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Sample records for 30-day hospital mortality

  1. An Administrative Claims Model for Profiling Hospital 30-Day Mortality Rates for Pneumonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bratzler, Dale W.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Wang, Yun; O'Donnell, Walter J.; Metersky, Mark; Han, Lein F.; Rapp, Michael T.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Outcome measures for patients hospitalized with pneumonia may complement process measures in characterizing quality of care. We sought to develop and validate a hierarchical regression model using Medicare claims data that produces hospital-level, risk-standardized 30-day mortality rates useful for public reporting for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. Methodology/Principal Findings Retrospective study of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries age 66 years and older with a principal discharge diagnosis of pneumonia. Candidate risk-adjustment variables included patient demographics, administrative diagnosis codes from the index hospitalization, and all inpatient and outpatient encounters from the year before admission. The model derivation cohort included 224,608 pneumonia cases admitted to 4,664 hospitals in 2000, and validation cohorts included cases from each of years 1998–2003. We compared model-derived state-level standardized mortality estimates with medical record-derived state-level standardized mortality estimates using data from the Medicare National Pneumonia Project on 50,858 patients hospitalized from 1998–2001. The final model included 31 variables and had an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.72. In each administrative claims validation cohort, model fit was similar to the derivation cohort. The distribution of standardized mortality rates among hospitals ranged from 13.0% to 23.7%, with 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of 16.5%, 17.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. Comparing model-derived risk-standardized state mortality rates with medical record-derived estimates, the correlation coefficient was 0.86 (Standard Error = 0.032). Conclusions/Significance An administrative claims-based model for profiling hospitals for pneumonia mortality performs consistently over several years and produces hospital estimates close to those using a medical record model. PMID:21532758

  2. Trends and Variations in the Rates of Hospital Complications, Failure-to-Rescue and 30-Day Mortality in Surgical Patients in New South Wales, Australia, 2002-2009

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lixin; Chen, Jack; Assareh, Hassan; Hollis, Stephanie J.; Hillman, Ken; Flabouris, Arthas

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increased acceptance of failure-to-rescue (FTR) as an important patient safety indicator (defined as the percentage of deaths among surgical patients with treatable complications), there has not been any large epidemiological study reporting FTR in an Australian setting nor any evaluation on its suitability as a performance indicator. Methods We conducted a population-based study on elective surgical patients from 82 public acute hospitals in New South Wales, Australia between 2002 and 2009, exploring the trends and variations in rates of hospital complications, FTR and 30-day mortality. We used Poisson regression models to derive relative risk ratios (RRs) after adjusting for a range of patient and hospital characteristics. Results The average rates of complications, FTR and 30-day mortality were 13.8 per 1000 admissions, 14.1% and 6.1 per 1000 admission, respectively. The rates of complications and 30-day mortality were stable throughout the study period however there was a significant decrease in FTR rate after 2006, coinciding with the establishment of national and state-level peak patient safety agencies. There were marked variations in the three rates within the top 20% of hospitals (best) and bottom 20% of hospitals (worst) for each of the four peer-hospital groups. The group comprising the largest volume hospitals (principal referral/teaching hospitals) had a significantly higher rate of FTR in comparison to the other three groups of smaller-sized peer hospital groups (RR = 0.78, 0.57, and 0.61, respectively). Adjusted rates of complications, FTR and 30-day mortality varied widely for individual surgical procedures between the best and worst quintile hospitals within the principal referral hospital group. Conclusions The decrease in FTR rate over the study period appears to be associated with a wide range of patient safety programs. The marked variations in the three rates between- and within- peer hospital groups highlight the

  3. Predictors of 30-Day Mortality and 90-Day Functional Recovery after Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage : Hospital Based Multivariate Analysis in 585 Patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify independent predictors of mortality and functional recovery in patients with primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH) and to improve functional outcome in these patients. Methods Data were collected retrospectively on 585 patients with supratentorial PICH admitted to the Stroke Unit at our hospital between 1st January 2004 and the 31st July 2008. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, the associations between all selected variables and 30-day mortality and 90-day functional recoveries after PICH was evaluated. Results Ninety-day functional recovery was achieved in 29.1% of the 585 patients and 30-day mortality in 15.9%. Age (OR=7.384, p=0.000), limb weakness (OR=6.927, p=0.000), and hematoma volume (OR=5.293, p=0.000) were found to be powerful predictors of 90-day functional recovery. Furthermore, initial consciousness (OR=3.013, p=0.014) hematoma location (lobar, OR=2.653, p=0.003), ventricular extension of blood (OR=2.077, p=0.013), leukocytosis (OR=2.048, p=0.008), alcohol intake (drinker, OR=1.927, p=0.023), and increased serum aminotransferase (OR=1.892, p=0.035) were found to be independent predictors of 90-day functional recovery after PICH. On the other hand, a pupillary abnormality (OR=4.532, p=0.000) and initial unconsciousness (OR=3.362, p=0.000) were found to be independent predictors of 30-day mortality after PICH. Conclusion The predictors of mortality and functional recovery after PICH identified during this analysis may assist during clinical decision-making, when advising patients or family members about the prognosis of PICH and when planning intervention trials. PMID:19609417

  4. Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Lindman, Anja Schou

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of patient administrative data (PAS) for calculating 30-day mortality after hip fracture as a quality indicator, by a retrospective study of medical records. Methods We used PAS data from all Norwegian hospitals (2005–2009), merged with vital status from the National Registry, to calculate 30-day case-mix adjusted mortality for each hospital (n = 51). We used stratified sampling to establish a representative sample of both hospitals and cases. The hospitals were stratified according to high, low and medium mortality of which 4, 3, and 5 hospitals were sampled, respectively. Within hospitals, cases were sampled stratified according to year of admission, age, length of stay, and vital 30-day status (alive/dead). The final study sample included 1043 cases from 11 hospitals. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. Diagnostic and clinical information from the medical records and PAS were used to define definite and probable hip fracture. We used logistic regression analysis in order to estimate systematic between-hospital variation in unmeasured confounding. Finally, to study the consequences of unmeasured confounding for identifying mortality outlier hospitals, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Results The estimated overall positive predictive value was 95.9% for definite and 99.7% for definite or probable hip fracture, with no statistically significant differences between hospitals. The standard deviation of the additional, systematic hospital bias in mortality estimates was 0.044 on the logistic scale. The effect of unmeasured confounding on outlier detection was small to moderate, noticeable only for large hospital volumes. Conclusions This study showed that PAS data are adequate for identifying cases of hip fracture, and the effect of unmeasured case mix variation was small. In conclusion, PAS data are adequate for calculating 30-day mortality after hip-fracture as a quality

  5. Discharge Outcomes in Seniors Hospitalized for More than 30 Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozyrskyj, Anita; Black, Charlyn; Chateau, Dan; Steinbach, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    Hospitalization is a sentinel event that leads to loss of independence for many seniors. This study of long-stay hospitalizations (more than 30 days) in seniors was undertaken to identify risk factors for not going home, to characterize patients with risk factors who did go home and to describe one year outcomes following home discharge. Using…

  6. Vitamin D status predicts 30 day mortality in hospitalised cats.

    PubMed

    Titmarsh, Helen; Kilpatrick, Scott; Sinclair, Jennifer; Boag, Alisdair; Bode, Elizabeth F; Lalor, Stephanie M; Gaylor, Donna; Berry, Jacqueline; Bommer, Nicholas X; Gunn-Moore, Danielle; Reed, Nikki; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency, defined as low serum concentrations of the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been associated with the development of numerous infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders in humans. In addition, vitamin D insufficiency has been found to be predictive of mortality for many disorders. However, interpretation of human studies is difficult since vitamin D status is influenced by many factors, including diet, season, latitude, and exposure to UV radiation. In contrast, domesticated cats do not produce vitamin D cutaneously, and most cats are fed a commercial diet containing a relatively standard amount of vitamin D. Consequently, domesticated cats are an attractive model system in which to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and health outcomes. The hypothesis of this study was that vitamin D status would predict short term, all-cause mortality in domesticated cats. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, together with a wide range of other clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters, were measured in 99 consecutively hospitalised cats. Cats which died within 30 days of initial assessment had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations than cats which survived. In a linear regression model including 12 clinical variables, serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile was significantly predictive of mortality. The odds ratio of mortality within 30 days was 8.27 (95% confidence interval 2.54-31.52) for cats with a serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that low serum 25(OH)D concentration status is an independent predictor of short term mortality in cats. PMID:25970442

  7. Vitamin D Status Predicts 30 Day Mortality in Hospitalised Cats

    PubMed Central

    Titmarsh, Helen; Kilpatrick, Scott; Sinclair, Jennifer; Boag, Alisdair; Bode, Elizabeth F.; Lalor, Stephanie M.; Gaylor, Donna; Berry, Jacqueline; Bommer, Nicholas X.; Gunn-Moore, Danielle; Reed, Nikki; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency, defined as low serum concentrations of the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been associated with the development of numerous infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders in humans. In addition, vitamin D insufficiency has been found to be predictive of mortality for many disorders. However, interpretation of human studies is difficult since vitamin D status is influenced by many factors, including diet, season, latitude, and exposure to UV radiation. In contrast, domesticated cats do not produce vitamin D cutaneously, and most cats are fed a commercial diet containing a relatively standard amount of vitamin D. Consequently, domesticated cats are an attractive model system in which to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and health outcomes. The hypothesis of this study was that vitamin D status would predict short term, all-cause mortality in domesticated cats. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, together with a wide range of other clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters, were measured in 99 consecutively hospitalised cats. Cats which died within 30 days of initial assessment had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations than cats which survived. In a linear regression model including 12 clinical variables, serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile was significantly predictive of mortality. The odds ratio of mortality within 30 days was 8.27 (95% confidence interval 2.54-31.52) for cats with a serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that low serum 25(OH)D concentration status is an independent predictor of short term mortality in cats. PMID:25970442

  8. Utility of Socioeconomic Status in Predicting 30-Day Outcomes After Heart Failure Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Zubin J.; McCoy, Lisa A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Peterson, Eric D.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background An individual's socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with health outcomes and mortality, yet it is unknown whether accounting for SES can improve risk-adjustment models for 30-day outcomes among Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) beneficiaries hospitalized with heart failure (HF). Methods and Results We linked clinical data on hospitalized HF patients in the Get With The Guidelines®-HF™ database (01/2005–12/2011) with CMS claims and county-level SES data from the 2012 Area Health Resources Files. We compared the discriminatory capabilities of multivariable models that adjusted for SES, patient, and/or hospital characteristics to determine whether county-level SES data improved prediction or changed hospital rankings for 30-day all-cause mortality and rehospitalization. After adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, median household income (per $5,000 increase) was inversely associated with odds of 30-day mortality (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95–1.00, p=0.032), and the percentage of persons with at least a high school diploma (per 5 unit increase) was associated with lower odds of 30-day rehospitalization (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91–0.99).After adjustment for county-level SES data, relative to whites, Hispanic ethnicity (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.58, 0.83) and black race (OR 0.57, 95% CI: 0.50–0.65) remained significantly associated with lower 30-day mortality, but had similar 30-day rehospitalization. County-level SES did not improve risk adjustment or change hospital rankings for 30-day mortality or rehospitalization. Conclusions County-level SES data are modestly associated with 30-day outcomes for CMS beneficiaries hospitalized with HF, but do not improve risk adjustment models based on patient characteristics alone. PMID:25747700

  9. New consensus definition for acute kidney injury accurately predicts 30-day mortality in cirrhosis with infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Florence; O’Leary, Jacqueline G; Reddy, K Rajender; Patton, Heather; Kamath, Patrick S; Fallon, Michael B; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Subramanian, Ram M.; Malik, Raza; Maliakkal, Benedict; Thacker, Leroy R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims A consensus conference proposed that cirrhosis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) be defined as an increase in serum creatinine by >50% from the stable baseline value in <6 months or by ≥0.3mg/dL in <48 hrs. We prospectively evaluated the ability of these criteria to predict mortality within 30 days among hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and infection. Methods 337 patients with cirrhosis admitted with or developed an infection in hospital (56% men; 56±10 y old; model for end-stage liver disease score, 20±8) were followed. We compared data on 30-day mortality, hospital length-of-stay, and organ failure between patients with and without AKI. Results 166 (49%) developed AKI during hospitalization, based on the consensus criteria. Patients who developed AKI had higher admission Child-Pugh (11.0±2.1 vs 9.6±2.1; P<.0001), and MELD scores (23±8 vs17±7; P<.0001), and lower mean arterial pressure (81±16mmHg vs 85±15mmHg; P<.01) than those who did not. Also higher amongst patients with AKI were mortality in ≤30 days (34% vs 7%), intensive care unit transfer (46% vs 20%), ventilation requirement (27% vs 6%), and shock (31% vs 8%); AKI patients also had longer hospital stays (17.8±19.8 days vs 13.3±31.8 days) (all P<.001). 56% of AKI episodes were transient, 28% persistent, and 16% resulted in dialysis. Mortality was 80% among those without renal recovery, higher compared to partial (40%) or complete recovery (15%), or AKI-free patients (7%; P<.0001). Conclusions 30-day mortality is 10-fold higher among infected hospitalized cirrhotic patients with irreversible AKI than those without AKI. The consensus definition of AKI accurately predicts 30-day mortality, length of hospital stay, and organ failure. PMID:23999172

  10. Predictive factors of mortality within 30 days in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Min, Bo Ram; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common medical emergency that can be life threatening. This study evaluated predictive factors of 30-day mortality in patients with this condition. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted at a single hospital between April 2010 and November 2012, and 336 patients with symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Clinical characteristics and endoscopic findings were reviewed to identify potential factors associated with 30-day mortality. Results: Overall, 184 patients were included in the study (men, 79.3%; mean age, 59.81 years), and 16 patients died within 30 days (8.7%). Multivariate analyses revealed that comorbidity of diabetes mellitus (DM) or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hypotension (systolic pressure < 90 mmHg) during hospitalization were significant predictive factors of 30-day mortality. Conclusions: Comorbidity of DM or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hemodynamic instability during hospitalization were predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with NVUGIB. These results will help guide the management of patients with this condition. PMID:26767858

  11. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and 30-day mortality among patients with pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Farzin; Ahmadpoor, Amin; Amra, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the most life-threatening form of venous thrombosis which causes the majority of mortalities in this category. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been indicated as one of the risk factors for thromboembolism because of hemostatic alterations. The present study was designed to seek for the relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality of patients with PE. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted among 137 consecutive patients referred to hospital with symptoms of PE and preliminary stable hemodynamic. Confirmation of PE was made by multislice computed tomography pulmonary angiography and in the case of contraindication; V/Q lung scan and Doppler sonography were done. A STOP-Bang Questionnaire was used to determine patients with high- and low-risk of OSA. Patients were followed up for 1-month, and their survivals were recorded. Results: This study showed that there was no relationship between OSA and 30-day mortality (P = 0.389). Chronic kidney disease (P = 0.004), hypertension (P = 0.003), main thrombus (P = 0.004), and segmental thrombus (P = 0.022) were associated with 30-day mortality. In the logistic regression analysis, history of chronic kidney disease was diagnosed as a risk factor for 30-day mortality among the PE patients (P = 0.029, odds ratio = 4.93). Conclusion: Results of this study showed 30-day mortality was not affected by OSA directly. In fact, it was affected by complications of OSA such as hypertension and thrombus. Also, positive history of chronic kidney disease increased the risk of 30-day mortality. PMID:26622255

  12. Low platelet activity predicts 30 days mortality in patients undergoing heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Kuliczkowski, Wiktor; Sliwka, Joanna; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Zysko, Dorota; Zembala, Michal; Steter, Dawid; Zembala, Marian; Gierlotka, Marek; Kim, Moo Hyun; Serebruany, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Despite advanced techniques and improved clinical outcomes, patient survival following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is still a major concern. Therefore, predicting future CABG mortality represents an unmet medical need and should be carefully explored. The objective of this study is to assess whether pre-CABG platelet activity corresponds with 30 days mortality post-CABG. Retrospective analyses of platelet biomarkers and death at 30 days in 478 heart surgery patients withdrawn from aspirin or/and clopidogrel. Platelet activity was assessed prior to CABG for aspirin (ASPI-test) with arachidonic acid and clopidogrel (ADP-test) utilizing Multiplate impedance aggregometer. Most patients (n = 198) underwent conventional CABG, off-pump (n = 162), minimally invasive (n = 30), artificial valve implantation (n = 48) or valves in combination with CABG (n = 40). There were 22 deaths at 30 days, including 10 in-hospital fatalities. With the cut-off value set below 407 area under curve (AUC) for the ASPI-test, the 30-day mortality was 5.90% for the lower cohort and 2.66% for patients with significantly higher platelet reactivity (P = 0.038). For the ADP-test with a cut-off at 400AUC, the 30-day mortality was 9.68% for the lower cohort and 3.66% for patients with higher platelet reactivity, representing a borderline significant difference (P = 0.046). Aside from the platelet indices, patients who received red blood cell (RBC) concentrate had a highly significant (P < 0.0001) risk of death at 30 days. Both aspirin and clopidogrel tests were useful in predicting 30 days mortality following heart surgery, suggesting the danger of diminished platelet activity prior to CABG in such high-risk patients. These preliminary evidence supports early discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy for elective CABG and requires adequately powered randomized trials to test the hypothesis and potentially improve survival. PMID:26366827

  13. Predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with spontaneous primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Safatli, Diaa A.; Günther, Albrecht; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwarz, Falko; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a life threatening entity, and an early outcome assessment is mandatory for optimizing therapeutic efforts. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 342 patients with spontaneous primary ICH to evaluate possible predictors of 30-day mortality considering clinical, radiological, and therapeutical parameters. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. We also applied three widely accepted outcome grading scoring systems [(ICH score, FUNC score and intracerebral hemorrhage grading scale (ICH-GS)] on our population to evaluate the correlation of these scores with the 30-day mortality in our study. Results: From 342 patients (mean age: 67 years, mean Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] on admission: 9, mean ICH volume: 62.19 ml, most common hematoma location: basal ganglia [43.9%]), 102 received surgical and 240 conservative treatment. The 30-day mortality was 25.15%. In a multivariate analysis, GCS (Odds ratio [OR] =0.726, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.661–0.796, P < 0.001), bleeding volume (OR = 1.012 per ml, 95% CI = 1.007 – 1.017, P < 0.001), and infratentorial hematoma location (OR = 5.381, 95% CI = 2.166-13.356, P = 0.009) were significant predictors for the 30-day mortality. After receiver operating characteristics analysis, we defined a “high-risk group” for an unfavorable short-term outcome with GCS <11 and ICH volume >32 ml supratentorially or 21 ml infratentorially. Using Pearson correlation, we found a correlation of 0.986 between ICH score and 30-day mortality (P < 0.001), 0.853 between FUNC score and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001), and 0.924 between ICH-GS and 30-day mortality (P = 0.001). Conclusions: GCS score on admission together with the baseline volume and localization of the hemorrhage are strong

  14. Inpatient Readmissions and Emergency Department Visits within 30 Days of a Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jesse J.; Chan, Theodore C.; Killeen, James P.; Castillo, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inpatient hospital readmissions have become a focus for healthcare reform and cost-containment efforts. Initiatives targeting unanticipated readmissions have included care coordination for specific high readmission diseases and patients and health coaching during the post-discharge transition period. However, little research has focused on emergency department (ED) visits following an inpatient admission. The objective of this study was to assess 30-day ED utilization and all-cause readmissions following a hospital admission. Methods This was a retrospective study using inpatient and ED utilization data from two hospitals with a shared patient population in 2011. We assessed the 30-day ED visit rate and 30-day readmission rate and compared patient characteristics among individuals with 30-day inpatient readmissions, 30-day ED discharges, and no 30-day visits. Results There were 13,449 patients who met the criteria of an index visit. Overall, 2,453 (18.2%) patients had an ED visit within 30 days of an inpatient stay. However, only 55.6% (n=1,363) of these patients were admitted at one of these 30-day visits, resulting in a 30-day all-cause readmission rate of 10.1%. Conclusion Approximately one in five patients presented to the ED within 30 days of an inpatient hospitalization and over half of these patients were readmitted. Readmission measures that incorporate ED visits following an inpatient stay might better inform interventions to reduce avoidable readmissions. PMID:26759647

  15. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Estimating patient survival has hitherto been the main focus when treating metastatic bone disease (MBD) in the appendicular skeleton. This has been done in an attempt to allocate the patient to a surgical procedure that outlives them. No questions have been addressed as to whether the extent of the surgery and thus the surgical trauma reduces survival in this patient group. We wanted to evaluate if perioperative parameters such as blood loss, extent of bone resection, and duration of surgery were risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients having surgery due to MBD in the appendicular skeleton. We retrospectively identified 270 consecutive patients who underwent joint replacement surgery or intercalary spacing for skeletal metastases in the appendicular skeleton from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2013. We collected intraoperative (duration of surgery, extent of bone resection, and blood loss), demographic (age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologist score [ASA score], and Karnofsky score), and disease-specific (primary cancer) variables. An association with 30-day mortality was addressed using univariate and multivariable analyses and calculation of odds ratio (OR). All patients were included in the analysis. ASA score 3 + 4 (OR 4.16 [95% confidence interval, CI, 1.80–10.85], P = 0.002) and Karnofsky performance status below 70 (OR 7.34 [95% CI 3.16–19.20], P < 0.001) were associated with increased 30-day mortality in univariate analysis. This did not change in multivariable analysis. No parameters describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality. PMID:27082592

  16. 30-Day Mortality in Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Prognostic Value of Clinical Scores and Anamnestic Features

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Taute, Bettina-Maria; Baasai, Nansalmaa; Wienke, Andreas; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Schramm, Dominik; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Identification of high-risk patients with pulmonary embolism is vital. The aim of the present study was to examine clinical scores, their single items, and anamnestic features in their ability to predict 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods A retrospective, single-center study from 06/2005 to 01/2010 was performed. Inclusion criteria were presence of pulmonary embolism, availability of patient records and 30-day follow-up. The following clinical scores were calculated: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, original and simplified pulmonary embolism severity index, Glasgow Coma Scale, and euroSCORE II. Results In the study group of 365 patients 39 patients (10.7%) died within 30 days due to pulmonary embolism. From all examined scores and parameters the best predictor of 30-day mortality were the Glasgow Coma scale (≤ 10) and parameters of the circulatory system including presence of mechanical ventilation, arterial pH (< 7.335), and systolic blood pressure (< 99 mm Hg). Conclusions Easy to ascertain circulatory parameters have the same or higher prognostic value than the clinical scores that were applied in this study. From all clinical scores studied the Glasgow Coma Scale was the most time- and cost-efficient one. PMID:26866472

  17. Discharge Hospice Referral and Lower 30-Day All-Cause Readmission in Medicare Beneficiaries Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kheirbek, Raya E.; Fletcher, Ross D.; Bakitas, Marie A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Parvataneni, Sridivya; Bearden, Donna; Bailey, F. Amos; Morgan, Charity J.; Singh, Steven; Blackman, Marc R.; Zile, Michael R.; Patel, Kanan; Ahmed, Momanna B.; Tucker, Rodney O.; Brown, Cynthia J.; Love, Thomas E.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Roseman, Jeffrey M.; Rich, Michael W.; Allman, Richard M.; Ahmed, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause for hospital readmission. Hospice care may help palliate HF symptoms but its association with 30-day all-cause readmission remains unknown. Methods and Results Of the 8032 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for HF in 106 Alabama hospitals (1998–2001), 182 (2%) received discharge hospice referrals. Of the 7850 patients not receiving hospice referrals, 1608 (20%) died within 6 months post-discharge (the hospice-eligible group). Propensity scores for hospice referral were estimated for each of the 1790 (182+1608) patients and were used to match 179 hospice-referral patients with 179 hospice-eligible patients who were balanced on 28 baseline characteristics (mean age, 79 years, 58% women, 18% African American). Overall, 22% (1742/8032) died in 6 months, of whom 8% (134/1742) received hospice referrals. Among the 358 matched patients, 30-day all-cause readmission occurred in 5% and 41% of hospice-referral and hospice-eligible patients, respectively (hazard ratio {HR} associated with hospice referral, 0.12; 95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.06–0.24). HRs (95% CIs) for 30-day all-cause readmission associated with hospice referral among the 126 patients who died and 232 patients who survived 30-day post-discharge were 0.03 (0.04–0.21) and 0.17 (0.08–0.36), respectively. Although 30-day mortality was higher in the hospice referral group (43% vs. 27%), it was similar at 90 days (64% vs. 67% among hospice-eligible patients). Conclusions A discharge hospice referral was associated with lower 30-day all-cause readmission among hospitalized HF patients. However, most HF patients who died within 6 months of hospital discharge did not receive a discharge hospice referral. PMID:26019151

  18. Readmission for Acute Exacerbation within 30 Days of Discharge Is Associated with a Subsequent Progressive Increase in Mortality Risk in COPD Patients: A Long-Term Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Mónica; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Liapikou, Adamantia; Huerta, Arturo; Gabarrús, Albert; Chetta, Alfredo; Soler, Nestor; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Twenty per cent of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are readmitted for acute exacerbation (AECOPD) within 30 days of discharge. The prognostic significance of early readmission is not fully understood. The objective of our study was to estimate the mortality risk associated with readmission for acute exacerbation within 30 days of discharge in COPD patients. Methods The cohort (n = 378) was divided into patients readmitted (n = 68) and not readmitted (n = 310) within 30 days of discharge. Clinical, laboratory, microbiological, and severity data were evaluated at admission and during hospital stay, and mortality data were recorded at four time points during follow-up: 30 days, 6 months, 1 year and 3 years. Results Patients readmitted within 30 days had poorer lung function, worse dyspnea perception and higher clinical severity. Two or more prior AECOPD (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.51–4.05) was the only variable independently associated with 30-day readmission. The mortality risk during the follow-up period showed a progressive increase in patients readmitted within 30 days in comparison to patients not readmitted; moreover, 30-day readmission was an independent risk factor for mortality at 1 year (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.10–5.59). In patients readmitted within 30 days, the estimated absolute increase in the mortality risk was 4% at 30 days (number needed to harm NNH, 25), 17% at 6-months (NNH, 6), 19% at 1-year (NNH, 6) and 24% at 3 years (NNH, 5). Conclusion In conclusion a readmission for AECOPD within 30 days is associated with a progressive increased long-term risk of death. PMID:26943928

  19. Lower 30-day readmission rates with roflumilast treatment among patients hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Alex Z; Sun, Shawn X; Huang, Xingyue; Amin, Alpesh N

    2015-01-01

    Background Few data exist related to the impact of roflumilast on health care utilization. This retrospective study estimated 30-day hospital readmission rates between patients who did and did not use roflumilast among those with COPD hospitalizations. Methods Data were from MarketScan, a large US commercial health insurance claims database. Patients aged ≥40 years with at least one hospitalization for COPD between 2010 and 2011 were included. The roflumilast group included patients who used roflumilast within 14 days after the first hospitalization (index), while the comparison group (non-roflumilast) included patients who did not use roflumilast during the study period. Continuous enrollment for at least 6 months before and 30 days after the index date was required. The 30-day hospitalization rate was calculated after the index hospitalization. Conditional logistic regression with propensity score 1:3 matching was employed to assess the difference in 30-day hospital readmission rates between the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, adjusting for baseline characteristics, comorbidity, health care utilization, and COPD medication use within 14 days after the index date. Results A total of 15,755 COPD patients met the selection criteria, ie, 366 (2.3%) in the roflumilast group and 15,389 (97.7%) in the non-roflumilast group. The mean (± standard deviation) age was 71±12.5 years and 52% were female. After propensity score matching, all-cause 30-day hospitalization rates were 6.9% and 11.1% in the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, respectively. COPD-related 30-day hospitalization rates were 6.3% and 9.2% in the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, respectively. Conditional logistic regression identified a significantly lower likelihood of all-cause 30-day readmission (odds ratio 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.93, P=0.023) for roflumilast patients relative to non-roflumilast patients. Conclusion This study showed, in a real-world setting, that

  20. Half of 30-Day Hospital Readmissions Among HIV-Infected Patients Are Potentially Preventable

    PubMed Central

    Kitchell, Ellen; Etherton, Sarah Shelby; Duarte, Piper; Halm, Ethan A.; Jain, Mamta K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thirty-day readmission rates, a widely utilized quality metric, are high among HIV-infected individuals. However, it is unknown how many 30-day readmissions are preventable, especially in HIV patients, who have been excluded from prior potentially preventable readmission analyses. We used electronic medical records to identify all readmissions within 30 days of discharge among HIV patients hospitalized at a large urban safety net hospital in 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed whether readmissions were potentially preventable using both published criteria and detailed chart review, how readmissions might have been prevented, and the phase of care deemed suboptimal (inpatient care, discharge planning, post-discharge). Of 1137 index admissions, 213 (19%) resulted in 30-day readmissions. These admissions occurred among 930 unique HIV patients, with 130 individuals (14%) experiencing 30-day readmissions. Of these 130, about half were determined to be potentially preventable using published criteria (53%) or implicit chart review (48%). Not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) greatly increased the odds of a preventable readmission (OR 5.9, CI:2.4–14.8). Most of the preventable causes of readmission were attributed to suboptimal care during the index hospitalization. Half of 30-day readmission in HIV patients are potentially preventable. Increased focus on early ART initiation, adherence counseling, management of chronic conditions, and appropriate timing of discharge may help reduce readmissions in this vulnerable population. PMID:26154066

  1. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in

  2. Organization of Hospital Nursing and 30-day Readmissions in Medicare Patients Undergoing Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chenjuan; McHugh, Matthew D; Aiken, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    Background Growing scrutiny of readmissions has placed hospitals at the center of readmission prevention. Little is known, however, about hospital nursing - a critical organizational component of hospital service system - in relation to readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationships between hospital nursing factors - nurse work environment, nurse staffing, and nurse education - and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients undergoing general, orthopedic, and vascular surgery. Method and Design We linked Medicare patient discharge data, multi-state nurse survey data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Our sample included 220,914 Medicare surgical patients and 25,082 nurses from 528 hospitals in four states (CA, FL, NJ, & PA). Risk-adjusted robust logistic regressions were used for analyses. Results The average 30-day readmission rate was 10% in our sample (general surgery: 11%; orthopedic surgery: 8%; vascular surgery: 12%). Readmission rates varied widely across surgical procedures and could be as high as 26% (upper limb and toe amputation for circulatory system disorders). Each additional patient per nurse increased the odds of readmission by 3% (OR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.00-1.05). Patients cared in hospitals with better nurse work environments had lower odds of readmission (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99). Administrative support to nursing practice (OR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99) and nurse-physician relations (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99) were two main attributes of the work environment that were associated with readmissions. Conclusions Better nurse staffing and work environment were significantly associated with 30-day readmission, and can be considered as system-level interventions to reduce readmissions and associated financial penalties. PMID:25373404

  3. Health literacy and 30-day hospital readmission after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Fang, Gang; Annis, Izabela E; O'Conor, Rachel; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of a predictive model of health literacy, and to examine the relationship between derived health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants A National Institute of Aging (NIA) study cohort of 696 adult, English-speaking primary care patients, aged 55–74 years, was used to assess the validity of derived health literacy estimates. Claims from 7733 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalised for AMI in 2008 in North Carolina and Illinois were used to investigate the association between health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions. Measures The NIA cohort was administered 3 common health literacy assessments (Newest Vital Sign, Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, and Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine). Health literacy estimates at the census block group level were derived via a predictive model. 30-day readmissions were measured from Medicare claims data using a validated algorithm. Results Fair agreement was found between derived estimates and in-person literacy assessments (Pearson Correlation coefficients: 0.38–0.51; κ scores: 0.38–0.40). Medicare enrollees with above basic literacy according to derived health literacy estimates had an 18% lower risk of a 30-day readmission (RR=0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.92) and 21% lower incidence rate of 30-day readmission (IRR=0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87) than patients with basic or below basic literacy. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk of 30-day readmission was 12% lower (p=0.03), and the incidence rate 16% lower (p<0.01) for patients with above basic literacy. Conclusions Health literacy, as measured by a predictive model, was found to be a significant, independent predictor of 30-day readmissions. As a modifiable risk factor with evidence-based solutions, health literacy should be considered in readmission reduction

  4. Evaluation of 30-Day Hospital Readmission After Surgery for Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer in a Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ramez N.; Chang, Jenny; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bristow, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze rate, risk factors, and costs associated with 30-day readmission after ovarian cancer surgery. Patients and Methods The SEER-Medicare linked database (1992 to 2010) was used to evaluate readmission rates within 30 days of index surgery in patients with stage IIIC/IV ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with readmission. Results Of 5,152 eligible patients, 1,003 (19.5%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Mean patient age was 75 years. Diagnoses associated with readmission included infection (34.7%), dehydration (34.3%), ileus/obstruction (26.2%), metabolic/electrolyte derangements (23.1%), and anemia (12.3%). In multivariable analysis, year of discharge was significantly associated with 30-day readmission (1996 to 2000: odds ratio [OR], 1.32; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.71; 2001 to 2005: OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.0; 2006 to 2010: OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.35 to 2.21; referent years 1992 to 1995), as were length of index hospital stay more than 8 days (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.64) and discharge to a skilled nursing facility (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.63). Patients readmitted within 30 days had a significantly greater 1-year mortality rate compared with patients not readmitted (41.1% v 25.1%, respectively; P < .001). The median cost of readmission hospital stay was $9,220 in year 2010 dollars, with a total cost of $9.3 million over the study period. Conclusion Early readmission after surgery for ovarian cancer is common. There is a significant association between 30-day readmission and 1-year mortality. These findings may catalyze development of targeted interventions to decrease early readmission, improve patient outcomes, and control health care costs. PMID:25385738

  5. Causes and incidence of 30 day hospital re-admissions after primary TKJR

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, John; van Dalen, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: 30 day re-admission of patients following TKJR is estimated between 0.9-9.9%. It’s a cause of significant cost to the healthcare system and marks significant patient morbidity. Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the causes and incidence of patient re-admission to hospital within 30 days of a primary total knee joint replacement between 2009-2015 in a single centre. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, computerized records were used to evaluated the causes and incidence of patient re-admission within 30 days of discharge following primary TKJR. Results: The total 30 day Re-admission rate was 5.0%. Medical causes for re-admission accounted for 29% of re-admissions. 34% were attributed to non-specific pain/swelling. Infection was attributed to 26%. 29% of patients presented with wound problems, either infective or non-infective. The total incidence of re-operation at 30 days was 0.77%. Conclusions: Our rate of re-admission is consistent with previous studies in the literature. Many patients were found to have no specific cause for re-admission. This suggests it may be possible to further reduce re-admission rates with improved patient education and management of common post-operative symptoms such as pain and swelling. Infection remains a common complication; fortunately the majority superficial infections are successfully treated with antibiotics and few requiring a washout operation. Medical complications account for almost a third showing the importance of good management of patient medical co-morbidities and risk factors.

  6. Clinical review is essential to evaluate 30-day mortality after trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Securing high-quality mortality statistics requires systematic evaluation of all trauma deaths. We examined the proportion of trauma patients dying within 30 days from causes not related to the injury and the impact of exclusion of patients dead on arrival on 30-day trauma mortality. We also defined the demographics, injury characteristics, cause of death and time to death in patients admitted to our trauma center who died within 30 days, between 2007-2011. Methods Demographics, injury characteristics, status alive/dead on arrival, cause of death and time to death of all patients were reviewed. Deaths were analyzed based on injury mechanism (penetrating, blunt trauma and low energy blunt trauma) and cause of death (traumatic brain injury (TBI), hemorrhage, organ dysfunction and other/unknown). Results Of the 7422 admissions, 343 deaths were identified of which 36 (10.5%) involved causes not related to the injury. The overall age was 71 years, Injury Severity Score (ISS) 29 and time to death 24 hours (all medians). Fifty-four patients (17.6%) were dead on arrival. Exclusion of patients dead on arrival reduced the overall mortality rate (P < 0.05) and median ISS (P < 0.05) and increased median age (P < 0.01) and time to death (P < 0.001). Injury mechanism was penetrating trauma in 7.5%, blunt trauma in 56.0%, and low energy blunt trauma in 36.5%. TBI accounted for 58.6%; hemorrhage 16.3%, organ dysfunction 15.0%, and other/unknown for 10.1% of the deaths. Patients who died after low energy blunt trauma were older, had lower ISS and longer time to death compared to those who died after penetrating and blunt trauma (all P < 0.01). Conclusions Clinical review of all trauma deaths was essential to interpret mortality. Thirty-day trauma mortality included 10.5% deaths not directly related to the injury and the exclusion of patients dead on arrival significantly affected the unadjusted mortality rate, ISS, median age and time to death

  7. 30-day Mortality after Bariatric Surgery: Independently Adjudicated Causes of Death in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark D.; Patterson, Emma; Wahed, Abdus S.; Belle, Steven H.; Berk, Paul D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Dakin, Gregory F.; Flum, David R.; Machado, Laura; Mitchell, James E.; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Pories, Walter; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Schrope, Beth; Staten, Myrlene; Ude, Akuezunkpa; Wolfe, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Mortality following bariatric surgery is a rare event in contemporary series, making it difficult for any single center to draw meaningful conclusions as to cause of death. Nevertheless, much of the published mortality data come from single center case series and reviews of administrative databases. These sources tend to produce lower mortality estimates than those obtained from controlled clinical trials. Furthermore, information about the causes of death and how they were determined is not always available. The aim of the present report is to describe in detail all deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS). Methods LABS is a 10-center observational cohort study of bariatric surgical outcomes. Data were collected prospectively for bariatric surgeries performed between March 2005 and April 2009. All deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery were identified, and cause of death assigned by an independent Adjudication Subcommittee, blinded to operating surgeon and site. Results 6118 patients underwent primary bariatric surgery. 18 deaths (0.3%) occurred within 30-days of surgery. The most common cause of death was sepsis (33% of deaths), followed by cardiac causes (28%) and pulmonary embolism (17%). For one patient cause of death could not be determined despite examination of all available information. Conclusions This study confirms the low 30-day mortality rate following bariatric surgery. The recognized complications of anastomotic leak, cardiac events, and pulmonary emboli accounted for the majority of 30-day deaths. PMID:21866378

  8. Preventing 30-day hospital readmissions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Leppin, Aaron L.; Gionfriddo, Michael R.; Kessler, Maya; Brito, Juan Pablo; Mair, Frances S.; Gallacher, Katie; Wang, Zhen; Erwin, Patricia J.; Sylvester, Tanya; Boehmer, Kasey; Ting, Henry H.; Murad, M. Hassan; Shippee, Nathan D.; Montori, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Reducing early (<30 days) hospital readmissions is a policy priority aimed at improving healthcare quality. The Cumulative Complexity Model conceptualizes patient context. It predicts that highly supportive discharge interventions will enhance patient capacity to enact burdensome self-care and avoid readmissions. Objectives To synthesize the evidence of the efficacy of interventions to reduce early hospital readmissions and identify intervention features—including their impact on treatment burden and on patients’ capacity to enact post-discharge self-care—that might explain their varying effects. Data Sources We searched electronic databases (1990 until April 1st, 2013), contacted experts, and reviewed bibliographies. Study Selection Randomized trials that assessed the effect of interventions on all-cause or unplanned readmissions within 30 days of discharge in adult patients admitted to the hospital for a medical or surgical cause for > 24 hours and discharged to home. Data extraction and Synthesis Reviewer pairs extracted trial characteristics and used an activity-based coding strategy to characterize the interventions; fidelity was confirmed with authors. Blinded to trial outcomes, reviewers noted the extent to which interventions placed additional work on patients after discharge or supported their capacity for self-care in accordance with the Cumulative Complexity Model. Main Outcome Relative risk of all-cause or unplanned readmission with or without out of hospital deaths at 30 days post-discharge. Results In 42 trials, the tested interventions prevented early readmissions [pooled random effects relative risk (RR) 0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.91; p=.03; I2= 32%], a finding that was consistent across patient subgroups. Trials published before 2002 reported interventions that were 1.6 times more effective than those tested later (pinteraction = .01). In exploratory subgroup analyses, interventions with many components (pinteraction <.01), involving

  9. Trends in 30-day mortality rate and case mix for paediatric cardiac surgery in the UK between 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Katherine L; Crowe, Sonya; Franklin, Rodney; McLean, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Barron, David; Tsang, Victor; Pagel, Christina; Utley, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore changes over time in the 30-day mortality rate for paediatric cardiac surgery and to understand the role of attendant changes in the case mix. Methods, setting and participants Included were: all mandatory submissions to the National Institute of Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) relating to UK cardiac surgery in patients aged <16 years. The χ2 test for trend was used to retrospectively analyse the proportion of surgical episodes ending in 30-day mortality and with various case mix indicators, in 10 consecutive time periods, from 2000 to 2010. Comparisons were made between two 5-year eras of: 30-day mortality, period prevalence and mean age for 30 groups of specific operations. Main outcome measure 30-day mortality for an episode of surgical management. Results Our analysis includes 36 641 surgical episodes with an increase from 2283 episodes in 2000 to 3939 in 2009 (p<0.01). The raw national 30-day mortality rate fell over the period of review from 4.3% (95% CI 3.5% to 5.1%) in 2000 to 2.6% (95% CI 2.2% to 3.0%) in 2009/2010 (p<0.01). The case mix became more complex in terms of the percentage of patients <2.5 kg (p=0.05), with functionally univentricular hearts (p<0.01) and higher risk diagnoses (p<0.01). In the later time era, there was significant improvement in 30-day mortality for arterial switch with ventricular septal defect (VSD) repair, patent ductus arteriosus ligation, Fontan-type operation, tetralogy of Fallot and VSD repair, and the mean age of patients fell for a range of operations performed in infancy. Conclusions The raw 30-day mortality rate for paediatric cardiac surgery fell over a decade despite a rise in the national case mix complexity, and compares well with international benchmarks. Definitive repair is now more likely at a younger age for selected infants with congenital heart defects. PMID:25893099

  10. 30-day mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery has greatly improved over the last decade, but the 1-year mortality remains constant

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Laura Sommer; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) is a valuable tool in control of the quality of cardiac surgery. However, the validity of the risk score for the individual patient may be questioned. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the continued fall in short-term mortality reflects an actual improvement in late mortality, and subsequently, to investigate EuroSCORE as predictor of 1-year mortality. Methods: A population-based cohort study of 25,602 patients from a 12-year period from three public university hospitals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve surgery. Analysis was carried out based on EuroSCORE, age and co-morbidity factors (residual EuroSCORE). Results: During the period the average age increased from 65.1 ± 10.0 years to 68.9 ± 10.7 years (P < 0.001, one-way ANOVA), and the number of females increased from 26.0% to 28.2% (P = 0.0012, Chi-square test). The total EuroSCORE increased from 4.67 to 5.68 while the residual EuroSCORE decreased from 2.64 to 1.83. Thirty-day mortality decreased from 4.07% in 1999–2000 to 2.44% in 2011–2012 (P = 0.0056; Chi-square test), while 1-year mortality was unchanged (6.50% in 1999–2000 vs. 6.25% in 2011–2012 [P = 0.8086; Chi-square test]). Discussion: The study demonstrates that both co-morbidity and age has a great impact on 30-day mortality. However, with time the impact of co-morbidity seems less. Thus, age is more important than co-morbidity in late mortality. The various developments in short and long-term mortality are not readily explained. Conclusion: Although 30-day mortality of CABG and valve surgery patients has decreased during the 12-year period, the 1-year mortality remains the same. PMID:25849679

  11. Residents examine factors associated with 30-day, same-cause hospital readmissions on an internal medicine service.

    PubMed

    Moran, Jennifer; Colbert, Colleen Y; Song, Juhee; Hull, Joshua; Rajan, Sabitha; Varghees, Sunita; Arroliga, Alejandro C; Reddy, Santosh P

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in stemming the tide of hospital readmissions in an attempt to improve quality of care. This study presents the Phase I results of a resident-led quality improvement initiative to determine the percentage of and risk factors for same-cause readmissions (SCRs; defined as hospital readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for treatment of the same condition) to the internal medicine service of a multispecialty teaching hospital in central Texas. Results indicate that patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/asthma or anemia may be at increased risk for SCRs. Those patients who are insured by Medicaid and those who require assistance from social services also demonstrated an increased risk for SCRs. This study appears to be the first resident-led initiative in the field to examine 30-day SCRs to an internal medicine service for demographic and clinical risk factors. PMID:23550215

  12. A contemporary risk model for predicting 30-day mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine S.L.; Ludman, Peter F.; Hulme, William; de Belder, Mark A.; Stables, Rodney; Chowdhary, Saqib; Mamas, Mamas A.; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The current risk model for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the UK is based on outcomes of patients treated in a different era of interventional cardiology. This study aimed to create a new model, based on a contemporary cohort of PCI treated patients, which would: predict 30 day mortality; provide good discrimination; and be well calibrated across a broad risk-spectrum. Methods and results The model was derived from a training dataset of 336,433 PCI cases carried out between 2007 and 2011 in England and Wales, with 30 day mortality provided by record linkage. Candidate variables were selected on the basis of clinical consensus and data quality. Procedures in 2012 were used to perform temporal validation of the model. The strongest predictors of 30-day mortality were: cardiogenic shock; dialysis; and the indication for PCI and the degree of urgency with which it was performed. The model had an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.85 on the training data and 0.86 on validation. Calibration plots indicated a good model fit on development which was maintained on validation. Conclusion We have created a contemporary model for PCI that encompasses a range of clinical risk, from stable elective PCI to emergency primary PCI and cardiogenic shock. The model is easy to apply and based on data reported in national registries. It has a high degree of discrimination and is well calibrated across the risk spectrum. The examination of key outcomes in PCI audit can be improved with this risk-adjusted model. PMID:26942330

  13. HIV care engagement within 30 days after hospital discharge among patients from a Thai tertiary-care centre.

    PubMed

    Ayudhya, Daruni Phalakawong Na; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-06-01

    A cohort study was conducted to assess the rate of follow-up visit within 30 days after hospital discharge and to determine factors associated with no follow-up among Thai HIV-infected adults during the period from November 2012 to October 2013. Of the 120 eligible patients, 76 (63%) were males, median age was 40 years, and 57 (48%) were newly diagnosed with HIV infection. The rate of follow-up within 30 days after hospital discharge was 69%. Independent factors associated with no follow-up were no caregiver (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 7.82; p = 0.002), age (aOR 1.06; p = 0.007 for each year younger), being immigrant (aOR 5.10; p = 0.03) and monthly household income less than $US 300 (aOR 2.99; p = 0.04). These findings suggest the need for interventions to improve care engagement including close monitoring for follow-up, pre-discharge financial and medical coverage planning, assessment for the need for caregiver and patient education about the importance of care engagement. PMID:25015932

  14. Development and use of an administrative claims measure for profiling hospital-wide performance on 30-day unplanned readmission

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Leora I.; Partovian, Chohreh; Lin, Zhenqiu; Grady, Jacqueline N.; Herrin, Jeph; Conover, Mitchell; Montague, Julia; Dillaway, Chloe; Bartczak, Kathleen; Suter, Lisa G.; Ross, Joseph S.; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Drye, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing publicly-reported readmission measures are condition-specific, representing < 20% of adult hospitalizations. An all-condition measure may better measure quality and promote innovation. Objective To develop an all-condition, hospital-wide readmission measure. Design Measure development Setting 4,821 US hospitals. Patients Medicare Fee for Service (FFS) beneficiaries ≥ 65 years. Measurements Hospital-level, risk-standardized unplanned readmissions within 30 days of discharge. The measure uses Medicare FFS claims and is a composite of five specialty-based risk-standardized rates for medicine, surgery/gynecology, cardiorespiratory, cardiovascular and neurology cohorts. We randomly split the 2007–2008 admissions for development and validation. Models were adjusted for age, principal diagnosis and comorbidity. We examined calibration in Medicare and all-payer data, and compared hospital rankings in the development and validation samples. Results The development dataset contained 8,018,949 admissions associated with 1,276,165 unplanned readmissions (15.9%). The median hospital risk-standardized unplanned readmission rate was 15.8 (range 11.6–21.9). The five specialty cohort models accurately predicted readmission risk in both Medicare and all-payer datasets for average risk patients but slightly overestimated readmission risk at the extremes. Overall hospital risk-standardized readmission rates did not differ statistically in the split samples (p=0.7 for difference in rank) and 76% of hospitals’ validation set rankings were within two deciles of the development rank (24% >2 deciles). Of hospitals ranking in the top or bottom deciles, 90% remained within two deciles (10% >2 deciles), and 82% remained within one decile (18% > 1 decile). Limitations Risk-adjustment was limited to that available in claims data. Conclusions We developed a claims-based hospital-wide unplanned readmission measure for profiling hospitals that produced reasonably

  15. Utility of models to predict 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions: an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip R; Roberts, Pamela; Goh, Louise; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update previous systematic review of predictive models for 28-day or 30-day unplanned hospital readmissions. Design Systematic review. Setting/data source CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE from 2011 to 2015. Participants All studies of 28-day and 30-day readmission predictive model. Outcome measures Characteristics of the included studies, performance of the identified predictive models and key predictive variables included in the models. Results Of 7310 records, a total of 60 studies with 73 unique predictive models met the inclusion criteria. The utilisation outcome of the models included all-cause readmissions, cardiovascular disease including pneumonia, medical conditions, surgical conditions and mental health condition-related readmissions. Overall, a wide-range C-statistic was reported in 56/60 studies (0.21–0.88). 11 of 13 predictive models for medical condition-related readmissions were found to have consistent moderate discrimination ability (C-statistic ≥0.7). Only two models were designed for the potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions and had C-statistic >0.8. The variables ‘comorbidities’, ‘length of stay’ and ‘previous admissions’ were frequently cited across 73 models. The variables ‘laboratory tests’ and ‘medication’ had more weight in the models for cardiovascular disease and medical condition-related readmissions. Conclusions The predictive models which focused on general medical condition-related unplanned hospital readmissions reported moderate discriminative ability. Two models for potentially preventable/avoidable readmissions showed high discriminative ability. This updated systematic review, however, found inconsistent performance across the included unique 73 risk predictive models. It is critical to define clearly the utilisation outcomes and the type of accessible data source before the selection of the predictive model. Rigorous validation of the predictive models with moderate-to-high discriminative

  16. Preventing 30-day readmissions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Sherri

    2015-03-01

    Preventing 30-day readmissions to hospitals is a top priority in the era of health care reform. New regulations will be costly to health care facilities because of payment guidelines. The most frequently readmitted medical conditions are acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The transition from the hospital and into the home has been classified as a vulnerable time for many patients. During this time of transition patients may fail to fully understand their discharge instructions. Ineffective communication, low health literacy, and compliance issues contribute to readmissions. Telehealth and the use of technology may be used to prevent some readmissions. PMID:25680492

  17. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Roshni; Myles, Puja R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52–0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55–0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  18. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Roshni; Venkatesan, Sudhir; Myles, Puja R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52-0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55-0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  19. Development, Validation and Deployment of a Real Time 30 Day Hospital Readmission Risk Assessment Tool in the Maine Healthcare Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shiying; Wang, Yue; Jin, Bo; Shin, Andrew Young; Zhu, Chunqing; Huang, Min; Zheng, Le; Luo, Jin; Hu, Zhongkai; Fu, Changlin; Dai, Dorothy; Wang, Yicheng; Culver, Devore S.; Alfreds, Shaun T.; Rogow, Todd; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G.; Widen, Eric; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Identifying patients at risk of a 30-day readmission can help providers design interventions, and provide targeted care to improve clinical effectiveness. This study developed a risk model to predict a 30-day inpatient hospital readmission for patients in Maine, across all payers, all diseases and all demographic groups. Methods Our objective was to develop a model to determine the risk for inpatient hospital readmission within 30 days post discharge. All patients within the Maine Health Information Exchange (HIE) system were included. The model was retrospectively developed on inpatient encounters between January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 from 24 randomly chosen hospitals, and then prospectively validated on inpatient encounters from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013 using all HIE patients. Results A risk assessment tool partitioned the entire HIE population into subgroups that corresponded to probability of hospital readmission as determined by a corresponding positive predictive value (PPV). An overall model c-statistic of 0.72 was achieved. The total 30-day readmission rates in low (score of 0–30), intermediate (score of 30–70) and high (score of 70–100) risk groupings were 8.67%, 24.10% and 74.10%, respectively. A time to event analysis revealed the higher risk groups readmitted to a hospital earlier than the lower risk groups. Six high-risk patient subgroup patterns were revealed through unsupervised clustering. Our model was successfully integrated into the statewide HIE to identify patient readmission risk upon admission and daily during hospitalization or for 30 days subsequently, providing daily risk score updates. Conclusions The risk model was validated as an effective tool for predicting 30-day readmissions for patients across all payer, disease and demographic groups within the Maine HIE. Exposing the key clinical, demographic and utilization profiles driving each patient’s risk of readmission score may be useful to providers

  20. Effect of Hospital Use of Oral Nutritional Supplementation on Length of Stay, Hospital Cost, and 30-Day Readmissions Among Medicare Patients With COPD

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Julia Thornton; Linthicum, Mark T.; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Partridge, Jamie S.; LaVallee, Chris; Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Patients with COPD are at a high risk of nutritional deficiency, which is associated with declines in respiratory function, lean body mass and strength, and immune function. Although oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) has been associated with improvements in some of these domains, the impact of hospital ONS on readmission risk, length of stay (LOS), and cost among hospitalized patients is unknown. METHODS: Using the Premier Research Database, we first identified Medicare patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of COPD. We then identified hospitalizations in which ONS was provided, and used propensity-score matching to compare LOS, hospitalization cost, and 30-day readmission rates in a one-to-one matched sample of ONS and non-ONS hospitalizations. To further address selection bias among patients prescribed ONS, we also used instrumental variables analysis to study the association of ONS with study outcomes. Model covariates included patient and provider characteristics and a time trend. RESULTS: Out of 10,322 ONS hospitalizations and 368,097 non-ONS hospitalizations, a one-to-one matched sample was created (N = 14,326). In unadjusted comparisons in the matched sample, ONS use was associated with longer LOS (8.7 days vs 6.9 days, P < .0001), higher hospitalization cost ($14,223 vs $9,340, P < .0001), and lower readmission rates (24.8% vs 26.6%, P = .0116). However, in instrumental variables analysis, ONS use was associated with a 1.9-day (21.5%) decrease in LOS, from 8.8 to 6.9 days (P < .01); a hospitalization cost reduction of $1,570 (12.5%), from $12,523 to $10,953 (P < .01); and a 13.1% decrease in probability of 30-day readmission, from 0.34 to 0.29 (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: ONS may be associated with reduced LOS, hospitalization cost, and readmission risk in hospitalized Medicare patients with COPD. PMID:25357165

  1. Early Dynamic Risk Stratification with Baseline Troponin Levels and 90-minute ST Segment Resolution to Predict 30 Day Cardiovascular Mortality in STEMI: Analysis from CLARITY TIMI-28

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew W.; Morrow, David A.; Scirica, Benjamin M.; Jiang, Songtao; Bode, Christoph; Rifai, Nader; Gerszten, Robert E.; Gibson, C. Michael; Cannon, Christopher P.; Braunwald, Eugene; Sabatine, Marc S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Troponin is the preferred biomarker for risk stratification in non-ST-elevation ACS. The incremental prognostic utility of the initial magnitude of troponin elevation and its value in conjunction with ST segment resolution (STRes) in STEMI is less well-defined. Methods Troponin T (TnT) was measured in 1250 patients at presentation undergoing fibrinolysis for STEMI in CLARITY-TIMI 28. STRes was measured at 90 minutes. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the independent association between TnT levels, STRes, and 30-day cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Results Patients were classified into undetectable TnT at baseline (n=594), detectable but below the median of 0.12 ng/ml (n=330), and above the median (n=326). Rates of 30-day CV death were 1.5%, 4.5%, and 9.5% respectively (P<0.0001). Compared with those with undetectable levels and adjusting for baseline factors, the odds ratios for 30-day CV death were 4.56 (1.72-12.08, P=0.002) and 5.81 (2.29-14.73, P=0.0002) for those below and above the median, respectively. When combined with STRes, there was a significant gradient of risk, and in a multivariable model both baseline TnT (P=0.004) and STRes (P=0.003) were significant predictors of 30-day CV death. The addition of TnT and STRes to clinical risk factors significantly improved the C-statistic (0.86 to 0.90, P=0.02) and the integrated discriminative improvement 7.1% (P=0.0009). Conclusions Baseline TnT and 90-minute STRes are independent predictors of 30-day CV death in patients with STEMI. Use of these two simple, readily available tools can aid clinicians in early risk stratification. PMID:20569707

  2. Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Impact on Hospital and 30 Day Postdischarge Survival.

    PubMed

    Modrykamien, Ariel M; Hernandez, Omar O; Im, Yunhee; Walters, Ryan W; Schrader, Caleb L; Smith, Lauren E; Lima, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation support for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients involves the use of low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure. Nevertheless, the optimal ventilator strategy for ARDS patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy remains unknown. A retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of adult ARDS patients treated with V-V ECMO from October 2012 to May 2015 was performed. Mechanical ventilation data, as well as demographic and clinical data, were collected. We assessed the association between ventilator data and outcomes of interest. The primary outcome was hospital survival. Secondary outcome was 30 day survival posthospital discharge. Sixty-four ARDS patients were treated with ECMO. Univariate analysis showed that plateau pressure was independently associated with hospital survival. Tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and plateau were independently associated with 30 day survival. Multivariate analysis, after controlling for covariates, revealed that a 1 unit increase in plateau pressure was associated with a 21% decrease in the odds of hospital survival (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.39-33.42%, p = 0.007). In regards to 30 day survival postdischarge, a 1 unit increase in plateau pressure was associated with a 14.4% decrease in the odds of achieving the aforementioned outcome (95% CI = 1.75-25.4%, p = 0.027). Also, a 1 unit increase in PEEP was associated with a 36.2% decrease in the odds of 30 day survival (95% CI = 10.8-54.4%, p = 0.009). Among ARDS patients undergoing ECMO therapy, only plateau pressure is associated with hospital survival. Plateau pressure and PEEP are both associated with 30 day survival posthospital discharge. PMID:27347707

  3. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  4. Differences among hospitals in Medicare patient mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, M R; Park, R E; Lohr, K N; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge abstract data for fiscal year 1984 for all acute care hospitals treating Medicare patients (age greater than or equal to 65), we measured four mortality rates: inpatient deaths, deaths within 30 days after discharge, and deaths within two fixed periods following admission (30 days, and the 95th percentile length of stay for each condition). The metric of interest was the probability that a hospital would have as many deaths as it did (taking age, race, and sex into account). Differences among hospitals in inpatient death rates were large and significant (p less than .05) for 22 of 48 specific conditions studied and for all conditions together; among these 22 "high-variation" conditions, medical conditions accounted for far more deaths than did surgical conditions. We compared pairs of conditions in terms of hospital rankings by probability of observed numbers of inpatient deaths; we found relatively low correlations (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.3 or lower) for most comparisons except between a few surgical conditions. When we compared different pairs of the four death measures on their rankings of hospitals by probabilities of the observed numbers of deaths, the correlations were moderate to high (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.54 to 0.99). Hospitals with low probabilities of the number of observed deaths were not distributed randomly geographically; a small number of states had significantly more than their share of these hospitals (p less than .01). Information from hospital discharge abstract data is insufficient to determine the extent to which differences in severity of illness or quality of care account for this marked variability, so data on hospital death rates cannot now be used to draw inferences about quality of care. The magnitude of variability in death rates and the geographic clustering of facilities with low probabilities, however, both argue for further study of hospital death rates. These data may prove

  5. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  6. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence— Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared to non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet vs. non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor’s degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, p=0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.01, p=0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions Magnet hospitals have lower mortality than is fully accounted for by measured characteristics of nursing. Magnet recognition likely both identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:23047129

  7. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  8. The Impact of Profitability of Hospital Admissions on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Konetzka, R Tamara; Navathe, Amol S; Zhu, Jingsan; Chen, Wei; Volpp, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background Fiscal constraints faced by Medicare are leading to policies designed to reduce expenditures. Evidence of the effect of reduced reimbursement on the mortality of Medicare patients discharged from all major hospital service lines is limited. Methods We modeled risk-adjusted 30-day mortality of patients discharged from 21 hospital service lines as a function of service line profitability, service line time trends, and hospital service line and year-fixed effects. We simulated the effect of alternative revenue-neutral reimbursement policies on mortality. Our sample included all Medicare discharges from PPS-eligible hospitals (1997, 2001, and 2005). Results The results reveal a statistically significant inverse relationship between changes in profitability and mortality. A $0.19 average reduction in profit per $1.00 of costs led to a 0.010–0.020 percentage-point increase in mortality rates (p < .001). Mortality in newly unprofitable service lines is significantly more sensitive to reduced payment generosity than in service lines that remain profitable. Policy simulations that target service line inequities in payment generosity result in lower mortality rates, roughly 700–13,000 fewer deaths nationally. Conclusions The policy simulations raise questions about the trade-offs implicit in universal reductions in reimbursement. The effect of reduced payment generosity on mortality could be mitigated by targeting highly profitable services only for lower reimbursement. PMID:23346946

  9. Patient factors associated with 30-day morbidity, mortality, and length of stay after surgery for subdural hematoma: a study of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Grant, Ryan A; Basques, Bryce A; Webb, Matthew L; Samuel, Andre M; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Surgery for subdural hematoma (SDH) is a commonly performed neurosurgical procedure. This study identifies patient characteristics associated with adverse outcomes and prolonged length of stay (LOS) in patients who underwent surgical treatment for SDH. METHODS All patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) who were treated via craniotomy or craniectomy for SDH between 2005 and 2012 were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and 30-day outcomes were described. Multivariate regression was used to identify predictors of adverse events. RESULTS A total of 746 surgical procedures performed for SDH were identified and analyzed. Patients undergoing this procedure were 64% male with an average age (± SD) of 70.9 ± 14.1 years. The most common individual adverse events were death (17%) and intubation for more than 48 hours (19%). In total, 34% experienced a serious adverse event other than death, 8% of patients returned to the operating room (OR), and the average hospital LOS was 9.8 ± 9.9 days. In multivariate analysis, reduced mortality was associated with age less than 60 years (relative risk [RR] = 0.47, p = 0.017). Increased mortality was associated with gangrene (RR = 3.5, p = 0.044), ascites (RR = 3.00, p = 0.006), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class 4 or higher (RR = 2.34, p = 0.002), coma (RR = 2.25, p < 0.001), and bleeding disorders (RR = 1.87, p = 0.003). Return to the OR was associated with pneumonia (RR = 3.86, p = 0.044), male sex (RR = 1.85, p = 0.015), and delirium (RR = 1.75, p = 0.016). Serious adverse events were associated with ventilator dependence preoperatively (RR = 1.86, p < 0.001), dialysis (RR = 1.44, p = 0.028), delirium (RR = 1.40, p = 0.005), ASA Class 4 or higher (RR = 1.36, p = 0.035), and male sex (RR = 1.29, p = 0.037). Similarly, LOS was increased in ventilator dependent patients by 1.56-fold (p = 0.002), in patients with ASA Class 4 or higher by

  10. Utilization of non-US educated nurses in US hospitals: implications for hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Donna Felber; Cimiotti, Jeannie; Sloane, Douglas M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether, and under what circumstance, US hospital employment of non-US-educated nurses is associated with patient outcomes. Design Observational study of primary data from 2006 to 2007 surveys of hospital nurses in four states (California, Florida, New Jersey and Pennsylvania). The direct and interacting effects of hospital nurse staffing and the percentage of non-US-educated nurses on 30-day surgical patient mortality and failure-to-rescue were estimated before and after controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Participants Data from registered nurse respondents practicing in 665 hospitals were pooled with patient discharge data from state agencies. Main Outcomes Measure(s) Thirty-day surgical patient mortality and failure-to-rescue. Results The effect of non-US-educated nurses on both mortality and failure-to-rescue is nil in hospitals with lower than average patient to nurse ratios, but pronounced in hospitals with average and poor nurse to patient ratios. In hospitals in which patient-to-nurse ratios are 5:1 or higher, mortality is higher when 25% or more nurses are educated outside of the USA than when <25% of nurses are non-US-educated. Moreover, the effect of having >25% non-US-educated nurses becomes increasingly deleterious as patient-to-nurse ratios increase beyond 5:1. Conclusions Employing non-US-educated nurses has a negative impact on patient mortality except where patient-to-nurse ratios are lower than average. Thus, US hospitals should give priority to achieving adequate nurse staffing levels, and be wary of hiring large percentages of non-US-educated nurses unless patient-to-nurse ratios are low. PMID:23736834

  11. Long-term mortality of hospitalized pneumonia in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.

    PubMed

    Myint, P K; Hawkins, K R; Clark, A B; Luben, R N; Wareham, N J; Khaw, K-T; Wilson, A M

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about cause-specific long-term mortality beyond 30 days in pneumonia. We aimed to compare the mortality of patients with hospitalized pneumonia compared to age- and sex-matched controls beyond 30 days. Participants were drawn from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk prospective population study. Hospitalized pneumonia cases were identified from record linkage (ICD-10: J12-J18). For this study we excluded people with hospitalized pneumonia who died within 30 days. Each case identified was matched to four controls and followed up until the end June 2012 (total 15 074 person-years, mean 6·1 years, range 0·08-15·2 years). Cox regression models were constructed to examine the all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality using date of pneumonia onset as baseline with binary pneumonia status as exposure. A total of 2465 men and women (503 cases, 1962 controls) [mean age (s.d.) 64·5 (8·3) years] were included in the study. Between a 30-day to 1-year period, hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were 7·3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 5·4-9·9] and 5·9 (95% CI 3·5-9·7), respectively (with very few respiratory deaths within the same period) in cases compared to controls after adjusting for age, sex, asthma, smoking status, pack years, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes, physical activity, waist-to-hip ratio, prevalent cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. All outcomes assessed also showed increased risk of death in cases compared to controls after 1 year; respiratory cause of death being the most significant during that period (HR 16·4, 95% CI 8·9-30·1). Hospitalized pneumonia was associated with increased all-cause and specific-cause mortality beyond 30 days. PMID:26300532

  12. Beyond volume: hospital-based healthcare technology as a predictor of mortality for cardiovascular patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Yunhwan; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine whether hospital-based healthcare technology is related to 30-day postoperative mortality rates after adjusting for hospital volume of cardiovascular surgical procedures. This study used the National Health Insurance Service–Cohort Sample Database from 2002 to 2013, which was released by the Korean National Health Insurance Service. A total of 11,109 cardiovascular surgical procedure patients were analyzed. The primary analysis was based on logistic regression models to examine our hypothesis. After adjusting for hospital volume of cardiovascular surgical procedures as well as for all other confounders, the odds ratio (OR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals was 1.567-times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.069–2.297) than in those with high healthcare technology. We also found that, overall, cardiovascular surgical patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals, regardless of the extent of cardiovascular surgical procedures, had the highest 30-day mortality rate. Although the results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume–mortality relationship in cardiovascular surgical patients, the independent effect of hospital-based healthcare technology is strong, resulting in a lower mortality rate. As hospital characteristics such as clinical pathways and protocols are likely to also play an important role in mortality, further research is required to explore their respective contributions. PMID:27310998

  13. Hospital Strategies for Reducing Risk-Standardized Mortality Rates in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.; Spatz, Erica S.; Herrin, Jeph; Cherlin, Emily J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Thompson, Jennifer W.; Ting, Henry H.; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite recent improvements in survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), U.S. hospitals vary 2-fold in their 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs). Nevertheless, information is limited on hospital-level factors that may be associated with RSMRs. Objective To identify hospital strategies that were associated with lower RSMRs. Design Cross-sectional survey of 537 hospitals (91% response rate) and weighted multivariate regression by using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to determine the associations between hospital strategies and hospital RSMRs. Setting Acute care hospitals with an annualized AMI volume of at least 25 patients. Participants Patients hospitalized with AMI between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Measurements Hospital performance improvement strategies, characteristics, and 30-day RSMRs. Results In multivariate analysis, several hospital strategies were significantly associated with lower RSMRs and in aggregate were associated with clinically important differences in RSMRs. These strategies included holding monthly meetings to review AMI cases between hospital clinicians and staff who transported patients to the hospital (RSMR lower by 0.70 percentage points), having cardiologists always on site (lower by 0.54 percentage points), fostering an organizational environment in which clinicians are encouraged to solve problems creatively (lower by 0.84 percentage points), not cross-training nurses from intensive care units for the cardiac catheterization laboratory (lower by 0.44 percentage points), and having physician and nurse champions rather than nurse champions alone (lower by 0.88 percentage points). Fewer than 10% of hospitals reported using at least 4 of these 5 strategies. Limitation The cross-sectional design demonstrates statistical associations but cannot establish causal relationships. Conclusion Several strategies, which are currently implemented by relatively few hospitals, are

  14. Thirty-day in-hospital revascularization and mortality rates after acute myocardial infarction in seven Canadian provinces

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Helen; Brien, Susan E; Finès, Philippe; Bernier, Julie; Humphries, Karin; Stukel, Therese A; Ghali, William A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trials have demonstrated benefit with early revascularization following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Trends in and the association between early revascularization after (ie, 30 days or fewer) AMI and early death were determined. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Statistics Canada Health Person-Oriented Information Database, consisting of hospital discharge records for seven provinces from the Canadian Institute for Health Information Hospital Morbidity Database, was used. If there was no AMI in the preceding year, the first AMI visit within a fiscal year for a patient 20 years of age or older was included. Times to death in hospital and to revascularization procedures were counted from the admission date of the first AMI visit. Mixed model regression analyses with random slopes were used to assess the relationship between early revascularization and mortality. The overall rate of revascularization within 30 days of AMI increased significantly from 12.5% in 1995 to 37.4% in 2003, while the 30-day mortality rate decreased significantly from 13.5% to 10.6%. There was a linearly decreasing relationship – higher regional use of revascularization was associated with lower mortality in both men and women. CONCLUSIONS: These population-based utilization and outcome findings are consistent with clinical trial evidence of improved 30-day in-hospital mortality with increased early revascularization after AMI. PMID:20847971

  15. Accidents in Canada: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Paddon, P

    1989-01-01

    For Canadians under 45, accidents are the leading cause of both death and hospitalization. For the Canadian population as a whole, accidents rank fourth as a cause of death, after cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and respiratory disease. This article analyzes accident mortality and hospitalization in Canada using age-specific rates, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR), and potential years of life lost (PYLL). The six major causes of accidental death for men are motor vehicle traffic accidents (MVTA), falls, drowning, fires, suffocation and poisoning. For women, the order is slightly different: MVTA, falls, fires, suffocation, poisoning and drowning. From 1971 to 1986, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for accidents decreased by 44% for men and 39% for women. The largest decrease occurred in the under 15 age group. Accidents accounted for 11.5% of total hospital days in 1985, and 8% of hospital discharges. Because young people have the highest rates of accidental death, potential years of life lost (PYLL) are almost as high for accidents as for cardiovascular disease, although CVD deaths outnumbered accidental deaths by almost five to one in 1985. PMID:2491351

  16. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates <75, an association was significant for mortality only for both SR and AF patients. Conclusions Among older patients hospitalized with heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  17. Mortality and Treatment Patterns Among Patients Hospitalized With Acute Cardiovascular Conditions During Dates of National Cardiology Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Prasad, Vinay; Goldman, Dana P.; Romley, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Thousands of physicians attend scientific meetings annually. Although hospital physician staffing and composition may be affected by meetings, patient outcomes and treatment patterns during meeting dates are unknown. OBJECTIVE To analyze mortality and treatment differences among patients admitted with acute cardiovascular conditions during dates of national cardiology meetings compared with nonmeeting dates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of 30-day mortality among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or cardiac arrest from 2002 through 2011 during dates of 2 national cardiology meetings compared with identical nonmeeting days in the 3 weeks before and after conferences (AMI, 8570 hospitalizations during 82 meeting days and 57 471 during 492 nonmeeting days; heart failure, 19 282 during meeting days and 11 4591 during nonmeeting days; cardiac arrest, 1564 during meeting days and 9580 during nonmeeting days). Multivariable analyses were conducted separately for major teaching hospitals and nonteaching hospitals and for low-and high-risk patients. Differences in treatment utilization were assessed. EXPOSURES Hospitalization during cardiology meeting dates. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day mortality, procedure rates, charges, length of stay. RESULTS Patient characteristics were similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates. In teaching hospitals, adjusted 30-day mortality was lower among high-risk patients with heart failure or cardiac arrest admitted during meeting vs nonmeeting dates (heart failure, 17.5% [95% CI, 13.7%–21.2%] vs 24.8% [95% CI, 22.9%–26.6%]; P < .001; cardiac arrest, 59.1% [95% CI, 51.4%–66.8%] vs 69.4% [95% CI, 66.2%–72.6%]; P = .01). Adjusted mortality for high-risk AMI in teaching hospitals was similar between meeting and nonmeeting dates (39.2% [95% CI, 31.8%–46.6%] vs 38.5% [95% CI, 35.0%–42.0%]; P = .86), although adjusted percutaneous

  18. Mortality, Length of Stay, and Inpatient Charges for Heart Failure Patients at Public versus Private Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study compared in-hospital mortality within 30 days of admission, lengths of stay, and inpatient charges among patients with heart failure admitted to public and private hospitals in South Korea. Materials and Methods We obtained health insurance claims data for all heart failure inpatients nationwide between November 1, 2011 and May 31, 2012. These data were then matched with hospital-level data, and multi-level regression models were examined. A total of 8406 patients from 253 hospitals, including 31 public hospitals, were analyzed. Results The in-hospital mortality rate within 30 days of admission was 0.92% greater and the mean length of stay was 1.94 days longer at public hospitals than at private hospitals (mortality: 5.18% and 4.26%, respectively; LOS: 12.08 and 10.14 days, respectively). The inpatient charges were 11.4% lower per case and 24.5% lower per day at public hospitals than at private hospitals. After adjusting for patient- and hospital-level confounders, public hospitals had a 1.62-fold higher in-hospital mortality rate, a 16.5% longer length of stay, and an 11.7% higher inpatient charge per case than private hospitals, although the charges of private hospitals were greater in univariate analysis. Conclusion We recommend that government agencies and policy makers continue to monitor quality of care, lengths of stay in the hospital, and expenditures according to type of hospital ownership to improve healthcare outcomes and reduce spending. PMID:25837196

  19. Long-term morbidity and mortality after hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Jennie; Eurich, Dean T; Majumdar, Sumit R; Jin, Yan; Marrie, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term sequelae of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Therefore, we describe the long-term morbidity and mortality of patients after pneumonia requiring hospitalization. We specifically hypothesized that the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), designed to predict 30-day pneumonia-related mortality, would also be associated with longer-term all-cause mortality. Between 2000 and 2002, 3415 adults with CAP admitted to 6 hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, were prospectively enrolled in a population-based cohort. At the time of hospital admission, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected and the PSI was calculated for each patient. Postdischarge outcomes through to 2006 were ascertained using multiple linked administrative databases. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, hospital admissions, and re-hospitalization for pneumonia over a maximum of 5.4 years of follow-up. Follow-up data were available for 3284 (96%) patients; 66%were > or =65 years of age, 53% were male, and according to the PSI fully 63% were predicted to have greater than 18% 30-day pneumonia-related mortality (that is, PSI class IV-V). Median follow-up was 3.8 years. The 30-day, 1-year, and end of study mortality rates were 12%, 28%, and 53%, respectively. Overall, 82(19%) patients aged <45 years died compared with 1456 (67%) patients aged > or =65 years (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06-6.34). Male patients were more likely to die than female patients during follow-up (971 [56%] vs. 767 [49%], respectively; HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.13-1.37). Initial PSI classification predicted not only 30-day mortality, but also long-term postdischarge mortality, with 92 (15%) of PSI class I-II patients dying compared with 616 (82%) PSI class V patients (HR, 11.80; 95% CI, 4.70-14.70). Of 2950 patients who survived the initial CAP hospitalization, 72% were hospitalized again (median, 2 admissions over follow-up) and 16% were re-hospitalized with

  20. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  1. Risk factors for hospital morbidity and mortality after the Norwood procedure: A report from the Pediatric Heart Network Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial

    PubMed Central

    Tabbutt, Sarah; Ghanayem, Nancy; Ravishankar, Chitra; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Cooper, David S.; Frank, Deborah U.; Lu, Minmin; Pizarro, Christian; Frommelt, Peter; Goldberg, Caren S.; Graham, Eric M.; Krawczeski, Catherine Dent; Lai, Wyman W.; Lewis, Alan; Kirsh, Joel A.; Mahony, Lynn; Ohye, Richard G.; Simsic, Janet; Lodge, Andrew J.; Spurrier, Ellen; Stylianou, Mario; Laussen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We sought to identify risk factors for mortality and morbidity during the Norwood hospitalization in newborn infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and other single right ventricle anomalies enrolled in the Single Ventricle Reconstruction trial. Methods Potential predictors for outcome included patient- and procedure-related variables and center volume and surgeon volume. Outcome variables occurring during the Norwood procedure and before hospital discharge or stage II procedure included mortality, end-organ complications, length of ventilation, and hospital length of stay. Univariate and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed with bootstrapping to estimate reliability for mortality. Results Analysis included 549 subjects prospectively enrolled from 15 centers; 30-day and hospital mortality were 11.5% (63/549) and 16.0% (88/549), respectively. Independent risk factors for both 30-day and hospital mortality included lower birth weight, genetic abnormality, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and open sternum on the day of the Norwood procedure. In addition, longer duration of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest was a risk factor for 30-day mortality. Shunt type at the end of the Norwood procedure was not a significant risk factor for 30-day or hospital mortality. Independent risk factors for postoperative renal failure (n = 46), sepsis (n = 93), increased length of ventilation, and hospital length of stay among survivors included genetic abnormality, lower center/surgeon volume, open sternum, and post-Norwood operations. Conclusions Innate patient factors, ECMO, open sternum, and lower center/surgeon volume are important risk factors for postoperative mortality and/or morbidity during the Norwood hospitalization. PMID:22704284

  2. Temporal Changes in Postdischarge Mortality Risk After Hospitalization for Heart Failure (from the EVEREST Trial).

    PubMed

    Cook, Thomas D; Greene, Stephen J; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Fonarow, Gregg C; Zea, Ryan; Swedberg, Karl; Zannad, Faiez; Maggioni, Aldo P; Konstam, Marvin A; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-02-15

    In observational studies of patients hospitalized for heart failure (HHF), risk of death is highest immediately after discharge and decreases over time. It is unclear whether this population risk trajectory reflects (1) lowering of individual patient mortality risk with increasing time from index hospitalization or (2) temporal changes in population case-mix with earlier postdischarge death for "sicker" patients. Survival rate and longitudinal models were used to estimate temporal changes in postdischarge all-cause mortality risk in 3,993 HHF patients discharged alive in the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in Heart Failure Outcome Study with Tolvaptan (EVEREST) trial. After median follow-up of 9.9 months, 971 patients died (24.2%). Predicted mortality rate decreased from 15.9 per 100 patient-years immediately after discharge to 13.4 at 30 days and 12.8 at 90 days; mortality rate increased steadily thereafter. Risk variation between quintiles of risk was considerably larger than the temporal variation within risk strata. In a longitudinal model serially reassessing predicted patient mortality risk after each follow-up visit using data collected at these visits, predicted mortality risk increased during the 90 days preceding subsequent heart failure readmission and then followed a postdischarge trajectory similar to the index admission. In conclusion, although there is transiently elevated individual patient risk in the 90 days before and after discharge, the patient's individual risk profile, rather than temporal change in risk relative to hospitalization, remains the main determinant of mortality. For purposes of reducing all-cause mortality in HF patients, preventative and therapeutic measures may be best implemented as long-term interventions for high mortality risk patients based on serial risk assessments, irrespective of recent hospitalization. PMID:26742474

  3. Association between the Value-Based Purchasing pay for performance program and patient mortality in US hospitals: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jose F; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) program—the US pay for performance program introduced by Medicare to incentivize higher quality care—on 30 day mortality for three incentivized conditions: acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. Design Observational study. Setting 4267 acute care hospitals in the United States: 2919 participated in the HVBP program and 1348 were ineligible and used as controls (44 in general hospitals in Maryland and 1304 critical access hospitals across the United States). Participants 2 430 618 patients admitted to US hospitals from 2008 through 2013. Main outcome measures 30 day risk adjusted mortality for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia using a patient level linear spline analysis to examine the association between the introduction of the HVBP program and 30 day mortality. Non-incentivized, medical conditions were the comparators. A secondary outcome measure was to determine whether the introduction of the HVBP program was particularly beneficial for a subgroup of hospital—poor performers at baseline—that may benefit the most. Results Mortality rates of incentivized conditions in hospitals participating in the HVBP program declined at −0.13% for each quarter during the preintervention period and −0.03% point difference for each quarter during the post-intervention period. For non-HVBP hospitals, mortality rates declined at −0.14% point difference for each quarter during the preintervention period and −0.01% point difference for each quarter during the post-intervention period. The difference in the mortality trends between the two groups was small and non-significant (difference in difference in trends −0.03% point difference for each quarter, 95% confidence interval −0.08% to 0.13% point difference, P=0.35). In no subgroups of hospitals was HVBP associated with better outcomes, including poor performers at baseline

  4. Validation of the DECAF score to predict hospital mortality in acute exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, C; Steer, J; Heslop-Marshall, K; Stenton, SC; Hickey, PM; Hughes, R; Wijesinghe, M; Harrison, RN; Steen, N; Simpson, AJ; Gibson, GJ; Bourke, SC

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalisation due to acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) is common, and subsequent mortality high. The DECAF score was derived for accurate prediction of mortality and risk stratification to inform patient care. We aimed to validate the DECAF score, internally and externally, and to compare its performance to other predictive tools. Methods The study took place in the two hospitals within the derivation study (internal validation) and in four additional hospitals (external validation) between January 2012 and May 2014. Consecutive admissions were identified by screening admissions and searching coding records. Admission clinical data, including DECAF indices, and mortality were recorded. The prognostic value of DECAF and other scores were assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUROC) curve. Results In the internal and external validation cohorts, 880 and 845 patients were recruited. Mean age was 73.1 (SD 10.3) years, 54.3% were female, and mean (SD) FEV1 45.5 (18.3) per cent predicted. Overall mortality was 7.7%. The DECAF AUROC curve for inhospital mortality was 0.83 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.87) in the internal cohort and 0.82 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.87) in the external cohort, and was superior to other prognostic scores for inhospital or 30-day mortality. Conclusions DECAF is a robust predictor of mortality, using indices routinely available on admission. Its generalisability is supported by consistent strong performance; it can identify low-risk patients (DECAF 0–1) potentially suitable for Hospital at Home or early supported discharge services, and high-risk patients (DECAF 3–6) for escalation planning or appropriate early palliation. Trial registration number UKCRN ID 14214. PMID:26769015

  5. The relationship between hospital market competition, evidence-based performance measures, and mortality for chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jared Lane K; Lo Sasso, Anthony T

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the Joint Commission's ORYX initiative and the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file from 2003 to 2006, this study employed a fixed-effects approach to examine the relationship between hospital market competition, evidence-based performance measures, and short-term mortality at seven days, 30 days, 90 days, and one year for patients with chronic heart failure. We found that, on average, higher adherence with most of the Joint Commission's heart failure performance measures was not associated with lower mortality; the level of market competition also was not associated with any differences in mortality. However, higher adherence with the discharge instructions and left ventricular function assessment indicators at the 80th and 90th percentiles of the mortality distribution was associated with incrementally lower mortality rates. These findings suggest that targeting evidence-based processes of care might have a stronger impact in improving patient outcomes. PMID:22931022

  6. Measuring Hospital-Wide Mortality-Pitfalls and Potential.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Simon J; Goldmann, Don A; Perla, Rocco J; Parry, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Risk-adjusted hospital-wide mortality has been proposed as a key indicator of system-level quality. Several risk-adjusted measures are available, and one-the hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) - is publicly reported in a number of countries, but not in the United States. This paper reviews potential uses of such measures. We conclude that available methods are not suitable for interhospital comparisons or rankings and should not be used for pay-for-performance or value-based purchasing/payment. Hospital-wide mortality is a relatively imprecise, crude measure of quality, but disaggregation into condition- and service-line-specific mortality can facilitate targeted improvement efforts. If tracked over time, both observed and expected mortality rates should be monitored to ensure that apparent improvement is not due to increasing expected mortality, which could reflect changes in case mix or coding. Risk-adjusted mortality can be used as an initial signal that a hospital's mortality rate is significantly higher than statistically expected, prompting further inquiry. PMID:25103495

  7. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  8. 75 FR 45121 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request; 30-Day Notice... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human...

  9. Ares I-X 30 Day Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ess, Bob; Smith, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation represents the 30 day report on the Ares I-X test flight. Included in the review is information on the following areas: (1) Ground Systems, (2) Guidance, Navigation and Control, (3) Roll Response, (4) Vehicle Response, (5) Control System Performance, (6) Structural Damping, (7) Thrust Oscillation, (8) Stage Separation, (9) Connector Assessment, (10) USS Splashdown, (11) Data Recorder and (12) FS Hardware Assessment.

  10. Hospital Mortality Associated with Stroke in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Safari, Rasool; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Soleimani, Faroq; Sharifian, Maryam; Yektaparast Kashkuli, Sara; Nayebi Khayatghuchani, Mahsa; Azadi, Mahbube; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Safari, Anahid; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Alshekhlee, Amer; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Background: Unlike the western hemisphere, information about stroke epidemiology in southern Iran is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the main epidemiological characteristics of patients with stroke and its mortality rate in southern Iran. Methods: A retrospective, single-center, hospital-based longitudinal study was performed at Nemazee Hospital in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Patients with a diagnosis of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes were identified based on the International Classification of Diseases, 9th and 10th editions, for the period between 2001 and 2010. Demographics including age, sex, area of residence, socioeconomic status, length of hospital stay, and discharge destinations were analyzed in association with mortality. Results: 16351 patients with a mean age of 63.4 years (95% CI: 63.1, 63.6) were included in this analysis. Men were slightly predominant (53.6% vs. 46.4%). Forty-seven percent of the total sample was older than 65,17% were younger than 45, and 2.6% were children younger than 18. The mean hospital stay was 6.3 days (95% CI: 6.2, 6.4). Among all types of strokes, the overall hospital mortality was 20.5%. Multiple logistic regression revealed significantly higher in-hospital mortality in women and children (P<0.001) but not in patients with low socioeconomic status or from rural areas. During the study period, the mortality proportions increased from 17.8% to 22.2%. Conclusion: In comparison to western countries, a larger proportion of our patients were young adults and the mortality rate was higher. PMID:24293785

  11. Delirium and other clinical factors with Clostridium difficile infection that predict mortality in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Archbald-Pannone, Laurie R.; McMurry, Timothy L.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Warren, Cirle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) severity has increased, especially among hospitalized elderly. We evaluated clinical factors to predict mortality following CDI. Methods We collected data from inpatients diagnosed with CDI at US academic medical center (HSR-IRB# 13630). We evaluated age, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), admission from a long-term care facility (LTCF), intensive care unit (ICU) at time of diagnosis, white blood cell count (WBC), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), low body mass index (BMI), and delirium as possible predictors. A parsimonious predictive model was chosen using Akaike information criterion (AIC) and a best subsets model selection algorithm. Area under the ROC curve was used to assess the model’s comparative; with AIC as selection criterion for all subsets to measure fit and control for over-fitting. Results From 362 subjects, the selected model included CCI, WBC, BUN, ICU, and delirium. The logistic regression coefficients were converted to a points scale and calibrated so that each unit on the CCI contributed 2 points, ICU contributed 5, unit of WBC (natural log scale) contributed 3, unit of BUN contributed 5, and delirium contributed 11. Discussion Our model shows substantial ability to predict short term mortality in patients hospitalized with CDI. Conclusion Patients who were diagnosed in the ICU and developed delirium are at highest risk for dying within 30 days of CDI diagnosis. PMID:25920706

  12. High Mortality among Patients with Positive Blood Cultures at a Children's Hospital in Tbilisi, Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Jami; Chochua, Sopio; Kourbatova, Ekaterina V.; Barragan, Maribel; Wang, Yun F; Blumberg, Henry M; Rio, Carlos del; Walker, H. Kenneth; Leonard, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Background The etiology and outcomes of blood stream infections (BSI) among pediatric patients is not well described in resource-limited countries including Georgia. Methods Patients with positive blood cultures at the largest pediatric hospital in the country of Georgia were identified by review of medical and laboratory records for patients who had blood cultures obtained between 01/2004-06/2006. Results Of 1,693 blood cultures obtained during the study period, 338 (20%) were positive; 299 were included in our analysis. The median age was 14 days (range 2 days -14 years) and 178 (60%) were male; 53% of patients with a positive culture were admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) were representing 165 (55%) of 299 cultures. Further speciation of 135 (82%) of 165 GNR was not possible because of lack of laboratory capacity. Overall mortality was 30% (90 of 299). Among the 90 children who died, 80 (89%) were neonates and 68 (76%) had BSI caused by Gram-negative organism. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality included age <30 days (OR=4.00, 95% CI 1.89-8.46) and having a positive blood culture for a Gram-negative BSI (OR=2.38, 95% CI 1.32-4.29). Conclusions A high mortality was seen among children, particularly neonates, with positive blood cultures at the largest pediatric hospital in Georgia. Because of limited laboratory capacity microbiological identification of common organisms known to cause BSI in children was not possible and susceptibility testing was not performed. Improving the infrastructure of diagnostic microbiology laboratories in resource limited countries is critical in order to improve patient care and clinical outcomes and from a public health standpoint to improve surveillance activities. PMID:19759489

  13. Erratum: maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This erratum corrects article: "Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report." The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;21:16. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.21.16.3912[This corrects the article on p. 16 in vol. 21, PMID: 26401210.]. PMID:26816561

  14. Maternal mortality in a district hospital in West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Gun, K M

    1970-06-01

    To ascertain the causes of high maternal mortality in West Bengal, the author examined maternal mortality between 1964-68. It was intended that measures to improve the situation in rural areas could be suggested. Women in labor often arrive at the hospital very late and few antenatal care facilities are available in rural areas. High risk cases often are delivered at home, a situation which often results in fetal complications. Maternal deaths have declined, but not dramatically. Of the 24,265 deliveries at the Burdwan district hospital, there were 333 maternal deaths for an incidence of 13.7/1000, along with another 42 cases where death was due to pregnancy-associated causes. In contrast, the maternal mortality rate in a district hospital in Calcutta was 4/1000 in 1968. Eclampsia accounted for 42.34% (141) of maternal deaths making it the major cause of death. In Calcutta this cause of death is receding gradually but in the districts it still accounts for a heavy loss of life (an incidence of 1 in 38). Adequate antenatal care would reduce this high mortality. 2 factors which have contributed to the high mortality are the hours lost in transporting a patient from a rural area and inadequate hospital staff. Postpartum hemorrhage and/or retained placenta was responsible for 39 deaths and none of the cases admitted from outside had received antenatal care. A shortage of blood was also a contributory factor. Severe anemia was responsible for 34 deaths and abortions resulted in another 29 deaths (16 because of severe sepsis; 13 due to hemorrhage or shock). An emergency service would help reduce the number of deaths but at present such a service does not even exist in the urban areas. Ruptured uterus resulted in 29 deaths and obstructed labor in 27 deaths. Placenta previa brought about 14 deaths and the remaining 20 deaths were due to such causes as accidental hemorrhage (10), hydatidiform mole (4), puerperal sepsis (3), ectopic pregnancy (2), and uterine inversion (1

  15. Mortality in newborns referred to tertiary hospital: An introspection

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Kailash Chandra; Gupta, Ratan; Sharma, Shobha; Sehgal, Rachna; Roy, Manas Pratim

    2015-01-01

    Background: India is one of the largest contributors in the pool of neonatal death in the world. However, there are inadequate data on newborns referred to tertiary care centers. The present study aimed to find out predictors of mortality among newborns delivered elsewhere and admitted in a tertiary hospital in New Delhi between February and September 2014. Materials and Methods: Hospital data for were retrieved and analyzed for determining predictors for mortality of the newborns. Time of admission, referral and presenting clinical features were considered. Results: Out of 1496 newborns included in the study, there were 300 deaths. About 43% deaths took place in first 24 hours of life. Asphyxia and low birth weight were the main causes of death in early neonatal period, whereas sepsis had maximum contribution in deaths during late neonatal period. Severe hypothermia, severe respiratory distress, admission within first 24 hours of life, absence of health personnel during transport and referral from any hospital had significant correlation with mortality. Conclusions: There is need for ensure thermoregulation, respiratory sufficiency and presence of health personnel during transport. PMID:26288788

  16. The resurrection of hospital mortality statistics in England.

    PubMed

    Street, Andrew

    2002-04-01

    Mortality statistics for English hospitals were published by the Labour government in 1998, partly in response to the tragedy at the Bristol Royal Infirmary involving the deaths or serious injury of babies and children who had had unsuccessful heart operations. Despite being presented as an important innovation, this publication policy had a number of precedents, most notably the data produced as a result of Florence Nightingale's efforts in the 1860s and the clinical indicators developed by the Scottish Office in the early 1990s. In addition, league tables of death rates for English hospitals were available from 1992 to 1996, although there was widespread ignorance of their existence. This paper examines each of these precedents before discussing events that weakened public trust in the medical profession's ability to regulate itself and led to the Labour government's decision to resurrect the publication of hospital mortality data. It is suggested that these performance indicators may be largely symbolic of the government's broader commitment to performance assessment, but it is also recognised that, if coupled with appropriate incentives, public disclosure of mortality data may foster genuine performance improvements. PMID:11934375

  17. Incidence and 30-day case fatality for acute myocardial infarction in England in 2010: national-linked database study

    PubMed Central

    Smolina, Kate; Wright, Frances L.; Rayner, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited national population-based epidemiological data on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in England, making the current burden of disease, and clinical prognosis, difficult to quantify. The aim of this study was to provide national estimates of incidence and 30-day case fatality rate (CFR) for first and recurrent AMI in England. Methods: Population-based study using person-linked routine hospital and mortality data on 79 896 individuals of any age, who were admitted to hospital for AMI or who died suddenly from AMI in 2010. Results: Of 82 252 AMI events in 2010, 83% were first. Age-standardized incidence of first AMI per 100 000 population was 130 (95% CI 129–131) in men and 55.9 (95% CI 55.3–56.6) in women. Age-standardized 30-day overall CFRs including sudden AMI deaths for men and women, respectively, were 32.4% (95% CI 32.0–32.9) and 30.3% (95% CI 29.8–30.9) for first AMI and 29.7% (95% CI 28.7–30.7) and 26.7% (95% CI 25.5–27.9) for recurrent AMI. Age-standardized hospitalized 30-day CFR was 12.0% (95% CI 11.6–12.3) for men and 12.3% (95% CI 11.9–12.7) for women. Conclusions: While the majority of AMIs are not fatal, of those that are, two-thirds occur as sudden AMI deaths. About one in six of all AMIs are recurrent events. These findings reinforce the importance of primary and secondary prevention in reducing AMI morbidity and mortality. PMID:22241758

  18. An assessment of composite measures of hospital performance and associated mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction. Analysis of individual hospital performance and outcome for the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR)

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul D; Cattle, Brian A; Batin, Phillip D; Wilson, John I; West, Robert M; Hall, Alistair S; Weston, Clive F; Deanfield, John E; Fox, Keith A; Gale, Chris P

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether a hospital-specific opportunity-based composite score (OBCS) was associated with mortality in 136,392 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) using data from the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) 2008–2009. Methods and results: For 199 hospitals a multidimensional hospital OBCS was calculated on the number of times that aspirin, thienopyridine, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi), statin, β-blocker, and referral for cardiac rehabilitation was given to individual patients, divided by the overall number of opportunities that hospitals had to give that care. OBCS and its six components were compared using funnel plots. Associations between OBCS performance and 30-day and 6-month all-cause mortality were quantified using mixed-effects regression analysis. Median hospital OBCS was 95.3% (range 75.8–100%). By OBCS, 24.1% of hospitals were below funnel plot 99.8% CI, compared to aspirin (11.1%), thienopyridine (15.1%), β-blockers (14.7%), ACEi (19.1%), statins (12.1%), and cardiac rehabilitation (17.6%) on discharge. Mortality (95% CI) decreased with increasing hospital OBCS quartile at 30 days [Q1, 2.25% (2.07–2.43%) vs. Q4, 1.40% (1.25–1.56%)] and 6 months [Q1, 7.93% (7.61–8.25%) vs. Q4, 5.53% (5.22–5.83%)]. Hospital OBCS quartile was inversely associated with adjusted 30-day and 6-month mortality [OR (95% CI), 0.87 (0.80–0.94) and 0.92 (0.88–0.96), respectively] and persisted after adjustment for coronary artery catheterization [0.89 (0.82–0.96) and 0.95 (0.91–0.98), respectively]. Conclusions: Multidimensional hospital OBCS in AMI survivors are high, discriminate hospital performance more readily than single performance indicators, and significantly inversely predict early and longer-term mortality. PMID:24062929

  19. [Neonatal morbidity and hospital mortality of preterm triplets.

    PubMed

    Lamshing-Salinas, Priscilla; Rend Ón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Iglesias-Leboreiro, José; Bernárdez-Zapata, Isabel; Braverman-Bronstein, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    Background: multiple gestations have caused an increase in vulnerable preterm births. Our objective was to analyze neonatal morbidity and mortality in preterm triplets. Methods: we analyzed a cohort of 30 triplets in an obstetrics and gynecology hospital. Data were obtained during pregnancy, childbirth and neonatal period: birth order, sex, weight, height, malformations, advanced resuscitation, assisted ventilation, intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, days of hospitalization, and death. Results: 90 infants were analyzed. There was an omphalopagus con-joined twins case; 42 (70 %) had between 30-33 weeks and six between 24-29; 19 (21 %) had low weight for gestational age, and 18 (30 %) had a major malformation; 27 % required ventilatory support, 33 % sepsis, 32 % necrotizing enterocolitis, 21 % pulmonary hypertension, 14 % bronchopulmonary dysplasia and 2 % intraventricular hemorrhage, without statistically significant differences related to the order, presentation at birth, sex and number of placentas and amniotic sacs. Eight 24-week triplets died, four over 28 weeks, and a siamese (p = 38). There was no difference in hospital days between triplets. Conclusions: the triplets mortality is low and mainly associated with extreme prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction and sepsis. PMID:24290011

  20. Association of Comorbidities With Postoperative In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Krannich, Alexander; Weiss, Björn; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Spies, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to evaluate the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA PS) and the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) for the prediction of postoperative mortality. The ASA PS has been suggested to be equally good as the CCI in predicting postoperative outcome. However, these scores have never been compared in a broad surgical population. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a German tertiary care university hospital. Predictive accuracy was compared using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC). In a post hoc approach, a regression model was fitted and cross-validated to estimate the association of comorbidities and intraoperative factors with mortality. This model was used to improve prediction by recalibrating the CCI for surgical patients (sCCIs) and constructing a new surgical mortality score (SMS). The data of 182,886 patients with surgical interventions were analyzed. The CCI was superior to the ASA PS in predicting postoperative mortality (AUROCCCI 0.865 vs AUROCASAPS 0.833, P < 0.001). Predictive quality further improved after recalibration of the sCCI and construction of the new SMS (AUROCSMS 0.928 vs AUROCsCCI 0.896, P < 0.001). The SMS predicted postoperative mortality especially well in patients never admitted to an intensive care unit. The newly constructed SMS provides a good estimate of patient's risk of death after surgery. It is capable of identifying those patients at especially high risk and may help reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:25715258

  1. Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage: Clinical and computed tomography findings in predicting in-hospital mortality in Central Africans

    PubMed Central

    Tshikwela, Michel Lelo; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) constitutes now 52% of all strokes. Despite of its deadly pattern, locally there is no clinical grading scale for ICH-related mortality prediction. The first objective of this study was to develop a risk stratification scale (Kinshasa ICH score) by assessing the strength of independent predictors and their association with in-hospital 30-day mortality. The second objective of the study was to create a specific local and African model for ICH prognosis. Materials and Methods: Age, sex, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), smoking, alcohol intake, and neuroimaging data from CT scan (ICH volume, Midline shift) of patients admitted with primary ICH and follow-upped in 33 hospitals of Kinshasa, DR Congo, from 2005 to 2008, were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: A total of 185 adults and known hypertensive patients (140 men and 45 women) were examined. 30-day mortality rate was 35% (n=65). ICH volume>25 mL (OR=8 95% CI: 3.1-20.2; P<0.0001), presence of coma (OR=6.8 95% CI 2.6-17.4; P<0.0001) and left hemispheric site of ICH (OR 2.6 95% CI: 1.1-6; P=0.027) were identified as significant and independent predictors of 30-day mortality. Midline shift > 7 mm, a consequence of ICH volume, was also a significant predictor of mortality. The Kinshasa ICH score was the sum of individual points assigned as follows: Presence of coma coded 2 (2 × 2 = 4), absence of coma coded 1 (1 × 2 = 2), ICH volume>25 mL coded 2 (2 × 2=4), ICH volume of ≤25 mL coded 1(1 × 2=2), left hemispheric site of ICH coded 2 (2 × 1=2), and right hemispheric site of hemorrhage coded 1(1 × 1 = 1). All patients with Kinshasa ICH score ≤7 survived and the patients with a score >7 died. In considering sex influence (Model 3), points were allowed as follows: Presence of coma (2 × 3 = 6), absence of coma (1 × 3 = 3), men (2 × 2 = 4), women (1 × 2 = 2), midline shift ≤7 mm (1 × 3 = 3), and midline shift >7 mm (2 × 3

  2. Characteristics of patients dying within 30 days of diagnosis of breast or colorectal cancer in Scotland, 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, D H; Clark, D I; Stockton, D L; Munro, A J; Steele, R J C

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recent research has shown that most of the excess risk of death following breast and colorectal cancer in England compared with Norway and Sweden occurs in older age groups during the first year, and especially in the first month of follow-up. The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics of patients dying within 30 days of being diagnosed with one of these cancers in Scotland during 2003–2007. Methods: Anonymised cancer registry records linked to hospital discharge and death records were extracted. The study population was divided into patients who died within 30 days of diagnosis (cases) and those who survived beyond this threshold (controls). Differences in patient-, tumour-, and health service-related characteristics were assessed using the χ2-test and logistic regression. Results: Patients dying within 30 days were more likely to be elderly and to have experienced emergency admission to non-surgical specialities. Their tumours were less likely to have been verified microscopically, but they appeared more likely to be of high grade and advanced in stage. A substantial number of patients died from causes other than their cancer. Conclusion: These results suggest that early mortality after a diagnosis of breast or colorectal cancer may be partly due to comorbidity and lifestyle factors, as well as due to more advanced disease. Further research is required to determine the precise explanation for these findings and, in particular, if any potentially avoidable factors such as delays in presentation, referral, or diagnosis exist. PMID:21206498

  3. Impact of obesity on hospital complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Fayfman, Maya; Zhao, Liping; Weaver, Jeff; Buehler, Lauren; Smiley, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Haw, J Sonya; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have reported increased length of hospital stay and complications; however, there are also reports of obesity having a protective effect on health, a phenomenon coined the ‘obesity paradox’. We aimed to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research design and methods This retrospective analysis was conducted on 29 623 patients admitted to two academic hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were subdivided by body mass index into underweight (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2). Hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose >10 mmol/L during hospitalization. Hospital complications included a composite of pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, bacteremia and death. Results A total of 4.2% were underweight, 29.6% had normal weight, 30.2% were overweight, and 36% were obese. 27.2% of patients had diabetes and 72.8% did not have diabetes (of which 75% had hyperglycemia and 25% had normoglycemia during hospitalization). A J-shaped curve with higher rates of complications was observed in underweight patients in all glycemic groups; however, there was no significant difference in the rate of complications among normal weight, overweight, or obese patients, with and without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Underweight is an independent predictor for hospital complications. In contrast, increasing body mass index was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality, regardless of glycemic status. There was no evidence of an obesity paradox among inpatients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:27486518

  4. Length of hospital stay after hip fracture and risk of early mortality after discharge in New York state: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nikkel, Lucas E; Kates, Stephen L; Schreck, Michael; Maceroli, Michael; Mahmood, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Study question Can the length of hospital stay for hip fracture affect a patient’s risk of death 30 days after discharge? Methods In a retrospective cohort study, population based registry data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) were used to investigate 188 208 patients admitted to hospital for hip fracture in New York state from 2000 to 2011. Patients were aged 50 years and older, and received surgical or non-surgical treatment. The main outcome measure was the mortality rate at 30 days after hospital discharge. Study answer and limitations Hospital stays of 11-14 days for hip fracture were associated with a 32% increased odds of death 30 days after discharge, compared with stays lasting one to five days (odds ratio 1.32 (95% confidence interval 1.19 to 1.47)). These odds increased to 103% for stays longer than 14 days (2.03 (1.84 to 2.24)). Other risk factors associated with early mortality included discharge to a hospice facility, older age, metastatic disease, and non-surgical management. The 30 day mortality rate after discharge was 4.5% for surgically treated patients and 10.7% for non-surgically treated patients. These findings might not be generalizable to populations in other US states or in other countries. The administrative claims data used could have been incomplete or include inaccurate coding of diagnoses and comorbid conditions. The database also did not include patient socioeconomic status, which could affect access to care to a greater extent in New York state than in European countries. Specific cause of death was not available because few autopsies are performed in this population. What this study adds By contrast with recent findings in Sweden, decreased length of hospital stay for hip fracture was associated with reduced rates of early mortality in a US cohort in New York state. This could reflect critical system differences in the treatment of hip fractures between Europe and the USA. Funding

  5. Diagnosis and mortality in prehospital emergency patients transported to hospital: a population-based and registry-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Larsen, Thomas Mulvad; Jensen, Flemming Bøgh; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Hansen, Poul Anders; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Knowledge about patients after calling for an ambulance is limited to subgroups, such as patients with cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, trauma and stroke, while population-based studies including all diagnoses are few. We examined the diagnostic pattern and mortality among all patients brought to hospital by ambulance after emergency calls. Design Registry-based cohort study. Setting and participants We included patients brought to hospital in an ambulance dispatched after emergency calls during 2007–2014 in the North Denmark Region (580 000 inhabitants). We reported hospital diagnosis according to the chapters of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition (ICD-10), and studied death on days 1 and 30 after the call. Cohort characteristics and diagnoses were described, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate mortality and 95% CIs. Results In total, 148 757 patients were included, mean age 52.9 (SD 24.3) years. The most frequent ICD-10 diagnosis chapters were: ‘injury and poisoning’ (30.0%), and the 2 non-specific diagnosis chapters: ‘symptoms and abnormal findings, not elsewhere classified’ (17.5%) and ‘factors influencing health status and contact with health services’ (14.1%), followed by ‘diseases of the circulatory system’ (10.6%) and ‘diseases of the respiratory system’ (6.7%). The overall 1-day mortality was 1.8% (CI 1.7% to 1.8%) and 30-day mortality 4.7% (CI 4.6% to 4.8%). ‘Diseases of the circulatory system’ had the highest 1-day mortality of 7.7% (CI 7.3% to 8.1%) accounting for 1209 deaths. After 30 days, the highest number of deaths were among circulatory diseases (2313), respiratory diseases (1148), ‘symptoms and abnormal findings, not elsewhere classified’ (1119) and ‘injury and poisoning’ (741), and 30 days mortality in percentage was 14.7%, 11.6%, 4.3% and 1.7%, respectively. Conclusions Patients' diagnoses from hospital stay after calling 1-1-2 in this population

  6. Cancer Mortality Pattern in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akinde, Olakanmi Ralph; Phillips, Adekoyejo Abiodun; Oguntunde, Olubanji Ajibola; Afolayan, Olatunji Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and about 70% of all cancer deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries. The cancer mortality pattern is quite different in Africa compared to other parts of the world. Extensive literature research showed little or no information about the overall deaths attributable to cancer in Nigeria. Aims and Objectives. This study aims at providing data on the patterns of cancer deaths in our center using the hospital and autopsy death registers. Methodology. Demographic, clinical data of patients who died of cancer were extracted from death registers in the wards and mortuary over a period of 14 years (2000–2013). Results. A total of 1436 (4.74%) cancer deaths out of 30287 deaths recorded during the period. The male to female ratio was 1 : 2.2 and the peak age of death was between 51 and 60 years. Overall, breast cancer was responsible for most of the deaths. Conclusion. The study shows that the cancers that accounted for majority of death occurred in organs that were accessible to screening procedures and not necessary for survival. We advise regular screening for precancerous lesions in these organs so as to reduce the mortality rate and burden of cancer. PMID:25628656

  7. Causes of 30-day readmission after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jacob K; Washington, Chad W; Guniganti, Ridhima; Dacey, Ralph G; Derdeyn, Colin P; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Hospital readmission is a common but controversial quality measure increasingly used to influence hospital compensation in the US. The objective of this study was to evaluate the causes for 30-day hospital readmission following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to determine the appropriateness of this performance metric and to identify potential avenues for improved patient care. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who received surgical orendovas-cular treatment for aneurysmal SAH at Barnes-Jewish Hospital between 2003 and 2013. Two senior faculty identified by consensus the primary medical/surgical diagnosis associated with readmission as well as the underlying causes of rehospitalization. RESULTS Among 778 patients treated for aneurysmal SAH, 89 experienced a total of 97 readmission events, yielding a readmission rate of 11.4%. The median time from discharge to readmission was 9 days (interquartile range 3-17.5 days). Actual hydrocephalus or potential concern for hydrocephalus (e.g., headache) was the most frequent diagnosis (26/97, 26.8%), followed by infections (e.g., wound infection [5/97, 5.2%], urinary tract infection [3/97, 3.1%], and pneumonia [3/97, 3.1%]) and thromboembolic events (8/97, 8.2%). In most cases (75/97, 77.3%), we did not identify any treatment lapses contributing to readmission. The most common underlying causes for readmission were unavoidable development of SAH-related pathology (e.g., hydrocephalus; 36/97, 37.1%) and complications related to neurological impairment and immobility (e.g., thromboembolic event despite high-dose chemoprophylaxis; 21/97, 21.6%). The authors determined that 22/97 (22.7%) of the readmissions were likely preventable with alternative management. In these cases, insufficient outpatient medical care (for example, for hyponatremia; 16/97, 16.5%) was the most common shortcoming. CONCLUSIONS Most readmissions after aneurysmal SAH relate to late consequences of

  8. 75 FR 48971 - 30-Day Notice; Agency Information Collection Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 30-Day Notice; Agency Information Collection Request AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. Agency Information Collection Request. 30 Day Public Comment Request. In compliance with the requirement...), Department of Health and Human Services, is publishing the following summary of a proposed collection...

  9. Maternal mortality in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Ray, A

    1992-05-01

    This study was conducted in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region among 5,273 pregnant women over a period of 8 years. There were 29 deaths, the maternal mortality rate was 55 per 10,000. Septic abortion was encountered in 4 among them. Direct obstetric cause was responsible in 72.41% of cases and indirect cause in 27.59% cases. Sepsis, both puerperal and postabortal resulted in 24.14% followed by postpartum haemorrhage in 20.69%. Two of these cases were associated with inversion of the uterus. Preeclampsia caused 10.34% and eclampsia 6.9% of the deaths. Among the indirect causes severe anaemia and pulmonary tuberculosis accounted for 10.34% and 6.9% respectively. Infective hepatitis was the cause in 6.9% cases. Only 17% of the cases were booked and the rest were unbooked. Majority of the cases (62.07%) belonged to the age group of 20-30 years. Primigravida constituted 41.38% of the cases. PMID:1517613

  10. Predictors of mortality in HIV-associated hospitalizations in Portugal: a hierarchical survival model

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Sara S; Andreozzi, Valeska; Martins, Maria O; Torgal, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background The beneficial effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy, increasing survival and the prevention of AIDS defining illness development are well established. However, the annual Portuguese hospital mortality is still higher than expected. It is crucial to understand the hospitalization behaviour to better allocate resources. This study investigates the predictors of mortality in HIV associated hospitalizations in Portugal through a hierarchical survival model. Methods The study population consists of 12,078 adult discharges from patients with HIV infection diagnosis attended at Portuguese hospitals from 2005–2007 that were registered on the diagnosis-related groups' database. We used discharge and hospital level variables to develop a hierarchical model. The discharge level variables were: age, gender, type of admission, type of diagnoses-related group, related HIV complication, the region of the patient's residence, the number of diagnoses and procedures, the Euclidean distance from hospital to the centroid of the patient's ward, and if patient lived in the hospital's catchment area. The hospital characteristics include size and hospital classification according to the National Health System. Kaplan-Meier plots were used to examine differences in survival curves. Cox proportional hazard models with frailty were applied to identify independent predictors of hospital mortality and to calculate hazard ratios (HR). Results The Cox proportional model with frailty showed that male gender, older patient, great number of diagnoses and pneumonia increased the hazard of HIV related hospital mortality. On the other hand tuberculosis was associated with a reduced risk of death. Central hospital discharge also presents less risk of mortality. The frailty variance was small but statistically significant, indicating hazard ratio heterogeneity among hospitals that varied between 0.67 and 1.34, and resulted in two hospitals with HR different from the average risk

  11. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality. PMID:27455368

  12. Hospital Costs and Inpatient Mortality among Children Undergoing Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Romley, John A; Chen, Alex Y; Goldman, Dana P; Williams, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between hospital costs and risk-adjusted inpatient mortality among children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) in U.S. acute-care hospitals. Data Sources/Study Settings Retrospective cohort study of 35,446 children in 2003, 2006, and 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Study Design Cross-sectional logistic regression of risk-adjusted inpatient mortality and hospital costs, adjusting for a variety of patient-, hospital-, and community-level confounders. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We identified relevant discharges in the KID using the AHRQ Pediatric Quality Indicator for pediatric heart surgery mortality, and linked these records to hospital characteristics from American Hospital Association Surveys and community characteristics from the Census. Principal Findings Children undergoing CHD surgery in higher cost hospitals had lower risk-adjusted inpatient mortality (p = .002). An increase from the 25th percentile of treatment costs to the 75th percentile was associated with a 13.6 percent reduction in risk-adjusted mortality. Conclusions Greater hospital costs are associated with lower risk-adjusted inpatient mortality for children undergoing CHD surgery. The specific mechanisms by which greater costs improve mortality merit further exploration. PMID:24138064

  13. Firearm-related hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Kalesan, Bindu; French, Clare; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Fowler, Dennis L; Galea, Sandro

    2014-02-01

    Most firearm-related injuries are nonfatal and require hospitalization. Using data on 3,257,720 hospitalizations from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (2000-2010), we determined overall and cause-, gender-, and race-specific trends in firearm-related hospitalization (FRH) and determinants of in-hospital firearm mortality. Types of FRH evaluated, according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, E-diagnostic codes, were accident (codes E922.0-E922.3, E922.8, and E922.9), assault (codes E965.0-E965.4), attempted suicide (codes E955.0-E955.4), legal intervention (code E970), undetermined intent (codes E985.0-E985.3), and war (code E991). A moderate reduction in FRH rates was observed from 2000 to 2011: from 62 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 57 per 100,000 (P-trend = 0.0016). The majority of FRHs were due to assault (P-trend = 0.19) or accident (P-trend = 0.32) and showed no significant reduction in rates over time, whereas rates for 14% of all FRHs-those due to attempted suicide (P-trend = 0.002) and undetermined intent (P-trend = 0.0029)-declined moderately. Moderate declines were observed among both blacks (from 213.1 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 164.4 per 100,000; P-trend = 0.049) and whites (from 38.4 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 32.2 per 100,000; P-trend = 0.031). The decline was significant only among men (effect size = 0.9, P-trend = 0.004). In conclusion, the reduction in FRH was driven by a reduction in self-inflicted and undetermined injuries. FRH rates were 6-fold greater among blacks than among whites and 14-fold greater in men than in women throughout the period. PMID:24148708

  14. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  15. What is the value of hospital mortality indicators, and are there ways to do better?

    PubMed

    Barker, Anna; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morton, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring hospital performance using patient safety indicators is one of the key components of healthcare reform in Australia. Mortality indicators, including the hospital standardised mortality ratio and deaths in low mortality diagnosis reference groups have been included in the core national hospital-based outcome indicator set recommended for local generation and review and public reporting. Although the face validity of mortality indicators such as these is high, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that there are concerns regarding their internal, construct and criterion validity. Use of indicators with poor validity has the consequence of potentially incorrectly classifying hospitals as performance outliers and expenditure of limited hospital staff time on activities which may provide no gain to hospital quality and safety and may in fact cause damage to morale. This paper reviews the limitations of current approaches to monitoring hospital quality and safety performance using mortality indicators. It is argued that there are better approaches to improving performance than monitoring with mortality indicators generated from hospital administrative data. These approaches include use of epidemiologically sound, clinically relevant data from clinical-quality registries, better systems of audit, evidence-based bundles, checklists, simulators and application of the science of complex systems. PMID:23116606

  16. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  17. Analysis of risk factors, localization and 30-day prognosis of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dzevdet; Salihović, Denisa; C Ibrahimagić, Omer; Sinanović, Osman; Vidović, Mirjana

    2008-05-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is the deadliest, most disabling and least treatable form of stroke despite progression in medical science. The aim of the study was to analyze the frequency, risk factors, localization and 30-day prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. We analyzed 352 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) hospitalized at the Department of Neurology Tuzla during a three-year follow up. The following data were collected for all patients in a computerized database: age, sex, risk factors (hypertension, heart diseases, diabetes and smoking) and CT findings. Stroke severity was estimated with Scandinavian Stroke Scale, ICH topography was specified by CT, and outcome at 1st month after onset included information on vital status and disability (modified Rankin Scale, mRS). The most frequent risk factors were hypertension (84%), heart diseases (31%), cigarette smoking (28%) and diabetes mellitus (14%). The most frequent localization of ICH was multilobar (38%), internal capsule/basal ganglia region (36%) and lobar (17%). Within first month died 147 patients (42%). The highest mortality rate was in patients with brain stem (83%) and multilobar hemorrhage (64%). Factors independently associated with mortality were age (odds ratio 1,05 (95% confidence interval 1,02 to 1,08); p=0,001), stroke severity (OR 0,93 (0,92 to 0,95); p<0,0001), multilobar hemorrhage (OR 5,4 (3,0 to 9,6); p<0,0001) and intraventricular hemorrhage (OR 3,9 (2,2 to 7,1); p<0,0001). Favorable outcome at first month (mRS < or = 2) had 45% of the surviving patients with ICH. The best outcome was for the patients with cerebellar hemorrhage (63%), while only 40% of the patients with hemorrhage in internal capsule/basal ganglia region had Rankin scale 2 or less. Hypertension is the most frequent risk factor in patients with ICH. ICHs are mainly localized in lobar and internal capsule/basal ganglia regions. Independent predictors of mortality following ICH are age, hypertension

  18. Influence of psychiatric comorbidity on 30-day readmissions for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Solberg, Leif I.; Copeland, Laurel; Fang, Ying; Stewart, Christine; Hu, Jianhui; Nerenz, David R.; Williams, L. Keoki; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Waxmonsky, Jeanette; Lu, Christine Y.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Coleman, Karen J.; Lynch, Frances L.; Ahmed, Ameena T.; Beck, Arne L.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Simon, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented a policy in 2012 that penalizes hospitals for ‘excessive’ all-cause hospital readmissions within 30 days after discharge for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and pneumonia. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of psychiatric comorbidities on 30-day all-cause readmissions for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Methods Longitudinal study from 2009-2011 within 11 Mental Health Research Network (MHRN) affiliated health systems. Data were derived from the HMO Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse. Participants were individuals admitted to the hospital for HF, AMI, and pneumonia. All index inpatient hospitalizations for HF, AMI and pneumonia were captured (n=160,169 patient index admissions). Psychiatric diagnoses were measured for the year prior to admission. All-cause readmissions within 30 days of discharge were the outcome variable. Results Approximately 18% of all individuals with these conditions were readmitted within 30-days. The rate was 5% greater for individuals with a past-year psychiatric comorbidity (21.7%) than for those without (16.5%; p<.001). Depression, anxiety, and dementia were associated with more readmissions for those with index hospitalizations for all three conditions independently and combined (p<.05). Substance use and bipolar disorders were linked with higher readmissions for those with initial HF and pneumonia hospitalizations (p<.05). Readmission rates declined overall from 2009-2011. Conclusions Individuals with HF, AMI, and pneumonia experience high rates of readmission, but psychiatric comorbidities appear to increase that risk. Future readmission interventions should consider adding mental health components. PMID:25642610

  19. Judging hospitals by severity-adjusted mortality rates: the influence of the severity-adjustment method.

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, L I; Ash, A S; Shwartz, M; Daley, J; Hughes, J S; Mackiernan, Y D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This research examined whether judgments about a hospital's risk-adjusted mortality performance are affected by the severity-adjustment method. METHODS: Data came from 100 acute care hospitals nationwide and 11880 adults admitted in 1991 for acute myocardial infarction. Ten severity measures were used in separate multivariable logistic models predicting in-hospital death. Observed-to-expected death rates and z scores were calculated with each severity measure for each hospital. RESULTS: Unadjusted mortality rates for the 100 hospitals ranged from 4.8% to 26.4%. For 32 hospitals, observed mortality rates differed significantly from expected rates for 1 or more, but not for all 10, severity measures. Agreement between pairs of severity measures on whether hospitals were flagged as statistical mortality outliers ranged from fair to good. Severity measures based on medical records frequently disagreed with measures based on discharge abstracts. CONCLUSIONS: Although the 10 severity measures agreed about relative hospital performance more often than would be expected by chance, assessments of individual hospital mortality rates varied by different severity-adjustment methods. PMID:8876505

  20. Long-term (30 days) toxicity of NiO nanoparticles for adult zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Kovrižnych, Jevgenij A.; Zeljenková, Dagmar; Rollerová, Eva; Szabová, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide in the form of nanoparticles (NiO NPs) is extensively used in different industrial branches. In a test on adult zebrafish, the acute toxicity of NiO NPs was shown to be low, however longlasting contact with this compound can lead to its accumulation in the tissues and to increased toxicity. In this work we determined the 30-day toxicity of NiO NPs using a static test for zebrafish Danio rerio. We found the 30-day LC50 value to be 45.0 mg/L, LC100 (minimum concentration causing 100% mortality) was 100.0 mg/L, and LC0 (maximum concentration causing no mortality) was 6.25 mg/L for adult individuals of zebrafish. Considering a broad use of Ni in the industry, NiO NPs chronic toxicity may have a negative impact on the population of aquatic organisms and on food web dynamics in aquatic systems. PMID:26038672

  1. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital

  2. The Relationship Between Nurse Staffing and 30-Day Readmission for Adults With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Karen K.; Danesh, Valerie; Funk, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to better understand the relationship between nurse staffing and 30-day excess readmission ratios for patients with heart failure in the top US adult cardiology and heart surgery hospitals. BACKGROUND Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years and is the most frequent diagnosis associated with 30-day hospital readmission in the United States. METHODS A secondary data analysis was conducted using nurse staffing data from 661 cardiology and heart surgery hospitals from the 2013 US News & World Report “Best Hospitals” survey. These data were combined with excess readmission ratios from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospital Compare database from 2013. An independent-samples t test was used to compare staffing (low/high) and excess hospital readmissions rates. RESULTS A significant difference (P = .021) was found between the low nurse staffing group (n = 358) and the high nurse staffing group (n = 303). Hospitals with a lower nurse staffing index had a significantly higher excess readmission rate. CONCLUSION These data provide further support to the body of research showing a positive relationship between nurse staffing and positive outcomes. PMID:26579974

  3. 30-Day morbidity after augmentation enterocystoplasty and appendicovesicostomy: a NSQIP pediatric analysis

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Erin R.; Kurtz, Michael P.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Nelson, Caleb P.

    2015-01-01

    -term outcomes for these complex urologic procedures that has not been possible before. Although ACS-NSQIP has been used extensively in the adult surgical literature to identify rates of complications, and to determine predictors of readmission and adverse events, its use in pediatric surgery is new. As in the adult literature, the goal is for standardization of practice and transparency in reporting outcomes that may lead to reduction in morbidity and mortality. Conclusion In this cohort, any 30-day event is seen in almost 30% of the patients undergoing these urologic procedures. Operative time, number of concurrent procedures and higher surgical risk score all are associated with higher odds of the composite 30-day event of complication, readmission and/or reoperation. These data can be useful in counseling patients and families about expectations around surgery and in improving outcomes. PMID:26049255

  4. 78 FR 29147 - 30-Day Notice and Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ..., 2013 at 78 FR 14807, allowing for OMB review and a 60-day public comment period. No comments were... SECURITY United States Secret Service 30-Day Notice and Request for Comments SUMMARY: The Department of... United States Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, and sent via electronic mail to...

  5. 75 FR 160 - Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY Paperwork Reduction Act; 30-Day Notice AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy. The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) proposes the collection of information concerning...

  6. Epidemiology, outcomes, and predictors of mortality in hospitalized adults with Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sahil; Gupta, Arjun; Baddour, Larry M; Pardi, Darrell S

    2016-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated an increasing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence in hospitals and the community, with increasing morbidity and mortality. In this study, we analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) to evaluate CDI epidemiology, outcomes, and predictors of mortality in hospitalized adults. We identified cases of CDI (and associated comorbid conditions) from NHDS data from 2005 through 2009 using ICD-9 codes. Weighted univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to ascertain CDI incidence, associations between CDI and outcomes [length of stay (LOS), colectomy, all-cause in-hospital mortality, and discharge to a care facility], and predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Of an estimated 162 million adult inpatients, 1.26 million (0.8 %) had CDI. The overall CDI incidence is 77.8/10,000 hospitalizations, with no statistically significant change over the study period. On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, and comorbid conditions, CDI is an independent predictor of longer LOS (mean difference, 2.35 days), all-cause mortality [odds ratio (OR) 1.45], colectomy (OR 1.41), and discharge to a care facility (OR 2.12) (all P < 0.001). Elderly patients have a higher CDI incidence and worse outcomes than younger adults. The strongest predictors of all-cause mortality in patients with CDI include age 65 years or older, colectomy, and coagulation abnormalities. Despite stable CDI incidence and advances in management, CDI is associated with increased LOS, colectomy, all-cause in-hospital mortality, and discharge to a care facility in hospitalized, especially elderly, adults. Age older than 65 years should be added to the severity criteria for CDI. PMID:26694494

  7. Risk factors for 30-day readmission following hypoglycemia-related emergency room and inpatient admissions

    PubMed Central

    Emons, M F; Bae, J P; Hoogwerf, B J; Kindermann, S L; Taylor, R J; Nathanson, B H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of diabetes treatment. This retrospective observational study characterized hypoglycemia-related hospital emergency room (ER) and inpatient (in-pt) admissions and identified risk factors for 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Research design and methods 4476 hypoglycemia-related ER and in-pt encounters with discharge dates from 1/1/2009 to 3/31/2014 were identified in a large, multicenter electronic health record database. Outcomes were 30-day all-cause ER/hospital readmission and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Multivariable logistic regression methods identified risk factors for both outcomes. Results 1095 (24.5%) encounters had ER/hospital all-cause readmission within 30 days and 158 (14.4%) of these were hypoglycemia-related. Predictors of all-cause 30-day readmission included recent exposure to a hospital/nursing home (NH)/skilled nursing facility (SNF; OR 1.985, p<0.001); age 25–34 and 35–44 (OR 2.334 and 1.996, respectively, compared with age 65–74, both p<0.001); and African-American (AA) race versus all other race categories (OR 1.427, p=0.011). Other factors positively associated with readmission include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, cardiac dysrhythmias, congestive heart disease, hypertension, and mood disorders. Predictors of readmissions attributable to hypoglycemia included recent exposure to a hospital/NH/SNF (OR 2.299, p<0.001), AA race (OR 1.722, p=0.002), age 35–44 (OR 3.484, compared with age 65–74, p<0.001), hypertension (OR 1.891, p=0.019), and delirium/dementia and other cognitive disorders (OR 1.794, p=0.038). Obesity was protective against 30-day hypoglycemia-related readmission (OR 0.505, p=0.017). Conclusions Factors associated with 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission among patients with diabetic hypoglycemia include recent exposure to hospital/SNF/NH, adults <45 years, AAs, and several cardiovascular and

  8. Hospitals In ‘Magnet’ Program Show Better Patient Outcomes On Mortality Measures Compared To Non-‘Magnet’ Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Christopher R.; Xia, Rong; Ghaferi, Amir A.; Birkmeyer, John D.; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2015-01-01

    Hospital executives pursue external recognition to improve market share and demonstrate institutional commitment to quality of care. The Magnet Recognition Program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center identifies hospitals that epitomize nursing excellence, but it is not clear that receiving Magnet recognition improves patient outcomes. Using Medicare data on patients hospitalized for coronary artery bypass graft surgery, colectomy, or lower extremity bypass in 1998–2010, we compared rates of risk-adjusted thirty-day mortality and failure to rescue (death after a postoperative complication) between Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals matched on hospital characteristics. Surgical patients treated in Magnet hospitals, compared to those treated in non-Magnet hospitals, were 7.7 percent less likely to die within thirty days and 8.6 percent less likely to die after a postoperative complication. Across the thirteen–year study period, patient outcomes were significantly better in Magnet hospitals than in non-Magnet hospitals. However, outcomes did not improve for hospitals after they received Magnet recognition, which suggests that the Magnet program recognizes existing excellence and does not lead to additional improvements in surgical outcomes. PMID:26056204

  9. Mortality differences between New York City municipal and voluntary hospitals, for selected conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, M F; Park, R E; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1993-01-01

    To determine if mortality differences between municipal and voluntary hospitals in New York City persist after adjustment for computerized administrative data (age, sex, principal diagnosis, and secondary diagnosis), six conditions in those hospitals from 1984 through 1987 were studied. Unadjusted mortality was significantly higher in municipal hospitals for myocardial infarction, stroke, and head trauma, and lower for congestive heart failure and pneumonia. Adjustment using administrative data eliminated differences for myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia, but not for stroke and head trauma. We conclude that adjustment using administrative data eliminates some but not all mortality differences between municipal and voluntary hospitals. Medical record review is needed to determine why these differences persist. PMID:8328598

  10. Predictors of fifty days in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chinmaya Kumar; Daman, Ripu; Bhatia, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the predictors of 50 d in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). METHODS: Two hundred and eighteen patients admitted to an intensive care unit in a tertiary care hospital between June 2013 and June 2014 with the diagnosis of SBP (during hospitalization) and cirrhosis were retrospectively analysed. SBP was diagnosed by abdominal paracentesis in the presence of polymorphonuclear cell count ≥ 250 cells/mm3 in the peritoneal fluid. Student’s t test, multivariate logistic regression, cox proportional hazard ratio (HR), receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were utilized for statistical analysis. Predictive abilities of several variables identified by multivariate analysis were compared using the area under ROC curve. P < 0.05 were considered statistical significant. RESULTS: The 50 d in-hospital mortality rate attributable to SBP is 43.11% (n = 94). Median survival duration for those who died was 9 d. In univariate analysis acute kidney injury (AKI), hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, serum bilirubin, international normalized ratio, aspartate transaminase, and model for end-stage liver disease - sodium (MELD-Na) were significantly associated with in - hospital mortality in patients with SBP (P ≤ 0.001). Multivariate cox proportional regression analysis showed AKI (HR = 2.16, 95%CI: 1.36-3.42, P = 0.001) septic shock (HR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.05-2.83, P = 0.029) MELD-Na (HR = 1.06, 95%CI: 1.02-1.09, P ≤ 0.001) was significantly associated with 50 d in-hospital mortality. The prognostic accuracy for AKI, MELD-Na and septic shock was 77%, 74% and 71% respectively associated with 50 d in-hospital mortality in SBP patients. CONCLUSION: AKI, MELD-Na and septic shock were predictors of 50 d in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with SBP. PMID:27134704

  11. Evaluation of the HCFA model for the analysis of mortality following hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, H; Bailey, R C; Skellan, K J; Stewart, J D; Hartz, A J; Kuhn, E M; Rimm, A A

    1992-08-01

    From 1987 through 1990, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) evaluated variations in the mortality rates experienced by patients admitted to hospitals participating in the Medicare program. This study was conducted to evaluate the adequacy of the model used for that purpose. Detailed clinical data were gathered on 42,773 patients admitted to 84 statistically selected hospitals. The effect of risk adjustment using the HCFA model, which is based on claims data, was compared to a risk-adjustment model based on physiologic and clinical data. Models that include claims data were markedly superior to those containing only demographic characteristics in predicting the probability of patient death, and the addition of clinical data resulted in further improvement. The correlation of ranks of hospitals based on a model that uses only the claims data and on one that uses, in addition, clinical data, was .91. As a screen for the identification of "high (mortality) outlier" hospitals, the claims model had moderate sensitivity (81 percent) and specificity (79 percent), a high negative predictive value (90 percent), and a low positive predictive value (64 percent) when compared to the clinical model. The two mortality models gave similar results when used to determine which structural characteristics of hospitals were related to mortality rates: hospitals with a higher proportion of registered nurses or board-certified physician specialists, or with a greater level of access to high-technology equipment had lower risk-adjusted mortality rates. These data suggest that the current claims-based risk-adjustment procedure may satisfactorily be used to characterize variations in mortality rates associated with hospitalization. The procedure could also be used as a basis for further epidemiological analyses of factors that affect the probability of patient death. However, it does not positively identify outlier hospitals as providers of problematic care. PMID:1500289

  12. Predictors of hospital stay and mortality in dengue virus infection-experience from Aga Khan University Hospital Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection (DVI) is very common infection. There is scarcity of data on factor associated with increased hospital stay and mortality in dengue virus infection (DVI). This study was done to know about factors associated with increased hospital stay and mortality in patients admitted with DVI. Results Out of 532 patients, two third (72.6%) had stay ≤3 days while one third (27.4%) had stay greater than 3 days. The mean length of hospital stay was 3.46 ± 3.45 days. Factors associated with increased hospital stay (>3 days) included AKI (acute kidney injury) (Odd ratio 2.98; 95% CI 1.66-5.34), prolonged prothrombin time (Odd ratio 2.03; 95% CI 1.07-3.84), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (Odd ratio 1.80; CI 95% 1.15-2.83) and increased age of > 41.10 years (Odd ratio 1.03; CI 95% 1.01-1.04).Mortality was 1.5%. High mortality was found in those with AKI (P <0.01), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) (P <0.001), respiratory failure (P0.01), prolong PT (P 0.001), prolong aPTT (P0.01) and increased hospital stay (P0.04). Conclusion Increasing age, coagulopathy and acute kidney injury in patients with DVI is associated with increased hospital stay. Morality was more in patients with AKI, DHF and DSS, respiratory failure, coagulopathy and these patients had more prolonged hospitalization. PMID:25064632

  13. Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    Tebeu, Pierre-Marie; Pierre-Marie, Tebeu; Halle-Ekane, Gregory; Gregory, Halle-Ekane; Da Itambi, Maxwell; Maxwell, Da Itambi; Enow Mbu, Robinson; Robinson, Enow Mbu; Mawamba, Yvette; Yvette, Mawamba; Fomulu, Joseph Nelson; Nelson, Fomulu Joseph

    2015-01-01

    More than 550,000 women die yearly from pregnancy-related causes. Fifty percent (50%) of the world estimate of maternal deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa alone. There is insufficient information on the risk factors of maternal mortality in Cameroon. This study aimed at establishing causes and risk factors of maternal mortality. This was a case-control study from 1st January, 2006 to 31st December, 2010 after National Ethical Committee Approval. Cases were maternal deaths; controls were women who delivered normally. Maternal deaths were obtained from the delivery room registers and in-patient registers. Controls for each case were two normal deliveries following identified maternal deaths on the same day. Variables considered were socio-demographic and reproductive health characteristics. Epi Info 3.5.1 was used for analysis. The mean MMR was 287.5/100,000 live births. Causes of deaths were: postpartum hemorrhage (229.2%), unsafe abortion (25%), ectopic pregnancy (12.5%), hypertension in pregnancy (8.3%), malaria (8.3%), anemia (8.3%), heart disease (4.2%), and pneumonia (4.2%), and placenta praevia (4.2%). Ages ranged from 18 to 41 years, with a mean of 27.7 ± 5.14 years. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal death (OR=78.33; CI: (8.66- 1802.51)). The mean MMR from 2006 to 2010 was 287.5/100,000 live births. Most of the causes of maternal deaths were preventable. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal mortality. Key words: Maternal mortality, causes, risk factors, Cameroon. PMID:26401210

  14. A Population-Based Study of 30-day Incidence of Ischemic Stroke Following Surgical Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S. Danielle; Liu, Kuan; Garg, Amit X.; Tam, Samantha; Palma, David; Thind, Amardeep; Winquist, Eric; Yoo, John; Nichols, Anthony; Fung, Kevin; Hall, Stephen; Shariff, Salimah Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke following neck dissection compared to matched patients undergoing non-head and neck surgeries. A surgical dissection of the neck is a common procedure performed for many types of cancer. Whether such dissections increase the risk of ischemic stroke is uncertain. A retrospective cohort study using data from linked administrative and registry databases (1995–2012) in the province of Ontario, Canada was performed. Patients were matched 1-to-1 on age, sex, date of surgery, and comorbidities to patients undergoing non-head and neck surgeries. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke assessed in hospitalized patients using validated database codes. A total of 14,837 patients underwent surgical neck dissection. The 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke following the dissection was 0.7%. This incidence decreased in recent years (1.1% in 1995 to 2000; 0.8% in 2001 to 2006; 0.3% in 2007 to 2012; P for trend <0.0001). The 30-day incidence of ischemic stroke in patients undergoing neck dissection is similar to matched patients undergoing thoracic surgery (0.5%, P = 0.26) and colectomy (0.5%, P = 0.1). Factors independently associated with a higher risk of stroke in 30 days following neck dissection surgery were of age ≥75 years (odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–2.53), and a history of diabetes (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.02–2.49), hypertension (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.64–4.25), or prior stroke (OR 4.06, 95% CI 2.29–7.18). Less than 1% of patients undergoing surgical neck dissection will experience an ischemic stroke in the following 30 days. This incidence of stroke is similar to thoracic surgery and colectomy. PMID:26287406

  15. 30-Day Readmission Among Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Steve; Wei, Wenhui; Bhattacharjee, Sandipan; Miao, Raymond; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study retrospectively assessed rates and risk factors for all-cause hospital readmission among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) aged ≥65 years. Associations between 30-day readmission and patients' demographic, insurance, index hospital, and clinical characteristics; patient complexities specific to the elderly; and health care utilization were examined using multivariable logistic regressions. Of 202,496 elderly Medicare beneficiaries, 52% were female, 76% were white, the mean age was 75.8 years, and 13.2% had all-cause 30-day readmissions. Elderly patients with cognitive impairment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.01–1.12), falls and falls risk (aOR=1.15, 95% CI=1.08–1.22), polypharmacy (aOR=1.20, 95% CI=1.14–1.27), and urinary incontinence (aOR=1.08, 95% CI=1.01–1.15) were at higher risk for all-cause 30-day readmission than their counterparts without these complexities. As elderly-specific complexities are associated with greater risk for readmission, intervention programs to reduce readmission risk among elderly patients with T2DM should be tailored to suit the needs of elderly patients with extensive complexities. (Population Health Management 2015;18:256–264) PMID:25608114

  16. Predictors of in-hospital mortality following redo cardiac surgery: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Isa; Cayli, Murat; Gulcan, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Redo cardiac operations represent one of the main challenges in heart surgery. The purpose of the study was to analyze the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing reoperative cardiac surgery by a single surgical team. Methods A total of 1367 patients underwent cardiac surgical procedures and prospectively entered into a computerized database. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the reoperative cardiac surgery (n = 109) and control group (n = 1258). Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the possible predictors of hospital mortality. Results Mean age was 56 ± 13, and 46% were female in redo group. In-hospital mortality was 4.6 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.11. EuroSCORE (6 vs. 3; p < 0.01), cardiopulmonary bypass time (90 vs. 71 min; p < 0.01), postoperative bleeding (450 vs. 350 ml; p < 0.01), postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) (29 vs. 16%; p < 0.01), and inotropic support (58 vs. 31%; p = 0.001) were significantly different. These variables were entered into uni- and multivariate regression analysis. Postoperative AF (OR1.76, p = 0.007) and EuroSCORE (OR 1.42, p < 0.01) were significant risk factors predicting hospital mortality. Conclusions Reoperative cardiac surgery can be performed under similar risks as primary operations. Postoperative AF and EuroSCORE are predictors of in-hospital mortality for redo cases. PMID:26527452

  17. Hyponatremia and in-hospital mortality in patients admitted for heart failure (from the ATTEND registry).

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kajimoto, Katsuya; Munakata, Ryo; Minami, Yuichiro; Mizuno, Masayuki; Aokage, Toshiyuki; Asai, Kuniya; Sakata, Yasushi; Yumino, Dai; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Takano, Teruo

    2013-04-01

    Hyponatremia is known to be a poor prognostic factor in patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF), however not well studied in Japan. The aims of this study were to characterize hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF and to clarify the relations between hyponatremia and detailed in-hospital outcomes in Japan. Among 4,837 hospitalized patients with HF enrolled in the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Syndromes (ATTEND) registry, patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality in those with hyponatremia were examined. Hyponatremia (sodium <135 mEq/L) was observed in 11.6% of patients. Patients with hyponatremia were of similar age, included fewer men, and had a higher proportion of previous hospitalizations for HF compared to those with normonatremia. On admission, lower heart rates and blood pressures and higher brain natriuretic peptide levels were observed in patients with hyponatremia. During hospitalization, inotrope levels and mechanical device use were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia. Rates of all-cause and cardiac death were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia, 15.0% and 11.4%, respectively, compared to 5.3% and 3.6%, respectively, in those with normonatremia. In hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF, cardiac death accounted for 76.2% of all-cause death. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in Japan hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with HF is relatively common and is associated with a very high in-hospital mortality. PMID:23312128

  18. Assisted ventilation in COPD – association between previous hospitalizations and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Toft-Petersen, Anne Pernille; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Weinreich, Ulla Møller; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2016-01-01

    Background In general, previous studies have shown an association between prior exacerbations and mortality in COPD, but this association has not been demonstrated in the subpopulation of patients in need of assisted ventilation. We examined whether previous hospitalizations were independently associated with mortality among patients with COPD ventilated for the first time. Patients and methods In the Danish National Patient Registry, we established a cohort of patients with COPD ventilated for the first time from 2003 to 2011 and previously medicated for obstructive airway diseases. We assessed the number of hospitalizations for COPD in the preceding year, age, sex, comorbidity, mode of ventilation, survival to discharge, and days to death beyond discharge. Results The cohort consisted of 6,656 patients of whom 66% had not been hospitalized for COPD in the previous year, 18% once, 8% twice, and 9% thrice or more. In-hospital mortality was 45%, and of the patients alive at discharge, 11% died within a month and 39% within a year. In multivariate models, adjusted for age, sex, mode of ventilation, and comorbidity, odds ratios for in-hospital death were 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–1.44), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.19–1.72), and 1.56 (95% CI: 1.30–1.87) with one, two, and three or more hospitalizations, respectively. Hazard ratios for death after discharge from hospital were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.19–1.46), 1.76 (95% CI: 1.52–2.02), and 2.07 (95% CI: 1.80–2.38) with one, two, and three or more hospitalizations, respectively. Conclusion Preceding hospitalizations for COPD are associated with in-hospital mortality and after discharge in the subpopulation of patients with COPD with acute exacerbation treated with assisted ventilation for the first time. PMID:27217743

  19. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field. PMID:16649506

  20. Risk Factors for Increased Hospital Resource Utilization and In-Hospital Mortality in Adults With Single Ventricle Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Doshi, Pratik; Onukwube, Jennifer; Fram, Ricki Y; Robbins, James M

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease are now expected to survive to adulthood. Co-morbid medical conditions (CMCs) are common. We sought to identify risk factors for increased hospital resource utilization and in-hospital mortality in adults with single ventricle. We analyzed data from the 2001 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in patients aged ≥18 years admitted to nonteaching general hospitals (NTGHs), TGHs, and pediatric hospitals (PHs) with either hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tricuspid atresia or common ventricle. National estimates of hospitalizations were calculated. Elixhauser CMCs were identified. Length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and effect of CMCs were determined. Age was greater in NTGH (41.5 ± 1.3 years) than in TGH (32.8 ± 0.5) and PH (25.0 ± 0.6; p <0.0001). Adjusted LOS was shorter in NTGH (5.6 days) than in PH (9.7 days; p <0.0001). Adjusted costs were higher in PH ($56,671) than in TGH ($31,934) and NTGH ($18,255; p <0.0001). CMCs are associated with increased LOS (p <0.0001) and costs (p <0.0001). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality included increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 5.250, CI 2.825 to 9.758 for 45- to 64-year old vs 18- to 30-year old), male gender (OR 2.72, CI 1.804 to 4.103]), and the presence of CMC (OR 4.55, CI 2.193 to 9.436) for 2 vs none). No differences in mortality were found among NTGH, TGH, and PH. Cardiovascular procedures were more common in PH hospitalizations and were associated with higher costs and LOS. CMCs increase costs and mortality. In-hospital mortality is increased with age, male gender, and the presence of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. PMID:27291967

  1. The Tradeoff between Travel Time from Home to Hospital and Door to Balloon Time in Determining Mortality among STEMI Patients Undergoing PCI

    PubMed Central

    Cappai, Giovanna; Sciattella, Paolo; Belleudi, Valeria; Di Martino, Mirko; Agabiti, Nera; Mataloni, Francesca; Ricci, Roberto; Perucci, Carlo Alberto; Davoli, Marina; Fusco, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Background In ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), even in presence of short door to balloon time (DTBT), timely reperfusion with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is hampered by pre-hospital delays. Travel time (TT) constitutes a relevant part of these delays and may contribute to worse outcomes. Objective To evaluate the relationship between TT from home to hospital and DTBT on 30-day mortality after PCI among patients with STEMI. Methods We enrolled a cohort of 3,608 STEMI patients with a DTBT within 120 minutes who underwent PCI between years 2009 and 2013 in Lazio Region (Italy). We calculated the minimum travel time from residential address to emergency department where the first medical contact occurred. We defined system delay as the sum of travel time and DTBT time. Logistic regression models, including clinical and demographic characteristics were used to estimate the effect of TT and DTBT on mortality. Results Among patients with 0–90 minutes of system delay, TT above the median value is positively associated with mortality (OR = 2.46; P = 0.009). Survival benefit associated with DTBT below the median results only among patients with TT below the median (OR for DTBT below the median = 0.39; P = 0.013), (OR for interaction between TT and DTBT = 2.36; p = 0.076). Conclusion TT affects survival after PCI for STEMI, even in the presence of health care systems compliant with current guidelines. Results emphasize the importance of health system initiatives to reduce pre-hospital delay. Utilization of TT can contribute to a better estimate of patient mortality risk in the evaluation of quality of care. PMID:27336859

  2. Incidence, Causes and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission After Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W; Anthony, Chris A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Pugely, Andrew J.; Gao, Yubo; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service has identified several quality metrics, including unplanned readmission within 30 days of surgery, to assess and compare surgeons and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes and risk factors for unplanned 30-day readmission after total shoulder arthroplasty. Methods We identified patients undergoing primary elective shoulder arthroplasty performed at American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) participating hospitals in 2013. Cases were stratified by readmission status. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to assess patient demographics, comorbidities and operative variables predicting unplanned readmission. Results 2779 patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty were identified, with 74 (2.66%) requiring unplanned readmissions within 30 days of surgery. The most common surgical causes for unplanned readmission were surgical site infections (18.6%), dislocations (16.3%) and venous thromboembolism (14.0%). Medical causes for readmission were responsible for 51% of unplanned readmissions. Multivariate analysis identified patient age >75 (OR 2.62, 95% CI: 1.27 - 5.41), and ASA class of 3 (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.01 - 3.18) or 4 (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.31 - 10.08) as independent risk factors for unplanned readmission. Predictive modeling estimated that patients with ASA class of 4 and age >75 are 17.4 times more likely (95% CI 1.77-171.09) to be readmitted within 30 days of shoulder arthroplasty. Conclusion Unplanned readmission after shoulder arthroplasty is infrequent and medical complications account for more than 50% of occurrences. The risk of readmission exponentially increases when age and preoperative comorbidity burden are increased. PMID:27528839

  3. The Effectiveness of a Geriatric Hip Fracture Clinical Pathway in Reducing Hospital and Rehabilitation Length of Stay and Improving Short-Term Mortality Rates

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Tak-Wing; Fang, Christian; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Background: A geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway, led by an orthopedic surgeon, was developed in 2007. This clinical pathway team is multidisciplinary and consists of surgeons, physicians, anesthetists, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, medical social workers, dieticians as well as voluntary support groups. Methods: From early 2007 onward, all patients older than 65 years with acute isolated hip fractures were included. During the whole inpatient treatment, all relevant data were captured prospectively. The data in 2006, before the implementation of the clinical pathway, were collected retrospectively through computer record system. A study of the length of stay in acute and rehabilitation hospital and also the short-term mortality rate was carried out to compare the difference before and after the implementation of the pathway. Results: From 2007 onward, more than 1300 hip fractures were treated. After the implementation of the pathway, the preoperative length of stay was markedly shortened by 4 days, from an average of 6.1 days in 2006 to 1.5 days in 2011 (P < .05). The postoperative length of stay and the overall acute hospital length of stay also improved significantly. The length of stay in rehabilitation hospital was also significantly shorter in the 4-year period. Although the number of hip fractures increased annually with increased age and number of comorbidities each year, the inpatient mortality rate showed a gradual decrease from 2.7% in 2006 to 1.25% in 2010. The 30 days mortality rate also showed a decrease from 3.65% in 2006 to 2.75% in 2010. Conclusion: Geriatric hip fracture clinical pathway is an excellent approach to the geriatric hip fracture service. The most significant improvement is the dramatic shortening of the length of hospital stay. Our success in the past 5 years has proven its value and sustainability. PMID:23936733

  4. Four Decades of Educational Inequalities in Hospitalization and Mortality among Older Swedes

    PubMed Central

    Torssander, Jenny; Ahlbom, Anders; Modig, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background The inverse association between education and mortality has grown stronger the last decades in many countries. During the same period, gains in life expectancy have been concentrated to older ages; still, old-age mortality is seldom the focus of attention when analyzing trends in the education-mortality gradient. It is further unknown if increased educational inequalities in mortality are preceded by increased inequalities in morbidity of which hospitalization may be a proxy. Methods Using administrative population registers from 1971 and onwards, education-specific annual changes in the risk of death and hospital admission were estimated with complimentary log-log models. These risk changes were supplemented by estimations of the ages at which 25, 50, and 75% of the population had been hospitalized or died (after age 60). Results The mortality decline among older people increasingly benefitted the well-educated over the less well-educated. This inequality increase was larger for the younger old, and among men. Educational inequalities in the age of a first hospital admission generally followed the development of growing gaps, but at a slower pace than mortality and inequalities did not increase among the oldest individuals. Conclusions Education continues to be a significant predictor of health and longevity into old age. That the increase in educational inequalities is greater for mortality than for hospital admissions (our proxy of overall morbidity) may reflect that well-educated individuals gradually have obtained more possibilities or resources to survive a disease than less well-educated individuals have the last four decades. PMID:27031107

  5. Effect of Cardiogenic Shock Hospital Volume on Mortality in Patients With Cardiogenic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Shaefi, Shahzad; O'Gara, Brian; Kociol, Robb D.; Joynt, Karen; Mueller, Ariel; Nizamuddin, Junaid; Mahmood, Eitezaz; Talmor, Daniel; Shahul, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiogenic shock (CS) is associated with significant morbidity, and mortality rates approach 40% to 60%. Treatment for CS requires an aggressive, sophisticated, complex, goal‐oriented, therapeutic regimen focused on early revascularization and adjunctive supportive therapies, suggesting that hospitals with greater CS volume may provide better care. The association between CS hospital volume and inpatient mortality for CS is unclear. Methods and Results We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to examine 533 179 weighted patient discharges from 2675 hospitals with CS from 2004 to 2011 and divided them into quartiles of mean annual hospital CS case volume. The primary outcome was in‐hospital mortality. Multivariate adjustments were performed to account for severity of illness, relevant comorbidities, hospital characteristics, and differences in treatment. Compared with the highest volume quartile, the adjusted odds ratio for inpatient mortality for persons admitted to hospitals in the lowest‐volume quartile (≤27 weighted cases per year) was 1.27 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.40), whereas for admission to hospitals in the low‐volume and medium‐volume quartiles, the odds ratios were 1.20 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.32) and 1.12 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.24), respectively. Similarly, improved survival was observed across quartiles, with an adjusted inpatient mortality incidence of 41.97% (95% CI 40.87 to 43.08) for hospitals with the lowest volume of CS cases and a drop to 37.01% (95% CI 35.11 to 38.96) for hospitals with the highest volume of CS cases. Analysis of treatments offered between hospital quartiles revealed that the centers with volumes in the highest quartile demonstrated significantly higher numbers of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous coronary intervention, or intra‐aortic balloon pump counterpulsation. A similar relationship was demonstrated with the use of mechanical circulatory support (ventricular assist devices and

  6. Analysis of Diagnoses Associated with Multiple Sclerosis–Related In-Hospital Mortality Using the Premier Hospital Database

    PubMed Central

    Pocoski, Jennifer; Cutter, Gary; Kaufman, David W.; Pleimes, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare mortality rates and related diagnoses in hospitalized patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), those with diabetes mellitus (DM), and the general hospitalized population (GHP). Methods: Patients who died between 2007 and 2011 were identified in the US hospital–based Premier Healthcare Database. Demographic information was collected, mortality rates calculated, and principal diagnoses categorized. Results: Of 55,152 unique patients with MS identified, 1518 died. Mean age at death was 10 years younger for the MS group (63.4 years) than for the DM (73.3 years) and GHP (73.1 years) groups. Age-adjusted mortality rates, based on the 2000 US Standard Million Population, were 1077, 1248, and 1133 per 100,000, respectively. Infection was the most common principal diagnosis at the hospital stay during which the patient died in the MS cohort (43.1% vs. 26.3% and 24.0% in the DM and GHP groups, respectively). Other common principal diagnoses in the MS group included pulmonary (17.5%) and cardiovascular (12.1%) disease. Septicemia/sepsis/septic shock was a secondary diagnosis for 50.7% of patients with MS versus 36.0% and 31.0% of patients in the DM and GHP cohorts, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with MS had a shorter life span than patients with DM or the GHP and were more likely to have a principal diagnosis of infection at their final hospital stay. However, the database was limited to codes recorded in the hospital; diagnoses received outside the hospital were not captured. PMID:27252603

  7. Serum Alkaline Phosphatase Levels Predict Infection-Related Mortality and Hospitalization in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seun Deuk; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young Ok; Jin, Dong Chan; Song, Ho Chul; Choi, Euy Jin; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon-Su; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels have been reported to be associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. However, it is unclear whether serum ALP levels predict infection-related clinical outcomes in PD patients. The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between serum ALP levels, infection-related mortality and hospitalization in PD patients. Methods PD patients from the Clinical Research Center registry for end-stage renal disease, a multicenter prospective observational cohort study in Korea, were included in the present study. Patients were categorized into three groups by serum ALP tertiles as follows: Tertile 1, ALP <78 U/L; Tertile 2, ALP = 78–155 U/L; Tertile 3, ALP >155 U/L. Tertile 1 was used as the reference category. The primary outcomes were infection-related mortality and hospitalization. Results A total of 1,455 PD patients were included. The median follow-up period was 32 months. The most common cause of infection-related mortality and hospitalization was PD-related peritonitis. Multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that patients in the highest tertiles of serum ALP levels were at higher risk of infection-related mortality (HR 2.29, 95% CI, 1.42–5.21, P = 0.008) after adjustment for clinical variables. Higher tertiles of serum ALP levels were associated with higher risk of infection-related hospitalization (Tertile 2: HR 1.56, 95% CI, 1.18–2.19, P = 0.009, tertile 3: HR 1.34, 95% CI, 1.03–2.62, P = 0.031). Conclusions Our data showed that elevated serum ALP levels were independently associated with a higher risk of infection-related mortality and hospitalization in PD patients. PMID:27310428

  8. Perioperative risk factors for in-hospital mortality after emergency gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients who have undergone emergency gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients after emergency GI surgery.The medical records of 362 critically ill surgical patients who underwent emergency GI surgery, admitted to intensive care unit between January 2007 and December 2011, were reviewed retrospectively. Perioperative biochemical and clinical parameters of survivors and nonsurvivors were compared. Logistic regression multivariate analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors of mortality.The in-hospital mortality rate was 15.2% (55 patients). Multivariate analyses revealed cancer-related perforation (odds ratio [OR] 16.671, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.629-105.721, P = 0.003), preoperative anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL; OR 6.976, 95% CI 1.376-35.360, P = 0.019), and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (albumin <2.7 g/dL; OR 9.954, 95% CI 1.603-61.811, P = 0.014) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality after emergency GI surgery.The findings of this study suggest that in critically ill patients undergoing emergency GI surgery, cancer-related peritonitis, preoperative anemia, and preoperative hypoalbuminemia are associated with in-hospital mortality. Recognizing risk factors at an early stage could aid risk stratification and the provision of optimal perioperative care. PMID:27583863

  9. Perioperative risk factors for in-hospital mortality after emergency gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients who have undergone emergency gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients after emergency GI surgery. The medical records of 362 critically ill surgical patients who underwent emergency GI surgery, admitted to intensive care unit between January 2007 and December 2011, were reviewed retrospectively. Perioperative biochemical and clinical parameters of survivors and nonsurvivors were compared. Logistic regression multivariate analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors of mortality. The in-hospital mortality rate was 15.2% (55 patients). Multivariate analyses revealed cancer-related perforation (odds ratio [OR] 16.671, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.629–105.721, P = 0.003), preoperative anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL; OR 6.976, 95% CI 1.376–35.360, P = 0.019), and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (albumin <2.7 g/dL; OR 9.954, 95% CI 1.603–61.811, P = 0.014) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality after emergency GI surgery. The findings of this study suggest that in critically ill patients undergoing emergency GI surgery, cancer-related peritonitis, preoperative anemia, and preoperative hypoalbuminemia are associated with in-hospital mortality. Recognizing risk factors at an early stage could aid risk stratification and the provision of optimal perioperative care. PMID:27583863

  10. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  11. Return to the System Within 30 Days of Discharge after Pediatric Appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Short, Heather L; Sarda, Samir; Heiss, Kurt F; Chern, Joshua J; Raval, Mehul V

    2016-07-01

    Postprocedural revisits, readmissions, and reoperations are commonly tracked quality metrics and have reimbursement and hospital-level comparison implications. Our purpose was to document these rates after pediatric appendectomy and to identify patient factors related to these metrics. This study included 3756 appendectomies performed at a single institution from 2009 to 2013. Data were prospectively collected and clinical events within 30 days of discharge were analyzed. Regression models identified factors associated with each metric. There were 328 returns to the emergency department (8.7%), 128 readmissions (3.4%), and 41 reoperations (1.0%). The main source of readmission was the emergency department (n = 118, 92%). Nearly two-thirds of readmissions were nonoperative (n = 87, 68%) and 12.5 per cent of readmissions were not related to the index appendectomy. Factors associated with readmission include procedure length >70 minutes [odds ratio (OR) 1.89, P = 0.043] and failed nonoperative management of perforated appendicitis (OR 2.97, P = 0.041). The most common indication for reoperation was intra-abdominal abscess (n = 20, 49%), 55 per cent of which were managed with image-guided drainage. In conclusion, although 30-day revisit, readmission, and reoperation rates after appendectomy are low, there are opportunities for improvement. Furthermore, many 30-day readmissions are not related to the index procedure and must be clearly identified to avoid inaccuracies with reimbursement and quality rankings. PMID:27457862

  12. Outcomes of a quality improvement project implementing stroke discharge advocacy to reduce 30-day readmission rates.

    PubMed

    Poston, Kristen M; Dumas, Bonnie P; Edlund, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to determine whether use of aspects of a transitional care model by nurse navigators would affect 30-day readmission rates in hospitalized ischemic stroke patients discharged home with self-care. Thirty-day readmission rates and emergency department (ED) visits were compared before, during, and after the implementation of the revised discharge process. Comparative analysis demonstrated reductions in readmissions and in ED visits. Thirty-day readmission rates to our hospital decreased from 9.39% to 3.24% when comparing pre- with postintervention data. Thirty-day ED visit rates to all state hospitals decreased from 16.36% to 12.08% when comparing pre- with postintervention data. PMID:24322371

  13. Predictors of hip fracture mortality at a general hospital in South Brazil: an unacceptable surgical delay

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiango Aguiar; Premaor, Melissa Orlandin; Larangeira, João Alberto; Brito, Luiz Giulian; Luft, Michel; Guterres, Leonardo Waihrich; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hip fractures have been associated with increased mortality in the elderly. Several risk factors such as the time between the insult and the surgical repair have been associated with hip fracture mortality. Nevertheless, the risk of delayed surgical repair remains controversial. Few studies have examined this issue in Brazil. The aim of this study was to study the risk factors for death one year after hip fracture and in-hospital stay at a tertiary hospital in South Brazil. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was carried out from April 2005 to April 2011 at a tertiary university hospital at Santa Maria, Brazil. Subjects admitted for hip fracture who were 65 years of age or older were followed for one year. Information about fracture type, age, gender, clinical comorbidities, time to surgery, discharge, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score were recorded. Death was evaluated during the hospital stay and at one year. RESULTS: Four hundred and eighteen subjects were included in the final analysis. Of these, 4.3% died in-hospital and 15.3% were dead at one year. Time to surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Ischemic Heart Disease, and in-hospital stay were associated with death at one year in the univariate analysis. The American Society of Anesthesiologists score and time to surgery were one-year mortality predictors in the final regression model. In-hospital death was associated with American Society of Anesthesiologists score and age. CONCLUSION: Time to surgery is worryingly high at the South Brazil tertiary public health center studied here. Surgical delay is a risk factor that has the potential to be modified to improve mortality. PMID:24714833

  14. Comparison of risk-scoring systems in predicting hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Supsamutchai, Chaiyarat; Wilasrusmee, Chumpon; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Proprom, Napaphat; Kittur, Dilip S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity, Portsmouth adjustment (P-POSSUM), the Hardman index and the Glasgow aneurysm score (GAS) in the prediction of hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. METHODS: Medical charts of 146 AAA patients treated between January 1996 and January 2007 were reviewed. The P-POSSUM, Hardman index and GAS were calculated for each patient. The scores were tested and compared for their discriminatory ability to predict hospital death. RESULTS: Of the 146 patients with ruptured and unruptured AAAs (133 underwent open repair, five underwent extra-anatomical bypass and eight underwent endovascular aneurysm repair), 18 died (12%) after AAA repair. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the GAS, Hardman index and P-POSSUM for predicting hospital mortality were 0.740, 0.730 and 0.886, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the P-POSSUM was significantly higher than those of other scores. CONCLUSION: In the present study, the P-POSSUM was the best predictor of hospital mortality for patients undergoing AAA repair. PMID:22477446

  15. Changes in U.S. Hospitalization and Mortality Rates following Smoking Bans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shetty, Kanaka D.; DeLeire, Thomas; White, Chapin; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2011-01-01

    U.S. state and local governments have increasingly adopted restrictions on smoking in public places. This paper analyzes nationally representative databases, including the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, to compare short-term changes in mortality and hospitalization rates in smoking-restricted regions with control regions. In contrast with smaller…

  16. Predictors of In-hospital Mortality Among Patients Presenting with Variceal Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amith S.; Sibia, Raminderpal S.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: The recent years have witnessed an increase in number of people harboring chronic liver diseases. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding occurs in 30% of patients with cirrhosis, and accounts for 80%-90% of bleeding episodes. We aimed to assess the in-hospital mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding and (2) to investigate the predictors of mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from treatment records of 317 subjects who presented with variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding to Government Medical College, Patiala, between June 1, 2010, and May 30, 2014. The data thus obtained was compiled using a preset proforma, and the details analyzed using SPSSv20. Results: Cirrhosis accounted for 308 (97.16%) subjects with bleeding varices, with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction 9 (2.84%) completing the tally. Sixty-three (19.87%) subjects succumbed to death during hospital stay. Linear logistic regression revealed independent predictors for in-hospital mortality, including higher age (P = 0.000), Child-Pugh Class (P = 0.002), altered sensorium (P = 0.037), rebleeding within 24 h of admission (P = 0.000), low hemoglobin level (P = 0.023), and serum bilirubin (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Higher age, low hemoglobin, higher Child-Pugh Class, rebleeding within 24 h of admission, higher serum bilirubin, and lower systolic blood pressure are the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25672238

  17. Public-private settlement and hospital mortality per sources of payment

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Juliana Pires; Martins, Mônica; Leite, Iuri da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if the adjusted hospital mortality varies according to source of payment of hospital admissions, legal nature, and financing settlement of hospitals. METHODS Cros-ssectional study with information source in administrative databases. Specific hospital admission reasons were selected considering the volume of hospital admissions and the list of quality indicators proposed by the North-American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Were analyzed 852,864 hospital admissions of adults, occurred in 789 hospitals between 2008 and 2010, in Sao Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, applying multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS At hospital admission level, showed higher chances of death male patients in more advanced age groups, with comorbidity, who used intensive care unit, and had the Brazilian Unified Health System as source of payment. At the level of hospitals, in those located in the mean of the distribution, the adjusted probability of death in hospital admissions financed by plan or private was 5.0%, against 9.0% when reimbursed by the Brazilian Unified Health System. This probability increased in hospital admissions financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System in hospitals to two standard deviations above the mean, reaching 29.0%. CONCLUSIONS In addition to structural characteristics of the hospitals and the profile of the patients, interventions aimed at improving care should also consider the coverage of the population by health plans, the network shared between beneficiaries of plans and users of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the standard of care to the various sources of payment by hospitals and, most importantly, how these factors influence the clinical performance. PMID:27463256

  18. Nonelective Rehospitalizations and Postdischarge Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ragins, Arona; Scheirer, Peter; Liu, Vincent; Robles, Jay; Kipnis, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hospital discharge planning has been hampered by the lack of predictive models. Objective: To develop predictive models for nonelective rehospitalization and postdischarge mortality suitable for use in commercially available electronic medical records (EMRs). Design: Retrospective cohort study using split validation. Setting: Integrated health care delivery system serving 3.9 million members. Participants: A total of 360,036 surviving adults who experienced 609,393 overnight hospitalizations at 21 hospitals between June 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measure: A composite outcome (nonelective rehospitalization and/or death within 7 or 30 days of discharge). Results: Nonelective rehospitalization rates at 7 and 30 days were 5.8% and 12.4%; mortality rates were 1.3% and 3.7%; and composite outcome rates were 6.3% and 14.9%, respectively. Using data from a comprehensive EMR, we developed 4 models that can generate risk estimates for risk of the combined outcome within 7 or 30 days, either at the time of admission or at 8 am on the day of discharge. The best was the 30-day discharge day model, which had a c-statistic of 0.756 (95% confidence interval, 0.754–0.756) and a Nagelkerke pseudo-R2 of 0.174 (0.171–0.178) in the validation dataset. The most important predictors—a composite acute physiology score and end of life care directives—accounted for 54% of the predictive ability of the 30-day model. Incorporation of diagnoses (not reliably available for real-time use) did not improve model performance. Conclusions: It is possible to develop robust predictive models, suitable for use in real time with commercially available EMRs, for nonelective rehospitalization and postdischarge mortality. PMID:26465120

  19. Association of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy with Infant Hospitalization and Mortality Due to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Michael J.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking is associated with infant respiratory infections and with increased risk of low birthweight (LBW) infants and preterm birth. This study assesses the association of maternal smoking during pregnancy with both respiratory and non-respiratory infectious disease (ID) morbidity and mortality in infants. Methods We conducted two retrospective case-control analyses of infants born in Washington State from 1987–2004 using linked birth certificate, death certificate, and hospital discharge records. One assessed morbidity—infants hospitalized due to ID within one year of birth (47,404 cases/48,233 controls). The second assessed mortality—infants who died within one year due to ID (627 cases/2,730 controls). Results Maternal smoking was associated with both hospitalization (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.52; 95%CI: 1.46, 1.58) and mortality (AOR=1.51; 95%CI: 1.17, 1.96) due to any ID. In subgroup analyses, maternal smoking was associated with hospitalization due to a broad range of ID including both respiratory (AOR=1.69; 95%CI: 1.63, 1.76) and non-respiratory ID (AOR=1.27; 95%CI: 1.20, 1.34). Further stratification by birthweight and gestational age did not appreciably change these estimates. In contrast, there was no association of maternal smoking with ID infant mortality when only LBW infants were considered. Conclusions Maternal smoking was associated with a broad range of both respiratory and non-respiratory ID outcomes. Despite attenuation of the mortality association among LBW infants, ID hospitalization was found to be independent of both birthweight and gestational age. These findings suggest that full-term infants of normal weight whose mothers smoked may suffer an increased risk of serious ID morbidity and mortality. PMID:22929173

  20. Metrics of High-Density Lipoprotein Function and Hospital Mortality in Acute Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Potočnjak, Ines; Degoricija, Vesna; Trbušić, Matias; Terešak, Sanda Dokoza; Radulović, Bojana; Pregartner, Gudrun; Berghold, Andrea; Tiran, Beate; Marsche, Gunther; Frank, Saša

    2016-01-01

    Objective The functionality of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is impaired in chronic ischaemic heart failure (HF). However, the relationship between HDL functionality and outcomes in acute HF (AHF) has not been studied. The present study investigates whether the metrics of HDL functionality, including HDL cholesterol efflux capacity and HDL-associated paraoxonase (PON)-1 arylesterase (AE) activity are associated with hospital mortality in AHF patients. Methods and Results The study was performed as a prospective, single-centre, observational research on 152 patients, defined and categorised according to the ESC and ACCF/AHA Guidelines for HF by time of onset, final clinical presentation and ejection fraction. The mean age of the included patients (52% female) was 75.2 years (SD 10.3) and hospital mortality was 14.5%. HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was examined by measuring the capacity of apoB depleted serum to remove tritium-labelled cholesterol from cultured macrophages. The AE activity of the HDL fraction was examined by a photometric assay. In a univariable regression analysis, low cholesterol efflux, but not AE activity, was significantly associated with hospital mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64–0.96, p = 0.019]. In multivariable analysis progressively adjusting for important clinical and laboratory parameters the association obtained for cholesterol efflux capacity and hospital mortality by univariable analysis, despite a stable OR, did not stay significant (p = 0.179). Conclusion Our results suggest that HDL cholesterol efflux capacity (but not AE activity) contributes to, but is not an independent risk factor for, hospital mortality in AHF patients. Larger studies are needed to draw firm conclusions. PMID:27304214

  1. Transferring Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage Does Not Increase In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Claude; Albright, Karen C.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Mir, Osman; Sands, Kara A.; Savitz, Sean I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) accept transferred patients from referring hospitals in a given regional area. The transfer process itself has not been studied as a potential factor that may impact outcome. We compared in-hospital mortality and severe disability or death at CSCs between transferred and directly admitted intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients of matched severity. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed all primary ICH patients from a prospectively-collected stroke registry and electronic medical records, at two tertiary care sites. Patients meeting inclusion criteria were divided into two groups: patients transferred in for a higher level of care and direct presenters. We used propensity scores (PS) to match 175 transfer patients to 175 direct presenters. These patients were taken from a pool of 530 eligible patients, 291 (54.9%) of whom were transferred in for a higher level of care. Severe disability or death was defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) sore of 4–6. Mortality and morbidity were compared between the 2 groups using Pearson chi-squared test and Student t test. We fit logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for association between transfer status and in-hospital mortality and severe disability or death in full and PS-matched patients. Results There were no significant differences in the PS-matched transfer and direct presentation groups. Patients transferred to a regional center were not at higher odds of in-hospital mortality (OR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.50–1.71) and severe disability or death (OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.39–1.50), than direct presenters, even after adjustment for PS, age, baseline NIHSS score, and glucose on admission. Conclusion Our observation suggests that transfer patients of similar disease burden are not at higher risk of in-hospital mortality than direct presenters. PMID:27467594

  2. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and 30 Day Rehospitalizations: An Analysis of Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Kind, Amy JH; Jencks, Steve; Brock, Jane; Yu, Menggang; Bartels, Christie; Ehlenbach, William; Greenberg, Caprice; Smith, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Background Measures of socioeconomic disadvantage may enable improved targeting of programs to prevent rehospitalizations, but obtaining such information directly from patients can be difficult. Measures of US neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage are more readily available, although rarely employed clinically. Objective To evaluate the association between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage at the census block-group level, as measured by Singh’s validated Area Deprivation Index (ADI), and 30-day rehospitalization. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting United States Patients Random 5% national sample of fee-for-service Medicare patients discharged with congestive heart failure, pneumonia or myocardial infarction, 2004–2009 (N = 255,744) Measurements 30-day rehospitalizations. Medicare data were linked to 2000 Census data to construct an ADI for each patient’s census block-group, which were then sorted into percentiles by increasing ADI. Relationships between neighborhood ADI grouping and rehospitalization were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression models, controlling for patient sociodemographics, comorbidities/severity, and index hospital characteristics. Results The 30-day rehospitalization rate did not vary significantly across the least disadvantaged 85% of neighborhoods, which had an average rehospitalization rate=21%. However, within the most disadvantaged 15% of neighborhoods, rehospitalization rates rose from 22% to 27% with worsening ADI. This relationship persisted after full adjustment, with the most disadvantaged neighborhoods having a rehospitalization risk (adjusted risk ratio = 1.09, confidence interval 1.05–1.12) similar to that of chronic pulmonary disease (1.06, 1.04–1.08) and greater than that of diabetes (0.95, 0.94–0.97). Limitations No direct markers of care quality, access Conclusions Residence within a disadvantaged US neighborhood is a rehospitalization predictor of magnitude similar to chronic pulmonary

  3. Avoidability of hospital deaths and association with hospital-wide mortality ratios: retrospective case record review and regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zipfel, Rebecca; Neuburger, Jenny; Hutchings, Andrew; Darzi, Ara; Black, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the proportion of avoidable deaths (due to acts of omission and commission) in acute hospital trusts in England and to determine the association with the trust’s hospital-wide standardised mortality ratio assessed using the two commonly used methods - the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) and the summary hospital level mortality indicator (SHMI). Design Retrospective case record review of deaths. Setting 34 English acute hospital trusts (10 in 2009 and 24 in 2012/13) randomly selected from across the spectrum of HSMR. Main outcome measures Avoidable death, defined as those with at least a 50% probability of avoidability in view of trained medical reviewers. Association of avoidable death proportion with the HSMR and the SHMI assessed using regression coefficients, to estimate the increase in avoidable death proportion for a one standard deviation increase in standardised mortality ratio. Participants 100 randomly selected hospital deaths from each trust. Results The proportion of avoidable deaths was 3.6% (95% confidence interval 3.0% to 4.3%). It was lower in 2012/13 (3.0%, 2.4% to 3.7%) than in 2009 (5.2%, 3.8% to 6.6%). This difference is subject to several factors, including reviewers’ greater awareness in 2012/13 of orders not to resuscitate, patients being perceived as sicker on admission, minor differences in review form questions, and cultural changes that might have discouraged reviewers from criticising other clinicians. There was a small but statistically non-significant association between HSMR and the proportion of avoidable deaths (regression coefficient 0.3, 95% confidence interval −0.2 to 0.7). The regression coefficient was similar for both time periods (0.1 and 0.3). This implies that a difference in HSMR of between 105 and 115 would be associated with an increase of only 0.3% (95% confidence interval −0.2% to 0.7%) in the proportion of avoidable deaths. A similar weak non-significant association was

  4. [Evolution of neonatal mortality at the Blida University Teaching Hospital (Algeria) between 1999 and 2006].

    PubMed

    Bezzaoucha, A; El Kebboub, A; Aliche, A

    2010-02-01

    Within the framework of the active information system set up by the department of epidemiology on hospital mortality at the Blida (Algeria) University Teaching Hospital (CHU), a study was carried out to assess the importance and evolution of neonatal mortality recorded at the CHU in the last eight years (1999-2006) as well as the causes of neonatal death. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) was used to encode the nature of the causal disease. Using the software EpiInfo™ in its sixth version performed data entry, monitoring and analysis. On the whole, 2,167 neonatal deaths were recorded at the CHU during the study period, representing a proportional mortality of 25.4%. Early neonatal mortality (0-6 days) accounted for 83.4% of all neonatal mortality. Nearly two thirds of early neonatal deaths occurred in the first three days of life. The monthly evolution of the number of early neonatal deaths revealed a significant rising trend during the study period (P < 0.05) without identification of seasonal effect. The sex ratio was practically the same for early and late neonatal mortality, respectively 1.4 and 1.5. Prematurity accounted for 42.1% of the deaths in early neonatal deaths, followed by respiratory distress syndrome and infection, respectively 17.0 and 14.4%. Infections, with a relative frequency of 36.2%, represented the most common cause for the late neonatal mortality. The rate of early neonatal mortality during the study period, when this one took for denominator the number of newborns admitted in neonatology to express the mortality of service, was 15.6%. Throughout the study period, the rate of early neonatal mortality, without counting the deaths among transferred newborms, could be estimated at 19.2 per 1,000 live births, while the overall neonatal mortality rate could be estimated at 22.3 per 1,000 live births. No significant temporal tendency was pointed out. The CHU of Blida is not characterized by a lower risk of neonatal mortality

  5. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  6. Development and Implementation of a Real-Time 30-Day Readmission Predictive Model

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Patrick R.; Greenwald, Jeffrey L.; Crevensten, Gwen C.; Chueh, Henry C.; Zai, Adrian H.

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals are under great pressure to reduce readmissions of patients. Being able to reliably predict patients at increased risk for rehospitalization would allow for tailored interventions to be offered to them. This requires the creation of a functional predictive model specifically designed to support real-time clinical operations. A predictive model for readmissions within 30 days of discharge was developed using retrospective data from 45,924 MGH admissions between 2/1/2012 and 1/31/2013 only including factors that would be available by the day after admission. It was then validated prospectively in a real-time implementation for 3,074 MGH admissions between 10/1/2013 and 10/31/2013. The model developed retrospectively had an AUC of 0.705 with good calibration. The real-time implementation had an AUC of 0.671 although the model was overestimating readmission risk. A moderately discriminative real-time 30-day readmission predictive model can be developed and implemented in a large academic hospital. PMID:25954346

  7. Severe mental illness and mortality of hospitalized ACS patients in the VHA

    PubMed Central

    Plomondon, Mary E; Ho, P Michael; Wang, Li; Greiner, Gwendolyn T; Shore, James H; Sakai, Joseph T; Fihn, Stephan D; Rumsfeld, John S

    2007-01-01

    Background Severe mental illness (SMI) has been associated with more medical co-morbidity and less cardiovascular procedure use for older patients with myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether SMI is associated with increased long term mortality risk among patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We tested the hypothesis that SMI is associated with higher one-year mortality following ACS hospitalization. Methods All ACS patients (n = 14,194) presenting to Veterans Health Administration (VHA) hospitals between October 2003 and September 2005 were included. Survival analysis evaluated the association between SMI and one-year all-cause mortality, adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, in-hospital treatment, and discharge medications. Results Overall, 18.4 % of ACS patients had SMI. Patients with SMI were more likely female, younger, Caucasian race, have a history of alcohol abuse, liver disease, dementia, hypertension and more likely to be a current smoker; however, prior cardiac history was similar between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences in cardiac procedure use, including coronary angiogram (38.7% vs. 40.3%, p = 0.14) or coronary revascularization (31.0% vs. 32.3%, p = 0.19), and discharge medications between those with and without SMI. One-year mortality was lower for patients with SMI (15.8% vs. 19.1%, p < 0.001). However, in multivariable analysis, there were no significant differences in mortality (HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.81–1.02) between patients with and without SMI. Conclusion Among ACS patients in the VHA, SMI is prevalent, affecting almost 1 in 5 patients. However, patients with SMI were as likely to undergo coronary revascularization and be prescribed evidence-based medications at hospital discharge, and were not at elevated risk of adverse 1-year outcomes compared to patients without SMI. PMID:17877804

  8. Use of intensive care services and associated hospital mortality after Massachusetts healthcare reform

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Sarah M.; Wunsch, Hannah; Asch, David A.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use the natural experiment of health insurance reform in Massachusetts to study the impact of increased insurance coverage on ICU utilization and mortality Design Population based cohort study Setting Massachusetts and 4 states (New York, Washington, Nebraska, and North Carolina) that did not enact reform Participants All non-pregnant, non-elderly adults (age 18–64), admitted to non-federal, acute-care hospitals in one of the five states of interest were eligible, excluding patients who were not residents of a respective state at the time of admission. Measurements We used a difference-in-differences approach to compare trends in ICU admissions and outcomes of in-hospital mortality and discharge destination for ICU patients. Main Result Healthcare reform in Massachusetts was associated with a decrease in ICU patients without insurance from 9.3% to 5.1%. There were no significant changes in adjusted ICU admission rates, mortality, or discharge destination. In a sensitivity analysis excluding a state that enacted Medicaid reform prior to the study period, our difference-in differences analysis demonstrated a significant increase in mortality of 0.38% per year (95% CI 0.12 – 0.64%) in Massachusetts, attributable to a greater per-year decrease in mortality post-reform in comparison states (−0.37%, 95% CI −0.52 – −0.21%) compared to Massachusetts (0.01%, 95% CI −0.20% – 0.11%). Conclusion Massachusetts healthcare reform increased the number of ICU patients with insurance but was not associated with significant changes in ICU use or discharge destination among ICU patients. Reform was also not associated with changed in-hospital mortality for ICU patients; however, this association was dependent upon the comparison states chosen in the analysis. PMID:24275512

  9. Infant Stool Color Card Screening Helps Reduce the Hospitalization Rate and Mortality of Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Jui-Hua; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biliary atresia (BA) is a significant liver disease in children. Since 2004, Taiwan has implemented a national screening program that uses an infant stool color card (SCC) for the early detection of BA. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of BA cases before and after the launch of this screening program. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the rates of hospitalization, liver transplantation (LT), and mortality of BA cases before and after the program, and to examine the association between the hospitalization rate and survival outcomes. This was a population-based cohort study. BA cases born during 1997 to 2010 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Sex, birth date, hospitalization date, LT, and death data were collected and analyzed. The hospitalization rate by 2 years of age (Hosp/2yr) was calculated to evaluate its association with the outcomes of LT or death. Among 513 total BA cases, 457 (89%) underwent the Kasai procedure. Of these, the Hosp/2yr was significantly reduced from 6.0 to 6.9/case in the earlier cohort (1997–2004) to 4.9 to 5.3/case in the later cohort (2005–2010). This hospitalization rate reduction was followed by a reduction in mortality from 26.2% to 15.9% after 2006. The Cox proportional hazards model showed a significant increase in the risk for both LT (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10–1.18) and death (HR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01–1.08) for each additional hospitalization. A multivariate logistic regression model found that cases with a Hosp/2yr >6 times had a significantly higher risk for both LT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.35, 95% CI = 2.82–6.73) and death (aOR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.17–2.62). The hospitalization and mortality rates of BA cases in Taiwan were significantly and coincidentally reduced after the launch of the SCC screening program. There was a significant association between the

  10. Influence of hospice use on hospital inpatient mortality: a state-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cyril F; Steinberg, Stephanie C

    2006-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that high hospice enrollment is associated with lower Medicare inpatient mortality. The results show that Medicare inpatient mortality in a state can be explained by hospice enrollment and a host of demographic and market environment variables. An increase in hospice population by 100 individuals is associated with a reduction of 28 inpatient deaths, ceteris paribus. The results suggest, among other things, that opportunities exist for greater expansion of hospice capacity in low-use states to reduce deaths in the expensive hospital setting and improve the quality of end-of-life care for terminally ill patients. PMID:16708687

  11. Predictors of Hospitalized Exacerbations and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Santibáñez, Miguel; Garrastazu, Roberto; Ruiz-Nuñez, Mario; Helguera, Jose Manuel; Arenal, Sandra; Bonnardeux, Cristina; León, Carlos; García-Rivero, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) carry significant consequences for patients and are responsible for considerable health-care costs—particularly if hospitalization is required. Despite the importance of hospitalized exacerbations, relatively little is known about their determinants. This study aimed to analyze predictors of hospitalized exacerbations and mortality in COPD patients. Methods This was a retrospective population-based cohort study. We selected 900 patients with confirmed COPD aged ≥35 years by simple random sampling among all COPD patients in Cantabria (northern Spain) on December 31, 2011. We defined moderate exacerbations as events that led a care provider to prescribe antibiotics or corticosteroids and severe exacerbations as exacerbations requiring hospital admission. We observed exacerbation frequency over the previous year (2011) and following year (2012). We categorized patients according to COPD severity based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] grades 1–4). We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) by logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, COPD severity, and frequent exacerbator phenotype the previous year. Results Of the patients, 16.4% had ≥1 severe exacerbations, varying from 9.3% in mild GOLD grade 1 to 44% in very severe COPD patients. A history of at least two prior severe exacerbations was positively associated with new severe exacerbations (adjusted OR, 6.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.53–12.83) and mortality (adjusted OR, 7.63; 95%CI, 3.41–17.05). Older age and several comorbidities, such as heart failure and diabetes, were similarly associated. Conclusions Hospitalized exacerbations occurred with all grades of airflow limitation. A history of severe exacerbations was associated with new hospitalized exacerbations and mortality. PMID:27362765

  12. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  13. Preoperative hypoalbuminemia is a risk factor for 30-day morbidity after gynecological malignancy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Oh, In-Kyoung; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Lee, Sun-Joo; Kim, Soo-Nyung; Kang, Soon-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between preoperative hypoalbuminemia and the development of complications after gynecological cancer surgery, as well as postoperative bowel function and hospital stay. Methods The medical records of 533 patients with gynecological cancer surgery at Konkuk University Hospital between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. Serum albumin level <3.5 g/dL was defined as hypoalbuminemia. All perioperative complications within 30-days after surgery, time to resumption of normal diet and length of postoperative hospital stay, were analyzed. Regression models were used to assess predictors of postoperative morbidity. Results The median age was 49 years (range, 13 to 85 years). Eighty patients (15%) had hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemic patients had significantly higher consumption of alcohol >2 standard drinks per day, lower American Society of Anesthesiologist score, higher frequency of ascites, and more advanced stage compared with non-hypoalbuminemic patients. Overall complication rate within 30-days after surgery was 20.3% (108 out of 533). Hypoalbuminemic patients were more likely to develop postoperative complications compared to non-hypoalbuminemic patients (34.3% vs. 17.8%, P=0.022), and had significantly longer median time to resumption of normal diet (3.3 [1-6] vs. 2.8 [0-15] days, P=0.005) and length of postoperative hospital stay (0 [7-50] vs. 9 [1-97] days, P=0.014). In multivariate analysis, age >50 (odds ratio [OR], 2.478; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.310 to 4.686; P=0.005), operation time (OR, 1.006; 95% CI, 1.002 to 1.009; P=0.006), and hypoalbuminemia (OR, 2.367; 95% CI, 1.021 to 5.487; P=0.044) were the significant risk factor for postoperative complications. Conclusion Preoperative hypoalbuminemia in patients with elective surgery for gynecologic malignancy is an independent predictor of 30-days postoperative complications. Identification of this subset and preoperative optimization of nutritional status may improve

  14. The Impact of Hospital Payment Schemes on Healthcare and Mortality: Evidence from Hospital Payment Reforms in OECD Countries.

    PubMed

    Wubulihasimu, Parida; Brouwer, Werner; van Baal, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    In this study, aggregate-level panel data from 20 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries over three decades (1980-2009) were used to investigate the impact of hospital payment reforms on healthcare output and mortality. Hospital payment schemes were classified as fixed-budget (i.e. not directly based on activities), fee-for-service (FFS) or patient-based payment (PBP) schemes. The data were analysed using a difference-in-difference model that allows for a structural change in outcomes due to payment reform. The results suggest that FFS schemes increase the growth rate of healthcare output, whereas PBP schemes positively affect life expectancy at age 65 years. However, these results should be interpreted with caution, as results are sensitive to model specification. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26080792

  15. Predicting mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    de Gelder, Jelle; Lucke, Jacinta A; Heim, Noor; de Craen, Antonius J M; Lourens, Shantaily D; Steyerberg, Ewout W; de Groot, Bas; Fogteloo, Anne J; Blauw, Gerard J; Mooijaart, Simon P

    2016-06-01

    Acutely hospitalized older patients have an increased risk of mortality, but at the moment of presentation this risk is difficult to assess. Early identification of patients at high risk might increase the awareness of the physician, and enable tailored decision-making. Existing screening instruments mainly use either geriatric factors or severity of disease for prognostication. Predictive performance of these instruments is moderate, which hampers successive interventions. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all patients aged 70 years and over who were acutely hospitalized in the Acute Medical Unit of the Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands in 2012. We developed a prediction model for 90-day mortality that combines vital signs and laboratory test results reflecting severity of disease with geriatric factors, represented by comorbidities and number of medications. Among 517 patients, 94 patients (18.2 %) died within 90 days after admission. Six predictors of mortality were included in a model for mortality: oxygen saturation, Charlson comorbidity index, thrombocytes, urea, C-reactive protein and non-fasting glucose. The prediction model performs satisfactorily with an 0.738 (0.667-0.798). Using this model, 53 % of the patients in the highest risk decile (N = 51) were deceased within 90 days. In conclusion, we are able to predict 90-day mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients using a model with directly available clinical data describing disease severity and geriatric factors. After further validation, such a model might be used in clinical decision making in older patients. PMID:26825335

  16. Concordance of effects of medical interventions on hospital admission and readmission rates with effects on mortality

    PubMed Central

    Hemkens, Lars G.; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Despina G.; Ioannidis, John P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many clinical trials examine a composite outcome of admission to hospital and death, or infer a relationship between hospital admission and survival benefit. This assumes concordance of the outcomes “hospital admission” and “death.” However, whether the effects of a treatment on hospital admissions and readmissions correlate to its effect on serious outcomes such as death is unknown. We aimed to assess the correlation and concordance of effects of medical interventions on admission rates and mortality. Methods: We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from its inception to January 2012 (issue 1, 2012) for systematic reviews of treatment comparisons that included meta-analyses for both admission and mortality outcomes. For each meta-analysis, we synthesized treatment effects on admissions and death, from respective randomized trials reporting those outcomes, using random-effects models. We then measured the concordance of directions of effect sizes and the correlation of summary estimates for the 2 outcomes. Results: We identified 61 meta-analyses including 398 trials reporting mortality and 182 trials reporting admission rates; 125 trials reported both outcomes. In 27.9% of comparisons, the point estimates of treatment effects for the 2 outcomes were in opposite directions; in 8.2% of trials, the 95% confidence intervals did not overlap. We found no significant correlation between effect sizes for admission and death (Pearson r = 0.07, p = 0.6). Our results were similar when we limited our analysis to trials reporting both outcomes. Interpretation: In this metaepidemiological study, admission and mortality outcomes did not correlate, and discordances occurred in about one-third of the treatment comparisons included in our analyses. Both outcomes convey useful information and should be reported separately, but extrapolating the benefits of admission to survival is unreliable and should be avoided. PMID:24144601

  17. Morbidity and mortality characteristics of infants hospitalized in the Pediatrics Department of the largest Turkish military hospital in 2001.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Selim; Tezcan, Sabahat; Taşçilar, Emre; Cakir, Banu; Aydin, Halil Ibrahim; Hasde, Metin; Gökçay, Erdal

    2005-01-01

    A descriptive study was conducted in the pediatric inpatient unit of Gulhane Military Medical Academy, to investigate the morbidity and mortality characteristics of 532 infants hospitalized between January 1 and December 31, 2001, for treatment purposes. Of the study participants, 55.8% were boys and 44.2% were girls. The most common cause of hospitalization was neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (19.7%). The most common admission month was January (12.4%). Of 532 infants, 510 (95.9%) were discharged, whereas 22 patients died in the hospital. Twenty-one patients died in the neonatal period, and respiratory distress syndrome and neonatal sepsis were identified as the most common causes of death. Our finding of associations between male gender and low birth weight and hospital death is consistent with previous knowledge. Despite the high frequencies of pneumonia and gastroenteritis as admission diagnoses, the finding of only one pneumonia-related death and no gastroenteritis-related deaths in the study population is pleasing. PMID:15724854

  18. Patient characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality in children following tracheotomy

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G; Graham, Robert J; Roberson, David W; Rhein, Lawrence; Graham, Dionne A; Zhou, Jing; O’Brien, Jane; Putney, Heather; Goldmann, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify children at risk for in-hospital mortality following tracheotomy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 25 746 876 US hospitalisations for children within the Kids’ Inpatient Database 1997, 2000, 2003 and 2006. Participants 18 806 hospitalisations of children ages 0–18 years undergoing tracheotomy, identified from ICD-9-CM tracheotomy procedure codes. Main outcome measure Mortality during the initial hospitalisation when tracheotomy was performed in relation to patient demographic and clinical characteristics (neuromuscular impairment (NI), chronic lung disease, upper airway anomaly, prematurity, congenital heart disease, upper airway infection and trauma) identified with ICD-9-CM codes. Results Between 1997 and 2006, mortality following tracheotomy ranged from 7.7% to 8.5%. In each year, higher mortality was observed in children undergoing tracheotomy who were aged <1 year compared with children aged 1–4 years (mortality range: 10.2–13.1% vs 1.1–4.2%); in children with congenital heart disease, compared with children without congenital heart disease (13.1–18.7% vs 6.2–7.1%) and in children with prematurity, compared with children who were not premature (13.0–19.4% vs 6.8–7.3%). Lower mortality was observed in children with an upper airway anomaly compared with children without an upper airway anomaly (1.5–5.1% vs 9.1–10.3%). In 2006, the highest mortality (40.0%) was observed in premature children with NI and congenital heart disease, who did not have an upper airway anomaly. Conclusions Congenital heart disease, prematurity, the absence of an upper airway anomaly and age <1 year were characteristics associated with higher mortality in children following tracheotomy. These findings may assist provider communication with children and families regarding early prognosis following tracheotomy. PMID:20522454

  19. Impact of hospital delivery on child mortality: An analysis of adolescent mothers in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sarmistha

    2015-10-01

    New medical inventions for saving young lives are not enough if these do not reach the children and the mother. The present paper provides new evidence that institutional delivery can significantly lower child mortality risks, because it ensures effective and timely access to modern diagnostics and medical treatments to save lives. We exploit the exogenous variation in community's access to local health facilities (both traditional and modern) before and after the completion of the 'Women's Health Project' in 2005 (that enhanced emergency obstetric care in women friendly environment) to identify the causal effect of hospital delivery on various mortality rates among children. Our best estimates come from the parents fixed effects models that help limiting any parents-level omitted variable estimation bias. Using 2007 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey data from about 6000 children born during 2002-2007, we show that, ceteris paribus, access to family welfare clinic particularly boosted hospital delivery likelihood, which in turn lowered neo-natal, early and infant mortality rates. The beneficial effect was particularly pronouncedamong adolescent mothers after the completion of Women's Health Project in 2005; infant mortality for this cohort was more than halved when delivery took place in a health facility. PMID:26363451

  20. Paradoxical Association of Smoking With In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed F.; Smith, Eric E.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to those who never smoked, a paradoxical effect of smoking on reducing mortality in patients admitted with myocardial ischemia has been reported. We sought to determine if this effect was present in patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Using the local Get with the Guidelines‐Stroke registry, we analyzed 4305 consecutively admitted ischemic stroke patients (March 2002–December 2011). The sample was divided into smokers versus nonsmokers. The main outcome of interest was the overall inpatient mortality. Compared to nonsmokers, tobacco smokers were younger, more frequently male and presented with fewer stroke risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation. Smokers also had a lower average NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and fewer received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Patients in both groups had similar adherence to early antithrombotics, dysphagia screening prior to oral intake, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis. Smoking was associated with lower all‐cause in‐hospital mortality (6.6% versus 12.4%; unadjusted OR 0.46; CI [0.34 to 0.63]; P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, CAD, atrial fibrillation, NIHSS, and tPA, smoking remained independently associated with lower mortality (adjusted OR 0.64; CI [0.42 to 0.96]; P=0.03). Conclusions Similar to myocardial ischemia, smoking was independently associated with lower inpatient mortality in acute ischemic stroke. This effect may be due to tobacco‐induced changes in cerebrovascular vasoreactivity, or may be due in part to residual confounding. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to confirm the finding and the effect on 30‐day and 1‐year mortality. PMID:23782919

  1. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted. PMID:26986122

  2. Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratios: Sensitivity Analyses on the Impact of Coding

    PubMed Central

    Bottle, Alex; Jarman, Brian; Aylin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hospital standardized mortality ratios (HSMRs) are derived from administrative databases and cover 80 percent of in-hospital deaths with adjustment for available case mix variables. They have been criticized for being sensitive to issues such as clinical coding but on the basis of limited quantitative evidence. Methods In a set of sensitivity analyses, we compared regular HSMRs with HSMRs resulting from a variety of changes, such as a patient-based measure, not adjusting for comorbidity, not adjusting for palliative care, excluding unplanned zero-day stays ending in live discharge, and using more or fewer diagnoses. Results Overall, regular and variant HSMRs were highly correlated (ρ > 0.8), but differences of up to 10 points were common. Two hospitals were particularly affected when palliative care was excluded from the risk models. Excluding unplanned stays ending in same-day live discharge had the least impact despite their high frequency. The largest impacts were seen when capturing postdischarge deaths and using just five high-mortality diagnosis groups. Conclusions HSMRs in most hospitals changed by only small amounts from the various adjustment methods tried here, though small-to-medium changes were not uncommon. However, the position relative to funnel plot control limits could move in a significant minority even with modest changes in the HSMR. PMID:21790587

  3. Body mass index and in-hospital mortality in anorexia nervosa: data from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Shimada, Takafumi; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2013-12-01

    One of the main purposes of admission for anorexia nervosa is to manage acute medical conditions related to this condition. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality in anorexia nervosa remain unclear. This study describes the clinical features of anorexia nervosa patients requiring hospitalization in Japan. We analyzed the association between in-hospital mortality and body mass index upon admission using a currently available, nationwide hospital-based database. We identified 669 eligible patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI ≤ 16.5) from 229 hospitals between July and December, 2010. More than 90 % of the patients were female and 100 patients were admitted involuntarily. The average body mass index was 13.1, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 0.7 %. Five patients who died had a BMI under 11, indicating that patients with an extremely low BMI may be likely to die, despite admission. PMID:23929026

  4. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  5. Testosterone Deficiency Increases Hospital Readmission and Mortality Rates in Male Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Sayegh, Ana Luiza Carrari; Groehs, Raphaela Vilar Ramalho; Fonseca, Guilherme; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Barretto, Antônio Carlos Pereira; Arap, Marco Antônio; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo; Middlekauff, Holly R.; Alves, Maria-Janieire de Nazaré Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone deficiency in patients with heart failure (HF) is associated with decreased exercise capacity and mortality; however, its impact on hospital readmission rate is uncertain. Furthermore, the relationship between testosterone deficiency and sympathetic activation is unknown. Objective We investigated the role of testosterone level on hospital readmission and mortality rates as well as sympathetic nerve activity in patients with HF. Methods Total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were measured in 110 hospitalized male patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 45% and New York Heart Association classification IV. The patients were placed into low testosterone (LT; n = 66) and normal testosterone (NT; n = 44) groups. Hypogonadism was defined as TT < 300 ng/dL and FT < 131 pmol/L. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography in a subpopulation of 27 patients. Results Length of hospital stay was longer in the LT group compared to in the NT group (37 ± 4 vs. 25 ± 4 days; p = 0.008). Similarly, the cumulative hazard of readmission within 1 year was greater in the LT group compared to in the NT group (44% vs. 22%, p = 0.001). In the single-predictor analysis, TT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58–4.85; p = 0.02) predicted hospital readmission within 90 days. In addition, TT (HR, 4.65; 95% CI, 2.67–8.10; p = 0.009) and readmission within 90 days (HR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.23–8.69; p = 0.02) predicted increased mortality. Neurohumoral activation, as estimated by MSNA, was significantly higher in the LT group compared to in the NT group (65 ± 3 vs. 51 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats; p < 0.001). Conclusion These results support the concept that LT is an independent risk factor for hospital readmission within 90 days and increased mortality in patients with HF. Furthermore, increased MSNA was observed in patients with LT. PMID:26200897

  6. Independent influence of negative blood cultures and bloodstream infections on in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The independent influence of blood culture testing and bloodstream infection (BSI) on hospital mortality is unclear. Methods We included all adults treated in non-psychiatric services at our hospital between 2004 and 2011. We identified all blood cultures and their results to determine the independent association of blood culture testing and BSI on death in hospital using proportional hazards modeling that adjusted for important covariates. Results Of 297 070 hospitalizations, 48 423 had negative blood cultures and 5274 had BSI. 12 529 (4.2%) died in hospital. Compared to those without blood cultures, culture-negative patients and those with BSI were sicker. Culture-negative patients had a significantly increased risk of death in hospital (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] ranging between 3.1 and 4.4 depending on admission urgency, extent of comorbidities, and whether the blood culture was taken in the intensive care unit). Patients with BSI had a significantly increased risk of death (adj-HR ranging between 3.8 and 24.3] that was significantly higher when BSI was: diagnosed within the first hospital day; polymicrobial; in patients who were exposed to immunosuppressants or were neutropenic; or due to Clostridial and Candidal organisms. Death risk in culture negative and bloodstream infection patients decreased significantly with time. Conclusions Risk of death in hospital is independently increased both in patients with negative blood cultures and further in those with bloodstream infection. Death risk associated with bloodstream infections varied by the patient’s immune status and the causative microorganism. PMID:24444097

  7. Hospitalizations, Costs, and Mortality among Infants with Critical Congenital Heart Disease: How Important Is Timely Detection?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Cora; Dawson, April; Grosse, Scott D.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Olney, Richard S.; Tanner, Jean Paul; Kirby, Russell S.; Correia, Jane A.; Watkins, Sharon M.; Cassell, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was recently added to the U.S. Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for newborns. States considering screening requirements may want more information about the potential impact of screening. This study examined potentially avoidable mortality among infants with late detected CCHD and assessed whether late detection was associated with increased hospital resource use during infancy. METHODS This was a state-wide, population-based, observational study of infants with CCHD (n =3603) born 1998 to 2007 identified by the Florida Birth Defects Registry. We examined 12 CCHD conditions that are targets of newborn screening. Late detection was defined as CCHD diagnosis after the birth hospitalization. Deaths potentially avoidable through screening were defined as those that occurred outside a hospital following birth hospitalization discharge and those that occurred within 3 days of an emergency readmission. RESULTS For 23% (n =825) of infants, CCHD was not detected during the birth hospitalization. Death occurred among 20% (n =568/2,778) of infants with timely detected CCHD and 8% (n =66/825) of infants with late detected CCHD, unadjusted for clinical characteristics. Potentially preventable deaths occurred in 1.8% (n =15/825) of infants with late detected CCHD (0.4% of all infants with CCHD). In multivariable models adjusted for selected characteristics, late CCHD detection was significantly associated with 52% more admissions, 18% more hospitalized days, and 35% higher inpatient costs during infancy. CONCLUSION Increased CCHD detection at birth hospitals through screening may lead to decreased hospital costs and avoid some deaths during infancy. Additional studies conducted after screening implementation are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24000201

  8. The effect of discharge disposition on 30-day readmission rates after total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Nicholas L; Karia, Raj J; Hutzler, Lorraine H; Brandt, Aaron M; Slover, James D; Bosco, Joseph A

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated no significant difference in overall functional outcomes of patients discharged to a sub acute setting versus home with health services after total joint arthroplasty. These findings coupled with pressure to reduce health care costs and the implementation of a prospective payment system under Medicare have supported the use of home rehabilitation services and the trend towards earlier discharge after hospitalization. While the overall functional outcome of patients discharged to various settings has been studied, there is a relative dearth of investigation comparing postoperative complications and readmission rates between various discharge dispositions. Our study demonstrated patients discharged home with health services had a significantly lower 30 day readmission rate compared to those discharged to inpatient rehab facilities. Patients discharged to rehab facilities have a higher incidence of comorbidity and this association could be responsible for their higher rate of readmission. PMID:24183369

  9. Hypoglycemia, With or Without Insulin Therapy, Is Associated With Increased Mortality Among Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rajesh; Hurwitz, Shelley; Turchin, Alexander; Trivedi, Apoorva

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality in hospitalized patients. We investigated the relationship between spontaneous hypoglycemia versus insulin-associated hypoglycemia and mortality in hospitalized patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data for this retrospective cohort study were obtained from electronic databases of patients admitted between 1 April 2008 and 30 November 2010. Patients with one or more blood glucose values ≤50 mg/dL on point-of-care glucose testing were considered hypoglycemic. Patients treated with insulin were assumed to have insulin-associated hypoglycemia. Age-, sex-, and race-matched patients with all blood glucose values >70 mg/dL were selected as controls. The Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was used to control for severity of illness. RESULTS There were four groups: 1) noninsulin-treated hypoglycemia (NTH) (n = 135), 2) insulin-treated hypoglycemia (ITH) (n = 961), 3) noninsulin-treated control (NTC) (n = 1,058), and 4) insulin-treated control (ITC) (n = 736). Mortality was higher in the ITH group compared with the ITC group (20.3 vs. 4.5%, P < 0.0001), with a relatively higher CCI (1.8 vs. 1.5%, P < 0.0001), but much higher in the NTH group compared with the NTC group (34.5 vs. 1.1%, P < 0.0001), with much higher CCI (2.4 vs. 1.1%, P < 0.0001). Mortality was higher in the NTH group compared with the ITH group (P < 0.0001) but lower in the NTC group compared with the ITC group (P < 0.0001). After controlling for age, sex, CCI, and admission to the intensive care unit, insulin treatment was associated with a lower mortality among the hypoglycemic patients; hazard ratio of death in the ITH group relative to the NTH group was 0.34 (95% CI 0.25–0.47, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Insulin-associated and spontaneous hypoglycemia are associated with increased mortality among hospitalized patients. PMID:23248192

  10. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Wolf, Achim; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services. Method We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder) on outcomes. Results Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949) after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%), and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613) with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied—substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:27196309

  11. [Maternal mortality at the Hospital Center of Libreville (1984-1987)].

    PubMed

    Picaud, A; Nlome-Nze, R A; Faye, A; Ogowet Igumu, N

    1989-01-01

    Maternal mortality at the University Hospital of Libreville was 152.5 for every 100,000 live births. There were 48 maternal deaths out of 31,799 deliveries carried out between 1984 and 1987. The principal causes were: haemorrhage in 45.8%, infections in 20.8%, intercurrent diseases in 20.8%, vasculo-renal syndromes in 10.4% and thromboses in 2%. The main differences between this country and developed countries were the large number of haemorrhages and the rarity of thrombosis. Poor prognostic factors were SS sickle-cell disease in 10.4% of the cases who died and in deaths due to anaemias, of which 25% were due to haemorrhage connected with the afterbirth. Complications occurring in the 1st trimester of pregnancy caused nearly a third of all maternal deaths. Complications of abortion occurred in 16.6% and of extra-uterine pregnancies in 14.6%. If the maternal mortality rate is to be reduced it is important to have a proper blood bank. The risks of caesarean section are ten times greater than of vaginal delivery, although it is a good way out for difficult situations. The indications for the operation have to be carefully considered. Comparing the statistics reported from Cotonou, the University Hospital in Libreville has a lower incidence of maternal mortality but it is too high and requires real progress to be made. PMID:2778279

  12. Postoperative Morbidity by Procedure and Patient Factors Influencing Major Complications Within 30 Days Following Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Edward; Iannuzzi, James C.; Thorsness, Robert; Noyes, Katia; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little data are available to prioritize quality improvement initiatives in shoulder surgery. Purpose: To stratify the risk for 30-day postoperative morbidity in commonly performed surgical procedures about the shoulder completed in a hospital setting and to determine patient factors associated with major complications. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This retrospective study utilized the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from the years 2005 to 2010. Using Current Procedural Terminology codes, the database was queried for shoulder cases that were divided into 7 groups: arthroscopy without repair; arthroscopy with repair; arthroplasty; clavicle/acromioclavicular joint (AC) open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF)/repair; ORIF of proximal humeral fracture; open tendon release/repair; and open shoulder stabilization. The primary end point was any major complication, with secondary end points of incisional infection, return to the operating room, and venothromboembolism (VTE), all within 30 days of surgery. Results: Overall, 11,086 cases were analyzed. The overall major complication rate was 2.1% (n = 234). Factors associated with major complications on multivariate analysis included: procedure performed (P < .001), emergency case (P < .001), pulmonary comorbidity (P < .001), preoperative blood transfusion (P = .033), transfer from an outside institution (P = .03), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .006), wound class (P < .001), dependent functional status (P = .027), and age older than 60 years (P = .01). After risk adjustment, open shoulder stabilization was associated with the greatest risk of major complications relative to arthroscopy without repair (odds ratio [OR], 5.56; P = .001), followed by ORIF of proximal humerus fracture (OR, 4.90; P < .001) and arthroplasty (OR, 4.40; P < .001). These 3 groups generated over 60% of all major complications. Open shoulder

  13. Incidence And Risk Factors For 30-Day Readmissions After Hip Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Christopher T; Gao, Yubo; Pugely, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unplanned hospital readmission following orthopedic procedures results in significant expenditures for the Medicare population. In order to reduce expenditures, hospital readmission has become an important quality metric for Medicare patients. The purpose of the present study is to determine the incidence and risk factors for 30-day readmissions after hip fracture surgery. Methods Patients over the age of 18 years who underwent hip fracture surgery, including open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), intramedullary nailing, hemi-arthroplasty, or total hip arthroplasty, between the years 2012 and 2013 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Overall, 17,765 patients were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed in order to determine patient and surgical factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results There were 1503 patients (8.4%) readmitted within 30-days of their index procedure. Of the patients with a reason listed for readmission, 27.4% were for procedurally related reasons, including wound complications (16%), peri-prosthetic fractures (4.5%) and prosthetic dislocations (6%). 72.6% of readmissions were for medical reasons, including sepsis (7%), pneumonia (14%), urinary tract infection (6.3%), myocardial infarction (2.7%), renal failure (2.7%), and stroke (2.3%). In the subsequent multivariate analysis, pre-operative dyspnea, COPD, hypertension, disseminated cancer, a bleeding disorder, pre-operative hematocrit of <36, pre-operative creatinine of >1.2, an ASA class of 3 or 4, and the operative procedure type were each independently associated with readmissions risk (p<0.05 for each). Conclusions The overall rate of readmission following hip fracture surgery was moderate. Surgeons should consider discharge optimization in the at risk cohorts identified here, particularly patients with multiple medical comorbidities or an elevated ASA class, and

  14. Health Literacy and Mortality: A Cohort Study of Patients Hospitalized for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Methods and Results Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio for death among patients with low health literacy was 1.34 (95% CI 1.04, 1.73, P=0.02) compared to Brief Health Literacy Screen >9. Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Conclusions Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. PMID:25926328

  15. Relationship of surgical volume to short-term mortality, morbidity, and hospital charges in arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, C J; Guzman, J F

    1995-04-01

    In 1992, the Agency of Health Care Administration in Tallahassee, Florida, started releasing, as part of the patient discharge information, the names of the treating physicians, in addition to demographic and diagnostic data. This information is available to the general public for a small price and is being used by health planners, hospital administrators, finance departments, third-party payers, and other agencies involved in health care. Patient discharge information was used to assess the effects of volume on the short-term outcome of primary and revision hip and knee arthroplasty as a function of surgeon and hospital in the State of Florida, during 1992. A total of 19,925 primary and 2,536 revision arthroplasties of the hip and knee were performed during 1992 in Florida and were available for study. After the doctors and hospitals were arbitrarily divided into three case volume groups (low, medium, high), results showed that in primary arthroplasty, surgeons with a low volume of primary cases (< 10) have a significantly higher mortality rate (24%), higher average charges ($25,000), and increased average length of hospital stay (9.3 days). In revision surgery, physicians with a low volume of cases (< 10) have a higher mortality rate (13%) and increased average length of hospital stay (9.8 days). Patients discharge information has many potential uses for investigators interested in the short-term outcome of arthroplasty. In their present form, these databases should not be released to the general public or the media. Lastly, the volume-outcome relation for a specific surgical procedure should, in addition to case severity, account for characteristics affecting the degree of technical difficulty. PMID:7798093

  16. Changing Patterns of Disease and Mortality at the Children’s Hospital, Accra: Are Infections Rising?

    PubMed Central

    Tette, Edem M. A.; Donkor, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have led to reductions in child mortality world-wide. This has, invariably, led to the changes in the epidemiology of diseases associated with child mortality. Although facility based data do not capture all deaths, they provide an opportunity to confirm diagnoses and insight into these changes which are relevant for further disease control. Objective To identify changes in the disease pattern of children who died at the Princess Marie Louise Children’s Hospital (PML) in Ghana from 2003–2013. Methods A cross sectional review of mortality data was carried out at PML. The age, sex, duration of admission and diagnosis of consecutive patients who died at the hospital between 2003 and 2013 were reviewed. This information was entered into an Access database and analysed using Stata 11.0 software. Results Altogether, 1314 deaths (3.6%) occurred out of a total of 37,012 admissions. The majority of the deaths, 1187 (90.3%), occurred in children under the age of 5 years. While deaths caused by malaria, malnutrition, HIV infection and diarrhoea decreased, deaths caused by pneumonia were rising. Suspected septicaemia and meningitis showed a fluctuating trend with only a modest decrease between 2012 and 2013. The ten leading causes of mortality among under-fives were malnutrition, 363 (30.6%); septicaemia, 301 (25.4%); pneumonia, 218 (18.4%); HIV infection, 183 (15.4%); malaria, 155 (13.1%); anaemia, 135 (11.4%); gastroenteritis/dehydration, 110 (9.3%); meningitis, 58 (4.9%); tuberculosis, 34 (2.9%) and hypoglycaemia, 27 (2.3%). For children aged 5–9 years, the leading causes of mortality were malaria, 42 (42.9%); HIV infection, 27 (27.6%); anaemia, 14 (14.3%); septicaemia, 12 (12.2%); meningitis, 10 (10.2%); malnutrition, 9 (9.2%); tuberculosis, 5 (5.1%); pneumonia, 4 (4.1%); encephalopathy, 3 (3.1%); typhoid fever, 3 (3.1%) and lymphoma, 3 (3.1%). In the adolescent age group, malaria, 8 (27.6%); anaemia, 6 (20.7%); HIV

  17. Maternal mortality in a teaching hospital in southern India. A 13-year study.

    PubMed

    Rao, K B

    1975-10-01

    During the 13 years 1960-1972, in a teaching hospital that serves a predominantly rural and semiurban population in southern India, there were 74,384 deliveries and 1245 maternal deaths, a maternal mortality rate of 16.7 per 1000 births. Direct obstetric factors caused 854 (65.5%) of these deaths. The leading indirect or associated causes of maternal deaths were anemia, cerebrovascular accidents, and infectious hepatitis. During the past 13 years, monthly maternal mortality meetings have helped to reduce the incidence of avoidable factors in maternal deaths among patients from the city but not among those brought from the surrounding countryside. The important causes of maternal deaths in this developing country, and their prevention, are individually discussed. PMID:1080844

  18. Annual Hospital Volume of High Dose Interleukin-2 and Inpatient Mortality in Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kathan; Appleman, Leonard; Wang, Hong; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy using high dose interleukin-2 (HD IL2) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and melanoma is associated with severe toxicities. The association between annual hospital volume of HD IL2 and inpatient mortality is not well studied. In this study we aim to quantify the impact of annual hospital volume of HD IL2 on inpatient mortality using National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data. Methods We did a cross-sectional study using NIS, one of the largest inpatient datasets in United States, from 2003 to 2011. Patients with melanoma and RCC receiving HD IL2 were identified by ICD9 procedure code 00.15. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality. Using Joinpoint regression, which detects change in trend of inpatient mortality with change in annual volume, the hospitals were classified in three volume categories (low: 1–40, medium: 41–120, high: >120). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of inpatient mortality controlling for confounders. Results From 2003 to 2011, 29,532 patients with RCC or melanoma who received HD IL2 were identified, and 124 died during the hospitalization (0.4%). The hospitals with low, medium and high annual volume had significant difference in inpatient mortality (0.83%, 0.29% and 0.13% respectively, p = 0.0003). On multivariate analysis, low volume hospitals were associated with significantly higher odds of inpatient mortality (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.6–23.2, p = 0.003) as compared to high volume hospitals. Additionally, the hospitals with annual volume of 1–20 had even higher rates (1.31% vs. 0.13%, p<0.0001) and multivariate odds (OR 8.9, 95% CI 2.4–33.2, p = 0.0006) of inpatient mortality as compared to high volume hospitals. Conclusions Lower annual hospital volume of HD IL2 is associated with worse outcomes. Annual hospital volume of 1–40 and 1–20 treatments per year is associated with 6 and 9 times higher odds of inpatient mortality respectively as compared to high volume hospitals

  19. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  20. Predictors of Long-Term Mortality in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Cardiac Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bożena; Lisowska, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2016-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) are a heterogeneous population with a high mortality rate. The aim of our study was to investigate which clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic parameters routinely assessed may affect long-term mortality in a non-selected ICCU population.A total of 392 patients hospitalized between 2008-2011 (mean age, 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women) were consecutively and prospectively assessed with the following admission diagnoses: 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders. Patients were treated according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines.During a mean 29.3 (± 18.9) months of observation, 152 (38.8%) patients died and 7.9% of the patients needed a red blood cell transfusion (RBC Tx). Patients who died were significantly older and had lower baseline levels of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), cholesterol, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as lower eGFR values, and higher white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (P < 0.05). Predictors of death in multivariate regression analysis were age, Hb, LVEF, WBC, and CRP. The most powerful factor was hospitalization for non-ACS. The risk of long-term mortality increased with decreasing levels of Hb (P < 0.001), SIC (P = 0.001), TIBC (P = 0.009), and the need for RBC Tx (P < 0.001), as well as the diagnosis of ADHF (P < 0.001) and the absence of ACS (P = 0.007).In ICCU patients, age, Hb, parameters of iron status, and LVEF are strong predictors of long-term mortality. Among the ICCU population, patients with ACS diagnosis have better survival. PMID:26673443

  1. Mortality and Incidence of Hospital Admissions for Stroke among Brazilians Aged 15 to 49 Years between 2008 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Fernando; Figueiredo, Francisco Winter dos Santos; Paiva, Laércio da Silva; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Santos, Edige Felipe de Sousa; Martins, Bruno Luis; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to analyze rates of stroke-related mortality and incidence of hospital admissions in Brazilians aged 15 to 49 years according to region and age group between 2008 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis was performed in 2014 using data from the Hospital and Mortality Information Systems and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics. Stroke was defined by ICD, 10th revision (I60–I64). Crude and standardized mortality (WHO reference) and incidence of hospital admissions per 100,000 inhabitants, stratified by region and age group, were estimated. Absolute and relative frequencies; and linear regression were also used. The software used was Stata 11.0. Results There were 35,005 deaths and 131,344 hospital admissions for stroke in Brazilians aged 15–49 years old between 2008 and 2012. Mortality decreased from 7.54 (95% CI 7.53; 7.54) in 2008 to 6.32 (95% CI 6.31; 6.32) in 2012 (β = -0.27, p = 0.013, r2 = 0.90). During the same time, incidence of hospital admissions stabilized: 24.67 (95% CI 24.66; 24.67) in 2008 and 25.11 (95% CI 25.10; 25.11) in 2012 (β = 0.09, p = 0.692, r2 = 0.05). There was a reduction in mortality in all Brazilian regions and in the age group between 30 and 49 years. Incidence of hospitalizations decreased in the South, but no significant decrease was observed in any age group. Conclusion We observed a decrease in stroke-related mortality, particularly in individuals over 30 years old, and stability of the incidence of hospitalizations; and also regional variation in stroke-related hospital admission incidence and mortality among Brazilian young adults. PMID:27332892

  2. Does More Schooling Reduce Hospitalization and Delay Mortality? New Evidence Based on Danish Twins

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Hans-Peter; Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Pedersen, Dorthe; Petersen, Inge; Bingley, Paul; Christensen, Kaare

    2012-01-01

    Schooling generally is positively associated with better health-related outcomes—for example, less hospitalization and later mortality—but these associations do not measure whether schooling causes better health-related outcomes. Schooling may in part be a proxy for unobserved endowments—including family background and genetics—that both are correlated with schooling and have direct causal effects on these outcomes. This study addresses the schooling-health-gradient issue with twins methodology, using rich data from the Danish Twin Registry linked to population-based registries to minimize random and systematic measurement error biases. We find strong, significantly negative associations between schooling and hospitalization and mortality, but generally no causal effects of schooling. PMID:21842327

  3. Using hospital standardised mortality ratios to assess quality of care--proceed with extreme caution.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Brand, Caroline A; Phelps, Grant E; Barker, Anna L; Cameron, Peter A

    2011-06-20

    Australian Health Ministers have endorsed the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR) as a key indicator of quality and safety, and efforts are currently underway towards its national implementation. In the United Kingdom, Canada, the Netherlands and the United States, the HSMR has been used for several years within organisations to monitor performance and response to various quality and safety programs. In the UK and Canada, the HSMR is also publicly reported and used to compare performance between hospitals. The validity and reliability of the HSMR as a screening tool for distinguishing low-quality from high-quality hospitals remain in doubt, and it has not yet been proven that HSMR reporting necessarily leads to worthwhile improvement in quality of care and patient outcomes. Institutions may respond to an unfavourable HSMR by "gaming" administrative data and risk-adjustment models or implementing inappropriate changes to care. Despite its apparent low cost and ease of measurement, the HSMR is currently not "fit for purpose" as a screening tool for detecting low-quality hospitals and should not be used in making interhospital comparisons. It may be better suited to monitoring changes in outcomes over time within individual institutions. PMID:21692724

  4. Clinical characteristics associated with mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Takumi; Hamada, Yukihiro; Yamagishi, Yuka; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-06-01

    The presence of anaerobes in the blood stream is known to be associated with a higher rate of mortality. However, few prognostic risk factor analyses examining whether a patient's background characteristics are associated with the prognosis have been reported. We performed a retrospective case-controlled study to assess the prognostic factors associated with death from anaerobic bacteremia. Seventy-four patients with anaerobic bacteremia were treated between January 2005 and December 2014 at Aichi Medical University Hospital. The clinical information included drug susceptibility was used for analysis of prognostic factors for 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed an association between the 30-day mortality rate and malignancy (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.08-12.31) and clindamycin resistance (OR: 7.93, 95% CI: 2.33-27.94). The result of Kaplan-Meier analysis of mortality showed that the 30-day survival rate was 83% in clindamycin susceptible and 38.1% in clindamycin resistant anaerobes causing bacteremia. The result of log-rank test also showed that susceptibility to clindamycin affected mortality (P < 0.001). Our results indicated that malignancy and clindamycin susceptibility could be used to identify subgroups of patients with anaerobic bacteremia with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. The results of this study are important for the early and appropriate management of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26903282

  5. Physician impact on hospital admission and on mortality rates in the Medicare population.

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, H; Jacoby, I; Millman, M; Lukomnik, J E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We assess the effect of variations in the supply and specialty distribution of physicians on admission rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACS) and for all causes, and on mortality rates among Medicare beneficiaries of various health care service areas (HCSA). DATA SOURCES. For the Medicare beneficiaries, sources were the Health Care Financing Administration's 1992 enrollment and impatient (Part A) files for a 5 percent sample of that population; for the overall populations and for the medical resources of the HCSAs, the Area Resource File. STUDY DESIGN. This observational, cross-sectional study employed multiple linear regression to assess the influence of population characteristics and of the supply of physicians on hospital admissions, and Poisson regression in the analysis of the factors that affect mortality. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Physician supply levels vary nearly fourfold or more when comparing the top and bottom deciles of the HCSAs, Medicare admissions for ACS conditions vary about threefold, and admission rates for all causes and mortality rates vary about 1.5-fold. Physician supply levels and distributions have very little influence on ACS admission rates, and even less on the admissions for all causes and on mortality, except in HCSAs with very low physician supply levels (one-fourth the national average or less). However, these HCSAs account for only about 1 percent of the U.S. population. CONCLUSIONS. Physician supply levels and the proportions of specialists and generalists have negligible effects on health status as measured by mortality rates and by rates of admission for all causes and for conditions presumed to be sensitive to the adequacy of ambulatory care. Reductions in admissions for such conditions are not likely to be achieved through broadening of insurance to levels that exist under Medicare, nor through increases in the supply of physicians, nor, conversely, through a reduction in any presumed oversupply of

  6. Low Neonatal Mortality and High Incidence of Infectious Diseases in a Vietnamese Province Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hue T. H.; Cam, Phuong N.; Pedersen, Freddy K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neonatal deaths constitute the majority of child mortality in Vietnam, but studies are scarce and focus on community settings. Methods. During a 12-month period, all sick neonates admitted to a pediatric department in a province hospital were studied. Potential risk factors of death covering sociodemographic factors, pregnancy history, previous neonatal period, and status on admission were registered. The neonates were followed up until discharge or death or until 28 completed days of age if still hospitalized or until withdrawal of life support. The main outcome was neonatal death. Results. The neonatal mortality was 4.6% (50/1094). In a multivariate analysis, four associated risk factors of death were extremely low birth weight (OR = 22.9 (2.3–233.4)), no cry at birth (OR = 3.5 (1.3–9.4)), and cyanosis (OR = 3.3 (1.2–8.7)) and shock (OR = 12.3 (2.5–61.5)) on admission. The major discharge diagnoses were infection, prematurity, congenital malformations, and asphyxia in 88.5% (936/1058), 21.3% (225/1058), 5.0% (53/1058), and 4.6% (49/1058), respectively. In 36, a discharge diagnosis was not registered. Conclusion. Infection was the main cause of neonatal morbidity. Asphyxia and congenital malformations were diagnosed less frequently. The neonatal mortality was 4.6%. No sociodemographic factors were associated with death. Extreme low birth weight, no cry at birth, and cyanosis or shock at admission were associated with death. PMID:27597956

  7. Low Neonatal Mortality and High Incidence of Infectious Diseases in a Vietnamese Province Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ho, Binh T T; Kruse, Alexandra Y; Le, Hue T H; Cam, Phuong N; Pedersen, Freddy K

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neonatal deaths constitute the majority of child mortality in Vietnam, but studies are scarce and focus on community settings. Methods. During a 12-month period, all sick neonates admitted to a pediatric department in a province hospital were studied. Potential risk factors of death covering sociodemographic factors, pregnancy history, previous neonatal period, and status on admission were registered. The neonates were followed up until discharge or death or until 28 completed days of age if still hospitalized or until withdrawal of life support. The main outcome was neonatal death. Results. The neonatal mortality was 4.6% (50/1094). In a multivariate analysis, four associated risk factors of death were extremely low birth weight (OR = 22.9 (2.3-233.4)), no cry at birth (OR = 3.5 (1.3-9.4)), and cyanosis (OR = 3.3 (1.2-8.7)) and shock (OR = 12.3 (2.5-61.5)) on admission. The major discharge diagnoses were infection, prematurity, congenital malformations, and asphyxia in 88.5% (936/1058), 21.3% (225/1058), 5.0% (53/1058), and 4.6% (49/1058), respectively. In 36, a discharge diagnosis was not registered. Conclusion. Infection was the main cause of neonatal morbidity. Asphyxia and congenital malformations were diagnosed less frequently. The neonatal mortality was 4.6%. No sociodemographic factors were associated with death. Extreme low birth weight, no cry at birth, and cyanosis or shock at admission were associated with death. PMID:27597956

  8. In-hospital mortality following lung cancer resection: nationwide administrative database.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Pierre-Benoit; Cottenet, Jonathan; Mariet, Anne-Sophie; Bernard, Alain; Quantin, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to determine the effect of a national strategy for quality improvement in cancer management (the "Plan Cancer") according to time period and to assess the influence of type and volume of hospital activity on in-hospital mortality (IHM) within a large national cohort of patients operated on for lung cancer.From January 2005 to December 2013, 76 235 patients were included in the French Administrative Database. Patient characteristics, hospital volume of activity and hospital type were analysed over three periods: 2005-2007, 2008-2010 and 2011-2013.Global crude IHM was 3.9%: 4.3% during 2005-2007, 4% during 2008-2010 and 3.5% during 2011-2013 (p<0.01). 296, 259 and 209 centres performed pulmonary resections in 2005-2007, 2008-2010 and 2011-2013, respectively (p<0.01). The risk of death was higher in centres performing <13 resections per year than in centres performing >43 resections per year (adjusted (a)OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.197-1.834). The risk of death was lower in the period 2011-2013 than in the period 2008-2010 (aOR 0.841, 95% CI 0.764-0.926). Adjustment variables (age, sex, Charlson score and type of resection) were significantly linked to IHM, whereas the type of hospital was not.The French national strategy for quality improvement seems to have induced a significant decrease in IHM. PMID:26965293

  9. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income. PMID:26652043

  10. Developing a simple preinterventional score to predict hospital mortality in adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Meng-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Chi; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-07-01

    Despite gaining popularity, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) remains a controversial therapy for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adult patients due to its equivocal survival benefits. The study was aimed at identifying the preinterventional prognostic predictors of hospital mortality in adult VV-ECMO patients and developing a practical mortality prediction score to facilitate clinical decision-making.This retrospective study included 116 adult patients who received VV-ECMO for severe ARF in a tertiary referral center, from 2007 to 2015. The definition of severe ARF was PaO2/ FiO2 ratio < 70 mm Hg under advanced mechanical ventilation (MV). Preinterventional variables including demographic characteristics, ventilatory parameters, and severity of organ dysfunction were collected for analysis. The prognostic predictors of hospital mortality were generated with multivariate logistic regression and transformed into a scoring system. The discriminative power on hospital mortality of the scoring system was presented as the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC).The overall hospital mortality rate was 47% (n = 54). Pre-ECMO MV day > 4 (OR: 4.71; 95% CI: 1.98-11.23; P < 0.001), pre-ECMO sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score >9 (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.36-7.36; P = 0.01), and immunocompromised status (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.07-7.89; P = 0.04) were independent predictors of hospital mortality of adult VV-ECMO. A mortality prediction score comprising of the 3 binary predictors was developed and named VV-ECMO mortality score. The total score was estimated as follows: VV-ECMO mortality score = 2 × (Pre-ECMO MV day > 4) + 1 × (Pre-ECMO SOFA score >9) + 1 × (immunocompromised status). The AUROC of VV-ECMO mortality score was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67-0.85; P < 0.001). The corresponding hospital mortality rates to VV-ECMO mortality scores were 18% (Score 0), 35% (Score 1), 56% (Score 2), 75% (Score

  11. AST to Platelet Ratio Index Predicts Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With Hepatitis B-Related Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Weilin; Sun, Qinqin; Fan, Jian; Lin, Sha; Ye, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) has originally been considered as a noninvasive marker for detecting hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. APRI has been used for predicting liver-related mortality in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection or alcoholic liver disease. However, whether APRI could be useful for predicting mortality in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unevaluated. This study aims to address this knowledge gap. A total of 193 hospitalized chronic HBV-infected patients (cirrhosis, n = 100; noncirrhosis, n = 93) and 88 healthy subjects were retrospectively enrolled. All patients were followed up for 4 months. Mortality that occurred within 90 days of hospital stay was compared among patients with different APRI. APRI predictive value was evaluated by univariate and multivariate regression embedded in a Cox proportional hazards model. APRI varied significantly in our cohort (range, 0.16–10.00). Elevated APRI was associated with increased severity of liver disease and 3-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that APRI (odds ratio: 1.456, P < 0.001) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.194, P < 0.001) were 2 independent markers for predicting mortality. APRI is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 3-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis. PMID:26945406

  12. Association between hospital case volume and mortality in non-elderly pneumonia patients stratified by severity: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The characteristics and aetiology of pneumonia in the non-elderly population is distinct from that in the elderly population. While a few studies have reported an inverse association between hospital case volume and clinical outcome in elderly pneumonia patients, the evidence is lacking in a younger population. In addition, the relationship between volume and outcome may be different in severe pneumonia cases than in mild cases. In this context, we tested two hypotheses: 1) non-elderly pneumonia patients treated at hospitals with larger case volume have better clinical outcome compared with those treated at lower case volume hospitals; 2) the volume-outcome relationship differs by the severity of the pneumonia. Methods We conducted the study using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. Patients aged 18–64 years discharged from the participating hospitals between July to December 2010 were included. The hospitals were categorized into four groups (very-low, low, medium, high) based on volume quartiles. The association between hospital case volume and in-hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression with generalized estimating equations adjusting for pneumonia severity, patient demographics and comorbidity score, and hospital academic status. We further analyzed the relationship by modified A-DROP pneumonia severity score calculated using the four severity indices: dehydration, low oxygen saturation, orientation disturbance, and decreased systolic blood pressure. Results We identified 8,293 cases of pneumonia at 896 hospitals across Japan, with 273 in-hospital deaths (3.3%). In the overall population, no significant association between hospital volume and in-hospital mortality was observed. However, when stratified by pneumonia severity score, higher hospital volume was associated with lower in-hospital mortality at the intermediate severity level (modified A-DROP score = 2) (odds ratio (OR) of very low vs

  13. Factors Affecting Length of Hospital Stay and Mortality in Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers Undergoing Surgical Drainage without Major Amputation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gyun; Moon, Sang Young; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Jung, Ki Jin; Lee, Taeseung; Kim, Baek Kyu; Yoon, Chan; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate factors affecting length of hospital stay and mortality of a specific group of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage without major amputation, which is frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons. Data on length of hospital stay, mortality, demographics, and other medical information were collected for 79 consecutive patients (60 men, 19 women; mean age, 66.1 [SD, 12.3] yr) with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage while retaining the heel between October 2003 and May 2013. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors affecting length of hospital stay, while multiple Cox regression analysis was conducted to assess factors contributing to mortality. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, P=0.034), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (P=0.021), body mass index (BMI, P=0.001), and major vascular disease (cerebrovascular accident or coronary artery disease, P=0.004) were significant factors affecting length of hospital stay, whereas age (P=0.005) and serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level (P=0.024) were significant factors contributing to mortality. In conclusion, as prognostic factors, the length of hospital stay was affected by the severity of inflammation, the recent control of blood glucose level, BMI, and major vascular disease, whereas patient mortality was affected by age and renal function in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer undergoing surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment. PMID:26770047

  14. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kakusa, Mwanja; Kamanga, Brown; Ngalamika, Owen; Nyirenda, Soka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality. PMID:27042416

  15. TB as a cause of hospitalization and in-hospital mortality among people living with HIV worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Nathan; Matteelli, Alberto; Shubber, Zara; Hermans, Sabine; Meintjes, Graeme; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Waldrop, Greer; Kranzer, Katharina; Doherty, Meg; Getahun, Haileyesus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite significant progress in improving access to antiretroviral therapy over the past decade, substantial numbers of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in all regions continue to experience severe illness and require hospitalization. We undertook a global review assessing the proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths because of tuberculosis (TB) in PLHIV. Methods Seven databases were searched to identify studies reporting causes of hospitalizations among PLHIV from 1 January 2007 to 31 January 2015 irrespective of age, geographical region or language. The proportion of hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality attributable to TB was estimated using random effects meta-analysis. Results From an initial screen of 9049 records, 66 studies were identified, providing data on 35,845 adults and 2792 children across 42 countries. Overall, 17.7% (95% CI 16.0 to 20.2%) of all adult hospitalizations were because of TB, making it the leading cause of hospitalization overall; the proportion of adult hospitalizations because of TB exceeded 10% in all regions except the European region. Of all paediatric hospitalizations, 10.8% (95% CI 7.6 to 13.9%) were because of TB. There was insufficient data among children for analysis by region. In-hospital mortality attributable to TB was 24.9% (95% CI 19.0 to 30.8%) among adults and 30.1% (95% CI 11.2 to 48.9%) among children. Discussion TB remains a leading cause of hospitalization and in-hospital death among adults and children living with HIV worldwide. PMID:26765347

  16. Living the Good Life? Mortality and Hospital Utilization Patterns in the Old Order Amish

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Braxton D.; Lee, Woei-Jyh; Tolea, Magdalena I.; Shields, Kelsey; Ashktorab, Zahra; Magder, Laurence S.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Pollin, Toni I.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Schäffer, Alejandro A.

    2012-01-01

    Lifespan increases observed in the United States and elsewhere throughout the developed world, have been attributed in part to improvements in medical care access and technology and to healthier lifestyles. To differentiate the relative contributions of these two factors, we have compared lifespan in the Old Order Amish (OOA), a population with historically low use of medical care, with that of Caucasian participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), focusing on individuals who have reached at least age 30 years. Analyses were based on 2,108 OOA individuals from the Lancaster County, PA community born between 1890 and 1921 and 5,079 FHS participants born approximately the same time. Vital status was ascertained on 96.9% of the OOA cohort through 2011 and through systematic follow-up of the FHS cohort. The lifespan part of the study included an enlargement of the Anabaptist Genealogy Database to 539,822 individuals, which will be of use in other studies of the Amish. Mortality comparisons revealed that OOA men experienced better longevity (p<0.001) and OOA women comparable longevity than their FHS counterparts. We further documented all OOA hospital discharges in Lancaster County, PA during 2002–2004 and compared OOA discharge rates to Caucasian national rates obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Survey for the same time period. Both OOA men and women experienced markedly lower rates of hospital discharges than their non-Amish counterparts, despite the increased lifespan. We speculate that lifestyle factors may predispose the OOA to greater longevity and perhaps to lesser hospital use. Identifying these factors, which might include behaviors such as lesser tobacco use, greater physical activity, and/or enhanced community assimilation, and assessing their transferability to non-Amish communities may produce significant gains to the public health. PMID:23284714

  17. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  18. Decline in Child Hospitalization and Mortality After the Introduction of the 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugative Vaccine in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Rurangwa, Janvier; Rujeni, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Pneumonia is a public health problem in the tropics, and the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugative vaccine (PCV-7) has been introduced in an effort to prevent the disease and therefore reduce childhood mortality. In Rwanda, PCV-7 was introduced in 2009, and we aimed to determine its impact on the rate of child hospitalization/mortality due to pneumonia. A retrospective survey was conducted on hospitalization rates and pediatric deaths between two periods, that is, before the introduction of PCV-7 (2007-2009) and after the introduction of PCV-7 (2010-2013) in Kabutare District Hospital. There was a 53% reduction in hospitalization, with a significant decline in in-hospital deaths between the two periods. There was also a significant correlation between vaccination coverage and decline in hospitalization rates between 2009 and 2013. We conclude that PCV-7 vaccine is associated with significant reduction in the rate of child hospitalization and mortality but more mechanistic studies are warranted to determine the immunological impact, especially in the context of coinfections and malnutrition. PMID:27430538

  19. 78 FR 65695 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Technical Processing Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    .... ACTION: Correction, notice. SUMMARY: On October 25, 2013 at 78 FR 64146 HUD published a 30 day notice of... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Technical Processing Requirements..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  20. 17 CFR 41.12 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 41.12 Section 41.12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION SECURITY FUTURES PRODUCTS Narrow-Based Security Indexes § 41.12 Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of sale...

  1. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Delivery of merchandise. Within the 30-day period set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, the importer... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry... days after entry. Allowance in duties for merchandise abandoned to the Government in accordance...

  2. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Delivery of merchandise. Within the 30-day period set forth in paragraph (b) of this section, the importer... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry... days after entry. Allowance in duties for merchandise abandoned to the Government in accordance...

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodynamic Instability, and Endoscopic High-Risk Appearance Are Associated with 30-Day Rebleeding in Patients with Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Hah, Yu Jin; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2013-01-01

    The results of studies that evaluated predictive factors for rebleeding in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding in these patients. A consecutive 312 patients presenting symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. Clinical and demographic characteristics and endoscopic findings were evaluated for potential factors associated with 30-day rebleeding using logistic regression analysis. Overall, 176 patients were included (male, 80.1%; mean age, 59.7±16.0 yr). Rebleeding within 7 and 30 days occurred in 21 (11.9%) and 27 (15.3%) patients, respectively. We found that chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR, 10.29; 95% CI, 2.84-37.33; P<0.001), tachycardia (pulse>100 beats/min) during the admission (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.25-11.49; P=0.019), and Forrest classes I, IIa, and IIb (OR, 6.14; 95% CI, 1.36-27.66; P=0.018) were significant independent predictive factors for 30-day rebleeding. However, neither Rockall nor Blatchford scores showed statistically significant relationships with 30-day rebleeding in a multivariate analysis. CKD, hemodynamic instability during hospitalization, and an endoscopic high-risk appearance are significantly independent predictors of 30-day rebleeding in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. These factors may be useful for clinical management of such patients. PMID:24133356

  4. Predictive score for mortality in patients with COPD exacerbations attending hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about predictors of short-term outcomes in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (eCOPD) attending an emergency department (ED). Such information could help stratify these patients and guide medical decision-making. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical prediction rule for short-term mortality during hospital admission or within a week after the index ED visit. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of patients with eCOPD attending the EDs of 16 participating hospitals. Recruitment started in June 2008 and ended in September 2010. Information on possible predictor variables was recorded during the time the patient was evaluated in the ED, at the time a decision was made to admit the patient to the hospital or discharge home, and during follow-up. Main short-term outcomes were death during hospital admission or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED, as well as at death within 1 month of the index ED visit. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed in a derivation sample and validated in a validation sample. The score was compared with other published prediction rules for patients with stable COPD. Results In total, 2,487 patients were included in the study. Predictors of death during hospital admission, or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED were patient age, baseline dyspnea, previous need for long-term home oxygen therapy or non-invasive mechanical ventilation, altered mental status, and use of inspiratory accessory muscles or paradoxical breathing upon ED arrival (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85). Addition of arterial blood gas parameters (oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures (PO2 and PCO2)) and pH) did not improve the model. The same variables were predictors of death at 1 month (AUC = 0.85). Compared with other commonly used tools for predicting the severity of COPD in stable patients, our rule was significantly better

  5. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Acute Variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Moataz; EL-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; EL-Ghannam, Maged; El Ray, Ahmed; Ali, Abdel Aziz; Taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients remains a serious, unsolved problem, and the risk factors for acute variceal bleeding (AVB) in HCC patients remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the in-hospital mortality (IHM) and factors influencing the clinical outcomes of AVB in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Methods This was a retrospective, non-randomized, clinical study that was conducted in 2014. The study was conducted on 70 patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC presenting by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIH). All patients were examined endoscopically within 24 hours from presentation and bleeding varices accounted for AUGIH. Full medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory and radiologic data were collected from admission charts, and hospital medical records were statistically analyzed with SSPS version 22. Results Thirty-two patients (45.7%) survived and 38 died (54.3%). Survivors are more likely to be Child-Pugh class A or B, and the non-survivors were class C. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was highly predictive of IHM at an optimized cut-off value of ≥ 12.9. Higher esophageal varices grades and presence of active bleeding on index endoscopy were significant (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors compared to survivors. Complications of liver cirrhosis and associated major comorbidity were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors than the survivors. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified higher Grade Esophageal Varices and number of transfused packed red blood cells units as two independent predictors of IHM. Conclusions IHM was particularly high (54.3%) among HCC patients with AVB who had MELD score > 12.9, higher grade Esophageal Varices, active bleeding on index endoscopy, more increased needs for blood transfusion, longer hospital stay, decompensated liver disease with major comorbidity. PMID:26516439

  6. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  7. Comorbid disease and the effect of race and ethnicity on in-hospital mortality from aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, M. Norman; Stukenborg, George J.; Wagner, Douglas P.; Harrell, Frank E.; Kilbridge, Kerry L.; Lyman, Jason A.; Einbinder, Jonathan; Connors, Alfred F.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Racial and ethnic disparities in mortality have been demonstrated in several diseases. African Americans are hospitalized at a significantly higher rate than whites for aspiration pneumonia; however, no studies have investigated racial and ethnic disparities in mortality in this population. OBJECTIVE: To assess the independent effect of race and ethnicity on in-hospital mortality among aspiration pneumonia discharges while comprehensively controlling for comorbid diseases, and to assess whether the prevalence and effects of comorbid illness differed across racial and ethnic categories. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study of 41,581 patients admitted to California hospitals for aspiration pneumonia from 1996 through 1998, using principal and secondary diagnoses present on admission. MEASUREMENT: The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The adjusted odds of in-hospital death for African-American compared with white discharges [odds ratio (OR)=1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-1.11] was not significantly different. The odds of death for Asian compared with white discharges was significantly lower (OR=0.83; 95% CI, 0.75-0.91). Hispanics had a significantly lower odds of death (OR=0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.988) compared to non-Hispanics. Comorbid diseases were more prevalent among African Americans and Asians than whites, and among Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics. Differences in effects of comorbid disease on mortality risk by race and ethnicity were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Asians have a lower risk of death, and the risk of death for African Americans is not significantly different from whites in this analysis of aspiration pneumonia discharges. Hispanics have a lower risk of death than non-Hispanics. While there are differences in prevalence of comorbid disease by racial and ethnic category, the effects of comorbid disease on mortality risk do not differ meaningfully by race or

  8. Comparison of acid-base models for prediction of hospital mortality after trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Lewis J; Kellum, John A

    2008-06-01

    This study determines whether mortality after major trauma is predicted by the strong ion gap (SIG) and whether recent refinements in the calculation of SIG improve its predictive value. The design was an observational, retrospective review of trauma patients admitted on a single service at a level 1 facility. The setting was an urban level 1 trauma facility. An unselected cohort of patients sustaining blunt and/or penetrating injury requiring intensive care unit care was chosen. There were no interventions. Age, injury mechanism, survival, arterial blood gases, hemoglobin, albumin, electrolytes, lactate, standard base deficit, strong ion difference (SID), buffer base, and SIG were analyzed. Patients were grouped into survivors and nonsurvivors according to in-hospital survival truncated to 28 days. Multivariate logistic regression was used for further analysis of univariate predictors of mortality, and receiver-operator characteristic curves were generated for mortality. Both nonsurvivors (n = 26) and survivors (n = 52) were similar with respect to age (31.9 +/- 11.5 vs. 33.5 +/- 11.6 years) and injury mechanism (blunt 61% vs. 58%) Nonsurvivors were more likely to have multicavity injury (54% vs. 26%; P < 0.01) than survivors. Nonsurvivor and survivor pH (7.36 +/- 0.15 vs. 7.38 +/- 0.09), HCO3(-) (20.4 +/- 3.9 vs. 21.7 +/- 2.5 mEq/L; P = 0.11), albumin (3.6 +/- 0.7 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.5 gm/dL), lactate (2.9 +/- 2.5 vs. 2.3 +/- 1.3 mmol/L; P = 0.24), and phosphate (3.1 +/- 0.9 vs. 3.4 +/- 0.8 mEq/L; P = 0.26) were similar. Forty-two percent of nonsurvivors had normal lactate levels, whereas 33% of survivors had lactic acidosis. However, the apparent SID (41.0 +/- 4.2 vs. 36.7 +/- 5.5 mEq/L; P < 0.001), effective SID (32.7 +/- 4.2 vs. 35.4 +/- 4.9 mEq/L; P = 0.019), and SIG (8.3 +/- 4.4 vs. 1.3 +/- 3.6 mEq/L; P < 0.001) were all significantly different between nonsurvivors and survivors. Only one (2%) survivor had an SIG greater than 5 mEq/L, and only two (7

  9. Effect of outpatient therapy with inhaled corticosteroids on decreasing in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Hasegawa, Wakae; Sakamoto, Yukiyo; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Jo, Taisuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators (IBD) are beneficial for the management of COPD. Although ICS has been reported to increase the risk of pneumonia in patients with COPD, it remains controversial whether it influences mortality. Using a Japanese national database, we examined the association between preadmission ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD. Methods We retrospectively collected data from 1,165 hospitals in Japan on patients with COPD who received outpatient inhalation therapy and were admitted with pneumonia. Patients were categorized into those who received ICS with IBD and those who received IBD alone. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between outpatient ICS therapy and in-hospital mortality, adjusting for the patients’ backgrounds. Results Of the 7,033 eligible patients, the IBD alone group (n=3,331) was more likely to be older, have lower body mass index, poorer general conditions, and more severe pneumonia than the ICS with IBD group (n=3,702). In-hospital mortality was 13.2% and 8.1% in the IBD alone and the ICS with IBD groups, respectively. After adjustment for patients’ backgrounds, the ICS with IBD group had significantly lower mortality than the IBD alone group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.68–0.94). Higher mortality was associated with older age, being male, lower body mass index, poorer general status, and more severe pneumonia. Conclusion Outpatient inhaled ICS and IBD therapy was significantly associated with lower mortality from pneumonia in patients with COPD than treatment with IBD alone. PMID:27382276

  10. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD).Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk.Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007).In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  11. In Hospital and 3-Month Mortality and Functional Recovery Rate in Patients Treated for Hip Fracture by a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Rostagno, Carlo; Buzzi, Roberto; Campanacci, Domenico; Boccacini, Alberto; Cartei, Alessandro; Virgili, Gianni; Belardinelli, Andrea; Matarrese, Daniela; Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Gusinu, Roberto; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medical comorbidities affect outcome in elderly patients with hip fracture. This study was designed to preliminarily evaluate the usefulness of a hip-fracture unit led by an internal medicine specialist. Methods In-hospital and 3-month outcomes in patients with hip fracture were prospectively evaluated in 121 consecutive patients assessed before and followed after surgery by a multidisciplinary team led by internal medicine specialist; 337 consecutive patients were recalled from ICD-9 discharge records and considered for comparison regarding in-hospital mortality. Results In the intervention period, patients treated within 48 hours were 54% vs. 26% in the historical cohort (P<0.0001). In-hospital mortality remained stable at about 2.3 per 1000 person-days. At 3 months, 10.3% of discharged patients had died, though less than 8% of patients developed postoperative complications (mainly pneumonia and respiratory failure). The presence of more than 2 major comorbidities and the loss of 3 or more BADL were independent predictors of death. 50/105 patients recovered previous functional capacity, but no independent predictor of functional recovery could be identified. Mean length of hospital stay significantly decreased in comparison to the historical cohort (13.6± 4.7 vs 17 ± 5 days, p = 0.0001). Combined end-point of mortality and length of hospitalization < 12 days was significantly lower in study period (27 vs 34%, p <0.0132). Conclusions Identification and stabilization of concomitant clinical problems by internal medicine specialists may safely decrease time to surgery in frail subjects with hip fracture. Moreover, integrated perioperative clinical management may shorten hospital stay with no apparent increase in in-hospital mortality and ultimately improve the outcome. These results are to be confirmed by a larger study presently ongoing at our institution. PMID:27389193

  12. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD). Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk. Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28–2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007). In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  13. Prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers with ST elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kiatchoosakun, Songsak; Wongwipaporn, Chaiyasith; Pussadhamma, Burabha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in all comers and unselected patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have not been well established. Objective To identify the predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI in a tertiary heart centre. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, all patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI were retrospectively included in this study. Baseline characteristics and angiographic data were reviewed and recorded. The study endpoint was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of the 541 patients included in the study, 63 (11.6%) died during hospitalisation. Cardiogenic shock at admission was recorded in 301 patients (55.6%) and 424 patients (78%) had multivessel disease. Median door-to-device time was 65 min. After adjustment for baseline variables, the factors associated with in-hospital mortality included age >60 years (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.17 to 7.05; p=0.01), left ventricular ejection fraction <40% (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.20 to 5.36; p=0.02), and final TIMI flow grade 0/1 (OR 20.55, 95% CI 3.49 to 120.94; p=0.001). Conclusions Age, left ventricular function and final TIMI flow are significant predictors of adverse outcomes in unselected patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. PMID:27347008

  14. Out-of-Hospital Mortality among Patients Receiving Methadone for Non-Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wayne A.; Chung, Cecilia P.; Murray, Katherine T.; Cooper, William O.; Hall, Kathi; Stein, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Importance Growing methadone use in pain management has raised concerns regarding its safety relative to other long-acting opioids. Methadone may increase risk for both lethal respiratory depression related to accidental overdose and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Objective To compare risk of out-of-hospital death in users of methadone for non-cancer pain to that for comparable users of sustained-release (SR) morphine. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tennessee Medicaid, 1997 through 2009. Participants Cohort included current users of morphine SR or methadone 30–74 years of age without cancer or other life-threatening illness and not in a hospital or nursing home. At cohort entry, 32,742 and 6,014 had filled a prescription for morphine SR or methadone, respectively. The median age was 48 years, 58% were female, and comparable proportions had received cardiovascular, psychotropic, and other musculoskeletal medications. Nearly 90% of patients received the opioid for either back or other musculoskeletal pain. The median daily doses prescribed for morphine SR and methadone were 90mg and 40mg, respectively. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary study endpoint was out-of-hospital mortality, given that opioid-related deaths typically occur outside the hospital. Results There were 477 deaths during 28,699 person years of followup, or 166 deaths per 10,000 person-years. After control for study covariates, current methadone users had a 46% increased risk of death during followup, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.46 (95% confidence interval 1.17–1.83, p = .0008), resulting in 72 (27–130) excess deaths per 10,000 person-years. Methadone users of doses ≤20mg/day, the lowest dose quartile, had increased risk (HR =1.59 [1.01–2.51], p = .0461) relative to a comparable dose of morphine SR (<60mg/day). Conclusions and Relevance The increased risk of death observed for users of methadone, even for low doses, supports recommendations that it

  15. Lower mortality rates at cardiac specialty hospitals traceable to healthier patients and to doctors' performing more procedures.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Liam; Hartz, Arthur J

    2012-04-01

    Physician-owned cardiac specialty hospitals advertise that they have outstanding physicians and results. To test this assertion, we examined who gets referred to these hospitals, as well as whether different results occur when specialty physicians split their caseloads among specialty and general hospitals in the same markets. Using data on 210,135 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary interventions in Texas during 2004-07, we found that the risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality rate for patients treated at specialty hospitals was significantly below the rate for all hospitals in the state (0.68 percent versus 1.50 percent). However, the rate was significantly higher when physicians who owned cardiac specialty hospitals treated patients in general hospitals (2.27 percent versus 1.50 percent). In addition, several patient characteristics were associated with a lower likelihood of being admitted to a cardiac hospital for cardiac care, such as being African American or Hispanic and having Medicaid or no health insurance. After adjustment for patient severity and number of procedures performed, the overall outcomes for cardiologists who owned specialty hospitals were not significantly different from the "average outcomes" obtained at noncardiac hospitals. In contrast to previous studies, patient outcomes were found to be highly dependent on the type of hospital where the procedure was performed. To remove a potential source of bias and achieve a more balanced comparison, the quality statistics reported by physician-owned cardiac hospitals should be adjusted to incorporate the high rates of poor outcomes for the many procedures done by their cardiologists at nearby noncardiac hospitals. PMID:22492898

  16. Decreased mortality in patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases after installation of an intensive care unit in a secondary hospital in the interior of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Luciano Passamani; Bahlis, Laura Fuchs; Wajner, André; Waldemar, Fernando Starosta

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between the in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases and the availability of intensive care units. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated a database from a hospital medicine service involving patients hospitalized due to respiratory non-terminal diseases. Data on clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality, such as Charlson score and length of hospital stay, were collected. The following analyses were performed: univariate analysis with simple stratification using the Mantel Haenszel test, chi squared test, Student’s t test, Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression. Results Three hundred thirteen patients were selected, including 98 (31.3%) before installation of the intensive care unit and 215 (68.7%) after installation of the intensive care unit. No significant differences in the clinical and anthropometric characteristics or risk factors were observed between the groups. The mortality rate was 18/95 (18.9%) before the installation of the intensive care unit and 21/206 (10.2%) after the installation of the intensive care unit. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of death after the installation of the intensive care unit decreased by 58% (OR: 0.42; 95%CI 0.205 -0.879; p = 0.021). Conclusion Considering the limitations of the study, the results suggest a benefit, with a decrease of one death per every 11 patients treated for respiratory diseases after the installation of an intensive care unit in our hospital. The results corroborate the benefits of the implementation of intensive care units in secondary hospitals. PMID:26465244

  17. Mortality Trends in Patients Hospitalized with the Initial Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Middle Eastern Country over 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlBinali, Hajar A. H.; Gehani, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the temporal trend in the initial Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) management and outcome during the last two decades in a Middle Eastern country. A total of 10,915 patients were admitted with initial AMI with mean age of 53 ± 11.8 years. Comparing the two decades (1991–2000) to (2001–2010), the use of antiplatelet drugs increased from 84% to 95%, β-blockers increased from 38% to 56%, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) increased from 12% to 36% (P < 0.001 for all). The rates of PCI increased from 2.5% to 14.6% and thrombolytic therapy decreased from 71% to 65% (P < 0.001 for all). While the rate of hospitalization with Initial MI increased from 34% to 66%, and the average length of hospital stay decreased from 6.4 ± 3 to 4.6 ± 3, all hospital outcomes parameters improved significantly including a 39% reduction in in-hospital Mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that higher utilization of antiplatelet drugs, β-blockers, and ACEI were the main contributors to better hospital outcomes. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the hospitalization rate in patients presenting with initial AMI. Evidence-based medical therapies appear to be associated with a substantial improvement in outcome and in-hospital mortality. PMID:24868481

  18. The effect of alternative case-mix adjustments on mortality differences between municipal and voluntary hospitals in New York City.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, M F; Park, R E; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study investigated how mortality differences between groups of municipal versus voluntary hospitals are affected by case-mix adjustment methods. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. We sampled about 10,000 random admissions from administrative data for patients hospitalized with each of six conditions in hospitals in New York City during 1984-1987. STUDY DESIGN. We developed logistic regression models adjusting for age and gender, for principal diagnosis, for "limited other diagnoses" (secondary diagnoses that were very unlikely to result from care received), for "full other diagnoses" (all secondary diagnoses irrespective of whether they might have been due to care received), for previous diagnoses, and for other variables. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. For five of the six conditions, when the limited other diagnoses adjustment was used there was higher mortality in the municipal hospitals (p < .05), with 3.3 additional deaths/100 admissions for myocardial infarction, 1.2 for pneumonia, 8.3 for stroke, 2.8 for head trauma, and 0.8 for hip repair. However, when the full other diagnoses adjustment was used, differences remained significant only for stroke (4.3 additional deaths/100 admissions) and head trauma (1.3) (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS. Estimates of mortality differences between New York City municipal and voluntary hospitals are substantially affected by which secondary diagnoses are used in case-mix adjustment. Judgments of quality should not be based on administrative data unless models can be developed that validly capture level of sickness at admission. PMID:8163382

  19. Maternal mortality -- aetiological factors: analytic study from a teaching hospital of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Sarin, A R; Singla, P; Kaur, H

    1992-01-01

    A review of maternal deaths at Rajendra Hospital, Punjab, from January 1978 to December 1991 yielded important data for the planning of maternal health services in this area of India, During the 14 year study period, there were 33,160 births and 339 deaths, for a maternal mortality rate of 1002/100,000 live births. Women who had received no prenatal care accounted for 47.4% of deliveries but 92.8% of maternal deaths. In addition, a disproportionate number of deaths involved rural women (74.6%) and poor women (76.4%). 57.8% of maternal deaths involved women 21-30 years of age; 37.1% occurred among primigravidas. Direct obstetrical causes were considered the etiologic factor in 83.1% of these deaths. Primary among these causes were sepsis (37.1%), obstetric hemorrhage (26.2%), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (21.4%), and obstructed labor (15.3%). 30.6% of deaths occurred during pregnancy, 50.3% during labor, and 19.1% in the postpartum period. Indirect obstetrical causes, notably severe anemia and anesthesia complications, were implicated in 15.3% of the maternal deaths. Critical analysis of the maternal deaths in this series suggested that 89.6% were totally preventable, 9.6% were probably preventable, and only 0.8% were not avoidable. Factors that would reduce the high rate of maternal mortality in this region include more widespread use of prenatal care, training of traditional birth attendants in asepsis, referral of high-risk pregnancies, and improved transportation in rural areas. PMID:12288813

  20. Morbidity and mortality amongst infants of diabetic mothers admitted into Soba university hospital, Khartoum, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Abdelmoneim E.M.; Berair, Rabih; Gulfan, Islam G.I.; Karrar, Mohamed Z.; Mohammed, Zuhlel A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes during pregnancy is increasing and this is associated with an increased risk of complications in both mother and fetus. The aim of this research is to study the neonatal complications of maternal diabetes. This was a prospective observational study that was conducted in Soba university hospital between September 2010 and March 2011. All infants born to diabetic mothers during the study period were admitted to the neonatal care unit for evaluation. Data on sex, gestational age, and birth weight, mode of delivery, complications, investigations, birth injury, and length of hospital stay were recorded. Maternal data were retrieved from records. Data was analyzed using Minitab 15. A total of 50 infants of diabetic mothers (IDMs) were included in the study. Thirty infants (60%) were females and 20 (40%) were males. Forty two (84%) of the neonates were born by caesarian section, only 7(14%) were born by spontaneous vaginal delivery. Birth injury was observed in 4% of them. The mean gestational age was 37.2±2.051 weeks. The median birth weight was 3.5 kg. 14 (28%) of the babies were macrosomic, and 17 (34%) were large for gestational age (LGA). Congenital anomalies were found in 3 (6%), hypoglycemia in 6 (12%), hyperbillirubinaemia in 10 (20%), hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia each occurred in 2%, transient tachypnea of the newborn occurred in 5 (10%) of the neonates and respiratory distress syndrome in 2%. Cardiomyopathy occurred in 2% and mortality was 4%. We concluded that macrosomia, LGA, and hyperbillirubinaemia were the commonest complications in IDMs, maternal glycaemic control was found to have a significant effect on a number of outcomes.

  1. Effect of feeding in 30-day bioaccumulation assays using Hyalella azteca in fluoranthene-dosed sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Current protocols for conducting freshwater sediment bioaccumulation tests require that food be added to exposures. To determine effects of adding food, 30-day bioaccumulation assays were conducted with H. azteca exposed to sediment dosed with four concentrations (0.05 to 1,267 nmol/g dry weight) of fluoranthene. Accumulation was significantly greater in fed versus non-fed animals at all dose levels after 96 and 240 hours of exposure and continued to be greater after 30 days in the low dose levels. At sediment concentrations above 634 nmol/g dw, survival of unfed animals dropped to 34% after 30 days, However, after 30 days, reproduction was observed in fed animals exposed to sediment concentrations > 16 times the expected LC50 calculated for fluoranthene in sediment. These data raise questions concerning the interpretation of standard toxicity and bioaccumulation tests when food is routinely added.

  2. 78 FR 59046 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  3. 78 FR 60886 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; Quantification of Behavioral and Physiological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... best assured of having their full effect if received within 30-days of the date of this publication... different drugs. The primary purpose of the data collected is to determine eligibility in a...

  4. 78 FR 44579 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program.... A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot.... Description of the need for the information and proposed use: The Fellowship Placement Program places...

  5. 77 FR 50157 - Agency Information Collection Activities: 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Agency Information Collection Activities: 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for Public Comment AGENCY: National Park...

  6. 78 FR 36562 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Home Equity Conversion Mortgage... Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) Insurance... Mortgage Information Technology (HERMIT) System is HUD's system of record for the HECM program and...

  7. 78 FR 36561 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal... Information Collection: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory Committee Membership Application. OMB Approval... for the information and proposed use: The Housing Counseling Federal Advisory Committee (HCFAC)...

  8. 78 FR 39001 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Uniform Physical Standards and Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Uniform Physical Standards and Physical Inspection Requirements AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice... Information Collection: Uniform Physical Standards and Physical Inspection Requirements. OMB Approval...

  9. 78 FR 37834 - Submission for OMB review; 30-Day Comment Request; Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB review; 30-Day Comment Request; Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System Data Access Request SUMMARY: Under the... Collection: Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System Data...

  10. The concentration of hospital care for black veterans in Veterans Affairs hospitals: implications for clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish K; Stone, Roslyn; Lave, Judith; Chen, Huanyu; Klusaritz, Heather; Volpp, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Where minorities receive their care may contribute to disparities in care, yet, the racial concentration of care in the Veterans Health Administration is largely unknown. We sought to better understand which Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals treat Black veterans and whether location of care impacted disparities. We assessed differences in mortality rates between Black and White veterans across 150 VA hospitals for any of six conditions (acute myocardial infarction, hip fracture, stroke, congestive heart failure, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia) between 1996 and 2002. Just 9 out of 150 VA hospitals (6% of all VA hospitals) cared for nearly 30% of Black veterans, and 42 hospitals (28% of all VA hospitals) cared for more than 75% of Black veterans. While our findings show that overall mortality rates were comparable between minority-serving and non-minority-serving hospitals for four conditions, mortality rates were higher in minority-serving hospitals for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and pneumonia. The ratio of mortality rates for Blacks compared with Whites was comparable across all VA hospitals. In contrast to the private sector, there is little variation in the degree of racial disparities in 30-day mortality across VA hospitals, although higher mortality among patients with AMI and pneumonia requires further investigation. PMID:20946426

  11. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(d)-3 Special 30-day rules for... not qualify for, or the payor does not apply, the 90-day grace period described in § 1.6049-5(d)(2)(ii... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special 30-day rules for certain...

  12. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(d)-3 Special 30-day rules for... not qualify for, or the payor does not apply, the 90-day grace period described in § 1.6049-5(d)(2)(ii... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special 30-day rules for certain...

  13. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3406(d)-3 Special 30-day rules for... not qualify for, or the payor does not apply, the 90-day grace period described in § 1.6049-5(d)(2)(ii... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special 30-day rules for certain...

  14. Obesity and Mortality, Length of Stay and Hospital Cost among Patients with Sepsis: A Nationwide Inpatient Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chu-lin; Hwang, Lu-yu; Lai, Dejian; Markham, Christine; Patel, Bela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the association between obesity and all-cause mortality, length of stay and hospital cost among patients with sepsis 20 years of age or older. Materials and Methods It was a retrospective cohort study. The dataset was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2011, the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. Hospitalizations of sepsis patients 20 years of age or older were included. All 25 primary and secondary diagnosis fields were screened to identify patients with sepsis using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Obesity was the exposure of interest. It was one of the 29 standardized Elixhauser comorbidity measures and readily available in the dataset as a dichotomized variable. The outcome measures were all-cause in-hospital death, length of stay and hospital cost. Results After weighting, our sample projected to a population size of 1,763,000, providing an approximation for the number of hospital discharges of all sepsis patients 20 years of age or older in the US in 2011. The overall all-cause mortality rate was 14.8%, the median hospital length of stay was 7 days and the median hospital cost was $15,917. After adjustment, the all-cause mortality was lower (adjusted OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.88); the average hospital length of stay was longer (adjusted difference = 0.65 day; 95% CI = 0.44 to 0.86) and the hospital cost per stay was higher (adjusted difference = $2,927; 95% CI = $1,606 to $4,247) for obese sepsis patients as compared to non-obese ones. Conclusion With this large and nationally representative sample of over 1,000 hospitals in the US, we found that obesity was significantly associated with a 16% decrease in the odds of dying among hospitalized sepsis patients; however it was also associated with greater duration and cost of hospitalization. PMID:27124716

  15. Hip Fractures: What Information Does the Evidence Show That Patients and Families Need to Decrease 30-Day Readmission?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kristin OʼMara

    2015-01-01

    The current bundled payment reimbursement from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will not cover the additional cost of hospital readmission for the same diagnosis, and patients with hip fractures have one of the highest cost-saving opportunities when compared with other admission reasons. Common reasons for readmission to the hospital after hip fracture include pneumonia, dehydration, and mobility issues. The learning modalities including visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic were used to make recommendations on how the education can be incorporated into the instruction of patients with hip fractures and their families. These learning techniques can be used to develop education to decrease possibility of 30-day readmission after hip fracture. Nurses must focus their education to meet the needs of each individual patient, adapting to different types of adult learners to increase the health literacy of patients with hip fractures and their families. PMID:26575502

  16. Depressive symptoms are associated with higher rates of readmission or mortality after medical hospitalization: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Jenelle L; Warkentin, Lindsey M; Majumdar, Sumit R; McAlister, Finlay A

    2016-05-01

    Depressive symptoms during a medical hospitalization may be an overlooked prognostic factor for adverse events postdischarge. Our aim was to evaluate whether depressive symptoms predict 30-day readmission or death after medical hospitalization. We conducted a systematic review of studies that compared postdischarge outcomes by in-hospital depressive status. We assessed study quality and pooled published and unpublished data using random effects models. Overall, one-third of 6104 patients discharged from medical wards were depressed (interquartile range, 27%-40%). Compared to inpatients without depression, those discharged with depressive symptoms were more likely to be readmitted (20.4% vs 13.7%, risk ratio [RR]: 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-2.58) or die (2.8% vs 1.5%, RR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.31-3.44) within 30 days. Depressive symptoms were common in medical inpatients and are associated with an increased risk of adverse events postdischarge. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:373-380. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Hospital Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26824220

  17. Trends and ethnic differences in hospital admissions and mortality for congestive heart failure in the elderly in Singapore, 1991 to 1998

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T P; Niti, M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To describe trends in hospital admissions and mortality from congestive heart failure in the elderly population aged 65 years and over in Singapore, 1991 to 1998. Design: Analysis of trends and population subgroup differences in rates of hospital admission and mortality for a primary diagnosis of congestive heart failure, classified as ICD-9, codes 428, 402.0, 402.11, and 402.91. Setting: The state of Singapore (multiethnic population of three million: Chinese 77%, Malay 14%, Indian 8%). Results: Congestive heart failure accounted for 4.5% of all hospital admissions and 2.5% of overall mortality in this age group. Age adjusted hospital admission rates for congestive heart failure increased by 38% (from 85.4 per 10 000 in 1991 to 110.3 per 10 000 in 1998), while mortality decreased by 20% (from 7.3 per 10 000 in 1991 to 6.1 per 10 000 in 1998). The decline in mortality was greater in women than in men. There were no sex differences in the rates of hospital admission, but there were significant ethnic differences in admissions and mortality. Thus hospital admissions for congestive heart failure were about 35% higher in both Malays and Indians than in Chinese; and mortality was 3.5 times higher in Malays, but was about the same in Indians and Chinese. Over the period studied, mortality from congestive heart failure declined in both Chinese and Indians, but rose in Malays. The increases in hospital admissions were similar in both sexes and all ethnic groups. Conclusions: An increasing rate of hospital admission accompanied by declining mortality from congestive heart failure is occurring in elderly people in this Asian multiethnic population. However, there are pronounced ethnic differences, with both Malays and Indians showing higher hospital admission rates than Chinese, and Malays showing a rising mortality as opposed to the falling mortality in the other ethnic groups. PMID:12860859

  18. Do pre-hospital anaesthesiologists reliably predict mortality using the NACA severity score? A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    RAATINIEMI, L; MIKKELSEN, K; FREDRIKSEN, K; WISBORG, T

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics' (NACA) severity score is widely used in pre-hospital emergency medicine to grade the severity of illness or trauma in patient groups but is scarcely validated. The aim of this study was to assess the score's ability to predict mortality and need for advanced in-hospital interventions in a cohort from one anaesthesiologist-manned helicopter service in Northern Norway. Methods All missions completed by one helicopter service during January 1999 to December 2009 were reviewed. One thousand eight hundred forty-one patients were assessed by the NACA score. Pre-hospital and in-hospital interventions were collected from patient records. The relationship between NACA score and the outcome measures was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results A total of 1533 patients were included in the analysis; uninjured and dead victims were excluded per protocol. Overall mortality rate of the patients with NACA score 1–6 was 5.2%. Trauma patients with NACA score 1–6 had overall mortality rate of 1.9% (12/625) and non-trauma patients 7.4% (67/908). The NACA score's ability to predict mortality was assessed by using ROC area under curve (AUC) and was 0.86 for all, 0.82 for non-trauma and 0.98 for trauma patients. The NACA score's ability to predict a need for respiratory therapy within 24 h revealed an AUC of 0.90 for all patients combined. Conclusion The NACA score had good discrimination for predicting mortality and need for respiratory therapy. It is thus useful as a tool to measure overall severity of the patient population in this kind of emergency medicine system. PMID:24134443

  19. What Is the Best Way to Estimate Hospital Quality Outcomes? A Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Andrew; Burgess, James; Strawderman, Robert; Dimick, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the accuracy of alternative estimators of hospital mortality quality using a Monte Carlo simulation experiment. Data Sources Data are simulated to create an admission-level analytic dataset. The simulated data are validated by comparing distributional parameters (e.g., mean and standard deviation of 30-day mortality rate, hospital sample size) with the same parameters observed in Medicare data for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) inpatient admissions. Study Design We perform a Monte Carlo simulation experiment in which true quality is known to test the accuracy of the Observed-over-Expected estimator, the Risk Standardized Mortality Rate (RSMR), the Dimick and Staiger (DS) estimator, the Hierarchical Poisson estimator, and the Moving Average estimator using hospital 30-day mortality for AMI as the outcome. Estimator accuracy is evaluated for all hospitals and for small, medium, and large hospitals. Data Extraction Methods Data are simulated. Principal Findings Significant and substantial variation is observed in the accuracy of the tested outcome estimators. The DS estimator is the most accurate for all hospitals and for small hospitals using both accuracy criteria (root mean squared error and proportion of hospitals correctly classified into quintiles). Conclusions The mortality estimator currently in use by Medicare for public quality reporting, the RSMR, has been shown to be less accurate than the DS estimator, although the magnitude of the difference is not large. Pending testing and validation of our findings using current hospital data, CMS should reconsider the decision to publicly report mortality rates using the RSMR. PMID:22352894

  20. Roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Glaucia R.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Zornoff, Leonardo A.M.; Paiva, Sergio A.R.; Nogueira, Celia R.; Araujo, Natalia C.; Carmona, Bruno H.M.; Conde, Sandro J.; Minicucci, Marcos F.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in hospital mortality of burn patients. METHODS: In total, 105 consecutive burn injury patients over 18 years in age who were admitted to the Burn Unit of Bauru State Hospital from January to December 2013 were prospectively evaluated. Upon admission, patient demographic information was recorded and a blood sample was taken for biochemical analysis to identify the presence of the Taql(rs731236) and Bsml(rs1544410) polymorphisms. All of the patients were followed over their hospital stay and mortality was recorded. RESULTS: Eighteen of the patients did not sign the informed consent form, and there were technical problems with genotype analysis for 7 of the patients. Thus, 80 patients (mean age, 42.5±16.1 years) were included in the final analysis. In total, 60% of the patients were male, and 16.3% died during the hospital stay. The genotype frequencies for the Taql polymorphism were 51.25% TT, 41.25% TC and 7.50% CC; for the Bsml polymorphism, they were 51.25% GG, 42.50% GA and 6.25% AA. In logistic regression analysis, after adjustments for age, gender and total body surface burn area, there were no associations between the Taql (OR: 1.575; CI95%: 0.148-16.745; p=0.706) or Bsml (OR: 1.309; CI95%: 0.128-13.430; p=0.821) polymorphisms and mortality for the burn patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the Taql and Bsml vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms are not associated with hospital mortality of burn patients.

  1. Deficiency of ADAMTS-13 in pediatric patients with severe sepsis and impact on in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The enzyme involved in regulating the size of vWF (von Willebrand factor) in plasma is ADAMTS-13 (A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type-1 motives). Deficient proteolysis of ULvWF (ultra large von Willebrand factor) due to reduced ADAMTS-13 activity results in disseminated platelet-rich thrombi in the microcirculation characteristic of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Reduced ADAMTS-13 has also been observed in severe sepsis and is associated with poor survival. We conducted this study to detect ADAMTS-13 deficiency and its impact on in-hospital mortality in pediatric patients with severe sepsis. Methods Pediatric patients diagnosed with severe sepsis were recruited for the study. Baseline clinical characteristics were noted. ADAMTS-13 antigen levels were assayed by ELISA. According to ADAMTS-13 levels, patients were grouped as deficient and non-deficient. Comparison was done with regard to some clinical and biological characteristics and in-hospital mortality between the two groups. Results A total of 80 patients were enrolled in the study. The median age of the patients was 3.1 years (Range: 0.1-15 years). ADAMTS-13 deficiency with levels less than 350 ng/dl was found in 65% patients. In patients with ADAMTS-13 deficiency, 75.6% had low platelets of less than 150 × 109/L. In-hospital mortality was 42.3% and 35.7% in ADAMTS-13 deficient and non-deficient group, respectively. Conclusion Majority of the pediatric patients admitted to hospital with severe sepsis exhibit ADAMTS-13 deficiency. ADAMTS-13 deficiency might play a role in sepsis-induced thrombocytopenia. More studies are needed to evaluate the role of ADAMTS-13 deficiency on in-hospital mortality. PMID:23537039

  2. Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury and In-Hospital Mortality in Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Woo; Yu, Mi-yeon; Lee, Hajeong; Ahn, Shin Young; Kim, Sejoong; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most frequent complication in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), few studies have been conducted on the risk factors of AKI. We performed this study to identify the risk factors of AKI associated with in-hospital mortality. Methods Data from 322 adult patients receiving ECMO were analyzed. AKI and its stages were defined according to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classifications. Variables within 24 h before ECMO insertion were collected and analyzed for the associations with AKI and in-hospital mortality. Results Stage 3 AKI was associated with in-hospital mortality, with a hazard ratio (HR) (95% CI) of 2.690 (1.472–4.915) compared to non-AKI (p = 0.001). The simplified acute physiology score 2 (SAPS2) and serum sodium level were also associated with in-hospital mortality, with HRs of 1.02 (1.004–1.035) per 1 score increase (p = 0.01) and 1.042 (1.014–1.070) per 1 mmol/L increase (p = 0.003). The initial pump speed of ECMO was significantly related to in-hospital mortality with a HR of 1.333 (1.020–1.742) per 1,000 rpm increase (p = 0.04). The pump speed was also associated with AKI (p = 0.02) and stage 3 AKI (p = 0.03) with ORs (95% CI) of 2.018 (1.129–3.609) and 1.576 (1.058–2.348), respectively. We also found that the red cell distribution width (RDW) above 14.1% was significantly related to stage 3 AKI. Conclusion The initial pump speed of ECMO was a significant risk factor of in-hospital mortality and AKI in patients receiving ECMO. The RDW was a risk factor of stage 3 AKI. PMID:26469793

  3. The CD14 rs2569190 TT Genotype Is Associated with an Improved 30-Day Survival in Patients with Sepsis: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Ashham; Liese, Benjamin; Steinau, Maximilian; Ghadimi, Michael; Bergmann, Ingo; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Popov, Aron Frederik; Beissbarth, Tim; Bauer, Martin; Hinz, José

    2015-01-01

    According to previous investigations, CD14 is suggested to play a pivotal role in initiating and perpetuating the pro-inflammatory response during sepsis. A functional polymorphism within the CD14 gene, rs2569190, has been shown to impact the pro-inflammatory response upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide, a central mediator of inflammation in sepsis. In this study, we hypothesized that the strong pro-inflammatory response induced by the TT genotype of CD14 rs2569190 may have a beneficial effect on survival (30-day) in patients with sepsis. A total of 417 adult patients with sepsis (and of western European descent) were enrolled into this observational study. Blood samples were collected for rs2569190 genotyping. Patients were followed over the course of their stay in the ICU, and the 30-day mortality risk was recorded as the primary outcome parameter. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were quantified at sepsis onset and throughout the observational period to monitor organ failure as a secondary variable. Moreover, organ support-free days were evaluated as a secondary outcome parameter. TT-homozygous patients were compared to C-allele carriers. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a higher 30-day mortality risk among C-allele carriers compared with T homozygotes (p = 0.0261). To exclude the effect of potential confounders (age, gender, BMI and type of infection) and covariates that varied at baseline with a p-value < 0.2 (e.g., comorbidities), we performed multivariate Cox regression analysis to examine the survival time. The CD14 rs2569190 C allele remained a significant covariate for the 30-day mortality risk in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.08-4.12; p = 0.0282). The 30-day mortality rate among C allele carriers was 23%, whereas the T homozygotes had a mortality rate of 13%. Additionally, an analysis of organ-specific SOFA scores revealed a significantly higher SOFA-Central nervous system score among patients

  4. Comparing clinical outcomes in HIV-infected and uninfected older men hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, LA; Juthani-Mehta, M; Allore, H; Trentalange, M; Tate, J; Rimland, D; Pisani, M; Akgün, KM; Goetz, MB; Butt, AA; Rodriguez-Barradas, M; Duggal, M; Crothers, K; Justice, AC; Quagliarello, VJ

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Outcomes of community–acquired pneumonia (CAP) among HIV-infected older adults are unclear. Methods Associations between HIV infection and three CAP outcomes (30-day mortality, readmission within 30 days post-discharge, and hospital length of stay [LOS]) were examined in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) of male Veterans, age ≥ 50 years, hospitalized for CAP from 10/1/2002 through 08/31/2010. Associations between the VACS Index and CAP outcomes were assessed in multivariable models. Results Among 117 557 Veterans (36 922 HIV-infected and 80 635 uninfected), 1203 met our eligibility criteria. The 30-day mortality rate was 5.3%, the mean LOS was 7.3 days, and 13.2% were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. In unadjusted analyses, there were no significant differences between HIV-infected and uninfected participants regarding the three CAP outcomes (P > 0.2). A higher VACS Index was associated with increased 30-day mortality, readmission, and LOS in both HIV-infected and uninfected groups. Generic organ system components of the VACS Index were associated with adverse CAP outcomes; HIV-specific components were not. Among HIV-infected participants, those not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) had a higher 30-day mortality (HR 2.94 [95% CI 1.51, 5.72]; P = 0.002) and a longer LOS (slope 2.69 days [95% CI 0.65, 4.73]; P = 0.008), after accounting for VACS Index. Readmission was not associated with ART use (OR 1.12 [95% CI 0.62, 2.00] P = 0.714). Conclusion Among HIV-infected and uninfected older adults hospitalized for CAP, organ system components of the VACS Index were associated with adverse CAP outcomes. Among HIV-infected individuals, ART was associated with decreased 30-day mortality and LOS. PMID:25959543

  5. The clinical outcomes and predictive factors for in-hospital mortality in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tsai-Yu; Hung, Chia-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chou, Pai-Chien; Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lo, Yu-Lun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent epidemiologic studies have showed that candidemia is an important nosocomial infection in hospitalized patients. The majority of candidemia patients were non-neutropenic rather than neutropenic status. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome of non-neutropenic patients with candidemia and to measure the contributing factors for mortality. A total of 163 non-neutropenic patients with candidemia during January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively enrolled. The patients’ risk factors for mortality, clinical outcomes, treatment regimens, and Candida species were analyzed. The overall mortality was 54.6%. Candida albicans was the most frequent Candida species (n = 83; 50.9% of patients). Under multivariate analyses, hemodialysis (OR, 4.554; 95% CI, 1.464–14.164) and the use of amphotericin B deoxycholate (OR, 8.709; 95% CI, 1.587–47.805) were independent factors associated with mortality. In contrast, abdominal surgery (OR, 0.360; 95% CI, 0.158–0.816) was associated with a better outcome. The overall mortality is still high in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia. Hemodialysis and use of amphotericin B deoxycholate were independent factors associated with mortality, whereas prior abdominal surgery was associated with a better outcome. PMID:27281087

  6. Using data linkage to generate 30-day crash-fatality adjustment factors for Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Huei; Huang, Wei-Shin; Chang, Kai-Kuo; Jeng, Ming-Chang; Doong, Ji-Liang

    2006-07-01

    Different countries have their own police reporting time standards for counting the number of fatalities in reported crashes. A rapid estimation method (such as adjustment factor) for the comparison is important. The data-linkage technique was used to combine police-reported crash data and vital registration data, in order to generate 30-day fatality adjustment factors for various reporting time standards, which could also shed light on the fatal injury trend over time. The major findings were as follows. Firstly, a conservative 30-day fatality adjustment factor for the first day (or 24 h) would be 1.54 (or 1.35) in an area with a large motorcycle population, like Taiwan. This produced 20-40% higher 30-day fatalities than UK Transport Research Laboratory predicted, and 15-25% higher fatalities than those in Europe/Japan. Secondly, after excluding motorcycle impacts, the Taiwanese factors suggested 8-14% higher fatalities within 30 days than those in Europe/Japan. Third, motorcycle fatalities influenced the overall 30-day fatality trend within 3 days. In the future, both the police under-reporting problem and the motorcycle/overall fatal injury pattern within 3 days after crashing in developing countries like Taiwan merit further investigation. PMID:16430844

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS and other important predictors of maternal mortality in Mulago Hospital Complex Kampala Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Women with severe maternal morbidity are at high risk of dying. Quality and prompt management and sometimes luck have been suggested to reduce on the risk of dying. The objective of the study was to identify the direct and indirect causes of severe maternal morbidity, predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to maternal mortality in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Methods This was a longitudinal follow up study at the Mulago hospital's Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Participants were 499 with severe maternal morbidity admitted in Mulago hospital between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 were identified, recruited and followed up until discharge or death. Potential prognostic factors were HIV status and CD4 cell counts, socio demographic characteristics, medical and gynaecological history, past and present obstetric history and intra- partum and postnatal care. Results Severe pre eclampsia/eclampsia, obstructed labour and ruptured uterus, severe post partum haemorrhage, severe abruptio and placenta praevia, puerperal sepsis, post abortal sepsis and severe anaemia were the causes for the hospitalization of 499 mothers. The mortality incidence rate was 8% (n = 39), maternal mortality ratio of 7815/100,000 live births and the ratio of severe maternal morbidity to mortality was 12.8:1. The independent predictors of maternal mortality were HIV/AIDS (OR 5.1 95% CI 2-12.8), non attendance of antenatal care (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.3-9.2), non use of oxytocics (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.7), lack of essential drugs (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.3) and non availability of blood for transfusion (OR 53.7, 95% CI (15.7-183.9) and delivery of amale baby (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-10.1). Conclusion The predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to mortalitywere: residing far from hospital, low socio economic status, non attendance of antenatal care, poor intrapartum care, and HIV/AIDS. There is need to improve on the referral system, economic

  8. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ≥ 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (≥ 85 years), chronic renal

  9. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Falcão, Felipe José; Alves, Cláudia Maria Rodrigues; Barbosa, Adriano Henrique Pereira; Caixeta, Adriano; Sousa, José Marconi Almeida; Souza, José Augusto Marcondes; Amaral, Amaury; Wilke, Luiz Carlos; Perez, Fátima Cristina A.; Gonçalves, Iran; Stefanini, Edson; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing pharmacoinvasive treatment. METHODS: This was an observational, prospective study that included 398 patients admitted to a tertiary center for percutaneous coronary intervention within 3 to 24 hours after thrombolysis with tenecteplase. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01791764 RESULTS: The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. Compared with patients who survived, patients who died were more likely to be older, have higher rates of diabetes and chronic renal failure, have a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and demonstrate more evidence of heart failure (Killip class III or IV). Patients who died had significantly lower rates of successful thrombolysis (39% vs. 68%; p = 0.005) and final myocardial blush grade 3 (13.0% vs. 61.9%; p<0.0001). Based on the multivariate analysis, the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.09; p = 0.001), left ventricular ejection fraction (odds ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.89-0.97; p = 0.001), and final myocardial blush grade of 0-2 (odds ratio 8.85, 95% CI 1.34-58.57; p = 0.02) were independent predictors of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective study that evaluated patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated by a pharmacoinvasive strategy, the in-hospital mortality rate was 5.8%. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score, left ventricular ejection fraction, and myocardial blush were independent predictors of mortality in this high-risk group of acute coronary syndrome patients. PMID:24473509

  10. Sex differences in hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction in China: findings from a study of 45 852 patients in the COMMIT/CCS-2 study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiping; Jiang, Lixin; Smith, Margaret; Pan, Hongchao; Collins, Rory; Peto, Richard; Chen, Zhengming

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the sex difference in hospital mortality following ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in China. Design Observational study of patients enrolled into a large trial, adjusting for age, presenting characteristics and hospital treatments using logistic regression. Settings 1250 hospitals in China during 1999–2005. Patients 42 683 STEMI patients, including 31 309 men and 11 374 women. Intervention In the original trial, all patients received 162 mg of aspirin plus 75 mg of clopidogrel daily or matching placebo and metoprolol (15 mg intravenous then 200 mg oral daily) or matching placebo. All other aspects of patients' treatments were at the discretion of responsible doctors. Major outcomes Hospital mortality from any cause during the scheduled trial treatment period (ie, up to 4 weeks in hospital). Results Overall, 8% of the patients died in hospital, with the crude hospital mortality being twice as high in women as in men (12.6% vs 6.3%). After adjusting for age, the sex difference in hospital mortality attenuated but remained highly significant (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.43 to 1.66). Further adjustment for other baseline characteristics and for the treatments given in hospital had little effect on the sex difference in hospital mortality (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.62). The difference in hospital mortality was greater at a younger age, with the adjusted ORs being 2.14, 1.70, 1.48 and 1.18, respectively, for ages <55, 55–64, 65–74 and ≥75 years (p=0.0001 for trend). Conclusion Compared with men of the same age, women had approximately a 50% higher mortality following hospital admission for STEMI, with a particularly higher excess risk at age <55 years. PMID:27326005

  11. Early hospital discharge after direct angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, J T; Combs, D T; McLellan, B A; Railsback, L; Haugen, S

    1995-07-01

    To determine the feasibility and safety of early hospital discharge after myocardial infarction, we reviewed a 3-yr experience with direct angioplasty: 204 patients had direct angioplasty with in-hospital mortality of 3.4%. Of these patients, 125 were discharged < 5 days after infarction and 98% of these were available for 30-day follow-up. There was one early death (0.8% mortality), two early readmissions without complications, and three late readmissions. Thus early hospital discharge a mean of 3.4 days after infarction can be achieved in > 60% of patients undergoing direct angioplasty with no significant early complications and excellent 30-day survival (99.2%). PMID:7553817

  12. Registered nurse, healthcare support worker, medical staffing levels and mortality in English hospital trusts: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Ball, Jane; Murrells, Trevor; Jones, Simon; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine associations between mortality and registered nurse (RN) staffing in English hospital trusts taking account of medical and healthcare support worker (HCSW) staffing. Setting Secondary care provided in acute hospital National Health Service (NHS) trusts in England. Participants Two data sets are examined: Administrative data from 137 NHS acute hospital trusts (staffing measured as beds per staff member). A cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses in a subsample of 31 trusts (measured patients per ward nurse). Outcome measure Risk-adjusted mortality rates for adult patients (administrative data). Results For medical admissions, higher mortality was associated with more occupied beds per RN (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.43, p=0.02) and per doctor (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15, p <0.01) employed by the trust whereas, lower HCSW staffing was associated with lower mortality (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.00, p=0.04). In multivariable models the relationship was statistically significant for doctors (RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.15, p=0.02) and HCSWs (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98, p<01) but not RNs (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.38, p=0.17). Trusts with an average of ≤6 patients per RN in medical wards had a 20% lower mortality rate compared to trusts with >10 patients per nurse (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.85, p<0.01). The relationship remained significant in the multivariable model (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.95, p<0.01). Results for surgical wards/admissions followed a similar pattern but with fewer significant results. Conclusions Ward-based RN staffing is significantly associated with reduced mortality for medical patients. There is little evidence for beneficial associations with HCSW staffing. Higher doctor staffing levels is associated with reduced mortality. The estimated association between RN staffing and mortality changes when medical and HCSW staffing is considered and depending on whether ward or trust wide staffing levels are considered. PMID

  13. One-year follow-up of non-institutionalized dependent older adults: mortality, hospitalization, and mobility.

    PubMed

    Sarria Cabrera, Marcos Aparecido; Gomes Dellaroza, Mara Solange; Trelha, Celita Salmaso; Cecilio, Celso Henrique; Souza, Sara Ellias de

    2012-09-01

    Non-institutionalized dependent older adults present high morbidity and mortality, demand care from their families, and consume primary health care resources. To expand knowledge about this group, we conducted a population-based one-year prospective cohort study of 130 non-institutionalized dependent older persons (age 60 and older), stratified according to baseline mobility: independent walking (group A), use of walking aids (group B), and bedridden or confined to a wheelchair (group C). The outcomes analysed were death, hospitalization, and mobility disability. Total mortality was 8.5 per cent (p = .05). Overall hospitalization rate was 34.6 per cent; the main causes were stroke and pneumonia. After one year, there was a decline in the proportion of subjects classified as independent walking (57% vs. 43%; p = .03). We conclude that there was a high rate of mortality and hospitalization in this group of dependent older people, and an increase in disability after a one-year follow-up. PMID:22805052

  14. Reducing variation in hospital admissions from the emergency department for low-mortality conditions may produce savings.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Amber K; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Kocher, Keith E

    2014-09-01

    The emergency department (ED) is now the primary source for hospitalizations in the United States, and admission rates for all causes differ widely between EDs. In this study we used a national sample of ED visits to examine variation in risk-standardized hospital admission rates from EDs and the relationship of this variation to inpatient mortality for the fifteen most commonly admitted medical and surgical conditions. We then estimated the impact of variation on national health expenditures under different utilization scenarios. Risk-standardized admission rates differed substantially across EDs, ranging from 1.03-fold for sepsis to 6.55-fold for chest pain between the twenty-fifth and seventy-fifth percentiles of the visits. Conditions such as chest pain, soft tissue infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and urinary tract infection were low-mortality conditions that showed the greatest variation. This suggests that some of these admissions might not be necessary, thus representing opportunities to improve efficiency and reduce health spending. Our data indicate that there may be sizeable savings to US payers if differences in ED hospitalization practices could be narrowed among a few of these high-variation, low-mortality conditions. PMID:25201672

  15. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome. PMID:27595822

  16. Association of renal insufficiency with in-hospital mortality among Japanese patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Masuda, Yuichiro; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Iguchi, Akihisa; Kimata, Takaya; Uemura, Kazumasa

    2006-09-01

    It is not yet clear whether a difference in in-hospital morality between patients with and without renal insufficiency undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) exists. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if such as association exists in Japan. Data from the Tokai Acute Myocardial Infarction Study II were used. This was a prospective study of all 3274 patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to the 15 participating hospitals from 2001 to 2003. We abstracted the baseline and procedural characteristics as well as in-hospital mortality from detailed chart reviews. Patients were stratified into 2 groups according to the estimated creatinine clearance on admission. The creatinine clearance values were available in 2116, 107 of whom had renal insufficiency. The patients with renal insufficiency were more likely to be older, female, not independent in their daily activities, have lower body mass index and higher heart rate values on admission, lower prevalences of hypercholesterolemia and peptic ulcers, greater prevalences of diabetes, angina, previous heart failure, previous renal failure, previous cerebrovascular disease, aortic aneurysm, worse clinical course such as bleeding, and a multivessel coronary disease. Vasopressors, an intra-aortic balloon pump, and mechanical ventilation were frequently used in the patients with renal insufficiency, while thrombolytics were used less frequently. The patients with renal insufficiency had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than those without. Multivariate analysis identified renal insufficiency as an independent predictor of in-hospital death. The results suggest that renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital death among AMI patients undergoing PCI. PMID:17106145

  17. A systematic review of the outcomes of osteoporotic fracture patients after hospital discharge: morbidity, subsequent fractures, and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nazrun, Ahmad Shuid; Tzar, Mohd Nizam; Mokhtar, Sabarul Afian; Mohamed, Isa Naina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporotic fracture is the main complication of osteoporosis. The current management is to discharge patients as early as possible so they can get back to their daily activities. Once discharged, there are three main issues relating to morbidity, mortality, and risk of a subsequent fracture that need to be addressed and discussed. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to summarize and evaluate the evidence from published literature, to determine the outcome of osteoporotic fracture patients after their hospital discharge. Methods The MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were searched, using the terms “osteoporosis”, “fracture”, “osteoporotic fracture”, “hip fracture”, and “vertebral fracture”. We included only human studies published in English between 2004 and 2014. The reference lists of included studies were thoroughly reviewed in search for other relevant studies. Results A total of 18 studies met the selection criteria. Most were observational and cohort studies. Out of all the studies, five studies looked into the morbidity, six studies looked into the risk of subsequent fractures, and seven studies looked into mortality. Vertebral fracture caused the greatest health burden, but hip fracture patients were the main users of informal care after hospital discharge. There was an increased risk of a subsequent fracture after a primary fracture compared with the control group, a cohort comparison, or the general population. Osteoporotic fractures, especially hip fractures, are associated with higher mortality rate despite the advances in the management of osteoporotic fracture cases. Conclusion There is strong evidence to show that after hospital discharge, osteoporotic fracture patients are faced with higher morbidity, subsequent fractures, and mortality. PMID:25429224

  18. Clinical and Echocardiographic Factors Associated With In-Hospital Mortality in Patients With Infective Endocarditis Affecting the Native Tricuspid Valve.

    PubMed

    Mi, Michael Y; Nelson, Sandra B; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-09-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a highly morbid disease, for which most outcomes data come from patients with left-sided valvular lesions. Echocardiographic findings such as vegetation size and prosthetic valve involvement have been identified as important predictors of mortality in left-sided IE, but predictors of outcomes in right-sided IE are less well characterized. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify clinical and echocardiographic findings predictive of mortality in tricuspid valve (TV) IE. We retrospectively reviewed all echocardiograms showing TV vegetations that were performed at the Massachusetts General Hospital from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2013. We identified 105 patients who had echocardiographic evidence of TV vegetations and a definite clinical diagnosis of IE based on the modified Duke's criteria but did not have intracardiac device-associated vegetations. Of the 105 patients, 88 survived until discharge. Clinical and echocardiographic factors that positively correlated with in-hospital mortality included age (p = 0.002), immunosuppression status (p = 0.016), blood urea nitrogen level (p = 0.029), Candida causative organism (p = 0.025), left ventricular ejection fraction <40% (p = 0.027), right ventricular (RV) systolic dysfunction (p = 0.009), and estimated RV systolic pressure >40 mm Hg (p = 0.040). Of these factors, immunosuppression status, blood urea nitrogen level, and RV systolic dysfunction were independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality. In conclusion, RV systolic dysfunction may serve as an echocardiographic marker to aid clinicians in identifying high-risk patients with right-sided IE for more aggressive therapy. PMID:27392511

  19. 78 FR 66042 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 3 Business Registry Pilot Program...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Office of Management and Budget to extend data collection regarding the status of the health care system... September 2009 HHS has collected data on bed availability, health care system resource needs such as... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office...

  8. 19 CFR 158.42 - Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Abandonment by importer within 30 days after entry. 158.42 Section 158.42 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RELIEF FROM DUTIES ON MERCHANDISE LOST, DAMAGED, ABANDONED, OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned,...

  9. 78 FR 79474 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Father's Day

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  10. 78 FR 24220 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Women's Health Initiative Observational Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Next of kin 936 1 .6/60 92 Physician/Office Staff 17 1 5/60 1 * Annual burden is placed on health care... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request:...

  11. 17 CFR 41.12 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 41.12 Section 41.12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION SECURITY FUTURES PRODUCTS Narrow-Based Security Indexes § 41.12 Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for...

  12. 75 FR 67976 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... requirements of Section 512 of the Recovery Act, set forth by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  13. 78 FR 19496 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... of eHealth/ mHealth tobacco cessation intervention programs. SmokefreeTXT has been developed (and is... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request;...

  14. 78 FR 40314 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fair Housing Initiatives Program Grant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fair Housing Initiatives Program Grant AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD has...

  15. 77 FR 62595 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study ACTION: Notice of request... Department of State has submitted the information collection described below to the Office of Management and... is to allow 30 days for public comment. DATES: Submit comments directly to the Office of...

  16. 78 FR 46359 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards Payee Verification and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  17. 78 FR 64146 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Technical Processing Requirements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  18. Enhanced recovery of Phytophthora ramorum from soil following 30 days storage at 4C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlamydospores of Phytophthora ramorum produced by mixing 20 percent V8 juice broth cultures with sand and incubating over a 30 day period were used to infest field soil at densities ranging from 0.2 to 42 chlamydospores per cubic centimeter of soil. Chlamydospore recovery was determined by baiting...

  19. 78 FR 36564 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Default Status Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Default Status Report..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard... Report. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0041. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved...

  20. 78 FR 39305 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: OSHC Progress Report Template

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: OSHC Progress Report Template AGENCY... Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard at Colette.Pollard... Information Collection Title of Information Collection: OSHC Progress Report Template. OMB Approval...

  1. 78 FR 1916 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Smart Traveler Enrollment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ...The Department of State has submitted the information collection described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 we are requesting comments on this collection from all interested individuals and organizations. The purpose of this Notice is to allow 30 days for public...

  2. 77 FR 37706 - Agency Information Collection Activities: 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Agency Information Collection Activities: 30-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for Public Comment AGENCY: National Park Service,...

  3. 76 FR 78012 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  4. 78 FR 76187 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ...The Department of State has submitted the information collection described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 we are requesting comments on this collection from all interested individuals and organizations. The purpose of this Notice is to allow 30 days for public...

  5. 78 FR 7436 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... in the Federal Register (77 FR 69865) on November 21, 2012, and allowed 60 days for public comment... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information...

  6. 75 FR 48970 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment... Human Services, is publishing the following summary of a proposed collection for public...

  7. 75 FR 48969 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30 Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  8. 76 FR 10364 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human...

  9. 76 FR 10035 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human...

  10. 76 FR 10034 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request, Grants.gov AGENCY... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human...

  11. 75 FR 45120 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  12. 26 CFR 31.3406(d)-3 - Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special 30-day rules for certain reportable payments. 31.3406(d)-3 Section 31.3406(d)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection...

  13. 78 FR 36560 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal...: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th... Title of Information Collection: FHA Lender Approval, Annual Renewal, Periodic Updates and...

  14. 78 FR 36563 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Single Family Premium Collection Subsystem...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Single Family Premium Collection... to the proposal by name and/or OMB Control Number and should be sent to: HUD Desk Officer, Office of... access this number through TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. This...

  15. 75 FR 63478 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. In compliance with the requirement of section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary...

  16. 78 FR 60293 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request; Application for the Postdoctoral Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request...)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the information...

  17. 78 FR 47335 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 811 Project Rental Assistance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ...HUD has submitted the proposed information collection requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. The purpose of this notice is to allow for an additional 30 days of public...

  18. 75 FR 27346 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. In compliance with the requirement of section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary...

  19. 76 FR 59701 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30 Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30 Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. In compliance with the requirement of section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary...

  20. NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF 30 DAY CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO TOLUENE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-Evans hooded rats were exposed to 1000 ppm toluene or 0 ppm toluene 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 30 days. Following removal from the exposure conditions (18-26 hr) flash-evoked potentials were recorded to paired light flashes and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure properties were ...

  1. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American... Title of Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian... American and Alaskan Native populations, most notably through the Indian Housing Block Grant. The level...

  2. 78 FR 75365 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American... Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Housing Needs. OMB Approval... the United States. HUD provides funding though several programs to Native American and Alaskan...

  3. 78 FR 69103 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Quality Control for Rental Assistance Subsidy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Quality Control for Rental..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW... equipment, which are being used in part because they reduce interview times. The software also provides...

  4. 76 FR 67454 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is... numbered 4.C and titled ] ``Previous Grants.gov Tracking Number''; (2) Modification of an existing...

  5. 76 FR 40913 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... respondent (in hours) hours Survey Human Resource Manager 3,000 1 30/60 1,500 Focus Group Protocol Employees in All 48 1 1.5 72 Occupations Key Informant Interview Script...... Human Resource Manager 20 1 45/60... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office...

  6. 78 FR 49280 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation Facsimile Transmittal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation Facsimile..., 2013. A. Overview of Information Collection Title of Information Collection: Third-Party Documentation... of the need for the information and proposed use: The use of the Third-Party Documentation...

  7. Heart failure performance measures: do they have an impact on 30-day readmission rates?

    PubMed

    Mazimba, Sula; Grant, Nakash; Parikh, Analkumar; Mwandia, George; Makola, Diklar; Chilomo, Christine; Redko, Cristina; Hahn, Harvey S

    2013-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) accounts for more health care costs than any other diagnosis. Readmissions contribute to this expenditure. The authors evaluated the relationship between adherence to performance metrics and 30-day readmissions. This was a retrospective study of 6063 patients with CHF between 2001 and 2008. Data were collected for 30-day readmissions and compliance with CHF performance measures at discharge. Rates of readmission for CHF increased from 16.8% in 2002 to 24.8% in 2008. Adherence to performance measures increased concurrently from 95.8% to 99.9%. Except for left ventricular function (LVF) assessment, the 30-day readmission rate was not associated with adherence to performance measures. Readmitted patients had twice the odds of not having their LVF assessed (odds ratio = 2.0; P < .00005; 95% confidence interval = 1.45-2.63). CHF performance measures, except for the LVF assessment, have little relationship to 30-day readmissions. Further studies are needed to identify performance measures that correlate with quality of care. PMID:23110998

  8. 78 FR 38070 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing... Marketing (AFHM) Plan. OMB Approval Number: 2529-0013. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved collection. Form Number: HUD-935.2A Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan (Multifamily),...

  9. 78 FR 52008 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Housing Service Coordinator Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Multifamily Housing Service..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  10. 75 FR 48968 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30 Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is... is a biennial survey of the blood collection and utilization community to produce reliable...

  11. 75 FR 66101 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is..., OMB number, and OS document identifier, to Sherette.funncoleman@hhs.gov , or call the Reports... collections within 30 days of this notice directly to the OS OMB Desk Officer; faxed to OMB at...

  12. 75 FR 13288 - Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request; 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is... conduct a nationwide survey which will use computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) to interview...

  13. 78 FR 38064 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day comment request: NLM PEOPLE LOCATOR® System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB review; 30-day comment request: NLM... comment. The National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health, may not conduct or sponsor... instruments or request more information on the proposed project contact: David Sharlip, NLM Project...

  14. 76 FR 71036 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services,...

  15. 76 FR 33761 - Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency Information Collection Request. 30-Day Public Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services, is... research leverages best practices in behavior change, interaction design, and service innovation...

  16. 78 FR 52781 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Disclosure of Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Disclosure of Adjustable Rate... or speech impairments may access this number through TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Relay... Collection: Disclosure of Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) Rates. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0322. Type...

  17. 78 FR 52006 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Final Endorsement of Credit Instrument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Final Endorsement of Credit..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette...

  18. 78 FR 52007 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Management Certification and Management Entity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Management Certification and... Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW., Washington,...

  19. Initial antifungal strategy does not correlate with mortality in patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Murri, R; Scoppettuolo, G; Ventura, G; Fabbiani, M; Giovannenze, F; Taccari, F; Milozzi, E; Posteraro, B; Sanguinetti, M; Cauda, R; Fantoni, M

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of Candida bloodstream infections (BSIs) has increased over time, especially in medical wards. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of different antifungal treatment strategies on 30-day mortality in patients with Candida BSI not admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) at disease onset. This prospective, monocentric, cohort study was conducted at an 1100-bed university hospital in Rome, Italy, where an infectious disease consultation team was implemented. All cases of Candida BSIs observed in adult patients from November 2012 to April 2014 were included. Patients were grouped according to the initial antifungal strategy: fluconazole, echinocandin, or liposomal amphotericin B. Cox regression analysis was used to identify risk factors significantly associated with 15-day and 30-day mortality. During the study period, 130 patients with candidemia were observed (58 % with C. albicans, 7 % with C. glabrata, and 23 % with C. parapsilosis). The first antifungal drug was fluconazole for 40 % of patients, echinocandin for 57.0 %, and liposomal amphotericin B for 4 %. During follow-up, 33 % of patients died. The cumulative mortality 30 days after the candidemia episode was 30.8 % and was similar among groups. In the Cox regression analysis, clinical presentation was the only independent factor associated with 15-day mortality, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and clinical presentation were the independent factors associated with 30-day mortality. No differences in 15-day and 30-day mortality were observed between patients with and without C. albicans candidemia. In patients with candidemia admitted to medical or surgical wards, clinical severity but not the initial antifungal strategy were significantly correlated with mortality. PMID:26634352

  20. Effectiveness of the clinical pharmacist in reducing mortality in hospitalized cardiac patients: a propensity score-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Xiao-bo; Gu, Zhi-chun; Liu, Xiao-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacist-led medication review services have been assessed in the meta-analyses in hospital. Of the 135 relevant articles located, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria; however, there was no statistically significant difference found between pharmacists’ interventions and usual care for mortality (odds ratio 1.50, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 3.46, P=0.34). These analyses may not have found a statistically significant effect because they did not adequately control the wide variation in the delivery of care and patient selection parameters. Additionally, the investigators did not conduct research on the cases of death specifically and did not identify all possible drug-related problems (DRPs) that could cause or contribute to mortality and then convince physicians to correct. So there will be a condition to use a more precise approach to evaluate the effect of clinical pharmacist interventions on the mortality rates of hospitalized cardiac patients. Objective To evaluate the impact of the clinical pharmacist as a direct patient-care team member on the mortality of all patients admitted to the cardiology unit. Methods A comparative study was conducted in a cardiology unit of a university-affiliated hospital. The clinical pharmacists did not perform any intervention associated with improper use of medications during Phase I (preintervention) and consulted with the physicians to address the DRPs during Phase II (postintervention). The two phases were compared to evaluate the outcome, and propensity score (PS) matching was applied to enhance the comparability. The primary endpoint of the study was the composite of all-cause mortality during Phase I and Phase II. Results Pharmacists were consulted by the physicians to correct any drug-related issues that they suspected may cause or contribute to a fatal outcome in the cardiology ward. A total of 1,541 interventions were suggested by the clinical pharmacist in the study group; 1,416 (92.0%) of them were

  1. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries.To create a major change in Haiti's health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic "community care grids" to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis.We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti's health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  2. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries. To create a major change in Haiti’s health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic “community care grids” to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis. We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti’s health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  3. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  4. Parameters influencing in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized in intensive cardiac care unit: is there an influence of anemia and iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Sawicki, Robert; Kiluk, Izabela; Baranicz, Malgorzata; Stepek, Tomasz; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the incidence and prognostic value of anemia as well as of the iron status in non-selected patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU). 392 patients (mean age 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women), 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure, and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders were consecutively, prospectively assessed. The biomarkers of iron status-serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and transferrin saturation (TSAT) together with standard clinical, biochemical and echocardiographic variables-were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 3.8% (15 patients). The prevalences of anemia (according to WHO criteria), and iron deficiency (ID) were 64 and 63%, respectively. The level of biomarkers of iron status, but not anemia, was lower in patients who died (p < 0.05). Anemia was less frequent in patients with ACS as compared to the remaining ICCU population (p = 0.019). The analysis by logistic regression indicated the highest risk of death for age [odds ratio (OD) 1.38, 95% CI 1.27-1.55], SIC (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94), TIBC (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.98), left ventricle ejection fraction (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93), as well as hospitalization for non-ACS (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.14-0.46), (p < 0.05). The risk of death during hospitalization tended to increase with decreasing levels of TIBC (p = 0.49), as well as with the absence of ACS (p = 0.54). The incidence of anemia and ID in heterogeneous ICCU patients is high. Parameters of the iron status, but not anemia per se, independently influence in-hospital mortality. The prevalence of anemia is higher in non-ACS patients, and tends to worsen the prognosis. PMID:25502592

  5. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002–20111

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Brandon A.; Bonnewell, John P.; Wiemken, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  6. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002-2011(1).

    PubMed

    Wuerth, Brandon A; Bonnewell, John P; Wiemken, Timothy L; Arnold, Forest W

    2016-09-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  7. Outcomes and Risk Factors for Mortality among Patients Treated with Carbapenems for Klebsiella spp. Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Biehle, Lauren R.; Cottreau, Jessica M.; Thompson, David J.; Filipek, Rachel L.; O’Donnell, J. Nicholas; Lasco, Todd M.; Mahoney, Monica V.; Hirsch, Elizabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extensive dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae has led to increased resistance among Klebsiella species. Carbapenems are used as a last resort against resistant pathogens, but carbapenemase production can lead to therapy failure. Identification of risk factors for mortality and assessment of current susceptibility breakpoints are valuable for improving patient outcomes. Aim The objective of this study was to evaluate outcomes and risk factors for mortality among patients treated with carbapenems for Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. Methods Patients hospitalized between 2006 and 2012 with blood cultures positive for Klebsiella spp. who received ≥ 48 hours of carbapenem treatment within 72 hours of positive culture were included in this retrospective study. Patient data were retrieved from electronic medical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for 30-day hospital mortality. Results One hundred seven patients were included. The mean patient age was 61.5 years and the median APACHE II score was 13 ± 6.2. Overall, 30-day hospital mortality was 9.3%. After adjusting for confounding variables, 30-day mortality was associated with baseline APACHE II score (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01–1.35; P = 0.03), length of stay prior to index culture (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00–1.06; P = 0.04), and carbapenem non-susceptible (imipenem or meropenem MIC > 1 mg/L) infection (OR, 9.08; 95% CI, 1.17–70.51; P = 0.04). Conclusions Baseline severity of illness and length of stay prior to culture were associated with 30-day mortality and should be considered when treating patients with Klebsiella bacteremia. These data support the change in carbapenem breakpoints for Klebsiella species. PMID:26618357

  8. Descriptive epidemiology of mortality and morbidity of health-indicator diseases in hospitalized children from western Jamaica.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James E; Evans-Gilbert, Tracy

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of our study were to describe the epidemiology of child-health indicator diseases in western Jamaica, examine differences in indicator diseases between sex and age, and generate hypotheses about causes of disease burden. International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, coded discharge diagnoses were collected from consecutive admissions for 2003-2005 from a public tertiary care hospital. Mortality data were not coded. Perinatal disease was the most common cause of mortality, with hyaline membrane disease the primary cause. Younger children, particularly males, are disproportionately affected by all indicator diseases (P < 0.001) and more likely to die from acute respiratory tract infections and infectious diseases (P < 0.05). Sickle cell disease was the fourth most common diagnosis. Children in western Jamaica are most affected by diseases of prematurity. These children experience disease burden similar to that of children in other developing countries, but fewer neonatal sepsis and insect-borne infections, and more hematologic illness. PMID:19346383

  9. Erythrocyte selenium concentration predicts intensive care unit and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Selenoenzymes can modulate the extent of oxidative stress, which is recognized as a key feature of septic shock. The pathophysiologic role of erythrocyte selenium concentration in patients with septic shock remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association of erythrocyte selenium concentration with glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activity, GPx1 polymorphisms and with ICU and hospital mortality in septic shock patients. Methods This prospective study included all patients older than 18 years with septic shock on admission or during their ICU stay, admitted to one of the three ICUs of our institution, from January to August 2012. At the time of the patients’ enrollment, demographic information was recorded. Blood samples were taken within the first 72 hours of the patients’ admission or within 72 hours of the septic shock diagnosis for determination of selenium status, protein carbonyl concentration, GPx1 activity and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism (rs 1050450) genotyping. Results A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated. The mean age was 57.6 ± 15.9 years, 63.6% were male. Regarding selenium status, only erythrocyte selenium concentration was lower in patients who died in the ICU. The frequencies for GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism were 55%, 38% and 7% for Pro/Pro, Pro/Leu and Leu/Leu, respectively. In the logistic regression models, erythrocyte selenium concentration was associated with ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock even after adjustment for protein carbonyl concentration and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II) or sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA). Conclusions Erythrocyte selenium concentration was a predictor of ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock. However, this effect was not due to GPx1 activity or Pro198Leu polymorphism. PMID:24887198

  10. Association of daylight saving time transitions with incidence and in-hospital mortality of myocardial infarction in Finland.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Jussi O T; Rautava, Päivi; Kytö, Ville

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Circadian rhythm disturbance increases cardiovascular risk but the effects of daylight saving time (DST) transitions on the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) are unclear. Methods We studied association of DST transitions in 2001-2009 with incidence and in-hospital mortality of MI admissions nationwide in Finland. Incidence rations (IR) of observed incidences on seven days following DST transition were compared to expected incidences. Results Incidence of MI increased on Wednesday (IR 1.16; CI 1.01-1.34) after spring transition (6298 patients' cohort). After autumn transition (8161 patients' cohort), MI incidence decreased on Monday (IR 0.85; CI 0.74-0.97) but increased on Thursday (IR 1.15; CI 1.02-1.30). The overall incidence of MI during the week after each DST transition did not differ from control weeks. Patient age or gender, type of MI or in-hospital mortality were not associated with transitions. Renal insufficiency was more common among MI patients after spring transition (OR 1.81; CI 1.06-3.09; p < 0.05). Diabetes was less common after spring transition (OR 0.71; CI 0.55-0.91; p = 0.007), but more common after autumn transition (OR 1.21; 1.00-1.46; p < 0.05). Conclusions DST transitions are followed by changes in the temporal pattern but not the overall rate of MI incidence. Comorbidities may modulate the effects DST transitions. KEY MESSAGES Both spring and autumn daylight saving time transitions changed the temporal occurrence pattern but not the overall incidence of myocardial infarction occurrence on the week following the clock shift. The age or gender distribution of patients, ratio of different types of myocardial infarctions or in-hospital mortality were not affected by clock shifts. The effect of daylight saving time transitions on MI incidence may be modified by the presence of diabetes. PMID:26679065

  11. Medication Adherence and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality and Hospitalization Among Patients With Newly Prescribed Antihypertensive Medications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyeun; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Hwang, Yunji; Park, Sue K; Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, BeLong

    2016-03-01

    The importance of adherence to antihypertensive treatments for the prevention of cardiovascular disease has not been well elucidated. This study evaluated the effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on specific cardiovascular disease mortality (ischemic heart disease [IHD], cerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral infarction). Our study used data from a 3% sample cohort that was randomly extracted from enrollees of Korean National Health Insurance. Study subjects were aged ≥20 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, and started newly prescribed antihypertensive medication in 2003 to 2004. Adherence to antihypertensive medication was estimated as the cumulative medication adherence. Subjects were divided into good (cumulative medication adherence, ≥80%), intermediate (cumulative medication adherence, 50%-80%), and poor (cumulative medication adherence, <50%) adherence groups. We used time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between medication adherence and health outcomes. Among 33 728 eligible subjects, 670 (1.99%) died of coronary heart disease or stroke during follow-up. Patients with poor medication adherence had worse mortality from IHD (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.31; P for trend=0.005), cerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.77; P for trend=0.004), and cerebral infarction (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.96; P for trend=0.003) than those with good adherence. The estimated hazard ratios of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease were consistent with the mortality end point. Poor medication adherence was associated with higher mortality and a greater risk of hospitalization for specific cardiovascular diseases, emphasizing the importance of a monitoring system and strategies to improve medication adherence in clinical practice. PMID:26865198

  12. Impact of Hospital Teaching Status on Mortality, Length of Stay and Cost Among Patients With Cardiac Arrest in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dolmatova, Elena V; Moazzami, Kasra; Klapholz, Marc; Kothari, Neil; Feurdean, Mirela; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-09-01

    Limited data exist regarding the in-hospital outcomes in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) in teaching versus nonteaching hospital settings. Using the Nationwide (National) Inpatient Sample (2008 to 2012), 731,107 cases of CA were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition codes. Among these patients, 348,368 (47.6%) were managed in teaching hospitals and 376,035 (51.4%) in nonteaching hospitals. Patients in teaching hospitals with CA were younger (62.42 vs 68.08 years old), had less co-morbidities (p <0.001), were less likely to be white (54.6% vs 65.5%) and more likely to be uninsured (9.1% vs 7.6%). Mortality in patients with CA was significantly lower in teaching hospitals than in nonteaching hospitals (55.3% vs 58.8%; all p <0.001). The mortality remained significantly lower after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital characteristics (odds ratio 0.917, CI 0.899 to 0.937, p <0.001). However, the survival benefit was no longer present after adjusting for in-hospital procedures (OR 0.997, CI 0.974 to 1.02, p = 0.779). In conclusion, teaching status of the hospital was associated with decreased in-hospital mortality in patients with CA. The differences in mortality disappeared after adjusting for in-hospital procedures, indicating that routine application of novel therapeutic methods in patients with CA in teaching hospitals could translate into improved survival outcomes. PMID:27378144

  13. Mortality in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: a six-year survey from the University Hospital of Wales

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, J. F.; Counsell, B. R.; Penny, W. J.; Rhodes, J.

    1981-01-01

    In a retrospective survey of normal hospital practice, 583 patients were admitted between March 1972 and 1978 because of haematemesis or melaena. Sixty (10·3%) of these patients died; most deaths occurred in elderly patients (mean age 75 years) 75% of whom had a serious medical problem which complicated the situation. Malignancy, cardiovascular disease and respiratory problems were the most commonly associated factors. The attitude towards both emergency investigation and surgical intervention was very conservative and any reduction in mortality would require a concerted effort to deal with the special problems in elderly patients who are at particular risk. PMID:6977767

  14. Work capacity during 30 days of bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Ertl, A. C.; Trowbridge, T. S.; Wade, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a study to determine whether or not short-term variable intensity isotonic and intermittent high-intensity isokinetic short-duration leg exercise is effective for the maintenance of peak O2 (VO2) uptake and muscular strength and endurance, respectively, during 30 days of -6 deg head-down bed rest deconditioning. The results show no significant changes in leg peak torque, leg mean total work, arm total peak torque, or arm mean total work for members of the isotonic, isokinetic, and controls groups. Changes are observed, however, in peak VO2 levels. The results suggest that near-peak variabile intensity, isotonic leg excercise maintains peak VO2 during 30 days of bed rest, while peak intermittent, isokinetic leg excercise protocol does not.

  15. Maternal mortality at government maternity hospital. Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh (a review of 431 cases).

    PubMed

    Durgamba, K K; Qureshi, S

    1970-01-01

    This reviews 431 maternal deaths over 3 periods of 3-4 years each from January 1958 to December 1968. Trends in mortality are noted. A steady decline was noted. Associated diseases increased maternal mortality but age and parity had no significant influence. 47% of the deaths were intrapartum, 35% postpartum, and 18% antenatal. Major causes were hemorrhage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, sepsis, and anemia, in that order. Deaths due to infection diminished markedly during the period. 58.2% of the deaths were considered avoidable. Delay by patient or doctor and lack of facilities in rural areas were principle avoidable factors. Extension of obstetrical service to villages, emergency mobile squads, and periodic review of mortality statistics are recommended. PMID:12304876

  16. Comparison of robotic and laparoscopic colorectal resections with respect to 30-day perioperative morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Adina E.; Elnahas, Ahmad; Bashir, Shaheena; Cleghorn, Michelle C.; Quereshy, Fayez A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Robotic surgery has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional laparoscopy. Robotic surgery addresses many of the technical and ergonomic limitations of laparoscopic surgery, but the literature regarding clinical outcomes in colorectal surgery is limited. We sought to compare robotic and laparoscopic colorectal resections with respect to 30-day perioperative outcomes. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to identify all patients who underwent robotic or laparoscopic colorectal surgery in 2013. We performed a logistic regression analysis to compare intraoperative variables and 30-day outcomes. Results There were 8392 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery and 472 patients who underwent robotic colorectal surgery. The robotic cohort had a lower incidence of unplanned intraoperative conversion (9.5% v. 13.7%, p = 0.008). There were no significant differences between robotic and laparoscopic surgery with respect to other intraoperative and postoperative outcomes, such as operative duration, length of stay, postoperative ileus, anastomotic leak, venous thromboembolism, wound infection, cardiac complications and pulmonary complications. On multivariable analysis, robotic surgery was protective for unplanned conversion, while male sex, malignancy, Crohn disease and diverticular disease were all associated with open conversion. Conclusion Robotic colorectal surgery has comparable 30-day perioperative morbidity to laparoscopic surgery and may decrease the rate of intraoperative conversion in select patients. PMID:27240135

  17. The 10-30-day intraseasonal variation of the East Asian winter monsoon: The temperature mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Suxiang; Sun, Qingfei; Huang, Qian; Chu, Peng

    2016-09-01

    East Asia is known for its monsoon characteristics, but little research has been performed on the intraseasonal time scale of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM). In this paper, the extended reanalysis (ERA)-Interim sub-daily data are used to study the surface air temperature intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) of the EAWM. The results show that the air temperature (2-m level) of the EAWM has a dominant period of 10-30 days. Lake Baikal and south China are the centers of the air temperature ISO. An anomalous low frequency (10-30-day filtered) anticyclone corresponds to the intraseasonal cold air. The 10-30-day filtered cold air spreads from Novaya Zemlya to Lake Baikal and even to South China. The ISO of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index influences the temperature of the EAWM by stimulating Rossby waves in middle latitude, causing meridional circulation, and eventually leads to the temperature ISO of the EAWM. RegCM4 has good performance for the simulation of the air temperature ISO. The simulated results indicate that the plateau is responsible for the southward propagation of the intraseasonal anticyclone. The anticyclone could not reach South China when there was no plateau in western China and its upper reaches.

  18. Health in a fragile state: a five-year review of mortality patterns and trends at Somalia’s Banadir Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulane, Asli; Sematimba, Douglas; Mohamed, Lul M; Ali, Abdirashid H; Lu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background The recurrent civil conflict in Somalia has impeded progress toward improving health and health care, with lack of data and poor performance of health indicators. This study aimed at making inference about Banadir region by exploring morbidity and mortality trends at Banadir Hospital. This is one of the few functional hospitals during war. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted with data collected at Banadir Hospital for the period of January 2008–December 2012. The data were aggregated from patient records and summarized on a morbidity and mortality surveillance form with respect to age groups and stratified by sex. The main outcome was the number of patients that died in the hospital. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between sex and hospital mortality. Results Conditions of infectious origin were the major presentations at the hospital. The year 2011 recorded the highest number of cases of diarrhea and mortality due to diarrhea. The stillbirth rate declined during the study period from 272 to 48 stillbirths per 1,000 live births by 2012. The sum of total cases that were attended to at the hospital by the end of 2012 was four times the number at the baseline year of the study in 2008; however, the overall mortality rate among those admitted declined between 2008 and 2012. Conclusion There was reduction in patient mortality at the hospital over the study period. Data from Banadir Hospital are consistent with findings from Banadir region and could give credible public health reflections for the region given the lack of data on a population level. PMID:27621664

  19. Predicting Early Mortality in Adult Trauma Patients Admitted to Three Public University Hospitals in Urban India: A Prospective Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit; Khajanchi, Monty; Kumar, Vineet; Dharap, Satish; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Petzold, Max; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Saha, Makhan Lal; von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background In India alone, more than one million people die yearly due to trauma. Identification of patients at risk of early mortality is crucial to guide clinical management and explain prognosis. Prediction models can support clinical judgement, but existing models have methodological limitations. The aim of this study was to derive a vital sign based prediction model for early mortality among adult trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of adult trauma patients admitted to three urban university hospitals in India between October 2013 and January 2014. The outcome measure was mortality within 24 hours. We used logistic regression with restricted cubic splines to derive our model. We assessed model performance in terms of discrimination, calibration, and optimism. Results A total of 1629 patients were included. Median age was 35, 80% were males. Mortality between admission and 24 hours was 6%. Our final model included systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale. Our model displayed good discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROCC) of 0.85. Predicted mortality corresponded well with observed mortality, indicating good calibration. Conclusion This study showed that routinely recorded systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale predicted early hospital mortality in trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Our model needs to be externally validated before it can be applied in the clinical setting. PMID:25180494

  20. In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results From the National Inpatient Sample, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Bina; Davis, Herbert T.; Laskey, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Case‐fatality rates in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have significantly decreased; however, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a risk factor for AMI, has increased. The purposes of the present study were to assess the prevalence and clinical impact of DM among patients hospitalized with AMI and to estimate the impact of important clinical characteristics associated with in‐hospital mortality in patients with AMI and DM. Methods and Results We used the National Inpatient Sample to estimate trends in DM prevalence and in‐hospital mortality among 1.5 million patients with AMI from 2000 to 2010, using survey data‐analysis methods. Clinical characteristics associated with in‐hospital mortality were identified using multivariable logistic regression. There was a significant increase in DM prevalence among AMI patients (year 2000, 22.2%; year 2010, 29.6%, Ptrend<0.0001). AMI patients with DM tended to be older and female and to have more cardiovascular risk factors. However, age‐standardized mortality decreased significantly from 2000 (8.48%) to 2010 (4.95%) (Ptrend<0.0001). DM remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio 1.069, 95% CI 1.051 to 1.087; P<0.0001). The adverse impact of DM on in‐hospital mortality was unchanged over time. Decreased death risk over time was greatest among women and elderly patients. Among younger patients of both sexes, there was a leveling off of this decrease in more recent years. Conclusions Despite increasing DM prevalence and disease burden among AMI patients, in‐hospital mortality declined significantly from 2000 to 2010. The adverse impact of DM on mortality remained unchanged overall over time but was age and sex dependent. PMID:25158866

  1. Association of hospital volume with readmission rates: a retrospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhenqiu; Herrin, Jeph; Bernheim, Susannah; Drye, Elizabeth E; Krumholz, Harlan M; Ross, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of hospital volume (a marker of quality of care) with hospital readmission rates. Design Retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting 4651US acute care hospitals. Study data 6 916 644 adult discharges, excluding patients receiving psychiatric or medical cancer treatment. Main outcome measures We used Medicare fee-for-service data from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012 to calculate observed-to-expected, unplanned, 30 day, standardized readmission rates for hospitals and for specialty cohorts medicine, surgery/gynecology, cardiorespiratory, cardiovascular, and neurology. We assessed the association of hospital volume by quintiles with 30 day, standardized readmission rates, with and without adjustment for hospital characteristics (safety net status, teaching status, geographic region, urban/rural status, nurse to bed ratio, ownership, and cardiac procedure capability. We also examined associations with the composite outcome of 30 day, standardized readmission or mortality rates. Results Mean 30 day, standardized readmission rate among the fifth of hospitals with the lowest volume was 14.7 (standard deviation 5.3) compared with 15.9 (1.7) among the fifth of hospitals with the highest volume (P<0.001). We observed the same pattern of lower readmission rates in the lowest versus highest volume hospitals in the specialty cohorts for medicine (16.6 v 17.4, P<0.001), cardiorespiratory (18.5 v 20.5, P<0.001), and neurology (13.2 v 14.0, p=0.01) cohorts; the cardiovascular cohort, however, had an inverse association (14.6 v 13.7, P<0.001). These associations remained after adjustment for hospital characteristics except in the cardiovascular cohort, which became non-significant, and the surgery/gynecology cohort, in which the lowest volume fifth of hospitals had significantly higher standardized readmission rates than the highest volume fifth (difference 0.63 percentage points (95% confidence interval 0.10 to 1.17), P=0.02). Mean 30 day

  2. Timing of surgery for hip fracture and in-hospital mortality: a retrospective population-based cohort study in the Spanish National Health System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While the benefits or otherwise of early hip fracture repair is a long-running controversy with studies showing contradictory results, this practice is being adopted as a quality indicator in several health care organizations. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between early hip fracture repair and in-hospital mortality in elderly people attending public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System and, additionally, to explore factors associated with the decision to perform early hip fracture repair. Methods A cohort of 56,500 patients of 60-years-old and over, hospitalized for hip fracture during the period 2002 to 2005 in all the public hospitals in 8 Spanish regions, were followed up using administrative databases to identify the time to surgical repair and in-hospital mortality. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to analyze the relationship between the timing of surgery (< 2 days from admission) and in-hospital mortality, controlling for several confounding factors. Results Early surgery was performed on 25% of the patients. In the unadjusted analysis early surgery showed an absolute difference in risk of mortality of 0.57 (from 4.42% to 3.85%). However, patients undergoing delayed surgery were older and had higher comorbidity and severity of illness. Timeliness for surgery was not found to be related to in-hospital mortality once confounding factors such as age, sex, chronic comorbidities as well as the severity of illness were controlled for in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Older age, male gender, higher chronic comorbidity and higher severity measured by the Risk Mortality Index were associated with higher mortality, but the time to surgery was not. PMID:22257790

  3. AIDS deaths shift from hospital to home. AIDS Mortality Project Group.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J J; Chu, S Y; Buehler, J W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study monitors trends in place of death among persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) as a measure of health care usage patterns and terminal health care among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS. Sixteen health departments collected death certificates for 55,186 persons with AIDS whose deaths occurred through 1991. Place of death was categorized as hospital, residence, hospice or nursing home, and other. RESULTS. The percentage of AIDS deaths at hospital facilities decreased from 92% in 1983 to 57% in 1991. In 1988, 23% of deaths occurred at home or in hospices and nursing homes. This trend was more evident among men, Whites, and men who had sex with men; less so among persons with other modes of exposure; and not at all among injecting drug users and children with perinatally acquired AIDS. Place of death varied by geographic location, with the greatest percentage of hospital deaths in the Northeast (91%) and the greatest percentage of at-home deaths in the West (27%). CONCLUSIONS. The percentage of AIDS deaths at home or in hospices and nursing homes has increased since 1983. These trends may reflect changes in hospital use for end-stage HIV infection. Decreasing hospitalization and increasing outpatient services and home care will decrease costs and may allow HIV-infected persons improved social support. PMID:8214234

  4. The Effects of Preexisting Medical Comorbidities on Mortality and Length of Hospital Stay in Acute Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, Brett D.; Singh, Vijay A.; Halonen, Jill; Diallo, Alfa; Milner, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether and to what extent preexisting medical comorbidities influence mortality risk and length of hospitalization in patients with acute burn injury. Summary Background Data: The effects on mortality and length of stay of a number of important medical comorbidities have not been examined in acute burn injury. Existing studies that have investigated the effects of medical comorbidities on outcomes in acute burn injury have produced inconsistent results, chiefly due to the use of relatively small samples from single burn centers. Methods: Records of 31,338 adults who were admitted with acute burn injury to 70 burn centers from the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, were reviewed. A burn-specific list of medical comorbidities was derived from diagnoses included in the Charlson Index of Comorbidities and the Elixhauser method of comorbidity measurement. Logistic regression was used to assess the effects of preexisting medical conditions on mortality, controlling for demographic and burn injury characteristics. Ordinal least squares regression with a logarithmic transformation of the dependent variable was used to assess the relationship of comorbidities with length of stay. Results: In-hospital mortality was significantly predicted by HIV/AIDS (odds ratio [OR] = 10.2), renal disease (OR = 5.1), liver disease (OR = 4.8), metastatic cancer (OR = 4.6), pulmonary circulation disorders (OR = 2.9), congestive heart failure (OR = 2.4), obesity (OR = 2.1), non-metastatic malignancies (OR = 2.1), peripheral vascular disorders (OR = 1.8), alcohol abuse (OR = 1.8), neurological disorders (OR = 1.6), and cardiac arrhythmias (OR = 1.5). Increased length of hospital stay among survivors was significantly predicted by paralysis (90% increase), dementia (60%), peptic ulcer disease (53%), other neurological disorders (52%), HIV/AIDS (49%), renal disease (44%), a psychiatric diagnosis (42%), cerebrovascular disease (41%), cardiac arrhythmias

  5. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Antony; Jagannath, Pushpa; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC) score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD) of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001) for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]). Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality. PMID:26139742

  6. Gender-Related Dissociation in Outcomes in Chronic Heart Failure: Reduced Mortality but Similar Hospitalization in Women

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mustafa I.; Lainscak, Mitja; Mujib, Marjan; Love, Thomas E.; Aban, Inmaculada; Piña, Ileana L.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Bittner, Vera; Ahmed, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Background The impact of gender on major natural history endpoints in heart failure (HF) has not been examined in a propensity-matched study. Methods Of the 7788 chronic systolic and diastolic HF patients in the Digitalis Investigation Group trial 1926 were women. Propensity scores for female gender were used to assemble a cohort of 1669 pairs of men and women who were well-balanced on 32 measured baseline characteristics. Matched hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for outcomes associated with female gender were calculated using stratified Cox regression models. Results All-cause mortality occurred in 36% (rate, 1256/10,000 person-years) and 30% (rate, 1008/10,000 person-years) of matched men and women respectively during 5 years of follow up (HR when women were compared with men, 0.82, 95% CI, 0.72–0.94, P=0.004). Female gender was also associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality (matched HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73–0.99, P=0.037) and a trend toward reduced non-cardiovascular mortality (matched HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53–1.00; P=0.053). All-cause hospitalization occurred in 67% (rate, 4003/10,000 person-years) and 65% (rate, 3762/10,000 person-years) matched male and female patients respectively (HR for women, 1.03, 95% CI, 0.93–1.15, P=0.538). Female gender was not associated with cardiovascular or HF hospitalization but was associated with hospitalization due to unstable angina pectoris (matched HR, 1.38; 95%CI, 1.11–1.72; P=0.003) and stroke (matched HR, 0.65; 95%CI, 0.46–0.92; P=0.014). Conclusions In patients with chronic HF, female gender has a significant independent association with improved survival but has no association with all-cause, cardiovascular, or HF hospitalizations. PMID:19939481

  7. Predicting Short-term Mortality and Long-term Survival of Hospitalized U.S. Patients with Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Jennifer A.; Arslanlar, Sami; Yepuri, Jay; Montrose, Marc; Ahn, Chul W.; Shah, Jessica P.

    2014-01-01

    Background No study has evaluated current scoring systems for their accuracy in predicting short- and long-term outcome of alcoholic hepatitis in a U.S. population. Methods We reviewed electronic records for patients with ALD admitted to Parkland Memorial Hospital between January 2002 and August 2005. Data and outcomes for 148 of 1761 admissions meeting pre-defined criteria were collected. The discriminant function (DF) was revised (INRdf) to account for changes in prothrombin time reagents that could potentially affect identification of risk using the prior DF threshold of > 32. Admission and theoretical peak scores using the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) were calculated. Analysis models compared 5 different scoring systems. Results INRdf was closely correlated with the old DF (r2 = 0.95). Multivariate analysis of data showed that survival at 28 days was significantly associated with admission values for white blood cell count (p = 0.006), a scoring system using a combination of age, bilirubin, coagulation status and creatinine (p < 0.001) as well as an elevated ammonia result within 2 days of admission (p = 0.006). When peak values for MELD were included, they were the most significant predictor of short-term mortality (p < 0.001) followed by INRdf (p = 0.006 Conclusion On admission, 2 scoring systems that identify a subset of patients with severe alcoholic liver disease are able to predict > 50% mortality at 4 weeks as well as > 80% mortality at 6 months without specific treatment. PMID:24445730

  8. Trends in Maternal Mortality Ratio in a Tertiary Referral Hospital and the Effects of Various Maternity Schemes on It

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Sharanjit; Singh, Sukhwinderjit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the trend in maternal mortality ratio in a tertiary care centre and the effect of various maternity schemes on it. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of all maternal deaths occurring in the Guru Gobind Singh Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India was done from Jan 2010 to Dec 2012. Every maternal death was scrutinized from various aspects like direct cause of death, age, locality, antenatal care and gestational age. Results: The total number of deliveries has risen from 957 in 2010 to 1063 in 2012 at the same time the maternal mortality ratio has increased from 835.94 in 2010 to 2054.55 per one live birth in 2012. Haemorrhage (24.12%) and sepsis (18.9%) were the most common causes of death followed closely by pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia (15.5%). Anemia (12.06%) contributed to the most common indirect cause of death. Conclusion: Implementation of the various maternity schemes has had no significant impact on the profile of dying mothers. There is a need to stress the importance of good antenatal care in reducing Maternal Mortality Ratio. PMID:26175763

  9. Morbidity and mortality of infective endocarditis in a hospital system in New York City serving a diverse urban population.

    PubMed

    Alkhawam, Hassan; Sogomonian, Robert; Zaiem, Feras; Vyas, Neil; El-Hunjul, Mohammed; Jolly, JoshPaul; Al-Khazraji, Ahmed; Ashraf, Amar

    2016-08-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe illness associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate morbidity and mortality of IE in a hospital serving the most diverse area in New York City. An analysis of 209 patients admitted to the hospital from 2000 to 2012 who were found to have IE based on modified Duke criteria. Among the 209 patients with IE, 188 (88.8%) had native heart valves and 21 (11.2%) had prosthetic valves. Of the patients with native heart valves, 3.7% had coronary artery bypass graft, 4.3% were active drug users, 6.3% had permanent pacemakers, 12.2% had a history of IE, 25.7% were diabetic, 17% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD), 9% had congestive heart failure, 8% had abnormal heart valves, and 13.8% had an unknown etiology. Mortality rates of the patients with prosthetic heart valves were 27.7% compared to 8.11% in patients with native heart valves (OR 3, p<0.0001). Since we identified diabetes mellitus and ESRD to be significant risk factors in our population, we isolated and compared characteristics of patients with and without IE. IE among patients with diabetes mellitus was 23% compared with 13.8% in the control group (p=0.016). Cases of IE in patients with ESRD were 15.3%, compared with 4% in the control group (p<0.0001). We identified an overall mortality rate of 20.1% in patients with IE, a readmission rate within 30 days of discharge of 21.5%, and an average age of 59 years. Among 209 patients, 107 were males and 102 females. The most common organisms identified were Staphylococcus aureus (43.7%), viridans streptococci (17%) followed by Enterococcus (14.7%). Despite appropriate treatment, high rates of morbidity and mortality remained, with a higher impact in patients greater than 50 years of age. Such discoveries raise the importance of controlling and monitoring risk factors for IE. PMID:27206447

  10. Relationship of missed and shortened hemodialysis treatments to hospitalization and mortality: observations from a US dialysis network

    PubMed Central

    Obialo, Chamberlain I.; Hunt, William C.; Bashir, Khalid; Zager, Phillip G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The relationship of missed and shortened hemodialysis (HD) to clinical outcomes has not been well characterized in HD patients in the USA. Here we explored the frequency of missed and shortened treatments and their impact on mortality and hospitalization. Methods A retrospective review of data from a cohort of 15 340 HD patients treated in facilities operated by Dialysis Clinics, Inc. We compared the frequency of missed and shortened treatments by gender, race, age and treatment schedules [Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays (MWF) versus Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays (TTS)]. Results Of the 15 340 patients, 48% were non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), 41% African Americans (AAs), 6% Hispanics, 2% Native American (NA), 2% Asians and 1% other races. The median number of years on HD was 1.8 years and the median follow-up was 12.4 months. The odds of missing at least one treatment in a month were higher in: patients aged <55 years, odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (P<0.0001); in AAs, OR 1.51 (P < 0.0001); in NAs, OR 1.50 (P = 0.0003); and in Hispanics, OR 1.33 (P = 0.0003) compared with NHWs and in patients who dialyzed on TTS compared with MWF, OR 1.33 (P < 0.0001). Similar findings were observed for treatments shortened by at least 10 min per month. Missed and shortened treatments were most prevalent on Saturdays and were also associated with progressive increases in hospitalization and mortality. Conclusion Missed and shortened HD treatments pose a challenge to providers. Improved adherence to prescribed dialysis may decrease the morbidity and mortality. PMID:25874087

  11. Causes of mortality and associated modifiable health care factors for children (< 5-years) admitted at Onandjokwe Hospital, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Mdala, Johnface F.; Mash, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many countries, especially those from sub-Saharan Africa, are unlikely to reach the Millennium Development Goal for under-5 mortality reduction by 2015. This study aimed to identify the causes of mortality and associated modifiable health care factors for under-5 year-old children admitted to Onandjokwe Hospital, Namibia. Method: A descriptive retrospective review of the medical records of all children under five years who died in the hospital for the period of 12 months during 2013, using two different structured questionnaires targeting perinatal deaths and post-perinatal deaths respectively. Results: The top five causes of 125 perinatal deaths were prematurity 22 (17.6%), birth asphyxia 19 (15.2%), congenital anomalies 16 (12.8%), unknown 13 (10.4%) and abruptio placenta 11 (8.8%). The top five causes of 60 post-perinatal deaths were bacterial pneumonia 21 (35%), gastroenteritis 12 (20%), severe malnutrition 6 (10%), septicaemia 6 (10%), and tuberculosis 4 (6.7%). Sixty-nine (55%) perinatal deaths and 42 (70%) post-perinatal deaths were potentially avoidable. The modifiable factors were: late presentation to a health care facility, antenatal clinics not screening for danger signs, long distance referral, district hospitals not providing emergency obstetric care, poor monitoring of labour and admitted children in the wards, lack of screening for malnutrition, failure to repeat an HIV test in pregnant women in the third trimester or during breastfeeding, and a lack of review of the urgent results of critically ill children. Conclusion: A significant number of deaths in children under 5-years of age could be avoided by paying attention to the modifiable factors identified in this study. PMID:26245607

  12. External validation of the Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model for predicting death within 1 year after hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    van Walraven, Carl; McAlister, Finlay A.; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Hawken, Steven; Donzé, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background: Predicting long-term survival after admission to hospital is helpful for clinical, administrative and research purposes. The Hospital-patient One-year Mortality Risk (HOMR) model was derived and internally validated to predict the risk of death within 1 year after admission. We conducted an external validation of the model in a large multicentre study. Methods: We used administrative data for all nonpsychiatric admissions of adult patients to hospitals in the provinces of Ontario (2003–2010) and Alberta (2011–2012), and to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (2010–2012) to calculate each patient’s HOMR score at admission. The HOMR score is based on a set of parameters that captures patient demographics, health burden and severity of acute illness. We determined patient status (alive or dead) 1 year after admission using population-based registries. Results: The 3 validation cohorts (n = 2 862 996 in Ontario, 210 595 in Alberta and 66 683 in Boston) were distinct from each other and from the derivation cohort. The overall risk of death within 1 year after admission was 8.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.7% to 8.8%). The HOMR score was strongly and significantly associated with risk of death in all populations and was highly discriminative, with a C statistic ranging from 0.89 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.91) to 0.92 (95% CI 0.91 to 0.92). Observed and expected outcome risks were similar (median absolute difference in percent dying in 1 yr 0.3%, interquartile range 0.05%–2.5%). Interpretation: The HOMR score, calculated using routinely collected administrative data, accurately predicted the risk of death among adult patients within 1 year after admission to hospital for nonpsychiatric indications. Similar performance was seen when the score was used in geographically and temporally diverse populations. The HOMR model can be used for risk adjustment in analyses of health administrative data to predict long-term survival among hospital patients

  13. Early Hospital Mortality among Adult Trauma Patients Significantly Declined between 1998-2011: Three Single-Centre Cohorts from Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit; Dharap, Satish; Kumar, Vineet; Khajanchi, Monty; Tomson, Göran; Tsai, Li Felländer; Petzold, Max; von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic injury causes more than five million deaths each year of which about 90% occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Hospital trauma mortality has been significantly reduced in high-income countries, but to what extent similar results have been achieved in LMIC has not been studied in detail. Here, we assessed if early hospital mortality in patients with trauma has changed over time in an urban lower middle-income setting. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted due to trauma in 1998, 2002, and 2011 to a large public hospital in Mumbai, India. Our outcome measure was early hospital mortality, defined as death between admission and 24-hours. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the association between time and early hospital mortality, adjusting for patient case-mix. Injury severity was quantified using International Classification of Diseases-derived Injury Severity Score (ICISS). Major trauma was defined as ICISS<0.90. Results We analysed data on 4189 patients out of which 86.5% were males. A majority of patients were between 15 and 55 years old and 36.5% had major trauma. Overall early hospital mortality was 8.9% in 1998, 6.0% in 2002, and 8.1% in 2011. Among major trauma patients, early hospital mortality was 13.4%, in 1998, 11.3% in 2002, and 10.9% in 2011. Compared to trauma patients admitted in 1998, those admitted in 2011 had lower odds for early hospital mortality (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.41–0.76) including those with major trauma (OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.41–0.78). Conclusions We observed a significant reduction in early hospital mortality among patients with major trauma between 1998 and 2011. Improved survival was evident only after we adjusted for patient case-mix. This finding highlights the importance of risk-adjustment when studying longitudinal mortality trends. PMID:24594775

  14. Risk Prediction of Emergency Department Revisit 30 Days Post Discharge: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shiying; Jin, Bo; Shin, Andrew Young; Zhao, Yifan; Zhu, Chunqing; Li, Zhen; Hu, Zhongkai; Fu, Changlin; Ji, Jun; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yingzhen; Dai, Dorothy; Culver, Devore S.; Alfreds, Shaun T.; Rogow, Todd; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G.; Widen, Eric; Ling, Xuefeng B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Among patients who are discharged from the Emergency Department (ED), about 3% return within 30 days. Revisits can be related to the nature of the disease, medical errors, and/or inadequate diagnoses and treatment during their initial ED visit. Identification of high-risk patient population can help device new strategies for improved ED care with reduced ED utilization. Methods and Findings A decision tree based model with discriminant Electronic Medical Record (EMR) features was developed and validated, estimating patient ED 30 day revisit risk. A retrospective cohort of 293,461 ED encounters from HealthInfoNet (HIN), Maine's Health Information Exchange (HIE), between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012, was assembled with the associated patients' demographic information and one-year clinical histories before the discharge date as the inputs. To validate, a prospective cohort of 193,886 encounters between January 1, 2013 and June 30, 2013 was constructed. The c-statistics for the retrospective and prospective predictions were 0.710 and 0.704 respectively. Clinical resource utilization, including ED use, was analyzed as a function of the ED risk score. Cluster analysis of high-risk patients identified discrete sub-populations with distinctive demographic, clinical and resource utilization patterns. Conclusions Our ED 30-day revisit model was prospectively validated on the Maine State HIN secure statewide data system. Future integration of our ED predictive analytics into the ED care work flow may lead to increased opportunities for targeted care intervention to reduce ED resource burden and overall healthcare expense, and improve outcomes. PMID:25393305

  15. Medico-social and socio-demographic factors associated with maternal mortality at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Makokha, A E

    1991-01-01

    To identify the most significant determinants of maternal mortality in Kenya, a prospective study involving 49,335 deliveries occurring at Kenyatta National Hospital from January 1978-87 was conducted. There were 156 maternal deaths in this series, for a maternal mortality rate of 3.2/1000 deliveries. The 5 most frequent causes of death were abortion (24%), hypertensive disease of pregnancy (13%), sepsis (13%), anemia (10%), and cardiac disease (7%). 24% of women who died were age 19 years or under, 27% were 20-24 years, 23% were 25-29 years, and 11% were 30-34 years. The largest percentage (24%) of deaths involved nulliparous women; 16% were to women of parity 5 and above. 28% of the women who died were single, and single women contributed the majority of deaths from abortion. 66% of the women who died had received no prenatal care. The proportion of avoidable deaths was 19% among clinic attenders compared to 29% among non-attenders. Overall, age, parity, and marital status--traditionally regarded as the key factors associated with maternal mortality--vary in their impact, given the cause of death and medical services received. The assumption that high parity is associated with maternal mortality was not confirmed in this study due to the significant number of deaths from abortion that involved single, nulliparous women. In addition, many women who died were in the optimum age group for childbearing, but were more prone to suffer from anemia, hypertension, ectopic pregnancy, and cardiac disease than women over 30 years old. Overall, 126 deaths were considered avoidable. Contributory factors were slowness of surgical management of emergencies, prolonged confinement of women with cardiac disease, and a lack of emergency supplies of blood and drugs for complicated deliveries. PMID:12316813

  16. Changes in size and compliance of the calf after 30 days of simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Stein, Stewart L.

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis that reducing muscle compartment by a long-term exposure to microgravity would cause increased leg venous compliance was tested in eight men who were assessed for vascular compliance and for serial circumferences of the calf before and after 30 days of continuous 6-deg head-down bed rest. It was found that head-down bed rest caused decreases in the calculated calf volume and the calf-muscle compartment, as well as increases in calf compliance. The percent increases in calf compliance correlated significantly with decreases in calf muscle compartment.

  17. Hospitalization Incidence, Mortality, and Seasonality of Common Respiratory Viruses Over a Period of 15 Years in a Developed Subtropical City

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul K.S.; Tam, Wilson W.S.; Lee, Tsz Cheung; Hon, Kam Lun; Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C.W.; Mok, Hing Yim; Wong, Martin C.S.; Leung, Ting Fan; Lai, Raymond W.M.; Yeung, Apple C.M.; Ho, Wendy C.S.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Hui, David S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Information on respiratory viruses in subtropical region is limited. Incidence, mortality, and seasonality of influenza (Flu) A/B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), and parainfluenza viruses (PIV) 1/2/3 in hospitalized patients were assessed over a 15-year period (1998–2012) in Hong Kong. Male predominance and laterally transversed J-shaped distribution in age-specific incidence was observed. Incidence of Flu A, RSV, and PIV decreased sharply from infants to toddlers; whereas Flu B and ADV increased slowly. RSV conferred higher fatality than Flu, and was the second killer among hospitalized elderly. ADV and PIV were uncommon, but had the highest fatality. RSV, PIV 2/3 admissions increased over the 15 years, whereas ADV had decreased significantly. A “high season,” mainly contributed by Flu, was observed in late-winter/early-spring (February–March). The “medium season” in spring/summer (April–August) was due to Flu and RSV. The “low season” in late autumn/winter (October–December) was due to PIV and ADV. Seasonality varied between viruses, but predictable distinctive pattern for each virus existed, and temperature was the most important associating meteorological variable. Respiratory viruses exhibit strong sex- and age-predilection, and with predictable seasonality allowing strategic preparedness planning. Hospital-based surveillance is crucial for real-time assessment on severity of new variants. PMID:26579810

  18. Child-Pugh versus MELD score for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Qi, Xingshun; Dai, Junna; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to compare the performance of Child-Pugh and Model for End-Stage Liver Diseases (MELD) scores for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis. A total of 145 patients with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and acute UGIB between July 2013 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed (male/female: 94/51; mean age: 56.77±11.33 years; Child-Pugh class A/B/C: 46/64/35; mean Child-Pugh score: 7.88±2.17; mean MELD score: 7.86±7.22). The in-hospital mortality was 8% (11/145). Areas under receiving-operator characteristics curve (AUROC) for predicting the in-hospital mortality were compared between MELD and Child-Pugh scores. AUROCs for predicting the in-hospital mortality for Child-Pugh and MELD scores were 0.796 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.721-0.858) and 0.810 (95% CI: 0.736-0.870), respectively. The discriminative ability was not significant different between the two scoring systems (P=0.7241). In conclusion, Child-Pugh and MELD scores were similar for predicting the in-hospital mortality of acute UGIB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:25785053

  19. Mortality Associated with Severe Sepsis Among Age-Similar Women with and without Pregnancy-Associated Hospitalization in Texas: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The reported mortality among women with pregnancy-associated severe sepsis (PASS) has been considerably lower than among severely septic patients in the general population, with the difference being attributed to the younger age and lack of chronic illness among the women with PASS. However, no comparative studies were reported to date between patients with PASS and age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy (NPSS). MATERIAL AND METHODS We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to compare the crude and adjusted hospital mortality between women with severe sepsis, aged 20-34 years, with and without pregnancy-associated hospitalizations during 2001-2010, following exclusion of those with reported chronic comorbidities, as well as alcohol and drug abuse. RESULTS Crude hospital mortality among PASS vs. NPSS hospitalizations was lower for the whole cohort (6.7% vs. 14.1% [p<0.0001]) and those with ≥3 organ failures (17.6% vs. 33.2% [p=0.0100]). Adjusted PASS mortality (odds ratio [95% CI]) was 0.57 (0.38-0.86) [p=0.0070]. CONCLUSIONS Hospital mortality was unexpectedly markedly and consistently lower among women with severe sepsis associated with pregnancy, as compared with contemporaneous, age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy, without reported chronic comorbidities. Further studies are warranted to examine the sources of the observed differences and to corroborate our findings. PMID:27286326

  20. Mortality Associated with Severe Sepsis Among Age-Similar Women with and without Pregnancy-Associated Hospitalization in Texas: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The reported mortality among women with pregnancy-associated severe sepsis (PASS) has been considerably lower than among severely septic patients in the general population, with the difference being attributed to the younger age and lack of chronic illness among the women with PASS. However, no comparative studies were reported to date between patients with PASS and age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy (NPSS). Material/Methods We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to compare the crude and adjusted hospital mortality between women with severe sepsis, aged 20–34 years, with and without pregnancy-associated hospitalizations during 2001–2010, following exclusion of those with reported chronic comorbidities, as well as alcohol and drug abuse. Results Crude hospital mortality among PASS vs. NPSS hospitalizations was lower for the whole cohort (6.7% vs. 14.1% [p<0.0001]) and those with ≥3 organ failures (17.6% vs. 33.2% [p=0.0100]). Adjusted PASS mortality (odds ratio [95% CI]) was 0.57 (0.38–0.86) [p=0.0070]. Conclusions Hospital mortality was unexpectedly markedly and consistently lower among women with severe sepsis associated with pregnancy, as compared with contemporaneous, age-similar women with severe sepsis not associated with pregnancy, without reported chronic comorbidities. Further studies are warranted to examine the sources of the observed differences and to corroborate our findings. PMID:27286326

  1. Unfolding Physiological State: Mortality Modelling in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Naumann, Tristan; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Brimmer, Nicole; Joshi, Rohit; Rumshisky, Anna; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of a patient’s disease state and trajectory is critical in a clinical setting. Modern electronic healthcare records contain an increasingly large amount of data, and the ability to automatically identify the factors that influence patient outcomes stand to greatly improve the efficiency and quality of care. We examined the use of latent variable models (viz. Latent Dirichlet Allocation) to decompose free-text hospital notes into meaningful features, and the predictive power of these features for patient mortality. We considered three prediction regimes: (1) baseline prediction, (2) dynamic (time-varying) outcome prediction, and (3) retrospective outcome prediction. In each, our prediction task differs from the familiar time-varying situation whereby data accumulates; since fewer patients have long ICU stays, as we move forward in time fewer patients are available and the prediction task becomes increasingly difficult. We found that latent topic-derived features were effective in determining patient mortality under three timelines: inhospital, 30 day post-discharge, and 1 year post-discharge mortality. Our results demonstrated that the latent topic features important in predicting hospital mortality are very different from those that are important in post-discharge mortality. In general, latent topic features were more predictive than structured features, and a combination of the two performed best. The time-varying models that combined latent topic features and baseline features had AUCs that reached 0.85, 0.80, and 0.77 for in-hospital, 30 day post-discharge and 1 year post-discharge mortality respectively. Our results agreed with other work suggesting that the first 24 hours of patient information are often the most predictive of hospital mortality. Retrospective models that used a combination of latent topic features and structured features achieved AUCs of 0.96, 0.82, and 0.81 for in-hospital, 30 day, and 1-year mortality prediction. Our

  2. Impact of emergency medical helicopter transport directly to a university hospital trauma center on mortality of severe blunt trauma patients until discharge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The benefits of transporting severely injured patients by helicopter remain controversial. This study aimed to analyze the impact on mortality of helicopter compared to ground transport directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. Methods The French Intensive Care Research for Severe Trauma cohort study enrolled 2,703 patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to University hospital intensive care units within 72 hours. Pre-hospital and hospital clinical data, including the mode of transport, (helicopter (HMICU) versus ground (GMICU), both with medical teams), were recorded. The analysis was restricted to patients admitted directly from the scene to a University hospital trauma center. The main endpoint was mortality until ICU discharge. Results Of the 1,958 patients analyzed, 74% were transported by GMICU, 26% by HMICU. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 26 (interquartile range (IQR) 19 to 34) for HMICU patients and 25 (IQR 18 to 34) for GMICU patients. Compared to GMICU, HMICU patients had a higher median time frame before hospital admission and were more intensively treated in the pre-hospital phase. Crude mortality until hospital discharge was the same regardless of pre-hospital mode of transport. After adjustment for initial status, the risk of death was significantly lower (odds ratio (OR): 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98, P = 0.035) for HMICU compared with GMICU. This result did not change after further adjustment for ISS and overall surgical procedures. Conclusions This study suggests a beneficial impact of helicopter transport on mortality in severe blunt trauma. Whether this association could be due to better management in the pre-hospital phase needs to be more thoroughly assessed. PMID:23131068

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury Related to Motor Vehicle Accidents in Guinea: Impact of Treatment Delay, Access to Healthcare, and Patient's Financial Capacity on Length of Hospital Stay and In-hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Béavogui, Kézély; Koïvogui, Akoï; Loua, Tokpagnan Oscar; Baldé, Ramata; Diallo, Boubacar; Diallo, Aminata Rougui; Béavogui, Zézé; Goumou, Koué; Guilavogui, Vamala; Sylla, N’famara; Chughtai, Morad; Qureshi, Adnan I.; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Camara, Naby Daouda

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury related to road traffic accidents poses a major challenge in resource-poor settings within Guinea. Objective To analyze the impact of treatment delay, access to healthcare, and patient's financial capacity on duration of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality. Methodology Data from patients with traumatic brain injury secondary to motor vehicle accident admitted to a reference hospital (public or private) in Guinea during 2009 were analyzed. The association between various factors (treatment delay, access to healthcare, and patient's financial capacity) and prolonged hospital stay (>21 days) and in-hospital mortality were analyzed using two multivariate logistic regression models. Results The mean (±standard deviation) duration of hospital stay was 8.0 (±8.1) days. The risk of prolonged hospital stay increased by 60% when the time interval between accident and hospital arrival was greater than 12 hours compared with those in whom the time interval was less than 6 hours (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–2.6, p = 0.03). Compared with patients with low-financial capacity, patients with medium-financial capacity (adjusted OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4–0.8, p = 0.001) and those with high capacity (adjusted OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4–0.9, p = 0.02) were less likely to have a prolonged hospital stay. The risk of in-hospital mortality was 2.6 times higher in patients with time interval between accident and hospital arrival greater than 12 hours compared with those in whom the time interval was less than 6 hours (adjusted OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1–6.2 p = 0.03). In-hospital mortality was not related to patient’s financial capacity. Conclusion Prolonged hospital stay and higher in-hospital mortality was associated with longer time interval between accident and hospital arrival. This delay is attributed to inadequate condition of intercity roads and lack of emergency medical services. PMID:26576213

  4. The Mortality Associated with Erythema Nodosum Leprosum in Ethiopia: A Retrospective Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Stephen L.; Lebas, Eglantine; Doni, Shimelis N.; Lockwood, Diana N. J.; Lambert, Saba M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) is a debilitating multisystem disorder which complicates leprosy. It is characterised by fever, malaise and painful erythematous cutaneous nodules. ENL is often recurrent or chronic in nature and frequently severe. Patients often require prolonged treatment with high doses of oral corticosteroids. There are no data on the mortality associated with treated ENL. Methodology The notes of patients who were admitted, discharged, transferred to another facility or died with a diagnosis of leprosy or a leprosy-related complication for a five year period were reviewed. Result/Discussion 414 individuals were identified from the ward database. 312 (75.4%) patient records were located and reviewed. Ninety-nine individuals had ENL and 145 had a Type 1 reaction. The median age of individuals with ENLwas 25 years. Eight patients with erythema nodosum leprosum died compared with two diagnosed with Type 1 reaction. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0168, Fisher's Exact Test). There is a significant mortality and morbidity associated with ENL in this Ethiopian cohort. The adverse outcomes seen are largely attributable to the chronic administration of oral corticosteroids used to control the inflammatory and debilitating symptoms of the condition. PMID:24625394

  5. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. (a) An index on which a contract of sale for future delivery is trading on a designated contract market, registered derivatives...

  6. 76 FR 20688 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 30-Day Notices, 135-Day Premarket...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... February 25, 1998 (63 FR 9570). This guidance describes the user fees authorized, updates the previous... the guidance entitled ``30-Day Notices, 135-Day Premarket Approval (PMA) Supplements and 75-Day... of a guidance for industry entitled ``30-Day Notices, 135-Day Premarket Approval (PMA)...

  7. 78 FR 65696 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... October 25, 2013 at 78 FR 64145 HUD published a 30 day notice of proposed information collection. This... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk-Sharing... Collection Title of Information Collection: Housing Finance Agency Risk- Sharing Program. OMB Approval...

  8. 76 FR 6794 - 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Program for Health Information Technology, 76 FR 1262 (Jan. 7, 2011) (the ``Permanent Certification... HUMAN SERVICES 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status AGENCY... ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) status. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 300jj-11. DATES: The 30-day...

  9. 78 FR 58318 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: The Framingham Heart Study (FHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... studying the determinants of cardiovascular disease. Morbidity and mortality follow-up will continue to... data collection plans and instruments, contact Dr. Gina Wei, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences,...

  10. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  11. Effects of closure of an urban level I trauma centre on adjacent hospitals and local injury mortality: a retrospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Marie; Sharp, Douglas; Wei, Xiong; Nathens, Avery; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of the Martin Luther King Jr Hospital (MLK) closure on the distribution of admissions on adjacent trauma centres, and injury mortality rates in these centres and within the county. Design Observational, retrospective study. Setting Non-public patient-level data from the state of California were obtained for all trauma patients from 1999 to 2009. Geospatial analysis was used to visualise the redistribution of trauma patients to other hospitals after MLK closed. Variance of observed to expected injury mortality using multivariate logistic regression was estimated for the study period. Participants A total of 37 131 trauma patients were admitted to the five major south Los Angeles trauma centres from the MLK service area between 1999 and 2009. Main outcome measures (1) Number and type of trauma admissions to trauma centres in closest proximity to MLK; (2) inhospital injury mortality of trauma patients after the trauma centre closure. Results During and after the MLK closure, trauma admissions increased at three of the four nearby hospitals, particularly admissions for gunshot wounds (GSWs). This redistribution of patient load was accompanied by a dramatic change in the payer mix for surrounding hospitals; one hospital's share of uninsured more than tripled from 12.9% in 1999 to 44.6% by 2009. Overall trauma mortality did not significantly change, but GSW mortality steadily and significantly increased after the closure from 5.0% in 2007 to 7.5% in 2009. Conclusions Though local hospitals experienced a dramatic increase in trauma patient volume, overall mortality for trauma patients did not significantly change after MLK closed. PMID:27165650

  12. When Suicide Is Not Suicide: Self-induced Morbidity and Mortality in the General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal phenomena in the general hospital can take a variety of forms that can be parsed by taking into account whether or not the patient 1) intended to hasten death, and 2) included collaborators, including family and health care providers, in the decision to act. These two criteria can be used to distinguish entities as diverse as true suicide, non-compliance, euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide, and hospice/palliative care. Characterizing the nature of “suicide” events facilitates appropriate decision-making around management and disposition. PMID:25973265

  13. Minor Postoperative Increases of Creatinine Are Associated with Higher Mortality and Longer Hospital Length of Stay in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Spies, Claudia D.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ginde, Adit A.; Jankowski, Joachim; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical patients frequently experience postoperative increases in creatinine levels. The authors hypothesized that even small increases in postoperative creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Methods The authors examined the association of postoperative changes from preoperative baseline creatinine with all-cause in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay (HLOS) in a retrospective analysis of surgical patients at a single tertiary care center between January 2006 and June 2012. Results The data of 39,369 surgical patients (noncardiac surgery n = 37,345; cardiac surgery n = 2,024) were analyzed. Acute kidney injury (AKI)—by definition of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome group—was associated with a five-fold higher mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% CI, 4.1 to 5.7; P < 0.001) and a longer HLOS of 5 days (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, congestive heart failure, preoperative hemoglobin, preoperative creatinine, exposure to radiocontrast agent, type of surgery, and surgical AKI risk factors. Importantly, even minor creatinine increases (Δcreatinine 25 to 49% above baseline but < 0.3 mg/dl) not meeting AKI criteria were associated with a two-fold increased risk of death (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.4; P < 0.001) and 2 days longer HLOS (P < 0.001). This was more pronounced in noncardiac surgery patients. Patients with minor creatinine increases had a five-fold risk of death (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 20.3; P < 0.05) and a 3-day longer HLOS (P < 0.01) when undergoing noncardiac surgery. Conclusions Even minor postoperative increases in creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. These results emphasize the importance to find effective therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat even mild forms of postoperative kidney dysfunction to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26492475

  14. Impacts of typhoon and heavy rain disasters on mortality and infectious diarrhea hospitalization in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunduk; Shin, Yongseung; Kim, Ho; Pak, Haeoyong; Ha, Jongsik

    2013-01-01

    Several studies for health impacts of natural disasters have not been comprehensive with respect to disaster type and areas, nor quantitative. The aim of our study is to quantitatively examine the associations between disasters and human health in South Korea. This study considered "special disasters" that occurred from 2003 to 2009 in seven metropolitan cities and nine provinces in South Korea. First, we completed health impact counts in both disaster periods and reference periods. We then calculated the rate ratios between health impact counts in these two periods. Mortality is estimated to be higher in the case of typhoons, whereas morbidity is estimated to be higher in heavy rain disasters. The difference in health impacts of typhoons and heavy rain may be explained by the difference in meteorological exposure patterns. Consequentially, we suggest the development of properly adaptive plans against the influence of future natural disasters on human health. PMID:23075392

  15. Predictors of mortality in solid-organ transplant recipients with infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Ye, Qifa; Wan, Qiquan; Zhou, Jiandang

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii can cause a serious infection in solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients, and more data on A. baumannii infection is needed. We sought to investigate the epidemiology and distribution of A. baumannii isolates in SOT recipients. We also investigated the risk factors for overall in-hospital mortality and infection-related 30-day mortality using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A double-center retrospective study of SOT recipients who were infected with A. baumannii between January 2003 and January 2015 was conducted. A total of 71 individuals developed 93 episodes of A. baumannii infection, with a mean age of 44.5 years (44.5±11.9 years). Ninety percent of recipients had nosocomial origin A. baumannii infection, with the bloodstream as the most common site of infection (32.4%). Septic shock developed in 23.9% (17 of 71) of all recipients with A. baumannii infection. Morbidity and mortality rates of A. baumannii infections were high in SOT recipients. The incidence rate of A. baumannii infection in SOT recipients was 3.9% (71 of 1,821). Overall in-hospital mortality and infection-related 30-day mortality were 53.5% (38 of 71) and 40.8% (29 of 71), respectively. Risk factors independently associated with overall in-hospital mortality were mechanical ventilation at onset of A. baumannii infection (odds ratio [OR] 6.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48-26.85; P=0.013), liver or liver-kidney transplantation (OR 15.33, 95% CI 1.82-129.18; P=0.012), and late-onset A. baumannii infection (OR 7.61, 95% CI 1.07-54.36; P=0.043). A platelet count <50,000/mm(3) (OR 12.76, 95% CI 1.28-126.81; P=0.030) and mechanical ventilation at onset of A. baumannii infection (OR 189.98, 95% CI 13.23-2,728.81; P<0.001) were identified as independent risk factors for infection-related 30-day mortality. In conclusion, the morbidity and mortality rates of A. baumannii infections were high in SOT recipients. Mechanical ventilation at onset of A. baumannii

  16. NT-proBNP and Its Correlation with In-Hospital Mortality in the Very Elderly without an Admission Diagnosis of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Spannella, Francesco; Giulietti, Federico; Fedecostante, Massimiliano; Giordano, Piero; Gattafoni, Pisana; Espinosa, Emma; Busco, Franco; Piccinini, Gina; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of heart failure (HF) is often difficult and underestimated in very elderly comorbid patients, especially when an echocardiographic evaluation is not available or feasible. Aim: to evaluate NT-proBNP values and their correlation with in-hospital mortality in a population of very elderly hospitalized for medical conditions other than HF. Methods We performed a prospective observational study on 403 very elderly admitted to an Internal Medicine and Geriatrics Department. Exclusion criterion was an admission diagnosis of HF. Patients with at least one symptom or sign compatible with HF were tested for NT-proBNP. NT-proBNP values < 300 pg/ml were considered as an age-independent exclusion criterion for HF (high negative predictive value), while NT-proBNP values ≥ 1800 pg/ml were considered as a diagnostic criterion. Main comorbidities and laboratory parameters were considered to adjust regression analyses between NT-proBNP and in-hospital mortality. Results NT-proBNP values ≥ 1800 pg/ml were present in 61.0% of patients and 32.8% of patients laid between 300 ≤ NT-proBNP < 1800 pg/ml values. NT-proBNP values were associated with the main indices of disease severity/organ failure considered such as reduced eGFR, reduced albumin and elevated CRP. NT-proBNP values ≥ 1800 pg/ml and ln(NT-proBNP) values were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality independently from the main comorbidities and lab parameters considered. The patients, who were already taking ACE inhibitors/Angiotensin Receptor Blockers before admission, showed lower in-hospital mortality. Conclusions Testing for NT-proBNP should be strongly recommended in the hospitalized very elderly, because of the very high prevalence of underlying HF and its impact on in-hospital mortality, to identify an underlying cardiac involvement that requires appropriate treatment. PMID:27077910

  17. Validation of the Risk Estimator Decision aid for Atrial Fibrillation (RED-AF) for Predicting 30-Day Adverse Events in Emergency Department Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tyler W.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Self, Wesley H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nearly 70% of emergency departments (ED) visits for atrial fibrillation (AF) result in hospitalization. The incidence of serious 30-day adverse events following an ED evaluation for AF remains low. This study’s goal was to prospectively validate our previously reported Risk Estimator Decision aid for AF (RED-AF) model for estimating a patient’s risk of experiencing a 30-day adverse event. Methods This was a prospective cohort study, which enrolled a convenience sample of ED patients presenting with AF. RED-AF, previously derived from a retrospective cohort of 832 patients, assigns points based on age, sex, coexisting disease (heart failure, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), smoking, home medications (beta blocker, diuretic), physical examination findings (dyspnea, palpitations, peripheral edema), and adequacy of ED ventricular rate control. Primary outcome was occurrence of ≥1 AF-related adverse outcome (ED visits, rehospitalization, cardiovascular complications, death) within 30 days. We identified a clinically relevant threshold and measured RED-AF’s performance in this prospective cohort, assessing its calibration, discrimination, and diagnostic accuracy. Results The study enrolled 497 patients between June 2010 and February 2013. Of these, 120 (24%) had ≥1 adverse event within 30 days. A RED-AF score of 87 was identified as an optimal threshold, resulting in sensitivity (95% CI) and specificity (95%CI) of 96% (91–98) and 19% (15–23), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 27% (23–32) and 93% (85–97), respectively. The c-statistic for RED-AF was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.59 to 0.71). Conclusion In this separate validation cohort, RED-AF performed moderately well and similar to the original derivation cohort for identifying the risk of short-term AF-related adverse events in ED patients diagnosed with AF. PMID:25245277

  18. Correspondence between hair cortisol concentrations and 30-day integrated daily salivary and weekly urinary cortisol measures.

    PubMed

    Short, Sarah J; Stalder, Tobias; Marceau, Kristine; Entringer, Sonja; Moog, Nora K; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Wadhwa, Pathik D; Buss, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of cortisol production, regulation and function is of considerable interest and relevance given its ubiquitous role in virtually all aspects of physiology, health and disease risk. The quantification of cortisol concentration in hair has been proposed as a promising approach for the retrospective assessment of integrated, long-term cortisol production. However, human research is still needed to directly test and validate current assumptions about which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are reflected in hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Here, we report findings from a validation study in a sample of 17 healthy adults (mean±SD age: 34±8.6 yrs). To determine the extent to which HCC captures cumulative cortisol production, we examined the correspondence of HCC, obtained from the first 1cm scalp-near hair segment, assumed to retrospectively reflect 1-month integrated cortisol secretion, with 30-day average salivary cortisol area-under-the curve (AUC) based on 3 samples collected per day (on awakening, +30min, at bedtime) and the average of 4 weekly 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC) assessments. To further address which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are best reflected in the HCC measure, we also examined components of the salivary measures that represent: (1) production in response to the challenge of awakening (using the cortisol awakening response [CAR]), and (2) chronobiological regulation of cortisol production (using diurnal slope). Finally, we evaluated the test-retest stability of each cortisol measure. Results indicate that HCC was most strongly associated with the prior 30-day integrated cortisol production measure (average salivary cortisol AUC) (r=0.61, p=0.01). There were no significant associations between HCC and the 30-day summary measures using CAR or diurnal slope. The relationship between 1-month integrated 24-h UFC and HCC did not reach statistical significance (r=0.30, p=0.28). Lastly, of all cortisol

  19. Statin drugs mitigate cellular inflammatory response after ST elevation myocardial infarction, but do not affect in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pourafkari, Leili; Visnjevac, Ognjen; Ghaffari, Samad; Nader, Nader D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to examine the role of statins in modulating post-STEMI inflammation and related mortality. Methods: A total of 404 patients with STEMI were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, laboratory values, and outcomes were collected. The patients were grouped as STATIN and NOSTAT based on the use of statin drugs at the time of admission. Ninety-seven patients were receiving statin drugs. Results: The patients in the STATIN group were more likely to be hypertensive (53.6%), diabetic (37.1%) and to have previous coronary revascularization (9.3%). Following propensity matching of 89 patients in STATIN group to an equal number of patients in NOSTAT controls had lower neutrophil count 7.8 (6.8-8.4) compared to those in the NOSTAT group 9.1 (7.9-10.1). Although there was no difference in-hospital mortality between the two groups, the incidence of pump failure was lower in the STATIN group (5.6% vs. 15.7%; P < 0.01). Conclusion: Statin treatment prior to STEMI mitigates the cellular inflammatory response after the myocardial infarction, as evidenced by lower leukocyte and neutrophil cell counts in the STATIN group. PMID:27069565

  20. Predictors of Severity and Mortality in Children Hospitalized With Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Tropical Region

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Cárdenas, Andrea Constanza; Quilaguy, Ivonne Emilce; Mayorga, Leydy Yasmin; Falla, Luz Marlesvy; Nino, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in infants and young children. Although ALRI is a major public health problem in developing countries located in tropical areas, studies about RSV epidemiology in these regions are scarce. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we investigated the epidemiology and predictive variables that reflect disease severity and mortality in young children hospitalized with ALRI due to RSV in Colombia, South-America, during a 2-year period (2009–2011). Results Of a total of 6,344 children with a diagnosis of ALRI, we selected 2,147 (33.8%) that were positive for RSV. After controlling for pre-existing conditions, we found that independent predictors of severe disease in our population included age <6 months (RR 2.01; CI 95% 1.70–2.38; P < 0.001), prematurity (RR 1.61; CI 95% 1.20–2.17; P = 0.001), congenital heart disease (RR 2.03; CI 95% 1.16–3.54; P = 0.013), and mixed RSV-adenovirus infection (RR 2.09; CI 95% 1.60–2.73; P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified that cancer (RR 31.60; CI 95% 5.97–167.13; P < 0.001) is a predictor of mortality in our RSV-infected pediatric population independently of age and other co-morbidities. Conclusions RSV is an important cause of ALRI in infants and young children living in tropical regions, especially during the rainy season. The identified predictors of severe disease and mortality should be taken into account when planning interventions to reduce the burden of ALRI in young children living in these regions. PMID:23401345

  1. Association of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression With All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality and Hospitalization Among Hurricane Katrina Survivors With End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Donald; Gamboa, Christopher; Cohen, Andrew; Anderson, Amanda H.; Kutner, Nancy; Kronish, Ian; Mills, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the association of psychiatric symptoms in the year after Hurricane Katrina with subsequent hospitalization and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of ESRD patients (n = 391) treated at 9 hemodialysis centers in the New Orleans, Louisiana, area in the weeks before Hurricane Katrina were assessed for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms via telephone interview 9 to 15 months later. Two combined outcomes through August 2009 (maximum 3.5-year follow-up) were analyzed: (1) all-cause and (2) cardiovascular-related hospitalization and mortality. Results. Twenty-four percent of participants screened positive for PTSD and 46% for depression; 158 participants died (79 cardiovascular deaths), and 280 participants were hospitalized (167 for cardiovascular-related causes). Positive depression screening was associated with 33% higher risk of all-cause (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06, 1.66) and cardiovascular-related hospitalization and mortality (HR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.76). PTSD was not significantly associated with either outcome. Conclusions. Depression in the year after Hurricane Katrina was associated with increased risk of hospitalization and mortality in ESRD patients, underscoring the long-term consequences of natural disasters for vulnerable populations. PMID:23409901

  2. Development of Lightweight Material Composites to Insulate Cryogenic Tanks for 30-Day Storage in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for an MLI system which will meet the design constraints of an ILRV used for 7- to 30-day missions. The ten tasks are briefly described: (1) material survey and procurement, material property tests, and selection of composites to be considered; (2) definition of environmental parameters and tooling requirements, and thermal and structural design verification test definition; (3) definition of tanks and associated hardware to be used, and definition of MLI concepts to be considered; (4) thermal analyses, including purge, evacuation, and reentry repressurization analyses; (5) structural analyses (6) thermal degradation tests of composite and structural tests of fastener; (7) selection of MLI materials and system; (8) definition of a conceptual MLI system design; (9) evaluation of nondestructive inspection techniques and definition of procedures for repair of damaged areas; and (10) preparation of preliminary specifications.

  3. The Gravity of LBNP Exercise: Lessons Learned from Identical Twins in Bed for 30 Days

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Groppo, Eli R.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Watenpaugh, Donald; Schneider, Suzanne; O'Leary, Deborah; Smith, Scott M.; Steinbach, Gregory C.; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shinji; Meyer, R. Scott

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity leads to cardiovascular deconditioning in humans, which is manifested by post-flight reduction of orthostatic tolerance and upright exercise capacity. During upright posture on Earth, blood pressures are greater in the feet than at heart or head levels due to gravity's effects on columns of blood in the body. During exposure to Microgravity, all gravitational blood pressures disappear. Presently, there is no exercise hardware available for space flight to provide gravitational blood pressures to tissues of the lower body. We hypothesized that 40 minutes of supine treadmill running per day in a LBNP chamber at 1.0 to 1.2 body weight (approximately 50 - 60 mm Hg LBNP) with a 5 min resting, nonexercise LBNP exposure at 50 mm Hg after the exercise session will maintain aerobic fitness orthostatic tolerance, and selected parameters of musculoskeletal function during 30 days of bed rest (simulated microgravity). This paper is an interim report of some of our findings on 16 subjects.

  4. Continuous 30-day measurements utilizing the monkey metabolism pod. [study of weightlessness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    A fiberglass system was previously described, using which quantitative physiological measurements could be made to study the effects of weightlessness on 10 to 14 kg adult monkeys maintained in comfortable restraint under space flight conditions. Recent improvements in the system have made it possible to obtain continuous measurements of respiratory gas exchange, cardiovascular function, and mineral balance for periods of up to 30 days on pig-tailed monkeys. It has also been possible to operate two pods which share one set of instrumentation, thereby permitting simultaneous measurements to be made on two animals by commutating signal outputs from the pods. In principle, more than two pods could be operated in this fashion. The system is compatible with Spacelab design. Representative physiological data from ground tests of the system are presented.

  5. Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality of Severe Malaria in HIV-Coinfected Children and Adults in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Ferro, Josefo; Montoya, Pablo; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Seni, Amir; Gomes, Ermelinda; Silamut, Kamolrat; Lee, Sue J.; Lucas, Marcelino; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Fanello, Caterina I.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Severe falciparum malaria with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is common in settings with a high prevalence of both diseases, but there is little information on whether HIV affects the clinical presentation and outcome of severe malaria. Methods. HIV status was assessed prospectively in hospitalized parasitemic adults and children with severe malaria in Beira, Mozambique, as part of a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (ISRCTN50258054). Clinical signs, comorbidity, complications, and disease outcome were compared according to HIV status. Results. HIV-1 seroprevalence was 11% (74/655) in children under 15 years and 72% (49/68) in adults with severe malaria. Children with HIV coinfection presented with more severe acidosis, anemia, and respiratory distress, and higher peripheral blood parasitemia and plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2). During hospitalization, deterioration in coma score, convulsions, respiratory distress, and pneumonia were more common in HIV-coinfected children, and mortality was 26% (19/74) versus 9% (53/581) in uninfected children (P < .001). In an age- and antimalarial treatment–adjusted logistic regression model, significant, independent predictors for death were renal impairment, acidosis, parasitemia, and plasma PfHRP2 concentration. Conclusions. Severe malaria in HIV-coinfected patients presents with higher parasite burden, more complications, and comorbidity, and carries a higher case fatality rate. Early identification of HIV coinfection is important for the clinical management of severe malaria. PMID:22752514

  6. Onyalai at Rundu, Namibia 1981-1988: age, sex, morbidity, mortality and seasonal variation of 612 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Hesseling, P B

    1990-01-01

    Of 51,263 admissions to Rundu State Hospital in Namibia between 1981 and 1988, 612 (1.19%) were diagnosed as onyalai. The annual incidence varied between 0.96% and 1.66% of all admissions. The female to male ratio was 3:2. The mean age at presentation was 24.8 years (range 6 months to 80 years) and the mean hospital stay (and duration of clinical bleeding) for the years 1981 to 1982 and 1985 to 1988 was 7.68 d (range 1-38 d). Although the highest number of cases occurred during the months March, April and May a statistically significant monthly variation was not found. The treatment policy of commencing intravenous fluid on admission and a blood transfusion whenever the haemoglobin dropped below 10 g/dl in patients with active bleeding was associated with a mortality rate of 2.78% compared to 9.8% in cases recorded up to 1981. PMID:2091364

  7. Alcohol use by urban bicyclists is associated with more severe injury, greater hospital resource use, and higher mortality.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Monica; Heyer, Jessica H; Wall, Stephen; DiMaggio, Charles; Shinseki, Matthew; Slaughter, Dekeya; Frangos, Spiros G

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol use is a risk factor for severe injury in pedestrians struck by motor vehicles. Our objective was to investigate alcohol use by bicyclists and its effects on riding behaviors, medical management, injury severity, and mortality within a congested urban setting. A hospital-based, observational study of injured bicyclists presenting to a Level I regional trauma center in New York City was conducted. Data were collected prospectively from 2012 to 2014 by interviewing all bicyclists presenting within 24 h of injury and supplemented with medical record review. Variables included demographic characteristics, scene-related data, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), computed tomography (CT) scans, and clinical outcomes. Alcohol use at the time of injury was determined by history or blood alcohol level (BAL) >0.01 g/dL. Of 689 bicyclists, 585 (84.9%) were male with a mean age of 35.2. One hundred four (15.1%) bicyclists had consumed alcohol prior to injury. Alcohol use was inversely associated with helmet use (16.5% [9.9-25.1] vs. 43.2% [39.1-47.3]). Alcohol-consuming bicyclists were more likely to fall from their bicycles (42.0% [32.2-52.3] vs. 24.2% [20.8-27.9]) and less likely to be injured by collision with a motor vehicle (52.0% [41.7-62.1] vs. 67.5% [63.5-71.3]). 80% of alcohol-consuming bicyclists underwent CT imaging at presentation compared with 51.5% of non-users. Mortality was higher among injured bicyclists who had used alcohol (2.9% [0.6-8.2] vs. 0.0% [0.0-0.6]). Adjusted multivariable analysis revealed that alcohol use was independently associated with more severe injury (Adjusted Odds Ratio 2.27, p = 0.001, 95% Confidence Interval 1.40-3.68). Within a dense urban environment, alcohol use by bicyclists was associated with more severe injury, greater hospital resource use, and higher mortality. As bicycling continues to increase in popularity internationally, it is important to heighten awareness about the risks and consequences of bicycling while under the

  8. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Zwart, Sara R.; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25–49 yr) who participated in a 30-day −6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ∼20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ∼25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ∼20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = −0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  9. The cost of clinical mastitis in the first 30 days of lactation: An economic modeling tool.

    PubMed

    Rollin, E; Dhuyvetter, K C; Overton, M W

    2015-12-01

    Clinical mastitis results in considerable economic losses for dairy producers and is most commonly diagnosed in early lactation. The objective of this research was to estimate the economic impact of clinical mastitis occurring during the first 30 days of lactation for a representative US dairy. A deterministic partial budget model was created to estimate direct and indirect costs per case of clinical mastitis occurring during the first 30 days of lactation. Model inputs were selected from the available literature, or when none were available, from herd data. The average case of clinical mastitis resulted in a total economic cost of $444, including $128 in direct costs and $316 in indirect costs. Direct costs included diagnostics ($10), therapeutics ($36), non-saleable milk ($25), veterinary service ($4), labor ($21), and death loss ($32). Indirect costs included future milk production loss ($125), premature culling and replacement loss ($182), and future reproductive loss ($9). Accurate decision making regarding mastitis control relies on understanding the economic impacts of clinical mastitis, especially the longer term indirect costs that represent 71% of the total cost per case of mastitis. Future milk production loss represents 28% of total cost, and future culling and replacement loss represents 41% of the total cost of a case of clinical mastitis. In contrast to older estimates, these values represent the current dairy economic climate, including milk price ($0.461/kg), feed price ($0.279/kg DM (dry matter)), and replacement costs ($2,094/head), along with the latest published estimates on the production and culling effects of clinical mastitis. This economic model is designed to be customized for specific dairy producers and their herd characteristics to better aid them in developing mastitis control strategies. PMID:26596651

  10. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Zwart, Sara R; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen; Smith, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25-49 yr) who participated in a 30-day -6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ~20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ~25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ~20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = -0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  11. Plasma Fibrinogen as a Biomarker for Mortality and Hospitalized Exacerbations in People with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, David M; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A.; Vestbo, Jorgen; Graham Barr, R.; Tetzlaff, Kay; Lowings, Michael; Rennard, Stephen I.; Snyder, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Martin, Ubaldo J.; Merrill, Deborah; Martin, Amber L.; Simeone, Jason C.; Fahrbach, Kyle; Murphy, Brian; Leidy, Nancy; Miller, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the COPD Foundation established the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium (CBQC) as a partnership between the Foundation, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the pharmaceutical industry to pool publicly-funded and industry data to develop innovative tools to facilitate the development and approval of new therapies for COPD. We present data from the initial project seeking regulatory qualification of fibrinogen as a biomarker for the stratification of COPD patients into clinical trials. Methods This analysis pooled data from 4 publicly-funded studies and 1 industry study into a common database resulting in 6376 individuals with spirometric evidence of COPD. We used a threshold of 350 mg/dL to determine high vs. low fibrinogen, and determined the subsequent risk of hospitalizations from exacerbations and death using Cox proportional hazards models. Results High fibrinogen levels at baseline were present in 2853 (44.7%) of individuals with COPD. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of hospitalized COPD exacerbations within 12 months (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39–1.93) among participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) study. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of death within 36 months (HR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.62–2.31) among all participants. Conclusions Fibrinogen levels ≥ 350 mg/dL identify COPD individuals at an increased risk of exacerbations and death and could be a useful biomarker for enriching clinical trials in the COPD population. PMID:25685850

  12. Temporal distribution of baseline characteristics and association with early mortality among HIV-positive patients at University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Joshua O; Adesina, Olubukola A; Kuti, Modupe O; Ogunbosi, Babatunde O; Irabor, Achiaka E; Odaibo, Georgina N; Olaleye, David O; Adewole, Isaac F

    2015-01-01

    The first six months of HIV care and treatment are very important for long-term outcome. Early mortality (within 6 months of care initiation) undermines care and treatment goals. This study assessed the temporal distribution in baseline characteristics and early mortality among HIV patients at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria from 2006-2013. Factors associated with early mortality were also investigated. This was a retrospective analysis of data from 14 857 patients enrolled for care and treatment at the adult antiretroviral clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Effects of factors associated with early mortality were summarised using a hazard ratio with a 95% confidence interval obtained from Cox proportional hazard regression models. The mean age of the subjects was 36.4 (SD=10.2) years with females being in the majority (68.1%). While patients' demographic characteristics remained virtually the same over time, there was significant decline in the prevalence of baseline opportunistic infections (2006-2007=55.2%; 2011-2013=38.0%). Overall, 460 (3.1%) patients were known to have died within 6 months of enrollment in care/treatment. There was no significant trend in incidence of early mortality. Factors associated with early mortality include: male sex, HIV encephalopathy, low CD4 count (< 50 cells), and anaemia. To reduce early mortality, community education should be promoted, timely access to care and treatment should be facilitated and the health system further strengthened to care for high risk patients. PMID:26282931

  13. Using linked birth, notification, hospital and mortality data to examine false-positive meningococcal disease reporting and adjust disease incidence estimates for children in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, A; Jorm, L; McIntyre, P

    2015-09-01

    Meningococcal disease is a rare, rapidly progressing condition which may be difficult to diagnose, disproportionally affects children, and has high morbidity and mortality. Accurate incidence estimates are needed to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination and treatment. We used linked notification, hospital, mortality and birth data for all children of an Australian state (2000-2007) to estimate the incidence of meningococcal disease. A total of 595 cases were notified, 684 cases had a hospital diagnosis, and 26 cases died from meningococcal disease. All deaths were notified, but only 68% (466/684) of hospitalized cases. Of non-notified hospitalized cases with more than one clinical admission, most (90%, 103/114) did not have meningococcal disease recorded as their final diagnosis, consistent with initial 'false-positive' hospital meningococcal disease diagnosis. After adjusting for false-positive rates in hospital data, capture-recapture estimation suggested that up to four cases of meningococcal disease may not have been captured in either notification or hospital records. The estimated incidence of meningococcal disease in NSW-born and -resident children aged 0-14 years was 5·1-5·4 cases/100 000 child-years at risk, comparable to international estimates using similar methods, but lower than estimates based on hospital data. PMID:25573266

  14. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and In-Hospital Mortality of Venous Thromboembolism in Liver Cirrhosis: A Single-Center Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xintong; Qi, Xingshun; De Stefano, Valerio; Hou, Feifei; Ning, Zheng; Zhao, Jiancheng; Peng, Ying; Li, Jing; Deng, Han; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), may be increased in liver cirrhosis. We conducted a single-center study to explore the epidemiology, risk factors, and in-hospital mortality of VTE in Chinese patients with liver cirrhosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients with liver cirrhosis who were consecutively admitted to our hospital between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively included. RESULTS Of 2006 patients with liver cirrhosis included, 9 patients were diagnosed with or developed VTE during hospitalization, including 5 patients with a previous history of DVT, 1 patient with either a previous history of DVT or new onset of PE, and 3 patients with new onset of VTE (PE, n=1; DVT, n=2). Risk factors for VTE included a significantly higher proportion of hypertension and significantly higher red blood cells, hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), D-dimer, and Child-Pugh scores. The in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with VTE than those without VTE (33.3% [3/9] versus 3.4% [67/1997], P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS VTE was observed in 0.4% of patients with liver cirrhosis during hospitalization and it significantly increased the in-hospital mortality. Elevated PT/INR aggravated the risk of VTE. PMID:27009380

  15. Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and In-Hospital Mortality of Venous Thromboembolism in Liver Cirrhosis: A Single-Center Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xintong; Qi, Xingshun; De Stefano, Valerio; Hou, Feifei; Ning, Zheng; Zhao, Jiancheng; Peng, Ying; Li, Jing; Deng, Han; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), may be increased in liver cirrhosis. We conducted a single-center study to explore the epidemiology, risk factors, and in-hospital mortality of VTE in Chinese patients with liver cirrhosis. Material/Methods All patients with liver cirrhosis who were consecutively admitted to our hospital between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively included. Results Of 2006 patients with liver cirrhosis included, 9 patients were diagnosed with or developed VTE during hospitalization, including 5 patients with a previous history of DVT, 1 patient with either a previous history of DVT or new onset of PE, and 3 patients with new onset of VTE (PE, n=1; DVT, n=2). Risk factors for VTE included a significantly higher proportion of hypertension and significantly higher red blood cells, hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), D-dimer, and Child-Pugh scores. The in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with VTE than those without VTE (33.3% [3/9] versus 3.4% [67/1997], P<0.001). Conclusions VTE was observed in 0.4% of patients with liver cirrhosis during hospitalization and it significantly increased the in-hospital mortality. Elevated PT/INR aggravated the risk of VTE. PMID:27009380

  16. Propensity-matched analysis of association between preoperative anemia and in-hospital mortality in cardiac surgical patients undergoing valvular heart surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shreedhar S.; George, Antony; Manasa, Dhananjaya; Savita, Hemalatha M.R.; Krishna, Prasad T. H.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Anaemia is associated with increased post-operative morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively assess the relationship between preoperative anaemia and in-hospital mortality in valvular cardiac surgical population. Materials and Methods: Data from consecutive adult patients who underwent valvular repair/replacement at our institute from January 2010 to April 2014 were collected from hospital records. Anaemia was defined according to WHO criteria (hemoglobin <13g/dl for males and <12g/dl for females). 1:1 matching was done for anemic and non-anemic patients based on propensity for potentially confounding variables. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between anaemia and in-hospital mortality. MatchIt package for R software was used for propensity matching and SPSS 16.0.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: 2449 patients undergoing valvular surgery with or without coronary artery grafting were included. Anaemia was present in 37.1% (33.91% among males & 40.88% among females). Unadjusted OR for mortality was 1.6 in anemic group (95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] – 1.041-2.570; p=0.033). 1:1 matching was done on the basis of propensity score for anaemia (866 pairs). Balancing was confirmed using standardized differences. Anaemia had an OR of 1.8 for mortality (95% CI- 1.042 to 3.094, P=0.035). Hematocrit of < 20 on bypass was associated with higher mortality. Conclusion: Preoperative anaemia is an independent risk factor associated with in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery. PMID:26139743

  17. Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Their Association With Hospital Mortality Among Patients With First Myocardial Infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction)

    PubMed Central

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertension (52.3%) was most common, followed by smoking (31.3%). The least common risk factor was diabetes (22.4%). Crude mortality was highest in patients with MI with diabetes (11.9%) and hypertension (9.8%) and lowest in those with smoking histories (5.4%) and dyslipidemia (4.6%). The inclusion of 5 atherosclerotic risk factors in a stepwise multivariate model contributed little toward predicting hospital mortality over age alone (C-statistic = 0.73 and 0.71, respectively). After extensive multivariate adjustments for clinical and sociodemographic factors, patients with MI with diabetes had higher odds of dying (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 1.26) than those without diabetes and similarly for hypertension (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.11). Conversely, family history (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.73), dyslipidemia (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), and smoking (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.88) were associated with decreased mortality (C-statistic = 0.82 for the full model). In conclusion, in the setting of acute MI, histories of diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher hospital mortality, but the inclusion of atherosclerotic risk factors in models of hospital mortality does not improve predictive ability beyond other major clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:22840346

  18. Atherosclerotic risk factors and their association with hospital mortality among patients with first myocardial infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction).

    PubMed

    Canto, John G; Kiefe, Catarina I; Rogers, William J; Peterson, Eric D; Frederick, Paul D; French, William J; Gibson, C Michael; Pollack, Charles V; Ornato, Joseph P; Zalenski, Robert J; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J; Greenland, Philip

    2012-11-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertension (52.3%) was most common, followed by smoking (31.3%). The least common risk factor was diabetes (22.4%). Crude mortality was highest in patients with MI with diabetes (11.9%) and hypertension (9.8%) and lowest in those with smoking histories (5.4%) and dyslipidemia (4.6%). The inclusion of 5 atherosclerotic risk factors in a stepwise multivariate model contributed little toward predicting hospital mortality over age alone (C-statistic = 0.73 and 0.71, respectively). After extensive multivariate adjustments for clinical and sociodemographic factors, patients with MI with diabetes had higher odds of dying (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 1.26) than those without diabetes and similarly for hypertension (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.11). Conversely, family history (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.73), dyslipidemia (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), and smoking (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.88) were associated with decreased mortality (C-statistic = 0.82 for the full model). In conclusion, in the setting of acute MI, histories of diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher hospital mortality, but the inclusion of atherosclerotic risk factors in models of hospital mortality does not improve predictive ability beyond other major clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:22840346

  19. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an

  20. Heart rate multiscale entropy at three hours predicts hospital mortality in 3,154 trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Norris, Patrick R; Anderson, Steven M; Jenkins, Judith M; Williams, Anna E; Morris, John A

    2008-07-01

    Complexity is a measure of variation and randomness potentially indicating improvement or deterioration in critically ill patients. Previously, we have shown integer heart rate (HR) multiscale entropy (MSE), an indicator of complexity, predicts death based on long duration (12 h) and dense (>or=0.4 Hz) windows of HR data. However, such restrictions reduce the use of MSE in the clinical setting. We hypothesized MSE predicts death using HR data of shorter duration and lower density. During the initial 24 h of intensive care unit stay, 3,154 patients had at least 3 h of continuous integer HR sampled. The first continuous window of 3, 6, 9, and 12 h was selected for each patient regardless of density, and an open-source MSE algorithm was applied (M. Costa, www.physionet.org; m = 2; r = 0.15). Risk of death based on MSE, alone and with covariates (age, sex, injury severity score), was assessed using randomly selected logistic regression in half of the cases. Area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) was computed in the other half in subgroups having various durations and densities of HR data. At days 2.3 (median) and 4.9 (mean), 441 patients (14%) died. Multiscale entropy stratified patients by mortality and was an independent predictor of death using 3 h or more of data. Multiscale entropy alone (AUC = 0.66 - 0.71) predicted death comparably to covariates alone (AUC = 0.72). We conclude: (1) Heart rate MSE within hours of admission predicts death occurring days later. (2) Multiscale entropy is robust to variation in bedside data duration and density occurring in a working intensive care unit. (3) Complexity may be a new clinical biomarker of outcome. PMID:18323736

  1. In-Hospital and One-Year Mortality and Their Predictors in Patients Hospitalized for First-Ever Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Te-Wei; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Huang, Chun-Ta; Lai, Feipei; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is punctuated by exacerbations; however, little is known about prognosis of the first-ever COPD exacerbation and variables predicting its outcomes. Materials and Methods A population-based cohort study among COPD patients with their first-ever exacerbations requiring hospitalizations was conducted. Main outcomes were in-hospital mortality and one-year mortality after discharge. Demographics, comorbidities, medications and in-hospital events were obtained to explore outcome predictors. Results The cohort comprised 4204 hospitalized COPD patients, of whom 175 (4%) died during the hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was related to higher age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.05 per year; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.06) and Charlson comorbidity index score (OR: 1.08 per point; 95% CI: 1.01–1.15); angiotensin II receptor blockers (OR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.38–0.98) and β blockers (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.41–0.95) conferred a survival benefit. At one year after discharge, 22% (871/4029) of hospital survivors were dead. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, age and Charlson comorbidity index remained independent predictors of one-year mortality. Longer hospital stay (hazard ratio [HR] 1.01 per day; 95% CI: 1.01–1.01) and ICU admission (HR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.03–1.73) during the hospitalization were associated with higher mortality risks. Prescription of β blockers (HR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.67–0.93) and statins (HR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.47–0.91) on hospital discharge were protective against one-year mortality. Conclusions Even the first-ever severe COPD exacerbation signifies poor prognosis in COPD patients. Comorbidities play a crucial role in determining outcomes and should be carefully assessed. Angiotensin II receptor blockers, β blockers and statins may, in theory, have dual cardiopulmonary protective properties and probably alter prognosis of COPD patients. Nevertheless, the limitations

  2. Risk factors and outcomes of hospitalized patients with blood infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a hospital of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ninghui; Xue, Wencheng; Tang, Dahai; Ding, Jinya; Zhao, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors and outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a hospital of Northern China. Risk factors associated with MDR A baumannii complex included older age, pneumonia, using drainage catheters, and intensive care unit stay. Multivariate analysis showed that multidrug resistance and mechanical ventilation were identified as independent risk factors for 30-day mortality in patients with A baumannii complex bacteremia. PMID:26804303

  3. Efficacy of Chinese Herbal Medicine as an Adjunctive Therapy on in-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tuo; Zhan, Libin; Fan, Zhiwei; Bai, Lizhi; Song, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to systematically assess the efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) as an adjunctive therapy on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods. We did a systematic review of articles published in any language up until Jun 23, 2015, by searching PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CBM, and CNKI. We included all RCTs that compared outcomes of patients with AKI taking CHM plus Western treatment (WT) with those taking WT alone. We applied Cochrane risk-of-bias tool to assess the methodological quality of the included trials. Results. Of 832 citations, 15 studies involving 966 patients met inclusion criteria. The methodological quality was assessed with unclear risk of bias. In the primary outcome of meta-analysis, pooled outcome of in-hospital mortality showed that patients randomly assigned to CHM treatment group were associated with low risk of in-hospital mortality compared with those randomly assigned to WT alone (RR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.24 to 0.71; P = 0.001). Conclusions. CHM as an adjunctive therapy is associated with a decreased risk of in-hospital mortality compared with WT in patients with AKI. Further studies with high quality and large sample size are needed to verify our conclusions. PMID:27127528

  4. Adiposity and incidence of heart failure hospitalization and mortality: a population-based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Emily B.; Yang, Amy Z.; Wolk, Alicja; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with heart failure (HF) incidence. We examined the strength of the association of body mass index (BMI) with HF by age and joint associations of BMI and waist circumference (WC). Methods and Results Women aged 48–83 (n = 36,873) and men aged 45–79 (n = 43,487) self-reported height, weight, and WC. HF hospitalization or death (n = 382 women, 718 men) between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2004 was determined through administrative registers. Hazard ratios (HR), from Cox proportional-hazards models, for an interquartile range higher BMI were 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.68) at age 60 and 1.13 (95% CI 1.02–1.27) at 75 in women. In men, HR were 1.54 (95% CI 1.37–1.73) at 60 and 1.25 (95% CI 1.16–1.35) at 75. A 10 cm higher WC was associated with 15% (95% CI 2%–31%) and 18% (95% CI 4%–33%) higher HF rates among women with BMI 25 and 30 kg/m2, respectively; HR for 1 kg/m2 higher BMI were 1.00 (95% CI 0.96–1.04) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.98–1.04) for WC 70 and 100 cm, respectively. In men, a 10 cm higher WC was associated with 16% and 18% higher rates for BMI 25 and 30 kg/m2, respectively; a 1 kg/m2 higher BMI was associated with 4% higher HF rates regardless of WC. Conclusions Strength of the association between BMI and HF events declined with age. In women, higher WC was associated with HF at all levels of BMI. Both BMI and WC were predictors among men. PMID:19808341

  5. 78 FR 52557 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 811 Project Rental... Information Collection: Section 811 Project Rental Assistance (PRA) for Persons with Disabilities....

  6. Trends in the Use of Guideline-Recommended Medications and In-Hospital Mortality of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Xie, Yanming; Shu, Zheng; Yang, Wei; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current practice guidelines recommend the routine use of several cardiac medications early in the course of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our objective was to analyze temporal trends in medication use and in-hospital mortality of AMI patients in a Chinese population. Methods This is a retrospective observational study using electronic medical records from the hospital information system (HIS) of 14 Chinese hospitals. We identified 5599 patients with AMI between 2005 and 2011. Factors associated with medication use and in-hospital mortality were explored by using hierarchical logistic regression. Results The use of several guideline-recommended medications all increased during the study period: statins (57.7%–90.1%), clopidogrel (61.8%–92.3%), β-Blockers (45.4%–65.1%), ACEI/ARB (46.7%–58.7%), aspirin (81.9%–92.9%), and the combinations thereof increased from 24.9% to 42.8% (P<0.001 for all). Multivariate analyses showed statistically significant increases in all these medications. The in-hospital mortality decreased from 15.9% to 5.7% from 2005 to 2011 (P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment, admission year was still a significant factor (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.79–0.96, P = 0.007), the use of aspirin (OR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46–0.87), clopidogrel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.31–0.61), ACEI/ARB (OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.56–0.94) and statins (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.40–0.73) were associated with a decrease in in-hospital mortality. Patients with older age, cancer and renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality, while they were generally less likely to receive all these medications. Conclusion Use of guideline-recommended medications early in the course of AMI increased between 2005 and 2011 in a Chinese population. During this same time, there was a decrease in in-hospital mortality. PMID:25706944

  7. In-hospital complications and mortality after elective spinal fusion surgery in the united states: a study of the nationwide inpatient sample from 2001 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Roth, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Spinal fusion surgery has increased dramatically and patients presenting for surgery are often more medically challenging. We hypothesized that advanced age and coexisting morbidities have increased in the population undergoing spinal fusion and are associated with greater risks for immediate complications and mortality. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was retrospectively reviewed for discharges after a principal procedure code for elective spinal fusion. Total records meeting study inclusion criteria were 254,640. Coexisting morbidities were tabulated using Elixhauser comorbidities and the Charlson comorbidity index. Logistic regression identified risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality and early complications. The largest increase in spinal fusion surgery was in patients >65 years. Overall, those with at least 1 comorbidity increased (49% to 62%; P=0.002), as did mean Charlson index (0.146 to 0.202; P<0.001). In-hospital mortality was 0.13%, but 0.29%, and 0.64% for patients of 65 to 74, and those >or=75 years, respectively. Adjusted odds ratios for complications in 65-year to 74-year olds versus <65 years was 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.84; P<0.001), and for mortality 3.81 (95% confidence interval, 2.62-5.55; P<0.001); risks increased with the number of coexisting morbidities. Congestive heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease, coagulopathy, metastatic cancer, renal failure, and weight loss significantly correlated with in-hospital mortality, whereas hypertension or hypothyroidism had, unexpectedly, the opposite effect. Although it is known for some other forms of complex surgery, we showed that elderly and medically complex spinal fusion patients were at increased risk for in-hospital mortality and early complications. The majority of complications were operative, pulmonary, cardiovascular, or genito-urinary. Patient risk correlated with the number and nature of coexisting morbidities. PMID:19098620

  8. Association of Intensive Care Unit Admission With Mortality Among Older Patients With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Thomas S.; Sjoding, Michael W.; Ryan, Andrew M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Cooke, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Among patients whose need for intensive care is uncertain, the relationship of intensive care unit (ICU) admission with mortality and costs is unknown. OBJECTIVE To estimate the relationship between ICU admission and outcomes for elderly patients with pneumonia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries (aged >64 years) admitted to 2988 acute care hospitals in the United States with pneumonia from 2010 to 2012. EXPOSURES ICU admission vs general ward admission. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included Medicare spending and hospital costs. Patient and hospital characteristics were adjusted to account for differences between patients with and without ICU admission. To account for unmeasured confounding, an instrumental variable was used—the differential distance to a hospital with high ICU admission (defined as any hospital in the upper 2 quintiles of ICU use). RESULTS Among 1 112 394 Medicare beneficiaries with pneumonia, 328 404 (30%) were admitted to the ICU. In unadjusted analyses, patients admitted to the ICU had significantly higher 30-day mortality, Medicare spending, and hospital costs than patients admitted to a general hospital ward. Patients (n = 553 597) living closer than the median differential distance (<3.3 miles) to a hospital with high ICU admission were significantly more likely to be admitted to the ICU than patients living farther away (n = 558 797) (36%for patients living closer vs 23%for patients living farther, P < .001). In adjusted analyses, for the 13%of patients whose ICU admission decision appeared to be discretionary (dependent only on distance), ICU admission was associated with a significantly lower adjusted 30-day mortality (14.8%for ICU admission vs 20.5%for general ward admission, P = .02; absolute decrease, −5.7%[95%CI, −10.6%, −0.9%]), yet there were no significant differences in Medicare spending or hospital

  9. 77 FR 59318 - Removal of 30-Day Residency Requirement for Per Diem Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... programs-veterans, Health care, Health facilities, Health professions, Health records, Mental health programs, Nursing homes, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Travel and transportation expenses... the veteran is absent for purposes other than receiving hospital care.'' See 74 FR 19433. In...

  10. Risk Factors for Long-Term Mortality after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Jan C.; Ueland, Thor; Jenum, Pål A.; Müller, Fredrik; Brunborg, Cathrine; Frøland, Stig S.; Aukrust, Pål; Husebye, Einar; Heggelund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Contributors to long-term mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain unclear, with little attention paid to pneumonia etiology. We examined long-term survival, causes of death, and risk factors for long-term mortality in adult patients who had been hospitalized for CAP, with emphasis on demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological characteristics. Methods Two hundred and sixty-seven consecutive patients admitted in 2008–2011 to a general hospital with CAP were prospectively recruited and followed up. Patients who died during hospital stay were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected within 48 hours of admission. Extensive microbiological work-up was performed to establish the etiology of CAP in 63% of patients. Mortality data were obtained from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Cox regression models were used to identify independent risk factors for all-cause mortality. Results Of 259 hospital survivors of CAP (median age 66 years), 79 (30.5%) died over a median of 1,804 days (range 1–2,520 days). Cumulative 5-year survival rate was 72.9% (95% CI 67.4–78.4%). Standardized mortality ratio was 2.90 for men and 2.05 for women. The main causes of death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), vascular diseases, and malignancy. Independent risk factors for death were the following (hazard ratio, 95% CI): age (1.83 per decade, 1.47–2.28), cardiovascular disease (2.63, 1.61–4.32), COPD (2.09, 1.27–3.45), immunocompromization (1.98, 1.17–3.37), and low serum albumin level at admission (0.75 per 5g/L higher, 0.58–0.96), whereas active smoking was protective (0.32, 0.14–0.74); active smokers were younger than non-smokers (P < 0.001). Microbial etiology did not predict mortality. Conclusions Results largely confirm substantial comorbidity-related 5-year mortality after hospitalization for CAP and the impact of several well-known risk factors for death, and extend

  11. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Invasive Heteroresistant Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Korean Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eu Suk; Bae, In-Gyu; Cho, Jeong Eun; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Il-Hwan; Kang, Gi-Su; Sin, Hye-yun; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Chulmin; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Moonsuk; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Hong Bin

    2016-03-01

    Invasive heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (h-VISA) isolates were identified and characterized in 10 Korean hospitals from July 2009 to June 2011. The prevalence of h-VISA infections was 3.3% (42/1,289). Most (41/42) were health care-associated infections caused by strains belonging to sequence type 5. Cases of persistent bacteremia were frequent (17/42), and 30-day mortality was high (16/40). PMID:26677256

  12. An adapted frailty-related phenotype and the VACS Index as predictors of hospitalization and mortality in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, Kathleen M.; Tate, Janet P.; Crothers, Kristina; Crystal, Stephen; Leaf, David A.; Womack, Julie; Brown, Todd T.; Justice, Amy C.; Oursler, Krisann K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Frailty is a geriatric syndrome of decreased physiologic reserve and a risk factor for hospitalization and mortality. We hypothesized that an adapted, survey-based frailty-related phenotype (aFRP) predicts hospitalization and mortality among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals in adjusted models but is uncommon among those achieving undetectable HIV-1 RNA. Methods Defined from self-reported domains of physical shrinking, exhaustion, slowness and low physical activity in Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) participants, aFRP was considered present with ≥3 domains and pre-frailty with 1-2 domains. Cox survival analysis determined hazard ratios (HR) for 5-year hospitalization and mortality risk adjusting for frailty states, demographics, health behaviors, comorbidities, and a validated risk index incorporating HIV-specific and general organ system biomarkers, the VACS Index. Model discrimination was assessed. Results Participants with complete data were included (6515/7324 (89%)). Of these, 3.9% of HIV-infected with HIV-1 RNA>400copies/ml; 2.0% of HIV-infected with HIV-1 RNA ≤ 400copies/ml; and 2.8% of uninfected individuals met aFRP criteria (p=0.01). After adjustment for other covariates, aFRP was associated with hospitalization (HR=1.78, 95% CI [1.48, 2.13]) and mortality (HR=1.75, 95% CI [1.28, 2.40]). C-statistics for the VACS Index for hospitalization (0.633) and for mortality (0.756) were higher than for aFRP frailty (0.565 and 0.584, respectively). C-statistic for hospitalization improved modestly when VACS Index and aFRP were both included (0.646) and minimally for mortality (0.761). Conclusions aFRP was independently associated with adverse health outcomes among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. aFRP modestly improved prediction for hospitalization. However, the aFRP is rare among HIV-infected individuals with undetectable HIV-1 RNA. PMID:25202921

  13. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care, an alternative strategy to reduce maternal mortality: experience of Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, Ismael Fatou; Hu, Jian; Gong, Xun; Wang, Xuanxuan; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Pengqian

    2012-04-01

    The burden of maternal mortality (MM) and morbidity is especially high in Asia. However, China has made significant progress in reducing MM over the past two decades, and hence maternal death rate has declined considerably in last decade. To analyze availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) received by women at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, this study retrospectively analyzed various pregnancy-related complications at the hospital from 2000 to 2009. Two baseline periods of equal length were used for the comparison of variables. A total of 11 223 obstetric complications leading to MM were identified on a total of 15 730 hospitalizations, either 71.35% of all activities. No maternal death was recorded. Mean age of women was 29.31 years with a wide range of 14-52 years. About 96.26% of women had higher levels of schooling, university degrees and above and received the education of secondary school or college. About 3.74% received primary education at period two (P2) from 2005 to 2009, which was significantly higher than that of period one (P1) from 2000 to 2004 (P<0.05) (OR: 0.586; 95% CI: 0.442 to 0.776). About 65.69% were employed as skilled or professional workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). About 34.31% were unskilled workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). Caesarean section was performed for 9,930 women (88.48%) and the percentage of the procedure increased significantly from 19.25% at P1 to 69.23% at P2 (P<0.05). We were led to conclude that, despite the progress, significant gaps in the performance of maternal health services between rural and urban areas remain. However, MM reduction can be achieved in China. Priorities must include, but not limited to the following: secondary healthcare development, health policy and management, strengthening primary healthcare services. PMID:22528213

  14. Association of persistent and transient worsening renal function with mortality risk, readmissions risk, length of stay, and costs in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jacqueline B; Friedman, Howard S; Waltman Johnson, Katherine; Navaratnam, Prakash; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Background Data comparing effects of transient worsening renal function (WRFt) and persistent WRF (WRFp) on outcomes in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure (AHF) are lacking. We determined the characteristics of hospitalized AHF patients who experienced no worsening renal function (non-WRF), WRFt, or WRFp, and the relationship between cohorts and AHF-related outcomes. Methods and results A patient’s first AHF hospitalization (index) was identified in the Cerner Health Facts® database (January 2008−March 2011). Patients had WRF if serum creatinine (SCr) was ≥0.3 mg/dL and increased ≥25% from baseline, and they were designated as WRFp if present at discharge or WRFt if not present at discharge. A total of 55,436 patients were selected (non-WRF =77%, WRFp =10%, WRFt =13%). WRFp had greater comorbidity burden than WRFt. At index hospitalization, WRFp patients had the highest mortality, whereas WRFt patients had the longest length of stay (LOS) and highest costs. These trends were observed at 30, 180, and 365 days postdischarge and confirmed by multivariable analyses. WRF patients had more AHF-related readmissions than non-WRF patients. In sensitivity analyses of the patient subset with live index hospitalization discharges, postdischarge LOS and costs were highest in WRFt patients, whereas mortality associated with a HF hospitalization was significantly higher for WRF patients vs non-WRF patients, with no difference between WRFp and WRFt. Conclusion In patients hospitalized for AHF, WRFp was associated with the highest mortality, whereas WRFt was associated with the highest LOS and costs. WRF patients had higher readmissions than non-WRF patients. Transient increases in SCr appear to be associated with detrimental outcomes, especially longer LOS and higher costs. PMID:26150730

  15. A Propensity Score Analysis Shows that Empirical Treatment with Linezolid Does Not Increase the Thirty-Day Mortality Rate in Patients with Gram-Negative Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Soriano, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:25199780

  16. Relation of admission glucose levels, short- and long-term (20-year) mortality after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Jaap W; van Domburg, Ron T; Akkerhuis, Martijn; Nauta, Sjoerd T

    2013-11-01

    We examined temporal trends in mortality after myocardial infarction from 1985 to 2008 depending on admission glucose levels. We included 11,324 consecutive patients admitted to our intensive coronary care unit for myocardial infarction from 1985 to 2008. Patients were categorized into normal, mild, and severe hyperglycemia groups (admission glucose levels <140, 140 to 200, and ≥200 mg/dl, respectively). Temporal trends were determined using 3 groups: 1985 to 1990, 1990 to 2000, and 2000 to 2008. The prevalence of hyperglycemia increased from 26% in the 1980s to 49% in the 2000s. The prevalence of hyperglycemia primarily increased in patients without diabetes. Kaplan-Meier mortality was 4%, 8%, and 17% at 30 days and 64%, 71%, and 82% at 20 years in patients with normal, mild, and severe hyperglycemia, respectively. Compared with normal admission glucose level, adjusted 30-day mortality was 3.6-fold greater (95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3) in patients with severe hyperglycemia. This association was not dependent on diabetic status (p for interaction = 0.43) but was dependent on the decade of hospitalization with a stronger association from 2000 to 2008 (adjusted odds ratio 7.7, 95% confidence interval 5.4 to 11, p for interaction <0.001). Compared with diabetes, hyperglycemia was a better discriminator for 30-day mortality. Mortality at 30 days decreased from 1985 to 2008, however, it decreased less in patients with hyperglycemia compared with those with normoglycemia. In conclusion, elevated admission glucose levels are common in patients with myocardial infarction and are strongly associated with increased mortality. Mortality decreased less from 1985 to 2008 in patients with hyperglycemia compared with those with normoglycemia. Efforts that establish optimal treatment for these patients remain warranted. PMID:23866731

  17. Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Hyperglycemia in Non–Critically Ill Inpatients Increases the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality (Multicenter Study)

    PubMed Central

    Olveira, Gabriel; Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D.; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Maria del Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P.; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Matia, Pilar; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Prieto, Javier; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, María José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Rovira, Adela; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hyperglycemia may increase mortality in patients who receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN). However, this has not been well studied in noncritically ill patients (i.e., patients in the nonintensive care unit setting). The aim of this study was to determine whether mean blood glucose level during TPN infusion is associated with increased mortality in noncritically ill hospitalized patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective multicenter study involved 19 Spanish hospitals. Noncritically ill patients who were prescribed TPN were included prospectively, and data were collected on demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables as well as on in-hospital mortality. RESULTS The study included 605 patients (mean age 63.2 ± 15.7 years). The daily mean TPN values were 1.630 ± 323 kcal, 3.2 ± 0.7 g carbohydrates/kg, 1.26 ± 0.3 g amino acids/kg, and 0.9 ± 0.2 g lipids/kg. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the patients who had mean blood glucose levels >180 mg/dL during the TPN infusion had a risk of mortality that was 5.6 times greater than those with mean blood glucose levels <140 mg/dL (95% CI 1.47–21.4 mg/dL) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional state, presence of diabetes or hyperglycemia before starting TPN, diagnosis, prior comorbidity, carbohydrates infused, use of steroid therapy, SD of blood glucose level, insulin units supplied, infectious complications, albumin, C-reactive protein, and HbA1c levels. CONCLUSIONS Hyperglycemia (mean blood glucose level >180 mg/dL) in noncritically ill patients who receive TPN is associated with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality. PMID:23223407

  18. [Trends of tuberculosis related mortality and hospital discharges before and after the implementation of the health sector reform, Colombia, 1985-1999].

    PubMed

    Segura, Angela María; Rey, Juan José; Arbelaéz, María Patricia

    2004-06-01

    We describe the changes that have been presented in the tendencies of mortality and hospital discharges by tuberculosis (TB) between 1985-1999, period before and during the implementation of the Health Sector Reform (HSR) in Colombia. For it, we carried out an exploratory descriptive study with analysis of time series of hospital discharges and mortality rates of TB in Colombia. It was found that although starting from 1991 the Series approach stabilized, their tendencies showed a significant descent diminishing both in 30% between 1985 and 1990. The steady trend registered from 1991 to 1999, could be explained by deterioration of the primary care during this period, also due to other complex social processes occurred in Colombia during this decade, which barred the continuing the descent trend in hospital discharges and mortality due to TB previously registered. Due to the study design limitations we cannot establish causal relationships between these trends and the health sector reform in the country; we recommend the improvement the health sector performance about public health problems such as TB in order to avoid unnecessary hospitalizations and deaths due to causes responsive to health sector interventions. PMID:15495579

  19. The Global Contribution of Outdoor Air Pollution to the Incidence, Prevalence, Mortality and Hospital Admission for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qingkun; Christiani, David C.; Wang, Xiaorong; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the quantitative effects of outdoor air pollution, represented by 10 µg/m3 increment of PM10, on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in China, United States and European Union through systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: Publications in English and Chinese from PubMed and EMBASE were selected. The Cochrane Review Handbook of Generic Inverse Variance was used to synthesize the pooled effects on incidence, prevalence, mortality and hospital admission. Results: Outdoor air pollution contributed to higher incidence and prevalence of COPD. Short-term exposure was associated with COPD mortality increased by 6%, 1% and 1% in the European Union, the United States and China, respectively (p < 0.05). Chronic PM exposure produced a 10% increase in mortality. In a short-term exposure to 10 µg/m3 PM10 increment COPD mortality was elevated by 1% in China (p < 0.05) and hospital admission enrollment was increased by 1% in China, 2% in United States and 1% in European Union (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Outdoor air pollution contributes to the increasing burdens of COPD.10 µg/m3 increase of PM10 produced significant condition of COPD death and exacerbation in China, United States and European Union. Controlling air pollution will have substantial benefit to COPD morbidity and mortality. PMID:25405599

  20. Quality measures for total ankle replacement, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates within 1 year of surgery: a data linkage study using the NJR data set

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Razi; Macgregor, Alexander J; Goldberg, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report on the rate of 30-day readmission and the rate of additional or revision surgery within 12 months following total ankle replacement (TAR). Design A data-linkage study of the UK National Joint Registry (NJR) data and Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) database. These two databases were linked in a deterministic fashion. HES episodes 12 months following the index procedure were isolated and analysed. Logistic regression was used to model predictors of reoperation and revision for primary ankle replacement. Participants All patients who underwent primary and revision ankle replacements according to the NJR between February 2008 and February 2013. Results The rate of 30-day readmission following primary and revision ankle replacement was 2.2% and 1.3%, respectively. In the 12 months following primary and revision ankle replacements, the revision rate (where implants needed to be removed) was 1.2% with increased odds in those orthopaedic units preforming <20 ankle replacements per year and patients with a preoperative fixed equinus deformity. The reoperation other than revision (where implants were not removed) in the 12 months following primary and revision TARs was 6.6% and 9.3%, respectively. Rheumatoid arthritis, cemented prosthesis and high ASA grade significantly increased the odds of reoperation. Conclusions TAR has a 30-day readmission rate of 2.2%, which is similar to that of knee replacement but lower than that of total hip replacement. 6.6% of patients undergoing primary TAR require a reoperation within 12 months of the index procedure. Early revision rates are significantly higher in low-volume centres. PMID:27217286

  1. Infant Stool Color Card Screening Helps Reduce the Hospitalization Rate and Mortality of Biliary Atresia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Jui-Hua; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2016-03-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a significant liver disease in children. Since 2004, Taiwan has implemented a national screening program that uses an infant stool color card (SCC) for the early detection of BA. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of BA cases before and after the launch of this screening program. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the rates of hospitalization, liver transplantation (LT), and mortality of BA cases before and after the program, and to examine the association between the hospitalization rate and survival outcomes.This was a population-based cohort study. BA cases born during 1997 to 2010 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Sex, birth date, hospitalization date, LT, and death data were collected and analyzed. The hospitalization rate by 2 years of age (Hosp/2yr) was calculated to evaluate its association with the outcomes of LT or death.Among 513 total BA cases, 457 (89%) underwent the Kasai procedure. Of these, the Hosp/2yr was significantly reduced from 6.0 to 6.9/case in the earlier cohort (1997-2004) to 4.9 to 5.3/case in the later cohort (2005-2010). This hospitalization rate reduction was followed by a reduction in mortality from 26.2% to 15.9% after 2006. The Cox proportional hazards model showed a significant increase in the risk for both LT (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10-1.18) and death (HR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01-1.08) for each additional hospitalization. A multivariate logistic regression model found that cases with a Hosp/2yr >6 times had a significantly higher risk for both LT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.35, 95% CI = 2.82-6.73) and death (aOR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.17-2.62).The hospitalization and mortality rates of BA cases in Taiwan were significantly and coincidentally reduced after the launch of the SCC screening program. There was a significant association between the hospitalization rate and final

  2. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) –based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as “serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl,” “age above 79 years,” “without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker,” “without taking beta-blocker,” “without taking loop diuretics,” “with mechanical ventilator support,” “with non-invasive ventilator support,” “with vasopressors use,” and “experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation” were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  3. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) -based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as "serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl," "age above 79 years," "without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker," "without taking beta-blocker," "without taking loop diuretics," "with mechanical ventilator support," "with non-invasive ventilator support," "with vasopressors use," and "experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation" were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  4. Desert Dust Outbreaks in Southern Europe: Contribution to Daily PM10 Concentrations and Short-Term Associations with Mortality and Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Stafoggia, Massimo; Zauli-Sajani, Stefano; Pey, Jorge; Samoli, Evangelia; Alessandrini, Ester; Basagaña, Xavier; Cernigliaro, Achille; Chiusolo, Monica; Demaria, Moreno; Díaz, Julio; Faustini, Annunziata; Katsouyanni, Klea; Kelessis, Apostolos G.; Linares, Cristina; Marchesi, Stefano; Medina, Sylvia; Pandolfi, Paolo; Pérez, Noemí; Querol, Xavier; Randi, Giorgia; Ranzi, Andrea; Tobias, Aurelio; Forastiere, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the association between short-term exposure to desert dust and health outcomes is controversial. Objectives: We aimed to estimate the short-term effects of particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) on mortality and hospital admissions in 13 Southern European cities, distinguishing between PM10 originating from the desert and from other sources. Methods: We identified desert dust advection days in multiple Mediterranean areas for 2001–2010 by combining modeling tools, back-trajectories, and satellite data. For each advection day, we estimated PM10 concentrations originating from desert, and computed PM10 from other sources by difference. We fitted city-specific Poisson regression models to estimate the association between PM from different sources (desert and non-desert) and daily mortality and emergency hospitalizations. Finally, we pooled city-specific results in a random-effects meta-analysis. Results: On average, 15% of days were affected by desert dust at ground level (desert PM10 > 0 μg/m3). Most episodes occurred in spring–summer, with increasing gradient of both frequency and intensity north–south and west–east of the Mediterranean basin. We found significant associations of both PM10 concentrations with mortality. Increases of 10 μg/m3 in non-desert and desert PM10 (lag 0–1 days) were associated with increases in natural mortality of 0.55% (95% CI: 0.24, 0.87%) and 0.65% (95% CI: 0.24, 1.06%), respectively. Similar associations were estimated for cardio-respiratory mortality and hospital admissions. Conclusions: PM10 originating from the desert was positively associated with mortality and hospitalizations in Southern Europe. Policy measures should aim at reducing population exposure to anthropogenic airborne particles even in areas with large contribution from desert dust advections. Citation: Stafoggia M, Zauli-Sajani S, Pey J, Samoli E, Alessandrini E, Basagaña X, Cernigliaro A, Chiusolo M, Demaria M, Díaz J, Faustini A

  5. Improving Mortality Following Emergency Surgery in Older Patients Requires Focus on Complication Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Sheetz, Kyle H.; Waits, Seth A.; Krell, Robert W.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Englesbe, Michael J.; Ghaferi, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective To determine if a hospital’s ability to rescue patients from major complications underlies variation in outcomes for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Summary Background Data Perioperative mortality rates in elderly patients undergoing emergent general/vascular operations are high and vary widely across Michigan hospitals. Methods We identified 23,224 patients undergoing emergent general/vascular surgery procedures at 41 hospitals within the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative (MSQC) between 2006–2011. Hospitals were ranked by risk- and reliability-adjusted 30-day mortality and grouped into tertiles. We stratified patients by age (<75 and ≥75). Risk-adjusted major complication and failure to rescue (i.e., mortality following major complication) rates were determined for each tertile of hospital mortality. Results Risk-adjusted mortality rates in elderly patients varied 2-fold across all hospitals. Complication rates correlated poorly with mortality. Failure-to-rescue rates, however, were markedly higher in high mortality hospitals (29% lowest tertile vs. 41% highest tertile, p<0.01). When compared to younger patients, overall failure to rescue rates were almost 2-fold greater in the elderly (36.1% ≥75 vs. 18.7% <75, p<0.01). Conclusions Hospitals’ failure to rescue patients from major complications seems to underlie the variation in mortality across Michigan hospitals following emergent surgery. While higher failure to rescue rates in the elderly may signify their diminished physiological reserve for surviving critical illness, the wide variation across hospitals also highlights the importance of systems aimed at the early recognition and effective management of major complications in this vulnerable population. PMID:23979275

  6. 77 FR 59354 - Removal of 30-Day Residency Requirement for Per Diem Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ..., Mental health programs, Nursing homes, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Travel and... the veteran is absent for purposes other than receiving hospital care.'' See 74 FR 19433. In the... overnight stays) appears to be sufficient to establish permanent residency.'' 73 FR 72402. In addition,...

  7. Evolving Healthcare Quality in Top Tertiary General Hospitals in China during the China Healthcare Reform (2010–2012) from the Perspective of Inpatient Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xie-Min; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Ji-Shan; Lyman, Gary H.; Qu, Zhi; Ma, Wen; Song, Jing-Chen; Zhou, Chuan-Kun; Zhao, Lue Ping

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare reforms (HR) initiated by many countries impacts on healthcare systems worldwide. Being one of fast developing countries, China launched HR in 2009. Better understanding of its impact is helpful for China and others in further pursuit of HR. Here we evaluate inpatient mortality, a proxy to healthcare quality, in 43 top tertiary hospitals in China during this critical period. This is a hospital-based observational study with 8 million discharge summary reports (DSR) from 43 Chinese hospitals from 2010–2012. Using DSRs, we extract the vita status as the outcome, in addition to age, gender, diagnostic codes, and surgical codes. Nearly all hospitals have expanded their hospitalization capacities during this period. As of year 2010, inpatient mortality (IM) across hospitals varies widely from 2‰ to 20‰. Comparing IM of year 2011 and 2012 with 2010, the overall IM has been substantially reduced (OR = 0.883 and 0.766, p-values<0.001), showing steady improvements in healthcare quality. Surgical IM correlates with the overall IM (correlation = 0.60, p-value <0.001), but is less uniform. Over these years, surgical IM has also been steadily reduced (OR = 0.890 and 0.793, p-values<0.001). Further analyses of treatments on five major diseases and six major surgeries revealed that treatments of myocardial infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction have significant improvement. Observed temporal and spatial variations demonstrate that there is a substantial disparity in healthcare quality across tertiary hospitals, and that these hospitals are rapidly improving healthcare quality. Evidence-based assessment shed light on the reform impact. Lessons learnt here are relevant to further refining HR. PMID:26624005

  8. Effect of emergency percutaneous coronary intervention on in-hospital mortality of very elderly (80+ years of age) patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Masuda, Yuichiro; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Kimata, Takaya; Iguchi, Akihisa; Uemura, Kazumasa

    2006-09-01

    It is still controversial whether percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is effective in improving in-hospital survival in very elderly patients. Therefore, using data from the Tokai Acute Myocardial Infarction Study II, we studied the effect of emergency PCI on the in-hospital mortality of very elderly (80+ years of age) patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The study was a prospective study of all consecutive patients admitted to the 15 acute care hospitals in the Tokai region with the diagnosis of AMI from 2001 to 2003. A total of 211 patients undergoing emergency PCI and 176 patients not undergoing PCI were included in the present analysis. We compared the baseline and procedural characteristics and the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Patients without emergency PCI were older and had an increased prevalence of female gender, ADL impairment, and dementia in comparison with those with PCI. They also showed poorer clinical conditions. They were less likely to be transferred to intensive care or coronary care units and to be given intra-aortic balloon pumps. The patients with emergency PCI had nearly one-third the in-hospital mortality rate of the patients without emergency PCI. According to multivariate analysis, emergency PCI was still identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital death, with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.26 (95% CI, 0.07-0.97). The results indicated that emergency PCI has a preventative effect on in-hospital mortality in Japanese AMI patients 80 years of age and older. PMID:17106137

  9. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D at critical care initiation is associated with increased mortality

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Andrea B.; Gibbons, Fiona K.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Christopher, Kenneth B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that deficiency in 25-hydroxy vitamin D at critical care initiation would be associated with all cause mortality. Design Two-center observational study. Setting Two teaching hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts Patients 1,325 patients, age ≥ 18 years, in whom 25-hydroxy vitamin D was measured 7 days prior to or after critical care initiation between 1998 and 2009. Measurements 25-hydroxy vitamin D was categorized as deficiency in 25-hydroxy vitamin D (≤15 ng/mL), insufficiency (16–29 ng/mL) and sufficiency (≥30 ng/mL). Logistic regression examined death by days 30, 90 and 365 post-critical care initiation and in hospital mortality. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated by multivariable logistic regression models. Interventions None Key Results 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency is predictive for short term and long term mortality. 30 days following critical care initiation, patients with 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency have an OR for mortality of 1.85 (95% CI, 1.15–2.98;P=0.01) relative to patients with 25-hydroxy vitamin D sufficiency. 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency remains a significant predictor of mortality at 30 days following critical care initiation following multivariable adjustment for age, gender, race, Deyo-Charlson index, sepsis, season, and surgical versus medical patient type (adjusted OR 1.94; 95% CI, 1.18–3.20;P=0.01). Results were similarly significant at 90 and 365 days following critical care initiation and for in hospital mortality. The association between vitamin D and mortality was not modified by sepsis, race, or Neighborhood poverty rate, a proxy for socioeconomic status. Conclusion Deficiency of 25-hydroxy vitamin D at the time of critical care initiation is a significant predictor of all cause patient mortality in a critically ill patient population. PMID:21926604

  10. Bion M1. Peculiarities of life activities of microbes in 30-day spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Korshunov, Denis; Morozova, Julia; Voeikova, Tatiana; Tyaglov, Boris; Novikova, Liudmila; Krestyanova, Irina; Emelyanova, Lydia

    The aim of this work was to analyze the influence of space flight factors ( SFF) to microorganism strains , exposed inside unmanned spacecraft Bion M-1 during the 30- day space flight. Objectives of the work - the study of the influence of the SFF exchange chromosomal DNA in crosses microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces; the level of spontaneous phage induction of lysogenic strains fS31 from Streptomyces lividans 66 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) on the biosynthesis of the antibiotic tylosin strain of Streptomyces fradiae; survival electrogenic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR- 1 is used in the microbial fuel cell As a result of this work it was found that the SFF affect the exchange of chromosomal DNA by crossing strains of Streptomyces. Was detected polarity crossing , expressed in an advantageous contribution chromosome fragment of one of the parent strains in recombinant offspring. This fact may indicate a more prolonged exposure of cells in microgravity and , as a consequence, the transfer of longer fragments of chromosomal DNA This feature is the transfer of genetic material in microgravity could lead to wider dissemination and horizontal transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA of symbiotic microflora astronauts and other strains present in the spacecraft. It was shown no effect on the frequency of recombination PCF and the level of mutation model reversion of auxotrophic markers to prototrophy It was demonstrated that PCF increase the level of induction of cell actinophage fS31 lysogenic strain of S. lividans 66, but did not affect the level of induction of this phage cells S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). It is shown that the lower the level of synthesis PCF antibiotic aktinorodina (actinorhodin) in lysogenic strain S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). 66 Strains of S. lividans and S. coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) can be used as a biosensor for studying the effect on microorganisms PCF It is shown that the effect of the PCF reduces synthesis of tylosin and desmicosyn S. fradiae at

  11. Metabonomics Analysis of Plasma Reveals the Lactate to Cholesterol Ratio as an Independent Prognostic Factor of Short-Term Mortality in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Desmoulin, Franck; Galinier, Michel; Trouillet, Charlotte; Berry, Matthieu; Delmas, Clément; Turkieh, Annie; Massabuau, Pierre; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mortality in heart failure (AHF) remains high, especially during the first days of hospitalization. New prognostic biomarkers may help to optimize treatment. The aim of the study was to determine metabolites that have a high prognostic value. Methods We conducted a prospective study on a training cohort of AHF patients (n = 126) admitted in the cardiac intensive care unit and assessed survival at 30 days. Venous plasmas collected at admission were used for 1H NMR–based metabonomics analysis. Differences between plasma metabolite profiles allow determination of discriminating metabolites. A cohort of AHF patients was subsequently constituted (n = 74) to validate the findings. Results Lactate and cholesterol were the major discriminating metabolites predicting 30-day mortality. Mortality was increased in patients with high lactate and low total cholesterol concentrations at admission. Accuracies of lactate, cholesterol concentration and lactate to cholesterol (Lact/Chol) ratio to predict 30-day mortality were evaluated using ROC analysis. The Lact/Chol ratio provided the best accuracy with an AUC of 0.82 (P < 0.0001). The acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system provided an AUC of 0.76 for predicting 30-day mortality. APACHE II score, Cardiogenic shock (CS) state and Lact/Chol ratio ≥ 0.4 (cutoff value with 82% sensitivity and 64% specificity) were significant independent predictors of 30-day mortality with hazard ratios (HR) of 1.11, 4.77 and 3.59, respectively. In CS patients, the HR of 30-day mortality risk for plasma Lact/Chol ratio ≥ 0.4 was 3.26 compared to a Lact/Chol ratio of < 0.4 (P  =  0.018). The predictive power of the Lact/Chol ratio for 30-day mortality outcome was confirmed with the independent validation cohort. Conclusion This study identifies the plasma Lact/Chol ratio as a useful objective and simple parameter to evaluate short term prognostic and could be integrated into quantitative

  12. Effect of the Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease on Risk-Adjusted Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction, Congestive Heart Failure and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D.; Zhou, Ying; Alexoff, Aimee; Melitas, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measurement of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF) and pneumonia (PN) is a high priority since these are common reasons for hospitalization. However, mortality in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that are hospitalized for these common medical conditions is unknown. Methods A retrospective review of the 2005–2011 National Inpatient Sample (NIS), (approximately a 20% sample of discharges from community hospitals) was performed. A dataset for all patients with ICD-9-CM codes for primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia or congestive heart failure with a co-diagnosis of IBD, Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). 1:3 propensity score matching between patients with co-diagnosed disease vs. controls was performed. Continuous variables were compared between IBD and controls. Categorical variables were reported as frequency (percentage) and analyzed by Chi-square tests or Fisher’s exact test for co-diagnosed disease vs. control comparisons. Propensity scores were computed through multivariable logistic regression accounting for demographic and hospital factors. In-hospital mortality between the groups was compared. Results Patients with IBD, CD and UC had improved survival after AMI compared to controls. 94/2280 (4.1%) of patients with IBD and AMI died, compared to 251/5460 (5.5%) of controls, p = 0.01. This represents a 25% improved survival in IBD patients that were hospitalized with AMI. There was a 34% improved survival in patients with CD and AMI. There was a trend toward worsening survival in patients with IBD and CHF. Patients with CD and PN had improved survival compared to controls. 87/3362 (2.59%) patients with CD and PN died, compared to 428/10076 (4.25%) of controls, p < .0001. This represents a 39% improved survival in patients with CD that are hospitalized for PN. Conclusion IBD confers a survival benefit for patients hospitalized with AMI. A

  13. A retrospective study of seven-day consultant working: reductions in mortality and length of stay.

    PubMed

    Leong, K S; Titman, A; Brown, M; Powell, R; Moore, E; Bowen-Jones, D

    2015-12-01

    Weekend admission is associated with higher in-hospital mortality than weekday admission. Whether providing enhanced weekend staffing for acute medical inpatient services reduces mortality or length of stay is unknown. Methods This paper describes a retrospective analysis of in-hospital mortality and length of stay before and after introduction of an enhanced, consultant-led weekend service in acute medicine in November 2012. In-hospital mortality was compared for matching admission calendar months before and after introduction of the new service, adjusted for case volume. Length of stay and 30-day postdischarge mortality were also compared; illness severity of patients admitted was assessed by cross-sectional acuity audits. Results Admission numbers increased from 6,304 (November 2011-July 2012) to 7,382 (November 2012-July 2013), with no change in acuity score in elderly medical patients but a small fall in younger patients. At the same time, however, a 57% increase in early-warning score triggered calls was seen in 2013 (410 calls vs 262 calls in 2012; p<0.01). Seven-day consultant working was associated with a reduction in in-hospital mortality from 11.4% to 8.8% (p<0.001). Mortality within 30 days of discharge fell from 2.4% to 2.0% (p=0.12). Length of stay fell by 1.9 days (95% CI 1.1-2.7; p=0.004) for elderly medicine wards and by 1.7 days (95% CI 0.8-2.6; p=0.008) for medical wards. Weekend discharges increased from general medical wards (from 13.6% to 18.8%, p<0.001) but did not increase from elderly medicine wards. Conclusions Introduction of an enhanced, consultant-led model of working at weekends was associated with reduced in-hospital and 30-day post discharge mortality rates as well as reduced length of stay. These results require confirmation in rigorously designed prospective studies. PMID:27070886

  14. Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants on pneumonia and influenza hospitalization and mortality in all age groups in the United States.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lone; Taylor, Robert J; Young-Xu, Yinong; Haber, Michael; May, Larissa; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduced in the United States in 2000 has been shown to reduce invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both vaccinated children and adults through induction of herd immunity. We assessed the impact of infant immunization on pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and mortality in all age groups using Health Care Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (SID) for 1996 to 2006 from 10 states; SID contain 100% samples of ICD9-coded hospitalization data for the selected states. Compared to a 1996-1997 through 1998-1999 baseline, by the 2005-2006 season, both IPD and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and deaths had decreased substantially in all age groups, including a 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38 to 54%) reduction in nonbacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (ICD9 code 481 with no codes indicating IPD) in infants <2 years old and a 54% reduction (CI, 53 to 56%) in adults ≥65 years of age. A model developed to calculate the total burden of pneumococcal pneumonia prevented by infant PCV7 vaccination in the United States from 2000 to 2006 estimated a reduction of 788,838 (CI, 695,406 to 875,476) hospitalizations for pneumococcal pneumonia. Ninety percent of the reduction in model-attributed pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations occurred through herd immunity among adults 18 years old and older; similar proportions were found in pneumococcal disease mortality prevented by the vaccine. In the first seasons after PCV introduction, when there were substantial state differences in coverage among <5-year-olds, states with greater coverage had significantly fewer influenza-associated pneumonia hospitalizations among children, suggesting that PCV7 use also reduces influenza-attributable pneumonia hospitalizations. PMID:21264063

  15. Ten-years of bariatric surgery in Brazil: in-hospital mortality rates for patients assisted by universal health system or a health maintenance organization

    PubMed Central

    KELLES, Silvana Márcia Bruschi; MACHADO, Carla Jorge; BARRETO, Sandhi Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an option for sustained weight loss for the morbidly obese patient. In Brazil coexists the Unified Health System (SUS) with universal coverage and from which depend 150 million Brazilians and supplemental health security, predominantly private, with 50 million beneficiaries. Aim To compare access, in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs for patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assisted in one or another system. Methods Data from DATASUS and IBGE were used for SUS patients' and database from one health plan of southeastern Brazil for the health insurance patients. Results Between 2001 and 2010 there were 24,342 and 4,356 surgeries performed in SUS and in the health insurance company, respectively. The coverage rates for surgeries performed in 2010 were 5.3 and 91/100.000 individuals in SUS and health insurance respectively. The rate of in-hospital mortality in SUS, considering the entire country, was 0.55 %, 0.44 % considering SUS Southeast, and 0.30 % for the health insurance. The costs of surgery in the SUS and in the health insurance trend to equalization over the years. Conclusion Despite differences in access and characteristics that may compromise the outcome of bariatric surgery, patients treated at the Southeast SUS had similar rate of in-hospital mortality compared to the health insurance patients. PMID:25626935

  16. Sequelae of Early Hospital Readmission After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    McAdams-DeMarco, Mara A.; Grams, Morgan E.; King, Elizabeth; Desai, Niraj M.; Segev, Dorry L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently elucidated risk factors for early hospital readmission (EHR) following kidney transplantation (KT). We now sought to quantify the independent associations between EHR and post-KT outcomes, including late hospital readmission (LHR: 1 year after EHR window), death-censored graft loss, and mortality, among Medicare-primary KT recipients (2000-2005). Of 32,961 KT recipients, 7.7% had a least one readmission within 3 days of discharge, 14.8% within 7 days, 22.4% within 14 days, and 30.5% within 30 days of discharge after the initial KT hospitalization. KT recipients who experienced EHR within 30 days of discharge after the initial KT hospitalization were more likely to have experienced LHR (29.6% vs. 9.0%, P<0.001) and were at 3.02-times higher (95%CI:2.82-3.23,P<0.001) risk of LHR. Additionally, EHR was associated with death-censored graft loss (deceased donor recipients HR:1.43, 95%CI:1.36-1.51,P<0.001 and live donor recipients HR:1.54, 95%CI:1.40-1.70,P<0.001) and mortality (deceased donor recipients HR:1.50, 95%CI:1.43-1.58,P<0.001 and live donor recipients HR:1.45, 95%CI:1.32-1.60,P<0.001). 30 days post-transplant represents a high-risk window for KT recipients and the readmissions during this window are strong predictors of adverse sequelae, particularly LHRs. Efforts should be made to implement and improve systems to reduce LHR and subsequent graft loss and mortality among recipients with EHR. PMID:24447652

  17. Tackling 30-Day, All-Cause Readmissions with a Patient-Centered Transitional Care Bundle.

    PubMed

    Rice, Yvonne B; Barnes, Carol Ann; Rastogi, Rahul; Hillstrom, Tami J; Steinkeler, Cara N

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, Kaiser Permanente Northwest identified the transition from hospital to home as a pivotal quality improvement opportunity and used multiple patient-centered data collection methods to identify unmet needs contributing to preventable readmissions. A transitional care bundle that crosses care settings and organizational functions was developed to meet needs expressed by patients. It comprises 5 elements: risk stratification, a specialized phone number for discharged patients, timely postdischarge follow-up, standardized patient discharge instructions and same-day discharge summaries, and pharmacist-supported medication reconciliation. The transitional care bundle has been in place for 6 years. Readmission rates decreased from 12.1% to 10.6%, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores for the discharge instruction composite moved from below the 50(th) to above the 90(th) national percentile, average time to the first postdischarge appointment decreased from 9.7 days to 5.3 days, and error rates on the discharge medication list decreased from 57% to 21% (P<.0001 for all). The program, which continues to evolve to address sustainability challenges and organizational initiatives, suggests the potential of a multicomponent, patient-centered care bundle to address the complex, interrelated drivers of preventable readmissions. PMID:25919315

  18. 76 FR 17734 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1998E, Foreign Service Officer Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for ] approval in accordance with.... Originating Office: Human Resources, HR/REE/BEX. Form Number: DS-1998E. Respondents: Registrants for the... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for up to 30 days from March 30, 2011. ADDRESSES: Direct...

  19. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  20. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  1. 31 CFR 538.506 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. 538.506 Section 538.506 Money and Finance: Treasury....506 30-day delayed effective date for pre-November 4, 1997 trade contracts involving Sudan. (a) Pre... of Sudanese origin or owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan, importations under the...

  2. 76 FR 34122 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: NEA/PI Online Performance Reporting System (PRS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: NEA/PI Online Performance Reporting System (PRS) ACTION... Collection: NEA/PI Online Performance Reporting System (PRS). OMB Control Number: 1405-0183. Type of...

  3. Predicting 30-Day Readmissions: Performance of the LACE Index Compared with a Regression Model among General Medicine Patients in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Low, Lian Leng; Lee, Kheng Hock; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Shu Yun; Thumboo, Julian; Liu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    The LACE index (length of stay, acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, CCI, and number of emergency department visits in preceding 6 months) derived in Canada is simple and may have clinical utility in Singapore to predict readmission risk. We compared the performance of the LACE index with a derived model in identifying 30-day readmissions from a population of general medicine patients in Singapore. Additional variables include patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical and laboratory variables during the index admission, and prior healthcare utilization in the preceding year. 5,862 patients were analysed and 572 patients (9.8%) were readmitted in the 30 days following discharge. Age, CCI, count of surgical procedures during index admission, white cell count, serum albumin, and number of emergency department visits in previous 6 months were significantly associated with 30-day readmission risk. The final logistic regression model had fair discriminative ability c-statistic of 0.650 while the LACE index achieved c-statistic of 0.628 in predicting 30-day readmissions. Our derived model has the advantage of being available early in the admission to identify patients at high risk of readmission for interventions. Additional factors predicting readmission risk and machine learning techniques should be considered to improve model performance. PMID:26682212

  4. 78 FR 42090 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request; NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... on or after October 1, 1995, unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. Direct Comments... Survey--Race-Ethnicity-Gender-Birth Year (25% 3,073.0 1.0 3/60 153.65 Response Rate) Survey--Time to... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request;...

  5. 17 CFR 240.3a55-2 - Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indexes underlying futures contracts trading for fewer than 30 days. 240.3a55-2 Section 240.3a55-2 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and Regulations Under...

  6. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.