). The total mortality is 12% (early: 6.5%, late: 5.5%. 66% of the patients are over 60 and 45% present 3 or more coronary risks factors. The clinical picture is characterized by frequent initial complications (84% of the cases), dominated by hemodynamic failure. The infarction is most of the time located anteriorly (56.6% of the cases). Primary cardiogenic shock represents the main cause of early mortality (55.3%). A recurrent infarction represents 75% of the causes of late deaths. Tri-vessels involvement and alteration of the ventricular function are noted in 9 out of 14 coronary arteriograms. Prognosis factors are proposed to differentiate high risk patients requiring an early coronary arteriogram in view of a specific medical and/or surgical treatment. The best signs of a poor prognosis are: tri-vessels involvement and alteration of the ventricular function.

  4. Comparison of 60-day mortality in hospitalized heart failure patients with versus without hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Payvar, Saeed; Orlandi, Cesare; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Elkayam, Uri; Ouyang, John; Casscells, S Ward; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2006-12-01

    The use of aggressive treatments and the modification of current treatment in patients with heart failure (HF) relies heavily on the assessment of disease severity using prognostic markers. However, many such markers are unavailable in routine clinical practice, and others have little prognostic value. This study tested the hypothesis that low body temperature could predict short-term survival after discharge in patients hospitalized for HF. Data from the Acute and Chronic Therapeutic Impact of a Vasopressin Antagonist in Congestive Heart Failure (ACTIV in CHF) trial, which randomized 319 patients hospitalized for HF to receive placebo or tolvaptan, were retrospectively analyzed. Hypothermia was defined a priori as an oral body temperature <35.8 degrees C at randomization. Cox regression was used to analyze survival within a 60-day follow-up period. Hypothermia was observed in 32 patients (10%). Mortality rates at 60 days after discharge were 6.3% (20 of 319) overall, 9.4% (3 of 32) in hypothermic patients, and 5.9% (17 of 287) in nonhypothermic patients. Hypothermia was a strong multivariate predictor of mortality; hypothermic patients were 3.9 times more likely to die within 60 days than nonhypothermic patients (95% confidence interval 1.002 to 15.16, p = 0.0497) after adjustment for treatment group, age, and other confounders. Hypothermia was associated with such indicators of low cardiac output as an elevated blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, narrow pulse pressure, and a reduced ejection fraction. In conclusion, hypothermia appears to be a strong predictor of mortality in patients with HF.

  5. Factors Affecting Length of Hospital Stay and Mortality in Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers Undergoing Surgical Drainage without Major Amputation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gyun; Moon, Sang Young; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Jung, Ki Jin; Lee, Taeseung; Kim, Baek Kyu; Yoon, Chan; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate factors affecting length of hospital stay and mortality of a specific group of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage without major amputation, which is frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons. Data on length of hospital stay, mortality, demographics, and other medical information were collected for 79 consecutive patients (60 men, 19 women; mean age, 66.1 [SD, 12.3] yr) with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage while retaining the heel between October 2003 and May 2013. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors affecting length of hospital stay, while multiple Cox regression analysis was conducted to assess factors contributing to mortality. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, P=0.034), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (P=0.021), body mass index (BMI, P=0.001), and major vascular disease (cerebrovascular accident or coronary artery disease, P=0.004) were significant factors affecting length of hospital stay, whereas age (P=0.005) and serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level (P=0.024) were significant factors contributing to mortality. In conclusion, as prognostic factors, the length of hospital stay was affected by the severity of inflammation, the recent control of blood glucose level, BMI, and major vascular disease, whereas patient mortality was affected by age and renal function in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer undergoing surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment.

  6. 78 FR 64143 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Contractor's Requisition-Project Mortgages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Contractor's Requisition--Project..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Contractor's...

  7. 78 FR 44579 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program.... A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot.... Description of the need for the information and proposed use: The Fellowship Placement Program places...

  8. 78 FR 64234 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Environmental Review Procedures for Entities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... (NEPA), the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality, related federal environmental laws... compliance with all applicable environmental laws and authorities. HUD (or the State for certain State... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Environmental Review Procedures...

  9. 78 FR 59046 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  10. 78 FR 69103 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Quality Control for Rental Assistance Subsidy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Quality Control for Rental... Information Collection: Quality Control for Rental Assistance Subsidy Determinations. OMB Approval Number... Quality Control process involves selecting a nationally representative sample of assisted households...

  11. 78 FR 36561 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal... Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory Committee Membership Application. OMB Approval... for the information and proposed use: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory Committee (HCFAC)...

  12. Effect of feeding in 30-day bioaccumulation assays using Hyalella azteca in fluoranthene-dosed sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Current protocols for conducting freshwater sediment bioaccumulation tests require that food be added to exposures. To determine effects of adding food, 30-day bioaccumulation assays were conducted with H. azteca exposed to sediment dosed with four concentrations (0.05 to 1,267 nmol/g dry weight) of fluoranthene. Accumulation was significantly greater in fed versus non-fed animals at all dose levels after 96 and 240 hours of exposure and continued to be greater after 30 days in the low dose levels. At sediment concentrations above 634 nmol/g dw, survival of unfed animals dropped to 34% after 30 days, However, after 30 days, reproduction was observed in fed animals exposed to sediment concentrations > 16 times the expected LC50 calculated for fluoranthene in sediment. These data raise questions concerning the interpretation of standard toxicity and bioaccumulation tests when food is routinely added.

  13. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada: a trend analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weichenthal, Scott; Wong, Joan; Smith-Doiron, Marc; Dugandzic, Rose; Kosatsky, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of mortality and morbidity from carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada has received little attention. Our objective was to evaluate trends in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada. Methods Age- and sex-standardized mortality (1981–2009) and hospital admission (1995–2010) rates by age group, sex and site of carbon monoxide exposure were calculated for each province and for all of Canada. We quantified the long-term trends by calculating the average annual percent change. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of carbon monoxide poisoning across age groups, sex and month of occurrence. Results In Canada, there were 1808 unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning deaths between 1981 and 2009 and 1984 admissions to hospital between 1995 and 2010. Average annual decreases of 3.46% (95% confidence interval [CI] –4.59% to –2.31%) and 5.83% (95% CI –7.79% to –3.83%) were observed for mortality and hospital admission rates, respectively. Mortality (IRR 5.31, 95% CI 4.57 to 6.17) and hospital admission (IRR 2.77, 95% CI 2.51 to 3.03) rates were elevated in males compared with females. Decreased trends in the rates were observed for all sites of carbon monoxide exposure, but the magnitude of this decrease was lowest in residential environments. Deaths and admissions to hospital were most frequent from September to April, with peaks in December and January. Interpretation Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada have declined steadily. Continued efforts should focus on reducing carbon monoxide poisoning during the cooler months and in residential environments. PMID:26389101

  14. The effect of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants born with oral clefts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) increase mortality and morbidity risks for affected infants especially in less developed countries. This study aimed at assessing the effects of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) in South America. Methods The intervention group included live-born infants with isolated or associated CL/P in 47 hospitals between 2003 and 2005. The control group included live-born infants with CL/P between 2001 and 2002 in the same hospitals. The intervention group received systematic pediatric care between the 7th and 28th day of life. The primary outcomes were mortality between the 7th and 28th day of life and hospitalization days in this period among survivors adjusted for relevant baseline covariates. Results There were no significant mortality differences between the intervention and control groups. However, surviving infants with associated CL/P in the intervention group had fewer hospitalization days by about six days compared to the associated control group. Conclusions Early systematic pediatric care may significantly reduce neonatal hospitalizations of infants with CL/P and additional birth defects in South America. Given the large healthcare and financial burden of CL/P on affected families and the relatively low cost of systematic pediatric care, improving access to such care may be a cost-effective public policy intervention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00097149 PMID:22204448

  15. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income.

  16. Influence of alcohol use on mortality and expenditure during hospital admission: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-Hui; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Cheng, Ya-Ai; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to investigate the effect of alcohol intoxication on clinical presentation of hospitalised adult trauma patients at a Level I trauma centre using propensity score matching. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Taiwan. Participants Detailed data of 929 hospitalised adult trauma patients with alcohol intoxication, aged 20–65 years, and 10 104 corresponding patients without alcohol intoxication were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2014. Alcohol intoxication was defined as a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ≥50 mg/dL. Main outcome measures In-hospital mortality and expenditure. Results Patients with alcohol intoxication presented with significantly higher short-term mortality (OR: 3.0, 95% CI 2.0 to 4.4; p<0.001) than patients without alcohol intoxication. However, on comparison with propensity score-matched patients with respect to sex, age, comorbidity, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), injury region based on Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and Injury Severity Score (ISS), alcohol intoxication did not significantly influence mortality (OR: 0.8, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.4; p=0.563). This implied that the higher mortality of alcohol-intoxicated patients was attributable to patient characteristics such as a higher injury severity rather than alcohol intoxication. Even on comparison with sex-matched, age-matched and comorbidity-matched patients without alcohol intoxication, patients with alcohol intoxication still had significantly higher total expenditure (17.4% higher), cost of operation (40.3% higher), cost of examination (52.8% higher) and cost of pharmaceuticals (38.3% higher). Conclusions The associated higher mortality of adult trauma patients with alcohol intoxication was completely attributable to other patient characteristics and associated injury severity rather than the effects of alcohol. However, patients with alcohol intoxication incurred significantly higher expenditure than

  17. Mortality and Morbidity During Delivery Hospitalization Among Pregnant Women With Epilepsy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Sarah C.; Bateman, Brian T.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Between 0.3% and 0.5% of all pregnancies occur among women with epilepsy. Evidence suggests an increase in perinatal morbidity and mortality among women with epilepsy. However, these risks have not been quantified in large population-based samples. OBJECTIVE To report on the risk for death and adverse outcomes at the time of delivery for women with epilepsy in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of pregnant women identified through delivery hospitalization records from the 2007-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. From this representative sample of 20% of all US hospitals, we obtained a weighted sample of delivery hospitalizations from 69 385 women with epilepsy and 20 449 532 women without epilepsy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Obstetrical outcomes including maternal death, cesarean delivery, length of stay, preeclampsia, preterm labor, and stillbirth. RESULTS Women with epilepsy had a risk of death during delivery hospitalization of 80 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies, significantly higher than the 6 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies found among women without epilepsy (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 11.46 [95% CI, 8.64-15.19]). Women with epilepsy were also at a heightened risk for other adverse outcomes, including preeclampsia (adjusted OR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.54-1.63]), preterm labor (adjusted OR, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.50-1.57]), and stillbirth (adjusted OR, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.17-1.38]), and had increased health care utilization, including an increased risk of cesarean delivery (adjusted OR, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.38-1.42]) and prolonged length of hospital stay (>6 days) among both women with cesarean deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.13 [95% CI, 2.03-2.23]) and women with vaginal deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.60 [95% CI, 2.41-2.80]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Findings suggest that women with epilepsy are at considerably heightened risk for many adverse outcomes during their delivery hospitalization, including a more than 10-fold increased risk of

  18. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  19. Life Expectancy after Myocardial Infarction by Hospital Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bucholz, Emily M.; Butala, Neel M.; Ma, Shuangge; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Thirty-day risk-standardized mortality rates after acute myocardial infarction are commonly used to evaluate and compare hospital performance. However, it is not known whether differences between hospitals in early patient survival are associated with differences in long-term survival. Methods We analyzed data from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project, a study of Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction between 1994-96 with 17 years of follow-up. We grouped hospitals into five strata based on case-mix severity. Within each case-mix stratum, we compared life expectancy in patients admitted to high and low-performing hospitals, as defined by quintiles of thirty-day risk-standardized mortality rates. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate life expectancy. Results The study sample included 119,735 patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to 1,824 hospitals. Within each case-mix stratum, survival curves for patients admitted to hospitals in each risk-standardized mortality rate quintile separated within the first 30 days and then remained parallel over 17 years of follow-up. Estimated life expectancy declined as hospital risk-standardized mortality rate quintile increased. On average, patients treated at high-performing hospitals lived between 1.14 and 0.84 years longer than patients treated at low-performing hospitals, depending on hospital case-mix. When 30-day survivors were examined separately, there was no difference in unadjusted or adjusted life expectancy across hospital risk-standardized mortality rate quintiles. Conclusion Patients admitted to high-performing hospitals after acute myocardial infarction had longer life expectancies than patients treated in low-performing hospitals. This survival benefit arose in the first 30 days and persisted over the long term. PMID:27705249

  20. 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' predicts mortality and length of hospital stay in acutely ill elderly.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Rebecca J; King, Claire L; Stroud, Mike A; Jackson, Alan A; Elia, Marinos

    2006-02-01

    Malnutrition and its impact on clinical outcome may be underestimated in hospitalised elderly as many screening procedures require measurements of weight and height that cannot often be undertaken in sick elderly patients. The 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' ('MUST') has been developed to screen all adults, even if weight and/or height cannot be measured, enabling more complete information on malnutrition prevalence and its impact on clinical outcome to be obtained. In the present study, 150 consecutively admitted elderly patients (age 85 (sd 5.5) years) were recruited prospectively, screened with 'MUST' and clinical outcome recorded. Although only 56 % of patients could be weighed, all (n 150) could be screened with 'MUST'; 58 % were at malnutrition risk and these individuals had greater mortality (in-hospital and post-discharge, P<0.01) and longer hospital stays (P=0.02) than those at low risk. Both 'MUST' categorisation and component scores (BMI, weight loss, acute disease) were significantly related to mortality (P<0.03). Those patients with no measured or recalled weight ('MUST' subjective criteria used) had a greater risk of malnutrition (P=0.01) and a poorer clinical outcome (P<0.002) than those who could be weighed and, within both groups, clinical outcome was worse in those at risk of malnutrition. The present study suggests that 'MUST' predicts clinical outcome in hospitalised elderly, in whom malnutrition is common (58 %). In those who cannot be weighed, a higher prevalence of malnutrition and associated poorer clinical outcome supports the importance of routine screening with a tool, like 'MUST', that can be used to screen all patients.

  1. Mortality Risk After Cardiac Surgery: Application of Inscor in a University Hospital in Brazil's Northeast

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, João Vyctor Silva; Silva, Mayara Gabrielle Barbosa e; Baldez, Thiago Eduardo Pereira; Costa, Marina de Albuquerque Gonçalves; da Silva, Luan Nascimento; Pinheiro, Renata Silva; Fecks, Zullma Sampaio; Borges, Daniel Lago

    2016-01-01

    Objective To apply the InsCor in patients undergoing cardiac surgery in a university hospital in Brazil's northeast. Methods It is a retrospective, quantitative and analytical study, carried out at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Maranhão. InsCor is a remodeling of two risk score models. It evaluates the prediction of mortality through variables such as gender, age, type of surgery or reoperation, exams, and preoperative events. Data from January to December 2015 were collected, using a Physical Therapy Evaluation Form and medical records. Quantitative variables were expressed as mean and standard deviation and qualitative variables as absolute and relative frequencies. Fisher's exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied, considering significant differences when P value was < 0.05. Calibration was performed by Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Results One hundred and forty-eight patients were included. Thirty-six percent were female, with mean age of 54.7±15.8 years and mean body mass index (BMI) equal to 25.6 kg/m2. The most frequent surgery was coronary artery bypass grafting (51.3%). According to InsCor, 73.6% of the patients had low risk, 20.3% medium risk, and only 6.1% high risk. In this sample, 11 (7.4%) patients died. The percentage of death in patients classified as low, medium and high risk was 6.3, 7.1% and 11.1%, respectively. Conclusion InsCor presented easy applicability due to the reduced number of variables analyzed and it showed satisfactory prediction of mortality in this sample of cardiac surgery patients. PMID:27982349

  2. Mortality of doctors in different specialties: findings from a cohort of 20000 NHS hospital consultants.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, L M; Swerdlow, A J; Fear, N T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine patterns of cause specific mortality in NHS hospital consultants according to their specialty and to assess these in the context of potential occupational exposures. METHODS: A historical cohort assembled from Department of Health records with follow up through the NHS Central Register involving 18,358 male and 2168 female NHS hospital consultants employed in England and Wales between 1962 and 1979. Main outcome measures examined were cause specific mortality during 1962-92 in all consultants combined, and separately for 17 specialty groups, with age, sex, and calendar year adjusted standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for comparison with national rates, and rate ratios (RRs) for comparison with rates in all consultants combined. RESULTS: The 2798 deaths at ages 25 to 74 reported during the 30 year study period were less than half the number expected on the basis of national rates (SMR 48, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 46 to 49). Low mortality was evident for cardiovascular disease, lung cancer, other diseases related to smoking, and particularly for diabetes (SMR 14, 95% CI 6 to 29). Death rates from accidental poisoning were significantly raised among male consultants (SMR 227, 95% CI 135 to 359), the excess being most apparent in obstetricians and gynaecologists (SMR 934); almost all deaths from accidental poisoning involved prescription drugs. A significantly raised death rate from injury and poisoning among female consultants was due largely to a twofold excess of suicide (SMR 215, 95% CI 93 to 423), the rate for this cause being significantly raised in anaesthetists (SMR 405). Compared with all consultants, significantly raised mortality was found in psychiatrists for all causes combined (RR 1.12), ischaemic heart disease (RR 1.18), and injury and poisoning (RR 1.46); in anaesthetists for cirrhosis (RR 2.22); and in radiologists and radiotherapists for respiratory disease (RR 1.68). There were significant excesses of colon cancer in

  3. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke: A Population-Based Nationwide Cohort Study From 2002 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-03-01

    We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted.

  4. Facility-based maternal death reviews: effects on maternal mortality in a district hospital in Senegal.

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Alexandre; Gaye, Alioune; de Bernis, Luc; Chaillet, Nils; Landry, Anne; Delage, Joanne; Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The improvement of obstetric services is one of the key components of the Safe Motherhood Programme. Reviewing maternal deaths and complications is one method that may make pregnancy safer, but there is no evidence about the effectiveness of this strategy. The objective of our before and after study is to assess the effect of facility-based maternal deaths reviews (MDR) on maternal mortality rates in a district hospital in Senegal that provides primary and referral maternity services. METHODS: We included all women who were admitted to the maternity unit for childbirth, or within 24 hours of delivery. We recorded maternal mortality during a 1-year baseline period from January to December 1997, and during a 3-year period from January 1998 to December 2000 after MDR had been implemented. Effects of MDR on organization of care were qualitatively evaluated. FINDINGS: The MDR strategy led to changes in organizational structure that improved life-saving interventions with a relatively large financial contribution from the community. Overall mortality significantly decreased from 0.83 (95% CI (confidence interval) = 0.60 -1.06) in baseline period to 0.41 (95% CI = 0.25 -0.56) per 100 women 3 years later. CONCLUSION: MDR had a marked effect on resources, management and maternal outcomes in this facility. However, given the design of our study and the local specific context, further research is needed to confirm the feasibility of MDR in other settings and to confirm the benefits of this approach for maternal health in developing countries. PMID:16583081

  5. Hip Fractures: What Information Does the Evidence Show That Patients and Families Need to Decrease 30-Day Readmission?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kristin OʼMara

    2015-01-01

    The current bundled payment reimbursement from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will not cover the additional cost of hospital readmission for the same diagnosis, and patients with hip fractures have one of the highest cost-saving opportunities when compared with other admission reasons. Common reasons for readmission to the hospital after hip fracture include pneumonia, dehydration, and mobility issues. The learning modalities including visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic were used to make recommendations on how the education can be incorporated into the instruction of patients with hip fractures and their families. These learning techniques can be used to develop education to decrease possibility of 30-day readmission after hip fracture. Nurses must focus their education to meet the needs of each individual patient, adapting to different types of adult learners to increase the health literacy of patients with hip fractures and their families.

  6. The effect of methodology in determining disparities in in-hospital mortality of trauma patients based on payer source.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gina M; Lee, Felecia A; Hervey, Ashley M; Hines, Robert B; Basham-Saif, Angela; Harrison, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective registry review of adult patients admitted to a Level I trauma center sought to determine whether results regarding in-hospital mortality associated with payer source vary on the basis of methodology. Patients were categorized into 4 literature-derived definitions (Definition 1: insured and uninsured; Definition 2: commercially insured, publicly insured, and uninsured; Definition 3: commercially insured, Medicaid, Medicare, and uninsured; and Definition 4: commercially insured, Medicaid, and uninsured). In-hospital mortality differences were found in Definitions 2 and 3, and when reclassifying dual-eligible Medicare/Medicaid into socioeconomic and age indicators. Variations in methodology culminated in results that could be interpreted with differing conclusions.

  7. The Impact of Hospital/Surgeon Volume on Acute Renal Failure and Mortality in Liver Transplantation: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lin, Jr-Rung; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the case volume of surgeons and hospitals affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2938 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. They were divided into two groups, according to the cumulative case volume of their operating surgeons and the case volume of their hospitals. The duration of intensive care unit stay and post-transplantation hospitalization, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. The results showed that, in the low and high case volume surgeons groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred at the rate of 14.11% and 5.86% (p<0.0001), and the overall mortality rates were 19.61% and 12.44% (p<0.0001). In the low and high case volume hospital groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred in 11% and 7.11% of the recipients (p = 0.0004), and the overall mortality was 18.44% and 12.86% (p<0.0001). These findings suggest that liver transplantation recipients operated on higher case volume surgeons or in higher case volume hospitals have a lower rate of acute renal failure and mortality. PMID:27706183

  8. Predictive score for mortality in patients with COPD exacerbations attending hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about predictors of short-term outcomes in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (eCOPD) attending an emergency department (ED). Such information could help stratify these patients and guide medical decision-making. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical prediction rule for short-term mortality during hospital admission or within a week after the index ED visit. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of patients with eCOPD attending the EDs of 16 participating hospitals. Recruitment started in June 2008 and ended in September 2010. Information on possible predictor variables was recorded during the time the patient was evaluated in the ED, at the time a decision was made to admit the patient to the hospital or discharge home, and during follow-up. Main short-term outcomes were death during hospital admission or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED, as well as at death within 1 month of the index ED visit. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed in a derivation sample and validated in a validation sample. The score was compared with other published prediction rules for patients with stable COPD. Results In total, 2,487 patients were included in the study. Predictors of death during hospital admission, or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED were patient age, baseline dyspnea, previous need for long-term home oxygen therapy or non-invasive mechanical ventilation, altered mental status, and use of inspiratory accessory muscles or paradoxical breathing upon ED arrival (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85). Addition of arterial blood gas parameters (oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures (PO2 and PCO2)) and pH) did not improve the model. The same variables were predictors of death at 1 month (AUC = 0.85). Compared with other commonly used tools for predicting the severity of COPD in stable patients, our rule was significantly better

  9. In-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents or oral anticoagulants and hematoma evacuation of intracerebral hematomas.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marco; Misselwitz, Björn; Hamann, Gerhard F; Kolodziej, Malgorzata; Reinges, Marcus H T; Uhl, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents is described to be a risk factor for mortality after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the impact of antithrombotic agents on mortality in patients who undergo hematoma evacuation compared to conservatively treated patients with ICH remains controversial. This analysis is based on a prospective registry for quality assurance in stroke care in the State of Hesse, Germany. Patients' data were collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Only patients with the diagnosis of spontaneous ICH were included (International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision codes I61.0-I61.9). Predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by univariate analysis. Predictors with P<0.1 were included in a binary logistic regression model. The binary logistic regression model was adjusted for age, initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and pre-ICH disability prior to ictus. In 8,421 patients with spontaneous ICH, pre-treatment with oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents was documented in 16.3% and 25.1%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 23.2%. In-hospital mortality was decreased in operatively treated patients compared to conservatively treated patients (11.6% versus 24.0%; P<0.001). Patients with antiplatelet pre-treatment had a significantly higher risk of death during the hospital stay after hematoma evacuation (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.97; P=0.010) compared to patients without antiplatelet pre-treatment treatment (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.79-1.09; P=0.376). In conclusion a higher rate of in-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents in combination with hematoma evacuation after spontaneous ICH was observed in the presented cohort.

  10. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  11. Comorbid disease and the effect of race and ethnicity on in-hospital mortality from aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, M. Norman; Stukenborg, George J.; Wagner, Douglas P.; Harrell, Frank E.; Kilbridge, Kerry L.; Lyman, Jason A.; Einbinder, Jonathan; Connors, Alfred F.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Racial and ethnic disparities in mortality have been demonstrated in several diseases. African Americans are hospitalized at a significantly higher rate than whites for aspiration pneumonia; however, no studies have investigated racial and ethnic disparities in mortality in this population. OBJECTIVE: To assess the independent effect of race and ethnicity on in-hospital mortality among aspiration pneumonia discharges while comprehensively controlling for comorbid diseases, and to assess whether the prevalence and effects of comorbid illness differed across racial and ethnic categories. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study of 41,581 patients admitted to California hospitals for aspiration pneumonia from 1996 through 1998, using principal and secondary diagnoses present on admission. MEASUREMENT: The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The adjusted odds of in-hospital death for African-American compared with white discharges [odds ratio (OR)=1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-1.11] was not significantly different. The odds of death for Asian compared with white discharges was significantly lower (OR=0.83; 95% CI, 0.75-0.91). Hispanics had a significantly lower odds of death (OR=0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.988) compared to non-Hispanics. Comorbid diseases were more prevalent among African Americans and Asians than whites, and among Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics. Differences in effects of comorbid disease on mortality risk by race and ethnicity were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Asians have a lower risk of death, and the risk of death for African Americans is not significantly different from whites in this analysis of aspiration pneumonia discharges. Hispanics have a lower risk of death than non-Hispanics. While there are differences in prevalence of comorbid disease by racial and ethnic category, the effects of comorbid disease on mortality risk do not differ meaningfully by race or

  12. Effect of outpatient therapy with inhaled corticosteroids on decreasing in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Hasegawa, Wakae; Sakamoto, Yukiyo; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Jo, Taisuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators (IBD) are beneficial for the management of COPD. Although ICS has been reported to increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with COPD, it remains controversial whether it influences mortality. Using a Japanese national database, we examined the association between preadmission ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD. Methods We retrospectively collected data from 1,165 hospitals in Japan on patients with COPD who received outpatient inhalation therapy and were admitted with pneumonia. Patients were categorized into those who received ICS with IBD and those who received IBD alone. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between outpatient ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality, adjusting for the patients’ backgrounds. Results Of the 7,033 eligible patients, the IBD alone group (n=3,331) was more likely to be older, have lower body mass index, poorer general conditions, and more severe pneumonia than the ICS with IBD group (n=3,702). In-hospital mortality was 13.2% and 8.1% in the IBD alone and the ICS with IBD groups, respectively. After adjustment for patients’ backgrounds, the ICS with IBD group had significantly lower mortality than the IBD alone group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.68–0.94). Higher mortality was associated with older age, being male, lower body mass index, poorer general status, and more severe pneumonia. Conclusion Outpatient inhaled ICS and IBD therapy was significantly associated with lower mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD than treatment with IBD alone. PMID:27382276

  13. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-12-23

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56-3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15-41) versus 23 days (IQR 14-36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  14. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41) versus 23 days (IQR 14–36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation. PMID:28025528

  15. In Hospital and 3-Month Mortality and Functional Recovery Rate in Patients Treated for Hip Fracture by a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Rostagno, Carlo; Buzzi, Roberto; Campanacci, Domenico; Boccacini, Alberto; Cartei, Alessandro; Virgili, Gianni; Belardinelli, Andrea; Matarrese, Daniela; Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Gusinu, Roberto; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical comorbidities affect outcome in elderly patients with hip fracture. This study was designed to preliminarily evaluate the usefulness of a hip-fracture unit led by an internal medicine specialist. Methods In-hospital and 3-month outcomes in patients with hip fracture were prospectively evaluated in 121 consecutive patients assessed before and followed after surgery by a multidisciplinary team led by internal medicine specialist; 337 consecutive patients were recalled from ICD-9 discharge records and considered for comparison regarding in-hospital mortality. Results In the intervention period, patients treated within 48 hours were 54% vs. 26% in the historical cohort (P<0.0001). In-hospital mortality remained stable at about 2.3 per 1000 person-days. At 3 months, 10.3% of discharged patients had died, though less than 8% of patients developed postoperative complications (mainly pneumonia and respiratory failure). The presence of more than 2 major comorbidities and the loss of 3 or more BADL were independent predictors of death. 50/105 patients recovered previous functional capacity, but no independent predictor of functional recovery could be identified. Mean length of hospital stay significantly decreased in comparison to the historical cohort (13.6± 4.7 vs 17 ± 5 days, p = 0.0001). Combined end-point of mortality and length of hospitalization < 12 days was significantly lower in study period (27 vs 34%, p <0.0132). Conclusions Identification and stabilization of concomitant clinical problems by internal medicine specialists may safely decrease time to surgery in frail subjects with hip fracture. Moreover, integrated perioperative clinical management may shorten hospital stay with no apparent increase in in-hospital mortality and ultimately improve the outcome. These results are to be confirmed by a larger study presently ongoing at our institution. PMID:27389193

  16. Who Dies after ICU Discharge? Retrospective Analysis of Prognostic Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of ICU Survivors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the causes of inpatient death after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge and determined predictors of in-hospital mortality in Korea. Using medical ICU registry data of Seoul National University Hospital, we performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who were discharged alive from their first ICU admission with at least 24 hours of ICU length of stay (LOS). From January 2011 to August 2013, 723 patients were admitted to ICU and 383 patients were included. The estimated in-hospital mortality rate was 11.7% (45/383). The most common cause of death was respiratory failure (n = 25, 56%) followed by sepsis and cancer progression; the causes of hospital death and ICU admission were the same in 64% of all deaths; sudden unexpected deaths comprised about one-fifth of all deaths. In order to predict in-hospital mortality among ICU survivors, multivariate analysis identified presence of solid tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.01–8.2; P < 0.001), hematologic disease (OR, 4.75; 95% CI, 1.51–14.96; P = 0.013), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score upon ICU admission (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.99–1.17; P = 0.075), and hemoglobin (Hb) level (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52–0.86; P = 0.001) and platelet count (Plt) (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.99–1.00; P = 0.033) upon ICU discharge as significant factors. In conclusion, a significant proportion of in-hospital mortality is predictable and those who die in hospital after ICU discharge tend to be severely-ill, with comorbidities of hematologic disease and solid tumor, and anemic and thrombocytopenic upon ICU discharge. PMID:28145659

  17. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients treated in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Skok, P; Sinkovič, A

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, cohort study assessed the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at the University Clinical Centre Maribor, Slovenia. Using univariate, multivariate and logistic regression methods the predictors of mortality in 54 upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage patients (47 men, mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 14.2 years) were investigated. The mean ± SD duration of treatment in the MICU was 2.8 ± 2.9 days and the mortality rate was 31.5%. Significant differences between nonsurvivors and survivors were observed in haemorrhagic shock, heart failure, infection, diastolic blood pressure at admission, haemoglobin and red blood cell count at admission, and lowest haemoglobin and red blood cell count during treatment. Heart failure (odds ratio 59.13) was the most significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Haemorrhagic shock and the lowest red blood cell count during treatment were also important independent predictive factors of in-hospital mortality.

  18. Prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers with ST elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kiatchoosakun, Songsak; Wongwipaporn, Chaiyasith; Pussadhamma, Burabha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers and unselected patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have not been well established. Objective To identify the predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI in a tertiary heart centre. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, all patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI were retrospectively included in this study. Baseline characteristics and angiographic data were reviewed and recorded. The study endpoint was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of the 541 patients included in the study, 63 (11.6%) died during hospitalisation. Cardiogenic shock at admission was recorded in 301 patients (55.6%) and 424 patients (78%) had multivessel disease. Median door-to-device time was 65 min. After adjustment for baseline variables, the factors associated with in-hospital mortality included age >60 years (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.05; p=0.01), left ventricular ejection fraction <40% (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.20 to 5.36; p=0.02), and final TIMI flow grade 0/1 (OR 20.55, 95% CI 3.49 to 120.94; p=0.001). Conclusions Age, left ventricular function and final TIMI flow are significant predictors of adverse outcomes in unselected patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. PMID:27347008

  19. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome.

  20. Early detection of pneumonia as a risk factor for mortality in burn patients in Menoufiya University Hospitals, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mgahed, M; El-Helbawy, R; Omar, A; El-Meselhy, H; Abd El-Halim, R

    2013-09-30

    Pneumonia is common among critically ill burn patients and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among them. Prediction of mortality in patients with severe burns remains unreliable. The aim of this research is to study the incidence, early diagnosis and management of nosocomial pneumonia, and to discuss the relationship between pneumonia and death in burn patients. This prospective study was carried out on 80 burn patients (35 males and 45 females) admitted to Menoufiya University Hospital Burn Center and Chest Department, Egypt, from September 2011 to March 2012. Our findings showed an overall burn patient mortality rate of 26.25 % (21/80), 15% (12/80) incidence of pneumonia, and a 50% (6/12) mortality rate among patients with pneumonia compared to 22 % (15/68) for those without pneumonia. The incidence of pneumonia was twice as high in the subset of patients with inhalation injury as among those without inhalation injury (P< 0.001). It was found that the presence of pneumonia, inhalation injury, increased burn size, and advanced age were all associated with increased mortality (P< 0.001). In the late onset pneumonia, other associated factors also contributed to mortality. Severity of disease, severity of illness (APACHE score), organ failure, underlying co-morbidities, and VAP PIRO score all have significant correlations with mortality rate. Pneumonia was an important factor for predicting burn patient mortality. Early detection and management of pneumonia are absolutely essential.

  1. Mortality Trends in Patients Hospitalized with the Initial Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Middle Eastern Country over 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlBinali, Hajar A. H.; Gehani, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the temporal trend in the initial Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) management and outcome during the last two decades in a Middle Eastern country. A total of 10,915 patients were admitted with initial AMI with mean age of 53 ± 11.8 years. Comparing the two decades (1991–2000) to (2001–2010), the use of antiplatelet drugs increased from 84% to 95%, β-blockers increased from 38% to 56%, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) increased from 12% to 36% (P < 0.001 for all). The rates of PCI increased from 2.5% to 14.6% and thrombolytic therapy decreased from 71% to 65% (P < 0.001 for all). While the rate of hospitalization with Initial MI increased from 34% to 66%, and the average length of hospital stay decreased from 6.4 ± 3 to 4.6 ± 3, all hospital outcomes parameters improved significantly including a 39% reduction in in-hospital Mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that higher utilization of antiplatelet drugs, β-blockers, and ACEI were the main contributors to better hospital outcomes. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the hospitalization rate in patients presenting with initial AMI. Evidence-based medical therapies appear to be associated with a substantial improvement in outcome and in-hospital mortality. PMID:24868481

  2. A population-based matched cohort study examining the mortality and costs of patients with community-onset Clostridium difficile infection identified using emergency department visits and hospital admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nanwa, Natasha; Sander, Beate; Krahn, Murray; Daneman, Nick; Lu, Hong; Austin, Peter C.; Govindarajan, Anand; Rosella, Laura C.; Cadarette, Suzanne M.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the mortality or quantified the economic burden of community-onset Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We estimated the attributable mortality and costs of community-onset CDI. We conducted a population-based matched cohort study. We identified incident subjects with community-onset CDI using health administrative data (emergency department visits and hospital admissions) in Ontario, Canada between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2010. We propensity-score matched each infected subject to one uninfected subject and followed subjects in the cohort until December 31, 2011. We evaluated all-cause mortality and costs (unadjusted and adjusted for survival) from the healthcare payer perspective (2014 Canadian dollars). During our study period, we identified 7,950 infected subjects. The mean age was 63.5 years (standard deviation = 22.0), 62.7% were female, and 45.0% were very high users of the healthcare system. The relative risk for 30-day, 180-day, and 1-year mortality were 7.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.94–9.02), 3.55 (95%CI, 3.17–3.97), and 2.59 (95%CI, 2.37–2.83), respectively. Mean attributable cumulative 30-day, 180-day, and 1-year costs (unadjusted for survival) were $7,434 (95%CI, $7,122-$7,762), $12,517 (95%CI, $11,687-$13,366), and $13,217 (95%CI, $12,062-$14,388). Mean attributable cumulative 1-, 2-, and 3-year costs (adjusted for survival) were $10,700 (95%CI, $9,811-$11,645), $13,312 (95%CI, $12,024-$14,682), and $15,812 (95%CI, $14,159-$17,571). Infected subjects had considerably higher risk of all-cause mortality and costs compared with uninfected subjects. This study provides insight on an understudied patient group. Our study findings will facilitate assessment of interventions to prevent community-onset CDI. PMID:28257438

  3. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Methods We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. Results In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831–308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93–6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66–4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257–US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033–US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%–24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55–8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94–7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044–US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353–US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%–12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%–11.77%). Conclusion Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population. PMID:28176930

  4. 77 FR 67657 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service (IHS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  5. 77 FR 13128 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

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    2012-03-05

    ...'' campaign is a national Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign that aims to educate, engage and empower... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  6. 78 FR 49280 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation Facsimile Transmittal...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation Facsimile..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  7. 78 FR 52008 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Housing Service Coordinator Program

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Housing Service..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  8. 78 FR 39002 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Request for Withdrawals From Replacements...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Request for Withdrawals From..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  9. 78 FR 52009 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Utility Allowance Adjustments

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Utility Allowance Adjustments AGENCY... Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard at...

  10. 78 FR 39001 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Uniform Physical Standards and Physical...

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  11. 78 FR 52007 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Management Certification and Management Entity...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Management Certification and... Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW., Washington,...

  12. 78 FR 52007 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Financial Statement of Corporate Applicant for...

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Financial Statement of Corporate..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street,...

  13. 78 FR 52006 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Final Endorsement of Credit Instrument

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    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Final Endorsement of Credit..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  14. 77 FR 39318 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-5513, Supplemental Questionnaire To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ..., Office of Project Management and Operational Support, Program Coordination (CA/PPT/PMO/PC) Form Number... information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval in accordance with... to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for up to 30 days from July 2, 2012. ADDRESSES:...

  15. 78 FR 36565 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Standardized Form for Collecting Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Standardized Form for Collecting... Information Collection: Standardized Form for Collecting Information Regarding Race and Ethnic Data. OMB... quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) Ways to minimize the burden...

  16. 77 FR 37407 - Agency Information Collection Request-30-Day Public Comment Request

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    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request--30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is.... Proposed Project: New Comprehensive Communication Campaign on Right To Non-Discrimination in Certain...

  17. Enhanced recovery of Phytophthora ramorum from soil following 30 days storage at 4C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlamydospores of Phytophthora ramorum produced by mixing 20 percent V8 juice broth cultures with sand and incubating over a 30 day period were used to infest field soil at densities ranging from 0.2 to 42 chlamydospores per cubic centimeter of soil. Chlamydospore recovery was determined by baiting...

  18. 77 FR 18820 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  19. 78 FR 38070 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing... Marketing (AFHM) Plan. OMB Approval Number: 2529-0013. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved collection. Form Number: HUD-935.2A Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan (Multifamily),...

  20. 78 FR 1916 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program ACTION: Notice of request... Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). OMB Control Number: 1405-0152. Type...

  1. 78 FR 64142 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Condominium Project Approval Document Collection

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    2013-10-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Condominium Project Approval... submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and... Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503; fax: 202-395-5806. Email:...

  2. 78 FR 36560 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th... Title of Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic Updates and...

  3. 78 FR 40309 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Application for Multifamily Project Mortgage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public comment. DATES... sent to: HUD Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building,...

  4. 78 FR 75366 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing Energy Audits and Utility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing Energy Audits and... Audits and Utility Allowances. OMB Approval Number: 2577-062. Type of Request: Reinstatement, with change... information and proposed use: 24 CFR 965.301, Subpart C, Energy Audit and Energy Conservation...

  5. 76 FR 59129 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

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    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is... to send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of...

  6. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments. 31.3406(d)-3 Section 31.3406(d)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... account. (b) Sale of an instrument for a customer by electronic transmission or by mail. The special...

  7. 78 FR 39305 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: OSHC Progress Report Template

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    2013-07-01

    ... Doc No: 2013-15689] DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5683-N-54] 30-Day... Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard at Colette.Pollard@hud.gov or... proposed use: The Appropriations Act, provided a total of $100,000,000 to HUD for a Sustainable...

  8. 77 FR 32638 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

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    2012-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is...) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) the...

  9. 78 FR 52964 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 8 Management Assessment Program (SEMAP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 8 Management Assessment..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  10. 78 FR 65695 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Technical Processing Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Technical Processing Requirements..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  11. 78 FR 66042 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 3 Business Registry Pilot Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 3 Business Registry Pilot..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  12. 75 FR 50791 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recording, Reporting, and Data Collection...

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    2010-08-17

    ... following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval in... Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of Designation, ECA/EC/D. Form Number: Forms...: Submit comments to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for up to 30 days from August 17,...

  13. 76 FR 79683 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is... new AIDS cases. As one strategy to address this disparity, the U.S. Department of Health and...

  14. 78 FR 79474 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Father's Day

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  15. 78 FR 79475 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Impact of Housing and Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  16. 78 FR 75365 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

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    2013-12-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard... Number: 2528-0288. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Form Number:...

  17. 78 FR 79703 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Application Process for Clinical Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Application Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical... contact: Robert M. Lembo, MD, Deputy Director, Office of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education... Process for Clinical Research Training and Medical Education at the Clinical Center and its Impact...

  18. Temporal Trends of In-Hospital Mortality in Patients Treated with Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping: A Nationwide Population Study in Taiwan, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chiang, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) is widely used for hemodynamic support in critical patients with cardiogenic shock (CS). We examined whether the in-hospital mortality of patients in Taiwan treated with IABP has recently declined. We used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to retrospectively review the in-hospital all-cause mortality of 9952 (7146 men [71.8%]) 18-year-old and older patients treated with IABP between 1998 and 2008. The mortality rate was 13.84% (n = 1377). The urbanization levels of the hospitals, and the number of days in the intensive care unit, of hospitalization, and of IABP treatment, and prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were associated with mortality. Seven thousand six hundred thirty-five patients (76.72%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, and 576 (5.79%) underwent high-risk PCI with IABP treatment. The number of patients treated with IABP significantly increased during this decade (ptrend < 0.0001), the in-hospital all-cause mortality for patients treated with IABP significantly decreased (ptrend = 0.0243), but the in-hospital all-cause mortality of patients who underwent CABG and PCI plus IABP did not decrease. In conclusion, the in-hospital mortality rate of IABP treatment decreased annually in Taiwan during the study period. However, high-risk patients who underwent coronary revascularization with IABP had a higher and unstable in-hospital mortality rate.

  19. 76 FR 6794 - 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status AGENCY... ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) status. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 300jj-11. DATES: The 30-day submission... a notice in the Federal Register to announce the 30-day period during which requests for...

  20. Obesity and Mortality, Length of Stay and Hospital Cost among Patients with Sepsis: A Nationwide Inpatient Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chu-lin; Hwang, Lu-yu; Lai, Dejian; Markham, Christine; Patel, Bela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the association between obesity and all-cause mortality, length of stay and hospital cost among patients with sepsis 20 years of age or older. Materials and Methods It was a retrospective cohort study. The dataset was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2011, the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. Hospitalizations of sepsis patients 20 years of age or older were included. All 25 primary and secondary diagnosis fields were screened to identify patients with sepsis using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Obesity was the exposure of interest. It was one of the 29 standardized Elixhauser comorbidity measures and readily available in the dataset as a dichotomized variable. The outcome measures were all-cause in-hospital death, length of stay and hospital cost. Results After weighting, our sample projected to a population size of 1,763,000, providing an approximation for the number of hospital discharges of all sepsis patients 20 years of age or older in the US in 2011. The overall all-cause mortality rate was 14.8%, the median hospital length of stay was 7 days and the median hospital cost was $15,917. After adjustment, the all-cause mortality was lower (adjusted OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.88); the average hospital length of stay was longer (adjusted difference = 0.65 day; 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.86) and the hospital cost per stay was higher (adjusted difference = $2,927; 95% CI = $1,606 to $4,247) for obese sepsis patients as compared to non-obese ones. Conclusion With this large and nationally representative sample of over 1,000 hospitals in the US, we found that obesity was significantly associated with a 16% decrease in the odds of dying among hospitalized sepsis patients; however it was also associated with greater duration and cost of hospitalization. PMID:27124716

  1. Mortality in cancer patients previously diagnosed with herpes zoster in the hospital setting: a nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, S A J; Sørensen, G V; Horváth-Puhó, E; Pedersen, L; Obel, N; Petersen, K L; Schønheyder, H C; Sørensen, H T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Herpes zoster (HZ) is associated with underlying immunodeficiency and may thereby predict mortality of subsequent cancer. Methods: By using Danish nationwide medical databases, we identified all cancer patients with a prior hospital-based HZ diagnosis during 1982–2011 (n=2754) and a matched cancer cohort without prior HZ (n=26 243). We computed adjusted mortality rate ratios (aMRRs) associating prior HZ with mortality following cancer. Results: Prior HZ was associated with decreased mortality within the year after cancer diagnosis (aMRR 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81–0.93), but not thereafter (aMRR 1.07; 95% CI: 0.99–1.15). However, prior HZ predicted increased mortality throughout the entire follow-up among patients aged <60 years (aMRR 1.39; 95% CI: 1.15–1.68) and those with disseminated HZ (aMRR 1.18; 95% CI: 1.01–1.37). The increased mortality rates were observed primarily for haematological and immune-related cancers. Conclusions: Overall, HZ was not a predictor of increased mortality following subsequent cancer. PMID:25880013

  2. Oral Care and Mortality in Older Adults with Pneumonia in Hospitals or Nursing Homes: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Petteri; Wårdh, Inger; Zimmerman, Mikael; Almståhl, Annica; Wikström, Maude

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare the effect of intensified oral care interventions given by dental or nursing personnel on mortality from healthcare-associated pneumonia (HAP) in elderly adults in hospitals or nursing homes with the effect of usual oral care. Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the Health Technology Assessment database of the National Health Service Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (August 2015). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were considered for inclusion. Data were extracted and risk of bias was assessed independently and agreed on in consensus meetings. Five RCTs, with some or major study limitations, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Based on meta-analyses, oral care interventions given by dental personnel reduced mortality from HAP (risk ratio (RR) = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.25-0.76, P = .003), whereas oral care interventions given by nursing personnel did not result in a statistically significant difference in mortality from HAP (RR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.97-1.48, P = .09), in elderly adults in hospitals or nursing homes from usual oral care. Oral care interventions given by dental personnel may reduce mortality from HAP (low certainty of evidence, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) ⊕⊕○○), whereas oral care interventions given by nursing personnel probably result in little or no difference from usual care (moderate certainty of evidence, GRADE ⊕⊕⊕○) in elderly adults in hospitals or nursing homes.

  3. Roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Glaucia R.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Zornoff, Leonardo A.M.; Paiva, Sergio A.R.; Nogueira, Celia R.; Araujo, Natalia C.; Carmona, Bruno H.M.; Conde, Sandro J.; Minicucci, Marcos F.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients. METHODS: In total, 105 consecutive burn injury patients over 18 years in age who were admitted to the Burn Unit of Bauru State Hospital from January to December 2013 were prospectively evaluated. Upon admission, patient demographic information was recorded and a blood sample was taken for biochemical analysis to identify the presence of the Taql(rs731236) and Bsml(rs1544410) polymorphisms. All of the patients were followed over their hospital stay and mortality was recorded. RESULTS: Eighteen of the patients did not sign the informed consent form, and there were technical problems with genotype analysis for 7 of the patients. Thus, 80 patients (mean age, 42.5±16.1 years) were included in the final analysis. In total, 60% of the patients were male, and 16.3% died during the hospital stay. The genotype frequencies for the Taql polymorphism were 51.25% TT, 41.25% TC and 7.50% CC; for the Bsml polymorphism, they were 51.25% GG, 42.50% GA and 6.25% AA. In logistic regression analysis, after adjustments for age, gender and total body surface burn area, there were no associations between the Taql (OR: 1.575; CI95%: 0.148-16.745; p=0.706) or Bsml (OR: 1.309; CI95%: 0.128-13.430; p=0.821) polymorphisms and mortality for the burn patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms are not associated with hospital mortality of burn patients. PMID:27626478

  4. Modelling Factors Causing Mortality in Oesophageal VaricesPatients in King Abdul Aziz University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bahlas, Sami

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study is to reach a model defining factors precipitating short survival in patients with oesophageal varices and improving the understanding of such factors. Models would help to prioritize the clinical goals and intervention for saving the lives of patients. Methods Retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to King Abdul Aziz University Hospital who had been diagnosed with oesophageal varices. The patients’ demographics, disease history, physical examination, viral infections, parasitic infections, blood pictures, cancer biomarkers, liver enzymes and bleeding details were collected, tested for correlation with mortality to formulate a model. Results A total of 148 patients were included in this study. 37 clinical variables were studied only 15 factors were found to have a statistical significance. These factors were PT (RC=0.17338 P-value 0.00011), APTT (RC=0.07916, P-value 0.00002), haemoglobin level (RC=-0.44748, P-value <0.0001), WBC (RC = 0.22255, P-value 0.00001), serum albumin level (RC=-0.12953, P-value 0.00001), serum creatinine (RC=0.01483, P-value 0.00002), at least one incidence of encephalopathy (RC=1.80500, P-value 0.00014), total bilirubin (RC=0.01371, P-value 0.00016), direct bilirubin (RC=0.01298, P-value 0.00357, serum AST (RC=0.00914, P-value 0.00462), presence of at least bleeding event (RC=1.03373, P-value 0.00613), ascites grade I (RC=-1.57435, P-value 0.00967), SBP (RC=1.47216, P-value 0.01581), platelets count (RC=0.00398, P-value 0.03476) and oesophageal varices (RC = -1.42139, P-value 0.03673). Only 5 factors were likely to affect the mortality status. These factors were encephalopathy, spontaneous SBP, bleeding, ascites and grade of oesophageal varices. Six models were then formulated. Conclusion These models should be retested in larger study groups to test their reliability in order to use them as surrogate end point in future clinical studies. PMID:22224185

  5. Work capacity during 30 days of bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Trowbridge, T. S.; Wade, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a study to determine whether or not short-term variable intensity isotonic and intermittent high-intensity isokinetic short-duration leg exercise is effective for the maintenance of peak O2 (VO2) uptake and muscular strength and endurance, respectively, during 30 days of -6 deg head-down bed rest deconditioning. The results show no significant changes in leg peak torque, leg mean total work, arm total peak torque, or arm mean total work for members of the isotonic, isokinetic, and controls groups. Changes are observed, however, in peak VO2 levels. The results suggest that near-peak variabile intensity, isotonic leg excercise maintains peak VO2 during 30 days of bed rest, while peak intermittent, isokinetic leg excercise protocol does not.

  6. The clinical outcomes and predictive factors for in-hospital mortality in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tsai-Yu; Hung, Chia-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chou, Pai-Chien; Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lo, Yu-Lun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent epidemiologic studies have showed that candidemia is an important nosocomial infection in hospitalized patients. The majority of candidemia patients were non-neutropenic rather than neutropenic status. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome of non-neutropenic patients with candidemia and to measure the contributing factors for mortality. A total of 163 non-neutropenic patients with candidemia during January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively enrolled. The patients’ risk factors for mortality, clinical outcomes, treatment regimens, and Candida species were analyzed. The overall mortality was 54.6%. Candida albicans was the most frequent Candida species (n = 83; 50.9% of patients). Under multivariate analyses, hemodialysis (OR, 4.554; 95% CI, 1.464–14.164) and the use of amphotericin B deoxycholate (OR, 8.709; 95% CI, 1.587–47.805) were independent factors associated with mortality. In contrast, abdominal surgery (OR, 0.360; 95% CI, 0.158–0.816) was associated with a better outcome. The overall mortality is still high in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia. Hemodialysis and use of amphotericin B deoxycholate were independent factors associated with mortality, whereas prior abdominal surgery was associated with a better outcome. PMID:27281087

  7. What Is the Best Way to Estimate Hospital Quality Outcomes? A Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Andrew; Burgess, James; Strawderman, Robert; Dimick, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the accuracy of alternative estimators of hospital mortality quality using a Monte Carlo simulation experiment. Data Sources Data are simulated to create an admission-level analytic dataset. The simulated data are validated by comparing distributional parameters (e.g., mean and standard deviation of 30-day mortality rate, hospital sample size) with the same parameters observed in Medicare data for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) inpatient admissions. Study Design We perform a Monte Carlo simulation experiment in which true quality is known to test the accuracy of the Observed-over-Expected estimator, the Risk Standardized Mortality Rate (RSMR), the Dimick and Staiger (DS) estimator, the Hierarchical Poisson estimator, and the Moving Average estimator using hospital 30-day mortality for AMI as the outcome. Estimator accuracy is evaluated for all hospitals and for small, medium, and large hospitals. Data Extraction Methods Data are simulated. Principal Findings Significant and substantial variation is observed in the accuracy of the tested outcome estimators. The DS estimator is the most accurate for all hospitals and for small hospitals using both accuracy criteria (root mean squared error and proportion of hospitals correctly classified into quintiles). Conclusions The mortality estimator currently in use by Medicare for public quality reporting, the RSMR, has been shown to be less accurate than the DS estimator, although the magnitude of the difference is not large. Pending testing and validation of our findings using current hospital data, CMS should reconsider the decision to publicly report mortality rates using the RSMR. PMID:22352894

  8. Skeletal muscle adaptations following blood flow-restricted training during 30 days of muscular unloading.

    PubMed

    Cook, Summer B; Brown, Kimberly A; Deruisseau, Keith; Kanaley, Jill A; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of low-load resistance training with a blood flow restriction (LL(BFR)) to attenuate muscle loss and weakness after 30 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Sixteen subjects (ages 18-50 yr) underwent 30 days of ULLS. Measurements of muscle strength, cross-sectional area, and endurance on the knee extensors and plantar flexors were collected before and after ULLS. Plasma concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were also assessed. During ULLS, eight subjects (5 males, 3 females) participated in LL(BFR) three times per week (ULLS + Exercise) while eight subjects (4 males, 4 females) did not exercise (ULLS). The blood flow-restricted exercise consisted of dynamic knee extension at 20% of the subject's isometric maximum voluntary contraction coupled with a suprasystolic blood flow restriction. After 30 days of limb suspension, the ULLS + Exercise group experienced minimal and insignificant losses in knee extensor cross-sectional area and strength (1.2% and 2.0%, respectively; P 0.05). Muscular endurance in the knee extensors improved 31% in the ULLS + Exercise group, while it decreased 24% in the ULLS group (P = 0.01). No changes were seen in hormone concentrations throughout the study. In conclusion, LL(BFR) of the knee extensors is effective in maintaining muscle strength and size during 30 days of ULLS and results in improved knee extensor muscular endurance.

  9. The 10-30-day intraseasonal variation of the East Asian winter monsoon: The temperature mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Suxiang; Sun, Qingfei; Huang, Qian; Chu, Peng

    2016-09-01

    East Asia is known for its monsoon characteristics, but little research has been performed on the intraseasonal time scale of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM). In this paper, the extended reanalysis (ERA)-Interim sub-daily data are used to study the surface air temperature intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) of the EAWM. The results show that the air temperature (2-m level) of the EAWM has a dominant period of 10-30 days. Lake Baikal and south China are the centers of the air temperature ISO. An anomalous low frequency (10-30-day filtered) anticyclone corresponds to the intraseasonal cold air. The 10-30-day filtered cold air spreads from Novaya Zemlya to Lake Baikal and even to South China. The ISO of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index influences the temperature of the EAWM by stimulating Rossby waves in middle latitude, causing meridional circulation, and eventually leads to the temperature ISO of the EAWM. RegCM4 has good performance for the simulation of the air temperature ISO. The simulated results indicate that the plateau is responsible for the southward propagation of the intraseasonal anticyclone. The anticyclone could not reach South China when there was no plateau in western China and its upper reaches.

  10. Relationship between polycythemia and in-hospital mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lu; Chughtai, Aamer Rasheed; Jiang, Hongli; Gao, Lingyun; Yang, Yan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Yuejian

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequent in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and associated with high mortality. This multi-center retrospective study was performed to investigate if secondary polycythemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in COPD patients with low-risk PE. Methods We identified COPD patients with proven PE between October, 2005 and October, 2015. Patients in risk classes III–V on the basis of the PESI score were excluded. We extracted demographic, clinical and laboratory information at the time of admission from medical records. All subjects were followed until hospital discharge to identify all-cause mortality. Results We enrolled 629 consecutive patients with COPD and PE at low risk: 132 of them (21.0%) with and 497 (79.0%) without secondary polycythemia. Compared with those without polycythemia, the polycythemia group had significantly lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) level (0.9±0.3 vs. 1.4±0.5, P=0.000), lower PaO2 and SpO2 as well as higher PaCO2 (P=0.03, P=0.03 and P=0.000, respectively). COPD patients with polycythemia had a higher proportion of arrhythmia in electrocardiogram (ECG) (49.5% vs. 35.7%, P=0.02), a longer hospital duration time (15.3±10.1 vs. 9.7±9.1, P=0.001), a higher mechanical ventilation rate (noninvasive and invasive, 51.7% vs. 30.3%, P=0.04 and 31.0% vs. 7.9%, P=0.04, respectively), and a higher in-hospital mortality (12.1% vs. 6.6%, P=0.04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that polycythemia was associated with mortality in COPD patients with low-risk PE (adjusted OR 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04–1.66). Conclusions Polycythemia is an independent risk factor for all-cause in-hospital mortality in COPD patients with PE at low risk. PMID:28066591

  11. Prognostic factors associated with mortality and major in-hospital complications in patients with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Jessica A.; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Tyrrell, Gregory J.; Marrie, Thomas J.; Eurich, Dean T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) causes considerable mortality and morbidity. We aimed to identify prognostic factors associated with mortality and major in-hospital complications in BPP. A prospective, population-based clinical registry of 1636 hospitalized adult patients (≥18 years) with BPP was established between 2000 and 2010 in Northern Alberta, Canada. Prognostic factors for mortality and major in-hospital complications (e.g., cardiac events, mechanical ventilation, aspiration) were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Average age was 54 (standard deviation 18) years, 57% males, and 59% had high case-fatality rate (CFR) serotypes. Overall, 14% (226/1636) of patients died and 22% (315/1410) of survivors developed at least 1 complication. Independent prognostic factors for mortality were age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.5 per decade; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–1.7), nursing home residence (aOR, 3.7; 95% CI 1.8–7.4), community-dwelling dementia (aOR 3.7; 95% CI, 1.6–8.6), alcohol abuse (aOR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4–3.4), acid-suppressing drugs (aOR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0–2.3), guideline-discordant antibiotics (aOR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.4–4.8), multilobe pneumonia (aOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.8–3.6), and high CFR serotypes (aOR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2–2.8). Similar prognostic factors were observed for major in-hospital complications. Pneumococcal vaccination was associated with reduced in-hospital mortality (aOR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.05–0.9) but not major complications (P = 0.2). Older and frailer patients, and those who abuse alcohol or take acid-suppressing drugs, are at increased risk of BPP-related mortality and complications, as are those with high CFR serotypes. Beyond identifying those at highest risk, our findings demonstrate the importance of guideline-concordant antibiotics and pneumococcal vaccination in those with BPP. PMID:27861340

  12. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ≥ 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (≥ 85 years), chronic renal

  13. Elevation in systolic blood pressure during heart failure hospitalization is associated with increased short and long-term mortality

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Omer; Segal, Gad; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Goldenberg, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud; Klempfner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP) change during hospitalization of patients with heart failure (HF) and clinical outcomes has never been thoroughly investigated. A total of 3393 patients hospitalized with HF, from 25 hospitals in Israel, were enrolled. The SBP change was calculated by subtracting the discharge SBP values from the admission values and then divided into quartiles of SBP change. We compared the group with upper quartile SBP change to the lower 3 quartiles of change. Both groups had largely similar demographics and clinical characteristics. All-cause mortality rate was 24% at 1-year and 82.6% at 10-years, whereas patients in the upper SBP change group had significantly higher cumulative mortality probability at 1-year (30% vs 22%; log-rank P <0.001), and at 10-years (86% vs 82%; log-rank P <0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis adjusted for comorbidities demonstrated that patients in the upper SBP change quartile have an independent 17% higher mortality risk at 10-years [hazard ratio (HR) 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.28]. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that mortality risk was more pronounced in patients with preserved ejection fraction and in the subgroup with admission SBP ≥140 mm Hg. SBP change is significantly associated with 1- and 10-year all-cause mortality, as an increased SBP change is associated with worse prognosis. We believe that this readily available marker might facilitate risk stratification of patients and possibly improve care. PMID:28151864

  14. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Falcão, Felipe José; Alves, Cláudia Maria Rodrigues; Barbosa, Adriano Henrique Pereira; Caixeta, Adriano; Sousa, José Marconi Almeida; Souza, José Augusto Marcondes; Amaral, Amaury; Wilke, Luiz Carlos; Perez, Fátima Cristina A.; Gonçalves, Iran; Stefanini, Edson; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment. METHODS: This was an observational, prospective study that included 398 patients admitted to a tertiary center for percutaneous coronary intervention within 3 to 24 hours after thrombolysis with tenecteplase. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01791764 RESULTS: The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. Compared with patients who survived, patients who died were more likely to be older, have higher rates of diabetes and chronic renal failure, have a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and demonstrate more evidence of heart failure (Killip class III or IV). Patients who died had significantly lower rates of successful thrombolysis (39% vs. 68%; p = 0.005) and final myocardial blush grade 3 (13.0% vs. 61.9%; p<0.0001). Based on the multivariate analysis, the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.09; p = 0.001), left ventricular ejection fraction (odds ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.89-0.97; p = 0.001), and final myocardial blush grade of 0-2 (odds ratio 8.85, 95% CI 1.34-58.57; p = 0.02) were independent predictors of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective study that evaluated patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated by a pharmacoinvasive strategy, the in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score, left ventricular ejection fraction, and myocardial blush were independent predictors of mortality in this high-risk group of acute coronary syndrome patients. PMID:24473509

  15. Association of mild anemia with hospitalization and mortality in the elderly: the Health and Anemia population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Mosconi, Paola; Apolone, Giovanni; Gandini, Francesca; Nobili, Alessandro; Tallone, Maria Vittoria; Detoma, Paolo; Giacomin, Adriano; Clerico, Mario; Tempia, Patrizia; Guala, Adriano; Fasolo, Gilberto; Lucca, Ugo

    2009-01-01

    Background Mild anemia is a frequent laboratory finding in the elderly usually disregarded in everyday practice as an innocent bystander. The aim of the present population-based study was to prospectively investigate the association of mild grade anemia with hospitalization and mortality. Design and Methods A prospective population-based study of all 65 to 84 year old residents in Biella, Italy was performed between 2003 and 2007. Data from a total of 7,536 elderly with blood tests were available to estimate mortality; full health information available to evaluate health-related outcomes was available for 4,501 of these elderly subjects. Mild grade anemia was defined as a hemoglobin concentration between 10.0 and 11.9 g/dL in women and between 10.0 and 12.9 g/dL in men. Results The risk of hospitalization in the 3 years following recruitment was higher among the mildly anemic elderly subjects than among subjects who were not anemic (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.32; 95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.60). Mortality risk in the following 3.5 years was also higher among the mildly anemic elderly (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.86; 95% confidence interval: 1.34–2.53). Similar results were found when slightly elevating the lower limit of normal hemoglobin concentration to 12.2 g/dL in women and to 13.2 g/dL in men. The risk of mortality was significantly increased in mild anemia of chronic disease but not in that due to β-thalassemia minor. Conclusions After controlling for many potential confounders, mild grade anemia was found to be prospectively associated with clinically relevant outcomes such as increased risk of hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Whether raising hemoglobin concentrations can reduce the risks associated with mild anemia should be tested in controlled clinical trials. PMID:19001283

  16. Risk Factors and Indications for 30-Day Readmission After Primary Surgery for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    AlHilli, Mariam; Langstraat, Carrie; Tran, Christine; Martin, Janice; Weaver, Amy; McGree, Michaela; Mariani, Andrea; Cliby, William; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify patients at risk for postoperative morbidities, we evaluated indications and factors associated with 30-day readmission after epithelial ovarian cancer surgery. Methods Patients undergoing primary surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer between January 2, 2003, and December 29, 2008, were evaluated. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were fit to identify factors associated with 30-day readmission. A parsimonious multivariable model was identified using backward and stepwise variable selection. Results In total, 324 (60.2%) patients were stage III and 91 (16.9%) were stage IV. Of all 538 eligible patients, 104 (19.3%) were readmitted within 30 days. Cytoreduction to no residual disease was achieved in 300 (55.8%) patients, and 167 (31.0%) had measurable disease (≤1 cm residual disease). The most common indications for readmission were surgical site infection (SSI; 21.2%), pleural effusion/ascites management (14.4%), and thromboembolic events (12.5%). Multivariate analysis identified American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (odds ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–2.89; P = 0.007), ascites [1.76 (1.11–2.81); P = 0.02], and postoperative complications during initial admission [grade 3–5 vs none, 2.47 (1.19–5.16); grade 1 vs none, 2.19 (0.98–4.85); grade 2 vs none, 1.28 (0.74–2.21); P = 0.048] to be independently associated with 30-day readmission (c-index = 0.625). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the sole predictor of readmission for SSI (odds ratio, 3.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–4.33; P = 0.04). Conclusions Clinically significant risk factors for 30-day readmission include American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher, ascites and postoperative complications at initial admission. The SSI and pleural effusions/ascites are common indications for readmission. Systems can be developed to predict patients needing outpatient management, improve care, and reduce

  17. Coronary artery bypass grafting in Canada: hospital mortality rates, 1992-1995

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, W A; Quan, H; Brant, R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of in-hospital death after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have been studied in many regions of Canada as possible indicators of hospital-specific quality of care. This nationwide study examined observed and risk-adjusted death rates for 23 Canadian hospitals performing CABG. METHODS: Hospital discharge data were obtained from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and were used to identify all CABG procedures performed in Canadian hospitals in fiscal years 1992/93 through 1995/96. Cases from Quebec hospitals were not studied because hospitals in that province do not report to the institute. Observed death rates were evaluated, and a logistic regression model was used to calculate a risk-adjusted death rate for each hospital for the 4-year period studied. Changes over time in hospital-specific death rates were also examined. RESULTS: A total of 50,357 CABG cases were studied, with an overall death rate of 3.6%. Interhospital comparisons showed that average severity of illness varied considerably across hospitals. Despite risk adjustment accounting for this variable severity, there was considerable variation in adjusted death rates across the 23 hospitals, from 1.95% to 5.76% (p < 0.001 for difference across hospitals). For some hospitals, death rates decreased between 1992/93 and 1995/96, whereas for others the rates were stable or increased. INTERPRETATION: Risk-adjusted rates of in-hospital death after CABG vary widely across Canadian hospitals. There may be differences in quality of care across hospitals, and focused quality-improvement initiatives may be necessary in some institutions. PMID:9834717

  18. Risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality among Korean elderly bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Bum Sik; Kim, Myung Soo; Han, Sang Hoon; Shin, So Youn; Choi, Hee Kyung; Chae, Yun Tae; Jin, Sung Joon; Baek, Ji-Hyeon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, June Myung

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most frequent cause of bacteremia/sepsis in elderly people and increasing antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens has been observed. To describe the characteristics of bacteremic UTI in elderly patients and to identify the independent risk factors of all-cause in-hospital mortality, a retrospective cohort study of bacteremic UTI patients of age over 65 was performed at a single 2000-bed tertiary hospital. Bacteremic UTI was defined as the isolation of the same organism from both urine and blood within 48 h. Eighty-six elderly bacteremic UTI patients were enrolled. Community-acquired infection was the case for most patients (79.1%), and Escherichia coli accounted for 88.6% (70/79) among Gram-negative organisms. Non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were more frequent in hospital-acquired cases and male patients while chronic urinary catheter insertion was related with Gram-positive urosepsis. The antibiotic susceptibility among Gram-negative organisms was not different depending on the source of bacteremic UTI, while non-E. coli Gram-negative organisms were less frequently susceptible for cefotaxime, cefoperazone/sulbactam, and aztreonam. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 11.6%, and functional dependency (adjusted hazard ratio=HR=10.9, 95% confidence interval=95%CI=2.2-54.6) and low serum albumin (adjusted HR=27.0, 95%CI=2.0-361.2) were independently related with increased all-cause in-hospital mortality.

  19. Predictors of Early Post-discharge Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study from the California Intensive Care Outcomes Project

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kuzniewicz, Michael W.; Cason, Brian A.; Lane, Rondall K.; Dean, Mitzi L.; Clay, Ted; Rennie, Deborah J.; Dudley, R. Adams

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Existing intensive care unit (ICU) mortality measurement systems address in-hospital mortality only. However, early post-discharge mortality contributes significantly to overall 30-day mortality. Factors associated with early post-discharge mortality are unknown. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 8,484 ICU patients. Our primary outcome was early post-discharge mortality: death after hospital discharge and ≤ 30 days from ICU admission. Cox regression models assessed the association between patient, hospital, and utilization factors and the primary outcome. Results In multivariate analyses, the hazard for early post-discharge mortality increased with rising severity of illness and decreased with full code status (HR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.49). Compared to discharges home, early post-discharge mortality was highest for acute care transfers (HR 3.18, 95% CI 2.45 to 4.12). Finally, patients with very short ICU length of stay (< 1 day) had greater early post-discharge mortality (HR 1.86, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.61) than those with longest stays (≥ 7 days). Conclusions Early post-discharge mortality is associated with patient preferences (full-code status) and decisions regarding timing and location of discharge. These findings have important implications for anyone attempting to measure or improve ICU performance and who rely upon in-hospital mortality measures to do so. PMID:20716477

  20. Modeling of in hospital mortality determinants in myocardial infarction patients, with and without stroke: A national study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Khaledifar, Arsalan; Etemad, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The data and determinants of mortality due to stroke in myocardial infarction (MI) patients are unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate the differences in risk factors for hospital mortality among MI patients with and without stroke history. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective, cohort study; 20,750 new patients with MI from April, 2012 to March, 2013 were followed up and their data were analyzed according to having or not having the stroke history. Stroke and MI were defined based on the World Health Organization's definition. The data were analyzed by logistic regression in STATA software. Results: Of the 20,750 studied patients, 4293 had stroke history. The prevalence of stroke in the studied population was derived 20.96% (confidence interval [CI] 95%: 20.13–21.24). Of the patients, 2537 (59.1%) had ST-elevation MI (STEMI). Mortality ratio in patients with and without stroke was obtained 18.8% and 10.3%, respectively. The prevalence of risk factors in MI patients with and without a stroke is various. The adjusted odds ratio of mortality in patients with stroke history was derived 7.02 (95% CI: 5.42–9) for chest pain resistant to treatment, 2.39 (95% CI: 1.97–2.9) for STEMI, 3.02 (95% CI: 2.5–3.64) for lack of thrombolytic therapy, 2.2 (95% CI: 1.66–2.91) for heart failure, and 2.17 (95% CI: 1.6–2.9) for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion: With regards to the factors associated with mortality in this study, it is particularly necessary to control the mortality in MI patients with stroke history. More emphasis should be placed on the MI patients with the previous stroke over those without in the interventions developed for prevention and treatment, and for the prevention of avoidable mortalities. PMID:27904619

  1. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of... the Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(55)) for the first 30 days of trading, if: (1) Such index would not...

  2. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of... the Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(55)) for the first 30 days of trading, if: (1) Such index would not...

  3. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of... the Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(55)) for the first 30 days of trading, if: (1) Such index would not...

  4. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of... the Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(55)) for the first 30 days of trading, if: (1) Such index would not...

  5. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of... the Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(55)) for the first 30 days of trading, if: (1) Such index would not...

  6. Which Is More Useful in Predicting Hospital Mortality -Dichotomised Blood Test Results or Actual Test Values? A Retrospective Study in Two Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary; Nangalia, Vishal; Prytherch, David; Holder, Roger; Briggs, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine blood tests are an integral part of clinical medicine and in interpreting blood test results clinicians have two broad options. (1) Dichotomise the blood tests into normal/abnormal or (2) use the actual values and overlook the reference values. We refer to these as the “binary” and the “non-binary” strategy respectively. We investigate which strategy is better at predicting the risk of death in hospital based on seven routinely undertaken blood tests (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, and white blood cell count) using tree models to implement the two strategies. Methodology A retrospective database study of emergency admissions to an acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010, involving 10,050 emergency admissions with routine blood tests undertaken within 24 hours of admission. We compared the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve for predicting in-hospital mortality using the binary and non-binary strategy. Results The mortality rate was 6.98% (701/10050). The mean predicted risk of death in those who died was significantly (p-value <0.0001) lower using the binary strategy (risk = 0.181 95%CI: 0.193 to 0.210) versus the non-binary strategy (risk = 0.222 95%CI: 0.194 to 0.251), representing a risk difference of 28.74 deaths in the deceased patients (n = 701). The binary strategy had a significantly (p-value <0.0001) lower area under the ROC curve of 0.832 (95% CI: 0.819 to 0.845) versus the non-binary strategy (0.853 95% CI: 0.840 to 0.867). Similar results were obtained using data from another hospital. Conclusions Dichotomising routine blood test results is less accurate in predicting in-hospital mortality than using actual test values because it underestimates the risk of death in patients who died. Further research into the use of actual blood test values in clinical decision making is required especially as the infrastructure to implement this potentially promising

  7. Rat brain pro-oxidant effects of peripherally administered 5 nm ceria 30 days after exposure.

    PubMed

    Hardas, Sarita S; Sultana, Rukhsana; Warrier, Govind; Dan, Mo; Florence, Rebecca L; Wu, Peng; Grulke, Eric A; Tseng, Michael T; Unrine, Jason M; Graham, Uschi M; Yokel, Robert A; Butterfield, D Allan

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the residual pro-or anti-oxidant effects in rat brain 30 days after systemic administration of a 5 nm citrate-stabilized ceria dispersion. A ∼4% aqueous ceria dispersion was iv-infused (0 or 85 mg/kg) into rats which were terminated 30 days later. Ceria concentration, localization, and chemical speciation in the brain was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), light and electron microscopy (EM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), respectively. Pro- or anti-oxidant effects were evaluated by measuring levels of protein carbonyls (PC), 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT), and protein-bound-4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (HNE) in the hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum. Glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase levels and activity were measured in addition to levels of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), and heat shock protein-70 (Hsp70). The blood brain barrier (BBB) was visibly intact and no ceria was seen in the brain cells. Ceria elevated PC and Hsp70 levels in hippocampus and cerebellum, while 3NT and iNOS levels were elevated in the cortex. Whereas glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity were decreased in the hippocampus, GR levels were decreased in the cortex, and GPx and catalase levels were decreased in the cerebellum. The GSH:GSSG ratio, an index of cellular redox status, was decreased in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The results are in accordance with the observation that this nanoscale material remains in this mammal model up to 30 days after its administration and the hypothesis that it exerts pro-oxidant effects on the brain without crossing the BBB. These results have important implications on the potential use of ceria ENM as therapeutic agents.

  8. Effect of glycemic state on hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Chi, Albert; Lissauer, Matthew E; Kirchoffner, Jill; Scalea, Thomas M; Johnson, Steven B

    2011-11-01

    Intensive insulin therapy can reduce mortality. Hypoglycemia related to intensive therapy may worsen outcomes. This study compared risk adjusted mortality for different glycemic states. A retrospective review of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit over 4 years was performed. Patients were divided into glycemic groups: HYPER (≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL, any <60), HYPO (≥1 episode < 60 mg/dL, any >180), BOTH (≥1 episode < 60 and ≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL), NORMO (all episodes 60-180 mg/dL), HYPER-Only (≥1 episode > 180, none <60 mg/dL), and HYPO-Only (≥1 episode < 60, none >180 mg/dL). Observed to expected Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III mortality ratios (O/E) were studied. Number of adverse glycemic events was compared with mortality. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia occurred in 18 per cent and 50 per cent of patients. Mortality was 12.4 per cent (O/E = 0.88). BOTH had the highest O/E ratio (1.43) with HYPO the second highest (1.30). Groups excluding hypoglycemia (NORMO and HYPER-only) had the lowest O/E ratios: 0.56 and 0.88. Increasing number of hypoglycemic events were associated with increasing O/E ratio: 0.69 O/E for no events, 1.19 for 1-3 events, 1.35 for 4-6 events, 1.9 for 7-9 events, and 3.13 for ≥ 10 events. Ten or more hyperglycemic events were needed to significantly associate with worse mortality (O/E 1.53). Hyper- and hypoglycemia increase mortality compared with APACHE III expected mortality, with highest mortality risk if both are present. Hypoglycemia is associated with worse risk. Glucose control may need to be loosened to prevent hypoglycemia and reduce glucose variability.

  9. Changes in size and compliance of the calf after 30 days of simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Stein, Stewart L.

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis that reducing muscle compartment by a long-term exposure to microgravity would cause increased leg venous compliance was tested in eight men who were assessed for vascular compliance and for serial circumferences of the calf before and after 30 days of continuous 6-deg head-down bed rest. It was found that head-down bed rest caused decreases in the calculated calf volume and the calf-muscle compartment, as well as increases in calf compliance. The percent increases in calf compliance correlated significantly with decreases in calf muscle compartment.

  10. Thalamic haemorrhage vs internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage: clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Raquel; Oliveres, Montserrat; Comes, Emili; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a) to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b) to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Methods Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT) scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Results Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420) and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364). Hypertension (53.2%), vascular malformations (6.4%), haematological conditions (4.3%) and anticoagulation (2.1%) were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9). Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56), intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74) and age (OR = 1.23), were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome. PMID:17919332

  11. Initial antifungal strategy does not correlate with mortality in patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Murri, R; Scoppettuolo, G; Ventura, G; Fabbiani, M; Giovannenze, F; Taccari, F; Milozzi, E; Posteraro, B; Sanguinetti, M; Cauda, R; Fantoni, M

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of Candida bloodstream infections (BSIs) has increased over time, especially in medical wards. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of different antifungal treatment strategies on 30-day mortality in patients with Candida BSI not admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) at disease onset. This prospective, monocentric, cohort study was conducted at an 1100-bed university hospital in Rome, Italy, where an infectious disease consultation team was implemented. All cases of Candida BSIs observed in adult patients from November 2012 to April 2014 were included. Patients were grouped according to the initial antifungal strategy: fluconazole, echinocandin, or liposomal amphotericin B. Cox regression analysis was used to identify risk factors significantly associated with 15-day and 30-day mortality. During the study period, 130 patients with candidemia were observed (58 % with C. albicans, 7 % with C. glabrata, and 23 % with C. parapsilosis). The first antifungal drug was fluconazole for 40 % of patients, echinocandin for 57.0 %, and liposomal amphotericin B for 4 %. During follow-up, 33 % of patients died. The cumulative mortality 30 days after the candidemia episode was 30.8 % and was similar among groups. In the Cox regression analysis, clinical presentation was the only independent factor associated with 15-day mortality, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and clinical presentation were the independent factors associated with 30-day mortality. No differences in 15-day and 30-day mortality were observed between patients with and without C. albicans candidemia. In patients with candidemia admitted to medical or surgical wards, clinical severity but not the initial antifungal strategy were significantly correlated with mortality.

  12. Trend and Seasonal Patterns of Injuries and Mortality Due to Motorcyclists Traffic Accidents; A Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpour, Marjan; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Esmaeilpour Aghdam, Mohammad; Mohammadian, Mahdi; Maleki, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate trend and seasonal pattern of occurrence and mortality of motorcycle accidents in patients referred to hospitals of Isfahan. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out using traffic accidents data of Isfahan province, extracted from Ministry of Health (MOH) database from 2006 to 2010. During the study period, 83648 people injured due to motorcycle traffic accidents were referred to hospitals, all of them entered in the study. Logistic regression model was used to calculate the hospital mortality odds ratio, and Cochrane-Armitage test was used for assessment of linear trend. Results: During the study period, the hospital admission for motorcycle accident was 83,648 and 89.3% (74743) of them were men. Mean age in accidents time was 26.41±14.3 years. The injuries and death sex ratio were 8.4 and 16.9, respectively. Lowest admission rate was during autumn and highest during summer. The injury mortality odds ratio was 1.01 (CI 95% 0.73-1.39) in the Spring, 1.34 (CI95% 1.01-1.79) in summer and 1.17 (CI95% 0.83-1.63). It was also calculated to be 2.51 (CI95% 1.36-4.64) in age group 40-49, 2.39 (CI95% 1.51-5.68) in 50-59 and 4.79 (CI95% 2.49-9.22) in 60-69 years. The mortality odds ratio was 3.53 (CI95% 2.77-4.5) in rural place, 1.33 (CI95% 1.15-1.54) in men, and 2.44 (CI95% 2.09-2.85) in the road out of town and village. In addition, trend of motorcycle accidents mortality was increasing (p<0.001). Conclusion: Motorcycle accidents injuries are more common in men, summer, young age and rural roads. These high risk groups need more attention, care and higher training. PMID:28246624

  13. The Association of Longitudinal and Interpersonal Continuity of Care with Emergency Department Use, Hospitalization, and Mortality among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Bentler, Suzanne E.; Morgan, Robert O.; Virnig, Beth A.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuity of medical care is widely believed to lead to better health outcomes and service utilization patterns for patients. Most continuity studies, however, have only used administrative claims to assess longitudinal continuity with a provider. As a result, little is known about how interpersonal continuity (the patient's experience at the visit) relates to improved health outcomes and service use. Methods We linked claims-based longitudinal continuity and survey-based self-reported interpersonal continuity indicators for 1,219 Medicare beneficiaries who completed the National Health and Health Services Use Questionnaire. With these linked data, we prospectively evaluated the effect of both types of continuity of care indicators on emergency department use, hospitalization, and mortality over a five-year period. Results Patient-reported continuity was associated with reduced emergency department use, preventable hospitalization, and mortality. Most of the claims-based measures, including those most frequently used to assess continuity, were not associated with reduced utilization or mortality. Conclusion Our results indicate that the patient- and claims-based indicators of continuity have very different effects on these important health outcomes, suggesting that reform efforts must include the patient-provider experience when evaluating health care quality. PMID:25531108

  14. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries. To create a major change in Haiti’s health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic “community care grids” to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis. We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti’s health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  15. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries.To create a major change in Haiti's health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic "community care grids" to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis.We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti's health care system will be among the leaders in that region.

  16. Parameters influencing in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized in intensive cardiac care unit: is there an influence of anemia and iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Sawicki, Robert; Kiluk, Izabela; Baranicz, Malgorzata; Stepek, Tomasz; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the incidence and prognostic value of anemia as well as of the iron status in non-selected patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU). 392 patients (mean age 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women), 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure, and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders were consecutively, prospectively assessed. The biomarkers of iron status-serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and transferrin saturation (TSAT) together with standard clinical, biochemical and echocardiographic variables-were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 3.8% (15 patients). The prevalences of anemia (according to WHO criteria), and iron deficiency (ID) were 64 and 63%, respectively. The level of biomarkers of iron status, but not anemia, was lower in patients who died (p < 0.05). Anemia was less frequent in patients with ACS as compared to the remaining ICCU population (p = 0.019). The analysis by logistic regression indicated the highest risk of death for age [odds ratio (OD) 1.38, 95% CI 1.27-1.55], SIC (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94), TIBC (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.98), left ventricle ejection fraction (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93), as well as hospitalization for non-ACS (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.14-0.46), (p < 0.05). The risk of death during hospitalization tended to increase with decreasing levels of TIBC (p = 0.49), as well as with the absence of ACS (p = 0.54). The incidence of anemia and ID in heterogeneous ICCU patients is high. Parameters of the iron status, but not anemia per se, independently influence in-hospital mortality. The prevalence of anemia is higher in non-ACS patients, and tends to worsen the prognosis.

  17. Perioperative risk factors for mortality and length of hospitalization in mares with dystocia undergoing general anesthesia: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Eva; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Costa, Maria Carolina; Valverde, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated associations between perioperative factors and probability of death and length of hospitalization of mares with dystocia that survived following general anesthesia. Demographics and perioperative characteristics from 65 mares were reviewed retrospectively and used in a risk factor analysis. Mortality rate was 21.5% during the first 24 h post-anesthesia. The mean ± standard deviation number of days of hospitalization of surviving mares was 6.3 ± 5.4 d. Several factors were found in the univariable analysis to be significantly associated (P < 0.1) with increased probability of perianesthetic death, including: low preoperative total protein, high temperature and severe dehydration on presentation, prolonged dystocia, intraoperative hypotension, and drugs used during recovery. Type of delivery and day of the week the surgery was performed were significantly associated with length of hospitalization in the multivariable mixed effects model. The study identified some risk factors that may allow clinicians to better estimate the probability of mortality and morbidity in these mares.

  18. Renal Failure in Sickle Cell Disease: Prevalence, Predictors of Disease, Mortality and Effect on Length of Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri L H; Paul, Yonette; Oneal, Patricia; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease is not only a chronic comorbidity but also a mortality risk factor. Though renal dysfunction starts early in life in sickle cell patients, the predictors that can identify sickle cell disease patients at risk of developing renal dysfunction is not known. We used the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Medicaid Databases from 2007 to 2012. Incidence of new acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was calculated in this cohort. There were 9481 patients with a diagnosis of sickle cell disease accounting for 64,201 hospital admissions, during the study period. Both ARF and CKD were associated with higher risk of inpatient mortality, longer duration of the hospital stay and expensive hospitalizations. The yearly incidence of new ARF in sickle cell disease patients was 1.4% and annual CKD incidence was 1.3%. The annual rate of new ARF and CKD in the control group was 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. The most important predictors of new CKD were proteinuria, ARF and hypertension. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension and sickle cell crisis were the most important predictors of new ARF. The annual rate of incidences of ARF and CKD were 2- to 3-fold higher in sickle cell disease compared to the non sickle cell disease group. Besides the common risk factors for renal disease in the general population, it is imperative to monitor the sickle cell disease patients with more severe disease to prevent them from developing renal dysfunction.

  19. Patient Safety Events and Harms During Medical and Surgical Hospitalizations for Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma E.; Pronovost, Peter; Dixon, Lisa B.; Guallar, Eliseo; Ford, Daniel E.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Boonyasai, Romsai T.; Thompson, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of patient safety events and associated nonfatal physical harms and mortality in a cohort of persons with serious mental illness. This group experiences high rates of medical comorbidity and premature mortality and may be at high risk of adverse patient safety events. Methods Medical record review was conducted for medical-surgical hospitalizations occurring during 1994–2004 in a community-based cohort of Maryland adults with serious mental illness. Individuals were eligible if they died within 30 days of a medical-surgical hospitalization and if they also had at least one prior medical-surgical hospitalization within five years of death. All admissions took place at Maryland general hospitals. A case-crossover analysis examined the relationships among patient safety events, physical harms, and elevated likelihood of death within 30 days of hospitalization. Results A total of 790 hospitalizations among 253 adults were reviewed. The mean number of patient safety events per hospitalization was 5.8, and the rate of physical harms was 142 per 100 hospitalizations. The odds of physical harm were elevated in hospitalizations in which 22 of the 34 patient safety events occurred (p<.05), including medical events (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.3–1.7) and procedure-related events (OR=1.6, CI=1.2–2.0). Adjusted odds of death within 30 days of hospitalization were elevated for individuals with any patient safety event, compared with those with no event (OR=3.7, CI=1.4–10.3). Conclusions Patient safety events were positively associated with physical harm and 30-day mortality in nonpsychiatric hospitalizations for persons with serious mental illness. PMID:27181736

  20. 78 FR 58318 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: The Framingham Heart Study (FHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... studying the determinants of cardiovascular disease. Morbidity and mortality follow-up will continue to... data collection plans and instruments, contact Dr. Gina Wei, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences,...

  1. 78 FR 70958 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recordkeeping for HUD's Continuum of Care Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recordkeeping for HUD's Continuum of Care Program AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD has... allow for an additional 30 days of public comment. DATES: Comments Due Date: December 27,...

  2. Erythrocyte selenium concentration predicts intensive care unit and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Selenoenzymes can modulate the extent of oxidative stress, which is recognized as a key feature of septic shock. The pathophysiologic role of erythrocyte selenium concentration in patients with septic shock remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association of erythrocyte selenium concentration with glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activity, GPx1 polymorphisms and with ICU and hospital mortality in septic shock patients. Methods This prospective study included all patients older than 18 years with septic shock on admission or during their ICU stay, admitted to one of the three ICUs of our institution, from January to August 2012. At the time of the patients’ enrollment, demographic information was recorded. Blood samples were taken within the first 72 hours of the patients’ admission or within 72 hours of the septic shock diagnosis for determination of selenium status, protein carbonyl concentration, GPx1 activity and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism (rs 1050450) genotyping. Results A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated. The mean age was 57.6 ± 15.9 years, 63.6% were male. Regarding selenium status, only erythrocyte selenium concentration was lower in patients who died in the ICU. The frequencies for GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism were 55%, 38% and 7% for Pro/Pro, Pro/Leu and Leu/Leu, respectively. In the logistic regression models, erythrocyte selenium concentration was associated with ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock even after adjustment for protein carbonyl concentration and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II) or sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA). Conclusions Erythrocyte selenium concentration was a predictor of ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock. However, this effect was not due to GPx1 activity or Pro198Leu polymorphism. PMID:24887198

  3. Medication Adherence and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality and Hospitalization Among Patients With Newly Prescribed Antihypertensive Medications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyeun; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Hwang, Yunji; Park, Sue K; Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, BeLong

    2016-03-01

    The importance of adherence to antihypertensive treatments for the prevention of cardiovascular disease has not been well elucidated. This study evaluated the effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on specific cardiovascular disease mortality (ischemic heart disease [IHD], cerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral infarction). Our study used data from a 3% sample cohort that was randomly extracted from enrollees of Korean National Health Insurance. Study subjects were aged ≥20 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, and started newly prescribed antihypertensive medication in 2003 to 2004. Adherence to antihypertensive medication was estimated as the cumulative medication adherence. Subjects were divided into good (cumulative medication adherence, ≥80%), intermediate (cumulative medication adherence, 50%-80%), and poor (cumulative medication adherence, <50%) adherence groups. We used time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between medication adherence and health outcomes. Among 33 728 eligible subjects, 670 (1.99%) died of coronary heart disease or stroke during follow-up. Patients with poor medication adherence had worse mortality from IHD (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.31; P for trend=0.005), cerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.77; P for trend=0.004), and cerebral infarction (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.96; P for trend=0.003) than those with good adherence. The estimated hazard ratios of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease were consistent with the mortality end point. Poor medication adherence was associated with higher mortality and a greater risk of hospitalization for specific cardiovascular diseases, emphasizing the importance of a monitoring system and strategies to improve medication adherence in clinical practice.

  4. Prognostic role of D-dimer for in-hospital and 1-year mortality in exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoping; Wu, Yankui; Zhou, Yumin; Wu, Zelong; Wei, Liping; Li, Yuqun; Peng, GongYong; Liang, Weiqiang; Ran, Pixin

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Serum D-dimer is elevated in respiratory disease. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of D-dimer on in-hospital and 1-year mortality after acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Methods Upon admission, we measured 343 AECOPD patients’ serum D-dimer levels and arterial blood gas analysis, and recorded their clinical characteristics. The level of D-dimer that discriminated survivors and non-survivors was determined using a receiver operator curve (ROC). The risk factors for in-hospital mortality were identified through univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression analyses. To evaluate the predictive role of D-dimer for 1-year mortality, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed. Results In all, 28 patients died, and 315 patients survived in the in-hospital period. The group of dead patients had lower pH levels (7.35±0.11 vs 7.39±0.05, P<0.0001), higher D-dimer, arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2), C-reactive protein (CRP), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels (D-dimer 2,244.9±2,310.7 vs 768.2±1,078.4 µg/L, P<0.0001; PaCO2: 58.8±29.7 vs 46.1±27.0 mmHg, P=0.018; CRP: 81.5±66, P=0.001; BUN: 10.20±6.87 vs 6.15±3.15 mmol/L, P<0.0001), and lower hemoglobin levels (118.6±29.4 vs 128.3±18.2 g/L, P=0.001). The areas under the ROC curves of D-dimer for in-hospital death were 0.748 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.641–0.854). D-dimer ≥985 ng/L was a risk factor for in-hospital mortality (relative risk =6.51; 95% CI 3.06–13.83). Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that D-dimer ≥985 ng/L and heart failure were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Both univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that D-dimer ≥985 ng/L was an independent risk factor for 1-year death (hazard ratio (HR) 3.48, 95% CI 2.07–5.85 for the univariate analysis; and HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.05–3.65 for the multivariate analysis

  5. Correspondence between hair cortisol concentrations and 30-day integrated daily salivary and weekly urinary cortisol measures.

    PubMed

    Short, Sarah J; Stalder, Tobias; Marceau, Kristine; Entringer, Sonja; Moog, Nora K; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Wadhwa, Pathik D; Buss, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of cortisol production, regulation and function is of considerable interest and relevance given its ubiquitous role in virtually all aspects of physiology, health and disease risk. The quantification of cortisol concentration in hair has been proposed as a promising approach for the retrospective assessment of integrated, long-term cortisol production. However, human research is still needed to directly test and validate current assumptions about which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are reflected in hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Here, we report findings from a validation study in a sample of 17 healthy adults (mean±SD age: 34±8.6 yrs). To determine the extent to which HCC captures cumulative cortisol production, we examined the correspondence of HCC, obtained from the first 1cm scalp-near hair segment, assumed to retrospectively reflect 1-month integrated cortisol secretion, with 30-day average salivary cortisol area-under-the curve (AUC) based on 3 samples collected per day (on awakening, +30min, at bedtime) and the average of 4 weekly 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC) assessments. To further address which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are best reflected in the HCC measure, we also examined components of the salivary measures that represent: (1) production in response to the challenge of awakening (using the cortisol awakening response [CAR]), and (2) chronobiological regulation of cortisol production (using diurnal slope). Finally, we evaluated the test-retest stability of each cortisol measure. Results indicate that HCC was most strongly associated with the prior 30-day integrated cortisol production measure (average salivary cortisol AUC) (r=0.61, p=0.01). There were no significant associations between HCC and the 30-day summary measures using CAR or diurnal slope. The relationship between 1-month integrated 24-h UFC and HCC did not reach statistical significance (r=0.30, p=0.28). Lastly, of all cortisol

  6. Interpretable Topic Features for Post-ICU Mortality Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yen-Fu; Rumshisky, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records provide valuable resources for understanding the correlation between various diseases and mortality. The analysis of post-discharge mortality is critical for healthcare professionals to follow up potential causes of death after a patient is discharged from the hospital and give prompt treatment. Moreover, it may reduce the cost derived from readmissions and improve the quality of healthcare. Our work focused on post-discharge ICU mortality prediction. In addition to features derived from physiological measurements, we incorporated ICD-9-CM hierarchy into Bayesian topic model learning and extracted topic features from medical notes. We achieved highest AUCs of 0.835 and 0.829 for 30-day and 6-month post-discharge mortality prediction using baseline and topic proportions derived from Labeled-LDA. Moreover, our work emphasized the interpretability of topic features derived from topic model which may facilitates the understanding and investigation of the complexity between mortality and diseases. PMID:28269879

  7. Delirium is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Mancini, Antonio; Grazzini, Maddalena; Paolacci, Giulia; Morettini, Alessandro; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for hospitalization and death in elderly people. Many predictors of in-hospital outcome have been studied in the general population with CAP. However, data are lacking on the prognostic significance of conditions unique to older patients, such as delirium and the coexistence of multiple comorbidities. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of in-hospital outcome in elderly patients hospitalized for CAP. In this retrospective study, consecutive patients with CAP aged ≥65 years were enrolled between January 2011 and June 2012 in two general wards. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were collected from electronic medical records. The end-point of the study was the occurrence of in-hospital death. 443 patients (mean age 81.8 ± 7.5, range 65-99 years) were enrolled. More than 3 comorbidities were present in 31 % of patients. Mean confusion, blood urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65 years (CURB-65) score was 2.5 ± 0.7 points. Mean length of stay was 7.6 ± 5.7 days. In-hospital death occurred in 54 patients (12.2 %). At multivariate analysis, independent predictors of in-hospital death were: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 6.21, p = 0.005), occurrence of at least one episode of delirium (OR 5.69, p = 0.017), male sex (OR 5.10, p < 0.0001), and CURB-65 score (OR 3.98, p < 0.0001). Several predictors of in-hospital death (COPD, male gender, CURB-65) in patients with CAP older than 65 years are similar to those of younger patients. In this cohort of elderly patients, the occurrence of delirium was highly prevalent and represented a distinctive predictor of death.

  8. Injury pattern, hospital triage, and mortality of 1250 patients with severe traumatic brain injury caused by road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Leijdesdorff, Henry A; van Dijck, Jeroen T J M; Krijnen, Pieta; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Schipper, Inger B

    2014-03-01

    This epidemiological study analyzed the incidence, risk factors, hospital triage, and outcome of patients with severe traumatic brain injuries (sTBIs) caused by road traffic accidents (RTAs) admitted to hospitals in the Trauma Center West-Netherlands (TCWN) region. Trauma registry data were used to identify TBI in all RTA victims admitted to hospitals in the mid-West region of the Netherlands from 2003 to 2011. Type of head injury and severity were classified using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Head injuries with AIS severity scores ≥ 3 were considered sTBI. Ten percent of all 12,503 hospital-admitted RTA victims sustained sTBI, ranging from 5.4% in motorcyclists, 7.4% in motorists, 9.6% in cyclists, and 12.7% in moped riders to 15.1% in pedestrians (p<0.0001). Among RTA victims admitted to hospital, sTBI was most prevalent in pedestrians (odds ratio [OR], 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-2.86) and moped riders (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.51-2.30). Injury patterns differed between road user groups. Incidence of contusion ranged from 46.6% in cyclists to 74.2% in motorcyclists, whereas basilar and open-skull fractures were least common in motorcyclists (22.6%) and most common in moped riders (51.5%). Hemorrhage incidence ranged from 44.9% (motorists) to 63.6% (pedestrians). Subdural and -arachnoid bleedings were most frequent. Age, Glasgow Coma Scale, and type of hemorrhage were independent prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality after sTBI. In-hospital mortality ranged from 4.2% in moped riders to 14.1% in motorists. Pedestrians have the highest risk to sustain sTBI and, more specifically, intracranial hemorrhage. Hemorrhage and contusion both occur in over 50% of patients with sTBI. Specific brain injury patterns can be distinguished for specific road user groups, and independent prognostic risk factors for sTBI were identified. This knowledge may be used to improve vigilance for particular injuries in specific patient groups and stimulate

  9. The Gravity of LBNP Exercise: Lessons Learned from Identical Twins in Bed for 30 Days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Groppo, Eli R.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Watenpaugh, Donald; Schneider, Suzanne; O'Leary, Deborah; Smith, Scott M.; Steinbach, Gregory C.; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shinji; Meyer, R. Scott

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity leads to cardiovascular deconditioning in humans, which is manifested by post-flight reduction of orthostatic tolerance and upright exercise capacity. During upright posture on Earth, blood pressures are greater in the feet than at heart or head levels due to gravity's effects on columns of blood in the body. During exposure to Microgravity, all gravitational blood pressures disappear. Presently, there is no exercise hardware available for space flight to provide gravitational blood pressures to tissues of the lower body. We hypothesized that 40 minutes of supine treadmill running per day in a LBNP chamber at 1.0 to 1.2 body weight (approximately 50 - 60 mm Hg LBNP) with a 5 min resting, nonexercise LBNP exposure at 50 mm Hg after the exercise session will maintain aerobic fitness orthostatic tolerance, and selected parameters of musculoskeletal function during 30 days of bed rest (simulated microgravity). This paper is an interim report of some of our findings on 16 subjects.

  10. Development of Lightweight Material Composites to Insulate Cryogenic Tanks for 30-Day Storage in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for an MLI system which will meet the design constraints of an ILRV used for 7- to 30-day missions. The ten tasks are briefly described: (1) material survey and procurement, material property tests, and selection of composites to be considered; (2) definition of environmental parameters and tooling requirements, and thermal and structural design verification test definition; (3) definition of tanks and associated hardware to be used, and definition of MLI concepts to be considered; (4) thermal analyses, including purge, evacuation, and reentry repressurization analyses; (5) structural analyses (6) thermal degradation tests of composite and structural tests of fastener; (7) selection of MLI materials and system; (8) definition of a conceptual MLI system design; (9) evaluation of nondestructive inspection techniques and definition of procedures for repair of damaged areas; and (10) preparation of preliminary specifications.

  11. Structural and metabolic characteristics of human skeletal muscle following 30 days of simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hikida, Robert S.; Gollnick, Philip D.; Dudley, Gary A.; Convertino, Victor A.; Buchanan, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The effects of simulated microgravity (30 days of continuous 6-deg headdown bedrest, BR) on the structural and metabolic characteristics of human skeletal muscle were determined. Percutaneous needle biopsy samples obtained from the vastus lateralis and soleus muscles before and after the headdown BR were analyzed for histochemical, biochemical and ultrastructual changes. It was found that headdown BR led to decreases in both fast-twitch and slow-twitch fiber areas in both muscles, and there was evidence of remodeling of the ultrastructure in both muscles. The activities of beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and citrate synthase were reduced during BR, but phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities did not change. The results indicate that 30-d exposure to simulated microgravity decreased the capacity for aerobic energy supply of human skeletal muscle and led to a disorganization of the contractile machinery.

  12. Continuous 30-day measurements utilizing the monkey metabolism pod. [study of weightlessness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    A fiberglass system was previously described, using which quantitative physiological measurements could be made to study the effects of weightlessness on 10 to 14 kg adult monkeys maintained in comfortable restraint under space flight conditions. Recent improvements in the system have made it possible to obtain continuous measurements of respiratory gas exchange, cardiovascular function, and mineral balance for periods of up to 30 days on pig-tailed monkeys. It has also been possible to operate two pods which share one set of instrumentation, thereby permitting simultaneous measurements to be made on two animals by commutating signal outputs from the pods. In principle, more than two pods could be operated in this fashion. The system is compatible with Spacelab design. Representative physiological data from ground tests of the system are presented.

  13. [Predictors of in-hospital mortality in adult postcardiotomy cardiacgenic shock patients successfully weaned from venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Xie, H X; Yang, F; Jiang, C J; Wang, J H; Hou, D B; Wang, J G; Wang, H; Hou, X T

    2017-03-28

    Objective: To assess the factors associated with outcome of patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in a large ECMO center. Methods: Patients aged >18 years who received ECMO support for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock were identified between January 2011 and December 2015. One hundred and seventy-seven patients (64.8%) successfully weaned from ECMO. These patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they could survive to hospital discharge: the survival group (group S, n=119) and death group (group D, n=58). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Results: Compared to those from group D, patients in group S exhibited a younger age[(53.4±11.7) vs (58.9±11.5) years], a lower inotrope score at the beginning of ECMO [25(15, 60) vs 35.0(23, 60)], a lower average platelets transfusion [4.0(2.0, 5.2) vs 5.0(3.0, 7.2)U] (all P<0.05). There were shorter duration of ECMO support [95.0(73.0, 131.0) vs 120.0(95.8, 160.2) h], shorter ventilation time [137.0(70.0, 236.8) vs 215.0(164.0, 305.0) h], shorter stay in ICU [182.0(140.0, 236.0) vs 259.0(207.0, 382.0) h] and longer hospital stay after weaned from ECMO [14(11, 24) vs 8(4, 16) d] in group S patients compared to those in group D (all P<0.05). Age>65 years (P=0.046), neurologic complications (P<0.001) and lower extremity ischemia (P<0.001) during ECMO support, left ventricular ejection fraction<35% (P=0.011) and central venous pressure (CVP)>12 cmH(2)O(P=0.018) when weaned from ECMO, and the multi-organ function failure (P<0.001) after weaned from ECMO were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions: Neurologic complications and lower extremity ischemia that occurred during ECMO, multi-organ function failure after weaned from ECMO had a significant impact on in-hospital mortality. Further studies are needed to prevent neurologic complications and lower extremity ischemia in

  14. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Zwart, Sara R; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen; Smith, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25-49 yr) who participated in a 30-day -6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ~20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ~25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ~20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = -0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration.

  15. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25–49 yr) who participated in a 30-day −6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ∼20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ∼25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ∼20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = −0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  16. Antibiotic treatment and mortality in patients with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis or bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Thønnings, S; Knudsen, J D; Schønheyder, H C; Søgaard, M; Arpi, M; Gradel, K O; Østergaard, C

    2016-08-01

    Invasive Listeria monocytogenes infections carry a high mortality despite antibiotic treatment. The rareness of the infection makes it difficult to improve antibiotic treatment through randomized clinical trials. This observational study investigated clinical features and outcome of invasive L. monocytogenes infections including the efficacy of empiric and definitive antibiotic therapies. Demographic, clinical and biochemical findings, antibiotic treatment and 30-day mortality for all episodes of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and/or meningitis were collected by retrospective medical record review in the North Denmark Region and the Capital Region of Denmark (17 hospitals) from 1997 to 2012. Risk factors for 30-day all-cause mortality were assessed by logistic regression. The study comprised 229 patients (median age: 71 years), 172 patients had bacteraemia, 24 patients had meningitis and 33 patients had both. Significant risk factors for 30-day mortality were septic shock (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.4), altered mental state (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-8.1). Cephalosporins accounted for 90% of inadequately treated cases. Adequate definitive antibiotic treatment was administered to 195 patients who survived the early period (benzylpenicillin 72, aminopenicillin 84, meropenem 28, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim 6, and piperacillin/tazobactam 5). Definitive antibiotic treatment with benzylpenicillin or aminopenicillin resulted in a lower 30-day mortality in an adjusted analysis compared with meropenem (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.8). In conclusion, inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy and definitive therapy with meropenem were both associated with significantly higher 30-day mortality.

  17. Delay in admission for elective coronary-artery bypass grafting is associated with increased in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Boris G; Fradet, Guy; Hayden, Robert; Kuramoto, Lisa; Levy, Adrian R; FitzGerald, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    Background Many health care systems now use priority wait lists for scheduling elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery, but there have not yet been any direct estimates of reductions in in-hospital mortality rate afforded by ensuring that the operation is performed within recommended time periods. Methods We used a population-based registry to identify patients with established coronary artery disease who underwent isolated CABG in British Columbia, Canada. We studied whether postoperative survival during hospital admission for CABG differed significantly among patients who waited for surgery longer than the recommended time, 6 weeks for patients needing semi-urgent surgery and 12 weeks for those needing non-urgent surgery. Results Among 7316 patients who underwent CABG, 97 died during the same hospital admission, for a province-wide death rate at discharge of 1.3%. The observed proportion of patients who died during the same admission was 1.0% (27 deaths among 2675 patients) for patients treated within the recommended time and 1.5% (70 among 4641) for whom CABG was delayed. After adjustment for age, sex, anatomy, comorbidity, calendar period, hospital, and mode of admission, patients with early CABG were only 2/3 as likely as those for whom CABG was delayed to experience in-hospital death (odds ratio 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39 to 0.96). There was a linear trend of 5% increase in the odds of in-hospital death for every additional month of delay before surgery, adjusted OR = 1.05 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.11). Conclusion We found a significant survival benefit from performing surgical revascularization within the time deemed acceptable to consultant surgeons for patients requiring the treatment on a semi-urgent or non-urgent basis. PMID:18803823

  18. Health in a fragile state: a five-year review of mortality patterns and trends at Somalia’s Banadir Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulane, Asli; Sematimba, Douglas; Mohamed, Lul M; Ali, Abdirashid H; Lu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background The recurrent civil conflict in Somalia has impeded progress toward improving health and health care, with lack of data and poor performance of health indicators. This study aimed at making inference about Banadir region by exploring morbidity and mortality trends at Banadir Hospital. This is one of the few functional hospitals during war. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted with data collected at Banadir Hospital for the period of January 2008–December 2012. The data were aggregated from patient records and summarized on a morbidity and mortality surveillance form with respect to age groups and stratified by sex. The main outcome was the number of patients that died in the hospital. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between sex and hospital mortality. Results Conditions of infectious origin were the major presentations at the hospital. The year 2011 recorded the highest number of cases of diarrhea and mortality due to diarrhea. The stillbirth rate declined during the study period from 272 to 48 stillbirths per 1,000 live births by 2012. The sum of total cases that were attended to at the hospital by the end of 2012 was four times the number at the baseline year of the study in 2008; however, the overall mortality rate among those admitted declined between 2008 and 2012. Conclusion There was reduction in patient mortality at the hospital over the study period. Data from Banadir Hospital are consistent with findings from Banadir region and could give credible public health reflections for the region given the lack of data on a population level. PMID:27621664

  19. [Hospital mortality of cerebrovascular insult in the Western Herzegovina Canton in the period 1998-2002].

    PubMed

    Vasilj, Ivan; Cavaljuga, Semra; Lucić, Tomo; Kvesić, Ferdo

    2005-01-01

    Cerebro-vascular insult is defined as sudden focal neurological deficit, caused by a cerebro-vascular disease lasting more then 24 hours. In this paper result of a retrospective epidemiological study of cerebro-vascular insult hospitalized and died patients from West Hercegovina Canton, was given. The study was done in Clinical hospital Mostar, for the period from 1998 to 2002. The source of the data was this hospital medical documentation. This hospital serves a total of 88,257 population of West Hercegovina Canton. A total of 393 insult cases were analyzed, out of which were 189 or 48.1% of male and 204 or 51.9% female patients. Hospital lethality found for that period was 37.4% (147 patients died out of 393 treated). Out of a total number of exited patients 37.1% (70 out of 189) were male and 37.7% (77 out of 204) were female patients. The highest lethality among both sexes was above the age of 65 years of life (37.4%), while the least was among patients between 30 to 49 years of life (25.0%).

  20. AIDS deaths shift from hospital to home. AIDS Mortality Project Group.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J J; Chu, S Y; Buehler, J W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study monitors trends in place of death among persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) as a measure of health care usage patterns and terminal health care among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS. Sixteen health departments collected death certificates for 55,186 persons with AIDS whose deaths occurred through 1991. Place of death was categorized as hospital, residence, hospice or nursing home, and other. RESULTS. The percentage of AIDS deaths at hospital facilities decreased from 92% in 1983 to 57% in 1991. In 1988, 23% of deaths occurred at home or in hospices and nursing homes. This trend was more evident among men, Whites, and men who had sex with men; less so among persons with other modes of exposure; and not at all among injecting drug users and children with perinatally acquired AIDS. Place of death varied by geographic location, with the greatest percentage of hospital deaths in the Northeast (91%) and the greatest percentage of at-home deaths in the West (27%). CONCLUSIONS. The percentage of AIDS deaths at home or in hospices and nursing homes has increased since 1983. These trends may reflect changes in hospital use for end-stage HIV infection. Decreasing hospitalization and increasing outpatient services and home care will decrease costs and may allow HIV-infected persons improved social support. PMID:8214234

  1. Hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs in relation to socioeconomic status among people with bipolar affective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chun; Kuo, Kuei-Hong; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the relationships between the socioeconomic status and long-term outcomes of individuals with bipolar affective disorder (BPD) is lacking. Aims We aimed to estimate the effects of baseline socioeconomic status on longitudinal outcomes. Method A national cohort of adult participants with newly diagnosed BPD was identified in 2008. The effects of personal and household socioeconomic status were explored on outcomes of hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs, over a 3-year follow-up period (2008–2011). Results A total of 7987 participants were recruited. The relative risks of hospital treatment and mortality were found elevated for the ones from low-income households who also had higher healthcare costs. Low premium levels did not correlate with future healthcare costs. Conclusions Socioeconomic deprivation is associated with poorer outcome and higher healthcare costs in BPD patients. Special care should be given to those with lower socioeconomic status to improve outcomes with potential benefits of cost savings in the following years. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © 2016 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703748

  2. [Mortality associated with nosocomial infection, occurring in a general hospital of Sumaré-SP, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Aline Caixeta; Donalisio, Maria Rita; Santiago, Thaiana Helena Roma; Freire, June Barreiros

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the socio-demographic profile, clinical procedures and etiology of nosocomial infection associated with deaths in the Hospital Estadual Sumaré, state of São Paulo, Brazil, from 2007 to 2008. The retrospective study of medical records (n = 133) revealed an average of 35 days of hospitalization. Most patients (97%) underwent some invasive procedure associated with nosocomial infection (p ≤ 0.05), including: 90 (67.7%) pneumonia, 62 (46.6%), urinary infections and 97 (73%) septicemia. Infection was the leading cause of death in 75 (56.4%) cases, with defined etiology in 110 (82.7%); 34 (30.9%) because of microorganisms that were multidrug-resistant. The most common was Staphylococcus aureus (25%), related to pneumonia and blood stream infection. The monitoring of hospital infection contributed to intervention at risk situation and death.

  3. Timing of surgery for hip fracture and in-hospital mortality: a retrospective population-based cohort study in the Spanish National Health System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While the benefits or otherwise of early hip fracture repair is a long-running controversy with studies showing contradictory results, this practice is being adopted as a quality indicator in several health care organizations. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between early hip fracture repair and in-hospital mortality in elderly people attending public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System and, additionally, to explore factors associated with the decision to perform early hip fracture repair. Methods A cohort of 56,500 patients of 60-years-old and over, hospitalized for hip fracture during the period 2002 to 2005 in all the public hospitals in 8 Spanish regions, were followed up using administrative databases to identify the time to surgical repair and in-hospital mortality. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to analyze the relationship between the timing of surgery (< 2 days from admission) and in-hospital mortality, controlling for several confounding factors. Results Early surgery was performed on 25% of the patients. In the unadjusted analysis early surgery showed an absolute difference in risk of mortality of 0.57 (from 4.42% to 3.85%). However, patients undergoing delayed surgery were older and had higher comorbidity and severity of illness. Timeliness for surgery was not found to be related to in-hospital mortality once confounding factors such as age, sex, chronic comorbidities as well as the severity of illness were controlled for in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Older age, male gender, higher chronic comorbidity and higher severity measured by the Risk Mortality Index were associated with higher mortality, but the time to surgery was not. PMID:22257790

  4. Evaluation of prehospital and emergency department systolic blood pressure as a predictor of in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Lalezarzadeh, Fariborz; Wisniewski, Paul; Huynh, Katie; Loza, Maria; Gnanadev, Dev

    2009-10-01

    Hypotension is a trauma activation criterion validated by multiple studies. However, field systolic blood pressures (SBP) are still met with skepticism. How significant is the role of prehospital (PH) and emergency department (ED) SBP in the patient's overall condition? A review of the trauma registry over a 5-year period was conducted. PH SBPs were stratified into four categories: severe (SBP 80 mmHg or less), moderate (81-100 mmHg), mild hypotension (101-120 mmHg), and normotension (greater than 120 mmHg). These four groups were further subcategorized into the patients who were hypotensive, SBP 90 mmHg or less in the ED, versus those that were not (SBP greater than 90 mmHg). Data for 6964 patients were analyzed. Patients with PH SBP of 80 mmHg or less compared with patients who had PH SBP of greater than 80 mmHg had higher mortality (OR, 9; 95% CI, 6.45-12.84). Patients with both PH SBP 80 mmHg or less and ED SBP 90 mmHg or less had the highest risk of mortality (50%) and highest need for emergent operative intervention (54%). PH and ED hypotension is a strong predictor of in-hospital mortality and need for emergent surgical intervention in trauma patients. Field or ED blood pressures should serve as a significant marker of the patient's condition.

  5. Low mortality but increasing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis in people who inject drugs: Experience from a Swedish referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Thalme, Anders; Weiland, Ola

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of infective endocarditis in people who inject drugs (PWID). The management of S aureus endocarditis (SAE) in PWID can be problematic. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to assess the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and mortality of S aureus endocarditis (SAE) in PWID in Stockholm, Sweden.The Department of Infectious Diseases at the Karolinska University Hospital serves as a regional referral center for drug users with severe infections. Patients with active intravenous drug use treated for SAE at the department between January 2004 and December 2013 were retrospectively identified. Clinical and microbiological data were obtained from medical records and the diagnosis verified according to the modified Duke criteria.In total, 120 SAE episodes related to intravenous drug use were identified. Its incidence in Stockholm was 0.76/100,000 adult person-years for the entire period, increasing from 0.52/100,000 person-years in 2004 to 2008 to 0.99 in 2009 to 2013 (P = 0.02). The SAE incidence among PWID specifically was 249 (range 153-649) /100,000 person-years. Forty-two (35%) episodes were left-sided, and multiple valves were involved in 26 (22%). Cardiac valve surgery was performed in 10 (8%) episodes, all left-sided. The in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 2.5% (3 deaths) and 8.0% (9 deaths), respectively.We noted a high and increasing incidence over time of SAE related to intravenous drug use in Stockholm. The increased incidence partly reflects a rising number of PWID during the study period. The low mortality noted, despite a substantial proportion with left-sided endocarditis, probably in part reflects the quality of care obtained at a large and specialized referral center for drug users with severe infections.

  6. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Antony; Jagannath, Pushpa; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC) score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD) of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001) for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]). Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality. PMID:26139742

  7. Ocular Inflammatory Disease as a Predictor for In-Hospital Mortality in Patients Hospitalized with Disseminated Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Aim To ascertain whether the presence of ocular inflammatory disease is a predictor for death in patients hospitalized with disseminated tuberculosis. Methods This is an IRB-approved retrospective study of patients admitted with a diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis within a seven-year period (2002–2009). The following data was collected from each record: age, sex, details of previous surgeries or therapy, the findings of anterior segment examination, the findings of dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy, systemic findings, investigations done, treatment rendered, and final status (died or discharged). Results A total of 57 patients (29 males (50.8%), 28 females (49.2%) with ages ranging from 14 to 78 years (mean 41.7 years) were identified. Common presentations included fever, sepsis or neurological complaints such as headache or convulsions. Significant medical histories included acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (n= 4), renal allograft transplantation (n=3), chronic renal failure on hemodialysis (n=3) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=6). Of these, 35 patients (61.4%) had ocular tuberculosis. These included 19 males (54.2%) and 16 females (46.8%) with ages ranging from 16 to 78 years (mean 43.3 years). Current medical conditions included AIDS, renal allograft transplantation and subsequent immunosuppressive therapy, chronic renal failure on hemodialysis, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty-seven of the 70 eyes (67.1%) had evidence of ocular tuberculosis. Specific presentations included 42 eyes (89.1%) with choroidal tubercles and five eyes (10.9%) with chorioretinitis. Two patients (2.8%) had disc edema. Of these 35 patients, eight (22.8%) patients died whereas 27 (77.2%) were discharged. The remaining 22 patients (38.6%) had no ocular tuberculosis. These included 10 males (45.5%) and 12 females (54.5%) with ages ranging from 14 to 78 years (mean 39.1 years). Significant medical histories included type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of these 44 eyes, four

  8. Factors associated with mortality and default among patients with tuberculosis attending a teaching hospital clinic in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Burton, Nicole T; Forson, Audrey; Lurie, Mark N; Kudzawu, Samuel; Kwarteng, Ernest; Kwara, Awewura

    2011-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality despite availability of effective chemotherapy. This study was performed to identify contributing factors for poor outcome during anti-tuberculosis treatment at a teaching hospital chest clinic. Medical records of registered patients treated for TB between 1 January and 31 December, 2009 were reviewed and abstracted for demographic, clinical and outcome data. Risk factors for mortality during therapy were assessed using bivariate and multivariate logistics approaches. Of 599 patients, 355 (58.9%) completed therapy and/or were cured, 192 (32.1%) died, and 39 (6.5%) defaulted. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality included pulmonary cases for which sputum smear status was unknown (odds ratio [OR] 13.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.0, 31.4), HIV coinfection (OR, 3.6; 95% CI 2.4, 5.4), disseminated TB (OR, 2.2; 95% CI 1.0, 4.9), TB meningitis (OR, 2.8; 95% CI 1.5, 5.3), not having a treatment supporter (OR, 2.0; 95% CI 1.3, 3.1), and low body weight (OR, 11.0; 95% CI 3.1, 38.6). Not having a treatment supporter (OR, 3.2; 95% CI 1.6, 6.6) and HIV coinfection (OR, 2.4; 95% CI 1.2, 5.2) were also independently associated with treatment default. Our findings suggest that enhanced measures to reduce mortality and default in TB patients with HIV coinfection, disseminated or meningeal disease and those who have no treatment supporters may help improve treatment outcomes in Ghana.

  9. Do acute myocardial infarction and stroke mortality vary by distance to hospitals in Switzerland? Results from the Swiss National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zwahlen, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Switzerland has mountains and valleys complicating the access to a hospital and critical care in case of emergencies. Treatment success for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or stroke depends on timely treatment. We examined the relationship between distance to different hospital types and mortality from AMI or stroke in the Swiss National Cohort (SNC) Study. Design and setting The SNC is a longitudinal mortality study of the census 2000 population of Switzerland. For 4.5 million Swiss residents not living in a nursing home and older than 30 years in the year 2000, we calculated driving time and straight-line distance from their home to the nearest acute, acute with emergency room, central and university hospital (in total 173 hospitals). On the basis of quintiles, we used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to estimate HRs of AMI and stroke mortality for driving time distance groups compared to the closest distance group. Results Over 8 years, 19 301 AMI and 21 931 stroke deaths occurred. Mean driving time to the nearest acute hospital was 6.5 min (29.7 min to a university hospital). For AMI mortality, driving time to a university hospital showed the strongest association among the four types of hospitals with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.19 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.30) and 1.10 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.20) for men and women aged 65+ years when comparing the highest quintile with the lowest quintile of driving time. For stroke mortality, the association with university hospital driving time was less pronounced than for AMI mortality and did not show a clear incremental pattern with increasing driving time. There was no association with driving time to the nearest hospital. Conclusions The increasing AMI mortality with increasing driving time to the nearest university hospital but not to any nearest hospital reflects a complex interplay of many factors along the care pathway. PMID:27803109

  10. Mortality, morbidity, and disease severity of patients with aspiration pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lanspa, Michael J.; Jones, Barbara E.; Brown, Samuel M.; Dean, Nathan C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspiration pneumonia is a common syndrome, although less well characterized than other pneumonia syndromes. We describe a large population of patients with aspiration pneumonia. Methods In this retrospective population study, we queried the electronic medical record at a tertiary-care, university-affiliated hospital from 1996–2006. Patients were initially identified by ICD-9 code 507.x; subsequent physician chart review excluded patients with aspiration pneumonitis and those without a confirmatory radiograph. Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia were compared to a contemporaneous population of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. We compared CURB-65 predicted mortality with actual 30-day mortality. Results We identified 628 patients with aspiration pneumonia, of which 510 were community-acquired. Median age was 77, with 30-day mortality of 21%. Compared to CAP patients, patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia had more frequent inpatient admission (99% vs. 58%) and ICU admission (38% vs. 14%), higher Charlson comorbidity index (3 vs. 1), and higher prevalence of “do not resuscitate/intubate” orders (24% vs. 11%). CURB-65 predicted mortality poorly in aspiration pneumonia patients (AUC 0.66). Conclusions Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia are older, have more comorbidities, and demonstrate higher mortality than CAP patients, even after adjustment for age and comorbidities. CURB-65 poorly predicts mortality in this population. PMID:23184866

  11. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual’s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. Methods In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Results Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7–179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6–109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2–4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. PMID:28118414

  12. 76 FR 39006 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing Program; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...-AMI Acute Myocardial .8477 Infarction (AMI) 30- Day Mortality Rate. MORT-30-HF Heart Failure (HF) 30... Acute Myocardial .8673 Infarction (AMI) 30- Day Mortality Rate. MORT-30-HF Heart Failure (HF) 30-...

  13. 78 FR 65697 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing, Contracting With Resident-Owned...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing, Contracting With...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451...

  14. 77 FR 73731 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Application Under the Hague Convention on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Notice is to allow 30 days for public comment. DATES: Submit comments directly to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) up to January 10, 2013. ADDRESSES: Direct comments to the Department of...

  15. Analysis of rat testicular proteome following 30-day exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed

    Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Kazemipour, Nasrin; Saeb, Mehdi; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-12-01

    The use of electromagnetic field (EMF) generating apparatuses such as cell phones is increasing, and has caused an interest in the investigations of its effects on human health. We analyzed proteome in preparations from the whole testis in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were exposed to 900 MHz EMF radiation for 1, 2, or 4 h/day for 30 consecutive days, simulating a range of possible human cell phone use. Subjects were sacrificed immediately after the end of the experiment and testes fractions were solubilized and separated via high-resolution 2D electrophoresis, and gel patterns were scanned, digitized, and processed. Thirteen proteins, which were found only in sham or in exposure groups, were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Among them, heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin-1, and other proteins related to misfolding of proteins and/or stress were identified. These results demonstrate significant effects of radio frequency modulated EMFs exposure on proteome, particularly in protein species in the rodent testis, and suggest that a 30-day exposure to EMF radiation induces nonthermal stress in testicular tissue. The functional implication of the identified proteins was discussed.

  16. Cause-specific mortality in adult epilepsy patients from Tyrol, Austria: hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Bauer, Gerhard; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Seppi, Klaus; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating condition with a considerable increase in mortality compared to the general population. Few studies have focused on cause-specific mortality which we analyse in detail in over 4,000 well-characterized epilepsy patients. The cohort comprised of epilepsy patients ≥ 18, treated between 1970 and 2009 at the epilepsy clinic of Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, and living in the province of Tyrol, Austria. Epilepsy diagnosis was based on ILAE guidelines (1989); patients with brain tumor were excluded. Deceased patients and causes of death (ICD-codes) were obtained via record linkage to the national death registry. We computed age-, sex-, and period-adjusted standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 36 diagnoses subgroups in four major groups. Additional analyses were performed for an incidence cohort. Overall cohort: 4,295 patients, 60,649.1 person-years, 822 deaths, overall SMR 1.7 (95 % CI 1.6-1.9), highest elevated cause-specific SMR: congenital anomalies [7.1 (95 % CI 2.3-16.6)], suicide [4.2 (95 % CI 2.0-8.1)], alcohol dependence syndrome [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], malignant neoplasm of esophagus [3.1 (95 % CI 1.2-6.4)], pneumonia [2.7 (95 % CI 1.6-4.2)]. Incidence cohort: 1,299 patients, 14,215.4 person-years, 267 deaths, overall SMR 1.8 (95 % CI 1.6-2.1), highest elevated cause-specific SMR congenital anomalies [10.8 (95 % CI 1.3-39.3)], suicide [6.8 (95 % CI 1.4-19.8)], alcohol dependence syndrome (6.4 [95 % CI 1.8-16.5)], pneumonia [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], cerebrovascular disease at 3.5 (95 % CI 2.6-4.6). Mortality due to mental health problems, such as suicide or alcohol dependence syndrome, malignant neoplasms, and cerebrovascular diseases was highly increased in our study. In addition to aim for seizure freedom, we suggest improving general health promotion, including cessation of smoking, lowering of alcohol intake, and reduction of weight as well as early identification of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy.

  17. Mortality Associated with Severe Sepsis Among Age-Similar Women with and without Pregnancy-Associated Hospitalization in Texas: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The reported mortality among women with pregnancy-associated severe sepsis (PASS) has been considerably lower than among severely septic patients in the general population, with the difference being attributed to the younger age and lack of chronic illness among the women with PASS. However, no comparative studies were reported to date between patients with PASS and age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy (NPSS). Material/Methods We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to compare the crude and adjusted hospital mortality between women with severe sepsis, aged 20–34 years, with and without pregnancy-associated hospitalizations during 2001–2010, following exclusion of those with reported chronic comorbidities, as well as alcohol and drug abuse. Results Crude hospital mortality among PASS vs. NPSS hospitalizations was lower for the whole cohort (6.7% vs. 14.1% [p<0.0001]) and those with ≥3 organ failures (17.6% vs. 33.2% [p=0.0100]). Adjusted PASS mortality (odds ratio [95% CI]) was 0.57 (0.38–0.86) [p=0.0070]. Conclusions Hospital mortality was unexpectedly markedly and consistently lower among women with severe sepsis associated with pregnancy, as compared with contemporaneous, age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy, without reported chronic comorbidities. Further studies are warranted to examine the sources of the observed differences and to corroborate our findings. PMID:27286326

  18. [Activity of various oxidases and transaminases in the rat liver in the readaptation period after hypokinesia up to 30 days].

    PubMed

    Potapov, P P

    1990-01-01

    The activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinic dehydrogenase in readaptation after 15-day hypokinesia was within normal limits, whereas following 30-day hypokinesia it was enhanced on days 11-15. Pyruvate dehydrogenase exhibited hyperactivity in the end of readaptation week 2 both in 15- and 30-day hypokinesia which resulted in rat liver hyperactivity of glutamate dehydrogenase and transaminases. Normal levels of the latter were recorded on readaptation day 12-19.

  19. Impact of intensive-care-unit(ICU)-acquired ventilator-associated pneumonia(VAP) on hospital mortality: a matched-paired case-control study.

    PubMed

    Uno, Hideo; Takezawa, Jun; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Suka, Machi; Yoshida, Katsumi

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ICU-acquired ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) on hospital mortality is still a controversial issue in many countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ICU-acquired VAP on hospital mortality in a Japanese university hospital. Our study population was comprised of patients aged 16 years or older who were admitted to our ICU and received mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours during a period of 42 months as of December 2003. To evaluate whether VAP was an independent risk factor for hospital mortality after controlling for other clinical factors, patients with fatal outcomes (cases) were compared to those who survived (controls). From 587 eligible patients, we analyzed 75 cases and 150 controls who were successfully matched on sex, age, and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score using conditional logistic regression models. Univariate analysis demonstrated that hemodialysis (odds ratio [OR], 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-4.15; p = 0.01), surgical site infection (OR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.22-4.91; p = 0.01), and VAP (OR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.55-4.69; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with hospital mortality. After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed that hemodialysis (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.06-3.94; p = 0.03) and VAP (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.10-4.39; p = 0.03) were independently associated with hospital mortality. In conclusion, these data suggest that ICU-acquired VAP significantly affects hospital mortality.

  20. Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university hospital trauma center on mortality of severe blunt trauma patients until discharge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. Methods The French Intensive Care Research for Severe Trauma cohort study enrolled 2,703 patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to University hospital intensive care units within 72 hours. Pre-hospital and hospital clinical data, including the mode of transport, (helicopter (HMICU) versus ground (GMICU), both with medical teams), were recorded. The analysis was restricted to patients admitted directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. The main endpoint was mortality until ICU discharge. Results Of the 1,958 patients analyzed, 74% were transported by GMICU, 26% by HMICU. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 26 (interquartile range (IQR) 19 to 34) for HMICU patients and 25 (IQR 18 to 34) for GMICU patients. Compared to GMICU, HMICU patients had a higher median time frame before hospital admission and were more intensively treated in the pre-hospital phase. Crude mortality until hospital discharge was the same regardless of pre-hospital mode of transport. After adjustment for initial status, the risk of death was significantly lower (odds ratio (OR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98, P = 0.035) for HMICU compared with GMICU. This result did not change after further adjustment for ISS and overall surgical procedures. Conclusions This study suggests a beneficial impact of helicopter transport on mortality in severe blunt trauma. Whether this association could be due to better management in the pre-hospital phase needs to be more thoroughly assessed. PMID:23131068

  1. [Causal analysis and management strategies of 30-day unplanned revision surgery following single-stage posterior vertebral column resection for severe spinal deformity].

    PubMed

    Tao, Y P; Wu, J G; Ma, H S; Shao, S L; Zhang, L L; Gao, B; Li, H X

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To investigate the causes of 30-day unplanned revision surgery following one-stage posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) for severe spinal deformity and the methods of prevention and management. Methods: A total of 112 severe deformity patients underwent one-stage PVCR for surgical treatment in the 306(th) Hospital of People's Liberation Army from May 2010 to December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Six patients required reoperation within 30 days after PVCR, including 2 males and 4 females with average age of 21 years (ranging from 12 to 38 years). Four cases were congenital kyphoscoliosis, 1 was post-laminectomy kyphoscoliosis and 1 was post-tuberculous angular kyphosis. Three cases associated with preoperative neurologic deficit (Frankel C in 1 patient and D in 2 patients). The causes, management and outcomes of unplanned revision surgery within 30 days after PVCR were recorded. Results: The total incidence of unplanned revision surgery within 30 days following PVCR was 5.4% (6/112). There was 1 case due to cerebrospinal fluid leak, 5 cases with varying degrees of new neurologic deficits, the causes were as followed: dural buckling in 1 case, residual bone compression in 1 case, epidural hematoma compression in 2 cases, spinal subdural hematoma in 1 case. All the 6 cases underwent surgical exploration again, including further dural repair, decompression and hematoma clearance. After unplanned reoperation, 6 cases recovered completely. The average follow-up time after surgery was 30.8 months (ranging from 10 to 60 months). The major curve at coronal plane was improved from preoperative 87.7° to 34.2°, with a mean correction of 61.0% at final follow-up; the sagittal kyphosis curve was improved from preoperative 119.5° to 45.5°, with a mean correction of 61.9% at final follow-up. Two patients' neurological status improved from Frankel D to Frankel E, one patient's neurological status improved from Frankel C to Frankel E. Conclusions: One

  2. 90-day postoperative mortality is a legitimate measure of hepatopancreatobiliary surgical quality

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Yoshihiro; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Zimmitti, Giuseppe; Parker, Nathan H.; Conrad, Claudius; Aloia, Thomas A.; Lee, Jeffery E.; Fleming, Jason B.; Katz, Matthew H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the legitimacy of 90-day mortality as a measure of hepatopancreatobiliary quality. Summary Background Data The 90-day mortality rate has been increasingly but not universally reported after hepatopancreatobiliary surgery. The legitimacy of this definition as a measure of surgical quality has not been evaluated. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the causes of all deaths that occurred within 365 postoperative days in patients undergoing hepatectomy (n = 2811) and/or pancreatectomy (n = 1092) from January 1997 through December 2012. The rates of surgery-related, disease-related, and overall mortality within 30 days, within 30 days or during the index hospitalization, within 90 days, and within 180 days following surgery were calculated. Results Seventy-nine (3%) surgery-related deaths and 92 (3%) disease-related deaths occurred within 365 days after hepatectomy. Twenty (2%) surgery-related deaths and 112 (10%) disease-related deaths occurred within 365 days after pancreatectomy. The overall mortality rates at 99 day and 118 days optimally reflected surgery-related mortality following hepatobiliary and pancreatic operations, respectively. The 90-day overall mortality rate was a less sensitive but equivalently specific measure of surgery-related death. Conclusions and Relevance The 99-day and 118-day definitions of postoperative mortality optimally reflected surgery-related mortality following hepatobiliary and pancreatic operations, respectively. However, among commonly reported metrics, the 90-day overall mortality rate represents a legitimate measure of surgical quality. PMID:25590497

  3. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of “suicide” events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  4. Impacts of typhoon and heavy rain disasters on mortality and infectious diarrhea hospitalization in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunduk; Shin, Yongseung; Kim, Ho; Pak, Haeoyong; Ha, Jongsik

    2013-01-01

    Several studies for health impacts of natural disasters have not been comprehensive with respect to disaster type and areas, nor quantitative. The aim of our study is to quantitatively examine the associations between disasters and human health in South Korea. This study considered "special disasters" that occurred from 2003 to 2009 in seven metropolitan cities and nine provinces in South Korea. First, we completed health impact counts in both disaster periods and reference periods. We then calculated the rate ratios between health impact counts in these two periods. Mortality is estimated to be higher in the case of typhoons, whereas morbidity is estimated to be higher in heavy rain disasters. The difference in health impacts of typhoons and heavy rain may be explained by the difference in meteorological exposure patterns. Consequentially, we suggest the development of properly adaptive plans against the influence of future natural disasters on human health.

  5. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  6. Clinical Features and Outcomes of IPF Patients Hospitalized for Pulmonary Infection: A Japanese Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Nishiyama, Osamu; Sano, Hiroyuki; Iwanaga, Takashi; Higashimoto, Yuji; Kume, Hiroaki; Tohda, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) undergo hospitalizations due to pulmonary infections. We retrospectively investigated the characteristics of hospitalizations due to pulmonary infection in patients with IPF to elucidate causative pathogens and mortality. We reviewed patients with IPF who were admitted between January 2008 and December 2014 for pulmonary infections including pneumonia and bronchitis. The causative pathogen, the relationship between the site of pneumonia and existing IPF radiological patterns on high-resolution chest CT, and predictors of mortality were evaluated. Forty-eight IPF patients were hospitalized a totally of 81 times due to pulmonary infection during the study period. In the 48 first-time admissions after IPF diagnosis, causative pathogens were detected in 20 patients (41.6%). The most common pathogen was Haemophilus influenzae (14.5%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.1%), Staphylococcus aureus (4.1%), Branhamella catarrhalis (4.1%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (4.1%). Among all 81 admissions, the most common pathogen was P. aeruginosa (12.3%), followed by H. influenzae (8.6%), S. aureus (6.1%) and Escherichia coli (4.9%). No relationship was observed between the detected pathogen and the site of pneumonia. The 30-day and hospital mortality rates were 14.5% and 18.7%, respectively. Pneumonia severity index on admission was significantly associated with both 30-day and hospital mortality. In conclusion, IPF patients hospitalized for pulmonary infections had high 30-day and hospital mortality. In contrast to community-acquired pneumonia, the causative pathogens mainly consisted of gram-negative bacteria. The PSI score may be a significant predictor of mortality. These results provide information for empiric antibiotic selection when treating IPF patients with pulmonary infections. PMID:27959904

  7. The association of market competition with hospital charges, length of stay, and quality outcomes for patients with joint diseases: a longitudinal study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Eun-Cheol; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Kwon, Jeoung A; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the association of market competition with hospital charges, length of stay, and quality outcomes. A total of 279,847 patients from 851 hospitals were analyzed. The Herfindahl-Hirschman Index was used as a measure of hospital market competition level. Our results suggest that hospitals in less competitive markets charged more on charge per admission, possibly by increasing the length of stays, however, hospitals in more competitive markets charged more for daily services by providing more intensive services while reducing the length of stays, thereby reducing the overall charge per admission. Quality outcomes measured by mortality within 30 days of admission and readmission within 30 days of discharge were better for surgical procedures within competitive areas. Continued government monitoring of hospital response to market competition level is recommended in order to determine whether changes in hospitals' strategies influence the long-term outcomes of services performance and health care spending.

  8. Minor Postoperative Increases of Creatinine Are Associated with Higher Mortality and Longer Hospital Length of Stay in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Spies, Claudia D.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ginde, Adit A.; Jankowski, Joachim; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical patients frequently experience postoperative increases in creatinine levels. The authors hypothesized that even small increases in postoperative creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Methods The authors examined the association of postoperative changes from preoperative baseline creatinine with all-cause in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay (HLOS) in a retrospective analysis of surgical patients at a single tertiary care center between January 2006 and June 2012. Results The data of 39,369 surgical patients (noncardiac surgery n = 37,345; cardiac surgery n = 2,024) were analyzed. Acute kidney injury (AKI)—by definition of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome group—was associated with a five-fold higher mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% CI, 4.1 to 5.7; P < 0.001) and a longer HLOS of 5 days (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, congestive heart failure, preoperative hemoglobin, preoperative creatinine, exposure to radiocontrast agent, type of surgery, and surgical AKI risk factors. Importantly, even minor creatinine increases (Δcreatinine 25 to 49% above baseline but < 0.3 mg/dl) not meeting AKI criteria were associated with a two-fold increased risk of death (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.4; P < 0.001) and 2 days longer HLOS (P < 0.001). This was more pronounced in noncardiac surgery patients. Patients with minor creatinine increases had a five-fold risk of death (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 20.3; P < 0.05) and a 3-day longer HLOS (P < 0.01) when undergoing noncardiac surgery. Conclusions Even minor postoperative increases in creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. These results emphasize the importance to find effective therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat even mild forms of postoperative kidney dysfunction to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26492475

  9. Effects of closure of an urban level I trauma centre on adjacent hospitals and local injury mortality: a retrospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Marie; Sharp, Douglas; Wei, Xiong; Nathens, Avery; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of the Martin Luther King Jr Hospital (MLK) closure on the distribution of admissions on adjacent trauma centres, and injury mortality rates in these centres and within the county. Design Observational, retrospective study. Setting Non-public patient-level data from the state of California were obtained for all trauma patients from 1999 to 2009. Geospatial analysis was used to visualise the redistribution of trauma patients to other hospitals after MLK closed. Variance of observed to expected injury mortality using multivariate logistic regression was estimated for the study period. Participants A total of 37 131 trauma patients were admitted to the five major south Los Angeles trauma centres from the MLK service area between 1999 and 2009. Main outcome measures (1) Number and type of trauma admissions to trauma centres in closest proximity to MLK; (2) inhospital injury mortality of trauma patients after the trauma centre closure. Results During and after the MLK closure, trauma admissions increased at three of the four nearby hospitals, particularly admissions for gunshot wounds (GSWs). This redistribution of patient load was accompanied by a dramatic change in the payer mix for surrounding hospitals; one hospital's share of uninsured more than tripled from 12.9% in 1999 to 44.6% by 2009. Overall trauma mortality did not significantly change, but GSW mortality steadily and significantly increased after the closure from 5.0% in 2007 to 7.5% in 2009. Conclusions Though local hospitals experienced a dramatic increase in trauma patient volume, overall mortality for trauma patients did not significantly change after MLK closed. PMID:27165650

  10. Morbidity and mortality of severe malnutrition among Sudanese children in New Halfa Hospital, Eastern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Mahgoub, Hyder M; Adam, Ishag

    2012-01-01

    Medical files of children with severe malnutrition admitted at New Halfa hospital, Sudan during 2007-2009 were reviewed. A total of 1097 children (54.9%, 602 male) with severe malnutrition were admitted during the three year period. Oedematous severe malnutrition was found in 179 (16.3%) children. Of these 1097, 796 (72.6%) patients with severe malnutrition were children <2 years old. Out of these 1097 children, 780 (71.1%) and 112 (10.2%) had diarrhoea and malaria, respectively. Sixty-one (5.5%) of these children died, 237 (21.6%) discharged against medical advice and 799 (72.8%) were discharged. Of the 61 children who died 11 (18.0%) had septicaemia following diarrhoea and respiratory tract infections. The case fatality rate was not different with sex or with presence/absence of oedema.

  11. In-Hospital Morbidity and Mortality Following Total Joint Arthroplasty in Patients with Hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Enayatollahi, Mohammad Ali; Novack, Thomas A; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Tabatabaee, Reza Mostafavi; Chen, Antonia F; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-08-01

    Given the growing patient population with hemoglobinopathies needing total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and paucity of literature addressing this cohort, we examined the in-hospital complications in patients with hemoglobinopathies undergoing TJA. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes were used to search the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database for hemoglobinopathy patients undergoing primary or revision TJA. Hemoglobinopathy patients had a significant increase in cardiac, respiratory, and wound complications; blood product transfusion; pulmonary embolism; surgical site infection; and systemic infection events, while there was no significant effect on deaths, deep vein thrombosis, and renal complications. It may be prudent to implement blood conservation strategies as well as diligent postoperative protocols to minimize the need for transfusion and related complications in this patient population.

  12. Association of Hospital-Level Volume of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Cases and Mortality. Analysis of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry

    PubMed Central

    Odetola, Folafoluwa O.; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Paden, Matthew L.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Davis, Matthew M.; Annich, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Recent pediatric studies suggest a survival benefit exists for higher-volume extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) centers. Objectives: To determine if higher annual ECMO patient volume is associated with lower case-mix–adjusted hospital mortality rate. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed an international registry of ECMO support from 1989 to 2013. Patients were separated into three age groups: neonatal (0–28 d), pediatric (29 d to <18 yr), and adult (≥18 yr). The measure of hospital ECMO volume was age group–specific and adjusted for patient-level case-mix and hospital-level variance using multivariable hierarchical logistic regression modeling. The primary outcome was death before hospital discharge. A subgroup analysis was conducted for 2008–2013. Measurements and Main Results: From 1989 to 2013, a total of 290 centers provided ECMO support to 56,222 patients (30,909 neonates, 14,725 children, and 10,588 adults). Annual ECMO mortality rates varied widely across ECMO centers: the interquartile range was 18–50% for neonates, 25–66% for pediatrics, and 33–92% for adults. For 1989–2013, higher age group–specific ECMO volume was associated with lower odds of ECMO mortality for neonates and adults but not for pediatric cases. In 2008–2013, the volume–outcome association remained statistically significant only among adults. Patients receiving ECMO at hospitals with more than 30 adult annual ECMO cases had significantly lower odds of mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.46–0.80) compared with adults receiving ECMO at hospitals with less than six annual cases. Conclusions: In this international, case-mix–adjusted analysis, higher annual hospital ECMO volume was associated with lower mortality in 1989–2013 for neonates and adults; the association among adults persisted in 2008–2013. PMID:25695688

  13. [Maternal mortality rate in the Aurelio Valdivieso General Hospital: a ten years follow up].

    PubMed

    Noguera-Sánchez, Marcelo Fidias; Arenas-Gómez, Susana; Rabadán-Martínez, Cesar Esli; Antonio-Sánchez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: en México, la mortalidad materna ha disminuido en las últimas décadas. En Oaxaca esto no se ha manifestado porque se incrementó la tasa de mortalidad materna. Este estado se ubica entre las entidades con más muertes maternas. Objetivo: analizar 10 años de mortalidad materna en el Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso de los Servicios de Salud de Oaxaca, para conocer el comportamiento epidemiológico y caracterización de los decesos. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo, transversal y descriptivo efectuado mediante la revisión de expedientes clínicos de mortalidad materna en la División de Gineco-Obstetricia. Se consideraron variables sociales, obstétricas y circunstanciales y las comprobaciones se efectuaron con estadística general y descriptiva. Resultados: entre el 1 de enero de 2000 y el 31 de diciembre de 2009 se registraron 109 muertes maternas, excluidas dos que no fueron obstétricas; es decir, que hubo 107 muertes maternas: 75 directas y 32 indirectas. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue de 172.14 × 100,000 nacidos vivos. De las muertes maternas revisadas 89 pudieron evitarse (83%) y 18 no (17%), esto con base en el dictamen del Comité ad hoc del Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso. La enfermedad hipertensiva aguda del embarazo fue la de mayor mortalidad; la escolaridad y el puerperio ueron el mayor riesgo. Conclusiones: las variables atribuibles a bajo índice de desarrollo humano, como: baja escolaridad y paridad elevada incrementaron el riesgo de mortalidad materna, que fue intrahospitalaria y durante el puerperio. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue la mayor encontrada en publicaciones nacionales con respecto a este referente.

  14. ALCOHOL USE BY URBAN BICYCLISTS IS ASSOCIATED WITH MORE SEVERE INJURY, GREATER HOSPITAL RESOURCE USE, AND HIGHER MORTALITY

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Monica; Heyer, Jessica; Wall, Stephen; DiMaggio, Charles; Shinseki, Matthew; Slaughter, Dekeya; Frangos, Spiros G

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol use is a risk factor for severe injury in pedestrians struck by motor vehicles. Our objective was to investigate alcohol use by bicyclists and its effects on riding behaviors, medical management, injury severity, and mortality within a congested urban setting. A hospital-based, observational study of injured bicyclists presenting to a Level I regional trauma center in New York City was conducted. Data were collected prospectively from 2012 to 2014 by interviewing all bicyclists presenting within 24 h of injury and supplemented with medical record review. Variables included demographic characteristics, scene-related data, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), computed tomography (CT) scans, and clinical outcomes. Alcohol use at the time of injury was determined by history or blood alcohol level (BAL) >0.01 g/dL. Of 689 bicyclists, 585 (84.9%) were male with a mean age of 35.2. One hundred four (15.1%) bicyclists had consumed alcohol prior to injury. Alcohol use was inversely associated with helmet use (16.5% [9.9–25.1] vs. 43.2% [39.1–47.3]). Alcohol-consuming bicyclists were more likely to fall from their bicycles (42.0% [32.2–52.3] vs. 24.2% [20.8–27.9]) and less likely to be injured by collision with a motor vehicle (52.0% [41.7–62.1] vs. 67.5% [63.5–71.3]). 80% of alcohol-consuming bicyclists underwent CT imaging at presentation compared with 51.5% of non-users. Mortality was higher among injured bicyclists who had used alcohol (2.9% [0.6–8.2] vs. 0.0% [0.0–0.6]). Adjusted multivariable analysis revealed that alcohol use was independently associated with more severe injury (Adjusted Odds Ratio 2.27, p = 0.001, 95% Confidence Interval 1.40–3.68). Within a dense urban environment, alcohol use by bicyclists was associated with more severe injury, greater hospital resource use, and higher mortality. As bicycling continues to increase in popularity internationally, it is important to heighten awareness about the risks and consequences of bicycling while

  15. [Oral rehydration therapy: an analysis of its results and impact on the hospitalization and mortality of children with diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Dohi-Fujii, B; Godoy-Olvera, L M; Durazo-Ortíz, J

    1993-11-01

    We present results of four years in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in the Hospital Infantil del Estado de Sonora. There was 10.2 consults by diarrhoea for day. Children lower of one year old received oral rehydration therapy in 86.8%, were included 11% of prolonged diarrhoea and 32.3% of children with malnutrition. During the procedure diarrhoea there was complicated in 3% with paralytic ileus sepsis and pneumonia. Effectivity of ORT was in 90.9%; 92.8% in light dehydration and 78.7% moderate. Failure in 8.6% was due to vomitus, no acceptation of the oral solution, abundant evacuations and other complication presented. Were observed reduction in hospitalization, rate of 19.2% in 1986 to 38.4% in 1989. The diarrheal mortality decreased in the Urgence Department in 42% and in the Infectology Department in 54%. We considered these results as satisfactory, but are susceptible to better when we diffuse more the oral rehydration therapy in own region.

  16. Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality of Severe Malaria in HIV-Coinfected Children and Adults in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Ferro, Josefo; Montoya, Pablo; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Seni, Amir; Gomes, Ermelinda; Silamut, Kamolrat; Lee, Sue J.; Lucas, Marcelino; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Fanello, Caterina I.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Severe falciparum malaria with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is common in settings with a high prevalence of both diseases, but there is little information on whether HIV affects the clinical presentation and outcome of severe malaria. Methods. HIV status was assessed prospectively in hospitalized parasitemic adults and children with severe malaria in Beira, Mozambique, as part of a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (ISRCTN50258054). Clinical signs, comorbidity, complications, and disease outcome were compared according to HIV status. Results. HIV-1 seroprevalence was 11% (74/655) in children under 15 years and 72% (49/68) in adults with severe malaria. Children with HIV coinfection presented with more severe acidosis, anemia, and respiratory distress, and higher peripheral blood parasitemia and plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2). During hospitalization, deterioration in coma score, convulsions, respiratory distress, and pneumonia were more common in HIV-coinfected children, and mortality was 26% (19/74) versus 9% (53/581) in uninfected children (P < .001). In an age- and antimalarial treatment–adjusted logistic regression model, significant, independent predictors for death were renal impairment, acidosis, parasitemia, and plasma PfHRP2 concentration. Conclusions. Severe malaria in HIV-coinfected patients presents with higher parasite burden, more complications, and comorbidity, and carries a higher case fatality rate. Early identification of HIV coinfection is important for the clinical management of severe malaria. PMID:22752514

  17. [Estimated parameters in linkage between mortality and hospitalization databases according to quality of records on underlying cause of death].

    PubMed

    Coeli, Cláudia Medina; Barbosa, Flávia dos Santos; Brito, Alexandre dos Santos; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Camargo, Kenneth Rochel de; Medronho, Roberto de Andrade; Bloch, Katia Vergetti

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the linkage parameter estimates between hospitalization and mortality databases, calculated separately for the subsets of deaths from ill-defined causes and deaths from known causes. The databases for deaths from known causes and ill-defined causes were linked to a hospital admissions database. Parameters were estimated using two strategies: (1) first name, last name, and day, month, and year of birth, (2) full name and date of birth. In the first strategy, the estimates for the first and last name were at least 97% in both sets. However, the items day, month, and year of birth produced low values in both sets. In the second strategy there was an important difference between the two groups, with much lower values for full name and especially for date of birth in the group of deaths from ill-defined causes. Our results emphasize the need for pilot studies to evaluate possible internal heterogeneity of databases during the planning stage of linkage projects.

  18. Monitoring and Modeling the Fluctuations in Apparent Groundwater Age During a 30-Day Pumping Test.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perle, M. E.; Zhang, Y.; Fogg, G. E.

    2004-12-01

    Recent research shows that dispersion due to geologic heterogeneity can cause large (10's to 100's of yrs) variations in actual groundwater age within individual samples drawn from a well, even if well bore mixing is not significant. We hypothesize that the presence of such large ranges in groundwater age may cause the mean apparent age as estimated from environmental tracers such as CFC's, SF&_{6}, and ^{3}H-^{3}He to drift measurably during long-term, continuous pumping. This hypothesis was confirmed by 3-D numerical experiments wherein variation in groundwater ages under high-rate (\\sim0.06 m^{3}/s; 1,000 gpm) long-term pumping was modeled using backward-time random walk particle tracking techniques combined with geostatistical simulations of hydrofacies heterogeneity. Results indicate that the age distribution within a water sample and the mean apparent age implied by environmental tracers is strongly influenced by historical atmospheric concentrations of environmental tracers and subsurface heterogeneity. As a partial implementation of this same experiment in the field, an abandoned well was pumped at a low rate (\\sim0.005 m^{3}/s; 75 gpm) during 53 days. Water samples were collected from the top and bottom of a 25 foot well screen at 12 hour intervals for the first 30 days and were analyzed for CFC's, SF&6, and 3H-3He. The measured tracer ages indicate that 1) CFC-11 apparent ages increased with time within the first five days of pumping and then remained constant for the remainder of the pump test; 2) trends in CFC-12, CFC-113 and SF&_{6}$ indicate a discrepancy in apparent ages with CFC-11, 3) water reaching the top interval is younger than water reaching the bottom interval. Gas samples were collected from the unsaturated zone to investigate possible CFC contamination and tracer concentration spatial variations in the pumping well recharge zone. Potential effects of heterogeneity and local CFC contamination on the monitoring results will be discussed.

  19. Bion M1. Peculiarities of life activities of microbes in 30-day spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Korshunov, Denis; Morozova, Julia; Voeikova, Tatiana; Tyaglov, Boris; Novikova, Liudmila; Krestyanova, Irina; Emelyanova, Lydia

    The aim of this work was to analyze the influence of space flight factors ( SFF) to microorganism strains , exposed inside unmanned spacecraft Bion M-1 during the 30- day space flight. Objectives of the work - the study of the influence of the SFF exchange chromosomal DNA in crosses microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces; the level of spontaneous phage induction of lysogenic strains fS31 from Streptomyces lividans 66 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) on the biosynthesis of the antibiotic tylosin strain of Streptomyces fradiae; survival electrogenic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR- 1 is used in the microbial fuel cell As a result of this work it was found that the SFF affect the exchange of chromosomal DNA by crossing strains of Streptomyces. Was detected polarity crossing , expressed in an advantageous contribution chromosome fragment of one of the parent strains in recombinant offspring. This fact may indicate a more prolonged exposure of cells in microgravity and , as a consequence, the transfer of longer fragments of chromosomal DNA This feature is the transfer of genetic material in microgravity could lead to wider dissemination and horizontal transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA of symbiotic microflora astronauts and other strains present in the spacecraft. It was shown no effect on the frequency of recombination PCF and the level of mutation model reversion of auxotrophic markers to prototrophy It was demonstrated that PCF increase the level of induction of cell actinophage fS31 lysogenic strain of S. lividans 66, but did not affect the level of induction of this phage cells S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). It is shown that the lower the level of synthesis PCF antibiotic aktinorodina (actinorhodin) in lysogenic strain S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). 66 Strains of S. lividans and S. coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) can be used as a biosensor for studying the effect on microorganisms PCF It is shown that the effect of the PCF reduces synthesis of tylosin and desmicosyn S. fradiae at

  20. The Trends of Atrial Fibrillation-Related Hospital Visit and Cost, Treatment Pattern and Mortality in Korea: 10-Year Nationwide Sample Cohort Data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hancheol; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Baek, Yong-Soo; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives The change of in-hospital and out-hospital treatments, and hospital costs for atrial fibrillation (AF) were not well known in rapidly aging Asian countries. This study is to examine the trends of AF management and outcomes in Korea. Subjects and Methods In the sample cohort from Korean National Health Insurance Data Sample Cohort (K-NHID-Sample Cohort) from 2004 through 2013, we identified patients with AF and hospital visit records using Korean Classification of Diseases, 6th Revision (KCD-6). Hospital cost, prescribed medications, radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA), morbidity and mortality were identified. Results AF-related hospitalization and outpatient clinic visits increased by 2.19 and 3.06-fold, respectively. While the total cost increased from 3.6 to 11.3 billion won (p<0.001), the mean cost per patient increased from 0.68 to 0.83 million won (p<0.001). Although the mean CHA2DS2-VASc score increased from 3.5 to 4.4 in the total AF population, the proportion of patients who receive anticoagulation therapy with warfarin showed no significant change for the decade. The proportion of hospitalization for RFCA was increased (0.4% to 1.1%, p<0.001). All-cause mortality (6.7% to 5.0%), cardiovascular mortality (1.4% to 1.1%) and stroke-related death (1.3% to 0.8%) showed a modest decrease from 2004 to 2013. Conclusion During the last decade, AF-related hospitalization and outpatient clinic visits have increased with the increase of many other comorbidities, whereas the rate of anticoagulation did not improved. Although mortality in patients with AF showed a modest decrease from 2004 to 2013, proper anticoagulation therapy is warranted for the improvement of public health. PMID:28154592

  1. Effects of a nurse-led heart failure clinic on hospital readmission and mortality in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ho Yu; Chair, Sek Ying; Wang, Qun; Sit, Janet WH; Wong, Eliza ML; Tang, Siu Wai

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a physically and socially debilitating disease that carries the burden of hospital re-admission and mortality. As an aging society, Hong Kong urgently needs to find ways to reduce the hospital readmission of HF patients. This study evaluates the effects of a nurse-led HF clinic on the hospital readmission and mortality rates among older HF patients in Hong Kong. Methods This study is a retrospective data analysis that compares HF patient in a nurse-led HF clinic in Hong Kong compared with HF patients who did not attend the clinic. The nurses of this clinic provide education on lifestyle modification and symptom monitoring, as well as titrate the medications and measure biochemical markers by following established protocols. This analysis used the socio-demographic and clinical data of HF patients who were aged ≥ 65 years old and stayed in the clinic over a six-month period. Results The data of a total of 78 HF patients were included in this data analysis. The mean age of the patients was 77.38 ± 6.80 years. Approximately half of the HF patients were male (51.3%), almost half were smokers (46.2%), and the majority received ≤ six years of formal education. Most of the HF patients (87.2%) belonged to classes II and III of the New York Heart Association Functional Classification, with a mean ejection fraction of 47.15 ± 20.31 mL. The HF patients who attended the clinic (n = 38, 75.13 ± 5.89 years) were significantly younger than those who did not attend the clinic (n = 40, 79.53 ± 6.96 years) (P = 0.04), and had lower recorded blood pressure. No other statistically significant difference existed between the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of the two groups. The HF patients who did not attend the nurse-led HF clinic demonstrated a significantly higher risk of hospital readmission [odd ratio (OR): 7.40; P < 0.01] than those who attended after adjusting for the effect of age and blood pressure. In addition, HF

  2. Clostridium difficile Associated Risk of Death Score (CARDS): A novel severity score to predict mortality among hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Zain; Fabersunne, Camila Cribb; Smith, Mark B.; Alm, Eric J.; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is public health threat and associated with significant mortality. However, there is a paucity of objectively derived CDI severity scoring systems to predict mortality. Aims To develop a novel CDI risk score to predict mortality entitled: Clostridium difficile Associated Risk of Death Score (CARDS). Methods We obtained data from the United States 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. All CDI-associated hospitalizations were identified using discharge codes (ICD-9-CM, 008.45). Multivariate logistic regression was utilized to identify independent predictors of mortality. CARDS was calculated by assigning a numeric weight to each parameter based on their odds ratio in the final logistic model. Predictive properties of model discrimination were assessed using the c-statistic and validated in an independent sample using the 2010 NIS database. Results We identified 77,776 hospitalizations, yielding an estimate of 374,747 cases with an associated diagnosis of CDI in the United States, 8% of whom died in the hospital. The 8 severity score predictors were identified on multivariate analysis: age, cardiopulmonary disease, malignancy, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, acute renal failure, liver disease and ICU admission, with weights ranging from −1 (for diabetes) to 5 (for ICU admission). The overall risk score in the cohort ranged from 0 to 18. Mortality increased significantly as CARDS increased. CDI-associated mortality was 1.2% with a CARDS of 0 compared to 100% with CARDS of 18. The model performed equally well in our validation cohort. Conclusion CARDS is a promising simple severity score to predict mortality among those hospitalized with CDI. PMID:26849527

  3. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an

  4. Incidence, Predictors, and Impact on Hospital Mortality of Amphotericin B Nephrotoxicity Defined Using Newer Acute Kidney Injury Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Carla Dinamérica; de Carvalho Almeida, Luna; de Oliveira dos Reis, Camilla; Santos, Barbara Mendes; Glesby, Marshall Jay

    2015-01-01

    Studies on amphotericin B (AmB) nephrotoxicity use diverse definitions of acute kidney injury (AKI). Here, we used the new Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) system to describe the incidence, predictors, and impact of AmB-induced AKI on hospital mortality in 162 patients treated with AmB (120 with deoxycholate preparation and 42 with liposomal preparation). KDIGO stage 1 requires an absolute increase of ≥0.3 mg/dl or ≥1.5× over baseline serum creatinine (SCr), while stage 2 requires ≥2×, and stage 3 requires ≥3×. A binary KDIGO definition (KDIGObin) corresponds to stage ≥1. For comparison, we included two definitions of AKI traditionally utilized in nephrotoxicity studies: ≥0.5 mg/dl (NT0.5) and ≥2× (NT2×) increase in baseline SCr. The overall incidence of AmB-induced AKI by KDIGObin was 58.6% (stage 1, 30.9%; stage 2, 18.5%; stage 3, 9.3%). Predictors of AKI by KDIGObin were older age and use of furosemide and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I). Traditional criteria detected lower incidences of AKI, at 45.1% (NT0.5) and 27.8% (NT2×). Predictors of AKI by traditional criteria were older age and use of vancomycin (NT0.5) and use of vancomycin and vasopressors (NT2×). KDIGObin detected AKI 2 days earlier than the most sensitive traditional criterion. However, only traditional criteria were associated with intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, and mortality. In conclusion, the increase in sensitivity of KDIGObin is accompanied by a loss of specificity and ability to predict outcomes. Prospective studies are required to weigh the potential gain from early AKI detection against the potential loss from undue changes in management in patients with subtle elevations in SCr. PMID:26014956

  5. Morbidity and mortality associated with Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection in a tertiary care kidney hospital.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Salman; Drohlia, Murtaza F; Nasir, Kiran; Hussain, Mehwish; Ahmad, Aasim

    2015-11-01

    Malaria is a disease of tropical regions and both types of plasmodia, i.e. Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, cause significant morbidity and mortality. P. vivax was thought to be benign and cause less morbidity and mortality. Many reports showed the devastating effect of vivax malaria too. We compared the clinical symptoms, laboratory markers, treatment and outcome of both the plasmodia. This is a retrospective analysis of 95 patients admitted to The Kidney Center, Karachi in a duration of 15 years (1997-2012); 45 patients with falciparum malaria and 50 patients with vivax malaria, and compared the clinical presentation, laboratory workup, treatment and outcome in both groups. The two groups constitute a mixed population of diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hemodialysis patients. Both plasmodia have an equal clinical impact in terms of fever and rigors, anorexia, nausea, feeling of dyspnea, change in the mental status, changes in the urine color, diarrhea, volume depletion and pedal edema. However, patients with falciparum had significantly more vomiting (P = 0.02), oliguria (P = 0.003) and jaundice (P = 0.003). Laboratory parameters also showed a severe impact of falciparum, as there was more severe anemia and kidney and liver dysfunction. More patients were treated with dialysis and blood transfusion in the falciparum group. The outcome in the two groups was not significantly different in terms of death and days of hospitalization. Falciparum malaria has a higher clinical impact than the vivax malaria, but vivax is not as benign as it was once thought to be. It also has devastating effects on vulnerable populations like patients with CKD and diabetes.

  6. [Hospital Mortality in Parkinson's Disease: Retrospective Analysis in a Portuguese Tertiary Centre].

    PubMed

    Martins, Joana; Rua, Adriana; Vila Chã, Nuno

    2016-05-01

    Introdução: A doença de Parkinson está associada a elevada mortalidade hospitalar. O sexo masculino, o início tardio da doença, o grau de incapacidade e a coexistência de deterioração cognitiva ou de depressão têm sido apontados como fatores de risco. A pneumonia e as doenças cardiovasculares são as principais causas de morte. Objetivo: Explorar a mortalidade hospitalar (motivo de internamento e de óbito) dos doentes com doença de Parkinson num hospital terciário, assim como as características demográficas e clínicas. Material e Métodos: Identificação das admissões hospitalares dos doentes com o diagnóstico de doença de Parkinson entre 2008 e 2014 e seleção dos doentes falecidos. Revisão retrospetiva dos processos clínicos e inclusão dos doentes com doença confirmada clinicamente por um neurologista. Avaliação das causas de óbito, características demográficas e clínicas. Resultados: Identificámos 1 525 admissões hospitalares de doentes com diagnóstico de doença de Parkinson, das quais 150 resultaram em óbito. Destes, 52 cumpriam critérios de inclusão. A idade média do início dos sintomas de doença foi 66,8 anos (± 8,7) e a duração média da doença foi 12,5 anos (± 7,9). Sessenta e cinco por cento dos doentes encontravam-se no estádio 4-5 na escala de Hoehn e Yahr. Trinta e três doentes (63%) apresentavam demência e onze depressão. As infeções foram a principal causa de morte (respiratória em 63% dos casos). Discussão: Ã semelhança da literatura, a pneumonia foi a principal causa de morte hospitalar e a maioria dos doentes apresentava estádio avançado de doença e demência. Contrastando com outros estudos, não se verificou diminuição da esperança média de vida e as doenças cardiovasculares e o traumatismo não foram causas de morte na nossa população. Conclusões: Apresentamos o primeiro estudo português de mortalidade na doença de Parkinson. A pneumonia é a principal causa de morte

  7. Association of Plasma Pentraxin-3 Levels on Admission with In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Chai, Xiang-Ping; Fang, Zhen-Fei; Hu, Xin-Qun; Tang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening cardiovascular emergency. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is proposed as a prognostic marker and found to be related to worse clinical outcomes in various cardiovascular diseases. This study sought to investigate the association of circulating PTX3 levels with in-hospital mortality in patients with acute Type A aortic dissection (TAAD). Methods: A total of 98 patients with TAAD between January 2012 and December 2015 were enrolled in this study. Plasma concentrations of PTX3 were measured upon admission using a high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system. Patients were divided into two groups as patients died during hospitalization (Group 1) and those who survived (Group 2). The clinical, laboratory variables, and imaging findings were analyzed between the two groups, and predictors for in-hospital mortality were evaluated using multivariate analysis. Results: During the hospital stay, 32 (33%) patients died and 66 (67%) survived. The patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher PTX3 levels on admission compared to those who survived. Pearson's correlation analysis demonstrated that PTX3 correlated positively with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), maximum white blood cell count, and aortic diameter. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that PTX3 levels, coronary involvement, cardiac tamponade, and a conservative treatment strategy are significant independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with TAAD. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis further illustrated that PTX3 levels on admission were strong predictors of mortality with an area under the curve of 0.89. A PTX3 level ≥5.46 ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 79%, and an hsCRP concentration ≥9.5 mg/L had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 69% for predicting in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: High PTX3 levels on admission are independently

  8. Clinical profile and factors associated with mortality in hospitalized patients with HIV/AIDS: a retrospective analysis from Tripoli Medical Centre, Libya, 2013.

    PubMed

    Shalaka, N S; Garred, N A; Zeglam, H T; Awasi, S A; Abukathir, L A; Altagdi, M E; Rayes, A A

    2015-10-02

    In Libya, little is known about HIV-related hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality. This was a retrospective analysis of HIV-related hospitalizations at Tripoli Medical Centre in 2013. Of 227 cases analysed, 82.4% were males who were significantly older (40.0 versus 36.5 years), reported injection drug use (58.3% versus 0%) and were hepatitis C virus co-infected (65.8% versus 0%) compared with females. Severe immunosuppression was prevalent (median CD4 count = 42 cell/μL). Candidiasis was the most common diagnosis (26.0%); Pneumocystis pneumonia was the most common respiratory disease (8.8%), while cerebral toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in 8.4% of patients. Current HAART use was independently associated with low risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 0.33), while central nervous system symptoms (OR 4.12), sepsis (OR 6.98) and low total lymphocyte counts (OR 3.60) were associated with increased risk. In this study, late presentation with severe immunosuppression was common, and was associated with significant in-hospital mortality.

  9. Superfund reform: US Environmental Protection Agency`s 30-day study and its implication for the US Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.R.; Friedman, J.R.; Neff, R.W.

    1993-03-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to reform and restructure the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAS) Superfund program, the EPA Administrator on October 21, 1991, announced several key programmatic reforms. These reforms are a result of the Superfund 30-Day Task Force Report (30-Day Study, EPA 1991a), an effort carried out by EPAs office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER). The EPA OSWER oversees environmental cleanup activities under a number of statutory authorities, including the Comprehensive Environmental response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). CERCLA and its implementing regulation, the National Contingency Plan (NCP), establish a regulatory framework to govern the cleanup of existing, and often abandoned, hazardous waste sites. The purposes of this report are to (1) review the background and recommendations of EPNs 30-Day Study, (2) identify and discuss the initiatives from the 30-Day Study that may impact DOE`s environmental restoration mission, (3) report on EPAs progress in implementing the selected priority initiatives, and (4) describe potentially related DOE activities.

  10. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  11. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  12. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  13. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  14. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  15. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. 560.515 Section 560.515 Money and Finance: Treasury....515 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. (a) All... involving Iran (a pre-existing trade contract), including the exportation of goods, services...

  16. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. 560.515 Section 560.515 Money and Finance: Treasury....515 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. (a) All... involving Iran (a pre-existing trade contract), including the exportation of goods, services...

  17. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. 560.515 Section 560.515 Money and Finance: Treasury....515 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. (a) All... involving Iran (a pre-existing trade contract), including the exportation of goods, services...

  18. Predicting 30-Day Readmissions: Performance of the LACE Index Compared with a Regression Model among General Medicine Patients in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Shu Yun; Thumboo, Julian; Liu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    The LACE index (length of stay, acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, CCI, and number of emergency department visits in preceding 6 months) derived in Canada is simple and may have clinical utility in Singapore to predict readmission risk. We compared the performance of the LACE index with a derived model in identifying 30-day readmissions from a population of general medicine patients in Singapore. Additional variables include patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory variables during the index admission, and prior healthcare utilization in the preceding year. 5,862 patients were analysed and 572 patients (9.8%) were readmitted in the 30 days following discharge. Age, CCI, count of surgical procedures during index admission, white cell count, serum albumin, and number of emergency department visits in previous 6 months were significantly associated with 30-day readmission risk. The final logistic regression model had fair discriminative ability c-statistic of 0.650 while the LACE index achieved c-statistic of 0.628 in predicting 30-day readmissions. Our derived model has the advantage of being available early in the admission to identify patients at high risk of readmission for interventions. Additional factors predicting readmission risk and machine learning techniques should be considered to improve model performance. PMID:26682212

  19. 76 FR 17734 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1998E, Foreign Service Officer Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    .... Originating Office: Human Resources, HR/REE/BEX. Form Number: DS-1998E. Respondents: Registrants for the... information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for ] approval in accordance with... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for up to 30 days from March 30, 2011. ADDRESSES: Direct...

  20. 78 FR 31999 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Young Turkey/Young America Evaluation (YTYA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Young Turkey/ Young America Evaluation (YTYA) Survey ACTION... Collection: Young Turkey/Young America Evaluation (YTYA) Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Type of...

  1. 78 FR 36562 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Application and Re-certification Packages for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  2. 78 FR 66040 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate-Sales Contract and Addendums

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate--Sales... collection entitled HUD-Owned Real Estate-Sales Contract and Addendums (2502-0306). HUD will republish...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... Title of Information Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report--Local Contracting... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report--Local Contracting Agencies (HUD Programs) AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval in accordance with... Collection. Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, ECA/A/E/EUR. Form Number: DS-7001... to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for up to 30 days from September 19, 2011....

  5. 77 FR 47690 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Civilian Response Corps Database In-Processing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Civilian Response Corps Database In-Processing Electronic Form... Database In-Processing Electronic Form. OMB Control Number: 1405-0168. Type of Request: Extension of...

  6. 75 FR 32961 - 30-Day Federal Register Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... collection Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Control 1024-0231. The OMB has up to 60 days to approve or... consideration, OMB should receive public comments within 30 days of the date on which this notice is published... were received on this notice. DATES: Public comments on the proposed Information Collection...

  7. 78 FR 15799 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book and/or... INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book...

  8. 78 FR 64145 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency... Secretary to implement risk sharing with State and local housing finance agencies (HFAs). Under this...

  9. 78 FR 65696 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing... Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk- Sharing Program. OMB Approval Number... with State and local housing finance agencies (HFAs). Under this program, HUD provides full...

  10. 78 FR 35040 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; Web-Based Media Literacy Parent Training for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; Web-Based Media Literacy Parent Training for Substance Use Prevention in Rural Locations SUMMARY: Under the... Branch, Division of Epidemiology, Services, and Prevention Research, NIDA, NIH, 6001 Executive...

  11. Association of Intensive Care Unit Admission With Mortality Among Older Patients With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Thomas S.; Sjoding, Michael W.; Ryan, Andrew M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Among patients whose need for intensive care is uncertain, the relationship of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and costs is unknown. OBJECTIVE To estimate the relationship between ICU admission and outcomes for elderly patients with pneumonia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries (aged >64 years) admitted to 2988 acute care hospitals in the United States with pneumonia from 2010 to 2012. EXPOSURES ICU admission vs general ward admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included Medicare spending and hospital costs. Patient and hospital characteristics were adjusted to account for differences between patients with and without ICU admission. To account for unmeasured confounding, an instrumental variable was used—the differential distance to a hospital with high ICU admission (defined as any hospital in the upper 2 quintiles of ICU use). RESULTS Among 1 112 394 Medicare beneficiaries with pneumonia, 328 404 (30%) were admitted to the ICU. In unadjusted analyses, patients admitted to the ICU had significantly higher 30-day mortality, Medicare spending, and hospital costs than patients admitted to a general hospital ward. Patients (n = 553 597) living closer than the median differential distance (<3.3 miles) to a hospital with high ICU admission were significantly more likely to be admitted to the ICU than patients living farther away (n = 558 797) (36%for patients living closer vs 23%for patients living farther, P < .001). In adjusted analyses, for the 13%of patients whose ICU admission decision appeared to be discretionary (dependent only on distance), ICU admission was associated with a significantly lower adjusted 30-day mortality (14.8%for ICU admission vs 20.5%for general ward admission, P = .02; absolute decrease, −5.7%[95%CI, −10.6%, −0.9%]), yet there were no significant differences in Medicare spending or hospital

  12. Effects of nurse staffing, work environments, and education on patient mortality: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunhee; Sloane, Douglas M.; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Sera; Choi, Miyoung; Yoo, Il Young; Lee, Hye Sun; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background While considerable evidence has been produced showing a link between nursing characteristics and patient outcomes in the U.S. and Europe, little is known about whether similar associations are present in South Korea. Objective To examine the effects of nurse staffing, work environment, and education on patient mortality. Methods This study linked hospital facility data with staff nurse survey data (N=1,024) and surgical patient discharge data (N = 76,036) from 14 high-technology teaching hospitals with 700 or more beds in South Korea, collected between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2008. Logistic regression models that corrected for the clustering of patients in hospitals were used to estimate the effects of the three nursing characteristics on risk-adjusted patient mortality within 30 days of admission. Results Risk-adjusted models reveal that nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and nurse education were significantly associated with patient mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00–1.10; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.31–0.88; and OR 0.91, CI 0.83–0.99; respectively). These odds ratios imply that each additional patient per nurse is associated with an 5% increase in the odds of patient death within 30 days of admission, that the odds of patient mortality are nearly 50% lower in the hospitals with better nurse work environments than in hospitals with mixed or poor nurse work environments, and that each 10% increase in BSN nurse is associated with a 9% decrease in patient deaths. Conclusions Nurse staffing, nurse work environments, and percentages of BSN nurses in South Korea are associated with patient mortality. Improving hospital nurse staffing and work environments and increasing the percentages of BSN nurses would help reduce the number of preventable in-hospital deaths. PMID:25213091

  13. Differences between determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs for patients with acute heart failure: a nationwide observational study from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Noriko; Kunisawa, Susumu; Ikai, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although current case-mix classifications in prospective payment systems were developed to estimate patient resource usage, whether these classifications reflect clinical outcomes remains unknown. The efficient management of acute heart failure (AHF) with high mortality is becoming more important in many countries as its prevalence and associated costs are rapidly increasing. Here, we investigate the determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs to clarify the impact of severity factors on these outcomes in patients with AHF, and examine the level of agreement between the predicted values of mortality and costs. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting and participants A total of 19 926 patients with AHF from 261 acute care hospitals in Japan were analysed using administrative claims data. Main outcome measures Multivariable logistic regression analysis and linear regression analysis were performed to examine the determinants of in-hospital mortality and hospitalisation costs, respectively. The independent variables were grouped into patient condition on admission, postadmission procedures indicating disease severity (eg, intra-aortic balloon pumping) and other high-cost procedures (eg, single-photon emission CT). These groups of independent variables were cumulatively added to the models, and their effects on the models' abilities to predict the respective outcomes were examined. The level of agreement between the quartiles of predicted mortality and predicted costs was analysed using Cohen's κ coefficient. Results In-hospital mortality was associated with patient's condition on admission and severity-indicating procedures (C-statistics 0.870), whereas hospitalisation costs were associated with severity-indicating procedures and high-cost procedures (R2 0.32). There were substantial differences in determinants between the outcomes. In addition, there was no consistent relationship observed (κ=0.016, p<0.0001) between the

  14. Risk Factors for Long-Term Mortality after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Jan C.; Ueland, Thor; Jenum, Pål A.; Müller, Fredrik; Brunborg, Cathrine; Frøland, Stig S.; Aukrust, Pål; Husebye, Einar; Heggelund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Contributors to long-term mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain unclear, with little attention paid to pneumonia etiology. We examined long-term survival, causes of death, and risk factors for long-term mortality in adult patients who had been hospitalized for CAP, with emphasis on demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological characteristics. Methods Two hundred and sixty-seven consecutive patients admitted in 2008–2011 to a general hospital with CAP were prospectively recruited and followed up. Patients who died during hospital stay were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected within 48 hours of admission. Extensive microbiological work-up was performed to establish the etiology of CAP in 63% of patients. Mortality data were obtained from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Cox regression models were used to identify independent risk factors for all-cause mortality. Results Of 259 hospital survivors of CAP (median age 66 years), 79 (30.5%) died over a median of 1,804 days (range 1–2,520 days). Cumulative 5-year survival rate was 72.9% (95% CI 67.4–78.4%). Standardized mortality ratio was 2.90 for men and 2.05 for women. The main causes of death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), vascular diseases, and malignancy. Independent risk factors for death were the following (hazard ratio, 95% CI): age (1.83 per decade, 1.47–2.28), cardiovascular disease (2.63, 1.61–4.32), COPD (2.09, 1.27–3.45), immunocompromization (1.98, 1.17–3.37), and low serum albumin level at admission (0.75 per 5g/L higher, 0.58–0.96), whereas active smoking was protective (0.32, 0.14–0.74); active smokers were younger than non-smokers (P < 0.001). Microbial etiology did not predict mortality. Conclusions Results largely confirm substantial comorbidity-related 5-year mortality after hospitalization for CAP and the impact of several well-known risk factors for death, and extend

  15. Associations of employment status and educational levels with mortality and hospitalization in the dialysis outcomes and practice patterns study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Karaboyas, Angelo; Robinson, Bruce M.; Pisoni, Ronald L.; Nomura, Takanobu; Akiba, Takashi; Akizawa, Tadao; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi; Saito, Akira; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Inaba, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic status (SES) factors such as employment, educational attainment, income, and marital status can affect the health and well-being of the general population and have been associated with the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, no studies to date in Japan have reported on the prognosis of patients with CKD with respect to SES. This study aimed to investigate the influences of employment and education level on mortality and hospitalization among maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients in Japan. Methods Data on 7974 HD patients enrolled in Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study phases 1–4 (1999–2011) in Japan were analysed. Employment status, education level, demographic data, and comorbidities were abstracted at entry into DOPPS from patient records. Mortality and hospitalization events were collected during follow-up. Patients on dialysis < 120 days at study entry were excluded from the analyses. Cox regression modelled the association between employment and both mortality and hospitalization among patients < 60 years old. The association between education and outcomes was also assessed. The association between patient characteristics and employment among patients < 60 years old was assessed using logistic regression. Results During a median follow-up of 24.9 months (interquartile range, 18.4–32.0), 10% of patients died and 43% of patients had an inpatient hospitalization. Unemployment was associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–2.36) and hospitalization (HR = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.08–1.44). Compared to patients who graduated from university, patients with less than a high school (HS) education and patients who graduated HS with some college tended to have elevated mortality (HR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.04–1.92 and HR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.02–1.82, respectively) but were not at risk for increased hospitalizations. Factors associated with unemployment included lower level of

  16. A propensity score analysis shows that empirical treatment with linezolid does not increase the thirty-day mortality rate in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Marcos, Miguel; Soriano, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

  17. Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ping; Momin, Mohetaboer; Huo, Yong; Wang, Chun-yan; Zhang, Yan; Gong, Yan-jun; Liu, Zhao-ping; Wang, Xin-gang; Zheng, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between renal function and clinical outcomes among patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (ASTEMI), who were treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: 420 patients hospitalized in Peking University First Hospital, diagnosed with ASTEMI treated with emergency (PCI) from January 2001 to June 2011 were enrolled in this study. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used as a measure of renal function. We compared the clinical parameters and outcomes between ASTEMI patients combined renal insufficiency and the patients with normal renal function. Results: There was a significant increase in the concentrations of fibrinogen and D-Dimer (P<0.05) and a much higher morbidity of diabetes mellitus in the group of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) (P<0.01). CKD (eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI receiving PCI therapy rapidly (P=0.032, odds ratio (OR) 4.159, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.127–15.346). Conclusions: Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI treated with primary PCI. PMID:22843184

  18. Meta-analysis of the effects of carvedilol versus metoprolol on all-cause mortality and hospitalizations in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Alexandros; Palla, Mohan; Afonso, Luis

    2015-04-15

    Long-term treatment with appropriate doses of carvedilol or metoprolol is currently recommended for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) to decrease the risk of death, hospitalizations, and patients' symptoms. It remains unclear if the β blockers used in patients with HFrEF are equal or carvedilol is superior to metoprolol types. We performed a meta-analysis of the comparative effects of carvedilol versus metoprolol tartrate and succinate on all-cause mortality and/or hospitalization. We conducted an Embase and MEDLINE search for prospective controlled trials and cohort studies of patients with HFrEF who were received to treatment with carvedilol versus metoprolol. We identified 4 prospective controlled and 6 cohort studies with 30,943 patients who received carvedilol and 69,925 patients on metoprolol types (tartrate and succinate) with an average follow-up duration of 36.4 months. All-cause mortality was reduced in prospective studies with carvedilol versus metoprolol tartrate. Neither all-cause mortality nor hospitalizations were significantly different between carvedilol and metoprolol succinate in the cohort studies. In conclusion, in patients with HFrEF, carvedilol and metoprolol succinate have similar effects in reducing all-cause mortality.

  19. Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Hyperglycemia in Non–Critically Ill Inpatients Increases the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality (Multicenter Study)

    PubMed Central

    Olveira, Gabriel; Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D.; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Maria del Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P.; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Matia, Pilar; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Prieto, Javier; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, María José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Rovira, Adela; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hyperglycemia may increase mortality in patients who receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN). However, this has not been well studied in noncritically ill patients (i.e., patients in the nonintensive care unit setting). The aim of this study was to determine whether mean blood glucose level during TPN infusion is associated with increased mortality in noncritically ill hospitalized patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective multicenter study involved 19 Spanish hospitals. Noncritically ill patients who were prescribed TPN were included prospectively, and data were collected on demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables as well as on in-hospital mortality. RESULTS The study included 605 patients (mean age 63.2 ± 15.7 years). The daily mean TPN values were 1.630 ± 323 kcal, 3.2 ± 0.7 g carbohydrates/kg, 1.26 ± 0.3 g amino acids/kg, and 0.9 ± 0.2 g lipids/kg. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the patients who had mean blood glucose levels >180 mg/dL during the TPN infusion had a risk of mortality that was 5.6 times greater than those with mean blood glucose levels <140 mg/dL (95% CI 1.47–21.4 mg/dL) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional state, presence of diabetes or hyperglycemia before starting TPN, diagnosis, prior comorbidity, carbohydrates infused, use of steroid therapy, SD of blood glucose level, insulin units supplied, infectious complications, albumin, C-reactive protein, and HbA1c levels. CONCLUSIONS Hyperglycemia (mean blood glucose level >180 mg/dL) in noncritically ill patients who receive TPN is associated with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality. PMID:23223407

  20. Predictors of in-hospital mortality among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: a protocol of systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Carlos Podalirio Borges; Couban, Rachel; Kallyth, Sun Makosso; Cabral, Vagner Kunz; Craigie, Samantha; Busse, Jason Walter; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health issue worldwide, with 1.4 million deaths occurring annually. There is uncertainty regarding which factors are associated with in-hospital mortality among patients with pulmonary TB. This knowledge gap complicates efforts to identify and improve the management of those individuals with TB at greatest risk of death. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to establish predictors of in-