Science.gov

Sample records for 30-day hospital mortality

  1. Examination of hospital characteristics and patient quality outcomes using four inpatient quality indicators and 30-day all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Carretta, Henry J; Chukmaitov, Askar; Tang, Anqi; Shin, Jihyung

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to examine hospital mortality outcomes and structure using 2008 patient-level discharges from general community hospitals. Discharges from Florida administrative files were merged to the state mortality registry. A cross-sectional analysis of inpatient mortality was conducted using Inpatient Quality Indicators (IQIs) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), stroke, pneumonia, and all-payer 30-day postdischarge mortality. Structural characteristics included bed size, volume, ownership, teaching status, and system affiliation. Outcomes were risk adjusted using 3M APR-DRG. Volume was inversely correlated with AMI, CHF, stroke, and 30-day mortality. Similarities and differences in the direction and magnitude of the relationship of structural characteristics to 30-day postdischarge and IQI mortality measures were observed. Hospital volume was inversely correlated with inpatient mortality outcomes. Other hospital characteristics were associated with some mortality outcomes. Further study is needed to understand the relationship between 30-day postdischarge mortality and hospital quality.

  2. Use of mortality within 30 days of a COPD hospitalisation as a measure of COPD care in UK hospitals.

    PubMed

    Walker, P P; Thompson, E; Crone, H; Flatt, G; Holton, K; Hill, S L; Pearson, M G

    2013-10-01

    Mortality rate has been proposed as a metric of hospital chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care in light of variation seen in national COPD audits. Using Hospital Episode Statistics (hospital 'coding') we examined 30-day mortality after COPD hospitalisation in 150 UK hospitals during 2006-2007 and 2007-2008. Mean and median 30-day mortalities were similar each year but the coefficient of variation was >20% and hospitals could change from a low or high quartile to the median by chance. We could not detect any reasons for hospitals being at the extremes. 30-day mortality after COPD hospitalisation is a complex variable and unlikely to be useful as a primary annual COPD metric.

  3. Prediction of Hospital Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure 30-Day Mortality Rates Using Publicly Reported Performance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, David S.; Bardach, Naomi S.; Lin, Grace A.; Chattopadhyay, Arpita; Goldman, L. Elizabeth; Dudley, R. Adams

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify an approach to summarizing publicly reported hospital performance data for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure (HF) that best predicts current year hospital mortality rates. Setting A total of 1,868 U.S. hospitals reporting process and outcome measures for AMI and HF to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from July 2005 to June 2006 (Year 0) and July 2006 to June 2007 (Year 1). Design Observational cohort study measuring the percentage variation in Year 1 hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate explained by denominator-based weighted composite scores summarizing hospital Year 0 performance. Data Collection Data were prospectively collected from hospitalcompare.gov. Results Percentage variation in Year 1 mortality was best explained by mortality rate alone in Year 0 over other composites including process performance. If only Year 0 mortality rates were reported, and consumers using hospitals in the highest decile of mortality instead chose hospitals in the lowest decile of mortality rate, the number of deaths at 30 days that potentially could have been avoided was 1.31 per 100 patients for AMI and 2.12 for HF (p < .001). Conclusion Public reports focused on 30-day risk-adjusted mortality rate may more directly address policymakers’ goals of facilitating consumer identification of hospitals with better outcomes. PMID:22093186

  4. Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Lindman, Anja Schou

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of patient administrative data (PAS) for calculating 30-day mortality after hip fracture as a quality indicator, by a retrospective study of medical records. Methods We used PAS data from all Norwegian hospitals (2005–2009), merged with vital status from the National Registry, to calculate 30-day case-mix adjusted mortality for each hospital (n = 51). We used stratified sampling to establish a representative sample of both hospitals and cases. The hospitals were stratified according to high, low and medium mortality of which 4, 3, and 5 hospitals were sampled, respectively. Within hospitals, cases were sampled stratified according to year of admission, age, length of stay, and vital 30-day status (alive/dead). The final study sample included 1043 cases from 11 hospitals. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. Diagnostic and clinical information from the medical records and PAS were used to define definite and probable hip fracture. We used logistic regression analysis in order to estimate systematic between-hospital variation in unmeasured confounding. Finally, to study the consequences of unmeasured confounding for identifying mortality outlier hospitals, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Results The estimated overall positive predictive value was 95.9% for definite and 99.7% for definite or probable hip fracture, with no statistically significant differences between hospitals. The standard deviation of the additional, systematic hospital bias in mortality estimates was 0.044 on the logistic scale. The effect of unmeasured confounding on outlier detection was small to moderate, noticeable only for large hospital volumes. Conclusions This study showed that PAS data are adequate for identifying cases of hip fracture, and the effect of unmeasured case mix variation was small. In conclusion, PAS data are adequate for calculating 30-day mortality after hip-fracture as a quality

  5. Discharge Outcomes in Seniors Hospitalized for More than 30 Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozyrskyj, Anita; Black, Charlyn; Chateau, Dan; Steinbach, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    Hospitalization is a sentinel event that leads to loss of independence for many seniors. This study of long-stay hospitalizations (more than 30 days) in seniors was undertaken to identify risk factors for not going home, to characterize patients with risk factors who did go home and to describe one year outcomes following home discharge. Using…

  6. Utility of Socioeconomic Status in Predicting 30-Day Outcomes After Heart Failure Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Zubin J.; McCoy, Lisa A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Peterson, Eric D.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background An individual's socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with health outcomes and mortality, yet it is unknown whether accounting for SES can improve risk-adjustment models for 30-day outcomes among Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) beneficiaries hospitalized with heart failure (HF). Methods and Results We linked clinical data on hospitalized HF patients in the Get With The Guidelines®-HF™ database (01/2005–12/2011) with CMS claims and county-level SES data from the 2012 Area Health Resources Files. We compared the discriminatory capabilities of multivariable models that adjusted for SES, patient, and/or hospital characteristics to determine whether county-level SES data improved prediction or changed hospital rankings for 30-day all-cause mortality and rehospitalization. After adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, median household income (per $5,000 increase) was inversely associated with odds of 30-day mortality (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95–1.00, p=0.032), and the percentage of persons with at least a high school diploma (per 5 unit increase) was associated with lower odds of 30-day rehospitalization (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91–0.99).After adjustment for county-level SES data, relative to whites, Hispanic ethnicity (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.58, 0.83) and black race (OR 0.57, 95% CI: 0.50–0.65) remained significantly associated with lower 30-day mortality, but had similar 30-day rehospitalization. County-level SES did not improve risk adjustment or change hospital rankings for 30-day mortality or rehospitalization. Conclusions County-level SES data are modestly associated with 30-day outcomes for CMS beneficiaries hospitalized with HF, but do not improve risk adjustment models based on patient characteristics alone. PMID:25747700

  7. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and 30-day mortality among patients with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Farzin; Ahmadpoor, Amin; Amra, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the most life-threatening form of venous thrombosis which causes the majority of mortalities in this category. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been indicated as one of the risk factors for thromboembolism because of hemostatic alterations. The present study was designed to seek for the relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality of patients with PE. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted among 137 consecutive patients referred to hospital with symptoms of PE and preliminary stable hemodynamic. Confirmation of PE was made by multislice computed tomography pulmonary angiography and in the case of contraindication; V/Q lung scan and Doppler sonography were done. A STOP-Bang Questionnaire was used to determine patients with high- and low-risk of OSA. Patients were followed up for 1-month, and their survivals were recorded. Results: This study showed that there was no relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality (P = 0.389). Chronic kidney disease (P = 0.004), hypertension (P = 0.003), main thrombus (P = 0.004), and segmental thrombus (P = 0.022) were associated with 30-day mortality. In the logistic regression analysis, history of chronic kidney disease was diagnosed as a risk factor for 30-day mortality among the PE patients (P = 0.029, odds ratio = 4.93). Conclusion: Results of this study showed 30-day mortality was not affected by OSA directly. In fact, it was affected by complications of OSA such as hypertension and thrombus. Also, positive history of chronic kidney disease increased the risk of 30-day mortality. PMID:26622255

  8. Incidence and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission Among Patients Hospitalized for Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    BERMAN, KENNETH; TANDRA, SWETA; FORSSELL, KATE; VUPPALANCHI, RAJ; BURTON, JAMES R.; NGUYEN, JAMES; MULLIS, DEVONNE; KWO, PAUL; CHALASANI, NAGA

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The rate of readmission to the hospital 30 days after discharge (30-day readmission rate) is used as a quality measure for hospitalized patients, but it has not been studied adequately for patients with advanced liver disease. We investigated the incidence and factors that predict this rate and its relationship with mortality at 90 days. METHODS We analyzed data from patients with advanced liver disease who were hospitalized to an inpatient hepatology service at 2 large academic medical centers in 2008. Patients with elective admission and recipients of liver transplants were not included. During the study period, there were 447 patients and a total of 554 eligible admissions. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify variables associated with 30-day readmission and to examine its relationship with mortality at 90 days. RESULTS The 30-day readmission rate was 20%. After adjusting for multiple covariates, readmission within 30 days was associated independently with model for end-stage liver disease scores at discharge (odds ratio [OR], 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.09; P = .002), the presence of diabetes (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.07–2.95; P = .027), and male sex (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.03–2.89; P = .038). After adjusting for age, sex, and model for end-stage liver disease score at discharge, the 90-day mortality rate was significantly higher among patients who were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days than those who were not (26.8% vs 9.8%; OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.36 –5.02; P = .004). CONCLUSIONS Patients with advanced liver disease frequently are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days after discharge; these patients have a higher 90-day mortality rate than those who are not readmitted in 30 days. These data might be used to develop strategies to reduce early readmission of hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. PMID:21092762

  9. Predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with spontaneous primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Safatli, Diaa A.; Günther, Albrecht; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwarz, Falko; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a life threatening entity, and an early outcome assessment is mandatory for optimizing therapeutic efforts. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 342 patients with spontaneous primary ICH to evaluate possible predictors of 30-day mortality considering clinical, radiological, and therapeutical parameters. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. Results: From 342 patients (mean age: 67 years, mean Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] on admission: 9, mean ICH volume: 62.19 ml, most common hematoma location: basal ganglia [43.9%]), 102 received surgical and 240 conservative treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25.15%. In a multivariate analysis, GCS (Odds ratio [OR] =0.726, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.661–0.796, P < 0.001), bleeding volume (OR = 1.012 per ml, 95% CI = 1.007 – 1.017, P < 0.001), and infratentorial hematoma location (OR = 5.381, 95% CI = 2.166-13.356, P = 0.009) were significant predictors for the 30-day mortality. After receiver operating characteristics analysis, we defined a “high-risk group” for an unfavorable short-term outcome with GCS <11 and ICH volume >32 ml supratentorially or 21 ml infratentorially. Using Pearson correlation, we found a correlation of 0.986 between ICH score and 30-day mortality (P < 0.001), 0.853 between FUNC score and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001), and 0.924 between ICH-GS and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001). Conclusions: GCS score on admission together with the baseline volume and localization of the hemorrhage are strong

  10. Inpatient Readmissions and Emergency Department Visits within 30 Days of a Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jesse J.; Chan, Theodore C.; Killeen, James P.; Castillo, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inpatient hospital readmissions have become a focus for healthcare reform and cost-containment efforts. Initiatives targeting unanticipated readmissions have included care coordination for specific high readmission diseases and patients and health coaching during the post-discharge transition period. However, little research has focused on emergency department (ED) visits following an inpatient admission. The objective of this study was to assess 30-day ED utilization and all-cause readmissions following a hospital admission. Methods This was a retrospective study using inpatient and ED utilization data from two hospitals with a shared patient population in 2011. We assessed the 30-day ED visit rate and 30-day readmission rate and compared patient characteristics among individuals with 30-day inpatient readmissions, 30-day ED discharges, and no 30-day visits. Results There were 13,449 patients who met the criteria of an index visit. Overall, 2,453 (18.2%) patients had an ED visit within 30 days of an inpatient stay. However, only 55.6% (n=1,363) of these patients were admitted at one of these 30-day visits, resulting in a 30-day all-cause readmission rate of 10.1%. Conclusion Approximately one in five patients presented to the ED within 30 days of an inpatient hospitalization and over half of these patients were readmitted. Readmission measures that incorporate ED visits following an inpatient stay might better inform interventions to reduce avoidable readmissions. PMID:26759647

  11. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Estimating patient survival has hitherto been the main focus when treating metastatic bone disease (MBD) in the appendicular skeleton. This has been done in an attempt to allocate the patient to a surgical procedure that outlives them. No questions have been addressed as to whether the extent of the surgery and thus the surgical trauma reduces survival in this patient group. We wanted to evaluate if perioperative parameters such as blood loss, extent of bone resection, and duration of surgery were risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients having surgery due to MBD in the appendicular skeleton. We retrospectively identified 270 consecutive patients who underwent joint replacement surgery or intercalary spacing for skeletal metastases in the appendicular skeleton from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013. We collected intraoperative (duration of surgery, extent of bone resection, and blood loss), demographic (age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologist score [ASA score], and Karnofsky score), and disease-specific (primary cancer) variables. An association with 30-day mortality was addressed using univariate and multivariable analyses and calculation of odds ratio (OR). All patients were included in the analysis. ASA score 3 + 4 (OR 4.16 [95% confidence interval, CI, 1.80–10.85], P = 0.002) and Karnofsky performance status below 70 (OR 7.34 [95% CI 3.16–19.20], P < 0.001) were associated with increased 30-day mortality in univariate analysis. This did not change in multivariable analysis. No parameters describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality. PMID:27082592

  12. Cirrhosis is Associated with an Increased 30-Day Mortality After Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Montomoli, Jonathan; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), but the impact of cirrhosis on the clinical course following VTE is unclear. In a nationwide cohort study, we examined 30-day mortality among patients with cirrhosis and VTE. Methods: We used Danish population-based health-care databases (1994–2011) to identify patients with incident VTE, i.e., deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Among these, we identified 745 patients with cirrhosis and 3647 patients without cirrhosis (matched on gender, year of birth, calendar year of VTE diagnosis and VTE type). We assessed the 30-day mortality risk among VTE patients with and without cirrhosis, and the mortality rate ratios (MRRs), using an adjusted Cox model with 95% confidence interval. We obtained information on immediate cause of death for patients who died within 30 days after VTE. Results: The 30-day mortality risk for DVT was 7% for patients with cirrhosis and 3% for patients without cirrhosis. Corresponding PE-related mortality risks were 35% and 16%, and PVT-related mortality risks were 19% and 15%, respectively. The adjusted 30-day MRRs were 2.17 (1.24–3.79) for DVT, 1.83 (1.30–2.56) for PE, and 1.30 (0.80–2.13) for PVT. Though overall mortality was higher in patients with cirrhosis than patients without cirrhosis, the proportions of deaths due to PE were similar among patients (25% and 24%, respectively). Conclusions: Cirrhosis is a predictor for increased short-term mortality following VTE, with PE as the most frequent cause of death. PMID:26133110

  13. Associations between Depressive Symptoms and 30-day Hospital Readmission among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Ivonne M.; Amr, Sania; Abraham, Danielle S.; Cannon, Dawn L.; Ostir, Glenn V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmissions are common and costly. Our goal was to determine the association between depressive symptoms and readmission within 30 days following hospital discharge in older adults. Methods We analyzed data from a study of 789 persons aged 65 years or older admitted to a 20-bed acute care for elders (ACE) hospital unit from May 2009 to July 2011. Depressive symptoms were recorded within 24-hours of admission to the hospital unit, using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies -Depression (CES-D) Scale. The primary outcome was readmission to hospital within 30 days of discharge. Results The mean age was 77 years; 66% were female, 72% were White, and 59% were unmarried. On average, older patients reported 2.6 comorbid conditions. Sixteen percent were classified with high depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16). The readmission rate within 30 days was 15%. Older patients with high depressive symptoms had more than 1.6 times the odds (OR 1.66; 95% CI: 1.01-2.74) of being readmitted within 30-days, as compared to those with low depressive symptoms (CES-D < 16), after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, sex, marital status and comorbid conditions. Conclusion High depressive symptoms increased the risk of hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge after adjusting for relevant covariates. In-hospital screening for depressive symptoms may identify older persons at risk for recurrent hospital admissions. PMID:27134802

  14. 30-Day Mortality in Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Prognostic Value of Clinical Scores and Anamnestic Features

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Taute, Bettina-Maria; Baasai, Nansalmaa; Wienke, Andreas; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Schramm, Dominik; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Identification of high-risk patients with pulmonary embolism is vital. The aim of the present study was to examine clinical scores, their single items, and anamnestic features in their ability to predict 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods A retrospective, single-center study from 06/2005 to 01/2010 was performed. Inclusion criteria were presence of pulmonary embolism, availability of patient records and 30-day follow-up. The following clinical scores were calculated: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, original and simplified pulmonary embolism severity index, Glasgow Coma Scale, and euroSCORE II. Results In the study group of 365 patients 39 patients (10.7%) died within 30 days due to pulmonary embolism. From all examined scores and parameters the best predictor of 30-day mortality were the Glasgow Coma scale (≤ 10) and parameters of the circulatory system including presence of mechanical ventilation, arterial pH (< 7.335), and systolic blood pressure (< 99 mm Hg). Conclusions Easy to ascertain circulatory parameters have the same or higher prognostic value than the clinical scores that were applied in this study. From all clinical scores studied the Glasgow Coma Scale was the most time- and cost-efficient one. PMID:26866472

  15. Readmission for Acute Exacerbation within 30 Days of Discharge Is Associated with a Subsequent Progressive Increase in Mortality Risk in COPD Patients: A Long-Term Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Mónica; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Liapikou, Adamantia; Huerta, Arturo; Gabarrús, Albert; Chetta, Alfredo; Soler, Nestor; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Twenty per cent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are readmitted for acute exacerbation (AECOPD) within 30 days of discharge. The prognostic significance of early readmission is not fully understood. The objective of our study was to estimate the mortality risk associated with readmission for acute exacerbation within 30 days of discharge in COPD patients. Methods The cohort (n = 378) was divided into patients readmitted (n = 68) and not readmitted (n = 310) within 30 days of discharge. Clinical, laboratory, microbiological, and severity data were evaluated at admission and during hospital stay, and mortality data were recorded at four time points during follow-up: 30 days, 6 months, 1 year and 3 years. Results Patients readmitted within 30 days had poorer lung function, worse dyspnea perception and higher clinical severity. Two or more prior AECOPD (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.51–4.05) was the only variable independently associated with 30-day readmission. The mortality risk during the follow-up period showed a progressive increase in patients readmitted within 30 days in comparison to patients not readmitted; moreover, 30-day readmission was an independent risk factor for mortality at 1 year (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.10–5.59). In patients readmitted within 30 days, the estimated absolute increase in the mortality risk was 4% at 30 days (number needed to harm NNH, 25), 17% at 6-months (NNH, 6), 19% at 1-year (NNH, 6) and 24% at 3 years (NNH, 5). Conclusion In conclusion a readmission for AECOPD within 30 days is associated with a progressive increased long-term risk of death. PMID:26943928

  16. Half of 30-Day Hospital Readmissions Among HIV-Infected Patients Are Potentially Preventable

    PubMed Central

    Kitchell, Ellen; Etherton, Sarah Shelby; Duarte, Piper; Halm, Ethan A.; Jain, Mamta K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thirty-day readmission rates, a widely utilized quality metric, are high among HIV-infected individuals. However, it is unknown how many 30-day readmissions are preventable, especially in HIV patients, who have been excluded from prior potentially preventable readmission analyses. We used electronic medical records to identify all readmissions within 30 days of discharge among HIV patients hospitalized at a large urban safety net hospital in 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed whether readmissions were potentially preventable using both published criteria and detailed chart review, how readmissions might have been prevented, and the phase of care deemed suboptimal (inpatient care, discharge planning, post-discharge). Of 1137 index admissions, 213 (19%) resulted in 30-day readmissions. These admissions occurred among 930 unique HIV patients, with 130 individuals (14%) experiencing 30-day readmissions. Of these 130, about half were determined to be potentially preventable using published criteria (53%) or implicit chart review (48%). Not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) greatly increased the odds of a preventable readmission (OR 5.9, CI:2.4–14.8). Most of the preventable causes of readmission were attributed to suboptimal care during the index hospitalization. Half of 30-day readmission in HIV patients are potentially preventable. Increased focus on early ART initiation, adherence counseling, management of chronic conditions, and appropriate timing of discharge may help reduce readmissions in this vulnerable population. PMID:26154066

  17. Half of 30-Day Hospital Readmissions Among HIV-Infected Patients Are Potentially Preventable.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, Ank E; Kitchell, Ellen; Etherton, Sarah Shelby; Duarte, Piper; Halm, Ethan A; Jain, Mamta K

    2015-09-01

    Thirty-day readmission rates, a widely utilized quality metric, are high among HIV-infected individuals. However, it is unknown how many 30-day readmissions are preventable, especially in HIV patients, who have been excluded from prior potentially preventable readmission analyses. We used electronic medical records to identify all readmissions within 30 days of discharge among HIV patients hospitalized at a large urban safety net hospital in 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed whether readmissions were potentially preventable using both published criteria and detailed chart review, how readmissions might have been prevented, and the phase of care deemed suboptimal (inpatient care, discharge planning, post-discharge). Of 1137 index admissions, 213 (19%) resulted in 30-day readmissions. These admissions occurred among 930 unique HIV patients, with 130 individuals (14%) experiencing 30-day readmissions. Of these 130, about half were determined to be potentially preventable using published criteria (53%) or implicit chart review (48%). Not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) greatly increased the odds of a preventable readmission (OR 5.9, CI:2.4-14.8). Most of the preventable causes of readmission were attributed to suboptimal care during the index hospitalization. Half of 30-day readmission in HIV patients are potentially preventable. Increased focus on early ART initiation, adherence counseling, management of chronic conditions, and appropriate timing of discharge may help reduce readmissions in this vulnerable population.

  18. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in

  19. Marked Improvement in 30-Day Mortality among Elderly Inpatients and Outpatients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Coca-Perraillon, Marcelo; Kitch, Barrett T.; Cutler, David M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Community-acquired pneumonia is the most common infectious cause of death in the United States. Over the last two decades, patient characteristics and clinical care have changed. To understand the impact of these changes, we quantified incidence and mortality trends among elderly adults. METHODS We used Medicare claims to identify episodes of pneumonia, based on a validated combination of diagnosis codes. Comorbidities were ascertained using the diagnosis codes located on a one-year look back. Trends in patient characteristics and site of care were compared. The association between year of pneumonia episode and 30-day mortality was then evaluated by logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. RESULTS We identified 2,654,955 cases of pneumonia from 1987–2005. During this period, the proportion treated as inpatients decreased, the proportion aged >= 80 increased, and the frequency of many comorbidities rose. Adjusted incidence increased to 3096 episodes per 100,000 population in 1999, with some decline thereafter. Age/sex-adjusted mortality decreased from 13.5% to 9.7%, a relative reduction of 28.1%. Compared to 1987, the risk of mortality declined through 2005 (adjusted odds ratio, 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.44 to 0.47). This result was robust to a restriction on comorbid diagnoses assessing for the results' sensitivity to increased coding. CONCLUSIONS These findings show a marked mortality reduction over time in community-acquired pneumonia patients. We hypothesize that increased pneumococcal and influenza vaccination rates as well as wider use of guideline-concordant antibiotics explain a large portion of this trend. PMID:21295197

  20. 30-day Mortality after Bariatric Surgery: Independently Adjudicated Causes of Death in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark D.; Patterson, Emma; Wahed, Abdus S.; Belle, Steven H.; Berk, Paul D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Dakin, Gregory F.; Flum, David R.; Machado, Laura; Mitchell, James E.; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Pories, Walter; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Schrope, Beth; Staten, Myrlene; Ude, Akuezunkpa; Wolfe, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Mortality following bariatric surgery is a rare event in contemporary series, making it difficult for any single center to draw meaningful conclusions as to cause of death. Nevertheless, much of the published mortality data come from single center case series and reviews of administrative databases. These sources tend to produce lower mortality estimates than those obtained from controlled clinical trials. Furthermore, information about the causes of death and how they were determined is not always available. The aim of the present report is to describe in detail all deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS). Methods LABS is a 10-center observational cohort study of bariatric surgical outcomes. Data were collected prospectively for bariatric surgeries performed between March 2005 and April 2009. All deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery were identified, and cause of death assigned by an independent Adjudication Subcommittee, blinded to operating surgeon and site. Results 6118 patients underwent primary bariatric surgery. 18 deaths (0.3%) occurred within 30-days of surgery. The most common cause of death was sepsis (33% of deaths), followed by cardiac causes (28%) and pulmonary embolism (17%). For one patient cause of death could not be determined despite examination of all available information. Conclusions This study confirms the low 30-day mortality rate following bariatric surgery. The recognized complications of anastomotic leak, cardiac events, and pulmonary emboli accounted for the majority of 30-day deaths. PMID:21866378

  1. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions are common, expensive, and a key target of the Medicare Value Based Purchasing (VBP) program. Risk assessment tools have been developed to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission so they can be targeted for interventions aimed at reducing the rate of readmission. One such tool is the HOSPITAL score that uses seven readily available clinical variables to predict the risk of readmission within 30 days of discharge. The HOSPITAL score has been internationally validated in large academic medical centers. This study aims to determine if the HOSPITAL score is similarly useful in a moderate sized university affiliated hospital in the midwestern United States. Materials and Methods All adult medical patients discharged from the SIU-SOM Hospitalist service from Memorial Medical Center (MMC) from October 15, 2015 to March 16, 2016, were studied retrospectively to determine if the HOSPITAL score was a significant predictor of hospital readmission within 30 days. Results During the study period, 998 discharges were recorded for the hospitalist service. The analysis includes data for the 931 discharges. Patients who died during the hospital stay, were transferred to another hospital, or left against medical advice were excluded. Of these patients, 109 (12%) were readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days. The patients who were readmitted were more likely to have a length of stay greater than or equal to 5 days (55% vs. 41%, p = 0.005) and were more likely to have been admitted more than once to the hospital within the last year (100% vs. 49%, p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the HOSPITAL score for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.77 (95% CI [0.73–0.81]), indicating good discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the HOSPITAL score in this setting was 0.10, indicating good overall performance. The Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness of fit test shows a χ2 value of 1

  2. The HOSPITAL score as a predictor of 30 day readmission in a retrospective study at a university affiliated community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions are common, expensive, and a key target of the Medicare Value Based Purchasing (VBP) program. Risk assessment tools have been developed to identify patients at high risk of hospital readmission so they can be targeted for interventions aimed at reducing the rate of readmission. One such tool is the HOSPITAL score that uses seven readily available clinical variables to predict the risk of readmission within 30 days of discharge. The HOSPITAL score has been internationally validated in large academic medical centers. This study aims to determine if the HOSPITAL score is similarly useful in a moderate sized university affiliated hospital in the midwestern United States. Materials and Methods All adult medical patients discharged from the SIU-SOM Hospitalist service from Memorial Medical Center (MMC) from October 15, 2015 to March 16, 2016, were studied retrospectively to determine if the HOSPITAL score was a significant predictor of hospital readmission within 30 days. Results During the study period, 998 discharges were recorded for the hospitalist service. The analysis includes data for the 931 discharges. Patients who died during the hospital stay, were transferred to another hospital, or left against medical advice were excluded. Of these patients, 109 (12%) were readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days. The patients who were readmitted were more likely to have a length of stay greater than or equal to 5 days (55% vs. 41%, p = 0.005) and were more likely to have been admitted more than once to the hospital within the last year (100% vs. 49%, p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic evaluation of the HOSPITAL score for this patient population shows a C statistic of 0.77 (95% CI [0.73–0.81]), indicating good discrimination for hospital readmission. The Brier score for the HOSPITAL score in this setting was 0.10, indicating good overall performance. The Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness of fit test shows a χ2 value of 1

  3. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing And 30-Day Readmissions: Are Hospitals Ready?

    PubMed

    Haley, D Rob; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between a hospital's Total Performance Score (TPS) and unplanned readmissions, a multivariate linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between hospital TPS and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Hospital TPS was significantly and inversely related to AMI, HF, and PN readmission rates. The higher the hospital TPS, the lower the readmission rates for patients with AMI, HF, and PN. Hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid patients had higher readmission rates for all three conditions. The TPS methodology will likely evolve to include additional measures or dimensions to assess hospital quality and payment. Policymakers and hospital administrators should consider other structure elements and process measures to assess and improve patient safety and quality.

  4. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing And 30-Day Readmissions: Are Hospitals Ready?

    PubMed

    Haley, D Rob; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between a hospital's Total Performance Score (TPS) and unplanned readmissions, a multivariate linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between hospital TPS and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Hospital TPS was significantly and inversely related to AMI, HF, and PN readmission rates. The higher the hospital TPS, the lower the readmission rates for patients with AMI, HF, and PN. Hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid patients had higher readmission rates for all three conditions. The TPS methodology will likely evolve to include additional measures or dimensions to assess hospital quality and payment. Policymakers and hospital administrators should consider other structure elements and process measures to assess and improve patient safety and quality. PMID:27439247

  5. Impact of preoperative serum albumin on 30-day mortality following surgery for colorectal cancer: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Montomoli, Jonathan; Erichsen, Rune; Antonsen, Sussie; Nilsson, Tove; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objective Surgery is the only potentially curable treatment for colorectal cancer (CRC), but it is hampered by high mortality. Human serum albumin (HSA) below 35 g/L is associated with poor overall prognosis in patients with CRC, but evidence regarding the impact on postoperative mortality is sparse. Methods We performed a population-based cohort study including patients undergoing CRC surgery in North and Central Denmark (1997–2011). We categorised patients according to HSA concentration measured 1–30 days prior to surgery date. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to compute 30-day mortality and Cox regression model to compute HRs as measures of the relative risk of death, controlling for potential confounders. We further stratified patients by preoperative conditions, including cancer stage, comorbidity level, and C reactive protein concentration. Results Of the 9339 patients undergoing first-time CRC surgery with preoperative HSA measurement, 26.4% (n=2464) had HSA below 35 g/L. 30-day mortality increased from 4.9% among patients with HSA 36–40 g/L to 26.9% among patients with HSA equal to or below 25 g/L, compared with 2.0% among patients with HSA above 40 g/L. The corresponding adjusted HRs increased from 1.75 (95% CI 1.25 to 2.45) among patients with HSA 36–40 g/L to 7.59 (95% CI 4.95 to 11.64) among patients with HSA equal to or below 25 g/L, compared with patients with HSA above 40 g/L. The negative impact associated with a decrement of HSA was found in all subgroups. Conclusions A decrement in preoperative HSA concentration was associated with substantial concentration-dependent increased 30-day mortality following CRC surgery. PMID:26462287

  6. Length of stay, wait time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures after the opening of a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michel; Hopman, Wilma; Yach, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background In September 2011, Kingston General Hospital (KGH) opened a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room. Previously, 1 weekend operating room (OR) was used by all surgical services. We assessed the impact this dedicated weekend trauma room had on hospital length of stay (LOS), time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures. Methods Patients admitted between Oct. 1, 2009, and Sept. 30, 2012, were identified through our trauma registry, representing the 2 years before and 1 year after the opening of the orthopedic weekend trauma room. We documented type of fracture, mode of fixation, age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, time to OR, LOS, discharge disposition and 30-day mortality. We excluded patients with multiple fractures, open fractures and those requiring trauma team activation. Results Our study included 609 patients (405 pre- and 204 post–trauma room opening). Mean LOS decreased from 11.6 to 9.4 days (p = 0.005) and there was a decreasing trend in mean time to OR from 31.5 to 28.5 hours (p = 0.16). There was no difference in 30-day mortality (p = 0.24). The LOS decreased by an average of 2 days following opening of the weekend trauma room (p = 0.031) and by an average of 2.2 additional days if the patient was admitted on the weekend versus during the week (p = 0.024). Conclusion The weekend trauma OR at KGH significantly decreased the LOS and appears to have decreased wait times to surgery. Further analysis is needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the current strategy, the long-term outcome of this patient population and the impact the additional orthopedic weekend trauma room has had on other surgical services (i.e., general surgery) and their patients. PMID:27668332

  7. Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Provisions of the Affordable Care Act that increase hospitals’ financial accountability for preventable readmissions have heightened interest in identifying system-level interventions to reduce readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationship between hospital nursing; i.e. nurse work environment, nurse staffing levels, and nurse education, and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Method and Design Analysis of linked data from California, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that included information on the organization of hospital nursing (i.e., work environment, patient-to-nurse ratios, and proportion of nurses holding a BSN degree) from a survey of nurses, as well as patient discharge data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Robust logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between nursing factors and 30-day readmission. Results Nearly one-quarter of heart failure index admissions (23.3% [n=39,954]); 19.1% (n=12,131) of myocardial infarction admissions; and 17.8% (n=25,169) of pneumonia admissions were readmitted within 30-days. Each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse’s workload was associated with a 7% higher odds of readmission for heart failure (OR=1.07, [1.05–1.09]), 6% for pneumonia patients (OR=1.06, [1.03–1.09]), and 9% for myocardial infarction patients (OR=1.09, [1.05–1.13]). Care in a hospital with a good versus poor work environment was associated with odds of readmission that were 7% lower for heart failure (OR = 0.93, [0.89–0.97]); 6% lower for myocardial infarction (OR = 0.94, [0.88–0.98]); and 10% lower for pneumonia (OR = 0.90, [0.85–0.96]) patients. Conclusions Improving nurses’ work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. PMID:23151591

  8. A contemporary risk model for predicting 30-day mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine S.L.; Ludman, Peter F.; Hulme, William; de Belder, Mark A.; Stables, Rodney; Chowdhary, Saqib; Mamas, Mamas A.; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The current risk model for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the UK is based on outcomes of patients treated in a different era of interventional cardiology. This study aimed to create a new model, based on a contemporary cohort of PCI treated patients, which would: predict 30 day mortality; provide good discrimination; and be well calibrated across a broad risk-spectrum. Methods and results The model was derived from a training dataset of 336,433 PCI cases carried out between 2007 and 2011 in England and Wales, with 30 day mortality provided by record linkage. Candidate variables were selected on the basis of clinical consensus and data quality. Procedures in 2012 were used to perform temporal validation of the model. The strongest predictors of 30-day mortality were: cardiogenic shock; dialysis; and the indication for PCI and the degree of urgency with which it was performed. The model had an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.85 on the training data and 0.86 on validation. Calibration plots indicated a good model fit on development which was maintained on validation. Conclusion We have created a contemporary model for PCI that encompasses a range of clinical risk, from stable elective PCI to emergency primary PCI and cardiogenic shock. The model is easy to apply and based on data reported in national registries. It has a high degree of discrimination and is well calibrated across the risk spectrum. The examination of key outcomes in PCI audit can be improved with this risk-adjusted model. PMID:26942330

  9. Nonclinical Factors Associated with 30-Day Mortality after Lung Cancer Resection: An Analysis of 215,000 Patients Using the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Melvan, John N; Sancheti, Manu S; Gillespie, Theresa; Nickleach, Dana C; Liu, Yuan; Higgins, Kristin; Ramalingam, Suresh; Lipscomb, Joseph; Fernandez, Felix G

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical variables associated with 30-day mortality after lung cancer surgery are well known. However, the effects of non-clinical factors, including insurance coverage, household income, education, type of treatment center, and area of residence, on short term survival are less appreciated. We studied the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint endeavor of the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons and the American Cancer Society, to identify disparities in 30-day mortality after lung cancer resection based on these non-clinical factors. Study Design We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of patients undergoing lung cancer resection from 2003-2011, using the NCDB. Data were analyzed using a multivariable logistic regression model to identify risk factors for 30-day mortality. Results 215,645 patients underwent lung cancer resection during our study period. We found that clinical variables such as age, gender, comorbidity, cancer stage, preoperative radiation, extent of resection, positive surgical margins, and tumor size were associated with 30-day mortality after resection. Non-clinical factors including living in lower income neighborhoods with a lesser proportion of high school graduates, and receiving cancer care at a non-academic medical center were also independently associated with increased 30-day postoperative mortality. Conclusions This study represents the largest analysis of 30-day mortality for lung cancer resection to date from a generalizable national cohort. Our results demonstrate that, in addition to known clinical risk factors, several non-clinical factors are associated with increased 30-day mortality after lung cancer resection. These disparities require further investigation to improve lung cancer patient outcomes. PMID:26206651

  10. Classifying emergency 30-day readmissions in England using routine hospital data 2004–2010: what is the scope for reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Blunt, Ian; Bardsley, Martin; Grove, Amy; Clarke, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    Background Many health systems across the globe have introduced arrangements to deny payment for patients readmitted to hospital as an emergency. The purpose of this study was to develop an exploratory categorisation based on likely causes of readmission, and then to assess the prevalence of these different types. Methods Retrospective analysis of 82 million routinely collected National Health Service hospital records in England (2004–2010) was undertaken using anonymised linkage of records at person-level. Numbers of 30-day readmissions were calculated. Exploratory categorisation of readmissions was applied using simple rules relating to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnostic codes for both admission and readmission. Results There were 5 804 472 emergency 30-day readmissions over a 6-year period, equivalent to 7.0% of hospital discharges. Readmissions were grouped into hierarchically exclusive categories: potentially preventable readmission (1 739 519 (30.0% of readmissions)); anticipated but unpredictable readmission (patients with chronic disease or likely to need long-term care; 1 141 987 (19.7%)); preference-related readmission (53 718 (0.9%)); artefact of data collection (16 062 (0.3%)); readmission as a result of accident, coincidence or related to a different body system (1 101 818 (19.0%)); broadly related readmission (readmission related to the same body system (1 751 368 (30.2%)). Conclusions In this exploratory categorisation, a large minority of emergency readmissions (eg, those that are potentially preventable or due to data artefacts) fell into groups potentially amenable to immediate reduction. For other categories, a hospital's ability to reduce emergency readmission is less clear. Reduction strategies and payment incentives must be carefully tailored to achieve stated aims. PMID:24668396

  11. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease: An Observational Study of a Historical Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-04-01

    Estimating patient survival has hitherto been the main focus when treating metastatic bone disease (MBD) in the appendicular skeleton. This has been done in an attempt to allocate the patient to a surgical procedure that outlives them. No questions have been addressed as to whether the extent of the surgery and thus the surgical trauma reduces survival in this patient group. We wanted to evaluate if perioperative parameters such as blood loss, extent of bone resection, and duration of surgery were risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients having surgery due to MBD in the appendicular skeleton. We retrospectively identified 270 consecutive patients who underwent joint replacement surgery or intercalary spacing for skeletal metastases in the appendicular skeleton from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013. We collected intraoperative (duration of surgery, extent of bone resection, and blood loss), demographic (age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologist score [ASA score], and Karnofsky score), and disease-specific (primary cancer) variables. An association with 30-day mortality was addressed using univariate and multivariable analyses and calculation of odds ratio (OR). All patients were included in the analysis. ASA score 3 + 4 (OR 4.16 [95% confidence interval, CI, 1.80-10.85], P = 0.002) and Karnofsky performance status below 70 (OR 7.34 [95% CI 3.16-19.20], P < 0.001) were associated with increased 30-day mortality in univariate analysis. This did not change in multivariable analysis. No parameters describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality.

  12. Development and use of an administrative claims measure for profiling hospital-wide performance on 30-day unplanned readmission

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Leora I.; Partovian, Chohreh; Lin, Zhenqiu; Grady, Jacqueline N.; Herrin, Jeph; Conover, Mitchell; Montague, Julia; Dillaway, Chloe; Bartczak, Kathleen; Suter, Lisa G.; Ross, Joseph S.; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Drye, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing publicly-reported readmission measures are condition-specific, representing < 20% of adult hospitalizations. An all-condition measure may better measure quality and promote innovation. Objective To develop an all-condition, hospital-wide readmission measure. Design Measure development Setting 4,821 US hospitals. Patients Medicare Fee for Service (FFS) beneficiaries ≥ 65 years. Measurements Hospital-level, risk-standardized unplanned readmissions within 30 days of discharge. The measure uses Medicare FFS claims and is a composite of five specialty-based risk-standardized rates for medicine, surgery/gynecology, cardiorespiratory, cardiovascular and neurology cohorts. We randomly split the 2007–2008 admissions for development and validation. Models were adjusted for age, principal diagnosis and comorbidity. We examined calibration in Medicare and all-payer data, and compared hospital rankings in the development and validation samples. Results The development dataset contained 8,018,949 admissions associated with 1,276,165 unplanned readmissions (15.9%). The median hospital risk-standardized unplanned readmission rate was 15.8 (range 11.6–21.9). The five specialty cohort models accurately predicted readmission risk in both Medicare and all-payer datasets for average risk patients but slightly overestimated readmission risk at the extremes. Overall hospital risk-standardized readmission rates did not differ statistically in the split samples (p=0.7 for difference in rank) and 76% of hospitals’ validation set rankings were within two deciles of the development rank (24% >2 deciles). Of hospitals ranking in the top or bottom deciles, 90% remained within two deciles (10% >2 deciles), and 82% remained within one decile (18% > 1 decile). Limitations Risk-adjustment was limited to that available in claims data. Conclusions We developed a claims-based hospital-wide unplanned readmission measure for profiling hospitals that produced reasonably

  13. Utility of models to predict 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions: an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip R; Roberts, Pamela; Goh, Louise; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update previous systematic review of predictive models for 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions. Design Systematic review. Setting/data source CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE from 2011 to 2015. Participants All studies of 28-day and 30-day readmission predictive model. Outcome measures Characteristics of the included studies, performance of the identified predictive models and key predictive variables included in the models. Results Of 7310 records, a total of 60 studies with 73 unique predictive models met the inclusion criteria. The utilisation outcome of the models included all-cause readmissions, cardiovascular disease including pneumonia, medical conditions, surgical conditions and mental health condition-related readmissions. Overall, a wide-range C-statistic was reported in 56/60 studies (0.21–0.88). 11 of 13 predictive models for medical condition-related readmissions were found to have consistent moderate discrimination ability (C-statistic ≥0.7). Only two models were designed for the potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions and had C-statistic >0.8. The variables ‘comorbidities’, ‘length of stay’ and ‘previous admissions’ were frequently cited across 73 models. The variables ‘laboratory tests’ and ‘medication’ had more weight in the models for cardiovascular disease and medical condition-related readmissions. Conclusions The predictive models which focused on general medical condition-related unplanned hospital readmissions reported moderate discriminative ability. Two models for potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions showed high discriminative ability. This updated systematic review, however, found inconsistent performance across the included unique 73 risk predictive models. It is critical to define clearly the utilisation outcomes and the type of accessible data source before the selection of the predictive model. Rigorous validation of the predictive models with moderate-to-high discriminative

  14. A Public-Private Partnership Develops and Externally Validates a 30-Day Hospital Readmission Risk Prediction Model

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Shahid A.; Li, Jing; Davis, Darcy; Erdmann, Cole; Sikka, Rishi; Sutariya, Bharat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Preventing the occurrence of hospital readmissions is needed to improve quality of care and foster population health across the care continuum. Hospitals are being held accountable for improving transitions of care to avert unnecessary readmissions. Advocate Health Care in Chicago and Cerner (ACC) collaborated to develop all-cause, 30-day hospital readmission risk prediction models to identify patients that need interventional resources. Ideally, prediction models should encompass several qualities: they should have high predictive ability; use reliable and clinically relevant data; use vigorous performance metrics to assess the models; be validated in populations where they are applied; and be scalable in heterogeneous populations. However, a systematic review of prediction models for hospital readmission risk determined that most performed poorly (average C-statistic of 0.66) and efforts to improve their performance are needed for widespread usage. Methods: The ACC team incorporated electronic health record data, utilized a mixed-method approach to evaluate risk factors, and externally validated their prediction models for generalizability. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied on the patient cohort and then split for derivation and internal validation. Stepwise logistic regression was performed to develop two predictive models: one for admission and one for discharge. The prediction models were assessed for discrimination ability, calibration, overall performance, and then externally validated. Results: The ACC Admission and Discharge Models demonstrated modest discrimination ability during derivation, internal and external validation post-recalibration (C-statistic of 0.76 and 0.78, respectively), and reasonable model fit during external validation for utility in heterogeneous populations. Conclusions: The ACC Admission and Discharge Models embody the design qualities of ideal prediction models. The ACC plans to continue its partnership to

  15. Preventing 30-day readmissions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Sherri

    2015-03-01

    Preventing 30-day readmissions to hospitals is a top priority in the era of health care reform. New regulations will be costly to health care facilities because of payment guidelines. The most frequently readmitted medical conditions are acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The transition from the hospital and into the home has been classified as a vulnerable time for many patients. During this time of transition patients may fail to fully understand their discharge instructions. Ineffective communication, low health literacy, and compliance issues contribute to readmissions. Telehealth and the use of technology may be used to prevent some readmissions.

  16. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Roshni; Myles, Puja R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52–0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55–0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  17. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Roshni; Venkatesan, Sudhir; Myles, Puja R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52-0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55-0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  18. Effect of Hospital Use of Oral Nutritional Supplementation on Length of Stay, Hospital Cost, and 30-Day Readmissions Among Medicare Patients With COPD

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Julia Thornton; Linthicum, Mark T.; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Partridge, Jamie S.; LaVallee, Chris; Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Patients with COPD are at a high risk of nutritional deficiency, which is associated with declines in respiratory function, lean body mass and strength, and immune function. Although oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) has been associated with improvements in some of these domains, the impact of hospital ONS on readmission risk, length of stay (LOS), and cost among hospitalized patients is unknown. METHODS: Using the Premier Research Database, we first identified Medicare patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of COPD. We then identified hospitalizations in which ONS was provided, and used propensity-score matching to compare LOS, hospitalization cost, and 30-day readmission rates in a one-to-one matched sample of ONS and non-ONS hospitalizations. To further address selection bias among patients prescribed ONS, we also used instrumental variables analysis to study the association of ONS with study outcomes. Model covariates included patient and provider characteristics and a time trend. RESULTS: Out of 10,322 ONS hospitalizations and 368,097 non-ONS hospitalizations, a one-to-one matched sample was created (N = 14,326). In unadjusted comparisons in the matched sample, ONS use was associated with longer LOS (8.7 days vs 6.9 days, P < .0001), higher hospitalization cost ($14,223 vs $9,340, P < .0001), and lower readmission rates (24.8% vs 26.6%, P = .0116). However, in instrumental variables analysis, ONS use was associated with a 1.9-day (21.5%) decrease in LOS, from 8.8 to 6.9 days (P < .01); a hospitalization cost reduction of $1,570 (12.5%), from $12,523 to $10,953 (P < .01); and a 13.1% decrease in probability of 30-day readmission, from 0.34 to 0.29 (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: ONS may be associated with reduced LOS, hospitalization cost, and readmission risk in hospitalized Medicare patients with COPD. PMID:25357165

  19. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  20. Differences among hospitals in Medicare patient mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, M R; Park, R E; Lohr, K N; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge abstract data for fiscal year 1984 for all acute care hospitals treating Medicare patients (age greater than or equal to 65), we measured four mortality rates: inpatient deaths, deaths within 30 days after discharge, and deaths within two fixed periods following admission (30 days, and the 95th percentile length of stay for each condition). The metric of interest was the probability that a hospital would have as many deaths as it did (taking age, race, and sex into account). Differences among hospitals in inpatient death rates were large and significant (p less than .05) for 22 of 48 specific conditions studied and for all conditions together; among these 22 "high-variation" conditions, medical conditions accounted for far more deaths than did surgical conditions. We compared pairs of conditions in terms of hospital rankings by probability of observed numbers of inpatient deaths; we found relatively low correlations (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.3 or lower) for most comparisons except between a few surgical conditions. When we compared different pairs of the four death measures on their rankings of hospitals by probabilities of the observed numbers of deaths, the correlations were moderate to high (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.54 to 0.99). Hospitals with low probabilities of the number of observed deaths were not distributed randomly geographically; a small number of states had significantly more than their share of these hospitals (p less than .01). Information from hospital discharge abstract data is insufficient to determine the extent to which differences in severity of illness or quality of care account for this marked variability, so data on hospital death rates cannot now be used to draw inferences about quality of care. The magnitude of variability in death rates and the geographic clustering of facilities with low probabilities, however, both argue for further study of hospital death rates. These data may prove

  1. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  2. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence— Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared to non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet vs. non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor’s degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, p=0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.01, p=0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions Magnet hospitals have lower mortality than is fully accounted for by measured characteristics of nursing. Magnet recognition likely both identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:23047129

  3. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  4. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  5. Influence of antimicrobial regimen on decreased in-hospital mortality of patients with MRSA bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Norihito; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Yamada, Koichi; Harada, Yosuke; Migiyama, Yohei; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Matsuda, Jun-Ichi; Uno, Naoki; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most important causes of bacteremia. Recently, several epidemiological and microbiological changes have become evident in MRSA infections. The purposes of this study were to assess clinical characteristics of patients with MRSA bacteremia and microbiological changes in MRSA. We conducted a retrospective observational study on patients with MRSA bacteremia who were hospitalized between 2008 and 2011. We used univariate and multivariate analysis to evaluate the predictors associated with 30-day mortality. The 7-day and 30-day mortality rates were 12.0% and 25.3%, respectively. According to multivariate analysis, the independent predictors that associated with 30-day mortality were leukopenia, low serum albumin, high sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, and quinolone use within 30 days. Compared to previous data (2003-2007), the SOFA score of the new data set remained unchanged, but in-hospital mortality decreased significantly. In particular, the mortality associated with use of vancomycin (VCM) was significantly lower. Although the minimum inhibitory concentration of VCM required to inhibit the growth of 90% of organisms (MIC90) had not changed, the trough value of VCM changed significantly; a VCM trough value of 10 or greater was significantly higher compared to previous data. Of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types, SCCmec II values decreased significantly, and SCCmec I and IV values increased significantly. Our results indicate that changes in VCM usage might contribute to decreased in-hospital mortality.

  6. Reducing 30-day Readmission After Joint Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Monique C; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Sayeed, Zain; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    Hospital readmission is a focus of quality measures used by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) to evaluate quality of care. Policy changes provide incentives and enforce penalties to decrease 30-day hospital readmissions. CMS implemented the Readmission Penalty Program. Readmission rates are being used to determine reimbursement rates for physicians. The need for readmission is deemed an indication for inadequate quality of care subjected to financial penalties. This reviews identifies risk factors that have been significantly associated with higher readmission rates, addresses approaches to minimize 30-day readmission, and discusses the potential future direction within this area as regulations evolve.

  7. Reducing 30-day Readmission After Joint Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Monique C; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Anoushiravani, Afshin A; Sayeed, Zain; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-10-01

    Hospital readmission is a focus of quality measures used by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) to evaluate quality of care. Policy changes provide incentives and enforce penalties to decrease 30-day hospital readmissions. CMS implemented the Readmission Penalty Program. Readmission rates are being used to determine reimbursement rates for physicians. The need for readmission is deemed an indication for inadequate quality of care subjected to financial penalties. This reviews identifies risk factors that have been significantly associated with higher readmission rates, addresses approaches to minimize 30-day readmission, and discusses the potential future direction within this area as regulations evolve. PMID:27637653

  8. Mortality and morbidity following hip fractures related to hospital thromboprophylaxis policy.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Nima; Jehan, Shah; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Bynoth, Sharon; Bottle, Alex; Loeffler, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Chemical thromboprophylaxis has been shown to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for patients with fractures of the hip, but it is not known with certainty whether it use also reduces mortality. Using postal and telephone questionnaires we collected data from English National Health Service (NHS) hospitals about their thromboprophylaxis policy for hip fractures patients from April 2003 to April 2007. Using Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) we ascertained in-hospital mortality rates at 30 days and at one year following admission to hospital. Unplanned hospital readmission rates for all causes (including episodes of thromboembolism and bleeding) within 30 days (all years) and one year (2003 to 2005) were also established. A total of 150 hospitals were contacted and data gathered from 62 hospitals (response rate 41.3%) There were 255841 patients with neck of femur fractures during this five year period who were assessed for morbidity and mortality, and we correlat these with thromboprophylaxis policy. There was no significant difference in hospital readmission within 30 days, or diagnosis of thromboembolism or haemorrhage among hospitals with different thromboprophylaxis policies. The hospitals using low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in half the dose recommended by the British National Formulary had significantly reduced mortality in-hospital (odds ratio (OR) 0.79, 95% CI 0.69-0.90, P=0.0006), at 30 days (OR 0.8 (0.70 - 0.92), P=0.001) and at one year (OR 0.89 (0.80 - 1.00), P=0.050), compared with those with no such policy. Our data suggest that the thromboprophylaxis regimen for patients with fracture neck of femur should be half dose LMWH for the duration of the hospital stay. PMID:22383321

  9. Prediction of 30-day mortality after hip fracture surgery by the Nottingham Hip Fracture Score and the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool.

    PubMed

    Marufu, T C; White, S M; Griffiths, R; Moonesinghe, S R; Moppett, I K

    2016-05-01

    The care of the elderly with hip fractures and their outcomes might be improved with resources targeted by the accurate calculation of risks of mortality and morbidity. We used a multicentre national dataset to evaluate and recalibrate the Nottingham Hip Fracture Score and Surgical Outcome Risk Tool. We split 9,017 hip fracture cases from the Anaesthesia Sprint Audit of Practice into derivation and validation data sets and used logistic regression to derive new model co-efficients for death at 30 postoperative days. The area (95% CI) under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.71 (0.67-0.75) indicated acceptable discrimination by the Nottingham Hip Fracture Score and acceptable calibration fit (Hosmer-Lemeshow test), p = 0.23, with a similar discrimination by the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool, 0.70 (0.66-0.74), which was miscalibrated to the observed data, p = 0.001. We recommend that studies test these scores for patients with hip fractures in other countries. We also recommend these models are compared with case-mix adjustment tools used in the UK.

  10. Utilization of non-US educated nurses in US hospitals: implications for hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Donna Felber; Cimiotti, Jeannie; Sloane, Douglas M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether, and under what circumstance, US hospital employment of non-US-educated nurses is associated with patient outcomes. Design Observational study of primary data from 2006 to 2007 surveys of hospital nurses in four states (California, Florida, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). The direct and interacting effects of hospital nurse staffing and the percentage of non-US-educated nurses on 30-day surgical patient mortality and failure-to-rescue were estimated before and after controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Participants Data from registered nurse respondents practicing in 665 hospitals were pooled with patient discharge data from state agencies. Main Outcomes Measure(s) Thirty-day surgical patient mortality and failure-to-rescue. Results The effect of non-US-educated nurses on both mortality and failure-to-rescue is nil in hospitals with lower than average patient to nurse ratios, but pronounced in hospitals with average and poor nurse to patient ratios. In hospitals in which patient-to-nurse ratios are 5:1 or higher, mortality is higher when 25% or more nurses are educated outside of the USA than when <25% of nurses are non-US-educated. Moreover, the effect of having >25% non-US-educated nurses becomes increasingly deleterious as patient-to-nurse ratios increase beyond 5:1. Conclusions Employing non-US-educated nurses has a negative impact on patient mortality except where patient-to-nurse ratios are lower than average. Thus, US hospitals should give priority to achieving adequate nurse staffing levels, and be wary of hiring large percentages of non-US-educated nurses unless patient-to-nurse ratios are low. PMID:23736834

  11. Long-term mortality of hospitalized pneumonia in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.

    PubMed

    Myint, P K; Hawkins, K R; Clark, A B; Luben, R N; Wareham, N J; Khaw, K-T; Wilson, A M

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about cause-specific long-term mortality beyond 30 days in pneumonia. We aimed to compare the mortality of patients with hospitalized pneumonia compared to age- and sex-matched controls beyond 30 days. Participants were drawn from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk prospective population study. Hospitalized pneumonia cases were identified from record linkage (ICD-10: J12-J18). For this study we excluded people with hospitalized pneumonia who died within 30 days. Each case identified was matched to four controls and followed up until the end June 2012 (total 15 074 person-years, mean 6·1 years, range 0·08-15·2 years). Cox regression models were constructed to examine the all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality using date of pneumonia onset as baseline with binary pneumonia status as exposure. A total of 2465 men and women (503 cases, 1962 controls) [mean age (s.d.) 64·5 (8·3) years] were included in the study. Between a 30-day to 1-year period, hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were 7·3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 5·4-9·9] and 5·9 (95% CI 3·5-9·7), respectively (with very few respiratory deaths within the same period) in cases compared to controls after adjusting for age, sex, asthma, smoking status, pack years, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes, physical activity, waist-to-hip ratio, prevalent cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. All outcomes assessed also showed increased risk of death in cases compared to controls after 1 year; respiratory cause of death being the most significant during that period (HR 16·4, 95% CI 8·9-30·1). Hospitalized pneumonia was associated with increased all-cause and specific-cause mortality beyond 30 days.

  12. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  13. Beyond volume: hospital-based healthcare technology as a predictor of mortality for cardiovascular patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Yunhwan; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine whether hospital-based healthcare technology is related to 30-day postoperative mortality rates after adjusting for hospital volume of cardiovascular surgical procedures. This study used the National Health Insurance Service–Cohort Sample Database from 2002 to 2013, which was released by the Korean National Health Insurance Service. A total of 11,109 cardiovascular surgical procedure patients were analyzed. The primary analysis was based on logistic regression models to examine our hypothesis. After adjusting for hospital volume of cardiovascular surgical procedures as well as for all other confounders, the odds ratio (OR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals was 1.567-times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.069–2.297) than in those with high healthcare technology. We also found that, overall, cardiovascular surgical patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals, regardless of the extent of cardiovascular surgical procedures, had the highest 30-day mortality rate. Although the results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume–mortality relationship in cardiovascular surgical patients, the independent effect of hospital-based healthcare technology is strong, resulting in a lower mortality rate. As hospital characteristics such as clinical pathways and protocols are likely to also play an important role in mortality, further research is required to explore their respective contributions. PMID:27310998

  14. Accidents in Canada: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Paddon, P

    1989-01-01

    For Canadians under 45, accidents are the leading cause of both death and hospitalization. For the Canadian population as a whole, accidents rank fourth as a cause of death, after cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and respiratory disease. This article analyzes accident mortality and hospitalization in Canada using age-specific rates, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR), and potential years of life lost (PYLL). The six major causes of accidental death for men are motor vehicle traffic accidents (MVTA), falls, drowning, fires, suffocation and poisoning. For women, the order is slightly different: MVTA, falls, fires, suffocation, poisoning and drowning. From 1971 to 1986, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for accidents decreased by 44% for men and 39% for women. The largest decrease occurred in the under 15 age group. Accidents accounted for 11.5% of total hospital days in 1985, and 8% of hospital discharges. Because young people have the highest rates of accidental death, potential years of life lost (PYLL) are almost as high for accidents as for cardiovascular disease, although CVD deaths outnumbered accidental deaths by almost five to one in 1985. PMID:2491351

  15. Accidents in Canada: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Paddon, P

    1989-01-01

    For Canadians under 45, accidents are the leading cause of both death and hospitalization. For the Canadian population as a whole, accidents rank fourth as a cause of death, after cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and respiratory disease. This article analyzes accident mortality and hospitalization in Canada using age-specific rates, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR), and potential years of life lost (PYLL). The six major causes of accidental death for men are motor vehicle traffic accidents (MVTA), falls, drowning, fires, suffocation and poisoning. For women, the order is slightly different: MVTA, falls, fires, suffocation, poisoning and drowning. From 1971 to 1986, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for accidents decreased by 44% for men and 39% for women. The largest decrease occurred in the under 15 age group. Accidents accounted for 11.5% of total hospital days in 1985, and 8% of hospital discharges. Because young people have the highest rates of accidental death, potential years of life lost (PYLL) are almost as high for accidents as for cardiovascular disease, although CVD deaths outnumbered accidental deaths by almost five to one in 1985.

  16. Comparing three clinical prediction rules for primarily predicting the 30-day mortality of patients with pulmonary embolism: The “Simplified Revised Geneva Score,” the “Original PESI,” and the “Simplified PESI”

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Fereyduni, Farid; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar; Kheyri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) should be evaluated for the clinical probability of PE using an applicable risk score. The Geneva prognostic score, the PE Severity Index (PESI), and its simplified version (sPESI) are well-known clinical prognostic scores for PE. The purpose of this study was to analyze these clinical scores as prognostic tools. Materials and Methods: A historical cohort study was conducted on patients with acute PE in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, from June 2013 to August 2014. To compare survival in the 1-month follow-up and factor-analyze mortality from the survival graph, Kaplan–Meier, and log-rank logistic regression were applied. Results: Two hundred and twenty four patients were assigned to two “low risk” and “high risk” groups using the three versions of “Simplified PESI, Original PESI, and Simplified Geneva.” They were followed for a period of 1 month after admission. The overall mortality rate within 1 month from diagnosis was about 24% (95% confidence interval, 21.4–27.2). The mortality rate of low risk PE patients was about 4% in the PESI, 17% in the Geneva, and <1% in the simplified PESI scales (P < 0.005). The mortality rate among high risk patients was 33%, 33.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Among patients with acute PE, the simplified PESI model was able to accurately predict mortality rate for low risk patients. Among high risk patients, however, the difference between the three models in predicting prognosis was not significant. PMID:27656606

  17. Comparing three clinical prediction rules for primarily predicting the 30-day mortality of patients with pulmonary embolism: The “Simplified Revised Geneva Score,” the “Original PESI,” and the “Simplified PESI”

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Fereyduni, Farid; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar; Kheyri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) should be evaluated for the clinical probability of PE using an applicable risk score. The Geneva prognostic score, the PE Severity Index (PESI), and its simplified version (sPESI) are well-known clinical prognostic scores for PE. The purpose of this study was to analyze these clinical scores as prognostic tools. Materials and Methods: A historical cohort study was conducted on patients with acute PE in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, from June 2013 to August 2014. To compare survival in the 1-month follow-up and factor-analyze mortality from the survival graph, Kaplan–Meier, and log-rank logistic regression were applied. Results: Two hundred and twenty four patients were assigned to two “low risk” and “high risk” groups using the three versions of “Simplified PESI, Original PESI, and Simplified Geneva.” They were followed for a period of 1 month after admission. The overall mortality rate within 1 month from diagnosis was about 24% (95% confidence interval, 21.4–27.2). The mortality rate of low risk PE patients was about 4% in the PESI, 17% in the Geneva, and <1% in the simplified PESI scales (P < 0.005). The mortality rate among high risk patients was 33%, 33.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Among patients with acute PE, the simplified PESI model was able to accurately predict mortality rate for low risk patients. Among high risk patients, however, the difference between the three models in predicting prognosis was not significant.

  18. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A; Wolkewitz, Martin; Davey, Peter G; Koller, Walter; Berger, Jutta; Nagler, Jan; Icket, Claudine; Kalenic, Smilja; Horvatic, Jasminka; Seifert, Harald; Kaasch, Achim J; Paniara, Olga; Argyropoulou, Athina; Bompola, Maria; Smyth, Edmond; Skally, Mairead; Raglio, Annibale; Dumpis, Uga; Kelmere, Agita Melbarde; Borg, Michael; Xuereb, Deborah; Ghita, Mihaela C; Noble, Michelle; Kolman, Jana; Grabljevec, Stanko; Turner, David; Lansbury, Louise; Grundmann, Hajo

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  19. Long-term morbidity and mortality after hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Jennie; Eurich, Dean T; Majumdar, Sumit R; Jin, Yan; Marrie, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term sequelae of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Therefore, we describe the long-term morbidity and mortality of patients after pneumonia requiring hospitalization. We specifically hypothesized that the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), designed to predict 30-day pneumonia-related mortality, would also be associated with longer-term all-cause mortality. Between 2000 and 2002, 3415 adults with CAP admitted to 6 hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, were prospectively enrolled in a population-based cohort. At the time of hospital admission, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected and the PSI was calculated for each patient. Postdischarge outcomes through to 2006 were ascertained using multiple linked administrative databases. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, hospital admissions, and re-hospitalization for pneumonia over a maximum of 5.4 years of follow-up. Follow-up data were available for 3284 (96%) patients; 66%were > or =65 years of age, 53% were male, and according to the PSI fully 63% were predicted to have greater than 18% 30-day pneumonia-related mortality (that is, PSI class IV-V). Median follow-up was 3.8 years. The 30-day, 1-year, and end of study mortality rates were 12%, 28%, and 53%, respectively. Overall, 82(19%) patients aged <45 years died compared with 1456 (67%) patients aged > or =65 years (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06-6.34). Male patients were more likely to die than female patients during follow-up (971 [56%] vs. 767 [49%], respectively; HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.13-1.37). Initial PSI classification predicted not only 30-day mortality, but also long-term postdischarge mortality, with 92 (15%) of PSI class I-II patients dying compared with 616 (82%) PSI class V patients (HR, 11.80; 95% CI, 4.70-14.70). Of 2950 patients who survived the initial CAP hospitalization, 72% were hospitalized again (median, 2 admissions over follow-up) and 16% were re-hospitalized with

  20. Utilization of trained volunteers decreases 30-day readmissions for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sales, Virna L; Ashraf, Muhammad Salman; Lella, Leela K; Huang, Jiaxin; Bhumireddy, Geetha; Lefkowitz, Lance; Feinstein, Mimi; Kamal, Mikail; Caesar, Raqib; Cusick, Elizabeth; Norenberg, Jane; Lee, Jiwon; Brener, Sorin; Sacchi, Terrence J; Heitner, John F

    2014-05-01

    Background: This study evaluated the effectiveness of using trained volunteer staff in reducing 30-day readmissions of congestive heart failure (CHF) patients.Methods: From June 2010 to December 2010, 137 patients (mean age 73 years) hospitalized for CHF were randomly assigned to either: an interventional arm (arm A) receiving dietary and pharmacologic education by a trained volunteer, follow-up telephone calls within 48 hours, and a month of weekly calls; ora control arm (arm B) receiving standard care. Primary outcomes were 30-day readmission rates for CHF and worsening New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification; composite and all-cause mortality were secondary outcomes.Results: Arm A patients had decreased 30-day readmissions (7% vs 19%; P ! .05) with a relative risk reduction (RRR) of 63% and an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 12%. The composite outcome of 30-day readmission, worsening NYHA functional class, and death was decreased in the arm A (24% vs 49%;P ! .05; RRR 51%, ARR 25%). Standard-care treatment and hypertension, age $65 years and hypertension,and cigarette smoking were predictors of increased risk for readmissions, worsening NYHA functional class, and all-cause mortality, respectively, in the multivariable analysis.Conclusions: Utilizing trained volunteer staff to improve patient education and engagement might be an efficient and low-cost intervention to reduce CHF readmissions.

  1. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  2. Risk factors for hospital morbidity and mortality after the Norwood procedure: A report from the Pediatric Heart Network Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial

    PubMed Central

    Tabbutt, Sarah; Ghanayem, Nancy; Ravishankar, Chitra; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Cooper, David S.; Frank, Deborah U.; Lu, Minmin; Pizarro, Christian; Frommelt, Peter; Goldberg, Caren S.; Graham, Eric M.; Krawczeski, Catherine Dent; Lai, Wyman W.; Lewis, Alan; Kirsh, Joel A.; Mahony, Lynn; Ohye, Richard G.; Simsic, Janet; Lodge, Andrew J.; Spurrier, Ellen; Stylianou, Mario; Laussen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We sought to identify risk factors for mortality and morbidity during the Norwood hospitalization in newborn infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and other single right ventricle anomalies enrolled in the Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial. Methods Potential predictors for outcome included patient- and procedure-related variables and center volume and surgeon volume. Outcome variables occurring during the Norwood procedure and before hospital discharge or stage II procedure included mortality, end-organ complications, length of ventilation, and hospital length of stay. Univariate and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed with bootstrapping to estimate reliability for mortality. Results Analysis included 549 subjects prospectively enrolled from 15 centers; 30-day and hospital mortality were 11.5% (63/549) and 16.0% (88/549), respectively. Independent risk factors for both 30-day and hospital mortality included lower birth weight, genetic abnormality, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and open sternum on the day of the Norwood procedure. In addition, longer duration of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest was a risk factor for 30-day mortality. Shunt type at the end of the Norwood procedure was not a significant risk factor for 30-day or hospital mortality. Independent risk factors for postoperative renal failure (n = 46), sepsis (n = 93), increased length of ventilation, and hospital length of stay among survivors included genetic abnormality, lower center/surgeon volume, open sternum, and post-Norwood operations. Conclusions Innate patient factors, ECMO, open sternum, and lower center/surgeon volume are important risk factors for postoperative mortality and/or morbidity during the Norwood hospitalization. PMID:22704284

  3. Hospitalization Rates and Post-Operative Mortality for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Italy over the Period 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sensi, Luigi; Tedesco, Dario; Mimmi, Stefano; Rucci, Paola; Pisano, Emilio; Pedrini, Luciano; McDonald, Kathryn M.; Fantini, Maria Pia

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have reported declines in incidence, prevalence and mortality for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in various countries, but evidence from Mediterranean countries is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine the trend of hospitalization and post-operative mortality rates for AAAs in Italy during the period 2000–2011, taking into account the introduction of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in 1990s. Methods This retrospective cohort study was carried out in Emilia-Romagna, an Italian region with 4.5 million inhabitants. A total of 19,673 patients hospitalized for AAAs between 2000 and 2011, were identified from the hospital discharge records (HDR) database. Hospitalization rates, percentage of OSR and EVAR and 30-day mortality rates were calculated for unruptured (uAAAs) and ruptured AAAs (rAAAs). Results Adjusted hospitalization rates decreased on average by 2.9% per year for uAAAs and 3.2% for rAAAs (p<0.001). The temporal trend of 30-day mortality rates remained stable for both groups. The percentage of EVAR for uAAAs increased significantly from 2006 to 2011 (42.7 versus 60.9% respectively, mean change of 3.9% per year, p<0.001). No significant difference in mortality was found between OSR and EVAR for uAAAs and rAAAs. Conclusions The incidence and trend of hospitalization rates for rAAAs and uAAAs decreased significantly in the last decade, while 30-day mortality rates in operated patients remained stable. OSR continued to be the most common surgery in rAAAs, although the gap between OSR and EVAR recently declined. The EVAR technique became the preferred surgery for uAAAs since 2008. PMID:24386294

  4. Nurse staffing and education and hospital mortality in nine European countries: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas M; Bruyneel, Luk; Van den Heede, Koen; Griffiths, Peter; Busse, Reinhard; Diomidous, Marianna; Kinnunen, Juha; Kózka, Maria; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; McHugh, Matthew D; Moreno-Casbas, M T; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Schwendimann, Rene; Scott, P Anne; Tishelman, Carol; van Achterberg, Theo; Sermeus, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Austerity measures and health-system redesign to minimise hospital expenditures risk adversely affecting patient outcomes. The RN4CAST study was designed to inform decision making about nursing, one of the largest components of hospital operating expenses. We aimed to assess whether differences in patient to nurse ratios and nurses’ educational qualifications in nine of the 12 RN4CAST countries with similar patient discharge data were associated with variation in hospital mortality after common surgical procedures. Methods For this observational study, we obtained discharge data for 422 730 patients aged 50 years or older who underwent common surgeries in 300 hospitals in nine European countries. Administrative data were coded with a standard protocol (variants of the ninth or tenth versions of the International Classification of Diseases) to estimate 30 day in-hospital mortality by use of risk adjustment measures including age, sex, admission type, 43 dummy variables suggesting surgery type, and 17 dummy variables suggesting comorbidities present at admission. Surveys of 26 516 nurses practising in study hospitals were used to measure nurse staffing and nurse education. We used generalised estimating equations to assess the effects of nursing factors on the likelihood of surgical patients dying within 30 days of admission, before and after adjusting for other hospital and patient characteristics. Findings An increase in a nurses’ workload by one patient increased the likelihood of an inpatient dying within 30 days of admission by 7% (odds ratio 1·068, 95% CI 1·031–1·106), and every 10% increase in bachelor’s degree nurses was associated with a decrease in this likelihood by 7% (0·929, 0·886–0·973). These associations imply that patients in hospitals in which 60% of nurses had bachelor’s degrees and nurses cared for an average of six patients would have almost 30% lower mortality than patients in hospitals in which only 30% of

  5. Temporal Changes in Postdischarge Mortality Risk After Hospitalization for Heart Failure (from the EVEREST Trial).

    PubMed

    Cook, Thomas D; Greene, Stephen J; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Fonarow, Gregg C; Zea, Ryan; Swedberg, Karl; Zannad, Faiez; Maggioni, Aldo P; Konstam, Marvin A; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-02-15

    In observational studies of patients hospitalized for heart failure (HHF), risk of death is highest immediately after discharge and decreases over time. It is unclear whether this population risk trajectory reflects (1) lowering of individual patient mortality risk with increasing time from index hospitalization or (2) temporal changes in population case-mix with earlier postdischarge death for "sicker" patients. Survival rate and longitudinal models were used to estimate temporal changes in postdischarge all-cause mortality risk in 3,993 HHF patients discharged alive in the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study with Tolvaptan (EVEREST) trial. After median follow-up of 9.9 months, 971 patients died (24.2%). Predicted mortality rate decreased from 15.9 per 100 patient-years immediately after discharge to 13.4 at 30 days and 12.8 at 90 days; mortality rate increased steadily thereafter. Risk variation between quintiles of risk was considerably larger than the temporal variation within risk strata. In a longitudinal model serially reassessing predicted patient mortality risk after each follow-up visit using data collected at these visits, predicted mortality risk increased during the 90 days preceding subsequent heart failure readmission and then followed a postdischarge trajectory similar to the index admission. In conclusion, although there is transiently elevated individual patient risk in the 90 days before and after discharge, the patient's individual risk profile, rather than temporal change in risk relative to hospitalization, remains the main determinant of mortality. For purposes of reducing all-cause mortality in HF patients, preventative and therapeutic measures may be best implemented as long-term interventions for high mortality risk patients based on serial risk assessments, irrespective of recent hospitalization. PMID:26742474

  6. Validation of the DECAF score to predict hospital mortality in acute exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, C; Steer, J; Heslop-Marshall, K; Stenton, SC; Hickey, PM; Hughes, R; Wijesinghe, M; Harrison, RN; Steen, N; Simpson, AJ; Gibson, GJ; Bourke, SC

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalisation due to acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is common, and subsequent mortality high. The DECAF score was derived for accurate prediction of mortality and risk stratification to inform patient care. We aimed to validate the DECAF score, internally and externally, and to compare its performance to other predictive tools. Methods The study took place in the two hospitals within the derivation study (internal validation) and in four additional hospitals (external validation) between January 2012 and May 2014. Consecutive admissions were identified by screening admissions and searching coding records. Admission clinical data, including DECAF indices, and mortality were recorded. The prognostic value of DECAF and other scores were assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUROC) curve. Results In the internal and external validation cohorts, 880 and 845 patients were recruited. Mean age was 73.1 (SD 10.3) years, 54.3% were female, and mean (SD) FEV1 45.5 (18.3) per cent predicted. Overall mortality was 7.7%. The DECAF AUROC curve for inhospital mortality was 0.83 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.87) in the internal cohort and 0.82 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.87) in the external cohort, and was superior to other prognostic scores for inhospital or 30-day mortality. Conclusions DECAF is a robust predictor of mortality, using indices routinely available on admission. Its generalisability is supported by consistent strong performance; it can identify low-risk patients (DECAF 0–1) potentially suitable for Hospital at Home or early supported discharge services, and high-risk patients (DECAF 3–6) for escalation planning or appropriate early palliation. Trial registration number UKCRN ID 14214. PMID:26769015

  7. Association between the Value-Based Purchasing pay for performance program and patient mortality in US hospitals: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jose F; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) program—the US pay for performance program introduced by Medicare to incentivize higher quality care—on 30 day mortality for three incentivized conditions: acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. Design Observational study. Setting 4267 acute care hospitals in the United States: 2919 participated in the HVBP program and 1348 were ineligible and used as controls (44 in general hospitals in Maryland and 1304 critical access hospitals across the United States). Participants 2 430 618 patients admitted to US hospitals from 2008 through 2013. Main outcome measures 30 day risk adjusted mortality for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia using a patient level linear spline analysis to examine the association between the introduction of the HVBP program and 30 day mortality. Non-incentivized, medical conditions were the comparators. A secondary outcome measure was to determine whether the introduction of the HVBP program was particularly beneficial for a subgroup of hospital—poor performers at baseline—that may benefit the most. Results Mortality rates of incentivized conditions in hospitals participating in the HVBP program declined at −0.13% for each quarter during the preintervention period and −0.03% point difference for each quarter during the post-intervention period. For non-HVBP hospitals, mortality rates declined at −0.14% point difference for each quarter during the preintervention period and −0.01% point difference for each quarter during the post-intervention period. The difference in the mortality trends between the two groups was small and non-significant (difference in difference in trends −0.03% point difference for each quarter, 95% confidence interval −0.08% to 0.13% point difference, P=0.35). In no subgroups of hospitals was HVBP associated with better outcomes, including poor performers at baseline

  8. The relationship between hospital market competition, evidence-based performance measures, and mortality for chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jared Lane K; Lo Sasso, Anthony T

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the Joint Commission's ORYX initiative and the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file from 2003 to 2006, this study employed a fixed-effects approach to examine the relationship between hospital market competition, evidence-based performance measures, and short-term mortality at seven days, 30 days, 90 days, and one year for patients with chronic heart failure. We found that, on average, higher adherence with most of the Joint Commission's heart failure performance measures was not associated with lower mortality; the level of market competition also was not associated with any differences in mortality. However, higher adherence with the discharge instructions and left ventricular function assessment indicators at the 80th and 90th percentiles of the mortality distribution was associated with incrementally lower mortality rates. These findings suggest that targeting evidence-based processes of care might have a stronger impact in improving patient outcomes. PMID:22931022

  9. 75 FR 45121 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request; 30-Day Notice... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human...

  10. Ares I-X 30 Day Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ess, Bob; Smith, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation represents the 30 day report on the Ares I-X test flight. Included in the review is information on the following areas: (1) Ground Systems, (2) Guidance, Navigation and Control, (3) Roll Response, (4) Vehicle Response, (5) Control System Performance, (6) Structural Damping, (7) Thrust Oscillation, (8) Stage Separation, (9) Connector Assessment, (10) USS Splashdown, (11) Data Recorder and (12) FS Hardware Assessment.

  11. A survey of newspaper coverage of HCFA hospital mortality data.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, J; Glanz, K

    1991-01-01

    A study that assessed newspaper coverage of the 1986 Hospital Mortality Data for Medicare Patients released by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is described. Media interpretation of Federal information about the quality of hospital medical care is also discussed. A sample of 68 articles from newspapers serving urban areas of various sizes in all regions of the United States was analyzed. Articles were coded into classifications according to how the news was played, headline bias (positive-negative-neutral), hospital mentions, quote sources, explanations for excessively high mortality rates, urban area population, and geographic region. The findings indicated that HCFA's release of the 1986 hospital mortality data received heavy news coverage. There were twice as many negative headlines as positive ones, although nearly 95 percent of the hospitals had mortality rates within expected ranges. Quotes from representatives of hospitals predominated in the newspaper articles, and they often blamed some aspect of the HCFA data for higher-than-expected mortality rates. Newspaper attention to the quality of hospital care clearly raised consumer awareness of the idea that health care quality can vary. The newspaper articles, however, provided no guidance on obtaining valid data or on using it to make health care choices. PMID:1910185

  12. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization and 30-Day Rehospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Julie C.; Intrator, Orna; Karuza, Jurgis; Wetle, Terrie; Mor, Vincent; Katz, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between features of nursing home (NH) medical staff organization and residents’ 30-day rehospitalizations. Design Cross-sectional study combining primary data collected from a survey of medical directors, NH resident assessment data (minimum data set), Medicare claims, and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Setting A total of 202 freestanding US nursing homes. Participants Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were hospitalized and subsequently admitted to a study nursing home. Measurements Medical staff organization dimensions derived from the survey, NH residents’ characteristics derived from minimum data set data, hospitalizations obtained from Part A Medicare claims, and NH characteristics from the OSCAR database and from www.ltcfocus.org. Study outcome defined within a 30-day window following an index hospitalization: rehospitalized, otherwise died, otherwise survived and not rehospitalized. Results Thirty-day rehospitalizations occurred for 3788 (20.3%) of the 18,680 initial hospitalizations. Death was observed for 884 (4.7%) of residents who were not rehospitalized. Adjusted by hospitalization, resident, and NH characteristics, nursing homes having a more formal appointment process for physicians were less likely to have 30-day rehospitalization (b = −0.43, SE = 0.17), whereas NHs in which a higher proportion of residents were cared for by a single physician were more likely to have rehospitalizations (b = 0.18, SE = 0.08). Conclusion This is the first study to show a direct relationship between features of NH medical staff organization and resident-level process of care. The relationship of a more strict appointment process and rehospitalizations might be a consequence of more formalized and dedicated medical practice with a sense of ownership and accountability. A higher volume of patients per physician does not appear to improve quality of care. PMID:22682694

  13. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  14. Predicting In-Hospital Maternal Mortality in Senegal and Mali

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, Cheikh; Dossou Gbété, Simplice; Bru, Noelle; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Fauconnier, Arnaud; Traoré, Mamadou; Diop, Aliou; Fournier, Pierre; Dumont, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify predictors of in-hospital maternal mortality among women attending referral hospitals in Mali and Senegal. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological survey using data from a cluster randomized controlled trial (QUARITE trial) in 46 referral hospitals in Mali and Senegal, during the pre-intervention period of the trial (from October 1st 2007 to October 1st 2008). We included 89,518 women who delivered in the 46 hospitals during this period. Data were collected on women's characteristics, obstetric complications, and vital status until the hospital discharge. We developed a tree-like classification rule (classification rule) to identify patient subgroups at high risk of maternal in-hospital mortality. Results Our analyses confirm that patients with uterine rupture, hemorrhage or prolonged/obstructed labor, and those who have an emergency ante-partum cesarean delivery have an increased risk of in-hospital mortality, especially if they are referred from another health facility. Twenty relevant patterns, based on fourteen predictors variables, are used to predict in-hospital maternal mortality with 81.41% sensitivity (95% CI = [77.12%–87.70%]) and 81.6% specificity (95% CI = [81.16%–82.02%]). Conclusion The proposed class association rule method will help health care professionals in referral hospitals in Mali and Senegal to identify mothers at high risk of in-hospital death, and can provide scientific evidence on which to base their decisions to manage patients delivering in their health facilities. PMID:23737972

  15. Classifying hospitals as mortality outliers: logistic versus hierarchical logistic models.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Roxana; Bottle, Alex; Jarman, Brian; Aylin, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The use of hierarchical logistic regression for provider profiling has been recommended due to the clustering of patients within hospitals, but has some associated difficulties. We assess changes in hospital outlier status based on standard logistic versus hierarchical logistic modelling of mortality. The study population consisted of all patients admitted to acute, non-specialist hospitals in England between 2007 and 2011 with a primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, acute cerebrovascular disease or fracture of neck of femur or a primary procedure of coronary artery bypass graft or repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. We compared standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) from non-hierarchical models with SMRs from hierarchical models, without and with shrinkage estimates of the predicted probabilities (Model 1 and Model 2). The SMRs from standard logistic and hierarchical models were highly statistically significantly correlated (r > 0.91, p = 0.01). More outliers were recorded in the standard logistic regression than hierarchical modelling only when using shrinkage estimates (Model 2): 21 hospitals (out of a cumulative number of 565 pairs of hospitals under study) changed from a low outlier and 8 hospitals changed from a high outlier based on the logistic regression to a not-an-outlier based on shrinkage estimates. Both standard logistic and hierarchical modelling have identified nearly the same hospitals as mortality outliers. The choice of methodological approach should, however, also consider whether the modelling aim is judgment or improvement, as shrinkage may be more appropriate for the former than the latter. PMID:24711175

  16. Hospital Mortality Associated with Stroke in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Safari, Rasool; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Soleimani, Faroq; Sharifian, Maryam; Yektaparast Kashkuli, Sara; Nayebi Khayatghuchani, Mahsa; Azadi, Mahbube; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Safari, Anahid; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Alshekhlee, Amer; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Background: Unlike the western hemisphere, information about stroke epidemiology in southern Iran is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the main epidemiological characteristics of patients with stroke and its mortality rate in southern Iran. Methods: A retrospective, single-center, hospital-based longitudinal study was performed at Nemazee Hospital in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Patients with a diagnosis of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes were identified based on the International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th editions, for the period between 2001 and 2010. Demographics including age, sex, area of residence, socioeconomic status, length of hospital stay, and discharge destinations were analyzed in association with mortality. Results: 16351 patients with a mean age of 63.4 years (95% CI: 63.1, 63.6) were included in this analysis. Men were slightly predominant (53.6% vs. 46.4%). Forty-seven percent of the total sample was older than 65,17% were younger than 45, and 2.6% were children younger than 18. The mean hospital stay was 6.3 days (95% CI: 6.2, 6.4). Among all types of strokes, the overall hospital mortality was 20.5%. Multiple logistic regression revealed significantly higher in-hospital mortality in women and children (P<0.001) but not in patients with low socioeconomic status or from rural areas. During the study period, the mortality proportions increased from 17.8% to 22.2%. Conclusion: In comparison to western countries, a larger proportion of our patients were young adults and the mortality rate was higher. PMID:24293785

  17. Preventable hospital mortality: learning from retrospective case record review

    PubMed Central

    Sorinola, Olanrewaju O; Weerasinghe, Chamindri; Brown, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of hospital deaths associated with preventable problems in care and how they can be reduced. Design A two phase before and after evaluation of a hospital mortality reduction programme. Setting A district general hospital in Warwickshire, England. Participants In Phase 1, 400 patients who died in 2009 at South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust had their case notes reviewed. In Phase 2, Trust wide measures were introduced across the whole Trust population to bring about quality improvements. Main outcome measures To reduce the crude mortality and in effect the risk adjusted mortality index (RAMI) by 45 in the three years following the start of the programme, from 145 in 2009 to 100 or less in 2012. Results In total, 34 (8.5%) patients experienced a problem in their care that contributed to death. The principal problems were lack of senior medical input (24%), poor clinical monitoring or management (24%), diagnostic errors (15%) and infections (15%). In total, 41% (14) of these were judged to have been preventable (3.5% of all deaths). Following the quality improvement programme, crude mortality fell from 1.95% (2009) to 1.56% (2012) while RAMI dropped from 145 (2009) to 87 (2012). Conclusion A quality improvement strategy based on good local evidence is effective in improving the quality of care sufficiently to reduce mortality. PMID:23323195

  18. The pattern of maternal mortality at maternity hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Nafisah Adeeb

    1983-01-01

    National data on maternal health status in Malaysia is minimal. These data, from Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, are presented toward the goal of accumulation of basic information. From 1978-81, there were 74,105 deliveries and 9,899 abortion admissions in this hospital, which serves as a referral center for areas within a 100-mile radius. 39 maternal mortalities were recorded in this time. Maternal mortality excluding that associated with abortions was 29.27/100,000 births; when abortions are included, the figure increases to 70.54. 50% of the women who died were under 30 years of age. 28.2% of deaths occurred among primigravida, and 25.64% were associated with parity 5 or above. Malays had a mortality rate double that of Chinese or Indians. Major causes of death were toxemia, hemorrhage, embolism, medical disease, and sepsis. These causes accounted for 89% of deaths, while the remaining 11% were due to uterine inversion, obstetric trauma, and pulmonary edema. Avoidable factors were isolated in all the deaths except 3, 1 due to infective hepatitis, and 2 due to cardiac disease. Inefficient hospital care occurred in 17 patients, defective care before admission in 2, and 4 death were associated with patients' failure to seek or accept medical attention. The need for documenting all maternal mortalities is a priority in Malaysia.

  19. Maternal mortality in a district hospital in West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Gun, K M

    1970-06-01

    To ascertain the causes of high maternal mortality in West Bengal, the author examined maternal mortality between 1964-68. It was intended that measures to improve the situation in rural areas could be suggested. Women in labor often arrive at the hospital very late and few antenatal care facilities are available in rural areas. High risk cases often are delivered at home, a situation which often results in fetal complications. Maternal deaths have declined, but not dramatically. Of the 24,265 deliveries at the Burdwan district hospital, there were 333 maternal deaths for an incidence of 13.7/1000, along with another 42 cases where death was due to pregnancy-associated causes. In contrast, the maternal mortality rate in a district hospital in Calcutta was 4/1000 in 1968. Eclampsia accounted for 42.34% (141) of maternal deaths making it the major cause of death. In Calcutta this cause of death is receding gradually but in the districts it still accounts for a heavy loss of life (an incidence of 1 in 38). Adequate antenatal care would reduce this high mortality. 2 factors which have contributed to the high mortality are the hours lost in transporting a patient from a rural area and inadequate hospital staff. Postpartum hemorrhage and/or retained placenta was responsible for 39 deaths and none of the cases admitted from outside had received antenatal care. A shortage of blood was also a contributory factor. Severe anemia was responsible for 34 deaths and abortions resulted in another 29 deaths (16 because of severe sepsis; 13 due to hemorrhage or shock). An emergency service would help reduce the number of deaths but at present such a service does not even exist in the urban areas. Ruptured uterus resulted in 29 deaths and obstructed labor in 27 deaths. Placenta previa brought about 14 deaths and the remaining 20 deaths were due to such causes as accidental hemorrhage (10), hydatidiform mole (4), puerperal sepsis (3), ectopic pregnancy (2), and uterine inversion (1

  20. Prediction of hospital mortality by changes in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).

    PubMed

    Berzan, E; Mellotte, G; Silke, B

    2015-03-01

    Deterioration of physiological or laboratory variables may provide important prognostic information. We have studied whether a change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) value calculated using the (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula) over the hospital admission, would have predictive value. An analysis was performed on all emergency medical hospital episodes (N = 61964) admitted between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2011. A stepwise logistic regression model examined the relationship between mortality and change in renal function from admission to discharge. The fully adjusted Odds Ratios (OR) for 5 classes of GFR deterioration showed a stepwise increased risk of 30-day death with OR's of 1.42 (95% CI: 1.20, 1.68), 1.59 (1.27, 1.99), 2.71 (2.24, 3.27), 5.56 (4.54, 6.81) and 11.9 (9.0, 15.6) respectively. The change in eGFR during a clinical episode, following an emergency medical admission, powerfully predicts the outcome. PMID:25876302

  1. Mortality in newborns referred to tertiary hospital: An introspection

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Kailash Chandra; Gupta, Ratan; Sharma, Shobha; Sehgal, Rachna; Roy, Manas Pratim

    2015-01-01

    Background: India is one of the largest contributors in the pool of neonatal death in the world. However, there are inadequate data on newborns referred to tertiary care centers. The present study aimed to find out predictors of mortality among newborns delivered elsewhere and admitted in a tertiary hospital in New Delhi between February and September 2014. Materials and Methods: Hospital data for were retrieved and analyzed for determining predictors for mortality of the newborns. Time of admission, referral and presenting clinical features were considered. Results: Out of 1496 newborns included in the study, there were 300 deaths. About 43% deaths took place in first 24 hours of life. Asphyxia and low birth weight were the main causes of death in early neonatal period, whereas sepsis had maximum contribution in deaths during late neonatal period. Severe hypothermia, severe respiratory distress, admission within first 24 hours of life, absence of health personnel during transport and referral from any hospital had significant correlation with mortality. Conclusions: There is need for ensure thermoregulation, respiratory sufficiency and presence of health personnel during transport. PMID:26288788

  2. Impact of the Development of a Regional Collaborative to Reduce 30-Day Heart Failure Readmissions.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Joy; Oliver-McNeil, Sandra; Patel, Shilpa; Mason, Lisa; Baker, Harolyn

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-day heart failure readmissions can be reduced if multiple interventions, such as 7-day postdischarge follow-up, are implemented, but this task is challenging for health systems. Ten hospitals participated in a multisystem collaborative implementing evidence-based strategies. The overall 30-day readmission rate was reduced more in the collaborating hospitals than in the noncollaborating hospitals (from 29.32% to 27.66% vs from 27.66% to 26.03%, P = .008). Regional collaboration between health care systems within a quality improvement project was associated with reduced 30-day readmission.

  3. [Neonatal morbidity and hospital mortality of preterm triplets.

    PubMed

    Lamshing-Salinas, Priscilla; Rend Ón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Iglesias-Leboreiro, José; Bernárdez-Zapata, Isabel; Braverman-Bronstein, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    Background: multiple gestations have caused an increase in vulnerable preterm births. Our objective was to analyze neonatal morbidity and mortality in preterm triplets. Methods: we analyzed a cohort of 30 triplets in an obstetrics and gynecology hospital. Data were obtained during pregnancy, childbirth and neonatal period: birth order, sex, weight, height, malformations, advanced resuscitation, assisted ventilation, intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, days of hospitalization, and death. Results: 90 infants were analyzed. There was an omphalopagus con-joined twins case; 42 (70 %) had between 30-33 weeks and six between 24-29; 19 (21 %) had low weight for gestational age, and 18 (30 %) had a major malformation; 27 % required ventilatory support, 33 % sepsis, 32 % necrotizing enterocolitis, 21 % pulmonary hypertension, 14 % bronchopulmonary dysplasia and 2 % intraventricular hemorrhage, without statistically significant differences related to the order, presentation at birth, sex and number of placentas and amniotic sacs. Eight 24-week triplets died, four over 28 weeks, and a siamese (p = 38). There was no difference in hospital days between triplets. Conclusions: the triplets mortality is low and mainly associated with extreme prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction and sepsis.

  4. Income inequality and 30 day outcomes after acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lagu, Tara; Rothberg, Michael B; Avrunin, Jill; Pekow, Penelope S; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between income inequality and the risk of mortality and readmission within 30 days of hospitalization. Design Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries in the United States. Hierarchical, logistic regression models were developed to estimate the association between income inequality (measured at the US state level) and a patient’s risk of mortality and readmission, while sequentially controlling for patient, hospital, other state, and patient socioeconomic characteristics. We considered a 0.05 unit increase in the Gini coefficient as a measure of income inequality. Setting US acute care hospitals. Participants Patients aged 65 years and older, and hospitalized in 2006-08 with a principal diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia. Main outcome measures Risk of death within 30 days of admission or rehospitalization for any cause within 30 days of discharge. The potential number of excess deaths and readmissions associated with higher levels of inequality in US states in the three highest quarters of income inequality were compared with corresponding data in US states in the lowest quarter. Results Mortality analyses included 555 962 admissions (4348 hospitals) for acute myocardial infarction, 1 092 285 (4484) for heart failure, and 1 146 414 (4520); readmission analyses included 553 037 (4262), 1 345 909 (4494), and 1 345 909 (4524) admissions, respectively. In 2006-08, income inequality in US states (as measured by the average Gini coefficient over three years) varied from 0.41 in Utah to 0.50 in New York. Multilevel models showed no significant association between income inequality and mortality within 30 days of admission for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia. By contrast, income inequality was associated with rehospitalization (acute myocardial infarction, risk ratio 1.09 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.15), heart failure 1

  5. Impact of obesity on hospital complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Fayfman, Maya; Zhao, Liping; Weaver, Jeff; Buehler, Lauren; Smiley, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Haw, J Sonya; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have reported increased length of hospital stay and complications; however, there are also reports of obesity having a protective effect on health, a phenomenon coined the ‘obesity paradox’. We aimed to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research design and methods This retrospective analysis was conducted on 29 623 patients admitted to two academic hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were subdivided by body mass index into underweight (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2). Hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose >10 mmol/L during hospitalization. Hospital complications included a composite of pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, bacteremia and death. Results A total of 4.2% were underweight, 29.6% had normal weight, 30.2% were overweight, and 36% were obese. 27.2% of patients had diabetes and 72.8% did not have diabetes (of which 75% had hyperglycemia and 25% had normoglycemia during hospitalization). A J-shaped curve with higher rates of complications was observed in underweight patients in all glycemic groups; however, there was no significant difference in the rate of complications among normal weight, overweight, or obese patients, with and without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Underweight is an independent predictor for hospital complications. In contrast, increasing body mass index was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality, regardless of glycemic status. There was no evidence of an obesity paradox among inpatients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:27486518

  6. Diagnosis and mortality in prehospital emergency patients transported to hospital: a population-based and registry-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Larsen, Thomas Mulvad; Jensen, Flemming Bøgh; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Hansen, Poul Anders; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Knowledge about patients after calling for an ambulance is limited to subgroups, such as patients with cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, trauma and stroke, while population-based studies including all diagnoses are few. We examined the diagnostic pattern and mortality among all patients brought to hospital by ambulance after emergency calls. Design Registry-based cohort study. Setting and participants We included patients brought to hospital in an ambulance dispatched after emergency calls during 2007–2014 in the North Denmark Region (580 000 inhabitants). We reported hospital diagnosis according to the chapters of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition (ICD-10), and studied death on days 1 and 30 after the call. Cohort characteristics and diagnoses were described, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate mortality and 95% CIs. Results In total, 148 757 patients were included, mean age 52.9 (SD 24.3) years. The most frequent ICD-10 diagnosis chapters were: ‘injury and poisoning’ (30.0%), and the 2 non-specific diagnosis chapters: ‘symptoms and abnormal findings, not elsewhere classified’ (17.5%) and ‘factors influencing health status and contact with health services’ (14.1%), followed by ‘diseases of the circulatory system’ (10.6%) and ‘diseases of the respiratory system’ (6.7%). The overall 1-day mortality was 1.8% (CI 1.7% to 1.8%) and 30-day mortality 4.7% (CI 4.6% to 4.8%). ‘Diseases of the circulatory system’ had the highest 1-day mortality of 7.7% (CI 7.3% to 8.1%) accounting for 1209 deaths. After 30 days, the highest number of deaths were among circulatory diseases (2313), respiratory diseases (1148), ‘symptoms and abnormal findings, not elsewhere classified’ (1119) and ‘injury and poisoning’ (741), and 30 days mortality in percentage was 14.7%, 11.6%, 4.3% and 1.7%, respectively. Conclusions Patients' diagnoses from hospital stay after calling 1-1-2 in this population

  7. A 2-year audit of perioperative mortality in Malaysian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Inbasegaran, K; Kandasami, P; Sivalingam, N

    1998-12-01

    An audit of all perioperative deaths within seven days of surgery in 14 major public hospitals is presented. This study is part of a quality assurance programme examining the surgical and anaesthetic practices in these hospitals. During the study period from July 1992 till June 1994, 211,354 surgeries were performed and 715 deaths were reported out of which 699 were available for analysis. The data was obtained by confidential enquiry using predetermined questionnaires filled by participating surgeons and anaesthetists and analysed by a group of peers. The overall crude mortality rate was 0.34% and the majority of the deaths occurred in severely ill patients in whom the clinical management was satisfactory. Polytrauma including head, intra-abdominal and skeletal trauma accounted for 253 of the deaths (36.19%). The other causes were bowel obstruction with sepsis, burns, ischaemic limbs, congenital malformations in neonates and pregnancy-related hemorrhage. 62.52% of the deaths occurred within two days of surgery and 85.87% were related to emergency procedures. The review identified some shortfalls in perioperative care and these were lack of adequate critical care facilities, lack of supervision, unnecessary surgery in the moribund and inadequate preoperative optimisation. The results of the study have been forwarded to all participating hospitals for implementation of remedial measures.

  8. Anastomotic leaks after colorectal anastomosis occurring more than 30 days postoperatively: a single-institution evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Phin; Hong, En Yaw; Phillips, Benjamin; Isenberg, Gerald A; Goldstein, Scott D

    2014-09-01

    National hospital registries only report colorectal anastomotic leaks (ALs) within 30 days postoperatively. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and significance of ALs that occur beyond 30 days postoperatively. We performed a retrospective review of our prospective database from June 2008 to August 2012. A total of 504 patients were included. These patients were operated on by two surgeons. Any clinical or radiographic abnormalities were considered to be an anastomotic imperfection. A total of 504 patients were reviewed with a total of 18 (3.6%) anastomotic leaks. Six leaks (31.6% of leaks) were diagnosed more than 30 days postoperatively (P < 0.001). Of the 18 leaks, interventional radiology drainage was performed for four cases and 14 patients required reoperation. All six delayed leaks required reoperation. There was one leak that occurred under 30 days, which was discovered on autopsy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1 to 4 months). All the delayed leak patients presented with fistulas, whereas 58 per cent of typical leak patients presented with the triad of leukocytosis, fever, and abdominal pain. Colorectal anastomotic leaks can occur after the 30-day postoperative period. In patients with vague and atypical abdominal findings, anastomotic leak must be suspected. More systematic, prospective studies are required to help us further understand the risk factors and natural history of anastomotic failures in elective colorectal surgery.

  9. Maternal mortality in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Ray, A

    1992-05-01

    This study was conducted in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region among 5,273 pregnant women over a period of 8 years. There were 29 deaths, the maternal mortality rate was 55 per 10,000. Septic abortion was encountered in 4 among them. Direct obstetric cause was responsible in 72.41% of cases and indirect cause in 27.59% cases. Sepsis, both puerperal and postabortal resulted in 24.14% followed by postpartum haemorrhage in 20.69%. Two of these cases were associated with inversion of the uterus. Preeclampsia caused 10.34% and eclampsia 6.9% of the deaths. Among the indirect causes severe anaemia and pulmonary tuberculosis accounted for 10.34% and 6.9% respectively. Infective hepatitis was the cause in 6.9% cases. Only 17% of the cases were booked and the rest were unbooked. Majority of the cases (62.07%) belonged to the age group of 20-30 years. Primigravida constituted 41.38% of the cases. PMID:1517613

  10. Influence of psychiatric comorbidity on 30-day readmissions for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Solberg, Leif I.; Copeland, Laurel; Fang, Ying; Stewart, Christine; Hu, Jianhui; Nerenz, David R.; Williams, L. Keoki; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Waxmonsky, Jeanette; Lu, Christine Y.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lynch, Frances L.; Ahmed, Ameena T.; Beck, Arne L.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Simon, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a policy in 2012 that penalizes hospitals for ‘excessive’ all-cause hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of psychiatric comorbidities on 30-day all-cause readmissions for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Methods Longitudinal study from 2009-2011 within 11 Mental Health Research Network (MHRN) affiliated health systems. Data were derived from the HMO Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse. Participants were individuals admitted to the hospital for HF, AMI, and pneumonia. All index inpatient hospitalizations for HF, AMI and pneumonia were captured (n=160,169 patient index admissions). Psychiatric diagnoses were measured for the year prior to admission. All-cause readmissions within 30 days of discharge were the outcome variable. Results Approximately 18% of all individuals with these conditions were readmitted within 30-days. The rate was 5% greater for individuals with a past-year psychiatric comorbidity (21.7%) than for those without (16.5%; p<.001). Depression, anxiety, and dementia were associated with more readmissions for those with index hospitalizations for all three conditions independently and combined (p<.05). Substance use and bipolar disorders were linked with higher readmissions for those with initial HF and pneumonia hospitalizations (p<.05). Readmission rates declined overall from 2009-2011. Conclusions Individuals with HF, AMI, and pneumonia experience high rates of readmission, but psychiatric comorbidities appear to increase that risk. Future readmission interventions should consider adding mental health components. PMID:25642610

  11. Long-term (30 days) toxicity of NiO nanoparticles for adult zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Kovrižnych, Jevgenij A.; Zeljenková, Dagmar; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide in the form of nanoparticles (NiO NPs) is extensively used in different industrial branches. In a test on adult zebrafish, the acute toxicity of NiO NPs was shown to be low, however longlasting contact with this compound can lead to its accumulation in the tissues and to increased toxicity. In this work we determined the 30-day toxicity of NiO NPs using a static test for zebrafish Danio rerio. We found the 30-day LC50 value to be 45.0 mg/L, LC100 (minimum concentration causing 100% mortality) was 100.0 mg/L, and LC0 (maximum concentration causing no mortality) was 6.25 mg/L for adult individuals of zebrafish. Considering a broad use of Ni in the industry, NiO NPs chronic toxicity may have a negative impact on the population of aquatic organisms and on food web dynamics in aquatic systems. PMID:26038672

  12. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital

  13. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital

  14. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality.

  15. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality. PMID:27455368

  16. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  17. 78 FR 18373 - Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... CONTROL POLICY Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. ] The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) proposes the collection of information concerning... of the President, Office of National Drug Control Policy, Research & Data Analysis, Washington,...

  18. 75 FR 160 - Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) proposes the collection of information concerning...

  19. 30-Day morbidity after augmentation enterocystoplasty and appendicovesicostomy: a NSQIP pediatric analysis

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Erin R.; Kurtz, Michael P.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Nelson, Caleb P.

    2015-01-01

    -term outcomes for these complex urologic procedures that has not been possible before. Although ACS-NSQIP has been used extensively in the adult surgical literature to identify rates of complications, and to determine predictors of readmission and adverse events, its use in pediatric surgery is new. As in the adult literature, the goal is for standardization of practice and transparency in reporting outcomes that may lead to reduction in morbidity and mortality. Conclusion In this cohort, any 30-day event is seen in almost 30% of the patients undergoing these urologic procedures. Operative time, number of concurrent procedures and higher surgical risk score all are associated with higher odds of the composite 30-day event of complication, readmission and/or reoperation. These data can be useful in counseling patients and families about expectations around surgery and in improving outcomes. PMID:26049255

  20. Variation in Risk-Standardized Mortality of Stroke among Hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in care, stroke remains a life-threatening disease. Little is known about current hospital mortality with stroke and how it varies by hospital in a national clinical setting in Japan. Using the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database (a national inpatient database in Japan), we identified patients aged ≥ 20 years who were admitted to the hospital with a primary diagnosis of stroke within 3 days of stroke onset from April 2012 to March 2013. We constructed a multivariable logistic regression model to predict in-hospital death for each patient with patient-level factors, including age, sex, type of stroke, Japan Coma Scale, and modified Rankin Scale. We defined risk-standardized mortality ratio as the ratio of the actual number of in-hospital deaths to the expected number of such deaths for each hospital. A hospital-level multivariable linear regression was modeled to analyze the association between risk-standardized mortality ratio and hospital-level factors. We performed a patient-level Cox regression analysis to examine the association of in-hospital death with both patient-level and hospital-level factors. Of 176,753 eligible patients from 894 hospitals, overall in-hospital mortality was 10.8%. The risk-standardized mortality ratio for stroke varied widely among the hospitals; the proportions of hospitals with risk-standardized mortality ratio categories of ≤ 0.50, 0.51-1.00, 1.01-1.50, 1.51-2.00, and >2.00 were 3.9%, 47.9%, 41.4%, 5.2%, and 1.5%, respectively. Academic status, presence of a stroke care unit, higher hospital volume and availability of endovascular therapy had a significantly lower risk-standardized mortality ratio; distance from the patient's residence to the hospital was not associated with the risk-standardized mortality ratio. Our results suggest that stroke-ready hospitals play an important role in improving stroke mortality in Japan.

  1. What is the value of hospital mortality indicators, and are there ways to do better?

    PubMed

    Barker, Anna; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morton, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring hospital performance using patient safety indicators is one of the key components of healthcare reform in Australia. Mortality indicators, including the hospital standardised mortality ratio and deaths in low mortality diagnosis reference groups have been included in the core national hospital-based outcome indicator set recommended for local generation and review and public reporting. Although the face validity of mortality indicators such as these is high, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that there are concerns regarding their internal, construct and criterion validity. Use of indicators with poor validity has the consequence of potentially incorrectly classifying hospitals as performance outliers and expenditure of limited hospital staff time on activities which may provide no gain to hospital quality and safety and may in fact cause damage to morale. This paper reviews the limitations of current approaches to monitoring hospital quality and safety performance using mortality indicators. It is argued that there are better approaches to improving performance than monitoring with mortality indicators generated from hospital administrative data. These approaches include use of epidemiologically sound, clinically relevant data from clinical-quality registries, better systems of audit, evidence-based bundles, checklists, simulators and application of the science of complex systems. PMID:23116606

  2. READMIT: a clinical risk index to predict 30-day readmission after discharge from acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Vigod, Simone N; Kurdyak, Paul A; Seitz, Dallas; Herrmann, Nathan; Fung, Kinwah; Lin, Elizabeth; Perlman, Christopher; Taylor, Valerie H; Rochon, Paula A; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to create a clinically useful risk index, administered prior to discharge, for determining the probability of psychiatric readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for general psychiatric inpatients. We used population-level sociodemographic and health administrative data to develop a predictive model for 30-day readmission among adults discharged from an acute psychiatric unit in Ontario, Canada (2008-2011), and converted the final model into a risk index system. We derived the predictive model in one-half of the sample (n = 32,749) and validated it in the other half of the sample (n = 32,750). Variables independently associated with 30-day readmission (forming the mnemonic READMIT) were: (R) Repeat admissions; (E) Emergent admissions (i.e. harm to self/others); (D) Diagnoses (psychosis, bipolar and/or personality disorder), and unplanned Discharge; (M) Medical comorbidity; (I) prior service use Intensity; and (T) Time in hospital. Each 1-point increase in READMIT score (range 0-41) increased the odds of 30-day readmission by 11% (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.10-1.12). The index had moderate discriminative capacity in both derivation (C-statistic = 0.631) and validation (C-statistic = 0.630) datasets. Determining risk of psychiatric readmission for individual patients is a critical step in efforts to address the potentially avoidable high rate of this negative outcome. The READMIT index provides a framework for identifying patients at high risk of 30-day readmission prior to discharge, and for the development, evaluation and delivery of interventions that can assist with optimizing the transition to community care for patients following psychiatric discharge.

  3. [Regional early mortality in relation to social and hospital structure].

    PubMed

    Obladen, M

    1985-01-01

    Detailed analysis of governmental mortality statistics yields information on regional differences in the care for preterm infants in West Germany. 68% of newborn infants dying within the first 7 days of life are of low birth weight. In the 11 states, highest/lowest early neonatal mortality fell from 11.6/6.0 to 6.2/3.1 during the years 1978 to 1982. In the 31 administrative districts, a small negative correlation (r = -0.37) exists for neonatal mortality and tax revenue. Increased regional mortality indicates diminished regionalization of perinatal care for preterm infants.

  4. Body Mass Index and Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Receiving Care in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Camprubi, Mercedes; Cabrera, Sandra; Sans, Jordi; Vidal, Georgina; Salvadó, Teresa; Bardají, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, some controversy has arisen with regard to its effect on hospital mortality in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Methods. Clinical and anthropometric variables were analyzed in patients consecutively admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital between 2009 and 2010, and the correlation of those variables with hospital mortality was examined. Results. A total of 824 patients with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina were analyzed. Body mass index was an independent factor in hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.739 (IC 95%: 0.597 − 0.916), P = 0.006). Mortality in normal weight (n = 218), overweight (n = 399), and obese (n = 172) subjects was 6.1%, 3.1%, and 4.1%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions. There is something of a paradox in the relationship between body mass index and hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in that the mortality rate decreases as body mass index increases. However, no statistically significant differences have been found in normal weight, overweight, or obese subjects. PMID:22900151

  5. A quality improvement plan to reduce 30-day readmissions of heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Monica

    2014-01-01

    An evidence-based quality initiative to decrease heart failure 30-day readmissions was implemented at a hospital in Florida. Heart failure education and postdischarge telephone contact were provided to patients determined to be at high risk of readmission using risk stratification tools. The rate during the project decreased 13% as compared to the same time period in the previous year and 8.5% from the 2012 year to date rate.

  6. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  7. Hospital volume and other risk factors for in-hospital mortality among diverticulitis patients: A nationwide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Michael J; Coward, Stephanie; Buie, W Donald; MacLean, Anthony; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Schaffer, Samuel; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found that a higher volume of colorectal surgery was associated with lower mortality rates. While diverticulitis is an increasingly common condition, the effect of hospital volume on outcomes among diverticulitis patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between hospital volume and other factors on in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for diverticulitis. METHODS: Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 1993 to 2008) were analyzed to identify 822,865 patients representing 4,108,726 admissions for diverticulitis. Hospitals were divided into quartiles based on the volume of diverticulitis cases admitted over the study period, adjusted for years contributed to the dataset. Mortality according to hospital volume was modelled using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, health care insurance, admission type, calendar year, colectomy, disease severity and clustering. Risk estimates were expressed as adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Patients at high-volume hospitals were more likely to be admitted emergently, undergo surgical treatment and have more severe disease. In-hospital mortality was higher among the lowest quartile of hospital volume compared with the highest volume (OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.05 to 1.21]). In-hospital mortality was increased among patients admitted emergently (OR 2.58 [95% CI 2.40 to 2.78]) as well as those receiving surgical treatment (OR 3.60 [95% CI 3.42 to 3.78]). CONCLUSIONS: Diverticulitis patients admitted to hospitals with a low volume of diverticulitis cases had an increased risk for death compared with those admitted to high-volume centres. PMID:25965439

  8. Judging hospitals by severity-adjusted mortality rates: the influence of the severity-adjustment method.

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, L I; Ash, A S; Shwartz, M; Daley, J; Hughes, J S; Mackiernan, Y D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This research examined whether judgments about a hospital's risk-adjusted mortality performance are affected by the severity-adjustment method. METHODS: Data came from 100 acute care hospitals nationwide and 11880 adults admitted in 1991 for acute myocardial infarction. Ten severity measures were used in separate multivariable logistic models predicting in-hospital death. Observed-to-expected death rates and z scores were calculated with each severity measure for each hospital. RESULTS: Unadjusted mortality rates for the 100 hospitals ranged from 4.8% to 26.4%. For 32 hospitals, observed mortality rates differed significantly from expected rates for 1 or more, but not for all 10, severity measures. Agreement between pairs of severity measures on whether hospitals were flagged as statistical mortality outliers ranged from fair to good. Severity measures based on medical records frequently disagreed with measures based on discharge abstracts. CONCLUSIONS: Although the 10 severity measures agreed about relative hospital performance more often than would be expected by chance, assessments of individual hospital mortality rates varied by different severity-adjustment methods. PMID:8876505

  9. Risk factors for 30-day readmission following hypoglycemia-related emergency room and inpatient admissions

    PubMed Central

    Emons, M F; Bae, J P; Hoogwerf, B J; Kindermann, S L; Taylor, R J; Nathanson, B H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of diabetes treatment. This retrospective observational study characterized hypoglycemia-related hospital emergency room (ER) and inpatient (in-pt) admissions and identified risk factors for 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Research design and methods 4476 hypoglycemia-related ER and in-pt encounters with discharge dates from 1/1/2009 to 3/31/2014 were identified in a large, multicenter electronic health record database. Outcomes were 30-day all-cause ER/hospital readmission and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Multivariable logistic regression methods identified risk factors for both outcomes. Results 1095 (24.5%) encounters had ER/hospital all-cause readmission within 30 days and 158 (14.4%) of these were hypoglycemia-related. Predictors of all-cause 30-day readmission included recent exposure to a hospital/nursing home (NH)/skilled nursing facility (SNF; OR 1.985, p<0.001); age 25–34 and 35–44 (OR 2.334 and 1.996, respectively, compared with age 65–74, both p<0.001); and African-American (AA) race versus all other race categories (OR 1.427, p=0.011). Other factors positively associated with readmission include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, cardiac dysrhythmias, congestive heart disease, hypertension, and mood disorders. Predictors of readmissions attributable to hypoglycemia included recent exposure to a hospital/NH/SNF (OR 2.299, p<0.001), AA race (OR 1.722, p=0.002), age 35–44 (OR 3.484, compared with age 65–74, p<0.001), hypertension (OR 1.891, p=0.019), and delirium/dementia and other cognitive disorders (OR 1.794, p=0.038). Obesity was protective against 30-day hypoglycemia-related readmission (OR 0.505, p=0.017). Conclusions Factors associated with 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission among patients with diabetic hypoglycemia include recent exposure to hospital/SNF/NH, adults <45 years, AAs, and several cardiovascular and

  10. Estimating the out-of-hospital mortality rate using patient discharge data.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Mehdi; Ridder, Geert

    2006-09-01

    This paper explores the hospital quality measures based on routine administrative data such as patient discharge records. Most of the measures used in the literature are based on in-hospital mortality risks rather than post-discharge events. The in-hospital outcomes are sensitive to the hospital's discharge policy, thus could bias the quality estimates. This study aims at identifying out-of-hospital mortality risks and disentangling discharge and re-hospitalization rates from mortality rates using patient discharge data. It is shown that these objectives can be achieved without post-discharge death records. This is an example of the use of public use administrative data for estimating empirical relations when key dependent variables are not available. Using data on the lengths of hospitalizations and out-of-hospital spells, the mortality rates before and after discharge are estimated for a sample of heart-attack patients hospitalized in California between 1992 and 1998. The results suggest that the quality assessments that ignore the variation of discharge rates among hospitals could be misleading.

  11. Risk Factors for Increased Hospital Resource Utilization and In-Hospital Mortality in Adults With Single Ventricle Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Doshi, Pratik; Onukwube, Jennifer; Fram, Ricki Y; Robbins, James M

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease are now expected to survive to adulthood. Co-morbid medical conditions (CMCs) are common. We sought to identify risk factors for increased hospital resource utilization and in-hospital mortality in adults with single ventricle. We analyzed data from the 2001 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in patients aged ≥18 years admitted to nonteaching general hospitals (NTGHs), TGHs, and pediatric hospitals (PHs) with either hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tricuspid atresia or common ventricle. National estimates of hospitalizations were calculated. Elixhauser CMCs were identified. Length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and effect of CMCs were determined. Age was greater in NTGH (41.5 ± 1.3 years) than in TGH (32.8 ± 0.5) and PH (25.0 ± 0.6; p <0.0001). Adjusted LOS was shorter in NTGH (5.6 days) than in PH (9.7 days; p <0.0001). Adjusted costs were higher in PH ($56,671) than in TGH ($31,934) and NTGH ($18,255; p <0.0001). CMCs are associated with increased LOS (p <0.0001) and costs (p <0.0001). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality included increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 5.250, CI 2.825 to 9.758 for 45- to 64-year old vs 18- to 30-year old), male gender (OR 2.72, CI 1.804 to 4.103]), and the presence of CMC (OR 4.55, CI 2.193 to 9.436) for 2 vs none). No differences in mortality were found among NTGH, TGH, and PH. Cardiovascular procedures were more common in PH hospitalizations and were associated with higher costs and LOS. CMCs increase costs and mortality. In-hospital mortality is increased with age, male gender, and the presence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

  12. Young Hispanic Women Experience Higher In-Hospital Mortality Following an Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fátima; Foody, JoAnne M; Wang, Yun; López, Lenny

    2015-01-01

    Background Although mortality rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have declined for men and women, prior studies have reported a sex gap in mortality such that younger women were most likely to die after an AMI. Methods and Results We sought to explore the impact of race and ethnicity on the sex gap in AMI patterns of care and mortality for younger women in a contemporary patient cohort. We constructed multivariable hierarchical logistic regression models to examine trends in AMI hospitalizations, procedures, and in-hospital mortality by sex, age (<65 and ≥65 years), and race/ethnicity (white, black, and Hispanic). Analyses were derived from 194 071 patients who were hospitalized for an AMI with available race and ethnicity data from the 2009–2010 National Inpatient Sample. Hospitalization rates, procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary interventions, and cardiac bypass surgery), and inpatient mortality were analyzed across age, sex, and race/ethnic groups. There was significant variation in hospitalization rates by age and race/ethnicity. All racial/ethnic groups were less likely to undergo invasive procedures compared with white men (P<0.001). After adjustment for comorbidities, younger Hispanic women experienced higher in-hospital mortality compared with younger white men, with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.9), adjusted for age and comorbidities. Conclusion We found significant racial and sex disparities in AMI hospitalizations, care patterns, and mortality, with higher in-hospital mortality experienced by younger Hispanic women. Future studies are necessary to explore determinants of these significant racial and sex disparities in outcomes for AMI. PMID:26353998

  13. Hospital Volume and Mortality of Very Low-Birthweight Infants in South America

    PubMed Central

    Wehby, George L; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge; Castilla, Eduardo E

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of hospital volume of very low-birthweight (VLBW) infants on in-hospital mortality of VLBW and very preterm birth (VPB) infants in South America. Data Sources/Study Setting Birth-registry data for infants born in 1982–2008 at VLBW or very preterm in 66 hospitals in Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Design Regression analyses that adjust for several individual-level demographic, socioeconomic, and health factors; hospital-level characteristics; and country-fixed effects are employed. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Physicians interviewed mothers before hospital discharge and abstracted hospital medical records using similar methods at all hospitals. Principal Findings Volume has significant nonlinear beneficial effects on VLBW and VPB in-hospital survival. The largest survival benefits––more than 80 percent decrease in mortality rates––are with volume increases from low to medium or medium-high levels (from ≤25 to 72 infants annually) with significantly lower incremental benefits thereafter. The cumulative volume effects are maximized at the 121–144 annual VLBW infant range––about 90 percent decrease in mortality rates compared to <25 VLBW infants annually. Conclusions Increasing the access of pregnancies at-risk of VLBW and VPB to medium- or high-volume hospitals up to 144 VLBW infants per year may substantially improve in-hospital infant survival in the study countries. PMID:22352946

  14. Are patients admitted to hospitals from care homes dehydrated? A retrospective analysis of hypernatraemia and in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Anthony; Stuckler, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare risks of hypernatraemia on admission to hospital in persons who were with those who were not identified as care home residents and evaluate the association of hypernatraemia with in-hospital mortality. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A National Health Service Trust in London. Participants A total of 21,610 patients aged over 65 years whose first admission to the Trust was between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. Main outcome measures Hypernatraemia on admission (plasma Na > 145 mmol/L) and in-hospital death. Results Patients admitted from care homes had 10-fold higher prevalence of hypernatraemia than those from their own homes (12.0% versus 1.3%, respectively; odds ratio [OR]: 10.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.43–13.0). Of those with hypernatraemia, nine in 10 cases were associated with nursing home ECOHOST residency (attributable fraction exposure: 90.5%), and the population attributable fraction of hypernatraemia on admission associated with care homes was 36.0%. After correcting for age, gender, mode of admission and dementia, care home residents were significantly more likely to be admitted with hypernatraemia than were own-home residents (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 5.32, 95% CI: 3.85–7.37). Compared with own-home residents, care home residents were also at about a two-fold higher risk of in-hospital mortality compared with non-care home residents (AOR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.59–2.45). Consistent with evidence that hypernatraemia is implicated in higher mortality, the association of nursing homes with in-hospital mortality was attenuated after adjustment for it (AOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.26–2.06). Conclusions Patients admitted to hospital from care homes are commonly dehydrated on admission and, as a result, appear to experience significantly greater risks of in-hospital mortality. PMID:25592963

  15. Incidence, Causes and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission After Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; Anthony, Chris A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Gao, Yubo; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service has identified several quality metrics, including unplanned readmission within 30 days of surgery, to assess and compare surgeons and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes and risk factors for unplanned 30-day readmission after total shoulder arthroplasty. Methods We identified patients undergoing primary elective shoulder arthroplasty performed at American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) participating hospitals in 2013. Cases were stratified by readmission status. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to assess patient demographics, comorbidities and operative variables predicting unplanned readmission. Results 2779 patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty were identified, with 74 (2.66%) requiring unplanned readmissions within 30 days of surgery. The most common surgical causes for unplanned readmission were surgical site infections (18.6%), dislocations (16.3%) and venous thromboembolism (14.0%). Medical causes for readmission were responsible for 51% of unplanned readmissions. Multivariate analysis identified patient age >75 (OR 2.62, 95% CI: 1.27 - 5.41), and ASA class of 3 (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.01 - 3.18) or 4 (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.31 - 10.08) as independent risk factors for unplanned readmission. Predictive modeling estimated that patients with ASA class of 4 and age >75 are 17.4 times more likely (95% CI 1.77-171.09) to be readmitted within 30 days of shoulder arthroplasty. Conclusion Unplanned readmission after shoulder arthroplasty is infrequent and medical complications account for more than 50% of occurrences. The risk of readmission exponentially increases when age and preoperative comorbidity burden are increased. PMID:27528839

  16. A 6-Point TACS Score Predicts In-Hospital Mortality Following Total Anterior Circulation Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Adrian D; Gollop, Nicholas D; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Clark, Allan B; Metcalf, Anthony K; Bowles, Kristian M; Flather, Marcus D; Potter, John F

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Little is known about the factors associated with in-hospital mortality following total anterior circulation stroke (TACS). We examined the characteristics and comorbidity data for TACS patients in relation to in-hospital mortality with the aim of developing a simple clinical rule for predicting the acute mortality outcome in TACS. Methods A routine data registry of one regional hospital in the UK was analyzed. The subjects were 2,971 stroke patients with TACS (82% ischemic; median age=81 years, interquartile age range=74–86 years) admitted between 1996 and 2012. Uni- and multivariate regression models were used to estimate in-hospital mortality odds ratios for the study covariates. A 6-point TACS scoring system was developed from regression analyses to predict in-hospital mortality as the outcome. Results Factors associated with in-hospital mortality of TACS were male sex [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.19], age (AOR=4.96 for ≥85 years vs. <65 years), hemorrhagic subtype (AOR=1.70), nonlateralization (AOR=1.75), prestroke disability (AOR=1.73 for moderate disability vs. no symptoms), and congestive heart failure (CHF) (AOR=1.61). Risk stratification using the 6-point TACS Score [T=type (hemorrhage=1 point) and territory (nonlateralization=1 point), A=age (65–84 years=1 point, ≥85 years=2 points), C=CHF (if present=1 point), S=status before stroke (prestroke modified Rankin Scale score of 4 or 5=1 point)] reliably predicted a mortality outcome: score=0, 29.4% mortality; score=1, 46.2% mortality [negative predictive value (NPV)=70.6%, positive predictive value (PPV)=46.2%]; score=2, 64.1% mortality (NPV=70.6, PPV=64.1%); score=3, 73.7% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=73.7%); and score=4 or 5, 81.2% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=81.2%). Conclusions We have identified the key determinants of in-hospital mortality following TACS and derived a 6-point TACS Score that can be used to predict the prognosis of particular patients.

  17. Dementia Increases Severe Sepsis and Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Li, Chung-Yi; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao

    2015-06-01

    Dementia increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. However, information on the potential effects of dementia on the risks of acute organ dysfunction, severe sepsis and in-hospital mortality, specifically among inpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is limited. The observational analytic study was inpatient claims during the period from 2000 to 2010 for 1 million people who were randomly selected from all of the beneficiaries of the Taiwan National Health Insurance in 2000. In total, 1406 patients with COPD and dementia were admitted during the study period. Hospitalized patients with COPD and free from a history of dementia were randomly selected and served as control subjects (n = 5334). The patient groups were matched according to age (±3 years), gender, and the year of admission, with a control/dementia ratio of 4. Only the first-time hospitalization data for each subject was analyzed. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of outcome measures (acute organ dysfunction, severe sepsis, and mortality), controlling for confounding factors (age, sex, comorbidity, infection site, hospital level, and length of stay). In COPD patients with dementia, the incidence rate of severe sepsis and hospital mortality was 17.1% and 4.8%, respectively, which were higher than the controls (10.6% and 2.3%). After controlling for potential confounding factors, dementia was found to significantly increase the odds of severe sepsis and hospital mortality with an adjusted OR (OR) of 1.38 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72) and 1.69 (95% CI 1.18-2.43), respectively. Dementia was also significantly associated with an increased OR of acute respiratory dysfunction (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.09-1.77). In hospitalized COPD patients, the presence of dementia may increase the risks of acute respiratory dysfunction, severe sepsis, and hospital mortality, which warrants the attention of health care

  18. Risk factors for maternal mortality in five Kampala hospitals, 1980-1986.

    PubMed

    Kampikaho, A; Irwig, L M

    1990-12-01

    A case-control study assessing risk factors for maternal mortality was carried out in five Kampala hospitals covering a period of seven years (1 January 1980 to 31 December 1986). The major predictors of maternal mortality were the general condition on admission, the mode of delivery and the Apgar score of the newborn. These predictors indicate that women at high risk were those admitted to hospital for delivery in a poor state of health. We believe that the risk of maternal mortality can be reduced through appropriate action by health workers and that there is a need for a more complete view of risk factors for both maternal and perinatal mortality to be obtained through population-based studies rather than only those women who deliver in hospital.

  19. Hospitals In ‘Magnet’ Program Show Better Patient Outcomes On Mortality Measures Compared To Non-‘Magnet’ Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Christopher R.; Xia, Rong; Ghaferi, Amir A.; Birkmeyer, John D.; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2015-01-01

    Hospital executives pursue external recognition to improve market share and demonstrate institutional commitment to quality of care. The Magnet Recognition Program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center identifies hospitals that epitomize nursing excellence, but it is not clear that receiving Magnet recognition improves patient outcomes. Using Medicare data on patients hospitalized for coronary artery bypass graft surgery, colectomy, or lower extremity bypass in 1998–2010, we compared rates of risk-adjusted thirty-day mortality and failure to rescue (death after a postoperative complication) between Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals matched on hospital characteristics. Surgical patients treated in Magnet hospitals, compared to those treated in non-Magnet hospitals, were 7.7 percent less likely to die within thirty days and 8.6 percent less likely to die after a postoperative complication. Across the thirteen–year study period, patient outcomes were significantly better in Magnet hospitals than in non-Magnet hospitals. However, outcomes did not improve for hospitals after they received Magnet recognition, which suggests that the Magnet program recognizes existing excellence and does not lead to additional improvements in surgical outcomes. PMID:26056204

  20. Predictors of fifty days in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chinmaya Kumar; Daman, Ripu; Bhatia, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the predictors of 50 d in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). METHODS: Two hundred and eighteen patients admitted to an intensive care unit in a tertiary care hospital between June 2013 and June 2014 with the diagnosis of SBP (during hospitalization) and cirrhosis were retrospectively analysed. SBP was diagnosed by abdominal paracentesis in the presence of polymorphonuclear cell count ≥ 250 cells/mm3 in the peritoneal fluid. Student’s t test, multivariate logistic regression, cox proportional hazard ratio (HR), receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were utilized for statistical analysis. Predictive abilities of several variables identified by multivariate analysis were compared using the area under ROC curve. P < 0.05 were considered statistical significant. RESULTS: The 50 d in-hospital mortality rate attributable to SBP is 43.11% (n = 94). Median survival duration for those who died was 9 d. In univariate analysis acute kidney injury (AKI), hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, serum bilirubin, international normalized ratio, aspartate transaminase, and model for end-stage liver disease - sodium (MELD-Na) were significantly associated with in - hospital mortality in patients with SBP (P ≤ 0.001). Multivariate cox proportional regression analysis showed AKI (HR = 2.16, 95%CI: 1.36-3.42, P = 0.001) septic shock (HR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.05-2.83, P = 0.029) MELD-Na (HR = 1.06, 95%CI: 1.02-1.09, P ≤ 0.001) was significantly associated with 50 d in-hospital mortality. The prognostic accuracy for AKI, MELD-Na and septic shock was 77%, 74% and 71% respectively associated with 50 d in-hospital mortality in SBP patients. CONCLUSION: AKI, MELD-Na and septic shock were predictors of 50 d in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with SBP. PMID:27134704

  1. Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    Tebeu, Pierre-Marie; Pierre-Marie, Tebeu; Halle-Ekane, Gregory; Gregory, Halle-Ekane; Da Itambi, Maxwell; Maxwell, Da Itambi; Enow Mbu, Robinson; Robinson, Enow Mbu; Mawamba, Yvette; Yvette, Mawamba; Fomulu, Joseph Nelson; Nelson, Fomulu Joseph

    2015-01-01

    More than 550,000 women die yearly from pregnancy-related causes. Fifty percent (50%) of the world estimate of maternal deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa alone. There is insufficient information on the risk factors of maternal mortality in Cameroon. This study aimed at establishing causes and risk factors of maternal mortality. This was a case-control study from 1st January, 2006 to 31st December, 2010 after National Ethical Committee Approval. Cases were maternal deaths; controls were women who delivered normally. Maternal deaths were obtained from the delivery room registers and in-patient registers. Controls for each case were two normal deliveries following identified maternal deaths on the same day. Variables considered were socio-demographic and reproductive health characteristics. Epi Info 3.5.1 was used for analysis. The mean MMR was 287.5/100,000 live births. Causes of deaths were: postpartum hemorrhage (229.2%), unsafe abortion (25%), ectopic pregnancy (12.5%), hypertension in pregnancy (8.3%), malaria (8.3%), anemia (8.3%), heart disease (4.2%), and pneumonia (4.2%), and placenta praevia (4.2%). Ages ranged from 18 to 41 years, with a mean of 27.7 ± 5.14 years. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal death (OR=78.33; CI: (8.66- 1802.51)). The mean MMR from 2006 to 2010 was 287.5/100,000 live births. Most of the causes of maternal deaths were preventable. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal mortality. Key words: Maternal mortality, causes, risk factors, Cameroon.

  2. Predictors of hospital stay and mortality in dengue virus infection-experience from Aga Khan University Hospital Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection (DVI) is very common infection. There is scarcity of data on factor associated with increased hospital stay and mortality in dengue virus infection (DVI). This study was done to know about factors associated with increased hospital stay and mortality in patients admitted with DVI. Results Out of 532 patients, two third (72.6%) had stay ≤3 days while one third (27.4%) had stay greater than 3 days. The mean length of hospital stay was 3.46 ± 3.45 days. Factors associated with increased hospital stay (>3 days) included AKI (acute kidney injury) (Odd ratio 2.98; 95% CI 1.66-5.34), prolonged prothrombin time (Odd ratio 2.03; 95% CI 1.07-3.84), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (Odd ratio 1.80; CI 95% 1.15-2.83) and increased age of > 41.10 years (Odd ratio 1.03; CI 95% 1.01-1.04).Mortality was 1.5%. High mortality was found in those with AKI (P <0.01), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) (P <0.001), respiratory failure (P0.01), prolong PT (P 0.001), prolong aPTT (P0.01) and increased hospital stay (P0.04). Conclusion Increasing age, coagulopathy and acute kidney injury in patients with DVI is associated with increased hospital stay. Morality was more in patients with AKI, DHF and DSS, respiratory failure, coagulopathy and these patients had more prolonged hospitalization. PMID:25064632

  3. Predictors of in-hospital mortality following redo cardiac surgery: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Isa; Cayli, Murat; Gulcan, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Redo cardiac operations represent one of the main challenges in heart surgery. The purpose of the study was to analyze the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing reoperative cardiac surgery by a single surgical team. Methods A total of 1367 patients underwent cardiac surgical procedures and prospectively entered into a computerized database. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the reoperative cardiac surgery (n = 109) and control group (n = 1258). Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the possible predictors of hospital mortality. Results Mean age was 56 ± 13, and 46% were female in redo group. In-hospital mortality was 4.6 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.11. EuroSCORE (6 vs. 3; p < 0.01), cardiopulmonary bypass time (90 vs. 71 min; p < 0.01), postoperative bleeding (450 vs. 350 ml; p < 0.01), postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) (29 vs. 16%; p < 0.01), and inotropic support (58 vs. 31%; p = 0.001) were significantly different. These variables were entered into uni- and multivariate regression analysis. Postoperative AF (OR1.76, p = 0.007) and EuroSCORE (OR 1.42, p < 0.01) were significant risk factors predicting hospital mortality. Conclusions Reoperative cardiac surgery can be performed under similar risks as primary operations. Postoperative AF and EuroSCORE are predictors of in-hospital mortality for redo cases. PMID:26527452

  4. Assisted ventilation in COPD – association between previous hospitalizations and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Toft-Petersen, Anne Pernille; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Weinreich, Ulla Møller; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2016-01-01

    Background In general, previous studies have shown an association between prior exacerbations and mortality in COPD, but this association has not been demonstrated in the subpopulation of patients in need of assisted ventilation. We examined whether previous hospitalizations were independently associated with mortality among patients with COPD ventilated for the first time. Patients and methods In the Danish National Patient Registry, we established a cohort of patients with COPD ventilated for the first time from 2003 to 2011 and previously medicated for obstructive airway diseases. We assessed the number of hospitalizations for COPD in the preceding year, age, sex, comorbidity, mode of ventilation, survival to discharge, and days to death beyond discharge. Results The cohort consisted of 6,656 patients of whom 66% had not been hospitalized for COPD in the previous year, 18% once, 8% twice, and 9% thrice or more. In-hospital mortality was 45%, and of the patients alive at discharge, 11% died within a month and 39% within a year. In multivariate models, adjusted for age, sex, mode of ventilation, and comorbidity, odds ratios for in-hospital death were 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–1.44), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.19–1.72), and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.30–1.87) with one, two, and three or more hospitalizations, respectively. Hazard ratios for death after discharge from hospital were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.19–1.46), 1.76 (95% CI: 1.52–2.02), and 2.07 (95% CI: 1.80–2.38) with one, two, and three or more hospitalizations, respectively. Conclusion Preceding hospitalizations for COPD are associated with in-hospital mortality and after discharge in the subpopulation of patients with COPD with acute exacerbation treated with assisted ventilation for the first time. PMID:27217743

  5. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field. PMID:16649506

  6. Maternal mortality in the government hospitals, West Malaysia 1967-1969.

    PubMed

    Ariffin Bin Marzuki; Thambu, J A

    1973-03-01

    The attempt was made to determine the factors responsible for the maternal deaths in the government hospitals of West Malaysia over the 1967-1969 period. The study covered all maternal deaths in the government hospitals during this 2-year period. Despite an increase in the number of deliveries in government hospitals from 83,654 in 1964 to 92,583 in 1969, the maternal mortality had declined from 27/10,000 to 22/10,000. The maternal mortality rate in government hospitals was higher than the national maternal mortality rate because of the practice of referring all abnormal obstetric cases to hospitals for management. Hemorrhage continued as the primary cause of maternal deaths with toxemia as the 2nd important cause and infection as the 3rd. In the rural areas midwives found postpartum hemorrhage a major problem because of the coexistence of anemia in pregnancy. Other complications of pregnancy, childbirth and puerperium included obstructed and neglected labors due to cephalo-pelvic disproportion, abnormal lie, and presentation and ruptured uterus referred from the rural areas to the hospitals. Hypertension was the most important cause in the associated maternal diseases. The following are included among the steps taken by the government to reduce maternal mortality: 1) development of an excellent infrastructure of health units; 2) a training program for midwives; and 3) a plan to integrate the family planning services with the health services.

  7. Risk Factors for Increased Hospital Resource Utilization and In-Hospital Mortality in Adults With Single Ventricle Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Doshi, Pratik; Onukwube, Jennifer; Fram, Ricki Y; Robbins, James M

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease are now expected to survive to adulthood. Co-morbid medical conditions (CMCs) are common. We sought to identify risk factors for increased hospital resource utilization and in-hospital mortality in adults with single ventricle. We analyzed data from the 2001 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in patients aged ≥18 years admitted to nonteaching general hospitals (NTGHs), TGHs, and pediatric hospitals (PHs) with either hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tricuspid atresia or common ventricle. National estimates of hospitalizations were calculated. Elixhauser CMCs were identified. Length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and effect of CMCs were determined. Age was greater in NTGH (41.5 ± 1.3 years) than in TGH (32.8 ± 0.5) and PH (25.0 ± 0.6; p <0.0001). Adjusted LOS was shorter in NTGH (5.6 days) than in PH (9.7 days; p <0.0001). Adjusted costs were higher in PH ($56,671) than in TGH ($31,934) and NTGH ($18,255; p <0.0001). CMCs are associated with increased LOS (p <0.0001) and costs (p <0.0001). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality included increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 5.250, CI 2.825 to 9.758 for 45- to 64-year old vs 18- to 30-year old), male gender (OR 2.72, CI 1.804 to 4.103]), and the presence of CMC (OR 4.55, CI 2.193 to 9.436) for 2 vs none). No differences in mortality were found among NTGH, TGH, and PH. Cardiovascular procedures were more common in PH hospitalizations and were associated with higher costs and LOS. CMCs increase costs and mortality. In-hospital mortality is increased with age, male gender, and the presence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. PMID:27291967

  8. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Milla, Emilio; Olalla, Julián; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Martos, Francisco; Matute-Cruz, Petra; Carmona-López, Guadalupe; Fornieles, Yolanda; Cayuela, Aurelio; García-Alegría, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848) diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72%) of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93). Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality. PMID:19344518

  9. Estimating Population Cause-Specific Mortality Fractions from in-Hospital Mortality: Validation of a New Method

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Christopher J. L; Lopez, Alan D; Barofsky, Jeremy T; Bryson-Cahn, Chloe; Lozano, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Background Cause-of-death data for many developing countries are not available. Information on deaths in hospital by cause is available in many low- and middle-income countries but is not a representative sample of deaths in the population. We propose a method to estimate population cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) using data already collected in many middle-income and some low-income developing nations, yet rarely used: in-hospital death records. Methods and Findings For a given cause of death, a community's hospital deaths are equal to total community deaths multiplied by the proportion of deaths occurring in hospital. If we can estimate the proportion dying in hospital, we can estimate the proportion dying in the population using deaths in hospital. We propose to estimate the proportion of deaths for an age, sex, and cause group that die in hospital from the subset of the population where vital registration systems function or from another population. We evaluated our method using nearly complete vital registration (VR) data from Mexico 1998–2005, which records whether a death occurred in a hospital. In this validation test, we used 45 disease categories. We validated our method in two ways: nationally and between communities. First, we investigated how the method's accuracy changes as we decrease the amount of Mexican VR used to estimate the proportion of each age, sex, and cause group dying in hospital. Decreasing VR data used for this first step from 100% to 9% produces only a 12% maximum relative error between estimated and true CSMFs. Even if Mexico collected full VR information only in its capital city with 9% of its population, our estimation method would produce an average relative error in CSMFs across the 45 causes of just over 10%. Second, we used VR data for the capital zone (Distrito Federal and Estado de Mexico) and estimated CSMFs for the three lowest-development states. Our estimation method gave an average relative error of 20%, 23

  10. Prognostic value of very early seizures for in-hospital mortality in atherothrombotic infarction.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià; Comes, Emili; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Juan B; Oliveres, Montserrat; Balcells, Miquel

    2003-01-01

    We studied the influence of very early seizures (within 48 h of stroke onset) on in-hospital mortality in a cohort of 452 consecutive patients with atherothrombotic infarction. These patients were selected from 2000 consecutive acute stroke patients registered in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry in Barcelona, Spain. A comparison of data between the nonseizure (n = 442) and seizure (n = 10) groups was made. Predictors of very early seizures were assessed by multivariate analysis. The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher in atherothrombotic stroke patients with very early seizures than in those without seizures (70 vs. 19.5%, p < 0.001). Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality included very early seizures, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, 85 years of age or older, altered consciousness, dizziness, parietal and pons involvement, and respiratory and cardiac complications. After multivariate analysis, atherothrombotic infarction of occipital topography and decreased consciousness appeared to be independent predictors of atherothrombotic stroke with very early seizures. Very early seizures constitute an important risk factor for in-hospital mortality after atherothrombotic stroke.

  11. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and 30 Day Rehospitalizations: An Analysis of Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Kind, Amy JH; Jencks, Steve; Brock, Jane; Yu, Menggang; Bartels, Christie; Ehlenbach, William; Greenberg, Caprice; Smith, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Background Measures of socioeconomic disadvantage may enable improved targeting of programs to prevent rehospitalizations, but obtaining such information directly from patients can be difficult. Measures of US neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage are more readily available, although rarely employed clinically. Objective To evaluate the association between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage at the census block-group level, as measured by Singh’s validated Area Deprivation Index (ADI), and 30-day rehospitalization. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting United States Patients Random 5% national sample of fee-for-service Medicare patients discharged with congestive heart failure, pneumonia or myocardial infarction, 2004–2009 (N = 255,744) Measurements 30-day rehospitalizations. Medicare data were linked to 2000 Census data to construct an ADI for each patient’s census block-group, which were then sorted into percentiles by increasing ADI. Relationships between neighborhood ADI grouping and rehospitalization were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression models, controlling for patient sociodemographics, comorbidities/severity, and index hospital characteristics. Results The 30-day rehospitalization rate did not vary significantly across the least disadvantaged 85% of neighborhoods, which had an average rehospitalization rate=21%. However, within the most disadvantaged 15% of neighborhoods, rehospitalization rates rose from 22% to 27% with worsening ADI. This relationship persisted after full adjustment, with the most disadvantaged neighborhoods having a rehospitalization risk (adjusted risk ratio = 1.09, confidence interval 1.05–1.12) similar to that of chronic pulmonary disease (1.06, 1.04–1.08) and greater than that of diabetes (0.95, 0.94–0.97). Limitations No direct markers of care quality, access Conclusions Residence within a disadvantaged US neighborhood is a rehospitalization predictor of magnitude similar to chronic pulmonary

  12. Analysis of Diagnoses Associated with Multiple Sclerosis–Related In-Hospital Mortality Using the Premier Hospital Database

    PubMed Central

    Pocoski, Jennifer; Cutter, Gary; Kaufman, David W.; Pleimes, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare mortality rates and related diagnoses in hospitalized patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), those with diabetes mellitus (DM), and the general hospitalized population (GHP). Methods: Patients who died between 2007 and 2011 were identified in the US hospital–based Premier Healthcare Database. Demographic information was collected, mortality rates calculated, and principal diagnoses categorized. Results: Of 55,152 unique patients with MS identified, 1518 died. Mean age at death was 10 years younger for the MS group (63.4 years) than for the DM (73.3 years) and GHP (73.1 years) groups. Age-adjusted mortality rates, based on the 2000 US Standard Million Population, were 1077, 1248, and 1133 per 100,000, respectively. Infection was the most common principal diagnosis at the hospital stay during which the patient died in the MS cohort (43.1% vs. 26.3% and 24.0% in the DM and GHP groups, respectively). Other common principal diagnoses in the MS group included pulmonary (17.5%) and cardiovascular (12.1%) disease. Septicemia/sepsis/septic shock was a secondary diagnosis for 50.7% of patients with MS versus 36.0% and 31.0% of patients in the DM and GHP cohorts, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with MS had a shorter life span than patients with DM or the GHP and were more likely to have a principal diagnosis of infection at their final hospital stay. However, the database was limited to codes recorded in the hospital; diagnoses received outside the hospital were not captured. PMID:27252603

  13. Carotid baroreflex response following 30 days exposure to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Eckberg, D. L.; Fritsch, J. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of the carotid-baroreflex response to weightlessness was investigated in human subjects exposed to simulated microgravity (30 days of 6-day head-down bed rest followed by 5 days of recovery). Baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses were elicited by a complex sequence of pressure changes delivered to a neck chamber device. The shape of the sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac response curve was examined for alterations and the occurrence of resetting, as well as for a possible association of the impaired baroreflex function with hypotension during the postexposure orthostatic stress. It was found that the exposure to head-down bed rest caused a significant shift on the R-R interval axis, which paralleled reductions and elevations in baseline HR such that the baseline R-R (operational point) remained in the same position on the response curve. This shift in the location of the reflex relation indicates a significant resetting of the carotid baroreceptors, which may represent an appropriate adaptation which contributes to the maintenance of a constant resting arterial blood pressure before, during, and after bed rest, observed in these study.

  14. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  15. Perioperative risk factors for in-hospital mortality after emergency gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients who have undergone emergency gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients after emergency GI surgery.The medical records of 362 critically ill surgical patients who underwent emergency GI surgery, admitted to intensive care unit between January 2007 and December 2011, were reviewed retrospectively. Perioperative biochemical and clinical parameters of survivors and nonsurvivors were compared. Logistic regression multivariate analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors of mortality.The in-hospital mortality rate was 15.2% (55 patients). Multivariate analyses revealed cancer-related perforation (odds ratio [OR] 16.671, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.629-105.721, P = 0.003), preoperative anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL; OR 6.976, 95% CI 1.376-35.360, P = 0.019), and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (albumin <2.7 g/dL; OR 9.954, 95% CI 1.603-61.811, P = 0.014) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality after emergency GI surgery.The findings of this study suggest that in critically ill patients undergoing emergency GI surgery, cancer-related peritonitis, preoperative anemia, and preoperative hypoalbuminemia are associated with in-hospital mortality. Recognizing risk factors at an early stage could aid risk stratification and the provision of optimal perioperative care. PMID:27583863

  16. Perioperative risk factors for in-hospital mortality after emergency gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients who have undergone emergency gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients after emergency GI surgery. The medical records of 362 critically ill surgical patients who underwent emergency GI surgery, admitted to intensive care unit between January 2007 and December 2011, were reviewed retrospectively. Perioperative biochemical and clinical parameters of survivors and nonsurvivors were compared. Logistic regression multivariate analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors of mortality. The in-hospital mortality rate was 15.2% (55 patients). Multivariate analyses revealed cancer-related perforation (odds ratio [OR] 16.671, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.629–105.721, P = 0.003), preoperative anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL; OR 6.976, 95% CI 1.376–35.360, P = 0.019), and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (albumin <2.7 g/dL; OR 9.954, 95% CI 1.603–61.811, P = 0.014) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality after emergency GI surgery. The findings of this study suggest that in critically ill patients undergoing emergency GI surgery, cancer-related peritonitis, preoperative anemia, and preoperative hypoalbuminemia are associated with in-hospital mortality. Recognizing risk factors at an early stage could aid risk stratification and the provision of optimal perioperative care. PMID:27583863

  17. Hospital mortality in acute coronary syndrome: differences related to gender and use of percutaneous coronary procedures

    PubMed Central

    Aguado-Romeo, María J; Márquez-Calderón, Soledad; Buzón-Barrera, María L

    2007-01-01

    Background To identify differences among men and women with acute coronary syndrome in terms of in-hospital mortality, and to assess whether these differences are related to the use of percutaneous cardiovascular procedures. Methods Observational study based on the Minimum Basic Data Set. This encompassed all episodes of emergency hospital admissions (46,007 cases, including 16,391 women and 29,616 men) with a main diagnosis of either myocardial infarction or unstable angina at 32 hospitals within the Andalusian Public Health System over a four-year period (2000–2003). The relationship between gender and mortality was examined for the population as a whole and for stratified groups depending on the type of procedures used (diagnostic coronary catheterisation and/or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty). These combinations were then adjusted for age group, main diagnosis and co-morbidityharlson score). Results During hospitalisation, mortality was 9.6% (4,401 cases out of 46,007), with 11.8% for women and 8.3% for men. There were more deaths among older patients with acute myocardial infarction and greater co-morbidity. Lower mortality was shown in patients undergoing diagnostic catheterisation and/or PTCA. After adjusting for age, diagnosis and co-morbidity, mortality affected women more than men in the overall population (OR 1.14, 95% CI: 1.06–1.22) and in the subgroup of patients where no procedure was performed (OR 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07–1.24). Gender was not an explanatory variable in the subgroups of patients who underwent some kind of procedure. Conclusion Gender has not been associated to in-hospital mortality in patients who undergo some kind of percutaneous cardiovascular procedure. However, in the group of patients without either diagnostic catheterisation or angioplasty, mortality was higher in women than in men. PMID:17631037

  18. Mortality in a pediatric secondary-care hospital in post-conflict Liberia in 2009

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Thomaz Bittencourt; Farhat, Sylvia Costa Lima; Reid, Tony; Schvartsman, Cláudio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe and analyze the causes of death in a pediatric secondary-care hospital (run by Médecins sans Frontières), in Monrovia, Liberia, 6 years post-civil war, to determine the quality of care and mortality in a setting with limited resources. Methods: Data were retrospectively collected from March 2009 to October 2009. Patient charts and laboratory records were reviewed to verify cause of death. Additionally, charts of patients aged over 1 month with an infectious cause of death were analyzed for decompensated septic shock, or fluid-refractory septic shock. Results: Of 8,254 admitted pediatric patients, 531 died, with a mortality rate of 6.4%. Ninety percent of deaths occurred in children <5 years old. Most deaths occurred within 24 hours of admission. The main cause of death (76%) was infectious disease. Seventy-eight (23.6%) patients >1 month old with infectious disease met the criteria for septic shock, and 28 (8.6%) for decompensated or fluid-refractory septic shock. Conclusion: Since the end of Liberia's devastating civil war, Island Hospital has improved care and mortality outcomes, despite operating with limited resources. Based on the available data, mortality in Island Hospital appears to be lower than that of other Liberian and African institutions and similar to other hospitals run by Médecins sans Frontières across Africa. This can be explained by the financial and logistic support of Médecins sans Frontières. The highest mortality burden is related to infectious diseases and neonatal conditions. The mortality of sepsis varied among different infections. This suggests that further mortality reduction can be obtained by tackling sepsis management and improving neonatal care. PMID:24488377

  19. Predictors of hip fracture mortality at a general hospital in South Brazil: an unacceptable surgical delay

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiango Aguiar; Premaor, Melissa Orlandin; Larangeira, João Alberto; Brito, Luiz Giulian; Luft, Michel; Guterres, Leonardo Waihrich; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hip fractures have been associated with increased mortality in the elderly. Several risk factors such as the time between the insult and the surgical repair have been associated with hip fracture mortality. Nevertheless, the risk of delayed surgical repair remains controversial. Few studies have examined this issue in Brazil. The aim of this study was to study the risk factors for death one year after hip fracture and in-hospital stay at a tertiary hospital in South Brazil. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was carried out from April 2005 to April 2011 at a tertiary university hospital at Santa Maria, Brazil. Subjects admitted for hip fracture who were 65 years of age or older were followed for one year. Information about fracture type, age, gender, clinical comorbidities, time to surgery, discharge, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score were recorded. Death was evaluated during the hospital stay and at one year. RESULTS: Four hundred and eighteen subjects were included in the final analysis. Of these, 4.3% died in-hospital and 15.3% were dead at one year. Time to surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Ischemic Heart Disease, and in-hospital stay were associated with death at one year in the univariate analysis. The American Society of Anesthesiologists score and time to surgery were one-year mortality predictors in the final regression model. In-hospital death was associated with American Society of Anesthesiologists score and age. CONCLUSION: Time to surgery is worryingly high at the South Brazil tertiary public health center studied here. Surgical delay is a risk factor that has the potential to be modified to improve mortality. PMID:24714833

  20. Changes in U.S. Hospitalization and Mortality Rates following Smoking Bans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shetty, Kanaka D.; DeLeire, Thomas; White, Chapin; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2011-01-01

    U.S. state and local governments have increasingly adopted restrictions on smoking in public places. This paper analyzes nationally representative databases, including the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, to compare short-term changes in mortality and hospitalization rates in smoking-restricted regions with control regions. In contrast with smaller…

  1. The Drug Derived Complexity Index (DDCI) Predicts Mortality, Unplanned Hospitalization and Hospital Readmissions at the Population Level

    PubMed Central

    Robusto, Fabio; Lepore, Vito; D'Ettorre, Antonio; Lucisano, Giuseppe; De Berardis, Giorgia; Bisceglia, Lucia; Tognoni, Gianni; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective to develop and validate the Drug Derived Complexity Index (DDCI), a predictive model derived from drug prescriptions able to stratify the general population according to the risk of death, unplanned hospital admission, and readmission, and to compare the new predictive index with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Design Population-based cohort study, using a record-linkage analysis of prescription databases, hospital discharge records, and the civil registry. The predictive model was developed based on prescription patterns indicative of chronic diseases, using a random sample of 50% of the population. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess weights of different prescription patterns and drug classes. The predictive properties of the DDCI were confirmed in the validation cohort, represented by the other half of the population. The performance of DDCI was compared to the CCI in terms of calibration, discrimination and reclassification. Setting 6 local health authorities with 2.0 million citizens aged 40 years or above. Results One year and overall mortality rates, unplanned hospitalization rates and hospital readmission rates progressively increased with increasing DDCI score. In the overall population, the model including age, gender and DDCI showed a high performance. DDCI predicted 1-year mortality, overall mortality and unplanned hospitalization with an accuracy of 0.851, 0.835, and 0.584, respectively. If compared to CCI, DDCI showed discrimination and reclassification properties very similar to the CCI, and improved prediction when used in combination with the CCI. Conclusions and Relevance DDCI is a reliable prognostic index, able to stratify the entire population into homogeneous risk groups. DDCI can represent an useful tool for risk-adjustment, policy planning, and the identification of patients needing a focused approach in everyday practice. PMID:26895073

  2. Public-private settlement and hospital mortality per sources of payment

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Juliana Pires; Martins, Mônica; Leite, Iuri da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if the adjusted hospital mortality varies according to source of payment of hospital admissions, legal nature, and financing settlement of hospitals. METHODS Cros-ssectional study with information source in administrative databases. Specific hospital admission reasons were selected considering the volume of hospital admissions and the list of quality indicators proposed by the North-American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Were analyzed 852,864 hospital admissions of adults, occurred in 789 hospitals between 2008 and 2010, in Sao Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, applying multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS At hospital admission level, showed higher chances of death male patients in more advanced age groups, with comorbidity, who used intensive care unit, and had the Brazilian Unified Health System as source of payment. At the level of hospitals, in those located in the mean of the distribution, the adjusted probability of death in hospital admissions financed by plan or private was 5.0%, against 9.0% when reimbursed by the Brazilian Unified Health System. This probability increased in hospital admissions financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System in hospitals to two standard deviations above the mean, reaching 29.0%. CONCLUSIONS In addition to structural characteristics of the hospitals and the profile of the patients, interventions aimed at improving care should also consider the coverage of the population by health plans, the network shared between beneficiaries of plans and users of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the standard of care to the various sources of payment by hospitals and, most importantly, how these factors influence the clinical performance. PMID:27463256

  3. Enterococcal bacteraemia: factors influencing mortality, length of stay and costs of hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Cheah, A L Y; Spelman, T; Liew, D; Peel, T; Howden, B P; Spelman, D; Grayson, M L; Nation, R L; Kong, D C M

    2013-04-01

    Enterococci are a major cause of nosocomial bacteraemia. The impacts of vanB vancomycin resistance and antibiotic therapy on outcomes in enterococcal bacteraemia are unclear. Factors that affect length of stay (LOS) and costs of managing patients with enterococcal bacteraemia are also unknown. This study aimed to identify factors associated with mortality, LOS and hospitalization costs in patients with enterococcal bacteraemia and the impact of vancomycin resistance and antibiotic therapy on these outcomes. Data from 116 patients with vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), matched 1:1 with patients with vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus (VSE), from two Australian hospitals were reviewed for clinical and economic outcomes. Univariable and multivariable logistic and quantile regression analyses identified factors associated with mortality, LOS and costs. Intensive care unit admission (OR, 8.57; 95% CI, 3.99-18.38), a higher burden of co-morbidities (OR, 4.55; 95% CI, 1.83-11.33) and longer time to appropriate antibiotics (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03) were significantly associated with mortality in enterococcal bacteraemia. VanB vancomycin resistance increased LOS (4.89 days; 95% CI, 0.56-11.52) and hospitalization costs (AU$ 28 872; 95% CI, 734-70 667), after adjustment for confounders. Notably, linezolid definitive therapy was associated with lower mortality (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.03-0.58) in vanB VRE bacteraemia patients. In patients with VSE bacteraemia, time to appropriate antibiotics independently influenced mortality, LOS and hospitalization costs, and underlying co-morbidities were associated with mortality. The study findings highlight the importance of preventing VRE bacteraemia and the significance of time to appropriate antibiotics in the management of enterococcal bacteraemia.

  4. Association of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy with Infant Hospitalization and Mortality Due to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Michael J.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking is associated with infant respiratory infections and with increased risk of low birthweight (LBW) infants and preterm birth. This study assesses the association of maternal smoking during pregnancy with both respiratory and non-respiratory infectious disease (ID) morbidity and mortality in infants. Methods We conducted two retrospective case-control analyses of infants born in Washington State from 1987–2004 using linked birth certificate, death certificate, and hospital discharge records. One assessed morbidity—infants hospitalized due to ID within one year of birth (47,404 cases/48,233 controls). The second assessed mortality—infants who died within one year due to ID (627 cases/2,730 controls). Results Maternal smoking was associated with both hospitalization (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.52; 95%CI: 1.46, 1.58) and mortality (AOR=1.51; 95%CI: 1.17, 1.96) due to any ID. In subgroup analyses, maternal smoking was associated with hospitalization due to a broad range of ID including both respiratory (AOR=1.69; 95%CI: 1.63, 1.76) and non-respiratory ID (AOR=1.27; 95%CI: 1.20, 1.34). Further stratification by birthweight and gestational age did not appreciably change these estimates. In contrast, there was no association of maternal smoking with ID infant mortality when only LBW infants were considered. Conclusions Maternal smoking was associated with a broad range of both respiratory and non-respiratory ID outcomes. Despite attenuation of the mortality association among LBW infants, ID hospitalization was found to be independent of both birthweight and gestational age. These findings suggest that full-term infants of normal weight whose mothers smoked may suffer an increased risk of serious ID morbidity and mortality. PMID:22929173

  5. Transferring Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage Does Not Increase In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Claude; Albright, Karen C.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Mir, Osman; Sands, Kara A.; Savitz, Sean I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) accept transferred patients from referring hospitals in a given regional area. The transfer process itself has not been studied as a potential factor that may impact outcome. We compared in-hospital mortality and severe disability or death at CSCs between transferred and directly admitted intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients of matched severity. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed all primary ICH patients from a prospectively-collected stroke registry and electronic medical records, at two tertiary care sites. Patients meeting inclusion criteria were divided into two groups: patients transferred in for a higher level of care and direct presenters. We used propensity scores (PS) to match 175 transfer patients to 175 direct presenters. These patients were taken from a pool of 530 eligible patients, 291 (54.9%) of whom were transferred in for a higher level of care. Severe disability or death was defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) sore of 4–6. Mortality and morbidity were compared between the 2 groups using Pearson chi-squared test and Student t test. We fit logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for association between transfer status and in-hospital mortality and severe disability or death in full and PS-matched patients. Results There were no significant differences in the PS-matched transfer and direct presentation groups. Patients transferred to a regional center were not at higher odds of in-hospital mortality (OR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.50–1.71) and severe disability or death (OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.39–1.50), than direct presenters, even after adjustment for PS, age, baseline NIHSS score, and glucose on admission. Conclusion Our observation suggests that transfer patients of similar disease burden are not at higher risk of in-hospital mortality than direct presenters. PMID:27467594

  6. Cerebral infarction in diabetes: Clinical pattern, stroke subtypes, and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rivas, Antoni; García-Eroles, Luis; de Marcos, Lourdes; Massons, Joan; Oliveres, Montserrat

    2005-01-01

    Background To compare the characteristics and prognostic features of ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes and without diabetes, and to determine the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in people with diabetes and ischemic stroke. Methods Diabetes was diagnosed in 393 (21.3%) of 1,840 consecutive patients with cerebral infarction included in a prospective stroke registry over a 12-year period. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, clinical events, stroke subtypes, neuroimaging data, and outcome in ischemic stroke patients with and without diabetes were compared. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results People with diabetes compared to people without diabetes presented more frequently atherothrombotic stroke (41.2% vs 27%) and lacunar infarction (35.1% vs 23.9%) (P < 0.01). The in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients with diabetes was 12.5% and 14.6% in those without (P = NS). Ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, subacute onset, 85 years old or more, atherothrombotic and lacunar infarcts, and thalamic topography were independently associated with ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes, whereas predictors of in-hospital mortality included the patient's age, decreased consciousness, chronic nephropathy, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation Conclusion Ischemic stroke in people with diabetes showed a different clinical pattern from those without diabetes, with atherothrombotic stroke and lacunar infarcts being more frequent. Clinical factors indicative of the severity of ischemic stroke available at onset have a predominant influence upon in-hospital mortality and may help clinicians to assess prognosis more accurately. PMID:15833108

  7. Associations of dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 inhibitors with mortality in hospitalized heart failure patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akihiko; Kanno, Yuki; Takiguchi, Mai; Miura, Shunsuke; Shimizu, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yuichi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Owada, Takashi; Sato, Takamasa; Suzuki, Satoshi; Oikawa, Masayoshi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu‐ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus (DM) often co‐exist. Treatment of DM in HF patients is challenging because some therapies for DM are contraindicated in HF. Although previous experimental studies have reported that dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 (DPP‐4) inhibitors improve cardiovascular function, whether DPP‐4 inhibition improves mortality of HF patients with DM remains unclear. Therefore, we examined the impact of DPP‐4 inhibition on mortality in hospitalized HF patients using propensity score analyses. Methods and results We performed observational study analysed by propensity score method with 962 hospitalized HF patients. Of these patients, 293 (30.5%) had DM, and 122 of these DM patients were treated with DPP‐4 inhibitors. Propensity scores for treatment with DPP‐4 inhibitors were estimated for each patient by logistic regression with clinically relevant baseline variables. The propensity‐matched 1:1 cohorts were assessed based on propensity scores (DPP‐4 inhibitors, n = 83, and non‐DPP‐4 inhibitors, n = 83). Kaplan–Meier analysis in the propensity score‐matched cohort demonstrated that cardiac and all‐cause mortality was significantly lower in the DPP‐4 inhibitor group than in the non‐DPP‐4 inhibitor group (cardiac mortality: 4.8% vs. 18.1%, P = 0.015; all‐cause mortality: 14.5% vs. 41.0%, P = 0.003, by a log‐rank test). In the multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses, after adjusting for other potential confounding factors, the use of DPP‐4 inhibitors was an independent predictor of all‐cause mortality (pre‐matched cohort: hazard ratio 0.467, P = 0.010; post‐matched cohort: hazard ratio 0.370, P = 0.003) in HF patients with DM. Conclusions Our data suggest that DPP‐4 inhibitors may improve cardiac and all‐cause mortality in hospitalized HF patients with DM.

  8. Reductions in Inpatient Mortality following Interventions to Improve Emergency Hospital Care in Freetown, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matthew; Spry, Emily; Daoh, Kisito; Baion, David; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2012-01-01

    Background The demand for high quality hospital care for children in low resource countries is not being met. This paper describes a number of strategies to improve emergency care at a children's hospital and evaluates the impact of these on inpatient mortality. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of improving emergency care is estimated. Methods and Findings A team of local and international staff developed a plan to improve emergency care for children arriving at The Ola During Children's Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone. Following focus group discussions, five priority areas were identified to improve emergency care; staff training, hospital layout, staff allocation, medical equipment, and medical record keeping. A team of international volunteers worked with local staff for six months to design and implement improvements in these five priority areas. The improvements were evaluated collectively rather than individually. Before the intervention, the inpatient mortality rate was 12.4%. After the intervention this improved to 5.9%. The relative risk of dying was 47% (95% CI 0.369–0.607) lower after the intervention. The estimated number of lives saved in the first two months after the intervention was 103. The total cost of the intervention was USD 29 714, the estimated cost per death averted was USD 148. There are two main limitation of the study. Firstly, the brevity of the study and secondly, the assumed homogeneity of the clinical cases that presented to the hospital before and after the intervention. Conclusions This study demonstarted a signficant reductuion in inpatient mortality rate after an intervention to improve emergency hospital care If the findings of this paper could be reproduced in a larger more rigorous study, improving the quality of care in hospitals would be a very cost effective strategy to save children's lives in low resource settings. PMID:23028427

  9. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  10. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  11. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  12. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  13. Post-discharge mortality in patients hospitalized with MRSA infection and/or colonization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Rogers, C; Rimland, D; Stafford, C; Satola, S; Crispell, E; Gaynes, R

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is known to increase in-hospital mortality, but little is known about its association with long-term health. Two hundred and thirty-seven deaths occurred among 707 patients with MRSA infection at the time of hospitalization and/or nasal colonization followed for almost 4 years after discharge from the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, USA. The crude mortality rate in patients with an infection and colonization (23·57/100 person-years) was significantly higher than the rate in patients with only colonization (15·67/100 person-years, P = 0·037). MRSA infection, hospitalization within past 6 months, and histories of cancer or haemodialysis were independent risk factors. Adjusted mortality rates in patients with infection were almost twice as high compared to patients who were only colonized: patients infected and colonized [hazard ratio (HR) 1·93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·31-2·84]; patients infected but not colonized (HR 1·96, 95% CI 1·22-3·17). Surviving MRSA infection adversely affects long-term mortality, underscoring the importance of infection control in healthcare settings.

  14. Factors affecting mortality of hospitalized chest trauma patients in United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Predictors of mortality of chest trauma vary globally. We aimed to define factors affecting mortality of hospitalized chest trauma patients in Al-Ain City, United Arab Emirates. Methods The data of Al-Ain Hospital Trauma Registry were prospectively collected over a period of three years. Patients with chest trauma who were admitted for more than 24 hours in Al-Ain Hospital or who died after arrival to the hospital were included in the study. Univariate analysis was used to compare patients who died and those who survived. Gender, age, nationality, mechanism of injury, systolic blood pressure and GCS on arrival, the need for ventilatory support, presence of head injury, AIS for the chest and head, presence of injuries outside the chest, and ISS were studied. Significant factors were then entered into a backward stepwise likelihood ratio logistic regression model. Results 474 patients having a median (range) age of 35 (1–90) years were studied. 90% were males and 18% were UAE citizens. The main mechanism of injury was road traffic collisions (66%) followed by falls (23.4%). Penetrating trauma occurred in 4 patients (0.8%). 88 patients (18.6%) were admitted to the ICU. The median (range) ISS was 5 (1–43). 173 patients (36.5%) had isolated chest injury. Overall mortality rate was 7.2%. Mortality was significantly increased by low GCS (p < 0.0001), high ISS (p = 0.025), and low systolic blood pressure on arrival (p = 0.027). Conclusion Chest trauma is associated with a significant mortality in Al-Ain City. This was significantly related to the severity of head injury, injury severity score, and hypotension on arrival. PMID:23547845

  15. A Neonatal Resuscitation Curriculum in Malawi, Africa: Did It Change In-Hospital Mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Hole, Michael K.; Olmsted, Keely; Kiromera, Athanase; Chamberlain, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The WHO estimates that 99% of the 3.8 million neonatal deaths occur in developing countries. Neonatal resuscitation training was implemented in Namitete, Malawi. The study's objective was to evaluate the training's impact on hospital staff and neonatal mortality rates. Study Design. Pre-/postcurricular surveys of trainee attitude, knowledge, and skills were analyzed. An observational, longitudinal study of secondary data assessed neonatal mortality. Result. All trainees' (n = 18) outcomes improved, (P = 0.02). Neonatal mortality did not change. There were 3449 births preintervention, 3515 postintervention. Neonatal mortality was 20.9 deaths per 1000 live births preintervention and 21.9/1000 postintervention, (P = 0.86). Conclusion. Short-term pre-/postintervention evaluations frequently reveal positive results, as ours did. Short-term pre- and postintervention evaluations should be interpreted cautiously. Whenever possible, clinical outcomes such as in-hospital mortality should be additionally assessed. More rigorous evaluation strategies should be applied to training programs requiring longitudinal relationships with international community partners. PMID:22164184

  16. Hemorrhagic Cystitis Requiring Bladder Irrigation is Associated with Poor Mortality in Hospitalized Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raup, Valary T.; Potretzke, Aaron M.; Manley, Brandon J.; Brockman, John A.; Bhayani, Sam B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the overall prognosis of post-stem cell transplant inpatients who required continuous bladder irrigation (CBI) for hematuria. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of adult stem cell transplant recipients who received CBI for de novo hemorrhagic cystitis as inpatients on the bone marrow transplant service at Washington University from 2011-2013. Patients who had a history of genitourinary malignancy and/or recent surgical urologic intervention were excluded. Multiple variables were examined for association with death. Results: Thirty-three patients met our inclusion criteria, with a mean age of 48 years (23-65). Common malignancies included acute myelogenous leukemia (17/33, 57%), acute lymphocytic leukemia (3/33, 10%), and peripheral T cell lymphoma (3/33, 10%). Median time from stem cell transplant to need for CBI was 2.5 months (0 days-6.6 years). All patients had previously undergone chemotherapy (33/33, 100%) and 14 had undergone prior radiation therapy (14/33, 42%). Twenty-eight patients had an infectious disease (28/33, 85%), most commonly BK viremia (19/33, 58%), cytomegalovirus viremia (17/33, 51%), and bacterial urinary tract infection (8/33, 24%). Twenty-two patients expired during the same admission as CBI treatment (22/33 or 67% of total patients, 22/28 or 79% of deaths), with a 30-day mortality of 52% and a 90-day mortality of 73% from the start of CBI. Conclusions: Hemorrhagic cystitis requiring CBI is a symptom of severe systemic disease in stem cell transplant patients. The need for CBI administration may be a marker for mortality risk from a variety of systemic insults, rather than directly attributable to the hematuria. PMID:26742970

  17. Infant Stool Color Card Screening Helps Reduce the Hospitalization Rate and Mortality of Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Jui-Hua; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biliary atresia (BA) is a significant liver disease in children. Since 2004, Taiwan has implemented a national screening program that uses an infant stool color card (SCC) for the early detection of BA. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of BA cases before and after the launch of this screening program. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the rates of hospitalization, liver transplantation (LT), and mortality of BA cases before and after the program, and to examine the association between the hospitalization rate and survival outcomes. This was a population-based cohort study. BA cases born during 1997 to 2010 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Sex, birth date, hospitalization date, LT, and death data were collected and analyzed. The hospitalization rate by 2 years of age (Hosp/2yr) was calculated to evaluate its association with the outcomes of LT or death. Among 513 total BA cases, 457 (89%) underwent the Kasai procedure. Of these, the Hosp/2yr was significantly reduced from 6.0 to 6.9/case in the earlier cohort (1997–2004) to 4.9 to 5.3/case in the later cohort (2005–2010). This hospitalization rate reduction was followed by a reduction in mortality from 26.2% to 15.9% after 2006. The Cox proportional hazards model showed a significant increase in the risk for both LT (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10–1.18) and death (HR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01–1.08) for each additional hospitalization. A multivariate logistic regression model found that cases with a Hosp/2yr >6 times had a significantly higher risk for both LT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.35, 95% CI = 2.82–6.73) and death (aOR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.17–2.62). The hospitalization and mortality rates of BA cases in Taiwan were significantly and coincidentally reduced after the launch of the SCC screening program. There was a significant association between the

  18. Fine Particulate Matter Constituents Associated with Cardiovascular Hospitalizations and Mortality in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kazuhiko; Mathes, Robert; Ross, Zev; Nádas, Arthur; Thurston, George; Matte, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent time-series studies have indicated that both cardiovascular disease (CVD)mortality and hospitalizations are associated with particulate matter (PM). However, seasonal patterns of PM associations with these outcomes are not consistent, and PM components responsible for these associations have not been determined. We investigated this issue in New York City (NYC), where PM originates from regional and local combustion sources. Objective In this study, we examined the role of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and its key chemical components on both CVD hospitalizations and on mortality in NYC. Methods We analyzed daily deaths and emergency hospitalizations for CVDs among persons ≥ 40 years of age for associations with PM2.5, its chemical components, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide for the years 2000–2006 using a Poisson time-series model adjusting for temporal and seasonal trends, temperature effects, and day of the week. We estimated excess risks per interquartile-range increases at lags 0 through 3 days for warm (April through September) and cold (October through March) seasons. Results The CVD mortality series exhibit strong seasonal trends, whereas the CVD hospitalization series show a strong day-of-week pattern. These outcome series were not correlated with each other but were individually associated with a number of PM2.5 chemical components from regional and local sources, each with different seasonal patterns and lags. Coal-combustion–related components (e.g., selenium) were associated with CVD mortality in summer and CVD hospitalizations in winter, whereas elemental carbon and NO2 showed associations with these outcomes in both seasons. Conclusion Local combustion sources, including traffic and residual oil burning, may play a year-round role in the associations between air pollution and CVD outcomes, but transported aerosols may explain the seasonal variation in associations

  19. Mortality according to age and burned body surface in the Virgen del Rocio University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cía, T; Mallén, J; Márquez, T; Portela, C; Lopez, I

    1999-06-01

    The application of updated clinical protocols for the treatment of burned patients is showing very good results. The mortality curves according to age and the percentage of burned body surface could be of great use for the comparison of clinical results between different burns units. The probability of survival in 1000 consecutive patients admitted to the Burns Unit of the Virgen del Rocio University Hospital between July, 1993 and August, 1997, is compared, by graphic analysis, with the mortality curves of other centers, obtaining similar results. We conclude that the results of medical attendance in our unit are in line with those considered as a reference.

  20. Influence of hospice use on hospital inpatient mortality: a state-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cyril F; Steinberg, Stephanie C

    2006-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high hospice enrollment is associated with lower Medicare inpatient mortality. The results show that Medicare inpatient mortality in a state can be explained by hospice enrollment and a host of demographic and market environment variables. An increase in hospice population by 100 individuals is associated with a reduction of 28 inpatient deaths, ceteris paribus. The results suggest, among other things, that opportunities exist for greater expansion of hospice capacity in low-use states to reduce deaths in the expensive hospital setting and improve the quality of end-of-life care for terminally ill patients. PMID:16708687

  1. Predictors of Hospitalized Exacerbations and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Santibáñez, Miguel; Garrastazu, Roberto; Ruiz-Nuñez, Mario; Helguera, Jose Manuel; Arenal, Sandra; Bonnardeux, Cristina; León, Carlos; García-Rivero, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) carry significant consequences for patients and are responsible for considerable health-care costs—particularly if hospitalization is required. Despite the importance of hospitalized exacerbations, relatively little is known about their determinants. This study aimed to analyze predictors of hospitalized exacerbations and mortality in COPD patients. Methods This was a retrospective population-based cohort study. We selected 900 patients with confirmed COPD aged ≥35 years by simple random sampling among all COPD patients in Cantabria (northern Spain) on December 31, 2011. We defined moderate exacerbations as events that led a care provider to prescribe antibiotics or corticosteroids and severe exacerbations as exacerbations requiring hospital admission. We observed exacerbation frequency over the previous year (2011) and following year (2012). We categorized patients according to COPD severity based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] grades 1–4). We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) by logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, COPD severity, and frequent exacerbator phenotype the previous year. Results Of the patients, 16.4% had ≥1 severe exacerbations, varying from 9.3% in mild GOLD grade 1 to 44% in very severe COPD patients. A history of at least two prior severe exacerbations was positively associated with new severe exacerbations (adjusted OR, 6.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.53–12.83) and mortality (adjusted OR, 7.63; 95%CI, 3.41–17.05). Older age and several comorbidities, such as heart failure and diabetes, were similarly associated. Conclusions Hospitalized exacerbations occurred with all grades of airflow limitation. A history of severe exacerbations was associated with new hospitalized exacerbations and mortality. PMID:27362765

  2. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    PubMed

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  3. Red cell distribution width and early mortality in elderly patients with severe sepsis and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sejin; Lee, Kyoungmi; Kim, Inbyung; Jung, Siyoung; Kim, Moon-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of red cell distribution width (RDW) with 30-day mortality in elderly patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods Patients were recruited from a single tertiary emergency department. Patients with age over 65 years were selected. The main outcome was 30-day mortality. Potential confounders as Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score along with initial vital signs were collected. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of 30-day mortality. The discriminative ability of RDW for 30-day mortality was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results Overall, 458 patients were included. Univariate analysis showed that patients’ survival was significantly associated with sites of infection, comorbidities, and severity scores. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, the RDW was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (hazards ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.17; P<0.001). Conclusion In this study, initial RDW values were significantly associated with 30-day mortality in older patients hospitalized with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  4. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  5. Trend and causes of maternal mortality among women delivering in S. N. Medical College Hospital, Agra.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Gupta, S C; Misra, S K; Singh, Richa; Bhagoliwal, A K; Kaushal, S K

    2009-01-01

    A retrospective data analysis from records of patients from medical record section of department of gynecology and obstetric, S. N. Medical College and Hospital, Agra was done to find out the trend and causes of maternal mortality occurred during 1999-2007. The maternal deaths in the context of different causes were analyzed. A total of 192 maternal deaths occurred on 6386 live-births during last 9 years which gives anoverall hospitalized Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) as 30.07 per 1000 live births during the period. Out of these total deaths more than half (51.04%) were due to indirect causes. Anaemia (47, 24.48%), hemorrhage (35,18.23%), toxemia (35,18.23%), septicemia (18, 19.23%) were the main causes.

  6. Incidence And Risk Factors For 30-Day Readmissions After Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T; Gao, Yubo; Pugely, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unplanned hospital readmission following orthopedic procedures results in significant expenditures for the Medicare population. In order to reduce expenditures, hospital readmission has become an important quality metric for Medicare patients. The purpose of the present study is to determine the incidence and risk factors for 30-day readmissions after hip fracture surgery. Methods Patients over the age of 18 years who underwent hip fracture surgery, including open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), intramedullary nailing, hemi-arthroplasty, or total hip arthroplasty, between the years 2012 and 2013 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Overall, 17,765 patients were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed in order to determine patient and surgical factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results There were 1503 patients (8.4%) readmitted within 30-days of their index procedure. Of the patients with a reason listed for readmission, 27.4% were for procedurally related reasons, including wound complications (16%), peri-prosthetic fractures (4.5%) and prosthetic dislocations (6%). 72.6% of readmissions were for medical reasons, including sepsis (7%), pneumonia (14%), urinary tract infection (6.3%), myocardial infarction (2.7%), renal failure (2.7%), and stroke (2.3%). In the subsequent multivariate analysis, pre-operative dyspnea, COPD, hypertension, disseminated cancer, a bleeding disorder, pre-operative hematocrit of <36, pre-operative creatinine of >1.2, an ASA class of 3 or 4, and the operative procedure type were each independently associated with readmissions risk (p<0.05 for each). Conclusions The overall rate of readmission following hip fracture surgery was moderate. Surgeons should consider discharge optimization in the at risk cohorts identified here, particularly patients with multiple medical comorbidities or an elevated ASA class, and

  7. Postoperative Morbidity by Procedure and Patient Factors Influencing Major Complications Within 30 Days Following Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Edward; Iannuzzi, James C.; Thorsness, Robert; Noyes, Katia; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little data are available to prioritize quality improvement initiatives in shoulder surgery. Purpose: To stratify the risk for 30-day postoperative morbidity in commonly performed surgical procedures about the shoulder completed in a hospital setting and to determine patient factors associated with major complications. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This retrospective study utilized the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from the years 2005 to 2010. Using Current Procedural Terminology codes, the database was queried for shoulder cases that were divided into 7 groups: arthroscopy without repair; arthroscopy with repair; arthroplasty; clavicle/acromioclavicular joint (AC) open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF)/repair; ORIF of proximal humeral fracture; open tendon release/repair; and open shoulder stabilization. The primary end point was any major complication, with secondary end points of incisional infection, return to the operating room, and venothromboembolism (VTE), all within 30 days of surgery. Results: Overall, 11,086 cases were analyzed. The overall major complication rate was 2.1% (n = 234). Factors associated with major complications on multivariate analysis included: procedure performed (P < .001), emergency case (P < .001), pulmonary comorbidity (P < .001), preoperative blood transfusion (P = .033), transfer from an outside institution (P = .03), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .006), wound class (P < .001), dependent functional status (P = .027), and age older than 60 years (P = .01). After risk adjustment, open shoulder stabilization was associated with the greatest risk of major complications relative to arthroscopy without repair (odds ratio [OR], 5.56; P = .001), followed by ORIF of proximal humerus fracture (OR, 4.90; P < .001) and arthroplasty (OR, 4.40; P < .001). These 3 groups generated over 60% of all major complications. Open shoulder

  8. The Impact of Hospital Payment Schemes on Healthcare and Mortality: Evidence from Hospital Payment Reforms in OECD Countries.

    PubMed

    Wubulihasimu, Parida; Brouwer, Werner; van Baal, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    In this study, aggregate-level panel data from 20 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries over three decades (1980-2009) were used to investigate the impact of hospital payment reforms on healthcare output and mortality. Hospital payment schemes were classified as fixed-budget (i.e. not directly based on activities), fee-for-service (FFS) or patient-based payment (PBP) schemes. The data were analysed using a difference-in-difference model that allows for a structural change in outcomes due to payment reform. The results suggest that FFS schemes increase the growth rate of healthcare output, whereas PBP schemes positively affect life expectancy at age 65 years. However, these results should be interpreted with caution, as results are sensitive to model specification. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26080792

  9. Concordance of effects of medical interventions on hospital admission and readmission rates with effects on mortality

    PubMed Central

    Hemkens, Lars G.; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Despina G.; Ioannidis, John P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many clinical trials examine a composite outcome of admission to hospital and death, or infer a relationship between hospital admission and survival benefit. This assumes concordance of the outcomes “hospital admission” and “death.” However, whether the effects of a treatment on hospital admissions and readmissions correlate to its effect on serious outcomes such as death is unknown. We aimed to assess the correlation and concordance of effects of medical interventions on admission rates and mortality. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from its inception to January 2012 (issue 1, 2012) for systematic reviews of treatment comparisons that included meta-analyses for both admission and mortality outcomes. For each meta-analysis, we synthesized treatment effects on admissions and death, from respective randomized trials reporting those outcomes, using random-effects models. We then measured the concordance of directions of effect sizes and the correlation of summary estimates for the 2 outcomes. Results: We identified 61 meta-analyses including 398 trials reporting mortality and 182 trials reporting admission rates; 125 trials reported both outcomes. In 27.9% of comparisons, the point estimates of treatment effects for the 2 outcomes were in opposite directions; in 8.2% of trials, the 95% confidence intervals did not overlap. We found no significant correlation between effect sizes for admission and death (Pearson r = 0.07, p = 0.6). Our results were similar when we limited our analysis to trials reporting both outcomes. Interpretation: In this metaepidemiological study, admission and mortality outcomes did not correlate, and discordances occurred in about one-third of the treatment comparisons included in our analyses. Both outcomes convey useful information and should be reported separately, but extrapolating the benefits of admission to survival is unreliable and should be avoided. PMID:24144601

  10. Patient characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality in children following tracheotomy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G; Graham, Robert J; Roberson, David W; Rhein, Lawrence; Graham, Dionne A; Zhou, Jing; O’Brien, Jane; Putney, Heather; Goldmann, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify children at risk for in-hospital mortality following tracheotomy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 25 746 876 US hospitalisations for children within the Kids’ Inpatient Database 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. Participants 18 806 hospitalisations of children ages 0–18 years undergoing tracheotomy, identified from ICD-9-CM tracheotomy procedure codes. Main outcome measure Mortality during the initial hospitalisation when tracheotomy was performed in relation to patient demographic and clinical characteristics (neuromuscular impairment (NI), chronic lung disease, upper airway anomaly, prematurity, congenital heart disease, upper airway infection and trauma) identified with ICD-9-CM codes. Results Between 1997 and 2006, mortality following tracheotomy ranged from 7.7% to 8.5%. In each year, higher mortality was observed in children undergoing tracheotomy who were aged <1 year compared with children aged 1–4 years (mortality range: 10.2–13.1% vs 1.1–4.2%); in children with congenital heart disease, compared with children without congenital heart disease (13.1–18.7% vs 6.2–7.1%) and in children with prematurity, compared with children who were not premature (13.0–19.4% vs 6.8–7.3%). Lower mortality was observed in children with an upper airway anomaly compared with children without an upper airway anomaly (1.5–5.1% vs 9.1–10.3%). In 2006, the highest mortality (40.0%) was observed in premature children with NI and congenital heart disease, who did not have an upper airway anomaly. Conclusions Congenital heart disease, prematurity, the absence of an upper airway anomaly and age <1 year were characteristics associated with higher mortality in children following tracheotomy. These findings may assist provider communication with children and families regarding early prognosis following tracheotomy. PMID:20522454

  11. Impact of hospital delivery on child mortality: An analysis of adolescent mothers in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sarmistha

    2015-10-01

    New medical inventions for saving young lives are not enough if these do not reach the children and the mother. The present paper provides new evidence that institutional delivery can significantly lower child mortality risks, because it ensures effective and timely access to modern diagnostics and medical treatments to save lives. We exploit the exogenous variation in community's access to local health facilities (both traditional and modern) before and after the completion of the 'Women's Health Project' in 2005 (that enhanced emergency obstetric care in women friendly environment) to identify the causal effect of hospital delivery on various mortality rates among children. Our best estimates come from the parents fixed effects models that help limiting any parents-level omitted variable estimation bias. Using 2007 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey data from about 6000 children born during 2002-2007, we show that, ceteris paribus, access to family welfare clinic particularly boosted hospital delivery likelihood, which in turn lowered neo-natal, early and infant mortality rates. The beneficial effect was particularly pronouncedamong adolescent mothers after the completion of Women's Health Project in 2005; infant mortality for this cohort was more than halved when delivery took place in a health facility.

  12. Impact of hospital delivery on child mortality: An analysis of adolescent mothers in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sarmistha

    2015-10-01

    New medical inventions for saving young lives are not enough if these do not reach the children and the mother. The present paper provides new evidence that institutional delivery can significantly lower child mortality risks, because it ensures effective and timely access to modern diagnostics and medical treatments to save lives. We exploit the exogenous variation in community's access to local health facilities (both traditional and modern) before and after the completion of the 'Women's Health Project' in 2005 (that enhanced emergency obstetric care in women friendly environment) to identify the causal effect of hospital delivery on various mortality rates among children. Our best estimates come from the parents fixed effects models that help limiting any parents-level omitted variable estimation bias. Using 2007 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey data from about 6000 children born during 2002-2007, we show that, ceteris paribus, access to family welfare clinic particularly boosted hospital delivery likelihood, which in turn lowered neo-natal, early and infant mortality rates. The beneficial effect was particularly pronouncedamong adolescent mothers after the completion of Women's Health Project in 2005; infant mortality for this cohort was more than halved when delivery took place in a health facility. PMID:26363451

  13. Decreasing Mortality Among Patients Hospitalized With Cirrhosis in the United States From 2002 Through 2010

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Monica L.; Barritt, A. Sidney; Oman, Eric S.; Hayashi, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS It is not clear whether evidence-based recommendations for inpatient care of patients with cirrhosis are implemented widely or are effective in the community. We investigated changes in inpatient outcomes and associated features over time. METHODS By using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, National Inpatient Sample, we analyzed 781,515 hospitalizations of patients with cirrhosis from 2002 through 2010. We compared data with those from equal numbers of hospitalizations of patients without cirrhosis and patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), matched for age, sex, and year of discharge. The primary outcome was a change in discharge status over time. Factors associated with outcomes were analyzed by Poisson modeling. RESULTS The mortality of patients with and without cirrhosis, and patients with CHF, decreased over time. The absolute decrease was significantly greater for patients with cirrhosis (from 9.1% to 5.4%) than for patients without cirrhosis (from 2.6% to 2.1%) or patients with CHF (from 2.5% to 1.4%) (P < .01). However, relative decreases were similar for patients with cirrhosis (41%) and patients with CHF (44%). For patients with cirrhosis, the independent mortality risk ratio decreased steadily to 0.50 by 2010 (95% confidence interval, 0.48–0.52), despite patients’ increasing age and comorbidities. Hepatorenal syndrome, hepatocellular carcinoma, variceal bleeding, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis were associated with a higher mortality rate, but the independent mortality risks for each decreased steadily. Sepsis was associated strongly with increased mortality, and the risk increased over time. CONCLUSIONS Among patients with cirrhosis in the United States, inpatient mortality decreased steadily from 2002 through 2010, despite increases in patient age and medical complexity. Improvements in cirrhosis care may have contributed to increases in patient survival beyond those attributable to general improvements in

  14. Risk Factors for Adverse Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Neil; Tapper, Elliot B.; Patwardhan, Vilas R.; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash A.; Thaker, Adarsh M.; Leffler, Daniel A.; Feuerstein, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine which risk factors and subtypes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) are associated with adverse outcomes after hospital discharge (30-day readmissions, recurrent LGIB, and death). Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective observational study of consecutive patients admitted with LGIB to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from April 1, 2013, through March 30, 2014. Patients were contacted 30 days after discharge to determine hospital readmissions, recurrent LGIB, and death. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to describe associations of variables with 30-day readmissions or recurrent LGIB. Logistic regression was used to determine association with mortality. Results There were 277 patients hospitalized with LGIB. Of the 271 patients surviving to discharge, 21% (n=57) were readmitted within 30 days, 21 of whom were admitted for recurrent LGIB. The following factors were associated with 30-day readmissions: developing in-hospital LGIB (hazard ratio [HR], 2.26; 95% CI, 1.08–4.28), anticoagulation (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.05–3.10), and active malignancy (HR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.11–4.42). Patients discharged while taking anticoagulants had higher rates of recurrent bleeding (HR, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.15–6.95). Patients with higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores (odds ratio [OR], 1.57; 95% CI, 1.25–2.08), active malignancy (OR, 6.57; 95% CI, 1.28–28.7), and in-hospital LGIB (OR, 11.5; 95% CI, 2.56–52.0) had increased 30-day mortality risk. Conclusion In-hospital LGIB, anticoagulation, and active malignancy are risk factors for 30-day readmissions in patients hospitalized with LGIB. In-hospital LGIB, Charlson Comorbidity Index scores, and active malignancy are risk factors for 30-day mortality. PMID:26141075

  15. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted. PMID:26986122

  16. [The comparative evaluation of tendencies in population mortality and particular characteristics of hospitalization under diseases of blood circulation system].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, T M; Belov, V B; Lushkina, N P

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of data bases established that in the Russian Federation population mortality of diseases of blood circulation system in toto and of main diseases included in this class (100-199 of ICD-10) is significantly higher than in European countries. The population mortality is determined both by morbidity and quality of medical care in case of development of disease. In Russia, the increase of number of cases of hospitalization per one patient passed away due to these causes. This indicator was lower in comparison with corresponding indicators characterizing levels of hospitalization in EU countries. In Russia, to decrease mortality of this pathology it is needed to extend indications for hospitalization.

  17. Morbidity, Mortality, and Seasonality of Influenza Hospitalizations in Egypt, November 2007-November 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kandeel, Amr; Labib, Manal; Said, Mayar; El-Refai, Samir; El-Gohari, Amani; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza typically comprises a substantial portion of acute respiratory infections, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, influenza epidemiology data are lacking in Egypt. We describe seven years of Egypt’s influenza hospitalizations from a multi-site influenza surveillance system. Methods Syndromic case definitions identified individuals with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to eight hospitals in Egypt. Standardized demographic and clinical data were collected. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were tested for influenza using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and typed as influenza A or B, and influenza A specimens subtyped. Results From November 2007–November 2014, 2,936/17,441 (17%) SARI cases were influenza-positive. Influenza-positive patients were more likely to be older, female, pregnant, and have chronic condition(s) (all p<0.05). Among them, 53 (2%) died, and death was associated with older age, five or more days from symptom onset to hospitalization, chronic condition(s), and influenza A (all p<0.05). An annual seasonal influenza pattern occurred from July–June. Each season, the proportion of the season’s influenza-positive cases peaked during November–May (19–41%). Conclusions In Egypt, influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality and influenza SARI hospitalization patterns mirror those of the Northern Hemisphere. Additional assessment of influenza epidemiology in Egypt may better guide disease control activities and vaccine policy. PMID:27607330

  18. Vitamin D status and its association with season, hospital and sepsis mortality in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D plays a key role in immune function. Deficiency may aggravate the incidence and outcome of infectious complications in critically ill patients. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and the correlation between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) and hospital mortality, sepsis mortality and blood culture positivity. Methods In a single-center retrospective observational study at a tertiary care center in Graz, Austria, 655 surgical and nonsurgical critically ill patients with available 25(OH) D levels hospitalized between September 2008 and May 2010 were included. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, severity of illness, renal function and inflammatory status was performed. Vitamin D levels were categorized by month-specific tertiles (high, intermediate, low) to reflect seasonal variation of serum 25(OH) D levels. Results Overall, the majority of patients were vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml; 60.2%) or insufficient (≥20 and <30 ng/dl; 26.3%), with normal 25(OH) D levels (>30 ng/ml) present in only 13.6%. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and mean 25(OH) D levels was significantly different in winter compared to summer months (P <0.001). Hospital mortality was 20.6% (135 of 655 patients). Adjusted hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients in the low (hazard ratio (HR) 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.31 to 3.22) and intermediate (HR 1.92, 95% CI 1.21 to 3.06) compared to the high tertile. Sepsis was identified as cause of death in 20 of 135 deceased patients (14.8%). There was no significant association between 25(OH) D and C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocyte count or procalcitonin levels. In a subgroup analysis (n = 244), blood culture positivity rates did not differ between tertiles (23.1% versus 28.2% versus 17.1%, P = 0.361). Conclusions Low 25(OH) D status is significantly associated with mortality in the critically ill. Intervention studies are needed to investigate

  19. Association of Hyperchloremia with Hospital Mortality in Critically Ill Septic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neyra, Javier A.; Canepa-Escaro, Fabrizio; Li, Xilong; Manllo, John; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Yee, Jerry; Yessayan, Lenar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperchloremia is frequently observed in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Our study aimed to examine the association of serum chloride (Cl) levels with hospital mortality in septic ICU patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Urban academic medical center ICU. Patients ICU adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock who had Cl measured on ICU admission were included. Those with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate < 15 ml/min/1.73 m2 or chronic dialysis were excluded. Intervention: None. Measurements and Main Results Of 1940 patients included in the study, 615 (31.7%) had hyperchloremia (Cl ≥ 110 mEq/L) on ICU admission. All-cause hospital mortality was the dependent variable. Cl on ICU admission (Cl0), Cl at 72 h (Cl72), and delta Cl (ΔCl = Cl72 – Cl0) were the independent variables. Those with Cl0 ≥ 110 mEq/L were older and had higher cumulative fluid balance, base deficit, and sequential organ failure assessment scores. Multivariate analysis showed that higher Cl72 but not Cl0 was independently associated with hospital mortality in the subgroup of patients with hyperchloremia on ICU admission [adjusted odds ratio (OR) for Cl72 per 5 mEq/L increase = 1.27, 95% CI (1.02–1.59), P = 0.03]. For those who were hyperchloremic on ICU admission, every within-subject 5 mEq/L increment in Cl72 was independently associated with hospital mortality [adjusted OR for ΔCl 5 mEq/L = 1.37, 95% CI [1.11–1.69], P = 0.003]. Conclusions In critically ill septic patients manifesting hyperchloremia (Cl ≥110 mEq/L) on ICU admission, higher Cl levels and within-subject worsening hyperchloremia at 72 h of ICU stay were associated with all-cause hospital mortality. These associations were independent of base deficit, cumulative fluid balance, acute kidney injury, and other critical illness parameters. PMID:26154934

  20. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Sayegh, Ana Luiza Carrari; Groehs, Raphaela Vilar Ramalho; Fonseca, Guilherme; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Barretto, Antônio Carlos Pereira; Arap, Marco Antônio; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Middlekauff, Holly R.; Alves, Maria-Janieire de Nazaré Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. Objective We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Methods Total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66) and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44) groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Results Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008). Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001). In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02) predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009) and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02) predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001). Conclusion These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT. PMID:26200897

  1. Platelet transfusions in platelet consumptive disorders are associated with arterial thrombosis and in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Ness, Paul M; Takemoto, Clifford M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; King, Karen E; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-02-26

    While platelets are primary mediators of hemostasis, there is emerging evidence to show that they may also mediate pathologic thrombogenesis. Little data are available on risks and benefits associated with platelet transfusions in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). This study utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the current in-hospital platelet transfusion practices and their association with arterial/venous thrombosis, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, and in-hospital mortality over 5 years (2007-2011). Age and gender-adjusted odds ratios (adjOR) associated with platelet transfusions were calculated. There were 10 624 hospitalizations with TTP; 6332 with HIT and 79 980 with ITP. Platelet transfusions were reported in 10.1% TTP, 7.1% HIT, and 25.8% ITP admissions. Platelet transfusions in TTP were associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis (adjOR = 5.8, 95%CI = 1.3-26.6), AMI (adjOR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.2-3.3) and mortality (adjOR = 2.0,95%CI = 1.3-3.0), but not venous thrombosis. Platelet transfusions in HIT were associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis (adjOR = 3.4, 95%CI = 1.2-9.5) and mortality (adjOR = 5.2, 95%CI = 2.6-10.5) but not venous thrombosis. Except for AMI, all relationships remained significant after adjusting for clinical severity and acuity. No associations were significant for ITP. Platelet transfusions are associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis and mortality among TTP and HIT patients.

  2. Comparison of four methods for deriving hospital standardised mortality ratios from a single hierarchical logistic regression model.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Manktelow, Bradley N; Hofer, Timothy P

    2016-04-01

    There is interest in deriving case-mix adjusted standardised mortality ratios so that comparisons between healthcare providers, such as hospitals, can be undertaken in the controversial belief that variability in standardised mortality ratios reflects quality of care. Typically standardised mortality ratios are derived using a fixed effects logistic regression model, without a hospital term in the model. This fails to account for the hierarchical structure of the data - patients nested within hospitals - and so a hierarchical logistic regression model is more appropriate. However, four methods have been advocated for deriving standardised mortality ratios from a hierarchical logistic regression model, but their agreement is not known and neither do we know which is to be preferred. We found significant differences between the four types of standardised mortality ratios because they reflect a range of underlying conceptual issues. The most subtle issue is the distinction between asking how an average patient fares in different hospitals versus how patients at a given hospital fare at an average hospital. Since the answers to these questions are not the same and since the choice between these two approaches is not obvious, the extent to which profiling hospitals on mortality can be undertaken safely and reliably, without resolving these methodological issues, remains questionable.

  3. Risk factors of mortality in severely-malnourished children hospitalized with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Roy, S K; Buis, Maaike; Weersma, Renee; Khatun, Wajiha; Chowdhury, S; Begum, Afroza; Sarker, Debjani; Thakur, Saima Kamal; Khanam, Mansura

    2011-06-01

    This case-control study was conducted in the Dhaka Hospital of ICDDR,B to identify the risk factors of mortality in severely-malnourished children hospitalized with diarrhoea. One hundred and three severely-malnourished children (weight-for-age <60% of median of the National Center for Health Statistics standard) who died during hospitalization were compared with another 103 severely-malnourished children who survived. These children were aged less than three years and admitted to the hospital during 1997. On admission, characteristics of the fatal cases and non-fatal controls were comparable, except for age. The median age of the cases and controls were six and eight months respectively (p = 0.05). Patients with low pulse rate or imperceptible pulse had three times the odds of death compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The presence of clinical septicaemia and clinical severe anaemia had 11.7 and 4.2 times the odds of death respectively (p < 0.01). Patients with leukocytosis (> 15,000/cm3) had 2.5 times the odds of death (p < 0.01). Using logistic regression, clinical septicaemia [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 8.8, confidence interval (CI) 3.7-21.1, p = 0.01], hypothermia (AOR = 3.5, CI 1.3-9.4, p < 0.01), and bronchopneumonia (AOR=3.0, CI 1.2-7.3, p < 0.01) were identified as the significant risk factors of mortality. Severely-malnourished children (n=129) with leukocytosis, imperceptible pulse, pneumonia, septicaemia, and hypothermia had a high risk of mortality. The identified risk factors can be used as a prognostic guide for patients with diarrhoea and severe malnutrition. PMID:21766558

  4. Regionalization and Local Hospital Closure in Norwegian Maternity Care—The Effect on Neonatal and Infant Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Grytten, Jostein; Monkerud, Lars; Skau, Irene; Sørensen, Rune

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study whether neonatal and infant mortality, after adjustments for differences in case mix, were independent of the type of hospital in which the delivery was carried out. Data The Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided detailed medical information for all births in Norway. Study Design Hospitals were classified into two groups: local hospitals/maternity clinics versus central/regional hospitals. Outcomes were neonatal and infant mortality. The data were analyzed using propensity score weighting to make adjustments for differences in case mix between the two groups of hospitals. This analysis was supplemented with analyses of 13 local hospitals that were closed. Using a difference-in-difference approach, the effects that these closures had on neonatal and infant mortality were estimated. Principal Finding Neonatal and infant mortality were not affected by the type of hospital where the delivery took place. Conclusion A regionalized maternity service does not lead to increased neonatal and infant mortality. This is mainly because high-risk deliveries were identified well in advance of the birth, and referred to a larger hospital with sufficient perinatal resources to deal with these deliveries. PMID:24476021

  5. Apolipoprotein E-related all-cause mortality in hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria G; Sancarlo, Daniele; Panza, Francesco; Gravina, Carolina; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Frisardi, Vincenza; Longo, Grazia; D'Ambrosio, Luigi P; Addante, Filomena; Copetti, Massimiliano; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Seripa, Davide; Pilotto, Alberto

    2010-09-01

    The most common apolipoprotein E (APOE) allelic variation is implicated in many age-related diseases and human longevity with controversial findings. We investigated the effect of APOE gene polymorphism on all-cause mortality in elderly patients taking into consideration the functional disability, cognitive impairment, malnutrition, and the occurrence of common age-related diseases. APOE genotypes were determined in 2,124 geriatric hospitalized patients (46.5% men and 53.5% women; mean age, 78.2 +/- 7.1 years; range, 65-100 years). At hospital admission, all patients underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment to evaluate functional disability, cognitive status, nutritional status, and comorbidity. The main and secondary diagnoses at hospital discharge were also recorded. Mortality status was evaluated in all patients after a maximum follow-up of 5 years (range, from 1.26 to 5.23 years; median, 2.86 years). During the study period, 671 patients died (32.0%). At hospital admission, these patients showed a significant higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (56.3% vs 53.4%; p = 0.007), neoplasias (32.3% vs 13.7%; p < 0.001), and lower prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (17.7% vs 20.7%; p < 0.001) than survived patients. Moreover, they also showed an higher prevalence of disability (52.0% vs 25.6%; p < 0.001), cognitive impairment (31.0% vs 18.8%; p < 0.001), and malnutrition (74.0% vs 46.1%; p < 0.001) than survived patients. In the overall study population, the APOE epsilon2 allele was significantly associated to neurodegenerative diseases (odds ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37-0.94). No significant association between the APOE polymorphism and disability, malnutrition, co-morbidity status, and with all-cause mortality was observed. In patients with cardiovascular diseases, however, a decreased risk of all-cause mortality was found in the epsilon2 allele carriers (hazard ratio = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). In this population, APOE allele

  6. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Wolf, Achim; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services. Method We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder) on outcomes. Results Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949) after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%), and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613) with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied—substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:27196309

  7. Unplanned 30-Day Readmissions in a General Internal Medicine Hospitalist Service at a Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Joanna-Grace M.; Gadiraju, Sahitya; Hiremath, Adarsh; Lin, Heather Yan; Farroni, Jeff; Halm, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hospital readmissions are considered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid as a metric for quality of health care delivery. Robust data on the readmission profile of patients with cancer are currently insufficient to determine whether this measure is applicable to cancer hospitals as well. To address this knowledge gap, we estimated the unplanned readmission rate and identified factors influencing unplanned readmissions in a hospitalist service at a comprehensive cancer center. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed unplanned 30-day readmission of patients discharged from the General Internal Medicine Hospitalist Service at a comprehensive cancer center between April 1, 2012, and September 30, 2012. Multiple independent variables were studied using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models, with generalized estimating equations to identify risk factors associated with readmissions. Results: We observed a readmission rate of 22.6% in our cohort. The median time to unplanned readmission was 10 days. Unplanned readmission was more likely in patients with metastatic cancer and those with three or more comorbidities. Patients discharged to hospice were less likely to be readmitted (all P values < .01). Conclusion: We observed a high unplanned readmission rate among our population of patients with cancer. The risk factors identified appear to be related to severity of illness and open up opportunities for improving coordination with primary care physicians, oncologists, and other specialists to manage comorbidities, or perhaps transition appropriate patients to palliative care. Our findings will be instrumental for developing targeted interventions to help reduce readmissions at our hospital. Our data also provide direction for appropriate application of readmission quality measures in cancer hospitals. PMID:26152375

  8. Mortality profile across our Intensive Care Units: A 5-year database report from a Singapore restructured hospital.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahla

    2015-12-01

    Intensive care remains an area of high acuity and high mortality across the globe. With a rapidly aging population, the disease burden requiring intensive care is growing. The cost of critical care also is rising with new technology becoming available rapidly. We present the all-cause mortality results of 5 years database established in a restructured, large public hospital in Singapore, looking at all three types of Intensive Care Units present in our hospital. These include medical, surgical, and coronary care units.

  9. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  10. Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infections Estimating All-Cause Mortality and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Eric T.; Cole, Stephen R.; Weber, David J.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Moehring, Rebekah W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a health care–associated infection of increasing importance. The purpose of this study was to estimate the time until death from any cause and time until release among patients with C. difficile, comparing the burden of those in the intensive care unit (ICU) with those in the general hospital population. Methods A parametric mixture model was used to estimate event times, as well as the case-fatality ratio in ICU and non-ICU patients within a cohort of 609 adult incident cases of C. difficile in the Southeastern United States between 1 July 2009 and 31 December 2010. Results ICU patients had twice the median time to death (relative time = 1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96–4.01]) and nearly twice the median time to release (1.88 [1.40–2.51]) compared with non-ICU patients. ICU patients also experienced 3.4 times the odds of mortality (95% CI = 1.8–6.2). Cause-specific competing risks analysis underestimated the relative survival time until death (0.65 [0.36–1.17]) compared with the mixture model. Conclusions Patients with C. difficile in the ICU experienced higher mortality and longer lengths of stay within the hospital. ICU patients with C. difficile infection represent a population in need of particular attention, both to prevent adverse patient outcomes and to minimize transmission of C. difficile to other hospitalized patients. PMID:24815305

  11. Psychiatric comorbidity and mortality among veterans hospitalized for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Banta, Jim E; Andersen, Ronald M; Young, Alexander S; Kominski, Gerald; Cunningham, William E

    2010-10-01

    A Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization approach was used to examine the impact of comorbid mental illness on mortality of veterans admitted to Veterans Affairs medical centers in fiscal year 2001 with a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure (n = 15,497). Thirty percent had a psychiatric diagnosis, 4.7% died during the index hospitalization, and 11.5% died during the year following discharge. Among those with mental illness, 23.6% had multiple psychiatric disorders. Multivariable logistic regression models found dementia to be positively associated with inpatient mortality. Depression alone (excluding other psychiatric disorders) was positively associated with one-year mortality. Primary care visits were associated with a reduced likelihood of both inpatient and one-year mortality. Excepting dementia, VA patients with a mental illness had comparable or higher levels of primary care visits than those having no mental illness. Patients with multiple psychiatric disorders had more outpatient care than those with one psychiatric disorder. PMID:20968262

  12. Effect of air pollution control on mortality and hospital admissions in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Dockery, Douglas W; Rich, David Q; Goodman, Patrick G; Clancy, Luke; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; George, Prethibha; Kotlov, Tania

    2013-07-01

    During the 1980s the Republic of Ireland experienced repeated severe pollution episodes. Domestic coal burning was a major source of this pollution. In 1990 the Irish government introduced a ban on the marketing, sale, and distribution of coal in Dublin. The ban was extended to Cork in 1995 and to 10 other communities in 1998 and 2000. We previously reported decreases in particulate black smoke (BS*) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations, measured as total gaseous acidity, in Dublin after the 1990 coal ban (Clancy et al. 2002). In the current study we explored and compared the effectiveness of the sequential 1990, 1995, and 1998 bans in reducing community air pollution and in improving public health. We compiled records of daily BS, total gaseous acidity (SO2), and counts of cause-specific deaths from 1981 to 2004 for Dublin County Borough (1990 ban), county Cork (1995 ban), and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1998 ban). We also compiled daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive diagnoses for Cork County Borough (1991 to 2004) and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1993 to 2004). We compared pre-ban and post-ban BS and SO2 concentrations for each city. Using interrupted time-series methods, we estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized mortality rates in each city or county after the corresponding local coal ban. We regressed weekly age- and sex-standardized mortality rates against an indicator of the post- versus pre-ban period, adjusting for influenza epidemics, weekly mean temperature, and a season smooth of the standardized mortality rates in Coastal counties presumably not affected by the bans. We compared these results with similar analyses in Midlands counties also presumably unaffected by the bans. We also estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized, weekly hospital admissions rates normalized for underreporting in each city or county after the 1995

  13. Maternal mortality in a teaching hospital in southern India. A 13-year study.

    PubMed

    Rao, K B

    1975-10-01

    During the 13 years 1960-1972, in a teaching hospital that serves a predominantly rural and semiurban population in southern India, there were 74,384 deliveries and 1245 maternal deaths, a maternal mortality rate of 16.7 per 1000 births. Direct obstetric factors caused 854 (65.5%) of these deaths. The leading indirect or associated causes of maternal deaths were anemia, cerebrovascular accidents, and infectious hepatitis. During the past 13 years, monthly maternal mortality meetings have helped to reduce the incidence of avoidable factors in maternal deaths among patients from the city but not among those brought from the surrounding countryside. The important causes of maternal deaths in this developing country, and their prevention, are individually discussed. PMID:1080844

  14. Predictors of Long-Term Mortality in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Cardiac Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bożena; Lisowska, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2016-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) are a heterogeneous population with a high mortality rate. The aim of our study was to investigate which clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic parameters routinely assessed may affect long-term mortality in a non-selected ICCU population.A total of 392 patients hospitalized between 2008-2011 (mean age, 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women) were consecutively and prospectively assessed with the following admission diagnoses: 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders. Patients were treated according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines.During a mean 29.3 (± 18.9) months of observation, 152 (38.8%) patients died and 7.9% of the patients needed a red blood cell transfusion (RBC Tx). Patients who died were significantly older and had lower baseline levels of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), cholesterol, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as lower eGFR values, and higher white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (P < 0.05). Predictors of death in multivariate regression analysis were age, Hb, LVEF, WBC, and CRP. The most powerful factor was hospitalization for non-ACS. The risk of long-term mortality increased with decreasing levels of Hb (P < 0.001), SIC (P = 0.001), TIBC (P = 0.009), and the need for RBC Tx (P < 0.001), as well as the diagnosis of ADHF (P < 0.001) and the absence of ACS (P = 0.007).In ICCU patients, age, Hb, parameters of iron status, and LVEF are strong predictors of long-term mortality. Among the ICCU population, patients with ACS diagnosis have better survival. PMID:26673443

  15. Clinical characteristics associated with mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Takumi; Hamada, Yukihiro; Yamagishi, Yuka; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-06-01

    The presence of anaerobes in the blood stream is known to be associated with a higher rate of mortality. However, few prognostic risk factor analyses examining whether a patient's background characteristics are associated with the prognosis have been reported. We performed a retrospective case-controlled study to assess the prognostic factors associated with death from anaerobic bacteremia. Seventy-four patients with anaerobic bacteremia were treated between January 2005 and December 2014 at Aichi Medical University Hospital. The clinical information included drug susceptibility was used for analysis of prognostic factors for 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed an association between the 30-day mortality rate and malignancy (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.08-12.31) and clindamycin resistance (OR: 7.93, 95% CI: 2.33-27.94). The result of Kaplan-Meier analysis of mortality showed that the 30-day survival rate was 83% in clindamycin susceptible and 38.1% in clindamycin resistant anaerobes causing bacteremia. The result of log-rank test also showed that susceptibility to clindamycin affected mortality (P < 0.001). Our results indicated that malignancy and clindamycin susceptibility could be used to identify subgroups of patients with anaerobic bacteremia with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. The results of this study are important for the early and appropriate management of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26903282

  16. Maternal mortality from septic abortions in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur from March 1968 to February 1974.

    PubMed

    Ng, K H; Sinnathuray, T A

    1975-09-01

    4 maternal deaths from abortion that took place during the 6-year period from March 1968 to February 1974 in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur are reviewed with focus on the avoidable causes and preventive aspects. The total maternal deaths from all causes for the 1699 admission was 13. The mortality rate from abortion during this period was 0.241/1000 pregnancies. The number of abortion cases admitted into the hospital during the 6-year period increased steadily. Of the 4 abortion deaths, 3 patients admitted to attempts at inducing abortion. 1 patient denied having induced abortion, although her husband felt that it could have occurred. All 4 cases of abortion deaths occurred in patients with septic abortions and were, theoretically, avoidable deaths. It is most important to prevent sepsis in a case of abortion. Patients with endotoxic shock are often given intravenous steroids in pharmacological doses every 4-6 hours.

  17. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Fernando; Figueiredo, Francisco Winter dos Santos; Paiva, Laércio da Silva; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Santos, Edige Felipe de Sousa; Martins, Bruno Luis; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60–I64). Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference) and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0. Results There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15–49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54) in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32) in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90). During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67) in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11) in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05). There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group. Conclusion We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults. PMID:27332892

  18. Correspondence between hospital admission and the pneumonia severity index (PSI), CURB-65 criteria and comparison of their predictive value in mortality and hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Varshochi, Mojtaba; Kianmehr, Parisa; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Bayat-Makoo, Zhinous

    2013-06-01

    Pneumonia severity assessment systems, such as the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65, were designed to guide physicians to admit the patients involved to appropriate wards of hospitals. This study evaluated concordance rate of decisions leading to patients' hospitalization in accordance with PSI and CURB-65 criteria and comparison of the two systems' P-values in evaluating mortality and the hospitalization period of the patients in question. A total of 134 hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were evaluated. Patients were classified on the basis of risk factors implicated in the PSI and CURB-65 systems. Prognostic P-values and indication measures of hospitalization for the two systems were then compared. Eighty-seven males (64.9%) and 47 females (35.1%) with a mean age of 64.23±19.82 (15-103) years were enrolled in the study. Based on the results of both systems, hospitalization was indicated in 112 cases (83.6%) and there was total agreement between the two systems in 61 cases (45.5%). There was no significant association between hospitalization duration in the two systems. However, both systems significantly predicted mortality within the hospitalization period with rather equal accuracies. Patients expired more frequently in the group with indication of hospitalization based on the PSI classes. However, there was no significant difference in the mortality between the two groups with and without admission indication according to the CURB-65 system. A considerable portion of our hospitalizations met the related criteria of the PSI/CURB-65. The two evaluation systems have near equal sensitivity and specificity for predicting mortality among hospitalized patients with CAP when the PSI class IV-V and CURB-65 score ≥ 2.

  19. 17 CFR 41.12 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 41.12 Section 41.12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION SECURITY FUTURES PRODUCTS Narrow-Based Security Indexes § 41.12 Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of sale...

  20. 78 FR 65695 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Technical Processing Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    .... ACTION: Correction, notice. SUMMARY: On October 25, 2013 at 78 FR 64146 HUD published a 30 day notice of... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Technical Processing Requirements..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  1. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.42 Abandonment by importer within 30... written notice of abandonment with the director of the port where the entry was filed within 30 days...

  2. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.42 Abandonment by importer within 30... written notice of abandonment with the director of the port where the entry was filed within 30 days...

  3. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.42 Abandonment by importer within 30... written notice of abandonment with the director of the port where the entry was filed within 30 days...

  4. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.42 Abandonment by importer within 30... written notice of abandonment with the director of the port where the entry was filed within 30 days...

  5. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.42 Abandonment by importer within 30... which the merchandise being abandoned appears. (b) Application within 30 days. The importer shall...

  6. 77 FR 48160 - Division of Cardiovascular Devices 30-Day Notices and Annual Reports; Public Workshop; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Division of Cardiovascular Devices 30-Day Notices and Annual... following public workshop entitled ``Division of Cardiovascular Devices 30-Day Notices and Annual Reports..., specifically for cardiovascular devices. DATES: Date and Time: The public workshop will be held on August...

  7. Socioeconomic Status and in-hospital Mortality of Acute Coronary Syndrome: Can Education and Occupation Serve as Preventive Measures?

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; De Leon, Antonio Ponce; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Karimi, Abbasali; Sundin, Örjan; Jalali, Arash; Soares, Joaquim; Macassa, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Socioeconomic status (SES) can greatly affect the clinical outcome of medical problems. We sought to assess the in-hospital mortality of patients with the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) according to their SES. Methods: All patients admitted to Tehran Heart Center due to 1st-time ACS between March 2004 and August 2011 were assessed. The patients who were illiterate/lowly educated (≤5 years attained education) and were unemployed were considered low-SES patients and those who were employed and had high educational levels (>5 years attained education) were regarded as high-SES patients. Demographic, clinical, paraclinical, and in-hospital medical progress data were recorded. Death during the course of hospitalization was considered the end point, and the impact of SES on in-hospital mortality was evaluated. Results: A total of 6246 hospitalized patients (3290 low SES and 2956 high SES) were included (mean age = 60.3 ± 12.1 years, male = 2772 [44.4%]). Among them, 79 (1.26%) patients died. Univariable analysis showed a significantly higher mortality rate in the low-SES group (1.9% vs. 0.6%; P < 0.001). After adjustment for possible cofounders, SES still showed a significant effect on the in-hospital mortality of the ACS patients in that the high-SES patients had a lower in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio: 0.304, 95% confidence interval: 0.094–0.980; P = 0.046). Conclusions: This study found that patients with low SES were at a higher risk of in-hospital mortality due to the ACS. Furthermore, the results suggest the need for increased availability of jobs as well as improved levels of education as preventive measures to curb the unfolding deaths owing to coronary artery syndrome. PMID:25984286

  8. Predicting hospital mortality using APACHE II scores in neurocritically ill patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying-Ying; Li, Xia; Li, Si-jie; Luo, Rong; Ding, Jian-ping; Wang, Lin; Cao, Gui-hua; Wang, Dong-yu; Gao, Jin-xia

    2009-09-01

    Four versions of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation are limited in predicting hospital mortality for neurocritically ill patients. This prospective study aimed to develop and assess the accuracy of a modified APACHE II model in predicting mortality in neurologic intensive care unit (N-ICU). A total of 653 patients entered the study. APACHE II scores on admission, and worst 24-, 48-, and 72-h scores were obtained. Neurologic diagnoses on admission were classified into five categories: cerebral infarction, intracranial hemorrhage, neurologic infection, neuromuscular disease, and other neurologic diseases. We developed a modified APACHE II model based on the variables of the 72-h APACHE II score and disease category using a multivariate logistic regression procedure to estimate probability of death. We assessed the calibration and discrimination of the modified APACHE II model using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit chi-squared statistic and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AU-ROC). The modified APACHE II model had good discrimination (AU-ROC = 0.88) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic: chi (2) = 3.707, P = 0.834). The discrimination of the 72-h APACHE II score for cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, and neurologic infection was satisfactory, with AU-ROC of 0.858, 0.863, and 1.000, respectively, but it was poor in discriminating for the categories of other neurologic diseases and neuromuscular disease. The results showed that our modified APACHE II model can accurately predict hospital mortality for patients in N-ICU. It is more applicable to clinical practice than the previous model because of its simplicity and ease of use.

  9. Low Neonatal Mortality and High Incidence of Infectious Diseases in a Vietnamese Province Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hue T. H.; Cam, Phuong N.; Pedersen, Freddy K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neonatal deaths constitute the majority of child mortality in Vietnam, but studies are scarce and focus on community settings. Methods. During a 12-month period, all sick neonates admitted to a pediatric department in a province hospital were studied. Potential risk factors of death covering sociodemographic factors, pregnancy history, previous neonatal period, and status on admission were registered. The neonates were followed up until discharge or death or until 28 completed days of age if still hospitalized or until withdrawal of life support. The main outcome was neonatal death. Results. The neonatal mortality was 4.6% (50/1094). In a multivariate analysis, four associated risk factors of death were extremely low birth weight (OR = 22.9 (2.3–233.4)), no cry at birth (OR = 3.5 (1.3–9.4)), and cyanosis (OR = 3.3 (1.2–8.7)) and shock (OR = 12.3 (2.5–61.5)) on admission. The major discharge diagnoses were infection, prematurity, congenital malformations, and asphyxia in 88.5% (936/1058), 21.3% (225/1058), 5.0% (53/1058), and 4.6% (49/1058), respectively. In 36, a discharge diagnosis was not registered. Conclusion. Infection was the main cause of neonatal morbidity. Asphyxia and congenital malformations were diagnosed less frequently. The neonatal mortality was 4.6%. No sociodemographic factors were associated with death. Extreme low birth weight, no cry at birth, and cyanosis or shock at admission were associated with death.

  10. Low Neonatal Mortality and High Incidence of Infectious Diseases in a Vietnamese Province Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ho, Binh T T; Kruse, Alexandra Y; Le, Hue T H; Cam, Phuong N; Pedersen, Freddy K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neonatal deaths constitute the majority of child mortality in Vietnam, but studies are scarce and focus on community settings. Methods. During a 12-month period, all sick neonates admitted to a pediatric department in a province hospital were studied. Potential risk factors of death covering sociodemographic factors, pregnancy history, previous neonatal period, and status on admission were registered. The neonates were followed up until discharge or death or until 28 completed days of age if still hospitalized or until withdrawal of life support. The main outcome was neonatal death. Results. The neonatal mortality was 4.6% (50/1094). In a multivariate analysis, four associated risk factors of death were extremely low birth weight (OR = 22.9 (2.3-233.4)), no cry at birth (OR = 3.5 (1.3-9.4)), and cyanosis (OR = 3.3 (1.2-8.7)) and shock (OR = 12.3 (2.5-61.5)) on admission. The major discharge diagnoses were infection, prematurity, congenital malformations, and asphyxia in 88.5% (936/1058), 21.3% (225/1058), 5.0% (53/1058), and 4.6% (49/1058), respectively. In 36, a discharge diagnosis was not registered. Conclusion. Infection was the main cause of neonatal morbidity. Asphyxia and congenital malformations were diagnosed less frequently. The neonatal mortality was 4.6%. No sociodemographic factors were associated with death. Extreme low birth weight, no cry at birth, and cyanosis or shock at admission were associated with death. PMID:27597956

  11. Low Neonatal Mortality and High Incidence of Infectious Diseases in a Vietnamese Province Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hue T. H.; Cam, Phuong N.; Pedersen, Freddy K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neonatal deaths constitute the majority of child mortality in Vietnam, but studies are scarce and focus on community settings. Methods. During a 12-month period, all sick neonates admitted to a pediatric department in a province hospital were studied. Potential risk factors of death covering sociodemographic factors, pregnancy history, previous neonatal period, and status on admission were registered. The neonates were followed up until discharge or death or until 28 completed days of age if still hospitalized or until withdrawal of life support. The main outcome was neonatal death. Results. The neonatal mortality was 4.6% (50/1094). In a multivariate analysis, four associated risk factors of death were extremely low birth weight (OR = 22.9 (2.3–233.4)), no cry at birth (OR = 3.5 (1.3–9.4)), and cyanosis (OR = 3.3 (1.2–8.7)) and shock (OR = 12.3 (2.5–61.5)) on admission. The major discharge diagnoses were infection, prematurity, congenital malformations, and asphyxia in 88.5% (936/1058), 21.3% (225/1058), 5.0% (53/1058), and 4.6% (49/1058), respectively. In 36, a discharge diagnosis was not registered. Conclusion. Infection was the main cause of neonatal morbidity. Asphyxia and congenital malformations were diagnosed less frequently. The neonatal mortality was 4.6%. No sociodemographic factors were associated with death. Extreme low birth weight, no cry at birth, and cyanosis or shock at admission were associated with death. PMID:27597956

  12. In-hospital mortality following lung cancer resection: nationwide administrative database.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Pierre-Benoit; Cottenet, Jonathan; Mariet, Anne-Sophie; Bernard, Alain; Quantin, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to determine the effect of a national strategy for quality improvement in cancer management (the "Plan Cancer") according to time period and to assess the influence of type and volume of hospital activity on in-hospital mortality (IHM) within a large national cohort of patients operated on for lung cancer.From January 2005 to December 2013, 76 235 patients were included in the French Administrative Database. Patient characteristics, hospital volume of activity and hospital type were analysed over three periods: 2005-2007, 2008-2010 and 2011-2013.Global crude IHM was 3.9%: 4.3% during 2005-2007, 4% during 2008-2010 and 3.5% during 2011-2013 (p<0.01). 296, 259 and 209 centres performed pulmonary resections in 2005-2007, 2008-2010 and 2011-2013, respectively (p<0.01). The risk of death was higher in centres performing <13 resections per year than in centres performing >43 resections per year (adjusted (a)OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.197-1.834). The risk of death was lower in the period 2011-2013 than in the period 2008-2010 (aOR 0.841, 95% CI 0.764-0.926). Adjustment variables (age, sex, Charlson score and type of resection) were significantly linked to IHM, whereas the type of hospital was not.The French national strategy for quality improvement seems to have induced a significant decrease in IHM.

  13. The Readmission Risk Flag: Using the Electronic Health Record to Automatically Identify Patients at Risk for 30-day Readmission

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Charles A.; VanZandbergen, Christine; Tait, Gordon; Hanish, Asaf; Leas, Brian; French, Benjamin; Hanson, C. William; Behta, Maryam; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Identification of patients at high risk for readmission is a crucial step toward improving care and reducing readmissions. The adoption of electronic health records (EHR) may prove important to strategies designed to risk stratify patients and introduce targeted interventions. Objective To develop and implement an automated prediction model integrated into our health system’s EHR that identifies on admission patients at high risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective and prospective cohort. Setting Healthcare system consisting of three hospitals. Patients All adult patients admitted from August 2009 to September 2012. Interventions An automated readmission risk flag integrated into the EHR. Measures Thirty-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned healthcare system readmissions. Results Using retrospective data, a single risk factor, ≥2 inpatient admissions in the past 12 months, was found to have the best balance of sensitivity (40%), positive predictive value (31%), and proportion of patients flagged (18%), with a c-statistic of 0.62. Sensitivity (39%), positive predictive value (30%), proportion of patients flagged (18%) and c-statistic (0.61) during the 12-month period after implementation of the risk flag were similar. There was no evidence for an effect of the intervention on 30-day all-cause and 7-day unplanned readmission rates in the 12-month period after implementation. Conclusions An automated prediction model was effectively integrated into an existing EHR and identified patients on admission who were at risk for readmission within 30 days of discharge. PMID:24227707

  14. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income. PMID:26652043

  15. [Particulate matter (PM10) air pollution, daily mortality, and hospital admissions: recent findings].

    PubMed

    Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Veronesi, Licia; Roveda, Anna Maria; Marangio, Emilio; Sansebastiano, Giuliano

    2006-01-01

    The first studies conducted to evaluate a possible association between air pollution and mortality date back to the serious events that occurred in the Mosa Valley, Belgium (1930), in the small city of Donora ("killer fog" incident of 1948) and in London (1952). The latter episode led to the introduction of air pollution control policies. Following the introduction of air pollution control measures in economically advanced cities in the 60s and 70s, the concentration levels of pollutants reached were believed, for many years, to be risk free. However, despite improvements in air quality achieved by many industrialized countries the negative effects of air pollution remain today an important public health problem. Among all air pollutants, particulate matter is the type of air pollution that causes the most numerous and serious effects on human health, because of the broad range of diverse toxic substances it contains,. For this reason, when assessing human health risk, PM10 may be considered to be a reliable indicator of the impact of global air pollution. Various epidemiologic studies conducted in the last 10 years, such as the Air Pollution and Health-European Approach (APHEA) project, the National Morbidity, Mortality and Air Pollution (NMMAPS) Study and Italian Meta-analysis of Studies on the short-term effects of Air pollution (MISA), have shown that current ambient concentrations of PM10 may lead to increased mortality and morbidity. Various studies have reported mean increases in mortality below 1% for 10 ?g/mc increases of ambient PM10. Studies have also underscored the role of particulate matter in aggravating cardiorespiratory diseases and consequently increasing hospital admissions. Air quality standards have been recently revised by legislation. The EU has issued a directive that sets limiting values and, where appropriate, threshold values, for the different air pollutants.

  16. Developing a simple preinterventional score to predict hospital mortality in adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Meng-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Chi; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-07-01

    Despite gaining popularity, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) remains a controversial therapy for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adult patients due to its equivocal survival benefits. The study was aimed at identifying the preinterventional prognostic predictors of hospital mortality in adult VV-ECMO patients and developing a practical mortality prediction score to facilitate clinical decision-making.This retrospective study included 116 adult patients who received VV-ECMO for severe ARF in a tertiary referral center, from 2007 to 2015. The definition of severe ARF was PaO2/ FiO2 ratio < 70 mm Hg under advanced mechanical ventilation (MV). Preinterventional variables including demographic characteristics, ventilatory parameters, and severity of organ dysfunction were collected for analysis. The prognostic predictors of hospital mortality were generated with multivariate logistic regression and transformed into a scoring system. The discriminative power on hospital mortality of the scoring system was presented as the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC).The overall hospital mortality rate was 47% (n = 54). Pre-ECMO MV day > 4 (OR: 4.71; 95% CI: 1.98-11.23; P < 0.001), pre-ECMO sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score >9 (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.36-7.36; P = 0.01), and immunocompromised status (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.07-7.89; P = 0.04) were independent predictors of hospital mortality of adult VV-ECMO. A mortality prediction score comprising of the 3 binary predictors was developed and named VV-ECMO mortality score. The total score was estimated as follows: VV-ECMO mortality score = 2 × (Pre-ECMO MV day > 4) + 1 × (Pre-ECMO SOFA score >9) + 1 × (immunocompromised status). The AUROC of VV-ECMO mortality score was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67-0.85; P < 0.001). The corresponding hospital mortality rates to VV-ECMO mortality scores were 18% (Score 0), 35% (Score 1), 56% (Score 2), 75% (Score

  17. AST to Platelet Ratio Index Predicts Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With Hepatitis B-Related Decompensated Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Weilin; Sun, Qinqin; Fan, Jian; Lin, Sha; Ye, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) has originally been considered as a noninvasive marker for detecting hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. APRI has been used for predicting liver-related mortality in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection or alcoholic liver disease. However, whether APRI could be useful for predicting mortality in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unevaluated. This study aims to address this knowledge gap. A total of 193 hospitalized chronic HBV-infected patients (cirrhosis, n = 100; noncirrhosis, n = 93) and 88 healthy subjects were retrospectively enrolled. All patients were followed up for 4 months. Mortality that occurred within 90 days of hospital stay was compared among patients with different APRI. APRI predictive value was evaluated by univariate and multivariate regression embedded in a Cox proportional hazards model. APRI varied significantly in our cohort (range, 0.16-10.00). Elevated APRI was associated with increased severity of liver disease and 3-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that APRI (odds ratio: 1.456, P < 0.001) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.194, P < 0.001) were 2 independent markers for predicting mortality. APRI is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 3-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis.

  18. AST to Platelet Ratio Index Predicts Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With Hepatitis B-Related Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Weilin; Sun, Qinqin; Fan, Jian; Lin, Sha; Ye, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) has originally been considered as a noninvasive marker for detecting hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. APRI has been used for predicting liver-related mortality in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection or alcoholic liver disease. However, whether APRI could be useful for predicting mortality in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unevaluated. This study aims to address this knowledge gap. A total of 193 hospitalized chronic HBV-infected patients (cirrhosis, n = 100; noncirrhosis, n = 93) and 88 healthy subjects were retrospectively enrolled. All patients were followed up for 4 months. Mortality that occurred within 90 days of hospital stay was compared among patients with different APRI. APRI predictive value was evaluated by univariate and multivariate regression embedded in a Cox proportional hazards model. APRI varied significantly in our cohort (range, 0.16–10.00). Elevated APRI was associated with increased severity of liver disease and 3-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that APRI (odds ratio: 1.456, P < 0.001) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.194, P < 0.001) were 2 independent markers for predicting mortality. APRI is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 3-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. PMID:26945406

  19. A 10-year review of maternal mortality in Chon Buri Hospital, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pinchun, P; Chullapram, T

    1993-06-01

    1. The overall maternal mortality rate (MMR) in Chon Buri Hospital in the 10-yr period from 1982-1991 was 51.1/100,000 livebirths. 2. The top causes of death were abortion related complications, pregnancy induced hypertension, puerperal infection and postpartum hemorrhage. 3. What we have done is to improve the quantity and quality of obstetric and medical care, solve the problem of vital statistics reports in our hospital, contact doctor in nearby hospitals in referral and interhospital OB-GYN conferences to meet and discuss both knowledge and management problems. 4. What we still faced in the last 4-yr were deaths from abortion related complications, puerperal sepsis and postpartum hemorrhage. Most of the deaths were preventable. 5. So what we have to target to lessen the MMR is to improve the obstetric and medical care, improve the quality of medical personnel in our area in KAP aspect (knowledge, attitude, practice) especially in the field of family planning to prevent unwanted pregnancies, proper prevention and management of postpartum hemorrhage, and prevention and treatment of puerperal and postabortal infection.

  20. Factors Affecting Length of Hospital Stay and Mortality in Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers Undergoing Surgical Drainage without Major Amputation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gyun; Moon, Sang Young; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Jung, Ki Jin; Lee, Taeseung; Kim, Baek Kyu; Yoon, Chan; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate factors affecting length of hospital stay and mortality of a specific group of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage without major amputation, which is frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons. Data on length of hospital stay, mortality, demographics, and other medical information were collected for 79 consecutive patients (60 men, 19 women; mean age, 66.1 [SD, 12.3] yr) with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage while retaining the heel between October 2003 and May 2013. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors affecting length of hospital stay, while multiple Cox regression analysis was conducted to assess factors contributing to mortality. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, P=0.034), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (P=0.021), body mass index (BMI, P=0.001), and major vascular disease (cerebrovascular accident or coronary artery disease, P=0.004) were significant factors affecting length of hospital stay, whereas age (P=0.005) and serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level (P=0.024) were significant factors contributing to mortality. In conclusion, as prognostic factors, the length of hospital stay was affected by the severity of inflammation, the recent control of blood glucose level, BMI, and major vascular disease, whereas patient mortality was affected by age and renal function in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer undergoing surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment.

  1. Factors Affecting Length of Hospital Stay and Mortality in Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers Undergoing Surgical Drainage without Major Amputation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate factors affecting length of hospital stay and mortality of a specific group of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage without major amputation, which is frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons. Data on length of hospital stay, mortality, demographics, and other medical information were collected for 79 consecutive patients (60 men, 19 women; mean age, 66.1 [SD, 12.3] yr) with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage while retaining the heel between October 2003 and May 2013. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors affecting length of hospital stay, while multiple Cox regression analysis was conducted to assess factors contributing to mortality. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, P=0.034), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (P=0.021), body mass index (BMI, P=0.001), and major vascular disease (cerebrovascular accident or coronary artery disease, P=0.004) were significant factors affecting length of hospital stay, whereas age (P=0.005) and serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level (P=0.024) were significant factors contributing to mortality. In conclusion, as prognostic factors, the length of hospital stay was affected by the severity of inflammation, the recent control of blood glucose level, BMI, and major vascular disease, whereas patient mortality was affected by age and renal function in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer undergoing surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment. PMID:26770047

  2. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kakusa, Mwanja; Kamanga, Brown; Ngalamika, Owen; Nyirenda, Soka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality. PMID:27042416

  3. Association between hospital case volume and mortality in non-elderly pneumonia patients stratified by severity: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The characteristics and aetiology of pneumonia in the non-elderly population is distinct from that in the elderly population. While a few studies have reported an inverse association between hospital case volume and clinical outcome in elderly pneumonia patients, the evidence is lacking in a younger population. In addition, the relationship between volume and outcome may be different in severe pneumonia cases than in mild cases. In this context, we tested two hypotheses: 1) non-elderly pneumonia patients treated at hospitals with larger case volume have better clinical outcome compared with those treated at lower case volume hospitals; 2) the volume-outcome relationship differs by the severity of the pneumonia. Methods We conducted the study using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. Patients aged 18–64 years discharged from the participating hospitals between July to December 2010 were included. The hospitals were categorized into four groups (very-low, low, medium, high) based on volume quartiles. The association between hospital case volume and in-hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression with generalized estimating equations adjusting for pneumonia severity, patient demographics and comorbidity score, and hospital academic status. We further analyzed the relationship by modified A-DROP pneumonia severity score calculated using the four severity indices: dehydration, low oxygen saturation, orientation disturbance, and decreased systolic blood pressure. Results We identified 8,293 cases of pneumonia at 896 hospitals across Japan, with 273 in-hospital deaths (3.3%). In the overall population, no significant association between hospital volume and in-hospital mortality was observed. However, when stratified by pneumonia severity score, higher hospital volume was associated with lower in-hospital mortality at the intermediate severity level (modified A-DROP score = 2) (odds ratio (OR) of very low vs

  4. Factors associated with mortality in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalized in General Medicine departments.

    PubMed

    Roca, Bernardino; Almagro, Pedro; López, Francisco; Cabrera, Francisco J; Montero, Lorena; Morchón, David; Díez, Jesús; de la Iglesia, Fernando; Fernández, Mario; Castiella, Jesús; Zubillaga, Elena; Recio, Jesús; Soriano, Joan B

    2011-02-01

    We aim to improve knowledge on risk factors that relate to mortality in subjects with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are hospitalized in General Medicine departments. In a cross-sectional multicenter study, by means of a logistic regression analysis, we assessed the possible association of death during hospitalization with the following groups of variables of participating patients: sociodemographic features, treatment received prior to admission and during hospitalization, COPD-related clinical features recorded prior to admission, comorbidity diagnosed prior to admission, clinical data recorded during hospitalization, laboratory results recorded during hospitalization, and electrocardiographic findings recorded during hospitalization. A total of 398 patients was included; 353 (88.7%) were male, and the median age of the patients was 75 years. Of these patients, 21 (5.3%) died during hospitalization. Only 270 (67.8%) received inhaled β(2) agonists during hospitalization, while 162 (40.7%) received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. The median of predicted FEV(1) prior to admission was 42%. A total of 350 patients (87.9%) had been diagnosed with two or more comorbid conditions prior to admission. An association was found between increased risk of death during hospitalization and the previous diagnoses of pneumonia, coronary heart disease, and stroke. In conclusion, comorbidity is an important contributor to mortality among patients hospitalized in General Medicine departments because of COPD exacerbation.

  5. TB as a cause of hospitalization and in-hospital mortality among people living with HIV worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Nathan; Matteelli, Alberto; Shubber, Zara; Hermans, Sabine; Meintjes, Graeme; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Waldrop, Greer; Kranzer, Katharina; Doherty, Meg; Getahun, Haileyesus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite significant progress in improving access to antiretroviral therapy over the past decade, substantial numbers of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in all regions continue to experience severe illness and require hospitalization. We undertook a global review assessing the proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths because of tuberculosis (TB) in PLHIV. Methods Seven databases were searched to identify studies reporting causes of hospitalizations among PLHIV from 1 January 2007 to 31 January 2015 irrespective of age, geographical region or language. The proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality attributable to TB was estimated using random effects meta-analysis. Results From an initial screen of 9049 records, 66 studies were identified, providing data on 35,845 adults and 2792 children across 42 countries. Overall, 17.7% (95% CI 16.0 to 20.2%) of all adult hospitalizations were because of TB, making it the leading cause of hospitalization overall; the proportion of adult hospitalizations because of TB exceeded 10% in all regions except the European region. Of all paediatric hospitalizations, 10.8% (95% CI 7.6 to 13.9%) were because of TB. There was insufficient data among children for analysis by region. In-hospital mortality attributable to TB was 24.9% (95% CI 19.0 to 30.8%) among adults and 30.1% (95% CI 11.2 to 48.9%) among children. Discussion TB remains a leading cause of hospitalization and in-hospital death among adults and children living with HIV worldwide. PMID:26765347

  6. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke: A Population-Based Nationwide Cohort Study From 2002 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-03-01

    We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted.

  7. Living the Good Life? Mortality and Hospital Utilization Patterns in the Old Order Amish

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Braxton D.; Lee, Woei-Jyh; Tolea, Magdalena I.; Shields, Kelsey; Ashktorab, Zahra; Magder, Laurence S.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Pollin, Toni I.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Schäffer, Alejandro A.

    2012-01-01

    Lifespan increases observed in the United States and elsewhere throughout the developed world, have been attributed in part to improvements in medical care access and technology and to healthier lifestyles. To differentiate the relative contributions of these two factors, we have compared lifespan in the Old Order Amish (OOA), a population with historically low use of medical care, with that of Caucasian participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), focusing on individuals who have reached at least age 30 years. Analyses were based on 2,108 OOA individuals from the Lancaster County, PA community born between 1890 and 1921 and 5,079 FHS participants born approximately the same time. Vital status was ascertained on 96.9% of the OOA cohort through 2011 and through systematic follow-up of the FHS cohort. The lifespan part of the study included an enlargement of the Anabaptist Genealogy Database to 539,822 individuals, which will be of use in other studies of the Amish. Mortality comparisons revealed that OOA men experienced better longevity (p<0.001) and OOA women comparable longevity than their FHS counterparts. We further documented all OOA hospital discharges in Lancaster County, PA during 2002–2004 and compared OOA discharge rates to Caucasian national rates obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Survey for the same time period. Both OOA men and women experienced markedly lower rates of hospital discharges than their non-Amish counterparts, despite the increased lifespan. We speculate that lifestyle factors may predispose the OOA to greater longevity and perhaps to lesser hospital use. Identifying these factors, which might include behaviors such as lesser tobacco use, greater physical activity, and/or enhanced community assimilation, and assessing their transferability to non-Amish communities may produce significant gains to the public health. PMID:23284714

  8. Single baseline serum creatinine measurements predict mortality in critically ill patients hospitalized for acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schefold, Joerg C.; Hodoscek, Lea Majc; Blöchlinger, Stefan; Doehner, Wolfram; von Haehling, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute heart failure (AHF) is a leading cause of death in critically ill patients and is often accompanied by significant renal dysfunction. Few data exist on the predictive value of measures of renal dysfunction in large cohorts of patients hospitalized for AHF. Methods Six hundred and eighteen patients hospitalized for AHF (300 male, aged 73.3 ± 10.3 years, 73% New York Heart Association Class 4, mean hospital length of stay 12.9 ± 7.7 days, 97% non‐ischaemic AHF) were included in a retrospective single‐centre data analysis. Echocardiographic data, serum creatinine/urea levels, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and clinical/laboratory markers were recorded. Mean follow‐up time was 2.9 ± 2.1 years. All‐cause mortality was recorded, and univariate/multivariate analyses were performed. Results Normal renal function defined as eGFR > 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 was noted in only 3% of AHF patients at baseline. A significant correlation of left ventricular ejection fraction with serum creatinine levels and eGFR (all P < 0.002) was noted. All‐cause mortality rates were 12% (90 days) and 40% (at 2 years), respectively. In a multivariate model, increased age, higher New York Heart Association class at admission, higher total cholesterol levels, and lower eGFR independently predicted death. Patients with baseline eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 had an exceptionally high risk of death (odds ratio 2.80, 95% confidence interval 1.52–5.15, P = 0.001). Conclusions In a large cohort of patients with mostly non‐ischaemic AHF, enhanced serum creatinine levels and reduced eGFR independently predict death. It appears that patients with eGFR < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 have poorest survival rates. Our data add to mounting data indicating that impaired renal function is an important risk factor for non‐survival in patients hospitalized for AHF.

  9. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  10. Mortality and Morbidity During Delivery Hospitalization Among Pregnant Women With Epilepsy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Sarah C.; Bateman, Brian T.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Between 0.3% and 0.5% of all pregnancies occur among women with epilepsy. Evidence suggests an increase in perinatal morbidity and mortality among women with epilepsy. However, these risks have not been quantified in large population-based samples. OBJECTIVE To report on the risk for death and adverse outcomes at the time of delivery for women with epilepsy in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of pregnant women identified through delivery hospitalization records from the 2007-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. From this representative sample of 20% of all US hospitals, we obtained a weighted sample of delivery hospitalizations from 69 385 women with epilepsy and 20 449 532 women without epilepsy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Obstetrical outcomes including maternal death, cesarean delivery, length of stay, preeclampsia, preterm labor, and stillbirth. RESULTS Women with epilepsy had a risk of death during delivery hospitalization of 80 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies, significantly higher than the 6 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies found among women without epilepsy (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 11.46 [95% CI, 8.64-15.19]). Women with epilepsy were also at a heightened risk for other adverse outcomes, including preeclampsia (adjusted OR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.54-1.63]), preterm labor (adjusted OR, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.50-1.57]), and stillbirth (adjusted OR, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.17-1.38]), and had increased health care utilization, including an increased risk of cesarean delivery (adjusted OR, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.38-1.42]) and prolonged length of hospital stay (>6 days) among both women with cesarean deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.13 [95% CI, 2.03-2.23]) and women with vaginal deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.60 [95% CI, 2.41-2.80]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Findings suggest that women with epilepsy are at considerably heightened risk for many adverse outcomes during their delivery hospitalization, including a more than 10-fold increased risk of

  11. Decline in Child Hospitalization and Mortality After the Introduction of the 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugative Vaccine in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Rurangwa, Janvier; Rujeni, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Pneumonia is a public health problem in the tropics, and the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugative vaccine (PCV-7) has been introduced in an effort to prevent the disease and therefore reduce childhood mortality. In Rwanda, PCV-7 was introduced in 2009, and we aimed to determine its impact on the rate of child hospitalization/mortality due to pneumonia. A retrospective survey was conducted on hospitalization rates and pediatric deaths between two periods, that is, before the introduction of PCV-7 (2007-2009) and after the introduction of PCV-7 (2010-2013) in Kabutare District Hospital. There was a 53% reduction in hospitalization, with a significant decline in in-hospital deaths between the two periods. There was also a significant correlation between vaccination coverage and decline in hospitalization rates between 2009 and 2013. We conclude that PCV-7 vaccine is associated with significant reduction in the rate of child hospitalization and mortality but more mechanistic studies are warranted to determine the immunological impact, especially in the context of coinfections and malnutrition. PMID:27430538

  12. Associations of increases in serum creatinine with mortality and length of hospital stay after coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Weisbord, Steven D; Chen, Huanyu; Stone, Roslyn A; Kip, Kevin E; Fine, Michael J; Saul, Melissa I; Palevsky, Paul M

    2006-10-01

    The absence of a universally accepted definition of radiocontrast nephropathy (RCN) has hampered efforts to characterize effectively the incidence and the clinical significance of this condition. The objective of this study was to identify a clinically relevant definition of RCN by assessment of the relationships between increases in serum creatinine (Scr) of varying magnitude after coronary angiography and clinical outcomes. An electronic medical database was used to identify all patients who underwent coronary angiography at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center during a 12-yr period and abstract Scr levels before and after angiography, as well as demographic characteristics and comorbid conditions. Changes in Scr after angiography were categorized into mutually exclusive categories on the basis of absolute and relative changes from baseline levels, with a separate category denoting "unknown" change. Discrete proportional odds models were used to examine the association between increases in Scr and 30-d in-hospital mortality and length of stay. A total of 27,608 patients who underwent coronary angiography were evaluated. Small absolute (0.25 to 0.5 mg/dl) and relative (25 to 50%) increases in Scr were associated with risk-adjusted odds ratios for in-hospital mortality of 1.83 and 1.39, respectively. Larger increases in Scr generally were associated with greater risks for these clinical outcomes. Small increases in Scr after the administration of intravascular radiocontrast are associated with adverse patient outcomes. This observation will help guide the post-procedure care of patients who undergo coronary angiography and has important implications for future studies that investigate RCN.

  13. Morbidity and mortality of infants of diabetic mothers born at the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Boo, N Y

    1992-03-01

    A prospective study was carried out in the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur in 1989 to determine the morbidity and mortality of infants of diabetic mothers. Out of 24,856 neonates born during the study period, 54 neonates (2.2 per 1000 livebirths) were born to mothers who were diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus before the current pregnancy or who had impaired glucose tolerance test during the current pregnancy. Almost a third (29.6 percent) of these infants of diabetic mothers had birthweight of 4000 grams and above, and 37.0 percent of the 54 babies were large-for-gestational age. Hypoglycemia occurred in 9/54 (16.7 percent) of the neonates, respiratory distress syndrome in 5/54 (9.3 percent), shoulder dystocia in 7/54 (13.0 percent), and congenital abnormalities in 4/54 (7.4 percent). Three (5.6 percent) neonates died during the neonatal period. The results of this study suggest a need to intensify control of maternal diabetes mellitus during pregnancy in order to reduce the rates of morbidity and mortality of their infants.

  14. Maternal mortality in obstetrics and gynaecology in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Khatun, K; Ara, R; Aleem, N T; Khan, S; Husein, S; Alam, S; Roy, A S

    2015-01-01

    Maternal mortality is the leading causes of death and disability of reproductive age in the developing countries. Bangladesh is one of the developing countries where maternal mortality is very high. The purpose of the present study was to see the causes of maternal deaths at Obstetrics and Gynaecology ward. This retrospective study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH). All maternal deaths were included in this study from July 2003 to June 2004 for a period of one year. The incidence of maternal death was 18.5/1000 live birth. Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (41.84%) was the most common cause of maternal death followed by unsafe abortions (21.4%), PPH (10.2%), obstructed labour (8.2%). Among 98 patients 36(36.7%) cases are died due to eclampsia. Death due to pre-eclampsia (5.1%), unsafe Abortion (21.4%), Obstetric haemorrhage (18.4%) and obstructed labour (8.3%) were commonly found in this study. The study permits to conclude that Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy is the leading cause of pregnancy related deaths followed by unsafe abortions and obstetric haemorrhage. Other causes include obstructed labour, anaesthetic complications and others.

  15. Facility-based maternal death reviews: effects on maternal mortality in a district hospital in Senegal.

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Alexandre; Gaye, Alioune; de Bernis, Luc; Chaillet, Nils; Landry, Anne; Delage, Joanne; Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The improvement of obstetric services is one of the key components of the Safe Motherhood Programme. Reviewing maternal deaths and complications is one method that may make pregnancy safer, but there is no evidence about the effectiveness of this strategy. The objective of our before and after study is to assess the effect of facility-based maternal deaths reviews (MDR) on maternal mortality rates in a district hospital in Senegal that provides primary and referral maternity services. METHODS: We included all women who were admitted to the maternity unit for childbirth, or within 24 hours of delivery. We recorded maternal mortality during a 1-year baseline period from January to December 1997, and during a 3-year period from January 1998 to December 2000 after MDR had been implemented. Effects of MDR on organization of care were qualitatively evaluated. FINDINGS: The MDR strategy led to changes in organizational structure that improved life-saving interventions with a relatively large financial contribution from the community. Overall mortality significantly decreased from 0.83 (95% CI (confidence interval) = 0.60 -1.06) in baseline period to 0.41 (95% CI = 0.25 -0.56) per 100 women 3 years later. CONCLUSION: MDR had a marked effect on resources, management and maternal outcomes in this facility. However, given the design of our study and the local specific context, further research is needed to confirm the feasibility of MDR in other settings and to confirm the benefits of this approach for maternal health in developing countries. PMID:16583081

  16. 78 FR 52007 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Financial Statement of Corporate Applicant for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Financial Statement of Corporate... Information Collection: Financial Statement of Corporate Applicant for Cooperative Housing Mortgage. OMB... information to determine feasibility, mortgagor/contractor acceptability as well as the financial data,...

  17. Effect of feeding in 30-day bioaccumulation assays using Hyalella azteca in fluoranthene-dosed sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Current protocols for conducting freshwater sediment bioaccumulation tests require that food be added to exposures. To determine effects of adding food, 30-day bioaccumulation assays were conducted with H. azteca exposed to sediment dosed with four concentrations (0.05 to 1,267 nmol/g dry weight) of fluoranthene. Accumulation was significantly greater in fed versus non-fed animals at all dose levels after 96 and 240 hours of exposure and continued to be greater after 30 days in the low dose levels. At sediment concentrations above 634 nmol/g dw, survival of unfed animals dropped to 34% after 30 days, However, after 30 days, reproduction was observed in fed animals exposed to sediment concentrations > 16 times the expected LC50 calculated for fluoranthene in sediment. These data raise questions concerning the interpretation of standard toxicity and bioaccumulation tests when food is routinely added.

  18. 78 FR 36561 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal... Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory Committee Membership Application. OMB Approval... for the information and proposed use: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory Committee (HCFAC)...

  19. 78 FR 40314 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fair Housing Initiatives Program Grant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fair Housing Initiatives Program..., 2012. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Fair Housing Initiatives... approved information collection used to select applicants for the Fair Housing Initiatives Program...

  20. 78 FR 59046 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  1. 78 FR 39001 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Uniform Physical Standards and Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Uniform Physical Standards and Physical Inspection Requirements AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice... Information Collection: Uniform Physical Standards and Physical Inspection Requirements. OMB Approval...

  2. 78 FR 54267 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Disaster Recovery Grant Reporting System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Disaster Recovery Grant Reporting..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Disaster Recovery Grant... information and proposed use: The Disaster Recovery Grant Reporting (DRGR) System is a grants...

  3. 78 FR 44579 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program.... A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot.... Description of the need for the information and proposed use: The Fellowship Placement Program places...

  4. High levels of bed occupancy associated with increased inpatient and thirty-day hospital mortality in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Flemming; Ladelund, Steen; Linneberg, Allan

    2014-07-01

    High bed occupancy rates have been considered a matter of reduced patient comfort and privacy and an indicator of high productivity for hospitals. Hospitals with bed occupancy rates of above 85 percent are generally considered to have bed shortages. Little attention has been paid to the impact of these shortages on patients' outcomes. We analyzed all 2.65 million admissions to Danish hospitals' departments of medicine in the period 1995-2012. We found that high bed occupancy rates were associated with a significant 9 percent increase in rates of in-hospital mortality and thirty-day mortality, compared to low bed occupancy rates. Being admitted to a hospital outside of normal working hours or on a weekend or holiday was also significantly associated with increased mortality. The health risks of bed shortages, including mortality, could be better documented as a priority health issue. Resources should be allocated to researching the causes and effects of bed shortages, with the aim of creating greater interest in exploring new methods to avoid or reduce bed shortages. PMID:25006151

  5. The Impact of Hospital/Surgeon Volume on Acute Renal Failure and Mortality in Liver Transplantation: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lin, Jr-Rung; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the case volume of surgeons and hospitals affects the rates of postoperative complications and survival after liver transplantation. This population-based retrospective cohort study included 2938 recipients of liver transplantation performed between 1998 and 2012, enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. They were divided into two groups, according to the cumulative case volume of their operating surgeons and the case volume of their hospitals. The duration of intensive care unit stay and post-transplantation hospitalization, postoperative complications, and mortality were analyzed. The results showed that, in the low and high case volume surgeons groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred at the rate of 14.11% and 5.86% (p<0.0001), and the overall mortality rates were 19.61% and 12.44% (p<0.0001). In the low and high case volume hospital groups, respectively, acute renal failure occurred in 11% and 7.11% of the recipients (p = 0.0004), and the overall mortality was 18.44% and 12.86% (p<0.0001). These findings suggest that liver transplantation recipients operated on higher case volume surgeons or in higher case volume hospitals have a lower rate of acute renal failure and mortality. PMID:27706183

  6. High levels of bed occupancy associated with increased inpatient and thirty-day hospital mortality in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Flemming; Ladelund, Steen; Linneberg, Allan

    2014-07-01

    High bed occupancy rates have been considered a matter of reduced patient comfort and privacy and an indicator of high productivity for hospitals. Hospitals with bed occupancy rates of above 85 percent are generally considered to have bed shortages. Little attention has been paid to the impact of these shortages on patients' outcomes. We analyzed all 2.65 million admissions to Danish hospitals' departments of medicine in the period 1995-2012. We found that high bed occupancy rates were associated with a significant 9 percent increase in rates of in-hospital mortality and thirty-day mortality, compared to low bed occupancy rates. Being admitted to a hospital outside of normal working hours or on a weekend or holiday was also significantly associated with increased mortality. The health risks of bed shortages, including mortality, could be better documented as a priority health issue. Resources should be allocated to researching the causes and effects of bed shortages, with the aim of creating greater interest in exploring new methods to avoid or reduce bed shortages.

  7. Mortality, health care utilization and associated diagnoses in hospitalized patients with haemophilia in the United States: first reported nationwide estimates.

    PubMed

    Goel, R; Krishnamurti, L

    2012-09-01

    To describe the in-hospital epidemiology of haemophilia A and B in the US we analysed the National Inpatient Sample (NIS), a stratified probability sample of 20% of all hospital discharges in the US for the year 2007. We applied sampling weights to represent all hospital discharges for haemophilia A and B identified using ICD-9 codes 286.0 and 286.1, respectively. Haemophilia (A or B) was one of all the listed diagnoses in 9737 discharges and principal diagnosis in 1684 discharges. The most common associated diagnoses in discharges with Haemophilia in adults and children were hypertension (28.1 ± 1.6%) and central line infections (15.2 ± 1.8%) respectively. No Hepatitis C or HIV was reported in children. Among 212 deaths, associated diagnoses included sepsis (37.9%), heart failure (30.2%), respiratory failure (28.3%), pneumonia (24.5%), HIV (14.2%), hepatic coma (5.2%) and intracranial haemorrhage (2.3%). All fifteen reported paediatric deaths occurred on day zero of life, the commonest associated diagnoses being Intraventricular haemorrhage and newborn haemorrhage-NOS (33% each). Median age of in-hospital mortality for diagnosis of Haemophilia was 68.3 years as compared to 72.3 years for all males for all hospitalizations in NIS combined. Mean hospital charges for haemophilia of $76823 ± 5530 were significantly higher than those from all causes of hospitalization of $26,120 ± 562. In-hospital mortality is rare in children with haemophilia beyond the neonatal period and age of mortality in adults is approaching that of the general male population. Hospitalization in children is most often due to central line infections and hospitalization and death in adults is primarily due to age-related illnesses.

  8. Predictive score for mortality in patients with COPD exacerbations attending hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about predictors of short-term outcomes in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (eCOPD) attending an emergency department (ED). Such information could help stratify these patients and guide medical decision-making. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical prediction rule for short-term mortality during hospital admission or within a week after the index ED visit. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of patients with eCOPD attending the EDs of 16 participating hospitals. Recruitment started in June 2008 and ended in September 2010. Information on possible predictor variables was recorded during the time the patient was evaluated in the ED, at the time a decision was made to admit the patient to the hospital or discharge home, and during follow-up. Main short-term outcomes were death during hospital admission or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED, as well as at death within 1 month of the index ED visit. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed in a derivation sample and validated in a validation sample. The score was compared with other published prediction rules for patients with stable COPD. Results In total, 2,487 patients were included in the study. Predictors of death during hospital admission, or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED were patient age, baseline dyspnea, previous need for long-term home oxygen therapy or non-invasive mechanical ventilation, altered mental status, and use of inspiratory accessory muscles or paradoxical breathing upon ED arrival (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85). Addition of arterial blood gas parameters (oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures (PO2 and PCO2)) and pH) did not improve the model. The same variables were predictors of death at 1 month (AUC = 0.85). Compared with other commonly used tools for predicting the severity of COPD in stable patients, our rule was significantly better

  9. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  10. Effect of outpatient therapy with inhaled corticosteroids on decreasing in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Hasegawa, Wakae; Sakamoto, Yukiyo; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Jo, Taisuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators (IBD) are beneficial for the management of COPD. Although ICS has been reported to increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with COPD, it remains controversial whether it influences mortality. Using a Japanese national database, we examined the association between preadmission ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD. Methods We retrospectively collected data from 1,165 hospitals in Japan on patients with COPD who received outpatient inhalation therapy and were admitted with pneumonia. Patients were categorized into those who received ICS with IBD and those who received IBD alone. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between outpatient ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality, adjusting for the patients’ backgrounds. Results Of the 7,033 eligible patients, the IBD alone group (n=3,331) was more likely to be older, have lower body mass index, poorer general conditions, and more severe pneumonia than the ICS with IBD group (n=3,702). In-hospital mortality was 13.2% and 8.1% in the IBD alone and the ICS with IBD groups, respectively. After adjustment for patients’ backgrounds, the ICS with IBD group had significantly lower mortality than the IBD alone group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.68–0.94). Higher mortality was associated with older age, being male, lower body mass index, poorer general status, and more severe pneumonia. Conclusion Outpatient inhaled ICS and IBD therapy was significantly associated with lower mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD than treatment with IBD alone. PMID:27382276

  11. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD). Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk. Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28–2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007). In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  12. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD).Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk.Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007).In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  13. In Hospital and 3-Month Mortality and Functional Recovery Rate in Patients Treated for Hip Fracture by a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Rostagno, Carlo; Buzzi, Roberto; Campanacci, Domenico; Boccacini, Alberto; Cartei, Alessandro; Virgili, Gianni; Belardinelli, Andrea; Matarrese, Daniela; Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Gusinu, Roberto; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical comorbidities affect outcome in elderly patients with hip fracture. This study was designed to preliminarily evaluate the usefulness of a hip-fracture unit led by an internal medicine specialist. Methods In-hospital and 3-month outcomes in patients with hip fracture were prospectively evaluated in 121 consecutive patients assessed before and followed after surgery by a multidisciplinary team led by internal medicine specialist; 337 consecutive patients were recalled from ICD-9 discharge records and considered for comparison regarding in-hospital mortality. Results In the intervention period, patients treated within 48 hours were 54% vs. 26% in the historical cohort (P<0.0001). In-hospital mortality remained stable at about 2.3 per 1000 person-days. At 3 months, 10.3% of discharged patients had died, though less than 8% of patients developed postoperative complications (mainly pneumonia and respiratory failure). The presence of more than 2 major comorbidities and the loss of 3 or more BADL were independent predictors of death. 50/105 patients recovered previous functional capacity, but no independent predictor of functional recovery could be identified. Mean length of hospital stay significantly decreased in comparison to the historical cohort (13.6± 4.7 vs 17 ± 5 days, p = 0.0001). Combined end-point of mortality and length of hospitalization < 12 days was significantly lower in study period (27 vs 34%, p <0.0132). Conclusions Identification and stabilization of concomitant clinical problems by internal medicine specialists may safely decrease time to surgery in frail subjects with hip fracture. Moreover, integrated perioperative clinical management may shorten hospital stay with no apparent increase in in-hospital mortality and ultimately improve the outcome. These results are to be confirmed by a larger study presently ongoing at our institution. PMID:27389193

  14. Out-of-Hospital Mortality among Patients Receiving Methadone for Non-Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wayne A.; Chung, Cecilia P.; Murray, Katherine T.; Cooper, William O.; Hall, Kathi; Stein, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Importance Growing methadone use in pain management has raised concerns regarding its safety relative to other long-acting opioids. Methadone may increase risk for both lethal respiratory depression related to accidental overdose and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Objective To compare risk of out-of-hospital death in users of methadone for non-cancer pain to that for comparable users of sustained-release (SR) morphine. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tennessee Medicaid, 1997 through 2009. Participants Cohort included current users of morphine SR or methadone 30–74 years of age without cancer or other life-threatening illness and not in a hospital or nursing home. At cohort entry, 32,742 and 6,014 had filled a prescription for morphine SR or methadone, respectively. The median age was 48 years, 58% were female, and comparable proportions had received cardiovascular, psychotropic, and other musculoskeletal medications. Nearly 90% of patients received the opioid for either back or other musculoskeletal pain. The median daily doses prescribed for morphine SR and methadone were 90mg and 40mg, respectively. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary study endpoint was out-of-hospital mortality, given that opioid-related deaths typically occur outside the hospital. Results There were 477 deaths during 28,699 person years of followup, or 166 deaths per 10,000 person-years. After control for study covariates, current methadone users had a 46% increased risk of death during followup, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.46 (95% confidence interval 1.17–1.83, p = .0008), resulting in 72 (27–130) excess deaths per 10,000 person-years. Methadone users of doses ≤20mg/day, the lowest dose quartile, had increased risk (HR =1.59 [1.01–2.51], p = .0461) relative to a comparable dose of morphine SR (<60mg/day). Conclusions and Relevance The increased risk of death observed for users of methadone, even for low doses, supports recommendations that it

  15. Decline in hospital mortality rate after the use of the World Health Organization protocol for management of severe malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Batista Filho, Malaquias; de Fátima Costa Caminha, Maria; Cabral-Filho, José Eulálio

    2009-04-01

    We studied the implementation of the World Health Organization protocol for the treatment of malnourished children at the largest maternal and infant hospital in the northeast of Brazil. The implementation of the protocol resulted in a reduction in the mortality rate from 38.0% to 16.2%.

  16. Prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers with ST elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kiatchoosakun, Songsak; Wongwipaporn, Chaiyasith; Pussadhamma, Burabha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers and unselected patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have not been well established. Objective To identify the predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI in a tertiary heart centre. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, all patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI were retrospectively included in this study. Baseline characteristics and angiographic data were reviewed and recorded. The study endpoint was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of the 541 patients included in the study, 63 (11.6%) died during hospitalisation. Cardiogenic shock at admission was recorded in 301 patients (55.6%) and 424 patients (78%) had multivessel disease. Median door-to-device time was 65 min. After adjustment for baseline variables, the factors associated with in-hospital mortality included age >60 years (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.05; p=0.01), left ventricular ejection fraction <40% (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.20 to 5.36; p=0.02), and final TIMI flow grade 0/1 (OR 20.55, 95% CI 3.49 to 120.94; p=0.001). Conclusions Age, left ventricular function and final TIMI flow are significant predictors of adverse outcomes in unselected patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. PMID:27347008

  17. Early detection of pneumonia as a risk factor for mortality in burn patients in Menoufiya University Hospitals, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mgahed, M; El-Helbawy, R; Omar, A; El-Meselhy, H; Abd El-Halim, R

    2013-09-30

    Pneumonia is common among critically ill burn patients and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among them. Prediction of mortality in patients with severe burns remains unreliable. The aim of this research is to study the incidence, early diagnosis and management of nosocomial pneumonia, and to discuss the relationship between pneumonia and death in burn patients. This prospective study was carried out on 80 burn patients (35 males and 45 females) admitted to Menoufiya University Hospital Burn Center and Chest Department, Egypt, from September 2011 to March 2012. Our findings showed an overall burn patient mortality rate of 26.25 % (21/80), 15% (12/80) incidence of pneumonia, and a 50% (6/12) mortality rate among patients with pneumonia compared to 22 % (15/68) for those without pneumonia. The incidence of pneumonia was twice as high in the subset of patients with inhalation injury as among those without inhalation injury (P< 0.001). It was found that the presence of pneumonia, inhalation injury, increased burn size, and advanced age were all associated with increased mortality (P< 0.001). In the late onset pneumonia, other associated factors also contributed to mortality. Severity of disease, severity of illness (APACHE score), organ failure, underlying co-morbidities, and VAP PIRO score all have significant correlations with mortality rate. Pneumonia was an important factor for predicting burn patient mortality. Early detection and management of pneumonia are absolutely essential. PMID:24563638

  18. Mortality Trends in Patients Hospitalized with the Initial Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Middle Eastern Country over 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlBinali, Hajar A. H.; Gehani, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the temporal trend in the initial Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) management and outcome during the last two decades in a Middle Eastern country. A total of 10,915 patients were admitted with initial AMI with mean age of 53 ± 11.8 years. Comparing the two decades (1991–2000) to (2001–2010), the use of antiplatelet drugs increased from 84% to 95%, β-blockers increased from 38% to 56%, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) increased from 12% to 36% (P < 0.001 for all). The rates of PCI increased from 2.5% to 14.6% and thrombolytic therapy decreased from 71% to 65% (P < 0.001 for all). While the rate of hospitalization with Initial MI increased from 34% to 66%, and the average length of hospital stay decreased from 6.4 ± 3 to 4.6 ± 3, all hospital outcomes parameters improved significantly including a 39% reduction in in-hospital Mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that higher utilization of antiplatelet drugs, β-blockers, and ACEI were the main contributors to better hospital outcomes. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the hospitalization rate in patients presenting with initial AMI. Evidence-based medical therapies appear to be associated with a substantial improvement in outcome and in-hospital mortality. PMID:24868481

  19. Decreased mortality in patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases after installation of an intensive care unit in a secondary hospital in the interior of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Luciano Passamani; Bahlis, Laura Fuchs; Wajner, André; Waldemar, Fernando Starosta

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between the in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases and the availability of intensive care units. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated a database from a hospital medicine service involving patients hospitalized due to respiratory non-terminal diseases. Data on clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality, such as Charlson score and length of hospital stay, were collected. The following analyses were performed: univariate analysis with simple stratification using the Mantel Haenszel test, chi squared test, Student’s t test, Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression. Results Three hundred thirteen patients were selected, including 98 (31.3%) before installation of the intensive care unit and 215 (68.7%) after installation of the intensive care unit. No significant differences in the clinical and anthropometric characteristics or risk factors were observed between the groups. The mortality rate was 18/95 (18.9%) before the installation of the intensive care unit and 21/206 (10.2%) after the installation of the intensive care unit. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of death after the installation of the intensive care unit decreased by 58% (OR: 0.42; 95%CI 0.205 -0.879; p = 0.021). Conclusion Considering the limitations of the study, the results suggest a benefit, with a decrease of one death per every 11 patients treated for respiratory diseases after the installation of an intensive care unit in our hospital. The results corroborate the benefits of the implementation of intensive care units in secondary hospitals. PMID:26465244

  20. The Dutch Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) method and cardiac surgery: benchmarking in a national cohort using hospital administration data versus a clinical database

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, S; Pouw, M E; Moons, K G M; Versteegh, M I M; Bots, M L; van der Graaf, Y; Kalkman, C J; van Herwerden, L A; Groenwold, R H H

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of data from hospital administration databases and a national clinical cardiac surgery database and to compare the performance of the Dutch hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) method and the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, for the purpose of benchmarking of mortality across hospitals. Methods Information on all patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010 in 10 centres was extracted from The Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery database and the Hospital Discharge Registry. The number of cardiac surgery interventions was compared between both databases. The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation and hospital standardised mortality ratio models were updated in the study population and compared using the C-statistic, calibration plots and the Brier-score. Results The number of cardiac surgery interventions performed could not be assessed using the administrative database as the intervention code was incorrect in 1.4–26.3%, depending on the type of intervention. In 7.3% no intervention code was registered. The updated administrative model was inferior to the updated clinical model with respect to discrimination (c-statistic of 0.77 vs 0.85, p<0.001) and calibration (Brier Score of 2.8% vs 2.6%, p<0.001, maximum score 3.0%). Two average performing hospitals according to the clinical model became outliers when benchmarking was performed using the administrative model. Conclusions In cardiac surgery, administrative data are less suitable than clinical data for the purpose of benchmarking. The use of either administrative or clinical risk-adjustment models can affect the outlier status of hospitals. Risk-adjustment models including procedure-specific clinical risk factors are recommended. PMID:24334377

  1. Lower mortality rates at cardiac specialty hospitals traceable to healthier patients and to doctors' performing more procedures.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Liam; Hartz, Arthur J

    2012-04-01

    Physician-owned cardiac specialty hospitals advertise that they have outstanding physicians and results. To test this assertion, we examined who gets referred to these hospitals, as well as whether different results occur when specialty physicians split their caseloads among specialty and general hospitals in the same markets. Using data on 210,135 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary interventions in Texas during 2004-07, we found that the risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality rate for patients treated at specialty hospitals was significantly below the rate for all hospitals in the state (0.68 percent versus 1.50 percent). However, the rate was significantly higher when physicians who owned cardiac specialty hospitals treated patients in general hospitals (2.27 percent versus 1.50 percent). In addition, several patient characteristics were associated with a lower likelihood of being admitted to a cardiac hospital for cardiac care, such as being African American or Hispanic and having Medicaid or no health insurance. After adjustment for patient severity and number of procedures performed, the overall outcomes for cardiologists who owned specialty hospitals were not significantly different from the "average outcomes" obtained at noncardiac hospitals. In contrast to previous studies, patient outcomes were found to be highly dependent on the type of hospital where the procedure was performed. To remove a potential source of bias and achieve a more balanced comparison, the quality statistics reported by physician-owned cardiac hospitals should be adjusted to incorporate the high rates of poor outcomes for the many procedures done by their cardiologists at nearby noncardiac hospitals. PMID:22492898

  2. Maternal mortality -- aetiological factors: analytic study from a teaching hospital of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Sarin, A R; Singla, P; Kaur, H

    1992-01-01

    A review of maternal deaths at Rajendra Hospital, Punjab, from January 1978 to December 1991 yielded important data for the planning of maternal health services in this area of India, During the 14 year study period, there were 33,160 births and 339 deaths, for a maternal mortality rate of 1002/100,000 live births. Women who had received no prenatal care accounted for 47.4% of deliveries but 92.8% of maternal deaths. In addition, a disproportionate number of deaths involved rural women (74.6%) and poor women (76.4%). 57.8% of maternal deaths involved women 21-30 years of age; 37.1% occurred among primigravidas. Direct obstetrical causes were considered the etiologic factor in 83.1% of these deaths. Primary among these causes were sepsis (37.1%), obstetric hemorrhage (26.2%), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (21.4%), and obstructed labor (15.3%). 30.6% of deaths occurred during pregnancy, 50.3% during labor, and 19.1% in the postpartum period. Indirect obstetrical causes, notably severe anemia and anesthesia complications, were implicated in 15.3% of the maternal deaths. Critical analysis of the maternal deaths in this series suggested that 89.6% were totally preventable, 9.6% were probably preventable, and only 0.8% were not avoidable. Factors that would reduce the high rate of maternal mortality in this region include more widespread use of prenatal care, training of traditional birth attendants in asepsis, referral of high-risk pregnancies, and improved transportation in rural areas. PMID:12288813

  3. The CD14 rs2569190 TT Genotype Is Associated with an Improved 30-Day Survival in Patients with Sepsis: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Ashham; Liese, Benjamin; Steinau, Maximilian; Ghadimi, Michael; Bergmann, Ingo; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Popov, Aron Frederik; Beissbarth, Tim; Bauer, Martin; Hinz, José

    2015-01-01

    According to previous investigations, CD14 is suggested to play a pivotal role in initiating and perpetuating the pro-inflammatory response during sepsis. A functional polymorphism within the CD14 gene, rs2569190, has been shown to impact the pro-inflammatory response upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide, a central mediator of inflammation in sepsis. In this study, we hypothesized that the strong pro-inflammatory response induced by the TT genotype of CD14 rs2569190 may have a beneficial effect on survival (30-day) in patients with sepsis. A total of 417 adult patients with sepsis (and of western European descent) were enrolled into this observational study. Blood samples were collected for rs2569190 genotyping. Patients were followed over the course of their stay in the ICU, and the 30-day mortality risk was recorded as the primary outcome parameter. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were quantified at sepsis onset and throughout the observational period to monitor organ failure as a secondary variable. Moreover, organ support-free days were evaluated as a secondary outcome parameter. TT-homozygous patients were compared to C-allele carriers. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a higher 30-day mortality risk among C-allele carriers compared with T homozygotes (p = 0.0261). To exclude the effect of potential confounders (age, gender, BMI and type of infection) and covariates that varied at baseline with a p-value < 0.2 (e.g., comorbidities), we performed multivariate Cox regression analysis to examine the survival time. The CD14 rs2569190 C allele remained a significant covariate for the 30-day mortality risk in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.08-4.12; p = 0.0282). The 30-day mortality rate among C allele carriers was 23%, whereas the T homozygotes had a mortality rate of 13%. Additionally, an analysis of organ-specific SOFA scores revealed a significantly higher SOFA-Central nervous system score among patients

  4. Using data linkage to generate 30-day crash-fatality adjustment factors for Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Huei; Huang, Wei-Shin; Chang, Kai-Kuo; Jeng, Ming-Chang; Doong, Ji-Liang

    2006-07-01

    Different countries have their own police reporting time standards for counting the number of fatalities in reported crashes. A rapid estimation method (such as adjustment factor) for the comparison is important. The data-linkage technique was used to combine police-reported crash data and vital registration data, in order to generate 30-day fatality adjustment factors for various reporting time standards, which could also shed light on the fatal injury trend over time. The major findings were as follows. Firstly, a conservative 30-day fatality adjustment factor for the first day (or 24 h) would be 1.54 (or 1.35) in an area with a large motorcycle population, like Taiwan. This produced 20-40% higher 30-day fatalities than UK Transport Research Laboratory predicted, and 15-25% higher fatalities than those in Europe/Japan. Secondly, after excluding motorcycle impacts, the Taiwanese factors suggested 8-14% higher fatalities within 30 days than those in Europe/Japan. Third, motorcycle fatalities influenced the overall 30-day fatality trend within 3 days. In the future, both the police under-reporting problem and the motorcycle/overall fatal injury pattern within 3 days after crashing in developing countries like Taiwan merit further investigation. PMID:16430844

  5. Impact of admission serum total cholesterol level on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xintian; Su, Xi; Zeng, Hesong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find out the association between serum total cholesterol (TC) on admission and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: From January 2007 to January 2014, we enrolled 1492 consecutive AAD patients with serum TC measured immediately on admission. Baseline characteristics and in-hospital mortality were compared between the patients with serum TC above and below the median (4.00 mmol/L). Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to account for known confounders in the study. Cox proportional hazard model was performed to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for admission serum TC levels. Results: With the use of PSM, 521 matched pairs of patients with AAD were yielded in this analysis due to their similar propensity scores. Patients with admission serum TC < 4.00 mmol/L, as compared with those with admission serum TC ≥ 4.00 mmol/L, had higher in-hospital mortality (11.7% vs. 5.8%; HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.33-3.19, P = 0.001). Stratified analysis according to Stanford classification showed that the inverse association between admission serum TC and in-hospital mortality was observed in patients with Type-A AAD (24.0% vs. 11.3%; HR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.33 - 3.57, P = 0.002) but not in those with Type-B AAD (3.8% vs. 2.2%; HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 0.67 - 4.34, P = 0.261). Conclusions: Lower serum TC level on admission was strongly associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients with Type-A AAD. PMID:27648044

  6. Initial weather regimes as predictors of numerical 30-day mean forecast accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colucci, Stephen J.; Baumhefner, David P.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty 30-day mean 500-mb-height anomaly forecasts generated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) for the year 1978 are examined in order to determine if the forecast accuracy can be estimated with the initial conditions. The initial weather regimes were defined in such a way that the regimes could discriminate between the best and the worst 30-day mean forecasts run from the initial fields in this data set. On the basis of the CCM experiments, it is suggested that the accuracy of numerical 30-day mean forecasts may depend upon the accuracy with which the cyclones and their interactions with the planetary scale are predicted early in the forecast cycle, and that this accuracy may depend upon the initial conditions.

  7. Short- and Long-Term Mortality after an Acute Illness for Elderly Whites and Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Daniel; Jha, Ashish K; Lave, Judith; Pauly, Mark V; Cen, Liyi; Klusaritz, Heather; Chen, Zhen; Volpp, Kevin G

    2008-01-01

    Objective To estimate racial differences in mortality at 30 days and up to 2 years following a hospital admission for the elderly with common medical conditions. Data Sources The Medicare Provider Analysis and Review File and the VA Patient Treatment File from 1998 to 2002 were used to extract patients 65 or older admitted with a principal diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture, gastrointestinal bleeding, congestive heart failure, or pneumonia. Study Design A retrospective analysis of risk-adjusted mortality after hospital admission for blacks and whites by medical condition and in different hospital settings. Principal Findings Black Medicare patients had consistently lower adjusted 30-day mortality than white Medicare patients, but the initial survival advantage observed among blacks dissipated beyond 30 days and reversed by 2 years. For VA hospitalizations similar patterns were observed, but the initial survival advantage for blacks dissipated at a slower rate. Conclusions Racial disparities in health are more likely to be generated in the posthospital phase of the process of care delivery rather than during the hospital stay. The slower rate of increase in relative mortality among black VA patients suggests an integrated health care delivery system like the VA may attenuate racial disparities in health. PMID:18355259

  8. Obesity and Mortality, Length of Stay and Hospital Cost among Patients with Sepsis: A Nationwide Inpatient Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chu-lin; Hwang, Lu-yu; Lai, Dejian; Markham, Christine; Patel, Bela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the association between obesity and all-cause mortality, length of stay and hospital cost among patients with sepsis 20 years of age or older. Materials and Methods It was a retrospective cohort study. The dataset was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2011, the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. Hospitalizations of sepsis patients 20 years of age or older were included. All 25 primary and secondary diagnosis fields were screened to identify patients with sepsis using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Obesity was the exposure of interest. It was one of the 29 standardized Elixhauser comorbidity measures and readily available in the dataset as a dichotomized variable. The outcome measures were all-cause in-hospital death, length of stay and hospital cost. Results After weighting, our sample projected to a population size of 1,763,000, providing an approximation for the number of hospital discharges of all sepsis patients 20 years of age or older in the US in 2011. The overall all-cause mortality rate was 14.8%, the median hospital length of stay was 7 days and the median hospital cost was $15,917. After adjustment, the all-cause mortality was lower (adjusted OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.88); the average hospital length of stay was longer (adjusted difference = 0.65 day; 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.86) and the hospital cost per stay was higher (adjusted difference = $2,927; 95% CI = $1,606 to $4,247) for obese sepsis patients as compared to non-obese ones. Conclusion With this large and nationally representative sample of over 1,000 hospitals in the US, we found that obesity was significantly associated with a 16% decrease in the odds of dying among hospitalized sepsis patients; however it was also associated with greater duration and cost of hospitalization. PMID:27124716

  9. A 30-day forecast experiment with the GISS model and updated sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Atlas, R.; Kuo, E.

    1975-01-01

    The GISS model was used to compute two parallel global 30-day forecasts for the month January 1974. In one forecast, climatological January sea surface temperatures were used, while in the other observed sea temperatures were inserted and updated daily. A comparison of the two forecasts indicated no clear-cut beneficial effect of daily updating of sea surface temperatures. Despite the rapid decay of daily predictability, the model produced a 30-day mean forecast for January 1974 that was generally superior to persistence and climatology when evaluated over either the globe or the Northern Hemisphere, but not over smaller regions.

  10. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome.

  11. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome. PMID:27595822

  12. The concentration of hospital care for black veterans in Veterans Affairs hospitals: implications for clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish K; Stone, Roslyn; Lave, Judith; Chen, Huanyu; Klusaritz, Heather; Volpp, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Where minorities receive their care may contribute to disparities in care, yet, the racial concentration of care in the Veterans Health Administration is largely unknown. We sought to better understand which Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals treat Black veterans and whether location of care impacted disparities. We assessed differences in mortality rates between Black and White veterans across 150 VA hospitals for any of six conditions (acute myocardial infarction, hip fracture, stroke, congestive heart failure, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia) between 1996 and 2002. Just 9 out of 150 VA hospitals (6% of all VA hospitals) cared for nearly 30% of Black veterans, and 42 hospitals (28% of all VA hospitals) cared for more than 75% of Black veterans. While our findings show that overall mortality rates were comparable between minority-serving and non-minority-serving hospitals for four conditions, mortality rates were higher in minority-serving hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and pneumonia. The ratio of mortality rates for Blacks compared with Whites was comparable across all VA hospitals. In contrast to the private sector, there is little variation in the degree of racial disparities in 30-day mortality across VA hospitals, although higher mortality among patients with AMI and pneumonia requires further investigation.

  13. The concentration of hospital care for black veterans in Veterans Affairs hospitals: implications for clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish K; Stone, Roslyn; Lave, Judith; Chen, Huanyu; Klusaritz, Heather; Volpp, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Where minorities receive their care may contribute to disparities in care, yet, the racial concentration of care in the Veterans Health Administration is largely unknown. We sought to better understand which Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals treat Black veterans and whether location of care impacted disparities. We assessed differences in mortality rates between Black and White veterans across 150 VA hospitals for any of six conditions (acute myocardial infarction, hip fracture, stroke, congestive heart failure, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia) between 1996 and 2002. Just 9 out of 150 VA hospitals (6% of all VA hospitals) cared for nearly 30% of Black veterans, and 42 hospitals (28% of all VA hospitals) cared for more than 75% of Black veterans. While our findings show that overall mortality rates were comparable between minority-serving and non-minority-serving hospitals for four conditions, mortality rates were higher in minority-serving hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and pneumonia. The ratio of mortality rates for Blacks compared with Whites was comparable across all VA hospitals. In contrast to the private sector, there is little variation in the degree of racial disparities in 30-day mortality across VA hospitals, although higher mortality among patients with AMI and pneumonia requires further investigation. PMID:20946426

  14. Can a Patient’s In-Hospital Length of Stay and Mortality Be Explained by Early-Risk Assessments?

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh-Fard, Nasibeh; Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Camelio, Jaime A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether a patient’s in-hospital length of stay (LOS) and mortality can be explained by early objective and/or physicians’ subjective-risk assessments. Data Sources/Study Setting Analysis of a detailed dataset of 1,021 patients admitted to a large U.S. hospital between January and September 2014. Study Design We empirically test the explanatory power of objective and subjective early-risk assessments using various linear and logistic regression models. Principal Findings The objective measures of early warning can only weakly explain LOS and mortality. When controlled for various vital signs and demographics, objective signs lose their explanatory power. LOS and death are more associated with physicians’ early subjective risk assessments than the objective measures. Conclusions Explaining LOS and mortality require variables beyond patients’ initial medical risk measures. LOS and in-hospital mortality are more associated with the way in which the human element of healthcare service (e.g., physicians) perceives and reacts to the risks. PMID:27632368

  15. [Epidemiological study of very preterm infants at Rouen University Hospital: changes in mortality, morbidity, and care over 11 years].

    PubMed

    Pinto Cardoso, G; Abily-Donval, L; Chadie, A; Guerrot, A-M; Pinquier, D; Marret, S

    2013-02-01

    The very preterm birth rate has increased in the past few years. Despite advances in neonatal medicine, neurodevelopmental sequelae have not decreased, despite a perinatal plan published in France in 1994. We conducted an epidemiological comparative survey at Rouen University Hospital in order to analyze morbidity, mortality, and care of very of premature infants by comparing the years 2000, 2005, and 2010. This hospital draws on an area of 17,000 births per year. Our survey was a single-center prospective, descriptive, and comparative study. The three cohorts had the same characteristics and the mortality rate was constant for 11 years. Use of medically assisted procreation and maternal age increased over this period. Chorioamnionitis halved, whereas duration of intrapartum antibiotic therapy increased. Neonatal morbidity was stable for hyaline membrane disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, maternofetal or nosocomial infections, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Regarding neurological complications, intraventricular hemorrhages decreased and white matter lesions remained constant. The rate of severe retinopathy remained low. The duration of parenteral nutrition and assisted ventilation, use of postnatal corticosteroids, and length of hospitalization decreased. The breastfeeding rate has increased since 2000 in parallel with postnatal growth restriction : 39% of the premature infants had a weight under the 10th percentile at hospital discharge. Our study allowed us to follow up the changes in neonatal epidemiological characteristics, the mortality and morbidity of extreme premature infants over a period of 11 years and showed few significant changes. Knowledge of medical practices is essential to improve the short- and long-term outcome of premature infants.

  16. Morbidity and Mortality Pattern in Late Preterm Infants at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Jammu & Kashmir, Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Ghulam Nabi; Jan, Muzafar; Rafiq, Wasim; Hussain, Sheikh Quyoom; Latief, Mohmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The morbidity and mortality pattern in late preterm infants is higher than term infants (gestational age ≥ 37weeks). The main reason behind that is the relative physiologic and metabolic immaturity, though there is no significant difference in the weight or the size of the two groups. Aim The present study was undertaken to study the incidence, early neonatal morbidity and mortality (within first 7 days of life) in late preterm infants (34 – 36 6/7 weeks). Materials and Methods It was a hospital based prospective study conducted from April 2012 to March 2013. The study was conducted in the Department of Paediatrics and Neonatology at G.B. Pant General Hospital and Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics L.D hospital and G.B. pant general hospital, (associated hospitals of Government Medical College, Srinagar). Results A total of 4100 neonates were included in the study. Incidence of late preterm neonates was 11.58 %. Three hundred sixty five (76.8%) of late preterm and 965 (28.3%) of term infants had at least one of the predefined neonatal conditions. Late preterm infants were at significantly higher risk for overall morbidity due to any cause (p<0.0001), respiratory morbidity (p<0.0001), mechanical ventilation (p=0.0002), jaundice (p<0.0001), hypoglycaemia (p<0.0001), and sepsis (p<0.0001) Perinatal asphyxia (p= 0.186). Early neonatal mortality in late preterm neonates was 2.5% or 25/1000 live births. Conclusion Compared with term infants, late preterm infants are at high risk for overall morbidity, respiratory morbidity, and need of mechanical ventilation, jaundice, hypoglycaemia & sepsis. They also have a higher mortality as compared to term neonates. PMID:26816959

  17. Deficiency of ADAMTS-13 in pediatric patients with severe sepsis and impact on in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The enzyme involved in regulating the size of vWF (von Willebrand factor) in plasma is ADAMTS-13 (A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type-1 motives). Deficient proteolysis of ULvWF (ultra large von Willebrand factor) due to reduced ADAMTS-13 activity results in disseminated platelet-rich thrombi in the microcirculation characteristic of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Reduced ADAMTS-13 has also been observed in severe sepsis and is associated with poor survival. We conducted this study to detect ADAMTS-13 deficiency and its impact on in-hospital mortality in pediatric patients with severe sepsis. Methods Pediatric patients diagnosed with severe sepsis were recruited for the study. Baseline clinical characteristics were noted. ADAMTS-13 antigen levels were assayed by ELISA. According to ADAMTS-13 levels, patients were grouped as deficient and non-deficient. Comparison was done with regard to some clinical and biological characteristics and in-hospital mortality between the two groups. Results A total of 80 patients were enrolled in the study. The median age of the patients was 3.1 years (Range: 0.1-15 years). ADAMTS-13 deficiency with levels less than 350 ng/dl was found in 65% patients. In patients with ADAMTS-13 deficiency, 75.6% had low platelets of less than 150 × 109/L. In-hospital mortality was 42.3% and 35.7% in ADAMTS-13 deficient and non-deficient group, respectively. Conclusion Majority of the pediatric patients admitted to hospital with severe sepsis exhibit ADAMTS-13 deficiency. ADAMTS-13 deficiency might play a role in sepsis-induced thrombocytopenia. More studies are needed to evaluate the role of ADAMTS-13 deficiency on in-hospital mortality. PMID:23537039

  18. Roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Glaucia R.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Zornoff, Leonardo A.M.; Paiva, Sergio A.R.; Nogueira, Celia R.; Araujo, Natalia C.; Carmona, Bruno H.M.; Conde, Sandro J.; Minicucci, Marcos F.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients. METHODS: In total, 105 consecutive burn injury patients over 18 years in age who were admitted to the Burn Unit of Bauru State Hospital from January to December 2013 were prospectively evaluated. Upon admission, patient demographic information was recorded and a blood sample was taken for biochemical analysis to identify the presence of the Taql(rs731236) and Bsml(rs1544410) polymorphisms. All of the patients were followed over their hospital stay and mortality was recorded. RESULTS: Eighteen of the patients did not sign the informed consent form, and there were technical problems with genotype analysis for 7 of the patients. Thus, 80 patients (mean age, 42.5±16.1 years) were included in the final analysis. In total, 60% of the patients were male, and 16.3% died during the hospital stay. The genotype frequencies for the Taql polymorphism were 51.25% TT, 41.25% TC and 7.50% CC; for the Bsml polymorphism, they were 51.25% GG, 42.50% GA and 6.25% AA. In logistic regression analysis, after adjustments for age, gender and total body surface burn area, there were no associations between the Taql (OR: 1.575; CI95%: 0.148-16.745; p=0.706) or Bsml (OR: 1.309; CI95%: 0.128-13.430; p=0.821) polymorphisms and mortality for the burn patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms are not associated with hospital mortality of burn patients. PMID:27626478

  19. No difference in mortality between terlipressin and somatostatin treatments in cirrhotic patients with esophageal variceal bleeding and renal functional impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Chih-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the differences in mortality between terlipressin and somatostatin treatments in cirrhotic patients with esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) and renal functional impairment (RFI). Methods The National Health Insurance Database, part of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll cirrhotic patients who had received endoscopic variceal ligation plus somatostatin or terlipressin for EVB and who were hospitalized between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010. The differences in mortality between the two vasoactive agents were compared and the risk factors for 30-day mortality because of EVB were identified. Results A total of 2324 cirrhotic patients with EVB were enrolled. The 30-day mortality data showed no significant differences between the somatostatin and the terlipressin groups (P=0.232). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in male patients [hazard ratio (HR): 1.50, P=0.002] and patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 1.82, P<0.001), ascites (HR: 1.32, P=0.008), bacterial infections (HR: 2.10, P<0.001), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 2.09, P<0.001), and RFI (HR: 3.89, P<0.001). A subgroup analysis of cirrhotic patients with RFI was carried out. The overall 30-day mortality was higher in patients treated with somatostatin than in those treated with terlipressin (52.6 vs. 42.3%), but the difference failed to reach significance (adjust HR: 1.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.94–2.37, P=0.091). Conclusion RFI was the most important risk factor for 30-day mortality in EVB patients. Terlipressin and somatostatin had similar effects on 30-day mortality in cirrhotic patients with EVB and RFI. PMID:27455080

  20. 77 FR 37706 - Agency Information Collection Activities: 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Agency Information Collection Activities: 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for Public Comment AGENCY: National Park Service,...

  1. 7 CFR 27.58 - Postponed classification; must be within 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Postponed classification; must be within 30 days. 27.58 Section 27.58 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS...

  2. 77 FR 47702 - 30-Day Notice of Request for Approval: Statutory Authority To Preserve Rail Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... this collection in the Federal Register on February 10, 2012, at 77 FR 7236-37 (60-day notice). That... Surface Transportation Board 30-Day Notice of Request for Approval: Statutory Authority To Preserve Rail Service AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY:...

  3. 78 FR 49280 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation Facsimile Transmittal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation Facsimile..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation... of the need for the information and proposed use: The use of the Third-Party Documentation...

  4. 78 FR 7436 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... in the Federal Register (77 FR 69865) on November 21, 2012, and allowed 60 days for public comment... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information...

  5. 78 FR 79474 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Father's Day

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  6. 78 FR 36198 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... process has been streamlined and is using information technology to make the application electronically... information technology. Send Requests for Further Information: For the proposed collection, or requests to... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information...

  7. Heart failure performance measures: do they have an impact on 30-day readmission rates?

    PubMed

    Mazimba, Sula; Grant, Nakash; Parikh, Analkumar; Mwandia, George; Makola, Diklar; Chilomo, Christine; Redko, Cristina; Hahn, Harvey S

    2013-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) accounts for more health care costs than any other diagnosis. Readmissions contribute to this expenditure. The authors evaluated the relationship between adherence to performance metrics and 30-day readmissions. This was a retrospective study of 6063 patients with CHF between 2001 and 2008. Data were collected for 30-day readmissions and compliance with CHF performance measures at discharge. Rates of readmission for CHF increased from 16.8% in 2002 to 24.8% in 2008. Adherence to performance measures increased concurrently from 95.8% to 99.9%. Except for left ventricular function (LVF) assessment, the 30-day readmission rate was not associated with adherence to performance measures. Readmitted patients had twice the odds of not having their LVF assessed (odds ratio = 2.0; P < .00005; 95% confidence interval = 1.45-2.63). CHF performance measures, except for the LVF assessment, have little relationship to 30-day readmissions. Further studies are needed to identify performance measures that correlate with quality of care. PMID:23110998

  8. 76 FR 10035 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY..., OMB number, to Ed.Calimag@hhs.gov , or call the Reports Clearance Office on (202) 205- 1193. Send... notice directly to the Grants.gov OMB Desk Officer; faxed to OMB at 202-395-6974. Proposed Project:...

  9. 76 FR 10036 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY..., OMB number, to Ed.Calimag@hhs.gov , or call the Reports Clearance Office on (202) 205- 1193. Send... notice directly to the Grants.gov OMB Desk Officer; faxed to OMB at 202-395-6974. Proposed Project:...

  10. 76 FR 10034 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY..., OMB number, to Ed.Calimag@hhs.gov , or call the Reports Clearance Office on (202) 205- 1193. Send... notice directly to the Grants.gov OMB Desk Officer; faxed to OMB at 202-395-6974. Proposed Project:...

  11. 76 FR 10364 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY..., OMB number, to Ed.Calimag@hhs.gov , or call the Reports Clearance Office on (202) 205- 1193. Send... notice directly to the Grants.gov OMB Desk Officer; faxed to OMB at 202-395-6974. Proposed Project:...

  12. 76 FR 10033 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY..., OMB number, to Ed.Calimag@hhs.gov , or call the Reports Clearance Office on (202) 690- 7569. Send... notice directly to the Grants.gov OMB Desk Officer; faxed to OMB at 202-395-6974. Proposed Project:...

  13. 78 FR 48178 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Autism Spectrum Disorder Research Portfolio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Autism... any data that is collected on autism projects that are funded. This comment was considered, but it did..., contact: The Office of Autism Research Coordination, NIMH, NIH, Neuroscience Center, 6001 Executive...

  14. 78 FR 1916 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ...The Department of State has submitted the information collection described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 we are requesting comments on this collection from all interested individuals and organizations. The purpose of this Notice is to allow 30 days for public...

  15. 78 FR 66042 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 3 Business Registry Pilot Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 3 Business Registry Pilot..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  16. 78 FR 69103 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Quality Control for Rental Assistance Subsidy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  17. 78 FR 19496 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... of eHealth/ mHealth tobacco cessation intervention programs. SmokefreeTXT has been developed (and is... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request;...

  18. 78 FR 36560 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th... Title of Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic Updates and...

  19. 78 FR 52964 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 8 Management Assessment Program (SEMAP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 8 Management Assessment... of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The... Officer, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503; fax:...

  20. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American... Title of Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian... American and Alaskan Native populations, most notably through the Indian Housing Block Grant. The level...

  1. 76 FR 28987 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. In compliance with the requirement of section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary...

  2. 78 FR 78369 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Early Career Reviewer Program Online...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Early.... Currently, the application process involves repeated email interactions with potential applicants and...

  3. 75 FR 48970 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment... Human Services, is publishing the following summary of a proposed collection for public...

  4. 75 FR 48969 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30 Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  5. 78 FR 36564 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Default Status Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Default Status Report..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard... Report. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0041. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved...

  6. 78 FR 39305 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: OSHC Progress Report Template

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: OSHC Progress Report Template AGENCY... Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard at Colette.Pollard... Information Collection Title of Information Collection: OSHC Progress Report Template. OMB Approval...

  7. 78 FR 38070 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing... Marketing (AFHM) Plan. OMB Approval Number: 2529-0013. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved collection. Form Number: HUD-935.2A Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan (Multifamily),...

  8. [Separate birth 30 days after a premature delivery in a twin pregnancy. A case report].

    PubMed

    Kisoka, R

    1994-01-01

    The author reports an exceptional observation concerning a delayed delivery of a second twin born at 34 weeks' gestation. The first infant was born 30 days before. The "fetal retention" of the second twin seems to improve its vital prognostic, 12 months later, the infant was in full growth and showing a good health. PMID:7995920

  9. 76 FR 40913 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... respondent (in hours) hours Survey Human Resource Manager 3,000 1 30/60 1,500 Focus Group Protocol Employees in All 48 1 1.5 72 Occupations Key Informant Interview Script...... Human Resource Manager 20 1 45/60... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office...

  10. 78 FR 79475 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Impact of Housing and Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  11. 78 FR 56908 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Training Evaluation Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Training Evaluation Form AGENCY... Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Training Evaluation Form. OMB Approval Number: 2577... Evaluation Form is currently being used and will be used are: On-site Core Curriculum training in...

  12. 78 FR 36563 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Single Family Premium Collection..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Single Family Premium... use: The Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem-Upfront (SFPCS-U) allows the lenders to remit...

  13. 78 FR 75366 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing Energy Audits and Utility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing Energy Audits and... Audits and Utility Allowances. OMB Approval Number: 2577-062. Type of Request: Reinstatement, with change... information and proposed use: 24 CFR 965.301, Subpart C, Energy Audit and Energy Conservation...

  14. 77 FR 39318 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-5513, Supplemental Questionnaire To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ..., Office of Project Management and Operational Support, Program Coordination (CA/PPT/PMO/PC) Form Number... information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval in accordance with... to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for up to 30 days from July 2, 2012. ADDRESSES:...

  15. 77 FR 29348 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. In compliance with the requirement of section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary...

  16. 76 FR 32008 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: RPPR Public Diplomacy Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... forms of social media and similar collaborative technologies to interact on Public Diplomacy themes in... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: RPPR Public Diplomacy Surveys ACTION: Notice of request...

  17. 77 FR 13128 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... social media PSA. This study will collect information on awareness of the ``Make the Call--Don't Miss a... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office...

  18. 78 FR 52009 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Utility Allowance Adjustments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Utility Allowance Adjustments AGENCY... Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Utility Allowance Adjustments. OMB Approval Number... advise the Secretary of the need for and request approval of a new utility allowance for...

  19. 78 FR 36565 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Standardized Form for Collecting Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  20. 76 FR 10037 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collections within 30 days of this... ``General Instructions'' section, the following sentence is added as the last sentence: ``In ALL cases total... B Budget Categories'' section, the last sentence is revised as follows: ``For each program,...

  1. In-hospital mortality risk for total shoulder arthroplasty: A comprehensive review of the medicare database from 2005 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U.; Kiriakopoulos, Emmanouil B. S.; Schairer, William W.; Provencher, Matthew T.; Levy, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The in-hospital mortality rate after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is unknown. The purpose of this study is to quantify the in-patient mortality rates and associated demographic risk factors for patients undergoing a TSA from 2005 to 2011 using a comprehensive Medicare registry database. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the Medicare database within the PearlDiver database. The PearlDiver database is a publicly available Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant national database that captures 100% of the Medicare hospital data for TSA between 2005 and 2011. Using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for TSA we identified a dataset of patients undergoing TSA as well as a subset of those for whom there was a death discharge (i.e., in-patient death). Risk for this outcome was further quantified by age, gender and year. Linear regression was performed to identify risk factors for the primary outcome. Results: A total of 101,323 patients underwent 125,813 TSAs between 2005 and 2011. There were 113 in-patient mortalities during this period. Thus the incidence of death was 0.09%. Increasing age was a significant risk factor for mortality (P = 0.03). Gender and year of procedure were not significant risk factors for mortality. Conclusion: The incidence of in-patient mortality for Medicare patients undergoing TSA between 2005 and 2011 was <1 in 1000 surgeries. Increased age is a significant predictor of mortality. Level 4: Retrospective analysis PMID:26622126

  2. Comparing clinical outcomes in HIV-infected and uninfected older men hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, LA; Juthani-Mehta, M; Allore, H; Trentalange, M; Tate, J; Rimland, D; Pisani, M; Akgün, KM; Goetz, MB; Butt, AA; Rodriguez-Barradas, M; Duggal, M; Crothers, K; Justice, AC; Quagliarello, VJ

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Outcomes of community–acquired pneumonia (CAP) among HIV-infected older adults are unclear. Methods Associations between HIV infection and three CAP outcomes (30-day mortality, readmission within 30 days post-discharge, and hospital length of stay [LOS]) were examined in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) of male Veterans, age ≥ 50 years, hospitalized for CAP from 10/1/2002 through 08/31/2010. Associations between the VACS Index and CAP outcomes were assessed in multivariable models. Results Among 117 557 Veterans (36 922 HIV-infected and 80 635 uninfected), 1203 met our eligibility criteria. The 30-day mortality rate was 5.3%, the mean LOS was 7.3 days, and 13.2% were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. In unadjusted analyses, there were no significant differences between HIV-infected and uninfected participants regarding the three CAP outcomes (P > 0.2). A higher VACS Index was associated with increased 30-day mortality, readmission, and LOS in both HIV-infected and uninfected groups. Generic organ system components of the VACS Index were associated with adverse CAP outcomes; HIV-specific components were not. Among HIV-infected participants, those not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) had a higher 30-day mortality (HR 2.94 [95% CI 1.51, 5.72]; P = 0.002) and a longer LOS (slope 2.69 days [95% CI 0.65, 4.73]; P = 0.008), after accounting for VACS Index. Readmission was not associated with ART use (OR 1.12 [95% CI 0.62, 2.00] P = 0.714). Conclusion Among HIV-infected and uninfected older adults hospitalized for CAP, organ system components of the VACS Index were associated with adverse CAP outcomes. Among HIV-infected individuals, ART was associated with decreased 30-day mortality and LOS. PMID:25959543

  3. Trends in Canadian hospital standardised mortality ratios and palliative care coding 2004–2010: a retrospective database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Christopher AKY; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Wilcox, M Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR), anchored at an average score of 100, is a controversial macromeasure of hospital quality. The measure may be dependent on differences in patient coding, particularly since cases labelled as palliative are typically excluded. Objective To determine whether palliative coding in Canada has changed since the 2007 national introduction of publicly released HSMRs, and how such changes may have affected results. Design Retrospective database analysis. Setting Inpatients in Canadian hospitals from April 2004 to March 2010. Patients 12 593 329 hospital discharges recorded in the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) Discharge Abstract Database from April 2004 to March 2010. Measurements Crude mortality and palliative care coding rates. HSMRs calculated with the same methodology as CIHI. A derived hospital standardised palliative ratio (HSPR) adjusted to a baseline average of 100 in 2004–2005. Recalculated HSMRs that included palliative cases under varying scenarios. Results Crude mortality and palliative care coding rates have been increasing over time (p<0.001), in keeping with the nation's advancing overall morbidity. HSMRs in 2008–2010 were significantly lower than in 2004–2006 by 8.55 points (p<0.001). The corresponding HSPR rises dramatically between these two time periods by 48.83 points (p<0.001). Under various HSMR scenarios that included palliative cases, the HSMR would have at most decreased by 6.35 points, and may have even increased slightly. Limitations Inability to calculate a definitively comparable HSMR that include palliative cases and to account for closely timed changes in national palliative care coding guidelines. Conclusions Palliative coding rates in Canadian hospitals have increased dramatically since the public release of HSMR results. This change may have partially contributed to the observed national decline in HSMR. PMID:23131397

  4. The clinical outcomes and predictive factors for in-hospital mortality in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tsai-Yu; Hung, Chia-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chou, Pai-Chien; Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lo, Yu-Lun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent epidemiologic studies have showed that candidemia is an important nosocomial infection in hospitalized patients. The majority of candidemia patients were non-neutropenic rather than neutropenic status. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome of non-neutropenic patients with candidemia and to measure the contributing factors for mortality. A total of 163 non-neutropenic patients with candidemia during January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively enrolled. The patients’ risk factors for mortality, clinical outcomes, treatment regimens, and Candida species were analyzed. The overall mortality was 54.6%. Candida albicans was the most frequent Candida species (n = 83; 50.9% of patients). Under multivariate analyses, hemodialysis (OR, 4.554; 95% CI, 1.464–14.164) and the use of amphotericin B deoxycholate (OR, 8.709; 95% CI, 1.587–47.805) were independent factors associated with mortality. In contrast, abdominal surgery (OR, 0.360; 95% CI, 0.158–0.816) was associated with a better outcome. The overall mortality is still high in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia. Hemodialysis and use of amphotericin B deoxycholate were independent factors associated with mortality, whereas prior abdominal surgery was associated with a better outcome. PMID:27281087

  5. Life Expectancy after Myocardial Infarction, According to Hospital Performance.

    PubMed

    Bucholz, Emily M; Butala, Neel M; Ma, Shuangge; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-10-01

    Background Thirty-day risk-standardized mortality rates after acute myocardial infarction are commonly used to evaluate and compare hospital performance. However, it is not known whether differences among hospitals in the early survival of patients with acute myocardial infarction are associated with differences in long-term survival. Methods We analyzed data from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project, a study of Medicare beneficiaries who were hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction between 1994 and 1996 and who had 17 years of follow-up. We grouped hospitals into five strata that were based on case-mix severity. Within each case-mix stratum, we compared life expectancy among patients admitted to high-performing hospitals with life expectancy among patients admitted to low-performing hospitals. Hospital performance was defined by quintiles of 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to calculate life expectancy. Results The study sample included 119,735 patients with acute myocardial infarction who were admitted to 1824 hospitals. Within each case-mix stratum, survival curves of the patients admitted to hospitals in each risk-standardized mortality rate quintile separated within the first 30 days and then remained parallel over 17 years of follow-up. Estimated life expectancy declined as hospital risk-standardized mortality rate quintile increased. On average, patients treated at high-performing hospitals lived between 0.74 and 1.14 years longer, depending on hospital case mix, than patients treated at low-performing hospitals. When 30-day survivors were examined separately, there was no significant difference in unadjusted or adjusted life expectancy across hospital risk-standardized mortality rate quintiles. Conclusions In this study, patients admitted to high-performing hospitals after acute myocardial infarction had longer life expectancies than patients treated in low-performing hospitals. This survival benefit

  6. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Falcão, Felipe José; Alves, Cláudia Maria Rodrigues; Barbosa, Adriano Henrique Pereira; Caixeta, Adriano; Sousa, José Marconi Almeida; Souza, José Augusto Marcondes; Amaral, Amaury; Wilke, Luiz Carlos; Perez, Fátima Cristina A.; Gonçalves, Iran; Stefanini, Edson; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment. METHODS: This was an observational, prospective study that included 398 patients admitted to a tertiary center for percutaneous coronary intervention within 3 to 24 hours after thrombolysis with tenecteplase. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01791764 RESULTS: The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. Compared with patients who survived, patients who died were more likely to be older, have higher rates of diabetes and chronic renal failure, have a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and demonstrate more evidence of heart failure (Killip class III or IV). Patients who died had significantly lower rates of successful thrombolysis (39% vs. 68%; p = 0.005) and final myocardial blush grade 3 (13.0% vs. 61.9%; p<0.0001). Based on the multivariate analysis, the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.09; p = 0.001), left ventricular ejection fraction (odds ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.89-0.97; p = 0.001), and final myocardial blush grade of 0-2 (odds ratio 8.85, 95% CI 1.34-58.57; p = 0.02) were independent predictors of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective study that evaluated patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated by a pharmacoinvasive strategy, the in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score, left ventricular ejection fraction, and myocardial blush were independent predictors of mortality in this high-risk group of acute coronary syndrome patients. PMID:24473509

  7. Work capacity during 30 days of bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Trowbridge, T. S.; Wade, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a study to determine whether or not short-term variable intensity isotonic and intermittent high-intensity isokinetic short-duration leg exercise is effective for the maintenance of peak O2 (VO2) uptake and muscular strength and endurance, respectively, during 30 days of -6 deg head-down bed rest deconditioning. The results show no significant changes in leg peak torque, leg mean total work, arm total peak torque, or arm mean total work for members of the isotonic, isokinetic, and controls groups. Changes are observed, however, in peak VO2 levels. The results suggest that near-peak variabile intensity, isotonic leg excercise maintains peak VO2 during 30 days of bed rest, while peak intermittent, isokinetic leg excercise protocol does not.

  8. Women are less likely to be admitted to substance abuse treatment within 30 days of assessment.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Borisova, Natalie; Klein, Chris; di Menza, Salvatore; Schuster, Charles R

    2002-01-01

    The information gathered in a centralized intake unit (CIU) allows payers and administrators to examine if there are access issues for their population. For this study, the authors examined whether there were gender differences in the rate at which people are admitted to treatment within 30 days of assessment. Of the 5,004 individuals seeking publicly-funded substance abuse treatment in Detroit for the years 1996-97, 50.3% of those assessed at the CIU actually entered treatment. Women (31% of the people assessed) had a lower rate of admission (45% for women versus 53% for men) a difference that was maintained even after controlling for known risk factors. Women who were given priority for admission (i.e., those who were pregnant, had children, or injected drugs) had a higher rate of admission than other women (73% versus 39%), but only 17% of the women presenting were included in the priority groups. Men who were injecting drugs (a priority group) also had a higher rate of admission than other men (83% versus 49%). In multivariate analysis controlling for priority groups and known risk factors, women were still less likely to be admitted to treatment within 30 days of admission than men. Establishing priorities improves the rate of admission within 30 days of assessment for those groups, but more needs to be done to improve the admission rate for women. These results demonstrate that a CIU allows administrators to monitor for access issues.

  9. The 10-30-day intraseasonal variation of the East Asian winter monsoon: The temperature mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Suxiang; Sun, Qingfei; Huang, Qian; Chu, Peng

    2016-09-01

    East Asia is known for its monsoon characteristics, but little research has been performed on the intraseasonal time scale of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM). In this paper, the extended reanalysis (ERA)-Interim sub-daily data are used to study the surface air temperature intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) of the EAWM. The results show that the air temperature (2-m level) of the EAWM has a dominant period of 10-30 days. Lake Baikal and south China are the centers of the air temperature ISO. An anomalous low frequency (10-30-day filtered) anticyclone corresponds to the intraseasonal cold air. The 10-30-day filtered cold air spreads from Novaya Zemlya to Lake Baikal and even to South China. The ISO of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index influences the temperature of the EAWM by stimulating Rossby waves in middle latitude, causing meridional circulation, and eventually leads to the temperature ISO of the EAWM. RegCM4 has good performance for the simulation of the air temperature ISO. The simulated results indicate that the plateau is responsible for the southward propagation of the intraseasonal anticyclone. The anticyclone could not reach South China when there was no plateau in western China and its upper reaches.

  10. Comparison of robotic and laparoscopic colorectal resections with respect to 30-day perioperative morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Adina E.; Elnahas, Ahmad; Bashir, Shaheena; Cleghorn, Michelle C.; Quereshy, Fayez A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Robotic surgery has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional laparoscopy. Robotic surgery addresses many of the technical and ergonomic limitations of laparoscopic surgery, but the literature regarding clinical outcomes in colorectal surgery is limited. We sought to compare robotic and laparoscopic colorectal resections with respect to 30-day perioperative outcomes. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to identify all patients who underwent robotic or laparoscopic colorectal surgery in 2013. We performed a logistic regression analysis to compare intraoperative variables and 30-day outcomes. Results There were 8392 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery and 472 patients who underwent robotic colorectal surgery. The robotic cohort had a lower incidence of unplanned intraoperative conversion (9.5% v. 13.7%, p = 0.008). There were no significant differences between robotic and laparoscopic surgery with respect to other intraoperative and postoperative outcomes, such as operative duration, length of stay, postoperative ileus, anastomotic leak, venous thromboembolism, wound infection, cardiac complications and pulmonary complications. On multivariable analysis, robotic surgery was protective for unplanned conversion, while male sex, malignancy, Crohn disease and diverticular disease were all associated with open conversion. Conclusion Robotic colorectal surgery has comparable 30-day perioperative morbidity to laparoscopic surgery and may decrease the rate of intraoperative conversion in select patients. PMID:27240135

  11. A systematic review of the outcomes of osteoporotic fracture patients after hospital discharge: morbidity, subsequent fractures, and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nazrun, Ahmad Shuid; Tzar, Mohd Nizam; Mokhtar, Sabarul Afian; Mohamed, Isa Naina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporotic fracture is the main complication of osteoporosis. The current management is to discharge patients as early as possible so they can get back to their daily activities. Once discharged, there are three main issues relating to morbidity, mortality, and risk of a subsequent fracture that need to be addressed and discussed. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to summarize and evaluate the evidence from published literature, to determine the outcome of osteoporotic fracture patients after their hospital discharge. Methods The MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were searched, using the terms “osteoporosis”, “fracture”, “osteoporotic fracture”, “hip fracture”, and “vertebral fracture”. We included only human studies published in English between 2004 and 2014. The reference lists of included studies were thoroughly reviewed in search for other relevant studies. Results A total of 18 studies met the selection criteria. Most were observational and cohort studies. Out of all the studies, five studies looked into the morbidity, six studies looked into the risk of subsequent fractures, and seven studies looked into mortality. Vertebral fracture caused the greatest health burden, but hip fracture patients were the main users of informal care after hospital discharge. There was an increased risk of a subsequent fracture after a primary fracture compared with the control group, a cohort comparison, or the general population. Osteoporotic fractures, especially hip fractures, are associated with higher mortality rate despite the advances in the management of osteoporotic fracture cases. Conclusion There is strong evidence to show that after hospital discharge, osteoporotic fracture patients are faced with higher morbidity, subsequent fractures, and mortality. PMID:25429224

  12. Risk Factors and Indications for 30-Day Readmission After Primary Surgery for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    AlHilli, Mariam; Langstraat, Carrie; Tran, Christine; Martin, Janice; Weaver, Amy; McGree, Michaela; Mariani, Andrea; Cliby, William; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify patients at risk for postoperative morbidities, we evaluated indications and factors associated with 30-day readmission after epithelial ovarian cancer surgery. Methods Patients undergoing primary surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer between January 2, 2003, and December 29, 2008, were evaluated. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were fit to identify factors associated with 30-day readmission. A parsimonious multivariable model was identified using backward and stepwise variable selection. Results In total, 324 (60.2%) patients were stage III and 91 (16.9%) were stage IV. Of all 538 eligible patients, 104 (19.3%) were readmitted within 30 days. Cytoreduction to no residual disease was achieved in 300 (55.8%) patients, and 167 (31.0%) had measurable disease (≤1 cm residual disease). The most common indications for readmission were surgical site infection (SSI; 21.2%), pleural effusion/ascites management (14.4%), and thromboembolic events (12.5%). Multivariate analysis identified American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (odds ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–2.89; P = 0.007), ascites [1.76 (1.11–2.81); P = 0.02], and postoperative complications during initial admission [grade 3–5 vs none, 2.47 (1.19–5.16); grade 1 vs none, 2.19 (0.98–4.85); grade 2 vs none, 1.28 (0.74–2.21); P = 0.048] to be independently associated with 30-day readmission (c-index = 0.625). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the sole predictor of readmission for SSI (odds ratio, 3.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–4.33; P = 0.04). Conclusions Clinically significant risk factors for 30-day readmission include American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher, ascites and postoperative complications at initial admission. The SSI and pleural effusions/ascites are common indications for readmission. Systems can be developed to predict patients needing outpatient management, improve care, and reduce

  13. Level of incongruence during cardiac rehabilitation and prediction of future CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Fiorenza A; Stauber, Stefanie; Wilhelm, Matthias; Znoj, Hansjörg; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Independent of traditional risk factors, psychosocial risk factors increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies in the field of psychotherapy have shown that the construct of incongruence (meaning a discrepancy between desired and achieved goals) affects the outcome of therapy. We prospectively measured the impact of incongruence in patients after undergoing a cardiac rehabilitation program. We examined 198 CVD patients enrolled in a 8-12 week comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program. Patients completed the German short version of the Incongruence Questionnaire and the SF-36 Health Questionnaire to measure quality of life (QoL) at discharge of rehabilitation. Endpoints at follow-up were CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality. During a mean follow-up period of 54.3 months, 29 patients experienced a CVD-related hospitalization and 3 patients died. Incongruence at discharge of rehabilitation was independent of traditional risk factors a significant predictor for CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality (HR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29-3.20, p = .002). We also found a significant interaction of incongruence with mental QoL (HR .96, 95% CI .92-.99, p = .027), i.e. incongruence predicted poor prognosis if QoL was low (p = .017), but not if QoL was high (p = .74). Incongruence at discharge predicted future CVD-related hospitalizations plus all-cause mortality and mental QoL moderated this relationship. Therefore, incongruence should be considered for effective treatment planning and outcome measurement.

  14. Patient Safety Events and Harms During Medical and Surgical Hospitalizations for Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma E.; Pronovost, Peter; Dixon, Lisa B.; Guallar, Eliseo; Ford, Daniel E.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Boonyasai, Romsai T.; Thompson, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of patient safety events and associated nonfatal physical harms and mortality in a cohort of persons with serious mental illness. This group experiences high rates of medical comorbidity and premature mortality and may be at high risk of adverse patient safety events. Methods Medical record review was conducted for medical-surgical hospitalizations occurring during 1994–2004 in a community-based cohort of Maryland adults with serious mental illness. Individuals were eligible if they died within 30 days of a medical-surgical hospitalization and if they also had at least one prior medical-surgical hospitalization within five years of death. All admissions took place at Maryland general hospitals. A case-crossover analysis examined the relationships among patient safety events, physical harms, and elevated likelihood of death within 30 days of hospitalization. Results A total of 790 hospitalizations among 253 adults were reviewed. The mean number of patient safety events per hospitalization was 5.8, and the rate of physical harms was 142 per 100 hospitalizations. The odds of physical harm were elevated in hospitalizations in which 22 of the 34 patient safety events occurred (p<.05), including medical events (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.3–1.7) and procedure-related events (OR=1.6, CI=1.2–2.0). Adjusted odds of death within 30 days of hospitalization were elevated for individuals with any patient safety event, compared with those with no event (OR=3.7, CI=1.4–10.3). Conclusions Patient safety events were positively associated with physical harm and 30-day mortality in nonpsychiatric hospitalizations for persons with serious mental illness. PMID:27181736

  15. Mortality from adverse drug reactions in adult medical inpatients at four hospitals in South Africa: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, Johannes P; Mehta, Ushma; Parrish, Andy G; Wilson, Douglas P K; Stewart, Annemie; Njuguna, Christine W; Kramer, Nicole; Maartens, Gary; Blockman, Marc; Cohen, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Aims Fatal adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are important causes of death, but data from resource-limited settings are scarce. We determined the proportion of deaths in South African medical inpatients attributable to ADRs, and their preventability, stratified by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. Methods We reviewed the folders of all patients who died over a 30 day period in the medical wards of four hospitals. We identified ADR-related deaths (deaths where an ADR was ‘possible’, ‘probable’ or ‘certain’ using WHO-UMC criteria and where the ADR contributed to death). We determined preventability according to previously published criteria. Results ADRs contributed to the death of 2.9% of medical admissions and 56 of 357 deaths (16%) were ADR-related. Tenofovir, rifampicin and co-trimoxazole were the most commonly implicated drugs. 43% of ADRs were considered preventable. The following factors were independently associated with ADR-related death: HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6, 12), exposure to more than seven drugs (aOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3, 4.8) and increasing comorbidity score (aOR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1, 1.7). Conclusions In our setting, where HIV and tuberculosis are highly prevalent, fatal in-hospital ADRs were more common than reported in high income settings. Most deaths were attributed to drugs used in managing HIV and tuberculosis. A large proportion of the ADRs were preventable, highlighting the need to strengthen systems for health care worker training and support. PMID:25475751

  16. Prediction of in-hospital mortality after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using an artificial neural network

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Eric S.; Hocking, Kyle M.; Brophy, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) carries a high mortality rate, even with prompt transfer to a medical center. An artificial neural network (ANN) is a computational model which improves predictive ability via pattern recognition, while continually adapting to new input data. The goal of this study was to effectively use ANN modeling to provide vascular surgeons a discriminant adjunct to assess the likelihood of in-hospital mortality on a pending rAAA admission using easily obtainable patient information from the field. Methods One-hundred and twenty-five of 332 total patients from a single-institution from 1998–2013 who had attempted rAAA repair were reviewed for preoperative factors associated with in-hospital mortality. One-hundred and eight patients received an open operation, and 17 patients received endovascular repair. Five variables were found significant upon multivariate analysis (P < .05), and four of these five: preoperative shock, loss of consciousness, cardiac arrest and age were modeled via multiple logistic regression and an ANN. These predictive models were compared against the Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS). All models were assessed by generation of receiver operating characteristic curves and Actual vs. Predicted outcomes plots, with area under the curve (AUC) and Pearson r2 value as the primary measures of discriminant ability. Results Of the 125 patients, 53 (42%) did not survive to discharge. Five preoperative factors were significant (P < .05) independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis: advanced age, renal disease, loss of consciousness, cardiac arrest and shock, though renal disease was excluded from the models. The sequential accumulation of zero to four of these risk factors progressively increased overall mortality rate, from 11% to 16% to 44% to 76% to 89% (Age ≥ 70 considered a risk factor). Algorithms derived from multiple logistic regression, ANN and GAS models generated AUC values of

  17. Effectiveness of the clinical pharmacist in reducing mortality in hospitalized cardiac patients: a propensity score-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Xiao-bo; Gu, Zhi-chun; Liu, Xiao-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacist-led medication review services have been assessed in the meta-analyses in hospital. Of the 135 relevant articles located, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria; however, there was no statistically significant difference found between pharmacists’ interventions and usual care for mortality (odds ratio 1.50, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 3.46, P=0.34). These analyses may not have found a statistically significant effect because they did not adequately control the wide variation in the delivery of care and patient selection parameters. Additionally, the investigators did not conduct research on the cases of death specifically and did not identify all possible drug-related problems (DRPs) that could cause or contribute to mortality and then convince physicians to correct. So there will be a condition to use a more precise approach to evaluate the effect of clinical pharmacist interventions on the mortality rates of hospitalized cardiac patients. Objective To evaluate the impact of the clinical pharmacist as a direct patient-care team member on the mortality of all patients admitted to the cardiology unit. Methods A comparative study was conducted in a cardiology unit of a university-affiliated hospital. The clinical pharmacists did not perform any intervention associated with improper use of medications during Phase I (preintervention) and consulted with the physicians to address the DRPs during Phase II (postintervention). The two phases were compared to evaluate the outcome, and propensity score (PS) matching was applied to enhance the comparability. The primary endpoint of the study was the composite of all-cause mortality during Phase I and Phase II. Results Pharmacists were consulted by the physicians to correct any drug-related issues that they suspected may cause or contribute to a fatal outcome in the cardiology ward. A total of 1,541 interventions were suggested by the clinical pharmacist in the study group; 1,416 (92.0%) of them were

  18. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries.To create a major change in Haiti's health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic "community care grids" to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis.We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti's health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  19. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries. To create a major change in Haiti’s health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic “community care grids” to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis. We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti’s health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  20. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  1. Perioperative risk factors for mortality and length of hospitalization in mares with dystocia undergoing general anesthesia: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Eva; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Costa, Maria Carolina; Valverde, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated associations between perioperative factors and probability of death and length of hospitalization of mares with dystocia that survived following general anesthesia. Demographics and perioperative characteristics from 65 mares were reviewed retrospectively and used in a risk factor analysis. Mortality rate was 21.5% during the first 24 h post-anesthesia. The mean ± standard deviation number of days of hospitalization of surviving mares was 6.3 ± 5.4 d. Several factors were found in the univariable analysis to be significantly associated (P < 0.1) with increased probability of perianesthetic death, including: low preoperative total protein, high temperature and severe dehydration on presentation, prolonged dystocia, intraoperative hypotension, and drugs used during recovery. Type of delivery and day of the week the surgery was performed were significantly associated with length of hospitalization in the multivariable mixed effects model. The study identified some risk factors that may allow clinicians to better estimate the probability of mortality and morbidity in these mares. PMID:23115362

  2. Outcomes and Risk Factors for Mortality among Patients Treated with Carbapenems for Klebsiella spp. Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Biehle, Lauren R.; Cottreau, Jessica M.; Thompson, David J.; Filipek, Rachel L.; O’Donnell, J. Nicholas; Lasco, Todd M.; Mahoney, Monica V.; Hirsch, Elizabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extensive dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae has led to increased resistance among Klebsiella species. Carbapenems are used as a last resort against resistant pathogens, but carbapenemase production can lead to therapy failure. Identification of risk factors for mortality and assessment of current susceptibility breakpoints are valuable for improving patient outcomes. Aim The objective of this study was to evaluate outcomes and risk factors for mortality among patients treated with carbapenems for Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. Methods Patients hospitalized between 2006 and 2012 with blood cultures positive for Klebsiella spp. who received ≥ 48 hours of carbapenem treatment within 72 hours of positive culture were included in this retrospective study. Patient data were retrieved from electronic medical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for 30-day hospital mortality. Results One hundred seven patients were included. The mean patient age was 61.5 years and the median APACHE II score was 13 ± 6.2. Overall, 30-day hospital mortality was 9.3%. After adjusting for confounding variables, 30-day mortality was associated with baseline APACHE II score (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01–1.35; P = 0.03), length of stay prior to index culture (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00–1.06; P = 0.04), and carbapenem non-susceptible (imipenem or meropenem MIC > 1 mg/L) infection (OR, 9.08; 95% CI, 1.17–70.51; P = 0.04). Conclusions Baseline severity of illness and length of stay prior to culture were associated with 30-day mortality and should be considered when treating patients with Klebsiella bacteremia. These data support the change in carbapenem breakpoints for Klebsiella species. PMID:26618357

  3. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002–20111

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Brandon A.; Bonnewell, John P.; Wiemken, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  4. Changes in size and compliance of the calf after 30 days of simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Stein, Stewart L.

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis that reducing muscle compartment by a long-term exposure to microgravity would cause increased leg venous compliance was tested in eight men who were assessed for vascular compliance and for serial circumferences of the calf before and after 30 days of continuous 6-deg head-down bed rest. It was found that head-down bed rest caused decreases in the calculated calf volume and the calf-muscle compartment, as well as increases in calf compliance. The percent increases in calf compliance correlated significantly with decreases in calf muscle compartment.

  5. Effects on groundwater microbial communities of an engineered 30-day in situ exposure to the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Haack, Sheridan K; Metge, David W; Fogarty, Lisa R; Meyer, Michael T; Barber, Larry B; Harvey, Ronald W; Leblanc, Denis R; Kolpin, Dana W

    2012-07-17

    Effects upon microbial communities from environmental exposure to concentrations of antibiotics in the μg L(-1) range remain poorly understood. Microbial communities from an oligotrophic aquifer (estimated doubling rates of only once per week) that were previously acclimated (AC) or unacclimated (UAC) to historical sulfamethoxazole (SMX) contamination, and a laboratory-grown Pseudomonas stutzeri strain, were exposed to 240-520 μg L(-1) SMX for 30 days in situ using filter chambers allowing exposure to ambient groundwater, but not to ambient microorganisms. SMX-exposed UAC bacterial communities displayed the greatest mortality and impairment (viable stain assays), the greatest change in sensitivity to SMX (dose-response assays), and the greatest change in community composition (Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism; T-RFLP). The sul1 gene, encoding resistance to SMX at clinically relevant levels, and an element of Class I integrons, was not detected in any community. Changes in microbial community structure and SMX resistance over a short experimental period in previously nonexposed, slow-growing aquifer communities suggest concentrations of antibiotics 2-3 orders of magnitude less than those used in clinical applications may influence ecological function through changes in community composition, and could promote antibiotic resistance through selection of naturally resistant bacteria.

  6. Maternal mortality at government maternity hospital. Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh (a review of 431 cases).

    PubMed

    Durgamba, K K; Qureshi, S

    1970-01-01

    This reviews 431 maternal deaths over 3 periods of 3-4 years each from January 1958 to December 1968. Trends in mortality are noted. A steady decline was noted. Associated diseases increased maternal mortality but age and parity had no significant influence. 47% of the deaths were intrapartum, 35% postpartum, and 18% antenatal. Major causes were hemorrhage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, sepsis, and anemia, in that order. Deaths due to infection diminished markedly during the period. 58.2% of the deaths were considered avoidable. Delay by patient or doctor and lack of facilities in rural areas were principle avoidable factors. Extension of obstetrical service to villages, emergency mobile squads, and periodic review of mortality statistics are recommended. PMID:12304876

  7. Health in a fragile state: a five-year review of mortality patterns and trends at Somalia’s Banadir Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulane, Asli; Sematimba, Douglas; Mohamed, Lul M; Ali, Abdirashid H; Lu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background The recurrent civil conflict in Somalia has impeded progress toward improving health and health care, with lack of data and poor performance of health indicators. This study aimed at making inference about Banadir region by exploring morbidity and mortality trends at Banadir Hospital. This is one of the few functional hospitals during war. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted with data collected at Banadir Hospital for the period of January 2008–December 2012. The data were aggregated from patient records and summarized on a morbidity and mortality surveillance form with respect to age groups and stratified by sex. The main outcome was the number of patients that died in the hospital. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between sex and hospital mortality. Results Conditions of infectious origin were the major presentations at the hospital. The year 2011 recorded the highest number of cases of diarrhea and mortality due to diarrhea. The stillbirth rate declined during the study period from 272 to 48 stillbirths per 1,000 live births by 2012. The sum of total cases that were attended to at the hospital by the end of 2012 was four times the number at the baseline year of the study in 2008; however, the overall mortality rate among those admitted declined between 2008 and 2012. Conclusion There was reduction in patient mortality at the hospital over the study period. Data from Banadir Hospital are consistent with findings from Banadir region and could give credible public health reflections for the region given the lack of data on a population level. PMID:27621664

  8. The Effects of Pre-Existing Hyponatremia and Subsequent-Developing Acute Kidney Injury on In-Hospital Mortality: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Woo; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin Young; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Both hyponatremia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common and harmful in hospitalized patients. However, their combined effects on patient mortality have been little studied. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 19191 adult patients who were admitted for 1 year. Pre-existing hyponatremia was defined as a serum sodium level < 135 mmol/L on the first measurement of their admission. AKI was defined as a rise in serum creatinine by ≥ 26.5 μmol/L or ≥ 1.5 times of the baseline value of creatinine during the hospital stay. Results The prevalence of pre-existing hyponatremia was 8.2%. During a median 6.0 days of hospital stay, the incidence rates of AKI and in-hospital patient mortality were 5.1% and 0.9%, respectively. Pre-existing hyponatremia independently predicted AKI development and in-hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.300, P = 0.004; HR 2.481, P = 0.002, respectively). Pre-existing hyponatremia and subsequent development of AKI increased in-hospital mortality by 85 times, compared to the patients with normonatremia and no AKI. In subgroup analysis, the AKI group showed higher rates of de novo hypernatremia than the non-AKI group during the admission. De novo hypernatremia, which might be associated with over-correction of hyponatremia, increased in-hospital mortality (HR 3.297, P <0.001), and patients with AKI showed significantly higher rates of de novo hypernatremia than patients without AKI (16.2% vs. 1.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Pre-existing hyponatremia may be associated with the development of AKI in hospitalized patients, and both hyponatremia and hospital-acquired AKI could have a detrimental effect on short term patient mortality, which might be related to the inappropriate correction of hyponatremia in AKI patients. PMID:27622451

  9. Health in a fragile state: a five-year review of mortality patterns and trends at Somalia’s Banadir Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulane, Asli; Sematimba, Douglas; Mohamed, Lul M; Ali, Abdirashid H; Lu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background The recurrent civil conflict in Somalia has impeded progress toward improving health and health care, with lack of data and poor performance of health indicators. This study aimed at making inference about Banadir region by exploring morbidity and mortality trends at Banadir Hospital. This is one of the few functional hospitals during war. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted with data collected at Banadir Hospital for the period of January 2008–December 2012. The data were aggregated from patient records and summarized on a morbidity and mortality surveillance form with respect to age groups and stratified by sex. The main outcome was the number of patients that died in the hospital. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between sex and hospital mortality. Results Conditions of infectious origin were the major presentations at the hospital. The year 2011 recorded the highest number of cases of diarrhea and mortality due to diarrhea. The stillbirth rate declined during the study period from 272 to 48 stillbirths per 1,000 live births by 2012. The sum of total cases that were attended to at the hospital by the end of 2012 was four times the number at the baseline year of the study in 2008; however, the overall mortality rate among those admitted declined between 2008 and 2012. Conclusion There was reduction in patient mortality at the hospital over the study period. Data from Banadir Hospital are consistent with findings from Banadir region and could give credible public health reflections for the region given the lack of data on a population level.

  10. 78 FR 58318 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: The Framingham Heart Study (FHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... studying the determinants of cardiovascular disease. Morbidity and mortality follow-up will continue to... data collection plans and instruments, contact Dr. Gina Wei, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences,...

  11. Predicting Early Mortality in Adult Trauma Patients Admitted to Three Public University Hospitals in Urban India: A Prospective Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit; Khajanchi, Monty; Kumar, Vineet; Dharap, Satish; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Petzold, Max; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Saha, Makhan Lal; von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background In India alone, more than one million people die yearly due to trauma. Identification of patients at risk of early mortality is crucial to guide clinical management and explain prognosis. Prediction models can support clinical judgement, but existing models have methodological limitations. The aim of this study was to derive a vital sign based prediction model for early mortality among adult trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of adult trauma patients admitted to three urban university hospitals in India between October 2013 and January 2014. The outcome measure was mortality within 24 hours. We used logistic regression with restricted cubic splines to derive our model. We assessed model performance in terms of discrimination, calibration, and optimism. Results A total of 1629 patients were included. Median age was 35, 80% were males. Mortality between admission and 24 hours was 6%. Our final model included systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale. Our model displayed good discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROCC) of 0.85. Predicted mortality corresponded well with observed mortality, indicating good calibration. Conclusion This study showed that routinely recorded systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale predicted early hospital mortality in trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Our model needs to be externally validated before it can be applied in the clinical setting. PMID:25180494

  12. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of sale for future delivery is trading on a designated contract market, registered derivatives...

  13. 78 FR 69428 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Cancer... and Budget (OMB) a request for review and approval of the information collection listed below. This... of this notice is to allow an additional 30 days for public comment. The National Cancer...

  14. 78 FR 65696 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... October 25, 2013 at 78 FR 64145 HUD published a 30 day notice of proposed information collection. This... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing... Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk- Sharing Program. OMB Approval...

  15. 76 FR 6794 - 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Program for Health Information Technology, 76 FR 1262 (Jan. 7, 2011) (the ``Permanent Certification... HUMAN SERVICES 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status AGENCY... ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) status. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 300jj-11. DATES: The 30-day...

  16. 78 FR 66040 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate-Sales Contract and Addendums

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... October 25, 2013 at 78 FR 64145, HUD inadvertently published a 30 day notice of proposed information... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate--Sales... Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard at...

  17. Detection of Excess Influenza Severity: Associating Respiratory Hospitalization and Mortality Data With Reports of Influenza-Like Illness by Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    van Asten, Liselotte; Meijer, Adam; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.; Donker, Gé A.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We explored whether excesses in influenza severity can be detected by combining respiratory syndromic hospital and mortality data with data on influenza-like illness (ILI) cases obtained from general practitioners. Methods. To identify excesses in the severity of influenza infections in the population of the Netherlands between 1999 and 2005, we looked for increases in influenza-associated hospitalizations and mortality that were disproportionate to the number of ILI cases reported by general practitioners. We used generalized estimating equation regression models to associate syndromic hospital and mortality data with ILI surveillance data obtained from general practitioners. Virus isolation and antigenic characterization data were used to interpret the results. Results. Disproportionate increases in hospitalizations and mortality (relative to ILI cases reported by general practitioners) were identified in 2003/04 during the A/Fujian/411/02(H3N2) drift variant epidemic. Conclusions. Combined surveillance of respiratory hospitalizations and mortality and ILI data obtained from general practitioners can capture increases in severe influenza-associated illness that are disproportionate to influenza incidence rates. Therefore, this novel approach should complement traditional seasonal and pandemic influenza surveillance in efforts to detect increases in influenza case fatality rates and percentages of patients hospitalized. PMID:20864730

  18. [Disparities in hospital mortality after proximal femoral fractures in East Germany 1989].

    PubMed

    Wildner, M; Markuzzi, A; Casper, W; Bergmann, K

    1998-01-01

    The revised and pseudonymized data set of the hospital discharge diagnoses of East Germany (German Democratic Republic, GDR) for 1989 was analyzed regarding the in-hospital case fatality of closed hip fractures (ICD-9 820.0, 820.2, 820.8). The case fatality of 20.2% during an average hospital stay of 60 days including between-ward and between-hospital transfers is high when compared to international data and data for West Germany. Apart from the expected influence of age, fatality was reduced for cervical (intracapsular) fractures, female sex, and for a location of the treating hospital within East Berlin. This reduction of the case fatality within East Berlin by nearly two thirds after adjustment for age, sex, and type of fracture compared to other regions is most likely explained by better medical treatment facitilities within East Berlin, the former capital of the GDR. The regional disparities that were observed during our model analysis give a hint towards the influence that medical care can have on the fatality associated with this on a population level relevant disease.

  19. Hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs in relation to socioeconomic status among people with bipolar affective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chun; Kuo, Kuei-Hong; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the relationships between the socioeconomic status and long-term outcomes of individuals with bipolar affective disorder (BPD) is lacking. Aims We aimed to estimate the effects of baseline socioeconomic status on longitudinal outcomes. Method A national cohort of adult participants with newly diagnosed BPD was identified in 2008. The effects of personal and household socioeconomic status were explored on outcomes of hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs, over a 3-year follow-up period (2008–2011). Results A total of 7987 participants were recruited. The relative risks of hospital treatment and mortality were found elevated for the ones from low-income households who also had higher healthcare costs. Low premium levels did not correlate with future healthcare costs. Conclusions Socioeconomic deprivation is associated with poorer outcome and higher healthcare costs in BPD patients. Special care should be given to those with lower socioeconomic status to improve outcomes with potential benefits of cost savings in the following years. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © 2016 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703748

  20. Timing of surgery for hip fracture and in-hospital mortality: a retrospective population-based cohort study in the Spanish National Health System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While the benefits or otherwise of early hip fracture repair is a long-running controversy with studies showing contradictory results, this practice is being adopted as a quality indicator in several health care organizations. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between early hip fracture repair and in-hospital mortality in elderly people attending public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System and, additionally, to explore factors associated with the decision to perform early hip fracture repair. Methods A cohort of 56,500 patients of 60-years-old and over, hospitalized for hip fracture during the period 2002 to 2005 in all the public hospitals in 8 Spanish regions, were followed up using administrative databases to identify the time to surgical repair and in-hospital mortality. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to analyze the relationship between the timing of surgery (< 2 days from admission) and in-hospital mortality, controlling for several confounding factors. Results Early surgery was performed on 25% of the patients. In the unadjusted analysis early surgery showed an absolute difference in risk of mortality of 0.57 (from 4.42% to 3.85%). However, patients undergoing delayed surgery were older and had higher comorbidity and severity of illness. Timeliness for surgery was not found to be related to in-hospital mortality once confounding factors such as age, sex, chronic comorbidities as well as the severity of illness were controlled for in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Older age, male gender, higher chronic comorbidity and higher severity measured by the Risk Mortality Index were associated with higher mortality, but the time to surgery was not. PMID:22257790

  1. Association of hospital volume with readmission rates: a retrospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhenqiu; Herrin, Jeph; Bernheim, Susannah; Drye, Elizabeth E; Krumholz, Harlan M; Ross, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of hospital volume (a marker of quality of care) with hospital readmission rates. Design Retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting 4651US acute care hospitals. Study data 6 916 644 adult discharges, excluding patients receiving psychiatric or medical cancer treatment. Main outcome measures We used Medicare fee-for-service data from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012 to calculate observed-to-expected, unplanned, 30 day, standardized readmission rates for hospitals and for specialty cohorts medicine, surgery/gynecology, cardiorespiratory, cardiovascular, and neurology. We assessed the association of hospital volume by quintiles with 30 day, standardized readmission rates, with and without adjustment for hospital characteristics (safety net status, teaching status, geographic region, urban/rural status, nurse to bed ratio, ownership, and cardiac procedure capability. We also examined associations with the composite outcome of 30 day, standardized readmission or mortality rates. Results Mean 30 day, standardized readmission rate among the fifth of hospitals with the lowest volume was 14.7 (standard deviation 5.3) compared with 15.9 (1.7) among the fifth of hospitals with the highest volume (P<0.001). We observed the same pattern of lower readmission rates in the lowest versus highest volume hospitals in the specialty cohorts for medicine (16.6 v 17.4, P<0.001), cardiorespiratory (18.5 v 20.5, P<0.001), and neurology (13.2 v 14.0, p=0.01) cohorts; the cardiovascular cohort, however, had an inverse association (14.6 v 13.7, P<0.001). These associations remained after adjustment for hospital characteristics except in the cardiovascular cohort, which became non-significant, and the surgery/gynecology cohort, in which the lowest volume fifth of hospitals had significantly higher standardized readmission rates than the highest volume fifth (difference 0.63 percentage points (95% confidence interval 0.10 to 1.17), P=0.02). Mean 30 day

  2. Correspondence between hair cortisol concentrations and 30-day integrated daily salivary and weekly urinary cortisol measures.

    PubMed

    Short, Sarah J; Stalder, Tobias; Marceau, Kristine; Entringer, Sonja; Moog, Nora K; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Wadhwa, Pathik D; Buss, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of cortisol production, regulation and function is of considerable interest and relevance given its ubiquitous role in virtually all aspects of physiology, health and disease risk. The quantification of cortisol concentration in hair has been proposed as a promising approach for the retrospective assessment of integrated, long-term cortisol production. However, human research is still needed to directly test and validate current assumptions about which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are reflected in hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Here, we report findings from a validation study in a sample of 17 healthy adults (mean±SD age: 34±8.6 yrs). To determine the extent to which HCC captures cumulative cortisol production, we examined the correspondence of HCC, obtained from the first 1cm scalp-near hair segment, assumed to retrospectively reflect 1-month integrated cortisol secretion, with 30-day average salivary cortisol area-under-the curve (AUC) based on 3 samples collected per day (on awakening, +30min, at bedtime) and the average of 4 weekly 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC) assessments. To further address which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are best reflected in the HCC measure, we also examined components of the salivary measures that represent: (1) production in response to the challenge of awakening (using the cortisol awakening response [CAR]), and (2) chronobiological regulation of cortisol production (using diurnal slope). Finally, we evaluated the test-retest stability of each cortisol measure. Results indicate that HCC was most strongly associated with the prior 30-day integrated cortisol production measure (average salivary cortisol AUC) (r=0.61, p=0.01). There were no significant associations between HCC and the 30-day summary measures using CAR or diurnal slope. The relationship between 1-month integrated 24-h UFC and HCC did not reach statistical significance (r=0.30, p=0.28). Lastly, of all cortisol

  3. Correspondence between hair cortisol concentrations and 30-day integrated daily salivary and weekly urinary cortisol measures.

    PubMed

    Short, Sarah J; Stalder, Tobias; Marceau, Kristine; Entringer, Sonja; Moog, Nora K; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Wadhwa, Pathik D; Buss, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of cortisol production, regulation and function is of considerable interest and relevance given its ubiquitous role in virtually all aspects of physiology, health and disease risk. The quantification of cortisol concentration in hair has been proposed as a promising approach for the retrospective assessment of integrated, long-term cortisol production. However, human research is still needed to directly test and validate current assumptions about which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are reflected in hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Here, we report findings from a validation study in a sample of 17 healthy adults (mean±SD age: 34±8.6 yrs). To determine the extent to which HCC captures cumulative cortisol production, we examined the correspondence of HCC, obtained from the first 1cm scalp-near hair segment, assumed to retrospectively reflect 1-month integrated cortisol secretion, with 30-day average salivary cortisol area-under-the curve (AUC) based on 3 samples collected per day (on awakening, +30min, at bedtime) and the average of 4 weekly 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC) assessments. To further address which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are best reflected in the HCC measure, we also examined components of the salivary measures that represent: (1) production in response to the challenge of awakening (using the cortisol awakening response [CAR]), and (2) chronobiological regulation of cortisol production (using diurnal slope). Finally, we evaluated the test-retest stability of each cortisol measure. Results indicate that HCC was most strongly associated with the prior 30-day integrated cortisol production measure (average salivary cortisol AUC) (r=0.61, p=0.01). There were no significant associations between HCC and the 30-day summary measures using CAR or diurnal slope. The relationship between 1-month integrated 24-h UFC and HCC did not reach statistical significance (r=0.30, p=0.28). Lastly, of all cortisol

  4. Depressive symptoms are associated with higher rates of readmission or mortality after medical hospitalization: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Jenelle L.; Warkentin, Lindsey M.; Majumdar, Sumit R.

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms during a medical hospitalization may be an overlooked prognostic factor for adverse events postdischarge. Our aim was to evaluate whether depressive symptoms predict 30‐day readmission or death after medical hospitalization. We conducted a systematic review of studies that compared postdischarge outcomes by in‐hospital depressive status. We assessed study quality and pooled published and unpublished data using random effects models. Overall, one‐third of 6104 patients discharged from medical wards were depressed (interquartile range, 27%‐40%). Compared to inpatients without depression, those discharged with depressive symptoms were more likely to be readmitted (20.4% vs 13.7%, risk ratio [RR]: 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16‐2.58) or die (2.8% vs 1.5%, RR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.31‐3.44) within 30 days. Depressive symptoms were common in medical inpatients and are associated with an increased risk of adverse events postdischarge. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:373–380. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Hospital Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Hospital Medicine PMID:26824220

  5. Investigating Maternal Mortality in a Public Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ezegwui, HU; Onoh, RC; Ikeako, LC; Onyebuchi, A; Umeora, OUJ; Ezeonu, P; Ibekwe, P

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa has remained high and this is a reflection of the poor quality of maternal services. Aim: To determine the causes, trends, and level of maternal mortality rate in Abakaliki, Ebonyi. Materials and Methods: This was a review of the records of all maternal deaths related to pregnancy over a ten-year period, that is, January 1999 to December 2008. Relevant information on number of deaths, booking status, age, parity, educational level of women, mode of delivery, and causes of death were extracted and analyzed. Results: During the study period, there were 12,587 deliveries and 171 maternal deaths. The maternal mortality ratio (MMR) was 1,359 per 100,000 live births. The trend over the period was lowest in 2008 and highest in 1999 with an MMR of 757 per 100,000 live births and 4,000 per 100,000 live births, respectively. There was a progressive decline in the MMR over the period of study except in the years 2003 and 2006, when the ratio spiked a little, giving an MMR of 1,510 per 100,000 live births and 1,290 per 100,000 live births, respectively. The progressive decline in maternal mortality corresponded with the time that free maternal services were introduced. Hemorrhage was the most important cause of maternal death, accounting for 23.0% (38/165), whereas diabetic ketoacidosis, congestive cardiac failure, and asthma in pregnancy were the least important causes of maternal deaths, each accounting for 0.6% (1/165). Majority of the maternal deaths occurred in unbooked patients (82.4% (136/165)), whereas 17.6% (29/165) of the deaths occurred in booked cases. Forty-seven (28.5% (47/165)) patients died following a cesarean section, 8.5% (14/165) died as a result of abortion complications, and 10.9% (18/165) died undelivered. Seventy-seven (46.7% (77/165)) of the maternal death patients had no formal education. Low socioeconomic status, poor educational level, and grand multiparity were some of the risk factors for

  6. Morbidity and mortality of infective endocarditis in a hospital system in New York City serving a diverse urban population.

    PubMed

    Alkhawam, Hassan; Sogomonian, Robert; Zaiem, Feras; Vyas, Neil; El-Hunjul, Mohammed; Jolly, JoshPaul; Al-Khazraji, Ahmed; Ashraf, Amar

    2016-08-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe illness associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate morbidity and mortality of IE in a hospital serving the most diverse area in New York City. An analysis of 209 patients admitted to the hospital from 2000 to 2012 who were found to have IE based on modified Duke criteria. Among the 209 patients with IE, 188 (88.8%) had native heart valves and 21 (11.2%) had prosthetic valves. Of the patients with native heart valves, 3.7% had coronary artery bypass graft, 4.3% were active drug users, 6.3% had permanent pacemakers, 12.2% had a history of IE, 25.7% were diabetic, 17% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD), 9% had congestive heart failure, 8% had abnormal heart valves, and 13.8% had an unknown etiology. Mortality rates of the patients with prosthetic heart valves were 27.7% compared to 8.11% in patients with native heart valves (OR 3, p<0.0001). Since we identified diabetes mellitus and ESRD to be significant risk factors in our population, we isolated and compared characteristics of patients with and without IE. IE among patients with diabetes mellitus was 23% compared with 13.8% in the control group (p=0.016). Cases of IE in patients with ESRD were 15.3%, compared with 4% in the control group (p<0.0001). We identified an overall mortality rate of 20.1% in patients with IE, a readmission rate within 30 days of discharge of 21.5%, and an average age of 59 years. Among 209 patients, 107 were males and 102 females. The most common organisms identified were Staphylococcus aureus (43.7%), viridans streptococci (17%) followed by Enterococcus (14.7%). Despite appropriate treatment, high rates of morbidity and mortality remained, with a higher impact in patients greater than 50 years of age. Such discoveries raise the importance of controlling and monitoring risk factors for IE. PMID:27206447

  7. Development of Lightweight Material Composites to Insulate Cryogenic Tanks for 30-Day Storage in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for an MLI system which will meet the design constraints of an ILRV used for 7- to 30-day missions. The ten tasks are briefly described: (1) material survey and procurement, material property tests, and selection of composites to be considered; (2) definition of environmental parameters and tooling requirements, and thermal and structural design verification test definition; (3) definition of tanks and associated hardware to be used, and definition of MLI concepts to be considered; (4) thermal analyses, including purge, evacuation, and reentry repressurization analyses; (5) structural analyses (6) thermal degradation tests of composite and structural tests of fastener; (7) selection of MLI materials and system; (8) definition of a conceptual MLI system design; (9) evaluation of nondestructive inspection techniques and definition of procedures for repair of damaged areas; and (10) preparation of preliminary specifications.

  8. Continuous 30-day measurements utilizing the monkey metabolism pod. [study of weightlessness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    A fiberglass system was previously described, using which quantitative physiological measurements could be made to study the effects of weightlessness on 10 to 14 kg adult monkeys maintained in comfortable restraint under space flight conditions. Recent improvements in the system have made it possible to obtain continuous measurements of respiratory gas exchange, cardiovascular function, and mineral balance for periods of up to 30 days on pig-tailed monkeys. It has also been possible to operate two pods which share one set of instrumentation, thereby permitting simultaneous measurements to be made on two animals by commutating signal outputs from the pods. In principle, more than two pods could be operated in this fashion. The system is compatible with Spacelab design. Representative physiological data from ground tests of the system are presented.

  9. The Gravity of LBNP Exercise: Lessons Learned from Identical Twins in Bed for 30 Days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Groppo, Eli R.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Watenpaugh, Donald; Schneider, Suzanne; O'Leary, Deborah; Smith, Scott M.; Steinbach, Gregory C.; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shinji; Meyer, R. Scott

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity leads to cardiovascular deconditioning in humans, which is manifested by post-flight reduction of orthostatic tolerance and upright exercise capacity. During upright posture on Earth, blood pressures are greater in the feet than at heart or head levels due to gravity's effects on columns of blood in the body. During exposure to Microgravity, all gravitational blood pressures disappear. Presently, there is no exercise hardware available for space flight to provide gravitational blood pressures to tissues of the lower body. We hypothesized that 40 minutes of supine treadmill running per day in a LBNP chamber at 1.0 to 1.2 body weight (approximately 50 - 60 mm Hg LBNP) with a 5 min resting, nonexercise LBNP exposure at 50 mm Hg after the exercise session will maintain aerobic fitness orthostatic tolerance, and selected parameters of musculoskeletal function during 30 days of bed rest (simulated microgravity). This paper is an interim report of some of our findings on 16 subjects.

  10. 42 CFR 412.92 - Special treatment: Sole community hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inaccessible for at least 30 days in each 2 out of 3 years. (2) The hospital is located between 15 and 25 miles... conditions, the other like hospitals are inaccessible for at least 30 days in each 2 out of 3 years. (3.... (i) Sole community hospital status is effective 30 days after the date of CMS's written...

  11. Inclusion of Dynamic Clinical Data Improves the Predictive Performance of a 30-Day Readmission Risk Model in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Taber, David J; Palanisamy, Arun P; Srinivas, Titte R; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Odeghe, John; Chavin, Kenneth D; Egede, Leonard E; Baliga, Prabhakar K

    2015-01-01

    Background 30-day readmissions (30DRA) are a highly scrutinized measure of healthcare quality and relatively frequent among kidney transplants (KTX). Development of predictive risk models are critical to reducing 30DRA and improving outcomes. Current approaches rely on fixed variables derived from administrative data. These models may not capture clinical evolution that is critical to predicting outcomes. Methods We directed a retrospective analysis towards: 1) developing parsimonious risk models for 30DRA and 2) comparing efficiency of models based on the use of immutable versus dynamic data. Baseline and in-hospital clinical and outcomes data were collected from adult KTX recipients between 2005 – 12. Risk models were developed using backward logistic regression and compared for predictive efficacy using ROC Curves. Results Of 1,147 KTX patients, 123 had 30DRA. Risk factors for 30DRA included recipient comorbidities, transplant factors, and index hospitalization patient level clinical data. The initial fixed variable model included 9 risk factors and was modestly predictive (AUC 0.64, 95% CI 0.58–0.69). The model was parsimoniously reduced to 6 risks, which remained modestly predictive (AUC 0.63, 95% CI 0.58–0.69). The initial predictive model using 13 fixed and dynamic variables was significantly predictive (AUC 0.73, 95% CI 0.67–0.80), with parsimonious reduction to 9 variables maintaining predictive efficacy (AUC 0.73, 95% CI 0.67–0.79). The final model using dynamically evolving clinical data outperformed the model using static variables (p=0.009). Internal validation demonstrated the final model was stable with minimal bias. Conclusion We demonstrate that modeling dynamic clinical data outperformed models utilizing immutable data in predicting 30DRA. PMID:25594549

  12. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Zwart, Sara R; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen; Smith, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25-49 yr) who participated in a 30-day -6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ~20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ~25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ~20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = -0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  13. External validation of the Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model for predicting death within 1 year after hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, Carl; McAlister, Finlay A.; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Hawken, Steven; Donzé, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background: Predicting long-term survival after admission to hospital is helpful for clinical, administrative and research purposes. The Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model was derived and internally validated to predict the risk of death within 1 year after admission. We conducted an external validation of the model in a large multicentre study. Methods: We used administrative data for all nonpsychiatric admissions of adult patients to hospitals in the provinces of Ontario (2003–2010) and Alberta (2011–2012), and to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (2010–2012) to calculate each patient’s HOMR score at admission. The HOMR score is based on a set of parameters that captures patient demographics, health burden and severity of acute illness. We determined patient status (alive or dead) 1 year after admission using population-based registries. Results: The 3 validation cohorts (n = 2 862 996 in Ontario, 210 595 in Alberta and 66 683 in Boston) were distinct from each other and from the derivation cohort. The overall risk of death within 1 year after admission was 8.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.7% to 8.8%). The HOMR score was strongly and significantly associated with risk of death in all populations and was highly discriminative, with a C statistic ranging from 0.89 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.91) to 0.92 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.92). Observed and expected outcome risks were similar (median absolute difference in percent dying in 1 yr 0.3%, interquartile range 0.05%–2.5%). Interpretation: The HOMR score, calculated using routinely collected administrative data, accurately predicted the risk of death among adult patients within 1 year after admission to hospital for nonpsychiatric indications. Similar performance was seen when the score was used in geographically and temporally diverse populations. The HOMR model can be used for risk adjustment in analyses of health administrative data to predict long-term survival among hospital patients

  14. Early Hospital Mortality among Adult Trauma Patients Significantly Declined between 1998-2011: Three Single-Centre Cohorts from Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit; Dharap, Satish; Kumar, Vineet; Khajanchi, Monty; Tomson, Göran; Tsai, Li Felländer; Petzold, Max; von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic injury causes more than five million deaths each year of which about 90% occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Hospital trauma mortality has been significantly reduced in high-income countries, but to what extent similar results have been achieved in LMIC has not been studied in detail. Here, we assessed if early hospital mortality in patients with trauma has changed over time in an urban lower middle-income setting. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted due to trauma in 1998, 2002, and 2011 to a large public hospital in Mumbai, India. Our outcome measure was early hospital mortality, defined as death between admission and 24-hours. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the association between time and early hospital mortality, adjusting for patient case-mix. Injury severity was quantified using International Classification of Diseases-derived Injury Severity Score (ICISS). Major trauma was defined as ICISS<0.90. Results We analysed data on 4189 patients out of which 86.5% were males. A majority of patients were between 15 and 55 years old and 36.5% had major trauma. Overall early hospital mortality was 8.9% in 1998, 6.0% in 2002, and 8.1% in 2011. Among major trauma patients, early hospital mortality was 13.4%, in 1998, 11.3% in 2002, and 10.9% in 2011. Compared to trauma patients admitted in 1998, those admitted in 2011 had lower odds for early hospital mortality (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.41–0.76) including those with major trauma (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.41–0.78). Conclusions We observed a significant reduction in early hospital mortality among patients with major trauma between 1998 and 2011. Improved survival was evident only after we adjusted for patient case-mix. This finding highlights the importance of risk-adjustment when studying longitudinal mortality trends. PMID:24594775

  15. Hospitalization Incidence, Mortality, and Seasonality of Common Respiratory Viruses Over a Period of 15 Years in a Developed Subtropical City

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul K.S.; Tam, Wilson W.S.; Lee, Tsz Cheung; Hon, Kam Lun; Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C.W.; Mok, Hing Yim; Wong, Martin C.S.; Leung, Ting Fan; Lai, Raymond W.M.; Yeung, Apple C.M.; Ho, Wendy C.S.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Hui, David S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Information on respiratory viruses in subtropical region is limited. Incidence, mortality, and seasonality of influenza (Flu) A/B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), and parainfluenza viruses (PIV) 1/2/3 in hospitalized patients were assessed over a 15-year period (1998–2012) in Hong Kong. Male predominance and laterally transversed J-shaped distribution in age-specific incidence was observed. Incidence of Flu A, RSV, and PIV decreased sharply from infants to toddlers; whereas Flu B and ADV increased slowly. RSV conferred higher fatality than Flu, and was the second killer among hospitalized elderly. ADV and PIV were uncommon, but had the highest fatality. RSV, PIV 2/3 admissions increased over the 15 years, whereas ADV had decreased significantly. A “high season,” mainly contributed by Flu, was observed in late-winter/early-spring (February–March). The “medium season” in spring/summer (April–August) was due to Flu and RSV. The “low season” in late autumn/winter (October–December) was due to PIV and ADV. Seasonality varied between viruses, but predictable distinctive pattern for each virus existed, and temperature was the most important associating meteorological variable. Respiratory viruses exhibit strong sex- and age-predilection, and with predictable seasonality allowing strategic preparedness planning. Hospital-based surveillance is crucial for real-time assessment on severity of new variants. PMID:26579810

  16. Mortality Associated with Severe Sepsis Among Age-Similar Women with and without Pregnancy-Associated Hospitalization in Texas: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The reported mortality among women with pregnancy-associated severe sepsis (PASS) has been considerably lower than among severely septic patients in the general population, with the difference being attributed to the younger age and lack of chronic illness among the women with PASS. However, no comparative studies were reported to date between patients with PASS and age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy (NPSS). Material/Methods We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to compare the crude and adjusted hospital mortality between women with severe sepsis, aged 20–34 years, with and without pregnancy-associated hospitalizations during 2001–2010, following exclusion of those with reported chronic comorbidities, as well as alcohol and drug abuse. Results Crude hospital mortality among PASS vs. NPSS hospitalizations was lower for the whole cohort (6.7% vs. 14.1% [p<0.0001]) and those with ≥3 organ failures (17.6% vs. 33.2% [p=0.0100]). Adjusted PASS mortality (odds ratio [95% CI]) was 0.57 (0.38–0.86) [p=0.0070]. Conclusions Hospital mortality was unexpectedly markedly and consistently lower among women with severe sepsis associated with pregnancy, as compared with contemporaneous, age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy, without reported chronic comorbidities. Further studies are warranted to examine the sources of the observed differences and to corroborate our findings. PMID:27286326

  17. Emergency obstetrical complications in a rural African setting (Kayes, Mali): the link between travel time and in-hospital maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Pirkle, Catherine McLean; Fournier, Pierre; Tourigny, Caroline; Sangaré, Karim; Haddad, Slim

    2011-10-01

    The West African country of Mali implemented referral systems to increase spatial access to emergency obstetrical care and lower maternal mortality. We test the hypothesis that spatial access- proxied by travel time during the rainy and dry seasons- is associated with in-hospital maternal mortality. Effect modification by caesarean section is explored. All women treated for emergency obstetrical complications at the referral hospital in Kayes, Mali were considered eligible for study. First, we conducted descriptive analyses of all emergency obstetrical complications treated at the referral hospital between 2005 and 2007. We calculated case fatality rates by obstetric diagnosis and travel time. Key informant interviews provided travel times. Medical registers provided clinical and demographic data. Second, a matched case-control study assessed the independent effect of travel time on maternal mortality. Stratification was used to explore effect modification by caesarean section. Case fatality rates increased with increasing travel time to the hospital. After controlling for age, diagnosis, and date of arrival, a travel time of four or more hours was significantly associated with in-hospital maternal mortality (OR: 3.83; CI: 1.31-11.27). Travel times between 2 and 4 h were associated with increased odds of maternal mortality (OR 1.88), but the relationship was not significant. The effect of travel time on maternal mortality appears to be modified by caesarean section. Poor spatial access contributes to maternal mortality even in women who reach a health facility. Improving spatial access will help women arrive at the hospital in time to be treated effectively.

  18. The association of market competition with hospital charges, length of stay, and quality outcomes for patients with joint diseases: a longitudinal study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Eun-Cheol; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Kwon, Jeoung A; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the association of market competition with hospital charges, length of stay, and quality outcomes. A total of 279,847 patients from 851 hospitals were analyzed. The Herfindahl-Hirschman Index was used as a measure of hospital market competition level. Our results suggest that hospitals in less competitive markets charged more on charge per admission, possibly by increasing the length of stays, however, hospitals in more competitive markets charged more for daily services by providing more intensive services while reducing the length of stays, thereby reducing the overall charge per admission. Quality outcomes measured by mortality within 30 days of admission and readmission within 30 days of discharge were better for surgical procedures within competitive areas. Continued government monitoring of hospital response to market competition level is recommended in order to determine whether changes in hospitals' strategies influence the long-term outcomes of services performance and health care spending.

  19. Cause-specific mortality in adult epilepsy patients from Tyrol, Austria: hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Granbichler, Claudia A; Oberaigner, Willi; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Bauer, Gerhard; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Seppi, Klaus; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating condition with a considerable increase in mortality compared to the general population. Few studies have focused on cause-specific mortality which we analyse in detail in over 4,000 well-characterized epilepsy patients. The cohort comprised of epilepsy patients ≥ 18, treated between 1970 and 2009 at the epilepsy clinic of Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, and living in the province of Tyrol, Austria. Epilepsy diagnosis was based on ILAE guidelines (1989); patients with brain tumor were excluded. Deceased patients and causes of death (ICD-codes) were obtained via record linkage to the national death registry. We computed age-, sex-, and period-adjusted standardized mortality rates (SMR) for 36 diagnoses subgroups in four major groups. Additional analyses were performed for an incidence cohort. Overall cohort: 4,295 patients, 60,649.1 person-years, 822 deaths, overall SMR 1.7 (95 % CI 1.6-1.9), highest elevated cause-specific SMR: congenital anomalies [7.1 (95 % CI 2.3-16.6)], suicide [4.2 (95 % CI 2.0-8.1)], alcohol dependence syndrome [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], malignant neoplasm of esophagus [3.1 (95 % CI 1.2-6.4)], pneumonia [2.7 (95 % CI 1.6-4.2)]. Incidence cohort: 1,299 patients, 14,215.4 person-years, 267 deaths, overall SMR 1.8 (95 % CI 1.6-2.1), highest elevated cause-specific SMR congenital anomalies [10.8 (95 % CI 1.3-39.3)], suicide [6.8 (95 % CI 1.4-19.8)], alcohol dependence syndrome (6.4 [95 % CI 1.8-16.5)], pneumonia [3.9 (95 % CI 1.8-7.4)], cerebrovascular disease at 3.5 (95 % CI 2.6-4.6). Mortality due to mental health problems, such as suicide or alcohol dependence syndrome, malignant neoplasms, and cerebrovascular diseases was highly increased in our study. In addition to aim for seizure freedom, we suggest improving general health promotion, including cessation of smoking, lowering of alcohol intake, and reduction of weight as well as early identification of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy.

  20. Repeat Procedures Within 30 days in Patients Stented for Malignant Distal Biliary Strictures: Experience of 508 Patients at a Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Michael F; Chan, Calvin HY; Branch, Malcolm S; Jowell, Paul S; Baillie, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Stent related occlusion and migration remains a problem despite attempts to improve stent design over this time period. Flanged polyethylene plastic stents (FPS) remains the stent of choice in most centers. Early failure of stents placed for malignant extrahepatic biliary strictures (MEBS) has not previously been studied in detail. We set out to determine the incidence and reasons for biliary stent change within 30 days of the index procedure in a large tertiary center population during a period where (FPS) was the sole plastic stent used. Methods Retrospective analysis of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) was undertaken in patients who were stented for presumed or known MEBS between 1993 and 2001. Patients who required repeat stenting within 30 days were identified. Results All 508 patients were stented for MEBS. 5.7% of patients had a total of 34 repeat stenting procedures within 30 days of the index procedure; 27of 29 index stents were plastic, 2 were self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), 20 (3.9%) patients had stent failure as the reason for a stent exchange (plastic stent occlusion n = 15, mean time to stent change 14 ± 8.3 days; metal stent occlusion n = 2, mean time to stent change 24.5 ± 7.8 days; plastic stent migration n = 3, mean time to stent change 25 ± 5.3 days). There was a statistically significant difference in the time to stent change between the occluded plastic stent and migrated plastic stent cases (P = 0.045, 95% CI -21.7 to -0.29). 6 patients spent at least 2 additional days in hospital as a result of stent failure. Conclusions Early stent failure is an uncommon problem, especially in patients with SEMS. Early plastic stent failure appears to occur sooner with stent occlusion than with stent migration. Early stent failure is associated with significant morbidity and bears an economic impact in additional procedures and hospital stay.

  1. Air pollution positively correlates with daily stroke admission and in hospital mortality: a study in the urban area of Como, Italy.

    PubMed

    Vidale, Simone; Bonanomi, A; Guidotti, M; Arnaboldi, M; Sterzi, R

    2010-04-01

    Some current evidences suggest that stroke incidence and mortality may be higher in elevated air pollution areas. Our study examined the hypothesis of a correlation between air pollution level and ischemic stroke admission and in Hospital mortality in an urban population. Data on a total of 759 stroke admissions and 180 deaths have been obtained over a 4-year period (2000-2003). Five air ambient particles have been studied. A general additive model estimating Poisson distribution has been used, adding meteorological variables as covariates. NO(2) and PM(10) were significantly associated with admission and mortality (P value < 0.05) and with estimated RR of 1.039 (95% CI 1.066-1.013) and 1.078 (95% CI 1.104-1.052) for hospital admission at 2- and 4-day lags, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests an association between short-term outdoor air pollution exposure and ischemic stroke admission and mortality.

  2. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of “suicide” events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  3. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J Michael

    2015-04-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of "suicide" events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  4. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  5. 77 FR 73731 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Application Under the Hague Convention on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... organizations. The purpose of this Notice is to allow 30 days for public comment. DATES: Submit comments directly to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) up to January 10, 2013. ADDRESSES: Direct comments...

  6. 78 FR 65697 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing, Contracting With Resident-Owned...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Public Housing, Contracting With...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451...

  7. Impacts of typhoon and heavy rain disasters on mortality and infectious diarrhea hospitalization in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunduk; Shin, Yongseung; Kim, Ho; Pak, Haeoyong; Ha, Jongsik

    2013-01-01

    Several studies for health impacts of natural disasters have not been comprehensive with respect to disaster type and areas, nor quantitative. The aim of our study is to quantitatively examine the associations between disasters and human health in South Korea. This study considered "special disasters" that occurred from 2003 to 2009 in seven metropolitan cities and nine provinces in South Korea. First, we completed health impact counts in both disaster periods and reference periods. We then calculated the rate ratios between health impact counts in these two periods. Mortality is estimated to be higher in the case of typhoons, whereas morbidity is estimated to be higher in heavy rain disasters. The difference in health impacts of typhoons and heavy rain may be explained by the difference in meteorological exposure patterns. Consequentially, we suggest the development of properly adaptive plans against the influence of future natural disasters on human health.

  8. Effects of closure of an urban level I trauma centre on adjacent hospitals and local injury mortality: a retrospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Marie; Sharp, Douglas; Wei, Xiong; Nathens, Avery; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of the Martin Luther King Jr Hospital (MLK) closure on the distribution of admissions on adjacent trauma centres, and injury mortality rates in these centres and within the county. Design Observational, retrospective study. Setting Non-public patient-level data from the state of California were obtained for all trauma patients from 1999 to 2009. Geospatial analysis was used to visualise the redistribution of trauma patients to other hospitals after MLK closed. Variance of observed to expected injury mortality using multivariate logistic regression was estimated for the study period. Participants A total of 37 131 trauma patients were admitted to the five major south Los Angeles trauma centres from the MLK service area between 1999 and 2009. Main outcome measures (1) Number and type of trauma admissions to trauma centres in closest proximity to MLK; (2) inhospital injury mortality of trauma patients after the trauma centre closure. Results During and after the MLK closure, trauma admissions increased at three of the four nearby hospitals, particularly admissions for gunshot wounds (GSWs). This redistribution of patient load was accompanied by a dramatic change in the payer mix for surrounding hospitals; one hospital's share of uninsured more than tripled from 12.9% in 1999 to 44.6% by 2009. Overall trauma mortality did not significantly change, but GSW mortality steadily and significantly increased after the closure from 5.0% in 2007 to 7.5% in 2009. Conclusions Though local hospitals experienced a dramatic increase in trauma patient volume, overall mortality for trauma patients did not significantly change after MLK closed. PMID:27165650

  9. Minor Postoperative Increases of Creatinine Are Associated with Higher Mortality and Longer Hospital Length of Stay in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Spies, Claudia D.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ginde, Adit A.; Jankowski, Joachim; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical patients frequently experience postoperative increases in creatinine levels. The authors hypothesized that even small increases in postoperative creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Methods The authors examined the association of postoperative changes from preoperative baseline creatinine with all-cause in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay (HLOS) in a retrospective analysis of surgical patients at a single tertiary care center between January 2006 and June 2012. Results The data of 39,369 surgical patients (noncardiac surgery n = 37,345; cardiac surgery n = 2,024) were analyzed. Acute kidney injury (AKI)—by definition of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome group—was associated with a five-fold higher mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% CI, 4.1 to 5.7; P < 0.001) and a longer HLOS of 5 days (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, congestive heart failure, preoperative hemoglobin, preoperative creatinine, exposure to radiocontrast agent, type of surgery, and surgical AKI risk factors. Importantly, even minor creatinine increases (Δcreatinine 25 to 49% above baseline but < 0.3 mg/dl) not meeting AKI criteria were associated with a two-fold increased risk of death (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.4; P < 0.001) and 2 days longer HLOS (P < 0.001). This was more pronounced in noncardiac surgery patients. Patients with minor creatinine increases had a five-fold risk of death (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 20.3; P < 0.05) and a 3-day longer HLOS (P < 0.01) when undergoing noncardiac surgery. Conclusions Even minor postoperative increases in creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. These results emphasize the importance to find effective therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat even mild forms of postoperative kidney dysfunction to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26492475

  10. Analysis of rat testicular proteome following 30-day exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed

    Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Kazemipour, Nasrin; Saeb, Mehdi; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-12-01

    The use of electromagnetic field (EMF) generating apparatuses such as cell phones is increasing, and has caused an interest in the investigations of its effects on human health. We analyzed proteome in preparations from the whole testis in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were exposed to 900 MHz EMF radiation for 1, 2, or 4 h/day for 30 consecutive days, simulating a range of possible human cell phone use. Subjects were sacrificed immediately after the end of the experiment and testes fractions were solubilized and separated via high-resolution 2D electrophoresis, and gel patterns were scanned, digitized, and processed. Thirteen proteins, which were found only in sham or in exposure groups, were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Among them, heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin-1, and other proteins related to misfolding of proteins and/or stress were identified. These results demonstrate significant effects of radio frequency modulated EMFs exposure on proteome, particularly in protein species in the rodent testis, and suggest that a 30-day exposure to EMF radiation induces nonthermal stress in testicular tissue. The functional implication of the identified proteins was discussed.

  11. Association of Hospital-Level Volume of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Cases and Mortality. Analysis of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry

    PubMed Central

    Odetola, Folafoluwa O.; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Paden, Matthew L.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Davis, Matthew M.; Annich, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Recent pediatric studies suggest a survival benefit exists for higher-volume extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) centers. Objectives: To determine if higher annual ECMO patient volume is associated with lower case-mix–adjusted hospital mortality rate. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed an international registry of ECMO support from 1989 to 2013. Patients were separated into three age groups: neonatal (0–28 d), pediatric (29 d to <18 yr), and adult (≥18 yr). The measure of hospital ECMO volume was age group–specific and adjusted for patient-level case-mix and hospital-level variance using multivariable hierarchical logistic regression modeling. The primary outcome was death before hospital discharge. A subgroup analysis was conducted for 2008–2013. Measurements and Main Results: From 1989 to 2013, a total of 290 centers provided ECMO support to 56,222 patients (30,909 neonates, 14,725 children, and 10,588 adults). Annual ECMO mortality rates varied widely across ECMO centers: the interquartile range was 18–50% for neonates, 25–66% for pediatrics, and 33–92% for adults. For 1989–2013, higher age group–specific ECMO volume was associated with lower odds of ECMO mortality for neonates and adults but not for pediatric cases. In 2008–2013, the volume–outcome association remained statistically significant only among adults. Patients receiving ECMO at hospitals with more than 30 adult annual ECMO cases had significantly lower odds of mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.46–0.80) compared with adults receiving ECMO at hospitals with less than six annual cases. Conclusions: In this international, case-mix–adjusted analysis, higher annual hospital ECMO volume was associated with lower mortality in 1989–2013 for neonates and adults; the association among adults persisted in 2008–2013. PMID:25695688

  12. Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality of Severe Malaria in HIV-Coinfected Children and Adults in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Ferro, Josefo; Montoya, Pablo; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Seni, Amir; Gomes, Ermelinda; Silamut, Kamolrat; Lee, Sue J.; Lucas, Marcelino; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Fanello, Caterina I.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Severe falciparum malaria with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is common in settings with a high prevalence of both diseases, but there is little information on whether HIV affects the clinical presentation and outcome of severe malaria. Methods. HIV status was assessed prospectively in hospitalized parasitemic adults and children with severe malaria in Beira, Mozambique, as part of a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (ISRCTN50258054). Clinical signs, comorbidity, complications, and disease outcome were compared according to HIV status. Results. HIV-1 seroprevalence was 11% (74/655) in children under 15 years and 72% (49/68) in adults with severe malaria. Children with HIV coinfection presented with more severe acidosis, anemia, and respiratory distress, and higher peripheral blood parasitemia and plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2). During hospitalization, deterioration in coma score, convulsions, respiratory distress, and pneumonia were more common in HIV-coinfected children, and mortality was 26% (19/74) versus 9% (53/581) in uninfected children (P < .001). In an age- and antimalarial treatment–adjusted logistic regression model, significant, independent predictors for death were renal impairment, acidosis, parasitemia, and plasma PfHRP2 concentration. Conclusions. Severe malaria in HIV-coinfected patients presents with higher parasite burden, more complications, and comorbidity, and carries a higher case fatality rate. Early identification of HIV coinfection is important for the clinical management of severe malaria. PMID:22752514

  13. [Oral rehydration therapy: an analysis of its results and impact on the hospitalization and mortality of children with diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Dohi-Fujii, B; Godoy-Olvera, L M; Durazo-Ortíz, J

    1993-11-01

    We present results of four years in oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in the Hospital Infantil del Estado de Sonora. There was 10.2 consults by diarrhoea for day. Children lower of one year old received oral rehydration therapy in 86.8%, were included 11% of prolonged diarrhoea and 32.3% of children with malnutrition. During the procedure diarrhoea there was complicated in 3% with paralytic ileus sepsis and pneumonia. Effectivity of ORT was in 90.9%; 92.8% in light dehydration and 78.7% moderate. Failure in 8.6% was due to vomitus, no acceptation of the oral solution, abundant evacuations and other complication presented. Were observed reduction in hospitalization, rate of 19.2% in 1986 to 38.4% in 1989. The diarrheal mortality decreased in the Urgence Department in 42% and in the Infectology Department in 54%. We considered these results as satisfactory, but are susceptible to better when we diffuse more the oral rehydration therapy in own region.

  14. Plasma Fibrinogen as a Biomarker for Mortality and Hospitalized Exacerbations in People with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, David M; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A.; Vestbo, Jorgen; Graham Barr, R.; Tetzlaff, Kay; Lowings, Michael; Rennard, Stephen I.; Snyder, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Martin, Ubaldo J.; Merrill, Deborah; Martin, Amber L.; Simeone, Jason C.; Fahrbach, Kyle; Murphy, Brian; Leidy, Nancy; Miller, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the COPD Foundation established the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium (CBQC) as a partnership between the Foundation, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the pharmaceutical industry to pool publicly-funded and industry data to develop innovative tools to facilitate the development and approval of new therapies for COPD. We present data from the initial project seeking regulatory qualification of fibrinogen as a biomarker for the stratification of COPD patients into clinical trials. Methods This analysis pooled data from 4 publicly-funded studies and 1 industry study into a common database resulting in 6376 individuals with spirometric evidence of COPD. We used a threshold of 350 mg/dL to determine high vs. low fibrinogen, and determined the subsequent risk of hospitalizations from exacerbations and death using Cox proportional hazards models. Results High fibrinogen levels at baseline were present in 2853 (44.7%) of individuals with COPD. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of hospitalized COPD exacerbations within 12 months (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39–1.93) among participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) study. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of death within 36 months (HR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.62–2.31) among all participants. Conclusions Fibrinogen levels ≥ 350 mg/dL identify COPD individuals at an increased risk of exacerbations and death and could be a useful biomarker for enriching clinical trials in the COPD population. PMID:25685850

  15. [Maternal mortality rate in the Aurelio Valdivieso General Hospital: a ten years follow up].

    PubMed

    Noguera-Sánchez, Marcelo Fidias; Arenas-Gómez, Susana; Rabadán-Martínez, Cesar Esli; Antonio-Sánchez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: en México, la mortalidad materna ha disminuido en las últimas décadas. En Oaxaca esto no se ha manifestado porque se incrementó la tasa de mortalidad materna. Este estado se ubica entre las entidades con más muertes maternas. Objetivo: analizar 10 años de mortalidad materna en el Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso de los Servicios de Salud de Oaxaca, para conocer el comportamiento epidemiológico y caracterización de los decesos. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo, transversal y descriptivo efectuado mediante la revisión de expedientes clínicos de mortalidad materna en la División de Gineco-Obstetricia. Se consideraron variables sociales, obstétricas y circunstanciales y las comprobaciones se efectuaron con estadística general y descriptiva. Resultados: entre el 1 de enero de 2000 y el 31 de diciembre de 2009 se registraron 109 muertes maternas, excluidas dos que no fueron obstétricas; es decir, que hubo 107 muertes maternas: 75 directas y 32 indirectas. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue de 172.14 × 100,000 nacidos vivos. De las muertes maternas revisadas 89 pudieron evitarse (83%) y 18 no (17%), esto con base en el dictamen del Comité ad hoc del Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso. La enfermedad hipertensiva aguda del embarazo fue la de mayor mortalidad; la escolaridad y el puerperio ueron el mayor riesgo. Conclusiones: las variables atribuibles a bajo índice de desarrollo humano, como: baja escolaridad y paridad elevada incrementaron el riesgo de mortalidad materna, que fue intrahospitalaria y durante el puerperio. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue la mayor encontrada en publicaciones nacionales con respecto a este referente.

  16. Alcohol use by urban bicyclists is associated with more severe injury, greater hospital resource use, and higher mortality.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Monica; Heyer, Jessica H; Wall, Stephen; DiMaggio, Charles; Shinseki, Matthew; Slaughter, Dekeya; Frangos, Spiros G

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol use is a risk factor for severe injury in pedestrians struck by motor vehicles. Our objective was to investigate alcohol use by bicyclists and its effects on riding behaviors, medical management, injury severity, and mortality within a congested urban setting. A hospital-based, observational study of injured bicyclists presenting to a Level I regional trauma center in New York City was conducted. Data were collected prospectively from 2012 to 2014 by interviewing all bicyclists presenting within 24 h of injury and supplemented with medical record review. Variables included demographic characteristics, scene-related data, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), computed tomography (CT) scans, and clinical outcomes. Alcohol use at the time of injury was determined by history or blood alcohol level (BAL) >0.01 g/dL. Of 689 bicyclists, 585 (84.9%) were male with a mean age of 35.2. One hundred four (15.1%) bicyclists had consumed alcohol prior to injury. Alcohol use was inversely associated with helmet use (16.5% [9.9-25.1] vs. 43.2% [39.1-47.3]). Alcohol-consuming bicyclists were more likely to fall from their bicycles (42.0% [32.2-52.3] vs. 24.2% [20.8-27.9]) and less likely to be injured by collision with a motor vehicle (52.0% [41.7-62.1] vs. 67.5% [63.5-71.3]). 80% of alcohol-consuming bicyclists underwent CT imaging at presentation compared with 51.5% of non-users. Mortality was higher among injured bicyclists who had used alcohol (2.9% [0.6-8.2] vs. 0.0% [0.0-0.6]). Adjusted multivariable analysis revealed that alcohol use was independently associated with more severe injury (Adjusted Odds Ratio 2.27, p = 0.001, 95% Confidence Interval 1.40-3.68). Within a dense urban environment, alcohol use by bicyclists was associated with more severe injury, greater hospital resource use, and higher mortality. As bicycling continues to increase in popularity internationally, it is important to heighten awareness about the risks and consequences of bicycling while under the

  17. Temporal distribution of baseline characteristics and association with early mortality among HIV-positive patients at University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Joshua O; Adesina, Olubukola A; Kuti, Modupe O; Ogunbosi, Babatunde O; Irabor, Achiaka E; Odaibo, Georgina N; Olaleye, David O; Adewole, Isaac F

    2015-01-01

    The first six months of HIV care and treatment are very important for long-term outcome. Early mortality (within 6 months of care initiation) undermines care and treatment goals. This study assessed the temporal distribution in baseline characteristics and early mortality among HIV patients at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria from 2006-2013. Factors associated with early mortality were also investigated. This was a retrospective analysis of data from 14 857 patients enrolled for care and treatment at the adult antiretroviral clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Effects of factors associated with early mortality were summarised using a hazard ratio with a 95% confidence interval obtained from Cox proportional hazard regression models. The mean age of the subjects was 36.4 (SD=10.2) years with females being in the majority (68.1%). While patients' demographic characteristics remained virtually the same over time, there was significant decline in the prevalence of baseline opportunistic infections (2006-2007=55.2%; 2011-2013=38.0%). Overall, 460 (3.1%) patients were known to have died within 6 months of enrollment in care/treatment. There was no significant trend in incidence of early mortality. Factors associated with early mortality include: male sex, HIV encephalopathy, low CD4 count (< 50 cells), and anaemia. To reduce early mortality, community education should be promoted, timely access to care and treatment should be facilitated and the health system further strengthened to care for high risk patients. PMID:26282931

  18. Using linked birth, notification, hospital and mortality data to examine false-positive meningococcal disease reporting and adjust disease incidence estimates for children in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, A; Jorm, L; McIntyre, P

    2015-09-01

    Meningococcal disease is a rare, rapidly progressing condition which may be difficult to diagnose, disproportionally affects children, and has high morbidity and mortality. Accurate incidence estimates are needed to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination and treatment. We used linked notification, hospital, mortality and birth data for all children of an Australian state (2000-2007) to estimate the incidence of meningococcal disease. A total of 595 cases were notified, 684 cases had a hospital diagnosis, and 26 cases died from meningococcal disease. All deaths were notified, but only 68% (466/684) of hospitalized cases. Of non-notified hospitalized cases with more than one clinical admission, most (90%, 103/114) did not have meningococcal disease recorded as their final diagnosis, consistent with initial 'false-positive' hospital meningococcal disease diagnosis. After adjusting for false-positive rates in hospital data, capture-recapture estimation suggested that up to four cases of meningococcal disease may not have been captured in either notification or hospital records. The estimated incidence of meningococcal disease in NSW-born and -resident children aged 0-14 years was 5·1-5·4 cases/100 000 child-years at risk, comparable to international estimates using similar methods, but lower than estimates based on hospital data. PMID:25573266

  19. Effects of a nurse-led heart failure clinic on hospital readmission and mortality in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ho Yu; Chair, Sek Ying; Wang, Qun; Sit, Janet WH; Wong, Eliza ML; Tang, Siu Wai

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a physically and socially debilitating disease that carries the burden of hospital re-admission and mortality. As an aging society, Hong Kong urgently needs to find ways to reduce the hospital readmission of HF patients. This study evaluates the effects of a nurse-led HF clinic on the hospital readmission and mortality rates among older HF patients in Hong Kong. Methods This study is a retrospective data analysis that compares HF patient in a nurse-led HF clinic in Hong Kong compared with HF patients who did not attend the clinic. The nurses of this clinic provide education on lifestyle modification and symptom monitoring, as well as titrate the medications and measure biochemical markers by following established protocols. This analysis used the socio-demographic and clinical data of HF patients who were aged ≥ 65 years old and stayed in the clinic over a six-month period. Results The data of a total of 78 HF patients were included in this data analysis. The mean age of the patients was 77.38 ± 6.80 years. Approximately half of the HF patients were male (51.3%), almost half were smokers (46.2%), and the majority received ≤ six years of formal education. Most of the HF patients (87.2%) belonged to classes II and III of the New York Heart Association Functional Classification, with a mean ejection fraction of 47.15 ± 20.31 mL. The HF patients who attended the clinic (n = 38, 75.13 ± 5.89 years) were significantly younger than those who did not attend the clinic (n = 40, 79.53 ± 6.96 years) (P = 0.04), and had lower recorded blood pressure. No other statistically significant difference existed between the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of the two groups. The HF patients who did not attend the nurse-led HF clinic demonstrated a significantly higher risk of hospital readmission [odd ratio (OR): 7.40; P < 0.01] than those who attended after adjusting for the effect of age and blood pressure. In addition, HF

  20. Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Their Association With Hospital Mortality Among Patients With First Myocardial Infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction)

    PubMed Central

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertension (52.3%) was most common, followed by smoking (31.3%). The least common risk factor was diabetes (22.4%). Crude mortality was highest in patients with MI with diabetes (11.9%) and hypertension (9.8%) and lowest in those with smoking histories (5.4%) and dyslipidemia (4.6%). The inclusion of 5 atherosclerotic risk factors in a stepwise multivariate model contributed little toward predicting hospital mortality over age alone (C-statistic = 0.73 and 0.71, respectively). After extensive multivariate adjustments for clinical and sociodemographic factors, patients with MI with diabetes had higher odds of dying (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 1.26) than those without diabetes and similarly for hypertension (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.11). Conversely, family history (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.73), dyslipidemia (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), and smoking (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.88) were associated with decreased mortality (C-statistic = 0.82 for the full model). In conclusion, in the setting of acute MI, histories of diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher hospital mortality, but the inclusion of atherosclerotic risk factors in models of hospital mortality does not improve predictive ability beyond other major clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:22840346

  1. Atherosclerotic risk factors and their association with hospital mortality among patients with first myocardial infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction).

    PubMed

    Canto, John G; Kiefe, Catarina I; Rogers, William J; Peterson, Eric D; Frederick, Paul D; French, William J; Gibson, C Michael; Pollack, Charles V; Ornato, Joseph P; Zalenski, Robert J; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J; Greenland, Philip

    2012-11-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertension (52.3%) was most common, followed by smoking (31.3%). The least common risk factor was diabetes (22.4%). Crude mortality was highest in patients with MI with diabetes (11.9%) and hypertension (9.8%) and lowest in those with smoking histories (5.4%) and dyslipidemia (4.6%). The inclusion of 5 atherosclerotic risk factors in a stepwise multivariate model contributed little toward predicting hospital mortality over age alone (C-statistic = 0.73 and 0.71, respectively). After extensive multivariate adjustments for clinical and sociodemographic factors, patients with MI with diabetes had higher odds of dying (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 1.26) than those without diabetes and similarly for hypertension (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.11). Conversely, family history (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.73), dyslipidemia (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), and smoking (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.88) were associated with decreased mortality (C-statistic = 0.82 for the full model). In conclusion, in the setting of acute MI, histories of diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher hospital mortality, but the inclusion of atherosclerotic risk factors in models of hospital mortality does not improve predictive ability beyond other major clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:22840346

  2. Atherosclerotic risk factors and their association with hospital mortality among patients with first myocardial infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction).

    PubMed

    Canto, John G; Kiefe, Catarina I; Rogers, William J; Peterson, Eric D; Frederick, Paul D; French, William J; Gibson, C Michael; Pollack, Charles V; Ornato, Joseph P; Zalenski, Robert J; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J; Greenland, Philip

    2012-11-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertension (52.3%) was most common, followed by smoking (31.3%). The least common risk factor was diabetes (22.4%). Crude mortality was highest in patients with MI with diabetes (11.9%) and hypertension (9.8%) and lowest in those with smoking histories (5.4%) and dyslipidemia (4.6%). The inclusion of 5 atherosclerotic risk factors in a stepwise multivariate model contributed little toward predicting hospital mortality over age alone (C-statistic = 0.73 and 0.71, respectively). After extensive multivariate adjustments for clinical and sociodemographic factors, patients with MI with diabetes had higher odds of dying (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 1.26) than those without diabetes and similarly for hypertension (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.11). Conversely, family history (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.73), dyslipidemia (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), and smoking (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.88) were associated with decreased mortality (C-statistic = 0.82 for the full model). In conclusion, in the setting of acute MI, histories of diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher hospital mortality, but the inclusion of atherosclerotic risk factors in models of hospital mortality does not improve predictive ability beyond other major clinical and sociodemographic characteristics.

  3. Decreasing Congestive Heart Failure Readmission Rates Within 30 Days at the Tampa VA.

    PubMed

    Messina, William

    2016-01-01

    High hospital readmission rates contribute to the problem of escalating costs and fragmented quality in the US health care system. This article describes the implementation of a home telehealth (HT) performance improvement project with subsequent cost-avoidance savings. The HT project was designed to potentiate communication between and among patients, clinicians, and administrative staff, in addition to reducing readmissions for patients with congestive heart failure at the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Pre- and post-HT implementation comparisons were made of readmission rates, costs, and veteran satisfaction from the same 4-month periods in 2012 and 2013. The application of telehealth and phone care initiatives reduced the congestive heart failure hospital readmission rate by 5%, decreased costs, and improved veteran satisfaction with overall care experience.

  4. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an

  5. Adiposity and incidence of heart failure hospitalization and mortality: a population-based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Emily B.; Yang, Amy Z.; Wolk, Alicja; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with heart failure (HF) incidence. We examined the strength of the association of body mass index (BMI) with HF by age and joint associations of BMI and waist circumference (WC). Methods and Results Women aged 48–83 (n = 36,873) and men aged 45–79 (n = 43,487) self-reported height, weight, and WC. HF hospitalization or death (n = 382 women, 718 men) between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2004 was determined through administrative registers. Hazard ratios (HR), from Cox proportional-hazards models, for an interquartile range higher BMI were 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.68) at age 60 and 1.13 (95% CI 1.02–1.27) at 75 in women. In men, HR were 1.54 (95% CI 1.37–1.73) at 60 and 1.25 (95% CI 1.16–1.35) at 75. A 10 cm higher WC was associated with 15% (95% CI 2%–31%) and 18% (95% CI 4%–33%) higher HF rates among women with BMI 25 and 30 kg/m2, respectively; HR for 1 kg/m2 higher BMI were 1.00 (95% CI 0.96–1.04) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.98–1.04) for WC 70 and 100 cm, respectively. In men, a 10 cm higher WC was associated with 16% and 18% higher rates for BMI 25 and 30 kg/m2, respectively; a 1 kg/m2 higher BMI was associated with 4% higher HF rates regardless of WC. Conclusions Strength of the association between BMI and HF events declined with age. In women, higher WC was associated with HF at all levels of BMI. Both BMI and WC were predictors among men. PMID:19808341

  6. 77 FR 59318 - Removal of 30-Day Residency Requirement for Per Diem Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... Friday (except holidays). Please call (202) 461-4902 for an appointment. (This is not a toll-free number..., (303) 331-7551. (This is not a toll-free number.) SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This rule amends part 51... the veteran is absent for purposes other than receiving hospital care.'' See 74 FR 19433. In...

  7. 77 FR 59354 - Removal of 30-Day Residency Requirement for Per Diem Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... call (202) 461-4902 for an appointment. (This is not a toll-free number.) In addition, during the... toll-free number.) SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This proposed rule would amend part 51 of title 38, Code... the veteran is absent for purposes other than receiving hospital care.'' See 74 FR 19433. In...

  8. Efficacy of Chinese Herbal Medicine as an Adjunctive Therapy on in-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tuo; Zhan, Libin; Fan, Zhiwei; Bai, Lizhi; Song, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to systematically assess the efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) as an adjunctive therapy on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods. We did a systematic review of articles published in any language up until Jun 23, 2015, by searching PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CBM, and CNKI. We included all RCTs that compared outcomes of patients with AKI taking CHM plus Western treatment (WT) with those taking WT alone. We applied Cochrane risk-of-bias tool to assess the methodological quality of the included trials. Results. Of 832 citations, 15 studies involving 966 patients met inclusion criteria. The methodological quality was assessed with unclear risk of bias. In the primary outcome of meta-analysis, pooled outcome of in-hospital mortality showed that patients randomly assigned to CHM treatment group were associated with low risk of in-hospital mortality compared with those randomly assigned to WT alone (RR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.24 to 0.71; P = 0.001). Conclusions. CHM as an adjunctive therapy is associated with a decreased risk of in-hospital mortality compared with WT in patients with AKI. Further studies with high quality and large sample size are needed to verify our conclusions. PMID:27127528

  9. Quality measures for total ankle replacement, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates within 1 year of surgery: a data linkage study using the NJR data set

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Razi; Macgregor, Alexander J; Goldberg, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report on the rate of 30-day readmission and the rate of additional or revision surgery within 12 months following total ankle replacement (TAR). Design A data-linkage study of the UK National Joint Registry (NJR) data and Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) database. These two databases were linked in a deterministic fashion. HES episodes 12 months following the index procedure were isolated and analysed. Logistic regression was used to model predictors of reoperation and revision for primary ankle replacement. Participants All patients who underwent primary and revision ankle replacements according to the NJR between February 2008 and February 2013. Results The rate of 30-day readmission following primary and revision ankle replacement was 2.2% and 1.3%, respectively. In the 12 months following primary and revision ankle replacements, the revision rate (where implants needed to be removed) was 1.2% with increased odds in those orthopaedic units preforming <20 ankle replacements per year and patients with a preoperative fixed equinus deformity. The reoperation other than revision (where implants were not removed) in the 12 months following primary and revision TARs was 6.6% and 9.3%, respectively. Rheumatoid arthritis, cemented prosthesis and high ASA grade significantly increased the odds of reoperation. Conclusions TAR has a 30-day readmission rate of 2.2%, which is similar to that of knee replacement but lower than that of total hip replacement. 6.6% of patients undergoing primary TAR require a reoperation within 12 months of the index procedure. Early revision rates are significantly higher in low-volume centres. PMID:27217286

  10. Bion M1. Peculiarities of life activities of microbes in 30-day spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Korshunov, Denis; Morozova, Julia; Voeikova, Tatiana; Tyaglov, Boris; Novikova, Liudmila; Krestyanova, Irina; Emelyanova, Lydia

    The aim of this work was to analyze the influence of space flight factors ( SFF) to microorganism strains , exposed inside unmanned spacecraft Bion M-1 during the 30- day space flight. Objectives of the work - the study of the influence of the SFF exchange chromosomal DNA in crosses microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces; the level of spontaneous phage induction of lysogenic strains fS31 from Streptomyces lividans 66 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) on the biosynthesis of the antibiotic tylosin strain of Streptomyces fradiae; survival electrogenic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR- 1 is used in the microbial fuel cell As a result of this work it was found that the SFF affect the exchange of chromosomal DNA by crossing strains of Streptomyces. Was detected polarity crossing , expressed in an advantageous contribution chromosome fragment of one of the parent strains in recombinant offspring. This fact may indicate a more prolonged exposure of cells in microgravity and , as a consequence, the transfer of longer fragments of chromosomal DNA This feature is the transfer of genetic material in microgravity could lead to wider dissemination and horizontal transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA of symbiotic microflora astronauts and other strains present in the spacecraft. It was shown no effect on the frequency of recombination PCF and the level of mutation model reversion of auxotrophic markers to prototrophy It was demonstrated that PCF increase the level of induction of cell actinophage fS31 lysogenic strain of S. lividans 66, but did not affect the level of induction of this phage cells S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). It is shown that the lower the level of synthesis PCF antibiotic aktinorodina (actinorhodin) in lysogenic strain S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). 66 Strains of S. lividans and S. coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) can be used as a biosensor for studying the effect on microorganisms PCF It is shown that the effect of the PCF reduces synthesis of tylosin and desmicosyn S. fradiae at

  11. Incidence, Predictors, and Impact on Hospital Mortality of Amphotericin B Nephrotoxicity Defined Using Newer Acute Kidney Injury Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Carla Dinamérica; de Carvalho Almeida, Luna; de Oliveira dos Reis, Camilla; Santos, Barbara Mendes; Glesby, Marshall Jay

    2015-01-01

    Studies on amphotericin B (AmB) nephrotoxicity use diverse definitions of acute kidney injury (AKI). Here, we used the new Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) system to describe the incidence, predictors, and impact of AmB-induced AKI on hospital mortality in 162 patients treated with AmB (120 with deoxycholate preparation and 42 with liposomal preparation). KDIGO stage 1 requires an absolute increase of ≥0.3 mg/dl or ≥1.5× over baseline serum creatinine (SCr), while stage 2 requires ≥2×, and stage 3 requires ≥3×. A binary KDIGO definition (KDIGObin) corresponds to stage ≥1. For comparison, we included two definitions of AKI traditionally utilized in nephrotoxicity studies: ≥0.5 mg/dl (NT0.5) and ≥2× (NT2×) increase in baseline SCr. The overall incidence of AmB-induced AKI by KDIGObin was 58.6% (stage 1, 30.9%; stage 2, 18.5%; stage 3, 9.3%). Predictors of AKI by KDIGObin were older age and use of furosemide and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I). Traditional criteria detected lower incidences of AKI, at 45.1% (NT0.5) and 27.8% (NT2×). Predictors of AKI by traditional criteria were older age and use of vancomycin (NT0.5) and use of vancomycin and vasopressors (NT2×). KDIGObin detected AKI 2 days earlier than the most sensitive traditional criterion. However, only traditional criteria were associated with intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, and mortality. In conclusion, the increase in sensitivity of KDIGObin is accompanied by a loss of specificity and ability to predict outcomes. Prospective studies are required to weigh the potential gain from early AKI detection against the potential loss from undue changes in management in patients with subtle elevations in SCr. PMID:26014956

  12. Clinical profile and factors associated with mortality in hospitalized patients with HIV/AIDS: a retrospective analysis from Tripoli Medical Centre, Libya, 2013.

    PubMed

    Shalaka, N S; Garred, N A; Zeglam, H T; Awasi, S A; Abukathir, L A; Altagdi, M E; Rayes, A A

    2015-10-02

    In Libya, little is known about HIV-related hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality. This was a retrospective analysis of HIV-related hospitalizations at Tripoli Medical Centre in 2013. Of 227 cases analysed, 82.4% were males who were significantly older (40.0 versus 36.5 years), reported injection drug use (58.3% versus 0%) and were hepatitis C virus co-infected (65.8% versus 0%) compared with females. Severe immunosuppression was prevalent (median CD4 count = 42 cell/μL). Candidiasis was the most common diagnosis (26.0%); Pneumocystis pneumonia was the most common respiratory disease (8.8%), while cerebral toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in 8.4% of patients. Current HAART use was independently associated with low risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 0.33), while central nervous system symptoms (OR 4.12), sepsis (OR 6.98) and low total lymphocyte counts (OR 3.60) were associated with increased risk. In this study, late presentation with severe immunosuppression was common, and was associated with significant in-hospital mortality.

  13. Association of Intensive Care Unit Admission With Mortality Among Older Patients With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Thomas S.; Sjoding, Michael W.; Ryan, Andrew M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Among patients whose need for intensive care is uncertain, the relationship of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and costs is unknown. OBJECTIVE To estimate the relationship between ICU admission and outcomes for elderly patients with pneumonia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries (aged >64 years) admitted to 2988 acute care hospitals in the United States with pneumonia from 2010 to 2012. EXPOSURES ICU admission vs general ward admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included Medicare spending and hospital costs. Patient and hospital characteristics were adjusted to account for differences between patients with and without ICU admission. To account for unmeasured confounding, an instrumental variable was used—the differential distance to a hospital with high ICU admission (defined as any hospital in the upper 2 quintiles of ICU use). RESULTS Among 1 112 394 Medicare beneficiaries with pneumonia, 328 404 (30%) were admitted to the ICU. In unadjusted analyses, patients admitted to the ICU had significantly higher 30-day mortality, Medicare spending, and hospital costs than patients admitted to a general hospital ward. Patients (n = 553 597) living closer than the median differential distance (<3.3 miles) to a hospital with high ICU admission were significantly more likely to be admitted to the ICU than patients living farther away (n = 558 797) (36%for patients living closer vs 23%for patients living farther, P < .001). In adjusted analyses, for the 13%of patients whose ICU admission decision appeared to be discretionary (dependent only on distance), ICU admission was associated with a significantly lower adjusted 30-day mortality (14.8%for ICU admission vs 20.5%for general ward admission, P = .02; absolute decrease, −5.7%[95%CI, −10.6%, −0.9%]), yet there were no significant differences in Medicare spending or hospital

  14. Neuraminidase Inhibitors and Hospital Mortality in British Patients with H1N1 Influenza A: A Re-Analysis of Observational Data

    PubMed Central

    Wolkewitz, Martin; Schumacher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Observational studies claimed reducing effects of neuraminidase inhibitors (NI) on hospital mortality in patients with H1N1 influenza A. It has been criticized that such findings are prone to common and serious survival biases. Methods With observational data from the FLU-CIN study group, multi-state and dynamic prediction models have been used to avoid such biases. The data included 1391 patients with confirmed pandemic influenza A/H1N1 infection collected during 2009-2010 in the UK. Due to their close relationship, the main outcome measures were hospital death and length of hospital stay. Findings There is no direct effect of NI on the hospital death rate; the hazard ratio (HR) of NI was 1.03 (95%-CI: 0.64–1.66). The discharge rate is increased for NI patients (HR = 1.89 (95%-CI: 1.65–2.16)) indicating that NI-treated patients stay shorter in hospital than NI-untreated patients, on average 3.10 days (95%-CI: 2.07–4.14). We also showed that the initiation timing of NI treatment (≤ 2 days versus > 2 days after onset) made no difference on the effects on the hospital death and discharge hazards. The hazard ratios remain stable after adjusting for potential confounders measured at admission (such as comorbidities and influenza-related clinical symptoms). Conclusions The potential beneficial effect of NI on hospitalized patients in the UK is rather a reduction of the length of hospital stay than a reduction of the mortality rate. There seems to be no confounding by indication and no differences if NI is given early or late. Different effects could be present in other populations (such as non-hospitalized individuals) or countries. Careful interpretation of the effect on length of hospital stay is needed due to potentially different discharge policies of NI-treated and NI-untreated patients. PMID:27583403

  15. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care, an alternative strategy to reduce maternal mortality: experience of Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, Ismael Fatou; Hu, Jian; Gong, Xun; Wang, Xuanxuan; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Pengqian

    2012-04-01

    The burden of maternal mortality (MM) and morbidity is especially high in Asia. However, China has made significant progress in reducing MM over the past two decades, and hence maternal death rate has declined considerably in last decade. To analyze availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) received by women at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, this study retrospectively analyzed various pregnancy-related complications at the hospital from 2000 to 2009. Two baseline periods of equal length were used for the comparison of variables. A total of 11 223 obstetric complications leading to MM were identified on a total of 15 730 hospitalizations, either 71.35% of all activities. No maternal death was recorded. Mean age of women was 29.31 years with a wide range of 14-52 years. About 96.26% of women had higher levels of schooling, university degrees and above and received the education of secondary school or college. About 3.74% received primary education at period two (P2) from 2005 to 2009, which was significantly higher than that of period one (P1) from 2000 to 2004 (P<0.05) (OR: 0.586; 95% CI: 0.442 to 0.776). About 65.69% were employed as skilled or professional workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). About 34.31% were unskilled workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). Caesarean section was performed for 9,930 women (88.48%) and the percentage of the procedure increased significantly from 19.25% at P1 to 69.23% at P2 (P<0.05). We were led to conclude that, despite the progress, significant gaps in the performance of maternal health services between rural and urban areas remain. However, MM reduction can be achieved in China. Priorities must include, but not limited to the following: secondary healthcare development, health policy and management, strengthening primary healthcare services. PMID:22528213

  16. Usefulness of Serum Albumin Concentration to Predict High Coronary SYNTAX Score and In-Hospital Mortality in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurtul, Alparslan; Murat, Sani Namik; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Duran, Mustafa; Ocek, Adil Hakan; Koseoglu, Cemal; Celık, Ibrahim Etem; Kilic, Alparslan; Aksoy, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    High SYNTAX score is a predictor of adverse cardiovascular events, including mortality, in acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). Decreased serum albumin (SA) concentration is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We aimed to investigate whether SA levels at admission are associated with high SYNTAX score and in-hospital mortality in patients with ACS. The study included 1303 patients with ACS who underwent coronary angiography (CA). The patients were divided into 2 groups as high SYNTAX score (≥33) and lower SYNTAX score (≤32). Baseline SA levels were significantly lower in patients with high SYNTAX score than with lower SYNTAX score (3.46 ± 0.42 mg/dL vs 3.97±0.37 mg/dL, respectively; P < .001). On multivariate logistic regression, SA (<3.65 mg/dL) was an independent predictor of high SYNTAX score (odds ratio 4.329, 95% confidence interval 2.028-8.264; P < .001) together with admission glucose, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and left ventricular ejection fraction. In Cox regression analyses, systolic blood pressure, high SYNTAX score, and SA (<3.65 mg/dL) were found as independent predictors of in-hospital all-cause mortality. In conclusion, SA concentration on admission is inversely associated with high SYNTAX score and in-hospital mortality in ACS.

  17. Facility characteristics and inhospital pediatric mortality after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mills, Brianna; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Simonetti, Joseph A; Vavilala, Monica S

    2015-06-01

    More than 500,000 children sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year. Previous studies have described significant variation in inhospital mortality after pediatric TBI. The aim of this study was to identify facility-level characteristics independently associated with 30-day inhospital mortality after pediatric severe TBI. We hypothesized that, even after accounting for patient-level characteristics associated with mortality, the characteristics of facilities where patients received care would be associated with inhospital mortality. Using data from the National Trauma Data Bank from 2009-2012, we identified a cohort of 6707 pediatric patients hospitalized with severe TBI in 391 facilities and investigated their risk of 30-day inhospital mortality. Pre-specified facility-level characteristics (trauma certification level, teaching status, census region, facility size, nonprofit status, and responsibility for pediatric trauma care) were added to a Poisson regression model that accounted for patient-level characteristics associated with mortality. In multivariable analyses, patients treated in facilities located in the Midwest (risk ratio [RR]=1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-1.81) and South (RR=1.39; 95% CI: 1.12-1.72) regions had higher likelihoods of 30-day inhospital mortality compared with patients treated in the Northeast. Other facility-level characteristics were not found to be significant. To our knowledge, this is one of the largest investigations to identify regional variation in inhospital mortality after pediatric severe TBI in a national sample after accounting for individual and other facility-level characteristics. Further investigations to help explain this variation are needed to inform evidence-based decision-making for pediatric severe TBI care across different settings.

  18. Tackling 30-Day, All-Cause Readmissions with a Patient-Centered Transitional Care Bundle.

    PubMed

    Rice, Yvonne B; Barnes, Carol Ann; Rastogi, Rahul; Hillstrom, Tami J; Steinkeler, Cara N

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, Kaiser Permanente Northwest identified the transition from hospital to home as a pivotal quality improvement opportunity and used multiple patient-centered data collection methods to identify unmet needs contributing to preventable readmissions. A transitional care bundle that crosses care settings and organizational functions was developed to meet needs expressed by patients. It comprises 5 elements: risk stratification, a specialized phone number for discharged patients, timely postdischarge follow-up, standardized patient discharge instructions and same-day discharge summaries, and pharmacist-supported medication reconciliation. The transitional care bundle has been in place for 6 years. Readmission rates decreased from 12.1% to 10.6%, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores for the discharge instruction composite moved from below the 50(th) to above the 90(th) national percentile, average time to the first postdischarge appointment decreased from 9.7 days to 5.3 days, and error rates on the discharge medication list decreased from 57% to 21% (P<.0001 for all). The program, which continues to evolve to address sustainability challenges and organizational initiatives, suggests the potential of a multicomponent, patient-centered care bundle to address the complex, interrelated drivers of preventable readmissions. PMID:25919315

  19. Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Hyperglycemia in Non–Critically Ill Inpatients Increases the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality (Multicenter Study)

    PubMed Central

    Olveira, Gabriel; Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D.; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Maria del Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P.; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Matia, Pilar; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Prieto, Javier; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, María José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Rovira, Adela; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hyperglycemia may increase mortality in patients who receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN). However, this has not been well studied in noncritically ill patients (i.e., patients in the nonintensive care unit setting). The aim of this study was to determine whether mean blood glucose level during TPN infusion is associated with increased mortality in noncritically ill hospitalized patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective multicenter study involved 19 Spanish hospitals. Noncritically ill patients who were prescribed TPN were included prospectively, and data were collected on demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables as well as on in-hospital mortality. RESULTS The study included 605 patients (mean age 63.2 ± 15.7 years). The daily mean TPN values were 1.630 ± 323 kcal, 3.2 ± 0.7 g carbohydrates/kg, 1.26 ± 0.3 g amino acids/kg, and 0.9 ± 0.2 g lipids/kg. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the patients who had mean blood glucose levels >180 mg/dL during the TPN infusion had a risk of mortality that was 5.6 times greater than those with mean blood glucose levels <140 mg/dL (95% CI 1.47–21.4 mg/dL) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional state, presence of diabetes or hyperglycemia before starting TPN, diagnosis, prior comorbidity, carbohydrates infused, use of steroid therapy, SD of blood glucose level, insulin units supplied, infectious complications, albumin, C-reactive protein, and HbA1c levels. CONCLUSIONS Hyperglycemia (mean blood glucose level >180 mg/dL) in noncritically ill patients who receive TPN is associated with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality. PMID:23223407

  20. 78 FR 20329 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: A Generic Submission for Formative Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... October 1, 1995, unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. Direct Comments to OMB: Written... having their full effect if received within 30-days of the date of this publication. FOR FURTHER... be requested in writing. Proposed Collection: A Generic Submission For Formative Research,...

  1. 75 FR 39577 - 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... comments on these information collection requirements on January 29, 2010 (75 FR 4838). The comment period... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of...

  2. 75 FR 8101 - 30-Day Federal Register Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Register on Wednesday, November 4, 2009 (74 FR 57188). The comment period closed on January 4, 2010. No... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 30-Day Federal Register Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection...

  3. 78 FR 64145 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate-Sales Contract and Addendums

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate--Sales..., Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503; fax: 202-395-5806... Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate--Sales Contract and Addendums. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0306. Type...

  4. 75 FR 32961 - 30-Day Federal Register Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... collection Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Control 1024-0231. The OMB has up to 60 days to approve or... consideration, OMB should receive public comments within 30 days of the date on which this notice is published... solicit comments on this proposed information collection on April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17152-17153). No...

  5. 78 FR 55264 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Awareness and Beliefs About Cancer Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Awareness and Beliefs About Cancer Survey, National Cancer Institute (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of... submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the...

  6. 78 FR 64145 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency... Secretary to implement risk sharing with State and local housing finance agencies (HFAs). Under this...

  7. 78 FR 69077 - Notice of 30-Day Public Review Period and Availability of Final Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Department of Navy's (DoN) transfer of excess property at... VA's implementation and monitoring of the mitigation measures identified in the FONSI, would not have... infrastructure at the former NAS Alameda. The FONSI is available for public review for 30 days before...

  8. 78 FR 55325 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: U.S. Passport Renewal Application for Eligible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... and/or card format) in the exercise of authorities granted to the Secretary of State in 22 United... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day.... SUMMARY: The Department of State has submitted the information collection described below to......

  9. 78 FR 40313 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Monthly Report of Excess Income and Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Monthly Report of Excess Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION... Information Collection: Monthly Report of Excess Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income....

  10. 78 FR 59047 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451...

  11. 78 FR 15958 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Pediatric Palliative Care Campaign Pilot Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Pediatric Palliative Care Campaign Pilot Survey SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of... previously published in the Federal Register on December 26, 2012, page 76053 and allowed 60-days for...

  12. 78 FR 64143 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA-Application for Insurance of Advance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  13. 78 FR 55083 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; Genomics and Society Public Surveys in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... and Society Public Surveys in Conjunction With Smithsonian Museum of Natural History Genome Exhibit... an additional 30 days for public comment. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI...: Genomics and Society Public Surveys in Conjunction with National Museum of Natural History Genome...

  14. 77 FR 71668 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Choice of Address and Agent for Immigrant Visa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Choice of Address and Agent for Immigrant Visa Applicants...: Title of Information Collection: Choice of Address and Agent for Immigrant Visa Applicants. OMB...

  15. 78 FR 15799 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book and/or... INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: Statement Regarding a Lost or Stolen U.S. Passport Book...

  16. 78 FR 42795 - Submission for OMB review; 30-Day Comment Request: Evaluation of the Brain Disorders in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ...: Evaluation of the Brain Disorders in the Developing World Program of the John E. Fogarty International Center... additional 30 days for public comment. The John E. Fogarty International Center (FIC), National Institutes of.... Rachel Sturke, Evaluation Officer, Division of Policy, Planning and Evaluation, FIC, NIH, Building...

  17. 77 FR 47690 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Civilian Response Corps Database In-Processing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval in... Currently Approved Collection. Originating Office: Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations (CSO... benefits. DATES: Submit comments to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for up to 30 days from...

  18. 77 FR 20687 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and then printed and signed by a sponsor official, and sent to the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual Report,...

  19. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. 560.515 Section 560.515 Money and Finance: Treasury....515 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. (a) All... involving Iran (a pre-existing trade contract), including the exportation of goods, services...

  20. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. 560.515 Section 560.515 Money and Finance: Treasury....515 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. (a) All... involving Iran (a pre-existing trade contract), including the exportation of goods, services...

  1. 78 FR 67385 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA PowerSaver Pilot Program (Title I Property...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA PowerSaver Pilot Program (Title I Property Improvement and Title II--203(k) Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance) AGENCY: Office of the... Collection Title of Information Collection: FHA PowerSaver Pilot Program (Title I Property Improvement...

  2. 78 FR 31999 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Young Turkey/Young America Evaluation (YTYA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Young Turkey/ Young America Evaluation (YTYA) Survey ACTION... Collection: Young Turkey/Young America Evaluation (YTYA) Survey. OMB Control Number: None. Type of...

  3. Infant Stool Color Card Screening Helps Reduce the Hospitalization Rate and Mortality of Biliary Atresia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Jui-Hua; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2016-03-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a significant liver disease in children. Since 2004, Taiwan has implemented a national screening program that uses an infant stool color card (SCC) for the early detection of BA. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of BA cases before and after the launch of this screening program. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the rates of hospitalization, liver transplantation (LT), and mortality of BA cases before and after the program, and to examine the association between the hospitalization rate and survival outcomes.This was a population-based cohort study. BA cases born during 1997 to 2010 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Sex, birth date, hospitalization date, LT, and death data were collected and analyzed. The hospitalization rate by 2 years of age (Hosp/2yr) was calculated to evaluate its association with the outcomes of LT or death.Among 513 total BA cases, 457 (89%) underwent the Kasai procedure. Of these, the Hosp/2yr was significantly reduced from 6.0 to 6.9/case in the earlier cohort (1997-2004) to 4.9 to 5.3/case in the later cohort (2005-2010). This hospitalization rate reduction was followed by a reduction in mortality from 26.2% to 15.9% after 2006. The Cox proportional hazards model showed a significant increase in the risk for both LT (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10-1.18) and death (HR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08) for each additional hospitalization. A multivariate logistic regression model found that cases with a Hosp/2yr >6 times had a significantly higher risk for both LT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.35, 95% CI = 2.82-6.73) and death (aOR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.17-2.62).The hospitalization and mortality rates of BA cases in Taiwan were significantly and coincidentally reduced after the launch of the SCC screening program. There was a significant association between the hospitalization rate and final

  4. Infant Stool Color Card Screening Helps Reduce the Hospitalization Rate and Mortality of Biliary Atresia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Jui-Hua; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2016-03-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a significant liver disease in children. Since 2004, Taiwan has implemented a national screening program that uses an infant stool color card (SCC) for the early detection of BA. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of BA cases before and after the launch of this screening program. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the rates of hospitalization, liver transplantation (LT), and mortality of BA cases before and after the program, and to examine the association between the hospitalization rate and survival outcomes.This was a population-based cohort study. BA cases born during 1997 to 2010 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Sex, birth date, hospitalization date, LT, and death data were collected and analyzed. The hospitalization rate by 2 years of age (Hosp/2yr) was calculated to evaluate its association with the outcomes of LT or death.Among 513 total BA cases, 457 (89%) underwent the Kasai procedure. Of these, the Hosp/2yr was significantly reduced from 6.0 to 6.9/case in the earlier cohort (1997-2004) to 4.9 to 5.3/case in the later cohort (2005-2010). This hospitalization rate reduction was followed by a reduction in mortality from 26.2% to 15.9% after 2006. The Cox proportional hazards model showed a significant increase in the risk for both LT (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10-1.18) and death (HR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08) for each additional hospitalization. A multivariate logistic regression model found that cases with a Hosp/2yr >6 times had a significantly higher risk for both LT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.35, 95% CI = 2.82-6.73) and death (aOR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.17-2.62).The hospitalization and mortality rates of BA cases in Taiwan were significantly and coincidentally reduced after the launch of the SCC screening program. There was a significant association between the hospitalization rate and final

  5. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) –based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as “serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl,” “age above 79 years,” “without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker,” “without taking beta-blocker,” “without taking loop diuretics,” “with mechanical ventilator support,” “with non-invasive ventilator support,” “with vasopressors use,” and “experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation” were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  6. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) -based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as "serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl," "age above 79 years," "without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker," "without taking beta-blocker," "without taking loop diuretics," "with mechanical ventilator support," "with non-invasive ventilator support," "with vasopressors use," and "experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation" were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  7. Desert Dust Outbreaks in Southern Europe: Contribution to Daily PM10 Concentrations and Short-Term Associations with Mortality and Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Stafoggia, Massimo; Zauli-Sajani, Stefano; Pey, Jorge; Samoli, Evangelia; Alessandrini, Ester; Basagaña, Xavier; Cernigliaro, Achille; Chiusolo, Monica; Demaria, Moreno; Díaz, Julio; Faustini, Annunziata; Katsouyanni, Klea; Kelessis, Apostolos G.; Linares, Cristina; Marchesi, Stefano; Medina, Sylvia; Pandolfi, Paolo; Pérez, Noemí; Querol, Xavier; Randi, Giorgia; Ranzi, Andrea; Tobias, Aurelio; Forastiere, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the association between short-term exposure to desert dust and health outcomes is controversial. Objectives: We aimed to estimate the short-term effects of particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) on mortality and hospital admissions in 13 Southern European cities, distinguishing between PM10 originating from the desert and from other sources. Methods: We identified desert dust advection days in multiple Mediterranean areas for 2001–2010 by combining modeling tools, back-trajectories, and satellite data. For each advection day, we estimated PM10 concentrations originating from desert, and computed PM10 from other sources by difference. We fitted city-specific Poisson regression models to estimate the association between PM from different sources (desert and non-desert) and daily mortality and emergency hospitalizations. Finally, we pooled city-specific results in a random-effects meta-analysis. Results: On average, 15% of days were affected by desert dust at ground level (desert PM10 > 0 μg/m3). Most episodes occurred in spring–summer, with increasing gradient of both frequency and intensity north–south and west–east of the Mediterranean basin. We found significant associations of both PM10 concentrations with mortality. Increases of 10 μg/m3 in non-desert and desert PM10 (lag 0–1 days) were associated with increases in natural mortality of 0.55% (95% CI: 0.24, 0.87%) and 0.65% (95% CI: 0.24, 1.06%), respectively. Similar associations were estimated for cardio-respiratory mortality and hospital admissions. Conclusions: PM10 originating from the desert was positively associated with mortality and hospitalizations in Southern Europe. Policy measures should aim at reducing population exposure to anthropogenic airborne particles even in areas with large contribution from desert dust advections. Citation: Stafoggia M, Zauli-Sajani S, Pey J, Samoli E, Alessandrini E, Basagaña X, Cernigliaro A, Chiusolo M, Demaria M, Díaz J, Faustini A

  8. Audit of maternal mortality ratio and causes of maternal deaths in the largest maternity hospital in Cairo, Egypt (Kasr Al Aini) in 2008 and 2009: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Wael F; Ragab, Wael S; Aboulgheit, Samah S

    2013-09-01

    This study examined maternal deaths at Cairo University Maternity Hospital between January 2008 and December 2009. The aim was to calculate Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) as well as identify the causes and predisposing factors to maternal deaths. Data were collected from the files of the hospitalized pregnant women in the hospital. There were 38 maternal deaths and MMR was 79 per 100,000 live births for the two years examined. The main causes of death were obstetric hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and cardiac arrest. Substandard medical care and the delay in seeking of medical advice were two contributing factors to maternal deaths recorded. The need for audit and publication of all obstetric hospitals MMR to compare and identify areas of improvements is recommended.

  9. Evolving Healthcare Quality in Top Tertiary General Hospitals in China during the China Healthcare Reform (2010-2012) from the Perspective of Inpatient Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xie-Min; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Ji-Shan; Lyman, Gary H; Qu, Zhi; Ma, Wen; Song, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Kun; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare reforms (HR) initiated by many countries impacts on healthcare systems worldwide. Being one of fast developing countries, China launched HR in 2009. Better understanding of its impact is helpful for China and others in further pursuit of HR. Here we evaluate inpatient mortality, a proxy to healthcare quality, in 43 top tertiary hospitals in China during this critical period. This is a hospital-based observational study with 8 million discharge summary reports (DSR) from 43 Chinese hospitals from 2010-2012. Using DSRs, we extract the vita status as the outcome, in addition to age, gender, diagnostic codes, and surgical codes. Nearly all hospitals have expanded their hospitalization capacities during this period. As of year 2010, inpatient mortality (IM) across hospitals varies widely from 2‰ to 20‰. Comparing IM of year 2011 and 2012 with 2010, the overall IM has been substantially reduced (OR = 0.883 and 0.766, p-values<0.001), showing steady improvements in healthcare quality. Surgical IM correlates with the overall IM (correlation = 0.60, p-value <0.001), but is less uniform. Over these years, surgical IM has also been steadily reduced (OR = 0.890 and 0.793, p-values<0.001). Further analyses of treatments on five major diseases and six major surgeries revealed that treatments of myocardial infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction have significant improvement. Observed temporal and spatial variations demonstrate that there is a substantial disparity in healthcare quality across tertiary hospitals, and that these hospitals are rapidly improving healthcare quality. Evidence-based assessment shed light on the reform impact. Lessons learnt here are relevant to further refining HR. PMID:26624005

  10. Evolving Healthcare Quality in Top Tertiary General Hospitals in China during the China Healthcare Reform (2010–2012) from the Perspective of Inpatient Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xie-Min; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Ji-Shan; Lyman, Gary H.; Qu, Zhi; Ma, Wen; Song, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Kun; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare reforms (HR) initiated by many countries impacts on healthcare systems worldwide. Being one of fast developing countries, China launched HR in 2009. Better understanding of its impact is helpful for China and others in further pursuit of HR. Here we evaluate inpatient mortality, a proxy to healthcare quality, in 43 top tertiary hospitals in China during this critical period. This is a hospital-based observational study with 8 million discharge summary reports (DSR) from 43 Chinese hospitals from 2010–2012. Using DSRs, we extract the vita status as the outcome, in addition to age, gender, diagnostic codes, and surgical codes. Nearly all hospitals have expanded their hospitalization capacities during this period. As of year 2010, inpatient mortality (IM) across hospitals varies widely from 2‰ to 20‰. Comparing IM of year 2011 and 2012 with 2010, the overall IM has been substantially reduced (OR = 0.883 and 0.766, p-values<0.001), showing steady improvements in healthcare quality. Surgical IM correlates with the overall IM (correlation = 0.60, p-value <0.001), but is less uniform. Over these years, surgical IM has also been steadily reduced (OR = 0.890 and 0.793, p-values<0.001). Further analyses of treatments on five major diseases and six major surgeries revealed that treatments of myocardial infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction have significant improvement. Observed temporal and spatial variations demonstrate that there is a substantial disparity in healthcare quality across tertiary hospitals, and that these hospitals are rapidly improving healthcare quality. Evidence-based assessment shed light on the reform impact. Lessons learnt here are relevant to further refining HR. PMID:26624005

  11. Comparison of Trends in Incidence, Revascularization, and In-Hospital Mortality in ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Versus Without Severe Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Goyal, Parag; Swaminathan, Rajesh V; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Wong, Shing-Chiu; Singh, Harsimran S; Minutello, Robert M; Bergman, Geoffrey; Kim, Luke K

    2016-05-01

    Patients with severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, are at elevated risk of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) but have previously been reported as less likely to receive revascularization. To study the persistence of these findings over time, we examined trends in STEMI incidence, revascularization, and in-hospital mortality for patients with and without SMI in the National Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2012. We further used multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess the odds of revascularization and in-hospital mortality. SMI was present in 29,503 of 3,058,697 (1%) of the STEMI population. Patients with SMI were younger (median age 58 vs 67 years), more likely to be women (44% vs 38%), and more likely to have several co-morbidities, including diabetes, chronic pulmonary disease, substance abuse, and obesity (p <0.001 for all). Over time, STEMI incidence significantly decreased in non-SMI (p for trend <0.001) but not in SMI (p for trend 0.14). Revascularization increased in all subgroups (p for trend <0.001) but remained less common in SMI. In-hospital mortality decreased in non-SMI (p for trend = 0.004) but not in SMI (p for trend 0.10). After adjustment, patients with SMI were less likely to undergo revascularization (odds ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.61, p <0.001), but SMI was not associated with increased in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.97, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.01, p = 0.16). In conclusion, in contrast to the overall population, the incidence of STEMI is not decreasing in patients with SMI. Despite changes in the care of STEMI, patients with SMI remain less likely to receive revascularization therapies.

  12. Comparison of Trends in Incidence, Revascularization, and In-Hospital Mortality in ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Versus Without Severe Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Goyal, Parag; Swaminathan, Rajesh V; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Wong, Shing-Chiu; Singh, Harsimran S; Minutello, Robert M; Bergman, Geoffrey; Kim, Luke K

    2016-05-01

    Patients with severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, are at elevated risk of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) but have previously been reported as less likely to receive revascularization. To study the persistence of these findings over time, we examined trends in STEMI incidence, revascularization, and in-hospital mortality for patients with and without SMI in the National Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2012. We further used multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess the odds of revascularization and in-hospital mortality. SMI was present in 29,503 of 3,058,697 (1%) of the STEMI population. Patients with SMI were younger (median age 58 vs 67 years), more likely to be women (44% vs 38%), and more likely to have several co-morbidities, including diabetes, chronic pulmonary disease, substance abuse, and obesity (p <0.001 for all). Over time, STEMI incidence significantly decreased in non-SMI (p for trend <0.001) but not in SMI (p for trend 0.14). Revascularization increased in all subgroups (p for trend <0.001) but remained less common in SMI. In-hospital mortality decreased in non-SMI (p for trend = 0.004) but not in SMI (p for trend 0.10). After adjustment, patients with SMI were less likely to undergo revascularization (odds ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.61, p <0.001), but SMI was not associated with increased in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.97, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.01, p = 0.16). In conclusion, in contrast to the overall population, the incidence of STEMI is not decreasing in patients with SMI. Despite changes in the care of STEMI, patients with SMI remain less likely to receive revascularization therapies. PMID:26956637

  13. Effect of the Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease on Risk-Adjusted Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction, Congestive Heart Failure and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D.; Zhou, Ying; Alexoff, Aimee; Melitas, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measurement of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF) and pneumonia (PN) is a high priority since these are common reasons for hospitalization. However, mortality in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that are hospitalized for these common medical conditions is unknown. Methods A retrospective review of the 2005–2011 National Inpatient Sample (NIS), (approximately a 20% sample of discharges from community hospitals) was performed. A dataset for all patients with ICD-9-CM codes for primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia or congestive heart failure with a co-diagnosis of IBD, Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). 1:3 propensity score matching between patients with co-diagnosed disease vs. controls was performed. Continuous variables were compared between IBD and controls. Categorical variables were reported as frequency (percentage) and analyzed by Chi-square tests or Fisher’s exact test for co-diagnosed disease vs. control comparisons. Propensity scores were computed through multivariable logistic regression accounting for demographic and hospital factors. In-hospital mortality between the groups was compared. Results Patients with IBD, CD and UC had improved survival after AMI compared to controls. 94/2280 (4.1%) of patients with IBD and AMI died, compared to 251/5460 (5.5%) of controls, p = 0.01. This represents a 25% improved survival in IBD patients that were hospitalized with AMI. There was a 34% improved survival in patients with CD and AMI. There was a trend toward worsening survival in patients with IBD and CHF. Patients with CD and PN had improved survival compared to controls. 87/3362 (2.59%) patients with CD and PN died, compared to 428/10076 (4.25%) of controls, p < .0001. This represents a 39% improved survival in patients with CD that are hospitalized for PN. Conclusion IBD confers a survival benefit for patients hospitalized with AMI. A

  14. Malaria prevention reduces in-hospital mortality among severely ill tuberculosis patients: a three-step intervention in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria and Tuberculosis (TB) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Malaria prevention reduces mortality among HIV patients, pregnant women and children, but its role in TB patients is not clear. In the TB National Reference Center in Guinea-Bissau, admitted patients are in severe clinical conditions and mortality during the rainy season is high. We performed a three-step malaria prevention program to reduce mortality in TB patients during the rainy season. Methods Since 2005 Permethrin treated bed nets were given to every patient. Since 2006 environmental prevention with permethrin derivates was performed both indoor and outdoor during the rainy season. In 2007 cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was added during the rainy season. Care was without charge; health education on malaria prevention was performed weekly. Primary outcomes were death, discharge, drop-out. Results 427, 346, 549 patients were adm